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August 21 - 27, 2013

DELTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

2


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN KIM HUNT

A

split second is about the time it takes to snap a photo,. It’s the same amount of time it took for Kim Hunt’s life to change completely. Hunt is a Jackson native, but chance took him all over the world, including to Romania where he met his wife, Tabita. A former schoolteacher, Hunt now follows his passion as a photographer. He propelled his love for photography into a business after he won “Who Wants to be a Millionaire” in 2000. He was the fifth contestant to win the million-dollar prize. “If not for that experience, I would never have met my wife; I would never have learned to speak Romanian. I would never have had my business,” Hunt says. “I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing now. ” To qualify for the hot seat on the show, Hunt had to win a preliminary competition called “fastest finger.” The producers had contestants put certain items in order and whoever was fastest got to compete for the million. “I knew I had it right, but the thing came up, and said nobody got it right, and I knew I got it right,” Hunt says. “Then they came on and said, ‘We had a computer glitch. We will run the tape back through and see who won.’” Hunt tied with another contestant down to one hundredth of a second. In a tie-breaker, he won by two seconds. “One hundredth of a second makes all the difference in the world,” he says.

CONTENTS

After going on to win the big prize, Hunt decided to travel and pursue photography, a love his father instilled. “My father photographed everything when we were growing up,” Hunt says. “He loved to travel and would capture any and everything for my family. That’s where I think I got my camera bug.” He remembers his first experience with a camera, on a ninth-grade Spanish trip to Mexico. “My father let me use his Canon camera. Everything was handheld in those days, and you had to learn how to work with light, and what settings matched what light,” he says. “It was a lot more complicated, but a great way to learn how the settings worked.” Today, light is still what stands out most with Hunt’s photography. He strives to make the Mississippi landscape come to life and show its true beauty. Some of his favorite spots to photograph include the sunrises and sunsets of the Mississippi Gulf Coast and the bridges in Vicksburg. He also plans to photograph more of the Natchez landscape and the Delta. Hunt sells his work most weekends at the Mississippi Farmers Market and through his website, picturemississippi.com. He just finished a calendar of Mississippi photos and is excited to share it with the Jackson community at the Mississippi Craft Show Aug. 24 and 25. His future plans include a book, and spreading his work through the state and beyond. “I want to share Mississippi with people,” Hunt says. —Alexis Moody

Cover illustration by Zilpha Young

8 Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems

“The hard part, of course, is how to fund an expansion (in the budgets of city departments). Under Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s proposal, water rates will rise from an average monthly bill of $15.54 to around $21, and the average sewer bill will increase from $14.50 to more than $31. That should generate more than $30 million.” —Tyler Cleveland, “Lumumba Proposes Sweeping Rate Hikes”

33 One in a Million

Chelsi West and J. Michael Ohueri’s nuptials centered around honoring family, celebrating love and dancing to great music.

35 No Paparazzi

Kirk West’s behind-the-scenes photos of iconic musicians are on display at the Arts Center of Mississippi through Aug. 25.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 13 .................................. BUSINESS 14 ................................ EDITORIAL 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 24 ...... BEST OF JACKSON LUNCHES 33 .................................... HITCHED 35 .............................. DIVERSIONS 36 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 38 ............................... JFP EVENTS 39 .......................................... FILM 40 ....................................... MUSIC 41 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 42 ..................................... SPORTS 43 .................................... PUZZLES 45 ....................................... ASTRO 45 ............................. CLASSIFIEDS

KIRK WEST; RENAISSANCE PHOTO NOLA; TRIP BURNS

AUGUST 21 - 27, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 50

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

A Battle Worth Fighting

S

everal years ago, I started calling them Jackson Warriors. It was a take on the “urban warriors” I had heard people talk about in other cities. But until I moved back to Mississippi, after 18 years in exile, to a city 90 miles from where I grew up, I never knew what being a part of a passionate urban renaissance movement was really about. Sure, I’d lived in New York City, both in the then-gritty East Village and then later on the tamer Upper West Side to be close to my graduate school. I loved New York then, and I still do. I discovered my calling in the East Village: hyper-local journalism as a forum for a community to make itself stronger. Ironically, it took living in New York for me to fully appreciate being part of a smaller village. It was the first time I really got to know such a diversity of neighbors—from homeless people to police captains to famous musicians. I became part of a larger effort, then largely focused on the poverty of the Reagan ’80s, when it really became chic to bash the American poor. National policies had led to rampant homelessness. It was also a time of violent gay bashing in Manhattan, with night riders coming from other boroughs to beat up gays and lesbians. (I couldn’t help but recall that era when Rankin thugs came to Jackson to murder James Craig Anderson, who was black and gay.) But here’s the thing: New York City didn’t need someone like me. Sure, I could’ve climbed the ladder to success in a corporate newspaper or magazine or other media outlet. I did that a little. But in New York, I was often, and still am, the most “conservative” person in a room where people often are way too smug about problems elsewhere. I’ll never forget how it felt to even consider coming back to Mississippi to live. It started out as a joke. I was about to graduate from Columbia, our rent was crazy high,

and I had rediscovered Mississippi—and Jackson—when I came home to do my master’s project on race relations. I thought I was moving back to write about the Mississippi of the past. If you had told me that barely a year after that, Todd and I would start a local newspaper here focusing as much on the present and the future as the past, I wouldn’t have believed it. But that is what happened. Why it happened is relevant to this insider’s guide to Jackson. It’s simple really: As soon as I started coming back to Jackson to interview people for my project, I was imme-

“A constant struggle, a ceaseless battle to bring success from inhospitable surroundings, is the price of all great achievements.” — Orison Swett Marden diately drawn to a city with such remarkable people—phenomenal insiders, you could call them. Many of them had never lived outside Mississippi or they had left and come back. Some left deliberately to get an education and a wider frame of reference that they could bring home and use for the common good in their work and lives here. For others, as in my case, the homing device suddenly went off, bringing us back to the place that had shaped us, the land where our families are buried and where we’ve shed so many tears on behalf of our state. I found myself envying these insiders. They were all clearly driven to invest in their city and their state, to use their lives to make their home the best it can possibly

be. Friends, this is when the phrase “Jackson Warrior” first came to me, 11 years ago when I was meeting so many of them on my journey back where I belonged. These insiders knew the secret to a full life: They chose to live somewhere where they can make a difference every day just by showing up, embracing diversity, taking action. This was so real that it almost hurt to think about. And, of course, the humor, hospitality and quirky characters here cannot be matched anywhere. We all know that. I also thought I was returning to Mississippi to live a romantically slower lifestyle than I had up north. I envisioned myself holed up writing books about the past and traveling a lot with Todd. Ha! The simple truth is that my life has never been more fast-paced, interesting, dynamic, creative, packed and meaningful than it is right here in Jackson, Miss. With due respect to the state’s other towns and suburbs, Jackson is different because it is a real city. We have an enviable tossed-salad population: people with different experiences who are used to living in a challenged city together, fighting the good fight as a village, watching each other’s backs and delighting in the wonders of life here. Jackson Warriors love our diversity. The reason we wanted to start this paper was to give a disparate readership a tool with which to find each other and to support each other’s arts, local businesses, and efforts do good things for each other and our city and state. Not long after starting the JFP, I read the results of a study about Jackson’s creative potential. The authors called Jackson a “sleeping giant” and a potential creative powerhouse—if our citizenry would start believing in our potential and bridge our gaps. That possibility was exactly what we started to see when we moved here in June 2001. People needed to connect with each other,

especially across socioeconomic and ethnic boundaries. Many people were cynical about living here, especially young people who, as I had done, couldn’t wait to get out of the state. But much of this “brain drain” problem was because these young people didn’t have a way to be connected to a larger creative community that believed in progress, and who weren’t mired in past negativity. Thus, the Jackson Free Press and later BOOM Jackson magazine were born. Our publications unapologetically exist to help this city, and the state it leads, become a place where young people want to stay or move to, not run from. The Jackson Warriors were already here, and we wanted them to know each other and grow their ranks, increasing local creativity and gumption to stare down the naysayers and do remarkable things. And it’s happening. Nearly every day, I talk to someone who grew up in the country or in the suburbs and were told never to go into Jackson. And every time someone tells me that, it is with a bewildered look on their face because they now realize how absurd a notion it was and what they missed. Usually, it’s one of those urban warriors who are busy as a local entrepreneur or dedicated artist or person of faith improving our city daily by blessing us with their gifts and passion. Some folks might belittle them and call them crazy because they’re so dedicated to Jackson’s future. But these are the very insiders that this issue, and every copy of the JFP and BOOM, are dedicated to. These warriors are everywhere, even in the suburbs, and they were here long before our U-Haul pulled into town. Insiders, we salute you. Thanks for everything you do to increase your numbers, help our local businesses win the daily battle, and ensure that Jackson will long be a rockin’ place to live and work. And to others: Please join our fight. It’s a heap of fun.

August 21 - 27, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Nneka Ayozie

Terry Sullivan

Mark Braboy

De’Arbreya Lee

Julie Skipper

Richard Coupe

Briana Robinson

Trip Burns

Editorial Intern Nneka Ayozie is a graduate of Jackson State University with a degree in mass communication. She enjoys watching movies, traveling, talking and shopping. She contributed to Jackpedia.

Fondrenite Terry Sullivan owns liveRIGHTnow LLC. He runs ultra-marathons broken up into smaller segments and spread out over several months. OK, they aren’t really ultra-marathons, but he runs a lot. He contributed to Jackpedia.

Editorial Intern Mark Braboy loves to write and listen to hip-hop music. A Jackson State University English major, he also writes for the college’s newspaper, the Blue & White Flash. He contributed to Jackpedia.

Editorial Intern De’Arbreya Lee is a Pittsburg, Calif., native and recent Jackson State University graduate. She enjoys family, art, fighting for the people and quoting lines from “Love Jones.” She contributed to Jackpedia.

Julie Skipper lives, works and plays downtown. She considers “flats” an ugly word and does her best to make Jackson a better place ... in heels. She contributed to Jackpedia.

Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He contributed to Jackpedia.

Music Editor Briana Robinson’s passions include dance and photography. Send her the scoop on music happenings at briana@jacksonfree press.com. She contributed to Jackpedia.

Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi. He enjoys the films of Stanley Kubrick. To see his numerous photos of Jackson, find him on Instagram at @tripburns and on Twitter at @trip_jfp. He took photos for the issue.


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JESSICA KING

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Johnna Henry Age: 20 How long have you lived in Jackson? 20 years How long have you read the JFP? Three years What’s your favorite part of Jackson? All the friendly people! Quote: “You were once wild here. Don’t let them tame you.�

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

—Isadora Duncan Secret to life: A good night’s sleep.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Examining Energy

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LITTLEKNOWN THING ABOUT JACKSON? Lain Hughes That it sits on an extinct volcano. Cari Fowler The little Bon Ami inside Interiors Market in Fondren. Great products and great food. Lonnie Stringfellow 4 the Record convention, the museum of art, the blues fest and agricultural museum. Katie Lawson It’s still illegal to spit on the sidewalk. This was, of course, during the horse-and-carriage days. So people wouldn’t spit their tobacco on the sidewalks. Rae Nell Hunter Riding around looking for houses, A. Hays Town, bonus points for N. W. Overstreet collaborations. See more fun facts about Jackson on page 8 and lots of insider tips about our city starting on page 16.

Loved the lead in using the Beverly Hillbillies song (in “Bryant’s ‘Crude’ Plan,� Issue 48). The Bigger Pie Forum gang continues the assault on Kemper. Kelley William’s satire of SO & MPC in this week’s NSS is worth reading just for literary value. Like your lead, it is biting satire; kept up in Kelley’s case for half a page. While the case against Kemper has been made pretty effectively in the Sun and BPF with facts and logic, it is the satire and parody of Mississippi residents being played as dumb yokels by SO that may turn the tide—the knock punch after the softening up. Your story was important—excellent and troubling. Even an old black energy guy like me cringes at the thought of mining and processing oil sands in a beautiful state like Mississippi. We don’t have fully economically viable biomass technology to replace the oil sands, but we are probably not too far away. It would be a shame to pursue a long term commitment like oil sands when biomass will provide direct economic benefit to famers, foresters, truckers and the construction companies oil field service companies already active in Mississippi— a large consortium of powerful political interests that would be better aligned with the collective good. It would be worth an article or more

What is an “Old� Catholic? Don’t let the name fool you . . . Learn more about this inclusive and progressive Independent Catholic Church and its origin . . .

August 21 - 27, 2013

St. Mary Magdalene the Apostle

6

OId Catholic Church

likely editorial suggesting that biomass be evaluated in lieu of oil sands. I suspect the unresolved technology challenges of biomass will be resolved before or shortly after an oil sands project clears the inevitable environmental hurdles. Combine Cool Planet Biofuels mobile processing technology (a consortium of big sophisticated energy investors— Google, BP, Conoco, etc.) with super giant miscanthus (a biomass feedstock plant that is environmentally benign invented at Mississippi State ag department) and you are likely, in a few years, to have a better solution than mining oil sands. Richard A. Sun, CFA Founder & Owner Sun & Co.

Flood Control Concerns Whatever Mr. McGowan’s Pearl River Basin Foundation and the Levee Board do to the Pearl River for flood control, they should leave the Mayes Lake public-use areas alone. The trails along the river, the picnic areas and two different primitive camping areas developed for and by local Scout troops are in a lowland section of the park that could be dredged. At least a dozen Eagle Scout projects have improved this area, including a trailhead kiosk and birdwatching deck along the river trail. That deck is at Stop 17 on the Museum of

Natural Science trail guide. We don’t know what the lake footprint looks like at this point or how much of LeFleur’s Bluff State Park will be condemned if a lake is built. Some of this will be revealed at the upcoming scoping meeting for the single lake flood control project on Thursday, Aug. 29, from 6-8 p.m. at the Agriculture and Forestry Museum on Lakeland Drive in Jackson. If you use these trails or care about this wonderful park in the middle of Jackson, this meeting is your chance to ask questions and give your concerns. Andrew Whitehurst Assistant Director of Science and Water Policy, Gulf Restoration Network

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Millsaps College

Driving the Conversation “Across the Street and Around the Globe” September 3, 7 p.m.

Arts & Lecture Series: Rambling Steve Gardner Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Recital Hall Admission: $10

September 7, 7 p.m.

Backyard Brawl – Millsaps v. Mississippi College Robinson-Hale Stadium, Mississippi College Tickets available at gomajors.com

September 17, Begins at 9:30 a.m.

Summers Lecture: “The Harmony of Liturgy & Life: A Day with Don & Emily Saliers” Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Lectures are free and open to the public. Registration required. Lunch: $10

September 25, 8:30 a.m.

Else School of Management Fall Forum: Economists Darrin Webb and Greg Daco

September 13, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Dance for PD® with David Leventhal and Misty Owens Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

Robert and Dee Leggett Special Events Center Admission: Free

www.millsaps.edu

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Wednesday, Aug. 14 Conservative activists and party leaders gather in Boston for the Republican National Committee’s annual summer meeting. ‌ Clashes in Egypt between police and supporters of ousted Islamist president Mohammed Morsi leave more than 700 people dead. The government declares a state of emergency.

Friday, Aug. 16 A U.S. District sets March 3 to begin jury selection on the Jackson Women’s Health Organization’s lawsuit against Mississippi for a law that could close JWHO’s doors. ‌ Army Col. Denise Lind releases her findings in the Pfc. Bradley Manning case for leaking classified documents. Saturday, Aug. 17 More than 100 people rally outside the Jackson Women’s Health Organization to keep the clinic open. ‌ Hundreds of firefighters battle a central Idaho wildfire that has forced more than 2,300 people to evacuate. Sunday, Aug. 18 London police detain David Miranda at Heathrow Airport under anti-terror legislation. Miranda is in a civil union with Glenn Greenwald, the reporter who broke the Edward Snowden story.

August 21 - 27, 2013

Monday, Aug. 19 Olympian Oscar Pistorius is indicted for the murder of Reeva Steenkamp. ‌ Egyptian officials announce that jailed ex-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak could be released later this week.

8

Tuesday, Aug. 20 Egypt arrests Mohammed Badie, the supreme leader of the country’s Muslim Brotherhood. ‌ An Iranian official announces that the country’s foreign minister will lead nuclear talks with world powers, taking over from the country’s national security council. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

by Tyler Cleveland

M

ayor Chokwe Lumumba has spent much of his first 50 days in office in preparation for the afternoon of Aug. 19 at City Hall, where he presented his proposed budget for fiscal year 2013 to the Jackson City Council. After hearing his proposal, it’s easy to see why. The mayor put forth a $502.5 million budget proposal, which represents a 43.3 percent increase in spending over last year’s budget of $350.8 million. He proposed funding much of that through rate increases on water and sewer services and the return of overfunding for Jackson Public Schools. “This can has been kicked down the road for years,� Lumumba said. “I don’t see the point in kicking it any farther.� The “can� Lumumba referred to includes the city’s aging sewer system, a consent decree from the Environmental Protection Agency that calls for the city to spend $400 million over the next 17 years, drainage issues and street repair needs that far outpace the budget allocated to fix them. Lumumba admits his budget won’t solve all those problems, either, but the first-term mayor assured the council and audience of approximately 50 that his plan is “a step in that direction.� Under the mayor’s proposal, nearly all of the city’s departments would receive a budget increase. The Department of Administration’s budget would increase by $1.2 million over this year; Human and Cultural Services would increase $1.9 million; Planning and Development would get an additional

$1 million; and $2 million more would be set aside for general government. The bigticket item is the Department of Public Works’ budget, which Lumumba hopes to increase more than $22 million—to a whopping $398 million. Public Works is in charge of fixing what ails Jackson: its potholes, sewers and drainage.

JPS’ debt service can better be used elsewhere for the coming year, he argues. “Let me be clear about that,� Lumumba said. “I don’t want people to go around saying I’m taking money from JPS. There’s a legal limit (on funds they can request from the city for operations), and we’re at it.� Lumumba said those combined funds, TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Aug. 15 More than 700 people gather at the Jackson Convention Center to find out how health care can be a driver for creating jobs and boosting revenues. ‌ President Barack Obama cancels joint U.S.Egypt military exercises, saying America’s traditional cooperation with Egypt “cannot continue as usual.â€?

Lumumba Proposes Sweeping Rate Hikes

Mayor Chokwe Lumumba on Monday presented a budget to City Council that represents a 43.3 percent increase in spending.

The hard part, of course, is how to fund an expansion of that proportion. Under Lumumba’s proposal, water rates will rise from an average monthly bill of $15.54 to around $21, and the average sewer bill will increase from $14.50 to more than $31. That should generate more than $30 million. Jackson Public Schools, which has recently refinanced its bond debt, doesn’t need its full millage this year, the mayor claims. The 5.53 mills extra millage not required for

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plus around $5 million in combined cuts to the fire, police and constituent services budgets, will balance the 2014 Jackson budget—even with the increase. “We had to make some tough decisions in this budget,� Lumumba said. “But I was elected to put the city of Jackson first, and not to make decisions that are politically popular.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

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MDA Ponies Up $1 Million for ‘One Lake’ by R.L. Nave

COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

the levees and a so-called “do nothing� plan. “We’re looking at all these different variations, and the selected plan is going to come from this analysis,� Quinn told Levee Board members recently. Flood control has worried many Jacksonians, and been a stone in the shoe of local policymakers since two floods, in spring 1979 and again in 1983, displaced thousands of people and damaged property that, in today’s dollars, would top $1 billion. Ever since, groups have floated a procession of flood plans, each one dying on the vine. The Two Lakes plan is a recent example. McGowan Working Partners, some of whom owned land in the proposed project footprint, advocated building lakes on the Pearl that would have inundated Mayes Lake, located in LaFleur’s Bluff State Park in Jackson, and a portion of its surrounding land. Opponents to the Two Lakes plan said it would cost too much and disrupt the Pearl’s fragile ecology, which includes the presence of the endangered ringed sawback turtle and the Gulf sturgeon. The Levee Board and PRVF will hold a meeting at the end of the month to address local citizens’ concerns. The meeting is Aug. 29 at 6 p.m. at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive, 601-432-4500). Citizens can make oral comments at the event and submit comments through the mail and a website that PRVF plans to launch in time for the meeting. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. Learn more at www.jacksonfreepress.com/pearlriver.

jacksonfreepress.com

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wo years ago, after John McGowan’s lake project,â€? Gelston told the Jackson Free vey, which the foundation concluded in late flood-control plan known as “Two Press during an Aug. 9 telephone interview. 2011. That analysis showed that a proposed Lakesâ€? went down in flames, the Gelston added: “That’s something that 1,500-acre six-mile-long lake from Lakeland longtime oil magnate and some- the state rarely does ‌ This is an extraordi- Drive south to the town of Richland might times developer retooled his dream for a wa- nary economic-development opportunity have some flood-control benefits. terfront development that would hopefully for the city, the governor agreed via MDA Since receiving the MDA grant, the protect Jackson from floods and provide an to provide the project with $1 million that Levee Board has reimbursed PRVF more economic boon for the city. than $200,000 in expenses for As an added bonus for the engineering work on the envimembers of the Rankin-Hinds ronmental-impact assessment Pearl River Flood and Drainage required under the National EnControl District—aka the Levironmental Policy Act (NEPA). vee Board—which manages the At the Levee Board’s monthly Pearl’s levees in those two counmeeting Aug. 12, the board apties and was fiercely divided over proved an invoice for $48,578.38, Two Lakes, McGowan offered to which PRVF paid out to three foot the bill for a feasibility study subconsultants: Jackson-based on the revised plan. SOL Engineering, Moon Town“It’s not going to be local ship, Pa.-based Michael Baker taxpayer money,â€? said Flowood Corp. and Blake Mendrop of Developers of a flood-control project will have to demonstrate that the plan does not violate federal laws that Mayor Gary Rhoads, who is Ridgeland-based Mendrop Engiprotect such endangered species such the Gulf sturgeon. also the current president of neering Resources. Previously, the the Levee Board. board had approved approximateNow it appears that Mississippi taxpay- will go directly for engineering and feasibility ly $180,000 in reimbursements to PRVF. ers do skin in Jackson’s flood-control game. costs related directly to preparing a plan.â€? The study shouldcost approximately $2 In May, without so much as a press release The grant consists of “all state money,â€? million to complete, Quinn said. In addition announcing it, the Mississippi Development Gelston said, not federal pass-through grants. to the money from MDA, the Greater JackAuthority gave the Levee Board a $1 million As the state’s primary economic-development son Chamber Partnership awarded PRVF grant for the flood-control study that Mc- agency, MDA, charged with recruiting new $200,000 in October 2012. Even though Gowan-backed nonprofit Pearl River Vision businesses and helping existing businesses PRVF has been conducting preliminary Foundation is putting together. grow, has a $21 million budget. Gelston said studies for nearly two years, the project was Kathy Gelston, MDA’s chief financial the agency would only reimburse the Jack- not official until July 25 of this year, when officer, said Gov. Phil Bryant, who oversees son lake project for what the agency deems the Corps, a division of the U.S. Defense MDA, talked to the top legislative Republicans, “eligible expenses,â€? which include engineer- Department, published a notice of intent to Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and House Speaker Philip ing and environmental studies. prepare a draft environmental-impact assessGunn, and the men agreed to the grant. In a conference call with PRVF spokes- ment in the Federal Register. “With Jackson being the capital city, man Dallas Quinn and Levee Board attorney Quinn said the foundation is considerthey wanted to help provide some of the Keith Turner, Quinn said the study McGowan ing a number of alternatives in its analysis, funding for the feasibility study for the one- offered to pay for was an initial hydrologic sur- including a one-lake plan, a plan to expand

9


DISH | supes by R.L. Nave

Obviously, people in the district who live in the city have different needs than those in rural areas. How do you balance them?

Roads. There are monies that we can take where we are able to repave roads—not waiting on the city to get it done but using your county tax dollars to get it done. The road right in front of us, Mayes Street— let me show you what I’m talking about: You have two businesses here on Mayes Street, in the midst of the ‘hood. You have a cattle company and a brick company. A big truck just drove by trying to get to the brick company, and they are paying great taxes in the city. But, right in front of their business, the road is so absolutely pathetic it’s unbelievable. ... The other things I hear people talk about is that we have some things to do but we don’t have nice areas where we can eat, drink and shop within and around the community itself. ... We’ve got to motivate ourselves to change the environment that is around the community so we can get their property values up. We’ve got to change that, and the way that you change that is you’ve got to go into the area. You’ve got to clean the area up. You help prevent crime, and you say no to things that are taking place like the drug

dealers in and around the community. You say no to the people that are parking cars all TRIP BURNS

D

avid Archie came pretty close to winning a seat on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors in 2011. That year, Archie finished second in the Democratic runoff for the District 2 seat, then held by board veteran Doug Anderson. Archie faced Anderson in a runoff, collecting 46 percent of the vote in that election. Now, he’s giving it another go in the special election to fill the District 2 seat after Anderson’s death earlier this year. Archie, 49, spoke with the Jackson Free Press about why he should finish in first place this time around.

After coming up a bit short in the last countywide election, David Archie is hoping the people of District 2 give him a supervisor’s job in the upcoming special election.

across the yards. You say no to those that are coming into the community late at night and walking the streets and shooting up in the sky. You don’t accept it. What’s your assessment of the ongoing problems at the Raymond Detention Center?

We need a 48- to 72-hour holding facility that is in Jackson where people are able to go to jail and bond out in Jackson, and not use all this tax money to transport them from one place to the next. They take them to jail in Jackson, then take them down (to Raymond) and book them in. It just doesn’t make any sense. They can book them (in Jackson) and give them three days to get their bond and get out of jail here, so you don’t use manpower, you don’t use gas going up and down the road. If you’re booked in on a DUI or (for) not paying a fine, why should you have to go all the way to Raymond to go to jail? Read full interview at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com

Lap’s Rocky Road by R.L. Nave

A

fter 17 years working in the planning division of the Hinds County’s Public Works Department, James “Lap� Baker says he knows the county’s roads like the back of his hand. As such, he believes that roads in the unincorporated areas of the county are not receiving the attention they deserve. Baker, a Democrat vying for a spot in the county’s largely white and Republican District 4, realizes he’s facing an uphill climb in winning the seat. He recently talked to the Jackson Free Press about the relationship between planning, infrastructure and economic development. What’s your position on the ByramClinton Parkway?

My private company was a contractor on the original study in 1989. I have a private consulting firm, CPC— Comprehensive Planning Consultants. We were one of two sub-consultants under Waggoner (Engineering Inc.). When we did the study for Hinds County, we looked at six corridor alignments. It could be a viable transportation corridor if it goes back to the original alignment. When you go to open space like that, that takes a lot of space and a lot of money. ‌ I support the parkway, but I’m not a stern supporter of the current alignment to Norrell Road. How would contingencies?

you

budget

for

You look ahead, and you know what your expenses are going to be. There was a guy who headed (the Department of Budget and Finance Administration) named Charlie Barnes. Charlie would come to our department every year before the budget started, and we would sit down—the director, myself and the executive assistant—and we would go over our budget.

At the same time, we would have copies of the county’s overall budget—we’re TRIP BURNS

Archie: Balancing Act

James “Lap� Baker, who recently retired from the Hinds County Public Works Department, wants to put infrastructure improvements back on track as the county’s District 4 supervisor.

looking at it. What enables you to have an increase, in my opinion, is your surplus. So you can’t be spending just to be spending, so you can carry some monies over. When you start spending just to spend, (then) your surplus decreases—your amount decreases from your road funds. What else does District 4 need?

I was reading an article about the population flight from Hinds County, and that’s pretty obvious. It’s planning. In order to maintain your population, you’ve got to have some strong magnets. Other places are installing magnets. Rankin County had an influx in population, but between 1990 and 1999, Rankin County’s black population increased by 30 percent and the white population by 14 percent. It’s not just white people fleeing. You have to have some good planning to keep and attract people to your county and to your city. Read full interview at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

August 21 - 27, 2013

       

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ississippi is making a con- able workforce housing in health-care zones. the Texas Medical Center, the largest medical certed push to capture some Developers of such housing will also receive center in the world, spoke about the center’s of the enormous money in special tax incentives. Community College of Health Careers, the health-care industry. That “Today is not all about what the gov- where students get employment offers before push, however, doesn’t include what they finish classes—and sometimes experts deem two of the most vital before they start. aspects of creating a health-care econThose missing pieces drew skepomy: healthy, well-educated citizens. ticism from Ocean Springs Mayor On Aug. 15, more than 700 Connie Moran, a former state ecopeople gathered at the Jackson Connomic-development official, after the vention Complex, eager to undersummit. stand how health care can be a driver “It’s ironic that in June, the Legfor creating jobs and boosting local islature voted to reject the federal dolrevenues in Mississippi. lars that would have provided 300,000 Gov. Phil Bryant began the dayworking Mississippians with access to long Governor’s Health Care Ecoaffordable health care insurance,” she nomic Development Summit with said. “That’s a conflict, and it’s the calls to think big about developing wrong thing.” medical corridors with the help of the Moran cited an Institutions of Ocean Springs Mayor Connie Moran says Gov. Phil Health Care Industry Zone Act. Higher Learning study that said the Bryant’s health-care industry push is misplaced That law, which the state Legisstate would see 9,000 new jobs as a without Medicaid expansion. lature passed in 2012, provides incenresult of expanding Medicaid under tives for health-care and related busithe Affordable Care Act, aka “Obamnesses, including laboratories, pharmaceuti- ernment can do for us,” Bryant said. “If we acare,” in addition to providing health insurcal companies, and support services such as keep standing by and waiting for the govern- ance to more than 300,000 working families. laundries and suppliers. The businesses must ment to solve all our problems, then we truly The IHL jobs figure is more than the proinvest a minimum of $10 million within a will fail.” jected 7,000 new jobs in health-care zones 5-mile radius of acute-care hospitals and The governor’s statement, though, is at that Bryant announced Wednesday. employ 25 or more full-time people. Incen- odds with what and who will push the exA single mother with a special-needs tives include a 10-year accelerated deprecia- pected economic boom: government action child, Moran has direct experience navigattion deduction from their income taxes, and and the governor himself. ing the state’s Medicaid system. She has also sales-tax exemptions for equipment and maThe legislation and resulting activ- worked to recruit businesses with the Missisterials from the certification date until three ity in the state spring from the Mississippi sippi Development Authority and other ecomonths after the business opens. Economic Council’s long-term plans, called nomic organizations. Ocean Springs is well During their last session, lawmakers “Blueprint Mississippi.” The MEC, a state suited to take advantage of the new healthexpanded the act to include certified Health government agency, released the health-care- care zones, but Moran has serious concerns. Care Zone Master Plan Communities. study portion of the plan last October. It comMoran indicated that Mississippi must “Why not use this great thing we call missioned New York City-based Newmark solve the problem of health-care access to rehealth care, that God has given us through Grubb Knight Frank to conduct the study alize Bryant’s vision of turning the state into a our wonderful physicians and health-care at a cost of $340,000. “Blueprint Mississippi health-care Mecca. The state’s residents rouproviders, and extend it to a growing econ- Health Care: An Economic Driver” analyzed tinely rank at the bottom of health studies, omy,” Bryant said of his inspiration to create where the state stands and outlined the steps which dissuades companies considering the health-care zones in Mississippi. to create a vibrant health-care economy. magnolia state for business expansion. Just in time for the summit, the govTwo major driving forces for the plan’s “It’s a prime factor,” Moran said. ernor announced that a dozen communi- success—healthy citizens and a highly skilled “They’re looking for an available, trained, ties—from Bay St. Louis on the Gulf Coast workforce—received scant attention from healthy workforce, because those things to Holly Springs in north Mississippi’s Mar- the speakers during the summit. translate into high productivity. That affects shall County—achieved certification. The “When businesses are making invest- their bottom line.” designation allows towns that don’t meet the ment decisions, the health of the workforce Moran said that Singing River Health minimum 375-bed-facility requirement in is a factor,” the report states. “(Mississippi’s) System, Jackson County’s second-largest emthe original act to take advantage of incen- population must be healthier and have better ployer, has laid off 200 people in the past two tives to lure health-care businesses their way. access to care in order to be competitive in years. With the loss of federal payments to They can, for example, include building a capturing private-sector investment.” cover those without health insurance, Singhospital by July 1, 2017, in their plans. During his presentation at the summit, ing River will have to shrink its staff even Bryant called his push to promote Bob Hess, NGKF executive managing direc- further, attempting to do more with less. health care as an economic driver for Missis- tor, played up the state’s positives, including “It’s all about putting party politics over sippi a “roadmap into the future,” and asked Mississippi’s pro-business environment. He the people,” Moran said of Bryant’s refusal attendees to set aside disagreements and skimmed over the fact that the state’s lack to expand Medicaid. “It’s the wrong deci“come together on what we agree on and of STEM (science, technology, engineering sion. … A healthier population is going to move forward on them.” and math) talent and its lack of investment make Mississippi a much more attractive for “Let us not have perfection become the in targeted educational programs continue to other businesses, no matter what their busienemy of the good,” Bryant added. impede Mississippi’s ability to attract health- ness sector is.” He also lauded the Mississippi Home industry players. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Corp., which is raising funds to build affordRichard Wainerdi, former president of Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

Cedar Creek Ramblers with the Tom Big Bee

Happy Birthday Kimberly!

by Ronni Mott

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TALK | business

Crowds Funding Local Entreprenuers by Tyler Cleveland

2011, removed some Depression-era restrictions on how businesses raise capital. It went into effect September 2012. Under the old rules, startups had to pitch their idea to indiCOURTESY KEITH RICHARDSON

J

Jackson trainer Keith Richardson wants to open a shoe store that will carry styles and brands now unavailable anywhere in Jackson.

vidual investors. Now, they can sell their idea to the masses via the Internet or television. Web sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, Richardson’ vessel, have been operating for years, but have spiked in popularity because of the sluggish recovery following what some economists have deemed the “Great Recession,” which began in 2006.

To reward investors, entrepreneurs like Richardson offer perks in return for investment donations. In Conkrete Sneakers’ case, that means T-shirts, discounts on future shoe purchases and, in the upper echelons of donations, free shoes and store credit. The 31-year-old personal trainer said the proposed location for Conkrete Sneakers will give him an opportunity to give back to the community that supports his store. He plans to hire interns from JSU, for example, helping them learn how to run a business. “It’s ideal,” Richardson said. “Jackson State has 9,000 students, and many of those students are business majors. What better way for them to learn than in a setting like that? You can sit in class and learn about theories and models, but this is practical experience.” Kimberly Hilliard, who earned her doctorate in urban and regional planning from Jackson State and serves as the school’s executive director of the office community engagement, said she doesn’t know of any other businesses in west Jackson built on crowd funding, but she has met with Richardson, and she found his ambition “very exciting.” “It’s a very innovative approach to look-

ing for investors,” Hilliard said. “It’s a new, exciting way to approach entrepreneurship. We are going to be watching his progress with much anticipation.” Hilliard added that the other businesses at One University Place have embraced the students, and that the mixed-use facility is at full capacity for the coming school year. Even if Richardson can’t raise $20,000, he gets to keep the funds he does raise, although he has to pay 9 percent to Indiegogo instead of the 4 percent he would pay if he were to reach his goal. Richardson has until Sept. 28, 2013, to raise the funds. He hopes to recreate the fundraising effort of another local business, Luckytown Brewery, which raised $22,304 from 266 backers in the first three months of 2012 to buy its first brewing equipment. “We bought our first fermentation tank with that money,” Luckytown spokesman Chip Jones said. “Without that successful project, I’m not sure where we would be. It gave us a marketing opportunity that we otherwise wouldn’t have had.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

ackson personal trainer Keith Richardson has a dream to own and manage a shoe store, and he’s found a creative way to get it done. Now, he needs the community’s help. By posting on the crowd-funding website indiegogo.com, Richardson hopes to raise $20,000 in start-up funds from the public to open his business, Conkrete Sneakers Boutique, in One University Place Shopping Center across the street from Jackson State University. “West Jackson has fallen on some hard times as of late,” Richardson says in his Indiegogo video. “But it’s coming back, and I want Conkrete to be a part of that resurgence.” The idea of crowd funding is hardly new. It was around long before newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer raised more than $100,000 from 125,000 different people to fund the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty in 1884. The concept has re-emerged in this tough economy, especially since President Barack Obama signed the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act in April 2012. The bill, which was an off-shoot of Obama’s defeated American Jobs Act of

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Nothing New in 41

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ecently, I received an email from a fellow activist that included the new petition to get a personhood initiative back on the ballot. This wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t news to me. Those of us who worked to defeat Initiative 26 in 2011 knew more than a year ago that Personhood Mississippi was planning a new petition drive. As I sat looking at my computer screen and read Initiative Measure No. 41 (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The right to life begins at conception. All human beings at every stage of development are unique, created in the image of God, and shall enjoy the inalienable right to life as persons under the law.â&#x20AC;?), I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help thinking that those behind it really believe Mississippians who voted against Initiative 26 were just confused. They may have a point but not in the way they think. Mississippi does need more education around reproductive health. Most of us fighting â&#x20AC;&#x153;personhood round oneâ&#x20AC;? found that many people didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a good grasp on how reproduction and birth control work. Without that basic understanding, it was hard for them to understand how personhood could threaten anything other than abortion. But this is a new day: Mississippians know better now, and for those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, plenty of us are ready to inform them. The truth is that Initiative 41 is nothing new. The petitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writers took out words they believe scare peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like cloning. They want us to think this version will only affect abortion-care access and not IVF or hormonal birth controlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but it will. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want us to understand that giving an embryo the same rights as a woman takes all kinds of pregnancy options away from childbearing women. The impact personhood could have on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthing options is what people have talked about the least. If your fetus is legally a person with rights equal to yours, your doctor can accuse you of endangering a child for not having the caesarean section they recommend, for not following their advice for testing and ultrasounds, for wanting to give birth at home, for using a midwife who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a nurse, or numerous actions that some doctors deem dangerous, such as taking medication while pregnant. Personhood USA and Personhood Mississippi should know that just because they changed the wordingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and put a woman out frontâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean Mississippians have stopped paying attention to their message. That message hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed, and neither has the opposition.

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14

Why it stinks: Certainly thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a potential for corruption in any election, but whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; evidence of a nefarious plot to tamper with the outcome of the election? As county Election Commission Chairwoman Connie Cochran pointed out to Stokes, the decision to tabulate votes at the courthouse was made by the Democratic and Republican parties, not the five-member commission. Maybe Stokes should focus on the problems in his district and let the elected members of the Election Commission do their jobs.

Jacksonians Should Explore Jackson, Too

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ackson is at times a divided city, segregated along hard racial, economic and educational lines. Just consider the conversation that often takes place when the subject of the Jackson Zoo comes up in casual conversation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used to go to the zoo all the time when I was little,â&#x20AC;? someone is sure to wax nostalgically. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go anymore because the neighborhood has just gotten so â&#x20AC;Ś bad.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a familiar trope that has picked up steam in recent weeks as rumors swirl that the zoo may be considering a move to property on Lakeland Drive that LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff State Park partly occupies. The zoo, located on West Capitol Street, is running a deficit of $675,000 amid a drop in attendance over the past seven years. The conventional wisdom says the zoo struggles because too few people are willing to brave the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roughand-tumble west Jackson neighborhood simply to look at a tiger. But conventional wisdom is often faulty. In the spirit of this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jackpedia issue, here are a few facts about the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s west Jackson neighborhood, pulled from city-data.com, which aggregates zip-code information from the U.S. Census Bureau and Internal Revenue Service. Unlike much of Jackson, the neighborhood is racially splitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with 595 white and 592 black residents, data show. Median household income

near the zoo is $45,777 per year, which exceeds the state average of $37,696. The average home near the zoo is valued at $159,420, which is well above the state average of $99,800. In the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhood, 12.7 percent of people live below the poverty level; the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poverty rate is 21.8 percent. The people who live by the zoo are also more charitable, giving 8.5 percent of their adjusted gross income to charity compared to the state average of 5.7 percent. They sound like good folks. Another strain in the zoo debate emerged this week when Kenneth Stokes, a Hinds County supervisor who lives close to the zoo, objected to the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s moving across town based on the fact that some people do not feel comfortable going to Lakeland Drive. That is likely true. Some Jackson residents probably are uncomfortable visiting LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff State Park and golf course, the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science or the Mississippi Agriculture & Forestry Museum because they are in â&#x20AC;&#x153;whiteâ&#x20AC;? areas. We suspect that is similar to the fear keeping some people from visiting the zoo. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot to discover in Jackson. We should all step outside our comfort zones and explore a new Jackson neighborhood, learn its history and get to know people who live there. Maybe if we all visited a part of Jackson that made us uncomfortable, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d feel more comfortable around each other.

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked. #/22%#4)/.,Q³%OXHV3LOJULPDJH5HYLVLWHG´ 9RO,VVXH ZHPLVWDNHQO\ZURWHWKDW*HRUJH0LWFKHOOZRXOGVLJQFRSLHV RIKLVERRN³0LVVLVVLSSL+LOO&RXQWU\%OXHV´DW/HPXULD%RRNV$XJ0LWFKHOOVSRNHDQGVLJQHGERRNVDWWKH0LVVLVVLSSL 0XVHXPRI$UW$XJDQG/HPXULD%RRNV$XJ7KH-DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVVDSRORJL]HVIRUWKHPLVWDNH


Much to Love Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Nneka Ayozie, Mark Braboy De’Arbreya Lee, Kimberly Murriel, Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Interns Lindsay Fox, Zilpha Young Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations Photo Interns Melanie Boyd, Jessica King ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

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hen I moved to Mississippi in 1997, the recommendations on where to live went something like this: Forget about Jackson. I settled on Madison County. Every day for years, I trekked to Jackson to work. For a few years, I bypassed the city’s streets altogether and drove to Clinton. Other than complaining about drivers on the interstate, I gave little thought to the city of Jackson. After all, I moved here from the Washington, D.C., area, where I mostly lived in the suburbs for 17 years. My excursions into the nation’s capital, like trips into Jackson, were for work or entertainment. It wasn’t until I started working for the Jackson Free Press that I began to understand what my city-avoidance cost me—and the city I’ve grown to love. Every city has problems, and Jackson is no exception. Surely, D.C. keeps its streets in better condition than Jackson does, a coworker once exclaimed. Well, no. D.C.’s street maintenance budget is undoubtedly larger than Jackson’s, but those of us who used those streets complained about the lack of snow removal, the craters from the chemicals the city used to clear snow, buckled roads in the hot summers, and how slow the city was to repair them. You can’t get across D.C. without navigating orange construction barrels that regularly narrow lanes and slow traffic to a crawl. And try to find convenient on-street parking in downtown D.C. Fugetaboutit. To its credit, D.C. has decent public transportation. Much of the city, but certainly not all of it, is accessible by subway. By all accounts, Jackson’s bus system is inadequate for all but a few residents. Bus lines date from the days when the city’s black residents used it to get to work—primarily, buses made it convenient to get to the homes of white folks where many of the city’s African American women worked as domestics. To this day, you can’t get to the city from the suburbs on public transportation—or vice versa—keeping those without a car stuck. And yes, Jackson has a higher crime rate, more poverty, more abandoned housing and higher property taxes than the suburbs. That’s not unusual for cities. They’re problems complicated by declining tax bases and little opportunity and exacerbated by moribund public schools. Jackson’s huge amount of tax-exempt government, school and church property doesn’t help. But enough about what’s wrong with Jackson. The reason living in the suburbs

was detrimental to me personally was the lack of community. In that sense, the ’burbs just don’t compare. Look around: Where else in the metro area can you find the vibrant energy of the city’s colleges and universities? Our little city boasts a nationally ranked liberal-arts college (Millsaps College) and a top Christian university (Belhaven University). It also holds a highly regarded medical school and teaching hospital (University of Mississippi Medical Center), a thriving city university (Jackson State), a renowned HBCU (Tougaloo College) and Mississippi College School of Law. Jackson fairly bursts at the seams with youthful exuberance and creative vigor. Every day of the week, Jackson offers live music from blues to rap to classical. The city’s cultural events—from plays to book signings to ballets—are unparalleled to anything found in Madison or Flowood. Art studios and galleries are everywhere. That’s not to say the suburbs don’t offer those things, but it’s nothing like what you’ll find in Jackson. Then there are our museums. You could easily spend a day or two exploring the Mississippi Museum of Art, the Arts Center of Mississippi, the Russell C. Davis Planetarium, and then relaxing in the Art Garden—all in a square block. You can run the kids ragged between the Mississippi Museum of Science, the Mississippi Children’s Museum and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum, not to mention the Jackson Zoo. And history buffs find plenty to amuse at the Old Capital Museum and the Smith Robertson Museum. The Mississippi History and Civil Rights museums will open before you know it. And don’t forget the food. Whether your tastes run to the traditional meat-andthree or ethnic favorites from the Middle and Far East to old Mexico, Jackson has you covered. Finding soul food and barbecue is a snap, as are fine-dining options with terrific wine lists, and even good vegetarian food. All that culture serves one important, overriding purpose: It creates community. Filling Jackson’s neighborhoods are folks who know their neighbors. Jacksonians celebrate community often, turning out for talks and lectures and street festivals. They come out as much for the fellowship—the simple pleasure of hugging friend’s necks—as for the music, dancing and shopping. Sure, the city has its problems, but Jackson is much, much more than the sum of its issues. The city’s people are what make Jackson a special place. Come join us.

Jackson is much, much more than the sum of its issues.

Write to Change Your World Hurry: Only 11 seats available! Register now for JFP Editor Donna Ladd’s popular creative non-fiction fall class series. All levels welcome in the 101 class series, the last in 2013. Class runs every other Saturday from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 21, Oct. 5, 19, Nov. 2, 16 Meets in the JFP classroom in Fondren $150, includes snacks and materials.

Call 601-362-6121 ext 15 or email class@writingtochange.com for more information.

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jacksonfreepress.com

RONNI MOTT

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TRIP BURNS

Becoming an Insider

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o you remember the moment you felt like a true Jacksonian? Maybe it was the first time you got from point A to point B without needing directions. (Or maybe the first time you got from point A to point B without directions while also instinctively knowing which shortcuts to take to avoid construction.) What about the first time you realized, hey, this city offers a lot to do? Or maybe, it was when you got to know the people at your favorite wine store by name. When you started calling people and places by their nicknames rather than their given names. When you stopped looking at the menu at most of the restaurants you frequent—because you already know exactly what you want, down to the sides and dessert. Maybe it happened as your art collection started to fill with pieces by artists whose stories you know, those you’ve talked to personally and have seen around town. Or when you threw a surprise party for one of your best friends and got practically an entire bar staff, a baker and several coworkers involved in the scheme. How about when you could name more than one member on the city council? When you scored an invite to the private Best of Jackson party? Perhaps it was when someone recognized you on the street because they know your neighbor, or saw you on the news, or maybe even read your stuff in the JFP or BOOM Jackson. Some folks are born insiders—raised in Jackson, they know the city like an old friend. But many of us—myself included—are transplants, who became insiders by taking an interest

Insiders take the time to venture outside their usual haunts and look at Jackson from a new angle. Are you ready? Jump on in!

in Jackson, by getting out there and experiencing what our city has to offer. For several years now, we’ve published an annual Jackpedia issue with lots and lots of information on places to eat, shop, learn and much more. This year, we decided to do something a little different. We want to share the stuff about Jackson you might not know, yet: the cool trivia, little-known places and quirky history. Of course, you can always find out about places to eat, shop, learn and much more every day on our website, jfp.ms and at jfpevents.com. So dive in and meet our insiders—and join us. —Kathleen Mitchell

[experience]

A Piece of History: The Mississippi River Basin Model by Richard Coupe

August 21 - 27, 2013

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in order to simulate the flow of water, to examine different scenarios, and experiment with solutions. The U.S. Army COURTESY U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

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re you sure you want to go in there?” I said as I looked over the poison ivy, so green and inviting. I thought back to the last time my friend Barb had gotten involved with poison ivy, and her skin oozed and itched for months, it seemed. “It’s the only way in,” she said. It actually has another forest entry, but I didn’t know that at the time as I gingerly followed her into the woods trying to walk on air with all my 250 pounds. We were spending the morning with Steve Solomon, the Washington, D.C., author of “Water: The Epic Struggle for Wealth, Power, and Civilization” as he prepared for his next book on the Mississippi River, and it had been Barb’s idea to show him one of the more amazing places you can see in the Jackson area. I readily agreed that it was an important artifact to see for anyone interested in the Mississippi River and the struggle to manage that behemoth. I had no idea, however, how overgrown it had become. The Mississippi River Basin model covers some 200 acres near Clinton off of McRaven Road and is a scale replica of the Mississippi River basin. In the 1930s after the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, flood control on the Mississippi River became a national imperative. Before computers (imagine that) were prevalent, people built physical models of rivers, harbors, and estuaries

The Mississippi River Basin model has not been used since 1973, but visitors can still see it.

Corps of Engineers built many of them—including this one—but none to this scale. Members of Rommel’s famed Afrika Korps from the nearby prisoner-of-war camp began construction on the

Mississippi River model in 1943, and it wasn’t completed until 1966, although there were portions that could be used before then. They built it using square 10-foot concrete panels with the topography etched into the concrete. The last use of the model was during the 1973 flood to test the effects of opening the Morganza Spillway. As we stepped out of the trees and onto the concrete of the model, the sun was blindingly bright and the air oppressively humid as only a summer day in Mississippi can be. The model stretched out to the left and right of us with tributaries coming out of the trees across from where we stood with pipes, bridges, towers and pumps askew everywhere. Barb had an old aerial photograph that was labeled, and she was turning it in her hands as she turned in circles trying to orient herself. I wandered off crossing streams, rivers and mountain ranges feeling somewhat like Gulliver walking through Lilliput. And so it went. We never did manage to find the beginning or the end. The model is deteriorating badly now and is so overgrown that it is becoming difficult to see. It is still, however, a reminder of the skill of our engineers and a unique piece of Jackson history. The Mississippi River Basin model is in Butts Park and is open to the public. To get to the park, take the Springridge Road exit on Interstate 20 and turn left at McRaven Road.


[experience]

Hidden Spots for Kids by Kelly Bryan Smith TRIP BURNS

deer wandering in the woods, public restrooms and a shaded, uncrowded playground. The $3 entry fee covers a whole carload of people and as much wandering as you like. -YNELLE'ARDENS &OLQWRQ%OYG FLW\MDFNVRQPVXV

Through a doorway in an unassuming little building lies a hidden Eden. Well-maintained paths meander by statues, over bridges, among flora and around a turtle-filled pond. The landscape gives ample scope for the imagination and plenty of little spots for running, reading, picnicking, dreaming and hide-and-seeking. Bring bug spray, a high adult-to-child ratio with littles and an extra 50 cents to buy a bag of turtle food. -ISSISSIPPI0ETRIFIED&OREST )RUHVW3DUN5RDG)ORUD PVSHWULILHGIRUHVWFRP  North on Highway 49, past the Indian mound and the giant teepee is a place of old-

world magic where fairies could live in tiny caves and crevasses that the moss-covered petrified wood created. Wander the trails, soak in the enchantment, find the old caboose, and be sure to leave a little time and perhaps a few dollars to explore the rock and gem shop. Mayes Lake is a wonderful spot to bring your family on a beautiful day.

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ots of parents are familiar with the usual ways to entertain their tykes, but when they get bored with the same old, same old, try something a little different. Here are a few funâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and less crowdedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;outdoor places to take your kids:

-AYES,AKE 5LYHUVLGH'ULYH

Often quiet and deserted, Mayes Lake is a relaxing spot in Jackson for early morning picnics, late afternoon strolls and everything in between. It has blue herons flying over the water,

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Keep driving past the crowded, paved Yogi Bear Park. Just 10 minutes further east, is the peaceful wooded Roosevelt State Park. Home to lovely trails, campsites and even a little playground, Roosevelt also has a waterslide that is fun for parents and kids of all ages. Smaller kids like my son can enjoy the slide in a parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lap. Climbing the steps with a big raft, visitors can enjoy the view looking down on the gorgeous forest and lake as well as the pool and splash pad area. And, unlike many local water park attractions, this serene destination wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break the bank.

A JACKSON GLOSSARY

Melonheadsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Conservative talk-show host Kim Wade (of WJNT-FM) came up with this nickname for ardent supporters of former Mayor Frank Melton. The Rezâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Many people call the Ross Barnett Reservoir simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rez,â&#x20AC;? perhaps because it is so painful to constantly call the name of a white supremacist. JFP Publisher Todd Stauffer is leading a one-man campaign to change the reservoirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name to the Eudora Welty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democratâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;This word is often used as a substitute for â&#x20AC;&#x153;black personâ&#x20AC;? in Mississippi, as in: â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Democrat moved in down the street.â&#x20AC;? When used in such a way, it is meant in a disparaging way. Always respond with â&#x20AC;&#x153;How do you know

he or she is a Democrat?â&#x20AC;? Pause and wait for uncertain stuttering in response to your question.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The North Jackson Angry Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club.â&#x20AC;? Members, however, arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always from north Jackson. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more a state of mind.

Jacktown, Jackteezy, Jafricaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban street names. They have the added benefit of sounding a bit less like the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s named for a leader of brutal assaults on Native Americans.

Fondrazonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;N-JAMMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; nickname for the JFP editor. Presumably, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fusion between Fondren and Amazon, and is meant to be an insult.

Chimneyvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The longtime nickname of Jackson. Yes, Grant burned us three times during the War Between the States (the preferred name for the Civil War south of the MasonDixon). True rebels prefer the â&#x20AC;&#x153;War of Northern Aggression.â&#x20AC;? Sludgehammerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The tool of choice for homes deemed crackhouses by former Jackson Mayor Frank Melton, pronounced just as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spelled. N-Jam Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The nickname JFP editor Donna Ladd gave to conservative Jackson men who belittle anything and everything progressive. It is short for

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Virden Dishinâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;How locals say Virden Addition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ridgewayâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;This was just a street name until July 2005, when Mayor Frank Melton led an entourage to destroy a duplex in the Virden Addition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember Ridgewayâ&#x20AC;? will inevitably become as important a historical phrase as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember the Alamo.â&#x20AC;?

for African Americans whom he believed worked too closely with white people. Charter members have included the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first black mayor, Harvey Johnson Jr. Tote-Sum storeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Another name for a convenience store. When you buy things, you get to Tote-Sum stuff away. The originals were white rectangular buildings with green vertical signs reading Tote-Sum that lit up in neon. As new, different stores came in, they were referred to as Tote-sumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as well, no matter what their name, and Tote-Sum took on a generic meaning. Nabsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Prepackaged snacks such as peanut butter crackers and those little hexagonal cheese crisps.

Capitol Street Gangâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The nickname for the old white power bloc that used to run the city of Jackson.

Jitney 14â&#x20AC;&#x201D;What some locals still call the Belhaven McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which was once Miss Weltyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite Jitney Jungle.

Brown Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A disparaging â&#x20AC;&#x153;societyâ&#x20AC;? created by now-deceased Jackson Advocate owner/editor Charles Tisdale

NoFo and SoFoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The inevitable SoHo copycat nicknames for local neighborhoods.

jacksonfreepress.com

Over the years, our readers have contributed to a growing body of Jackson slang, nicknames and inside jokes, proving once again that the JFP readership is the smartest, savviest, funniest group in town. Here are some of the best and most interesting:

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3MOKINGIN*ACKSON 1RWLQ3XEOLF3ODFHV

[play]

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Downtown Family Secrets by Julie Skipper

August 21 - 27, 2013

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One favorite is the spicy boiled fish, sliced and cooked in hot oil broth with vegetables, which Lynn says is the top spicy dish in China. Lynn also grows a lot COURTESY WASABI

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hen I moved downtown in December 2007, the first core group of residents joked that living in Tombigbee Lofts and Plaza Building was akin to a dorm for 30-year-oldsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a dysfunctional family of sorts. Over the years, the resident makeup diversified, adding empty nesters, graduate students and even people with kids. But the familial feeling remains. Like any family, we have secrets, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m willing to share a few. Wasabi Sushi & Bar (100 E. Capitol St., Suite 105, 601-948-8808), a neighborhood favorite of King Edward and Standard Life residents, now offers a â&#x20AC;&#x153;secretâ&#x20AC;? menu that you have to ask for. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Chinese and accompanied by photos of the dishes to help guests make a selection from the authentic dishes. Wasabi owner Lina Lynn started the menu because she wanted to give more adventuresome diners a chance to taste the food from the village where she grew up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We eat a lot of fish there,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since Wasabi has a lot of sushi fish, this lets us fix it different ways.â&#x20AC;?

Explore Wasabiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret menu.

of fresh greens in her organic garden and puts them to use on this secret menu. Every time you come in, the vegetable offering is different depending on what she harvested that day. Mapo Tofu uses popping peppersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;numbing and spicy at the same timeâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;that Lynn prepares â&#x20AC;&#x153;just like your grandma cooks.â&#x20AC;? The secret menu dishes are big enough to share, so next time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

in, ask for it and enjoy a downtown meal family-style. Recognizable by their bright yellow shirts as they patrol on bike and Segway, the Downtown Jackson Ambassadors offer people directions, keep things clean and safe, and will escort you to your car. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also on hand when you just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who else to call if you get a flat tire, run out of gas or even if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cat somehow stuck in your car engine (true story). Call them at 601-624-6684 any time for assistance, even if you are just visiting. What would a family be without sweets for the kids? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk Down Memory Laneâ&#x20AC;? dessert at Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St., 601-360-0090), served in a lunchbox, is a trip back to childhood memories. It varies with the season and the mood of the chef but includes an assortment of treats ranging from push-up pops to the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twinkiesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moon Pies.â&#x20AC;? Ordering one to share among friends is a surefire way to make you think of elementary-school lunches as you make new memories.

Jxnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drinking Laws

My Daily Karaoke

by Mark Braboy

by Briana Robinson

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hen it comes to karaoke, DJ Matt Collette knows best. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his advice on what to do and not to do to keep the DJ and audience happy.

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DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T tear up or write in the song books. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T use the song books as

TRIP BURNS

MELANIE BOYD

he occasional drink is always appreciated. However, the driving underthe-influence and alcohol-vending laws in Mississippi are strict and not to be taken lightly. â&#x20AC;˘ The legal age for drinking and purchasing alcohol is 21. â&#x20AC;˘ Those between ages 18 and 21 can consume beer on private property and in the presence of a parent or guardian at their consent. â&#x20AC;˘ Vendors can sell liquor from 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Saturday. â&#x20AC;˘ While driving, oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood alcohol content must be under .02 Drink local, drink legal. percent if younger than 21 and under .08 percent if older than 21. â&#x20AC;˘ For a first DUI offense, penalties can include up to 48 hours of jail time, a $250-$1,000 fine, a 90-day license suspension, completing an alcohol safety education program and attending a victim impact panel. â&#x20AC;˘ Second-time DUI-offender penalties can include jail time ranging from 5 days to a year, a fine of $600-$1,500, a two-year license suspension, impoundment of registered vehicles or 10 days to a year of community service. A third DUI offense is treated as a felony. â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi has a zero-tolerance policy for minors driving drunk and convicts them as adults.

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DO be adventurous with your song choices. DO have a good time. DO show support for all performers. DO learn micro- Matt Collette is karaoke king. phone control. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to scream or belt a drink coasters. certain part of the song, pull DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T go on stage unless the mic away from your you are called up. face a bit. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T start talking into the DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T drop the mic. mic while the karaoke DJ is DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T scream into the mic. making an announcement. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T hit the mic. They are DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T use the mic stand as expensive. a prop. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T spin the mic by the DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T turn on a song and wire. It can short out or then leave without letting become unattached. the karaoke DJ know.

If you itch to karaoke every night, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where to go: -ONDAY Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub Burgers & Blues University Place Sports Bar & Grill

4UESDAY Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge McBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant

7EDNESDAY Ole Tavern Last Call Sports Bar Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Philipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Rez Shuckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oyster Bar

4HURSDAY Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hot Shots Metropolitan Bar Sports Grill McBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant Last Call Sports Bar

&RIDAYAND3ATURDAY Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deboâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge Hot Shots For addresses, phone numbers and karaoke times, visit jfp.ms/ dailykaraoke


Mosaic Masterpieces

The Record Store Guide

T

he vinyl record never went away; last year, vinyl outsold CDs. Not bad for a dead format. With the demise of longtime independent record store Bebop in 2011, one may be left wondering where to buy music. Here are my local haunts for records: 4 "ONES2ECORDS#AFm

 +DUG\ 6W +DWWLHVEXUJ  WERQHVFDIHFRP T-Bones has become a local hotspot for new and used records. It also features live music and a full-service cafĂŠ. While worth a road trip, the guys from T-Bones are usually at Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4 the Record vinyl swap (the next swap is Sept. 28 at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s).

TRIP BURNS

by Tommy Burton

Mississippi has a selection of places to buy local music and vinyl records.

-ORNINGBELL 2ECORDS  3TUDIOS 'XOLQJ$YH6XLWH$  PRUQLQJEHOOUHFRUGVFRP Opened in 2012, Morningbell carries new and used LPs along with turntables and accessories. It hosts live shows and carries an assortment of sodas.

,ITTLE"IG3TORE

(0DLQ6W  OLWWOHELJVWRUHFRP Located in Raymondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old

train depot, Little Big Store spoils when it comes to sheer volume. It carries a wide variety of used records. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot to sort through, so plan on spending a while.

4HE%NDOF!LL-USIC

 1 /DPDU %OYG 2[IRUG  WKHHQGRIDOOPXVLFFRP This Oxford shop carries new and used records in a spacious building with a cool atmosphere. It usually has specials, and the selection is excellent.

by Michael Jacome

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COURTESY MIKE JACOME

[play]

My wife, ShaWanda, and I spent an afternoon being creative at the Mosaic Shop in Jackson for our Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s date.

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Jackson Sports: Sweetness and More

M

PUBLIC DOMAIN

y assignment: Tell you what a prospective sports and we now have the Mississippi Braves in Pearl. Since the fan needs to know about Jackson. Bravesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Class AA franchise moved to Trustmark Park in My response: Gladly. 2005, M-Braves have made what Jacksonian Eudora Welty Football: Walter Payton first became famous here. He would call â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Worn Pathâ&#x20AC;? to Atlanta. Former M-Braves such broke the NCAA record, scoras Freddie Freeman, Andrelton ing 65 touchdowns at Jackson Simmons, Jason Heyward, Mike State University (1971-74), Minor, Craig Kimbrel and Evan but did you know he punted Gattis led the white-hot Atlanta and place-kicked for the TiBraves to one of the best records gers, too? He ran the 40-yard in baseball this season. dash in 4.4 seconds. Have you Basketball: In Jackson, ever wondered if he also could high-school basketball is king. In hand-stand a 40-yard dash? fact, high-school basketball is part He could. of this cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social fabric. The fire Payton had the body of marshalls know all about it. They a Greek god. He built those have to keep hoards of fans from powerful legs running up and blocking exits in the various high down the levee of the Pearl school gymnasiums. School loyRiver and the concrete steps alty runs deep, and rivalries are of Veterans Memorial Stadioften bitter. Lanier probably has um. He would bring his Chithe largest followingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the most cago Bears teammates to town heralded legacyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but Murrah, and trick them into doing his Provine, Jim Hill, Wingfield, workouts with him. InevitaCallaway and Forest Hill all have bly, they lost their breakfasts had their moments, and many of before collapsing. We could Walter Payton helped make a name for Jackson them. Jackson basketball has prospend a whole piece talking in the football world. duced NBA pros such as Monta about Sweetness, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ellis, Mo Williams and Othella much more to the Jackson sports scene. Harrington. Cornell Warner, who played seven seasons in Baseball: Since the old Jackson Senators played the the NBA, was once a benchwarmer on a Lanier team that Fairgrounds ballpark in the early- to mid-20th century, mi- was 44-0 and won a national championship. nor-league baseball has been a Jackson-area staple. We had Tennis: Jackson spawned an NCAA champion in the Jackson Mets and Generals at Smith-Wills Stadium, Devin Britton, a current pro, and the late Slew Hester, a

Jacksonian, not only was a founder of River Hills but also spearheaded the building of the U.S. Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows, N.Y., where the U.S. Open will take place later this month. Golf: The Jackson area is home to many golf courses, both public and private. Eddie Payton, Walterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older brother, built an HBCU powerhouse golf program at Jackson State. Across town, at the Country Club of Jackson, 15year-old Jacksonian Wilson Furr might just be golfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next big deal. He just won every match he played in an international competition in China, and virtually every major college power in the nation has offered him a gold scholarship. He took an official NCAA visit to his hero Tiger Woodsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; school, Stanford, in July. Furr is now entering 9th grade. Places: Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium once hosted Southeastern Conference doubleheaders. Now the stadium is home to Jackson State football and the MHSAA state championship high school games, usually in December. The stadium lives on borrowed time, and will likely end up part of the ever-expanding University of Mississippi Medical Center. First, however, the state must find a football home for Jackson State, Walter Paytonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school. If you yearn for the stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s glory years, visit the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Cool Papa Bell Drive, 601-982-8264). Watch clips of Sammy Winderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7-yard dive into the northwest corner of the end zone, Mother Nature block Artie Cosbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s field goal, Archie Manning throwing another touchdown strike or even Walter Payton running up and down those stadium steps, glistening in the July heat but scarcely breathing hard at all. Rick Cleveland is executive director of the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame. Follow him on twitter @rick_cleveland.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Rick Cleveland

19


What the Hell is a Hill Run? by Terry Sullivan

I MEREDITH SULLIVAN

f you have driven up or down Old Canton Road between the hours of 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Mondays and Fridays, you have probably encountered an ever-increasing group of people running to the top of the hill, doing some type of plyometric exercise and running back down to do it all over again. This group has become known as the Fondren Hill Runners and consists of both novice and experienced runners from all over the Jackson metro area. The

Get Biking

O

3.

Running hills is an excellent form of interval training because it elevates your heart rate quickly,

Though the route (top photo) isn’t long, the elevation change (bottom) is what makes hill climbs on Old Canton Road a challenging workout.

strengthening your cardiovascular system and increasing your running economy.

4.

They are a great way to train without putting in excessive mileage, which can decrease wear and tear on your joints and can save you time in your busy schedule.

5.

They get results fast! If you are looking to shave time off your permile pace, there is no better way than running hills on a consistent basis. Terry Sullivan is the co-owner of liveRIGHTnow and one of the founding members of Jackson’s hill running crew.

by Melody Moody

ne of the best ways to meet people com, or find JXN Community Bike Shop in the Jackson area is by getting on Facebook. involved with the biking comIn a new effort to encourage more munity. Here are several bike-re- women to ride bikes in the Jackson Metro lated opportunities available around town. area, Bike Walk Mississippi and the Bike The Jackson Bike Advocates host a Crossing are co-sponsoring beginning “Community Bike Ride” on the last Fri- rides for women on the last Saturday of day of each month. The ride is open to all ages and abilities, and typically makes two or three stops along the way for socializing. Each month the ride changes routes, so it is also a great way to explore different parts of Jackson. Newcomers should find the ride unintimidating and welcoming. Find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook. has many opportunities for people to join You can also volunteer Jackson its growing biking community. at the JXN Community Bike Shop (1863 Wilson St.) in Midtown. Anyone can come learn how to fix and maintain bikes. The August and September. The Bike Crossing community bike shop is all about getting will also hold its annual all-women bike Jacksonians on bikes, so those who cannot ride, Bikes4Barks, Oct. 26. The charity afford bikes can “earn” one by volunteer- ride benefits CARA, a local no-kill animal ing for 10 hours and learning the basics shelter. Find Women Bike Mississippi on of bike repair. The JXN Community Bike Facebook to learn about this statewide efShop is open Wednesdays from 6-9 p.m. fort to get more women biking. and Sundays from 1-4 p.m. For more The On the Road to Health organizainformation, email jxnbikeshop@gmail. tion hosts “Cruising the Community,” a COURTESY MELODY MOODY

August 21 - 27, 2013

1. 2.

They are challenging regardless of your fitness level or running experience and will make you mentally tougher which comes in handy on race day. Hill runs build strength in your hips and upper and lower legs the same way that strength-training exercises do, but they do it in a functional way in which the muscles have to interact together instead of in isolation in the gym.

Hill running may seem daunting, but it has its health advantages.

20

group started with four Fondrenites back in 2011 and now attracts up to 60 runners each meet, all looking to increase both their speed and endurance, while also getting to socialize with like-minded individuals. Here are five key benefits of running hills:

COURTESY TERRY SULLIVAN

[move]

fun 1.2-mile bike ride for kids 5-12 years old Aug. 24 from 9-11 a.m. at the Jackson State Athletic Center. Gordon from Sesame Street will be in attendance, and participants can enjoy free food and health screenings. Visit jsums.edu/cubd/cruising. For the more serious bike rider, The Jackson Metro Cyclist hosts “Trekkin’ on the Trace” Sept. 2. The ride is on the Natchez Trace and has 21, 50, 62 and 100-mile options. It starts at 7:30 a.m. at Old Trace Park. Backyard Burger will provide food, and Buddy & the Squids will perform after the ride. Visit jacksonmetrocyclists.com. Jackson also has opportunities to get involved in other aspects of the biking community. The region is home to the Tri County Mountain Bike Association, an active mountain biking group, and a very active Bike Polo team. Bike polo takes place on weekends at Sykes Park. Visit tricountymtb.org, and find Jackson Bike Polo on Facebook. Find Bike Walk Mississippi on Facebook to learn how you can join a team of activists dedicated to making Jackson more bicycle-friendly, or email bikewalk@bikewalkmississippi.org or jacksonbikeadvocates@gmail.com. 5PCOMINGEVENTS Aug. 24, 8 a.m. - Cruising the Community: 1.2Mile Ride for Children at Jackson State Univer-

sity Athletic Center (1400 John R. Lynch St., 601-979-2121) Aug. 30, 6 p.m. - Community Bike Ride at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) Aug. 31, 8 a.m. - Women Bike Ride at Five Guys Burgers and Fries (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 2001, 601-605-1115) Sept. 2, 7:30 a.m. – Trekkin’ the Trace at Old Trace Park in Ridgeland Sept. 14, 8:30 a.m. – Bike Out Hunger at Old Trace Park in Ridgeland (outhunger.org.) Sept. 21, 7:30 a.m. – Cyclists Curing Cancer at Baptist Healthplex-Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton, 601-925-7900, mbhs.org) Sept. 27, 6 p.m. - Community Bike Ride at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) Oct. 25, 6 p.m. - Community Bike Ride at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) Oct. 26, 7:30 a.m. – Bikes4Barks (115 W. Jackson St., Suite 1D, Ridgeland, 601-856-0049) Nov. 29, 6 p.m. - Community Bike Ride at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) Dec. 27, 6 p.m. - Community Bike Ride at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602)

Co-founder of the Jackson Bike Advocates in 2009, Melody Moody runs the statewide bicycle and pedestrian advocacy nonprofit, Bike Walk Mississippi. She is excited about BikeWalk’s recent endeavor with JBA, MDOT and Midtown Partners to open Jackson’s first community bike shop.


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Millsaps Day  College Day 

Neat Used Things for Sale

Saturday,  August 24th

a different kind of resale store

NUTS Fondren Specializing in upscale clothing and home decor

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NUTS Midtown

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Enjoy 50% Off Clothing  & Accessories with your  College ID on August 24th. Any college will do! Discount applies to  professors, staff and  Recent Alumni, too!

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jacksonfreepress.com

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21


[shop] TRIP BURNS

Who Loves JX?

T

hrough the T-shirt design company Studio Chane and local clothing store Swell-OPhonic, Ron Chane has provided Jackson with snarky tees for two and a half decades now. Recently, Studio Chane celebrated its 25th anniversary, making it one of the longest-running businesses in the Fondren district. Chane shared his 25 most iconic T-shirt designs from the last 25 years. Swell-O-Phonic (2906 N. State St., 601-981-3547) is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturdays. Visit chane.com.

Studio Chane’s Jackson shirts have been a style statement for more than two decades.

1. Twiggy X

What are your favorite Chane shirts from over the years? Comment at jfp.ms/chane25 to weigh in.

Modsushi line:

2. I (heart) Bacon 3. I (heart) Cheese 4. I (heart) Guacamole 5. I Hate Mayonnaise 6. Aspiring Lower Middle Class

Jackson Thrifting

T

August 21 - 27, 2013

7. I (heart) JX 8. JAXXON 9. RUN JXN 10. King Edward Hotel 11. Standard Life 12. Reunion Swingers Club 13. Sid’s Dutch Bar

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

South Jackson University Pot Hole Jackson’s Roads Suck Sun & Sand Highway 80 Pearl is for Lovers More Cowbell

21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Finally Fortification South Jackson Strikes Back Asylum Heights Land Mass 39216

by Nicole Wyatt

hrifting is my favorite pastime. Some of my most loved wardrobe pieces came from consignment shops or even the nickel bin in a warehouse somewhere. Here is a short list of my go-to places and my honest opinion about each one.

22

Jackson series:

If you feel like digging for that jewel in the rough or just want to browse, these thrifty places have tons of selection for clothes. Orange Peel (422 E. Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977): This cute old house is stocked full of consignment options plus a furniture barn out back. N.U.T.S. (114 Millsaps Ave., 601-355-6276; 3011 N. State St., 601-366-9633; 117 Wesley Ave., 601-355-7458): Make sure to check out the Midtown location’s sales on Fridays and Saturdays. You can get the most bang for your buck in the dig bins in the back of the warehouse. Silly Billy’s Consignment Shop (534 E. Mitchell 601672-6693): Great atmosphere and fun workers, plus a downstairs area with an amazing selection of period pieces, make this the go-to spot for any theme or costume party (or if you want that perfect Cosby sweater for fall). Repeat Street (242 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland, 601-6059123): It has a huge selection with literally anything you could possibly need: clothes and shoes for the whole family, indoor and outdoor furniture, house furnishings, decor and more. Bargain Boutique (5070 Parkway Drive, 601-991-0500): This Junior League of Jackson shop is one of my favorite “boutique” thrift stores. It has a great selection without boutique prices.

Fondren Muse (3413 N. State St., 601-345-1155): It is Jackson’s upscale-designer consignment shop. You can always find what you’re looking for there. It has everything from mint-condition designer handbags to accessories under $10. This is the best local spot for designer finds, plus its proceeds benefit the no-kill animal shelter CARA.

make an effort to get to know you and go out of their way to help you. Make sure not to miss the next holiday party. Keep up with Old House Depot’s cool treasures and events on Facebook.

I still love spending Saturdays out on the open road antiquing. Here are a few places that are worth the drive: 45 Flea Market & Antiques (7890 As a child, my mom took me Highway 45 N., Marion, 601from one antique mall to another 679-7777): You can’t go wrong on Saturdays and on road trips. Tostopping at any of these antique day, I am thankful for that. I know malls and flea markets on the where to spot a good bargain and, Highway 45 stretch between Meequally important, how to spot ridian and Starkville, but is this a rip-off. Here are some of my my favorite. Because I’m so far favorite places: away, I keep up with it on its FaceFlowood Flea Market (1325 Flobook page. wood Drive, 601-953-5914): It Magnolia Flea Market (3967 has an equal mix of amazing finds Highway 49 S., Florence, 601and junk. The coolest part is the 845-4655) and 49 South AnSalvage Market in the back. It sells tiques & Flea Market (3977 architectural salvage as well as upHighway 49 S., Florence, 601cycled furniture made in-house. 845-4183): Side by side, these Since moving to Mitchell Avenue, the Old House Depot (639 Monroe Orange Peel has expanded its offerings, two gems are teeming with old St., 601-592-6200): I get lost in including more furniture. treasure. You can find great retro here every time. Its selection and furniture and unique home decor quality are amazing, and the atmothere at reasonable prices. sphere is incredible. Here, you can find all sorts of archi- Marketplace Antiques and Flea Market (5360 Highway tectural salvage items and high-quality in-house furniture 49, Hattiesburg, 601-544-6644): With more than 200 built with recycled materials. The guys here have fun with dealers and 50,000 square feet of retail space, this market what they do, and it shows. This is a place where they is sure to have something for you. TIRP BURNS

Project Chane line:


Your

Fashion

[shine]

Inspiration

Pure Bliss

Location

by ShaWanda Jacome TRIP BURNS

When I first arrived for my appointment, I was greeted at the door and escorted back to a softly lit room with plush couches to wait for my massage to begin. My therapist, Crystal, had magic hands. I entered that day in knots—stressed from all that comes with being a working mom, wife, sister, friend, etc.— and left feeling divine from head to toe. The mission of the spa, in the words of owner Rebecca Canzoneri is, “Massage is more than a luxury. It is a beautiful way to relax, release tension and soothe away the stress of everyday living.” SpaBeca offers deep Swedish massage, deep-tissue therapeutic, prenatal, postpartum, myofascial release, sports massage, neuromuscular, scalp massage, Reiki, Indian head massage, hot stone, aromaSpaBeca offers multiple types of massage, including lesser-known forms therapy, couples massage and reflexology. Some of such as Indian head massage, Reiki and myofascial release. its signature treatments include detoxification facials, whole body sonic vibration, full-body scrubs, Far Infrared BodyWrap, hydro-massage and massage with ure bliss is how I would describe my experience at Spa- RainDrop technique. Beca (357 Towne Center Blvd., Suite 101, Ridgeland, SpaBeca not only caters to the individual, but to wedding 601-977-8401). This hidden gem opened in 2005, and parties, couples and mother-daughter duos. It also offers special it offers a tranquil atmosphere with friendly service and packages, coupons, gift certificates and deals. experienced massage therapists. TRIP BURNS

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1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

Bar Hopping by Kathleen M. Mitchell

atin hair treatments. The salon’s offerings run from thrifty (a $5 five-minute scalp massage) to utterly indulgent—a Brazilian blowout with styling is $150, but it comes with a promise that it will last up to eight to 12 weeks. You can also get a simple blowout, loose curls or waves, or even an updo for a special event. The Smoothing Bar at LaCru (5352 Lakeland Drive, Suite 500, Flowood, 601-992-4911, smoothingbar.com) is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m Mondays; 9 a.m.-

Stephanie Barnes (standing), owner of LaCru salon, recently branched out into the trendy world of dry bars.

7 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesdays; and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays.

Saturday, August 24th

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MS Mon-Fri
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601.790.9003

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*excludes jewelry*

Mon - Sat 10 am - 6pm • 425 E. Mitchell Ave. • Fondren • 601-939-5203

The Shoe Bar @ Pieces

ShoeBarPieces

jacksonfreepress.com

T

hese days, women are hitting the bar before they even go out—but not to drink. In fact, it’s not that kind of bar. A new kind of hair salon is popping up all over the country, with not a bottle of hair dye or pair of scissors in sight. It is the dry bar, also called the smoothing bar, where women can get a blowout or basic hair upkeep. In Jackson, LaCru salon recently opened its Smoothing Bar by LaCru. It specializes in Brazilian blowouts and Ker-

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Best Local Lunch Overall, Best Flowood Lunch, Best Ridgeland Lunch: Primos CafĂŠ

Best Fondren/Belhaven/Midtown Lunch: Babalu Tacos & Tapas TATE K. NATIONS

A

ngelo â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popâ&#x20AC;? Primos came to the United States with his wife, Mildred, from Greece and started a family bakery in 1929. Nearly a century later, Primos has two of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular restaurants. The cream of Primosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; crop is its blue-plate specials. The eatery offers chicken potpie, hamburger steak, fried chicken and fried catfish, along with other classics. Each blue-plate special includes a meat, two or three vegetables, and a cornbread muffin or roll. Everything is made in-house and, these days, as healthy as possibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;balancing southern comfort food with a fresh, good-for-you approach. Primos is also known for its baked goods, especially its most popular cake flavor, caramel. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Kathleen M. Mitchell Best Local Lunch Overall Second: City Grille (1029 Highway 51 N., Suite A, Madison, 601-607-7885) / Third: Bravo! Italian Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 244, 601-982-8111) / Good Showing: Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie Drive, 601-713-3020); Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In (3016 N. State St., 601-982-2633)

Best Downtown Jackson Lunch: Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adobo

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Best North Jackson Lunch: Char Restaurant TRIP BURNS

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Second (tie): Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie Drive, 601-713-3020); Hickory Pit (1491 Canton Mart Road, 601-956-7079) / Third: Bon Ami (1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 230, 601-982-0405)

Best Clinton Lunch: Froghead Grill 121 Clinton Center Drive, Clinton, 601-924-0725 thefrogheadgrill.com TRIP BURNS

August 21 - 27, 2013

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ans of Cajun cuisine owe themselves a trip to Froghead Grill, tucked away on Clinton Center Drive just off of Interstate 20 in Clinton. Technically, Froghead is an American grill, but with dishes like crawfish quesadilla, ĂŠtouffĂŠe, red beans and rice, and seafood gumbo, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible for the three-year-old restaurant to hide its roots. The best deals are the lunch specials, served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. From Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dish of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poppy Seed Chicken Casseroleâ&#x20AC;? to Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spicy chicken spaghetti, these Cajun-themed dishes are not to be missed. The Tadpole Menu offers traditional and Cajun-inspired choices like the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold-Cut Mini-Boyâ&#x20AC;? and popcorn shrimp for the kids. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tyler Cleveland

or a healthy lunch, try Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adobo on the ground level of the Standard Life Building. Adobo celebrated its one-year anniversary Aug. 20. Luis Bruno is executive chef of the Latin and Caribbean eatery. The menu at Adobo features local, hormone-free ingredients. Favorites include Cuban black-bean soup, the Adobo burger, salmon burger, smoked chili hummus, smoked-guava barbecue tacos and Louie Tabboulieâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a gluten-free salad of quinoa with mangoes, grape tomatoes, parsley, green onions and lemon. As Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first certified green restaurant, Adobo uses recycled materials. Even the employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shirts are recycled, bought second-hand from Gateway Rescue Mission. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ShaWanda Jacome Second: Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888) / Third: Elite Restaurant (141 E. Capitol St., 601-352-5606) / Good Showing: Kieferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (120 N. Congress St., 601-353-4976); Mayflower CafĂŠ (123 W. Capitol St., 601-355-4122)

Best Madison Lunch: City Grille

1029 Highway 51 N., Suite A, Madison 601-607-7885; thecitygrille.com

C

ity Grille owner and chef Zack Athearnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers the best of Cajun and French-inspired casual and fine dining. Weekday blue-plate specials include a meat, three sides, bread and a drink for $10. Choose from country-fried steak, chicken, pot roast, pork chops, chicken spaghetti or beef tips. For dessert, try peach or pecan cobbler with ice cream. Highlights of the regular menu includes tempura lobster rolls, grilled mahi, Atlantic salmon, New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp and grits, and Cajun seafood pasta. City Grille opened its doors in February. On Aug. 15, the family-owned restaurant won â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Overallâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Tasteâ&#x20AC;? at Madisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Night Out at the Madison Square Center for the Arts. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ShaWanda Jacome Second: Local 463 Urban Kitchen (121 Colony Crossing Way, Madison, 601-707-7684) / Third: Mama Hamilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (480 Magnolia St., Madison, 601-856-4407) / Good Showing: Georgia Blue Restaurant (111 Colony Crossing Way, Madison, 601-898-3330)

TRIP BURNS

127 S. Roach St., 601-944-9501

Best Ridgeland Lunch Second: Trace Grill (574 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-853-1014) / Third (tie): Beagle Bagel CafĂŠ (898 Avery Blvd., Ridgeland, 601-956-1773); Amerigo Italian Restaurant (6592 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-977-0563)

harâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lunch menu is top-notch, with two blueplate specials Monday through Saturday that range from red beans and rice or beef brisket to fried catfish or roasted turkey from $8 to $12. Diners can top off lunch with pecan pie, pecan-caramel, butter-crunch, or triple-chocolate cake with raspberry coulis or peach cobbler bathed in vanilla ice cream. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tyler Cleveland

B

ill Latham and Al Roberts of the Eat Here restaurant group started Babalu Tacos & Tapas in 2010, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become a destination for cocktails, tacos and Latin-inspired dishes. Babalu serves a variety of tacos ranging from pork-belly carnitas to house-smoked chicken and fresh fish. The menuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tapas section has plenty to offer, too, such as braised beef short ribs with grits, lamb sliders and spice-seared rare tuna. Few better places in Jackson exist than the porch at Babalu, with its hilltop view of Fondren. Soak up the sun (or moon) and atmosphere with a Baba-rita or two. Nearing its third birthday, Babalu may have lost its new restaurant glitter, but on any given night it still has a line out the door, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Andrew Dunaway Second (tie): Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2906 N. State St., Suite 104, 601-982-2100); Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 904 (904 E. Fortification St., Suite B, 601-352-2002) / Third: Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In (3016 N. State St., 601-982-2633) / Good Showing: Roosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2906 N. State St., 601-982-2100)

Best Flowood Lunch Second: Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-420-4202) / Third: Grantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen (2847 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-665-4764) / Good Showing: Georgia Blue (223 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-919-1900)

4500 Interstate 55, Suite 142, 601-956-9562 charrestaurant.com

622 Duling Ave., Suite 106, 601-366-5757

TRIP BURNS

TRIP BURNS

2323 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-936-3398; 515 Lake Harbour Drive, Ridgeland, 601-898-3600 primoscafe.com


Best Byram Lunch: Melanie’s 7126 Siwell Road, Byram, 601-371-1933

1227 Phillips Lane, Pearl, 601-932-6301 friscodeli.com

W

hen Melanie Smith’s son, Kyle, started college at Mississippi State University, Smith turned her passion for cooking into a thriving business. Kyle graduated in 2011 with a degree in business, but Melanie’s is still going strong. Melanie’s offers fresh, home-style southern meals, and Smith buys from local farms and vendors. The chalkboard menu includes southern favorites such as chicken and dumplings, pulled pork, bacon wrapped chicken, barbecue baked potatoes, pot roast, meatloaf, beef tips over rice and smoked beef brisket. Leave room for dessert. The Cakery Bakery at Melanie’s cranks out decadent sweet treats such as cupcakes, caramel-topped cheesecake with nuts, lemon icebox pies, buttermilk pies, cinnamon rolls, sticky buns and even the Elvis cupcake (banana cake, peanut butter buttercream frosting with chocolate drizzle). Cake designer Amanda Eady leads the Cakery Bakery, and she does it all—from wedding cakes, birthday cakes, or any other type of celebration cakes to high-end special dessert orders. —ShaWanda Jacome

COURTESY MELANIE’S/FACEBOOK

TRIP BURNS

Best Pearl Lunch: Frisco Deli

O

pen since 1993, Frisco Deli owners Mitchell Malouf and Mitchell Malouf Jr. have been filling satisfied bellies for 10 years. The menu includes sandwiches, chicken dinners, salads, catfish plates, ribs and desserts. Choose the “Deli Meal” to include a s side and drink with a corned beef Reuben, Cajun, roast beef, ham, smoked turkey or tuna sandwich or Frisco Burger. Frisco Deli is a hometown favorite in Pearl, with a 95 percent approval rating on Urbanspoon and comments like, “Love me some Frisco Deli!” and this: “Had a Reuben, and it was delicious. The staff was friendly and patient even though the place was packed. Great place to eat.” —ShaWanda Jacome Second: Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Highway 80 E., Suite 16, Pearl, 601-932-8728)

Best Brandon Lunch: Kismet

ate. That is the meaning behind the name of Brandon’s Kismet. The first owners, Lee and Kathy Kennedy, grew up together. When they were 5 or 6 years old, Kathy told Lee they were going to be married. And they did. They opened Kismet in 1991, later selling it to Jason Shepherd and Jackie Barnes. The “Greek with a southern flare” menu includes hummus, spinach-artichoke dip, krabby bites, fried chicken or catfish fingers, whole and half-size salads, wraps, side dishes, sandwiches and hamburgers. Kismet poboys includes crab cakes or fried shrimp, crawfish, or catfish. Kismet will begin featuring Gulf shrimp in September. Kismet offers entertainment throughout the year, including in-house mystery shows by The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre, including the special Halloween and New Year’s Eve show. —ShaWanda Jacome Second: Heart and Soul Diner (900 Municipal Drive, Brandon, 601-825-9922) / Third: Friends & Company (154 W. Government St., Brandon, 601-825-5309)

Best Vicksburg Lunch: Walnut Hills Restaurant 1214 Adams St., Vicksburg, 601-638-4910

W

alnut Hills Restaurant is quite possibly one of the best “unkept” secrets in historic Vicksburg. Southern hospitality is well known throughout South, and Walnut Hills captures everything you think you may know about southern cooking and turns it up a notch. Walnut Hills Restaurant and its three generations of cooks have been causing visitors and locals to loosen their belts since opening in 1980. Many people eat here because someone recommended it. Even though it has undergone a renovation, this more than 130-year-old house maintained its southern charm, with a wrap-around porch, eclectic rocking chairs and a perfected menu to take visitors to another time. While it is completely acceptable to eat its well-known and well-loved fried chicken or baby-back ribs with your bare fingers, it is not OK to so with the hand-cut steaks, wild-caught salmon or the always popular pond-raised catfish—no matter how much you may want to. —Michael Jacome

COURTESY WALNUT HILLS

F

JESSICA KING

315 Crossgates Blvd., Brandon, 601-825-8380 kismet.net

Best West Jackson Lunch: Koinonia Coffee House LEE HARPER

3505 Terry Road, Suite 205, 601-372-2100

Any day, good or bad, is better with a little southern cooking. Jacksonians say Pearl’s Southern Cooking serves some of the best in town. Michael Carter and his wife, Virginia, opened the restaurant in October 2012, and they named it after his mother, Pearl. The restaurant serves buffet-style southern food with everything from cornbread dressing, greens, and fried chicken to banana pudding and peach cobbler. Customer favorites are the rutabagas, peach cobbler, and of course their famous macaroni and cheese. The buffet is $9.50, and each meal includes a sweetened or unsweetened tea. The restaurant is open from 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. on Sundays, and it is busiest during the lunch hour. —Amber Helsel

Second: E&L Barbeque (111 Bailey Ave., 601-355-5035)

Note: Some categories did not have clear finalists in second or third place.

jacksonfreepress.com

L

ee Harper and Alexis Spencer-Byers of Koinonia Coffee House open its doors each weekday morning for food and fellowship. The coffee house has a variety of selections to help keep the conversations rolling. Try an espresso to perk up or a Coco Mocha Nut frappuccino to cool down. The lunch menu includes a roast-chicken sandwich and apple-cider chicken salad sandwich, both served with leafy greens on wheatberry or other choice of bread. Koinonia also offers garden and grilled-chicken salads. Treat your sweet-tooth with desserts such as chocolate-chunk cookies, peanut butter cookies, apple pie and cheesecake. Koinonia is a Greek word meaning communion or joint participation, and the coffeehouse lives up to the name with public events such as Friday Forum each Friday at 9 a.m., featuring interesting and relevant speakers. —De’Arbreya Lee

Best South Jackson Lunch: Pearl’s Southern Cooking TRIP BURNS

136 S. Adams St., Suite C, 601-960-3008 koinoniacoffee.com

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Danny

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900 Suite E. County Line Rd. Former AJ’s | 769.251.2657

862 Avery Blvd • Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 • ruchiindia.com


[eat]

Farmers Markets and Produce

On Social Media: Unique dishes

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by Nneka Ayozie Brendaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Produce at Old Farmers Market 352 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave., 601-3540529 or 601-353-1633 Brendaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sells Smith County home-grown produce such as peas, okra and squash. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Sundays until November.

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Byram Farmers Market 20 Willow Creek Lane, Byram, 601373-4545 The marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s products include vegetables, Amish canned goods and rocking chairs. It is open 9 a.m-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday through October.

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Julepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honey-fried chicken breast is one of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique dishes.

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Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Produce 6031 Clinton Blvd., 601-923-3921 Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Produce is open year-round and sells a variety of produce. It is open 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Livingston Farmers Market 129 Mannsdale Road, 601-898-0212 Livingston has fresh produce from local growers, live music, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and

art from the Mississippi Craftsmen each Thursday from 4-8 p.m. until October. Mississippi Farmers Market 929 High St., 601-354-6573 mdac.state.ms.us Open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, it has locally grown fruits and vegetables and specialty foods and crafts from local artisans. Old Fannin Road Farmers Market 1307 Old Fannin Road, Brandon, 601-9191690 The market has locally grown produce including watermelons and peaches. It is open 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday and noon6 p.m. on Sundays until Christmas week. Olde Towne Market 202 W. Leake St., Clinton, 601-924-5472 mainstreetclintonms.com Olde Towne Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fresh at 5,â&#x20AC;? features home-grown and homemade products for sale from 5- 7 p.m. each Tuesday until Aug. 27. The fall market is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 12 and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 9.

EXTENDED HOURS

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OLD MASTERS three centuries of french painting  from the wadsworth atheneum

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Before You Hit the Books, Party With Us At The Bean!

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;T

by Adria Walker

he sound of them gnawed rib bones hittinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that bucket are like music to my ears,â&#x20AC;? Thelma Harper said on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family.â&#x20AC;? Tell it, Thelma. Preach it like you mean it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll shout my â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amen!â&#x20AC;? from way up in the choir loft. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll come down front and share my meaty testimony. I love ribs, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care who knows it. There is something so visceral, so primal and yet so perfect about eating ribs. The flesh yielding to the tooth. The tooth scraping the bone. The feel of wet sauce on your cheeks. The oh-hell-Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m-committed-to-this-and-Idonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t-give-a-damn-about-the-messyconsequences joy of letting yourself go and giving in to urges that stem back to your caveman roots. Ribs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appeal to our frontal lobesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no, sir. They set synapses

TRIP BURNS

Pure Instinct

C

Ribs awaken the primal in us.

ablaze deep in the reptilian core of our brains. Way down in the medulla oblongata where we breathe without thinking, ribs reside. Tucked away in the amygdala where aggression and emotion rule, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find ribs, spurring on the action. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tom Ramsey, BOOM Jackson magazine, Spring 2012 (boomjackson.com)

ontrary to popular belief, eating a non-meat diet isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hard. As a vegan, I frequently stop by Rainbow Co-Op and High Noon Cafe (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-3661602). If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a vegetarian or vegan new to Jackson, Rainbow and High Noon are about to become your best friends. High Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vegan chocolate cake is absolutely to die for. Many of my omnivore friends even prefer it to the traditional version. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a full meal, Chef Troy Woodson cooks up a â&#x20AC;&#x153;good burgerâ&#x20AC;? that lives up to its name. If you like Portobello mushrooms, visit Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 101, 601-3622900). Its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portobello Vegetarianâ&#x20AC;? is only $9.50, and vegans can simply or-

TRIP BURNS

[eat]

High Noon Cafeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vegetarian dishes can be treats for anyone.

der the dish without goat cheese. Broad Street also has an array of salads, soups and pizzas. Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adobo (127 S. Roach St., 601-944-9501) in downtown Jackson is dedicated to healthy eating options. Besides traditional Latin and Caribbean cuisine, Adobo also offers vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free choices.

On Social Media: Carnivores

On Social Media: Herbivores

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VASILIOS Join us for Happy Hour Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

In Town & in the USA

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

MON-FRI 11A-2P,5-10P SAT 5-10P

828 HWY 51, MADISON â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.0028

jacksonfreepress.com

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

With a dinner of Fresh Greek Salad, Pan-Cooked Tilapia topped with Scallops, and HomeAUTHENTIC GREEK DINING Made Baklava Cheesecake itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to know where to start.

29


30

August 21 - 27, 2013


JFPmenus.com Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

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Follow Us Cool Al’s

CoolAlsJxn

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

FOR VOTING US ONE OF THE

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

BEST LUNCHES

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best.

IN NORTH JACKSON & OVERALL

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma.

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

4654 McWillie Dr. Jackson, MS Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 9PM Friday & Saturday: 10AM - 10PM Sunday: CLOSED

601.713.3020

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Hazel Coffee Shop (2601 N. State St. Fondren Across from UMC) Fresh locally roasted coffee and specialty drinks to perk up your day!

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Back Yard Burgers (Multiple Locations, www.BackYardBurgers.com) North American Black Angus Beef cooked to order on a real grill. Great Breakfast at Fondren location. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Musician’s Emporium (642 Tombigbee St., 601-973-3400) Delicious appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, and more. Great food goes with great music! Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

jacksonfreepress.com

ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi

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te We Apprecia s One of the U g n ti o V u o Y Eat Lunch to s ce la P st e B n In West Jackso 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE. Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel!

August 21 - 27, 2013

For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800

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Welcome To The Ride of Your Life We Make It Happen!

VIP- Executive- Private Birthday Parties- Weddings- Vacations www.executivelimoms.com

601.987.9426

STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

With The Most Reliable Luxury Transportation Service Service Excellence with Southern Hospitality 1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA Š2013 Hilton Worldwide

Untitled - Page: 1

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100


LIFE&STYLE |

Harmony and Soul by Maggie Neff

RENAISSANCE PHOTO NOLA

Jackson’s Premier Provider of Custom Formal Wear since 1990.

4465 I-55 N Suite 203 Jackson, MS 601.981.0106

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419 Mitchell Ave|Jackson 601.982.5575 Tuesday - Friday|9:00 - 6:00 Saturday|9:00 - 2:00 Walk-Ins Welcome. Appointments are preferred.

J. Michael and Chelsi held hands, gazing at each other during the ceremony. In a nod to Ohueri’s African roots—his father is from Nigeria—the couple jumped the broom after being presented as Mr. and Mrs. Ohueri. Although many women dream of the perfect ceremony down to the details, Chelsi says she’s always been focused on an important aspect of the reception. “Growing up, I never thought, ‘I want this kind of wedding dress’ or ‘I want these types of flowers,’” she says. “But I knew without a shadow of doubt what my playlist was going to be—I had a Microsoft Word document.” Chelsi and J. Michael’s first dance was to Larry Graham’s “One in a Million You,” while the groom and his mother danced to Boyz II Men’s “Mama.” Chelsi took to the floor with her mother, Janice, and brother to “Love” by Al Green. This soul theme—of both the music and the people— carried reception-goers throughout the night.

Day-of coordinator: Andrea Hopkins, Perfection Wedding Coordination (perfectionwed.com) Officiant: Pastor Robert Davis, Church of God in Christ Number One, Austin,Texas Reception location: Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St., 601359-9000) Groom’s and groomsmen’s attire: Men’s Wearhouse (1039 E. County Line Road, Suite 103, 601977-0188) Bride’s attire: The Bridal Path (4465

N

N. Interstate 55, Suite 104, 601-982-8267) Caterer: Bruce Cain, Old Capitol Inn Cake: Carolyn Michael, C&M Designs (3819 Robinson St., 601922-4400) Florist: Decorator Jennifer CainSessmus Photographer: Ranada Rizzo, Renaissance Photo NOLA (504-228-7508, renaissancephotonola. com) Music: Timothy “DJ Phingaprint” Washington

10% Off Tuesdays & Thursdays

with Current Student ID

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jacksonfreepress.com

“I

don’t like clingy people.” and we went on our first date within that week.” These were the words my childhood That date went well; the couple saw each other five best friend Chelsi Amelia West casually told more times the following week before she left for Jackson. J. Michael Ohueri soon after their first date. Seven months later, J. Michael proposed atop Mount BonNothing personal—just a nell in Austin. This preemptive statement of June, the two married fact. At the time, Chelsi at Covenant Presbytewas preparing to leave rian Church in Jackson, Austin, Texas, where the where I stood alongside two reside, and return eight other bridesmaids to her native Jackson for and two maids of honthe summer. or to watch our best It wasn’t more friend’s wedding. than a few weeks before Chelsi and J. Mishe countered her own chael both wanted their philosophy. wedding to emphasize “She called me every the union of two famiday,” says J. Michael, 28, lies. Elements including a prosecutor in the Travis family remarks during County Attorney’s Office the ceremony brought in Austin. “I called her this concept home. one day, and she’s like, Chelsi composed a ‘I’m on my way to Ausmoving letter to her fatin. ... I just decided to ther, who died in 2012, come down.’” which family friend I guess she broke Mary King read before her own rule about the nuptials. She also being clingy. wore miniature framed Chelsi and J. Mipictures of her and her chael’s relationship began father on the backs of when the attorney logged her satin heels so he into his eHarmony accould still “walk me count—ready to cancel down the aisle,” Chelsi his subscription—only says. “One of my main Jackson native Chelsi West wed J. Michael Ohueri June 15. to find he had “like 100 concerns was to make page views” from some sure I was still involv“questionable” young lady, he says, knowingly gazing at 27- ing his memory and honoring his life, too.” year-old Chelsi, who is resting her head on his shoulder and The couple selected wisteria purple and canary yellow laughing heartily. This gaiety is inherent to the couple’s rela- as their wedding hues as an homage to Chelsi’s father, who tionship and makes time spent with them all the richer. was a member of Omega Psi Phi—the fraternity’s colors are Chelsi, a doctoral student in anthropology at the Uni- purple and gold. Chelsi’s younger brother, Gerald—who is a versity of Texas, takes a breath from her school-girl giggles member of the same fraternity and shares his father’s name— to set the record straight: “We met on eHarmony; he sent walked her down the aisle. me a message. While a little hesitant at first, I responded, I’ve never seen her look more beautiful.

33


THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 8/21:

Barry Leach (Restaurant) Ralph’s Open Mic Nights (Patio) THURSDAY 8/22:

T.B. Ledford & Friends (Restaurant) Jesse Robinson’s CD Release Party (Red) FRIDAY 8/23:

XtremeZ (Restaurant) SATURDAY 8/24:

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2 for 1 house wine

starting at •

August 22

Amy Lott (Restaurant) Cathead (Red) Jarekus Singleton’s All White Party (Big)

LADIES NIGHT

MONDAY 8/26:

Motel Mirrors

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday

WeeklySchedule

pm

Thursday

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday August 23

Npoebz

Uivstebz

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 5:30 pm Level 2

• 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Uvftebz

Gsjebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas

• 5:15 pm Tabatas

• 5:30 Level 1

(6 for $50/$10 drop in) • 6-7:15 pm Level 1

Xfeoftebz • 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Restorative Yoga • 5:30 Yoga from the Core

(Restaurant)

TUESDAY 8/27:

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

UPCOMING:

August 21 - 27, 2013

8.28: Singer/Songwriter Night with Natalie Long

34

9.5: ArdenLand presents: St. Paul & The Broken Bones (Red) Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

• 10:30 Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz • 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location)

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

BUY GROWLERS

$24

• 9-10:15 am Level I

• 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant) O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

Tbuvsebz

Saturday August 24

Napoleon Avenue

Tuesday August 27 Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner

Wednesday August 28

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

Let Steve’s Catering Take the Work Out of Your Business Lunch 2 Locations

125 S. Congress St. • 601-969-1119 200 S. Lamar Ave. • 601-714-5683

for catering

call 601-969-1119

www.stevesdowntown.com


8 DAYS p 36 | FILM p 39 | MUSIC p 40 | SPORTS p 42

Rock ‘n’ Roll Art T by Julie Skipper

COURTESY ARTS CENTER OF MISSISSIPPI

somewhat intense introduction, you get the sense that this show will show you those moments—the big and small aspects of musical performance. You move throughout several rooms full of (mostly) small-sized black-and-white images. Rather than their size making the images seem more precious, their scale has an opposite effect, rendering them more accessible. It’s as if you’re looking at photos that a friend took—if your friend hung out with the Allman Brothers, Phil Collins and David Bowie. West is best when he captures musicians mid-performance in the throes of doing what they live to do: Mick Jagger airborne, hand aloft; Bob Marley, tossing his dreadlocks around; Iggy Pop, shirtless and sweat-soaked, writhing on the ground. The black-and-white photos emphasize the light and shadow, and details such as muscles tensing or veins popping as the musicians give the performances their all. One diptych contrasts two images of The Police. In one, the band skates around a roller rink, with a mullet-sporting Sting in a Mickey Mouse sweatshirt. Looking at it, you get the sense West was just along for the ride with the Kirk West’s photos of guys on a day off. Roller skating musicians, including (from with Sting—can you imagine? The compantop) Bob Marley, the Bee ion image is the band mid-song onstage, with Gees, and Muddy Waters and Sting as the Sting we all recognize, frozen in a Bruce Springsteen, capture electric energy. high jump as he strikes a chord. Taken together, the photos show both sides of the coin, as it were: the iconic musiWest amassed an oerve of images that capture musicians in cians worshiped by crowds of screaming fans the moment beautifully. The show highlights his ability to and the regular guys in jeans goofing off. West got to convey the intensity of performers beautifully. know both, and his images let us in on the fun of it all. Viewers enter the exhibit to photographs of the The Lauren Rogers Museum of Art (565 N. Fifth Ave., drag queen Lady Devine in all her glory. Next to Devine Laurel) is open 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, and 1-4 is a photo of the Bee Gees in high-waisted tight white p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. The Arts Center of Mississippi pants, chests bare and hair flowing, caught onstage shar- (201 E. Pascagoula St.) is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friing a moment in which they seem to be communicat- day, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Sunday. All 35 ing something to each other with just a look. With that pieces are for sale, and admission is free. jacksonfreepress.com

hey say music is a universal language. Maybe that’s why we so often idolize musicians, giving them icon status. Their songs become the soundtrack to a particular place and time. Two current photography exhibits explore some of those icons, showing viewers musical artists captured in moments ranging from exuberant performances to intimate personal spaces. Like the music of the artists they portray, the images in these exhibits offer something to which everyone can relate. “While everyone doesn’t (necessarily) paint or do sculpture, we all have a camera. So photography is a medium that’s very accessible, even for people who may never have been to an art museum before,” says Holly Green, director of marketing for the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel. “Sound and Vision: Monumental Rock & Roll Photography” is on display at the Lauren Rogers, exhibiting in the upper galleries through Sept. 8 and including 40 photographs by 20 different artists. Hung in three gallery rooms arranged by musical genre, the photographs are digitally printed on watercolor paper. The porous texture of the paper lends a particularly rich quality to the images, which are uniform in size, allowing viewers to better appreciate the different styles of the photographers and the differences in their subjects. Chris Murray, owner of the Govinda Gallery in Washington, D.C., curated the exhibit, which spans a range of rock ‘n’ roll, starting with performers from the 1950s such as BB King and Elvis. Next, museum visitors move on through the British Invasion with The Beatles, Rolling Stones and The Who, and forward into glam rockers—Freddy Mercury, KISS, David Bowie and Little Richard. Reggae is included as well, before moving on to contemporary artists such Kurt Cobain and Jay-Z. One particularly iconic piece is a photograph of Jim Morrison, which the Doors used as the album cover for the “Best of the Doors” album. In Jackson, lovers of art and music can enjoy an exhibit featuring Kirk West’s photographs at the Arts Center of Mississippi through Aug. 25. West asserts that he is, first and foremost, a music lover, and that shines through in his photography. Since shooting his first concert at age 18,


WEDNESDAY 8/21

SUNDAY 8/25

TUESDAY 8/27

Walk to Cure Diabetes Kickoff is at Hilton Jackson.

Kirk West Photography Exhibit ends today at Arts Center of Mississippi.

Jimmy Mumford and Charles Carraway speak at Jackson State University.

BEST BETS AUGUST 22 - 28, 2013

ROB LOUD

WEDNESDAY 8/21 Steve Yates reads from his new book “Some Kinds of Love: Stories” during History Is Lunch at noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Crazy Cross Country Run is at 6 p.m. at Madison Middle School (1365 Mannsdale Road, Madison). After-party at Papitos (111 Colony Crossing Way, Suite 1200, Madison). Free; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

THURSDAY 8/22

COURTESY EUBANK BETTS

Walk to Cure Diabetes Kickoff is at noon at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). Free; call 601981-1184; email mississippi@jdrf.org; jdrf.org. … Mississippi Jazz Foundation Social Mixer is from 6-8 p.m. at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-594-2314; missjazzfoundation.com. … Saving Grace: A Benefit for Grace House with live music is from 6-9 p.m. at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). $35 in advance, $40 at the door; call 601-540-8447; email mollymacwade@hotmail.com.

Nashville-based indie-rock band Moon Taxi performs at Duling Hall Aug. 23.

at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Parallax and DJ Young Venom also perform. For ages 18 and up. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

mals will be on site for adoption. $5 (cash only), children 12 and under free; call 601-790-0654; mscraftshow.com.

MONDAY 8/26

SATURDAY 8/24

Prevention of Schoolhouse to Jailhouse Coalition Convening is from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). RSVP. Free; call 601-573-3978, 601214-7975, 601-354-3408, ext. 104 or 334-322-8218; email nlambright@uniteonevoice.org, mattiews@gmail.com, ddenney@aclu-ms.org or jed. oppenheim@splcenter.org; BY BRIANA ROBINSON tinyurl.com/PSHJHConvening. … Pink the Runway Model Casting Call is from 10 a.m.JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM 4 p.m. at Posh Boutique (4312 FAX: 601-510-9019 N. State St.). Free; call 364-2244; DAILY UPDATES AT email pinktherunway@gmail. JFPEVENTS.COM com. … “Breaking into Hollywood: How to Get Started” Actors Creative Workshop is from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). Registration required. $100; call 662-528-6997; email raphaeltalent@gmail.com; raphaelagency.eventbrite.com.

Battle of the Bartenders is from 6-9 p.m. at The South (627 E. Silas Brown St.). Benefits the Mississippi Burn Foundation. For ages 21 and up. $40 in advance, $50 at the door; call 601-540-2995; email afontaine@msburn.org; battleofthebartendersseasontwo.eventbrite.com. … Margarita Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. at Sombra Mexican Kitchen (140 Township Ave, Suite 100, Ridgeland). RSVP encouraged. $30; call 601-707-7950; sombramexicankitchen.com.

EVENTS@ TUESDAY 8/27

August 21 - 27, 2013

Local bartenders mix Cathead vodka-based drinks for judges and attendees at the Battle of the Bartenders Aug. 26.

FRIDAY 8/23

Dance with the Stars is at 7 p.m. at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). $150, $1,200 table of eight, $1,500 table of 10; call 601-960-2300 or 877-MSOPERA; msopera.org. … Anthony Hamilton performs at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). 36 $38.5-$58.5; call 800-745-3000. … Moon Taxi performs

SUNDAY 8/25

Kirk West Photography Exhibit ends today at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557. … Mississippi Craft Show is from 11 a.m.4 p.m. at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Proceeds benefit the Animal Rescue Fund (ARF), and ani-

Careers in Art Lecture is from noon-1 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) at the Welcome Center. RSVP. Free; call 601-979-0883; email latona.r.banks@jsums.edu. … Wine Tasting is at 6 p.m. at Amerigo Italian Restaurant (6592 Old Canton Road). Reservations required. $20 plus tax and tip; call 601-977-0563; amerigo.net.

WEDNESDAY 8/28

Day of Dignity: 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, D.C. for Jobs and Freedom is from 5:307:30 p.m. at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.) on the south steps facing Mississippi Street. RSVP. Free; tinyurl. com/DayofDignity. … Black Flag performs at 10 p.m. at Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 S. State St.). For ages 21 and up. $20; call 800-745-3000; blackflagofficial.com.


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 8/23 – Thur. 8/29

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Blue Jasmine PG13

Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters (non 3-D) PG

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*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Saving Grace: A Benefit for Grace House Aug. 22, 6-9 p.m., at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive), at Fowler Hall. Enjoy tapas-style refreshments and music from Cassandra Wilson, Bill and Temperance, James Martin and Latinismo! Wine and beer sold. Proceeds go toward renovations at Grace House, a home for people living with HIV and AIDS. $35 in advance, $40 at the door; call 601540-8447; email mollymacwade@hotmail.com. Dog Days of Summer Aug. 24, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., at Pelahatchie Shore Park (Lakeshore Drive, Brandon). The annual fundraiser for Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA) includes food, entertainment, craft vendors, a pet parade and microchipping ($35). Dog food or cat litter donations required to enter; call 601-842-4404; email denise.cantrell@ thinkvss.com; carams.org. Jesse Robinson CD Release Party Aug. 22, 7-11 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.), in the Red Room. The local bluesman celebrates the release of his new CD “Stray Star” with a performance. The CD was recorded in Jackson and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. $15, $20 with CD; call 601-362-8019 or 662347-2869; jesseguitarrobinson.com.

#/--5.)49 Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). • Artifact and Collectible Identification Program Aug. 28, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The MDAH staff is on hand to review and assist in identifying documents and objects of historical value, including potential donations to the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Free; call 601-576-6850. • History Is Lunch Aug. 21, noon Author Steve Yates reads from his new book “Some Kinds of Love: Stories.” Free; call 601-576-6998.

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August 21 - 27, 2013

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COMSTAT Meeting Aug. 22, 9 a.m., at Jackson Police Department Headquarters (327 E. Pascagoula St.). The JPD shares Jackson crime statistics. Free; call 601-960-1375; jacksonms.gov. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting Aug. 22, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Free; call 601-960-0004. Samuel Adams Beer Dinner Aug. 22, 7 p.m., at Nick’s Restaurant (3000 Old Canton Road). Enjoy a five-course meal paired with four Samuel Adams beers such as Cherry Wheat and Boston Lager. Reservations required. $45; call 601981-8017; nicksrestaurant.com. Manage Your Ethical and Cultural Risks Aug. 23, 8 a.m.-4:15 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). The ethical and cultural diversity education seminar is for professional social workers. Six CEU credits available for licensed workers. Registration required. $90-$145; call 601-936-0557; naswmschapter.org. Jump Start Jackson Fall Farmers Market Aug. 24, 8 a.m.-noon, at Lake Hico Park (4801 Watkins Drive). Free; call 601-898-0000, ext. 118; email jcollins@mbk-inc.org. I’m Beautiful Breakfast Aug. 24, 8-11 a.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The purpose of the event for women is to encourage and empower. The speaker is author Marjorie Lewis (“Pain NO More

Too”). Attire is casual or summer beach wear. RSVP. Free; call 601-953-5747; email evajustice5@hotmail.com. Cruising the Community Aug. 24, 8-11 a.m, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) at Lee E. Williams Athletic and Assembly Center. Children ages 5-12 ride anything with wheels during the 1.2-mile ride (no motors). Actor Roscoe Orman (Gordon from “Sesame Street”) reads from his book “Ricky & Mobo” and sings. Registration required. Free; call 601979-5828; email heather.a.wilcox@jsums.edu; jsums.edu/cubd/cruising. Mothers, Daughters & Sisters - Connected In Christ Ladies Seminar Aug. 24, 2-5 p.m., at God’s Refuge Christian Fellowship Center (1931 Boling St.). Speakers include Pastor Gwen Richardson of Nu Vision Worship Center International in Jackson and Pastor Sharon Johnson of Tabernacle of Mercy Church International in Columbus. Free; call 769-218-9450; godrefugecfcc.org. Margarita Dinner Aug. 26, 6:30 p.m., at Sombra Mexican Kitchen (140 Township Ave, Suite 100, Ridgeland). Sample four fruity margaritas along with three appetizers such as guacamole bruschetta. RSVP encouraged. $30; call 601707-7950; sombramexicankitchen.com. History Is Lunch Aug. 28, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Historian Parker Hills talks about the commemorative art in the Vicksburg National Military Park. Free; call 601-576-6998. Lunch and Learn Series Aug. 28, noon-1 p.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The topic is “Grant Research Tools.” Lunch included; registration required. $15, members free; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org.

7%,,.%33 Events at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison). Registration required. Call 601-948-6262; mbhs.org. • Solving the Mystery of Pelvic Pain Aug. 22, 6-7 p.m. In the Community Room. Dr. Paul Moore discusses causes and treatment options. Refreshments served. Free. • Do You “Kneed” a New Joint? Aug. 23, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. In the Community Room. Dr. Jeff Almand talks about advancements in knee replacement. Free, $5 optional lunch. Events at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). • Look Good Feel Better Program Aug. 26, 2-4 p.m. Oct. 21, 2-4 p.m. Nov. 4, 2-4 p.m. Cancer patients learn beauty techniques to manage the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment. Pre-registration required. Free; call 800-227-2345; lookgoodfeelbetter.org. • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Screening Aug. 24, 7-11 a.m, at the Cardiovascular Center. Recommended for males 55 and older, and women 60 and older with certain risk factors. Space limited; by appointment only. $35; call 601-948-6262; mbhs.org. Health Fair and Community Festival Aug. 24, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., at Zion Chapel AME Zion Church (361 Robinson Road, Canton). Includes a 5K walk and one-mile fun run at 8 a.m., a health fair from 9 a.m.-noon and a festival from noon-6 p.m. Enjoy games, entertainment, water slides, a space jump, a mechanical bull, horseback riding, vendors and more. Free; call 601-720-7107; find Zion Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church on Facebook.


DIVERSIONS | film

Workingman’s Hero

I

Winfrey is a fireball of maternal conviction. At a reconciliation dinner, Cecil says that Sidney Poitier’s character in “In The Heat of the Night” reminds him of Louis, and Louis responds by calling Poitier a rich Uncle Tom. Cecil explodes, demanding his puffed-up son and belching girlfriend leave his house. In a stand-by-her-man moment, Gloria backhands her son when he sasses his dad. Like Whitaker and Oyelowo, Winfrey delivers an Oscar-caliber performance. Not known for his subtle touch, Daniels (who directed “Precious” and produced “Monster’s Ball”) broadcasts a righteous indignation. He visually telegraphs the big moments with symbolic close-ups and further escalates the emotional drama with a fully loaded orchestra, ready on command to shatter your complacency with scores of violins. With 41 credited producers and a starstudded cast at least as long, this film is operatic and a touch too “Forrest Gump” as Cecil witnesses 30 years of historic events in the Oval Office. It’s also radically uneven, which happens when one approaches subject matter with an unyielding passion. Despite that, I laughed. I cried. I clapped as loudly as anyone else in the theater by the movie’s end.

Kid’s Run Featuring RAT (Reject All Tobacco) Aug. 24, 10 a.m., at Millie D’s Frozen Yogurt (140 Township Ave., Suite 112, Ridgeland). Before the run, learn yoga stretches in the RAT Fit Challenge. Enjoy yogurt after the run. Prizes given; visit gorat. com to prepare. Free; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

and members; call 601-960-0440; email info@ muslimmuseum.org; muslimmuseum.org.

COURTESY FOLLOW THROUGH PRODUCTIONS

n Lee Daniels’ “The Butler,” everyone their two boys. The White House notices endures taunts and scalding coffee thrown in loves Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) be- Cecil’s apolitical and unassuming ways and his face at a Woolworth sit-in. Louis’ younger cause he never says what he thinks. He’s hires him, and Cecil serves as a butler under brother Charlie (Elijah Kelley) enlists to fight a butler, trained as a house servant after eight presidents (played by a star-studded in Vietnam. The opposing ways Cecil and a white man rapes his mother Louis deal with bigotry, injustice (Mariah Carey) and murders his and racial discrimination is the father (David Banner). Before glue that holds this film together this tragedy, Cecil worked with as it swings back and forth from his parents as a field hand. inspiration to disillusionment. Miss Annabeth (Vanessa In a defining scene, Dr. MarRedgrave), the plantation matritin Luther King Jr. (Nelsan Ellis) arch, shows a bit of kindness to explains to Louis the vital role of young Cecil by taking him into domestic help in black history. the big house. She teaches Cecil Through hard work and subservithe secrets of fine service. ence, the butler slowly tears down “The room must feel empty the stereotypes and becomes subwhen you’re in it,” she tells him. versive without knowing it. The true story of Eugene This movie ambitiously Eugene Allen, a White House butler for more than 30 years, Allen, a White House butler introduces dozens of characters. inspired Lee Daniels’ “The Butler.” Forest Whitaker stars. for more than 30 years, was the Under Daniels’ direction, the inspiration for Danny Strong’s entire cast pulls out one phenomscreenplay for the film. In this highly fiction- list, including Robin Williams, James Mars- enal performance after another. Whitaker’s alized account, Cecil is the workingman’s den, John Cusack and Alan Rickman). performance, in particular, is a breathtakhero. He never dreams of a big life. He feels Daniels crosscuts news clips, home- ing balance of quiet truths and smoldering blessed to have a job at a swanky hotel in styled videos and historical events with Cecil’s anger. It’s in his eyes and the way he moves Washington, D.C., giving him the ability to personal life. While Cecil polishes silver and his body. Oyelowo’s Louis counters with fine financially support his wife, Gloria (Oprah sets a magnificent table for a White House nuances. He’s an angry Hamlet in an AmeriWinfrey), so she can stay home and raise state dinner, his son Louis (David Oyelowo) can nightmare.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. Power of the Mic Comedy Show Aug. 24, 8 p.m. Aug. 24, 10 p.m., at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Comedians include Rita B, Fiyaman, Mark Brooks, Jason Usry and Nardo Blactastic. Enjoy music from No Script featuring Keyone’ Memyselfni Edwards and DJ Sean Mac. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. $10; call 646801-1275; like Power of the Mic on Facebook.

-53)# Put on Your Mosh Boots and Hit the Pit Aug. 22, 5:30-10 p.m., at Rampage Extreme Park (931 Highway 80 W.). Performers include City in the Sea, Truly Truly and more. $7-$10; call 6537267; ranpageextremepark.com. The Return of “Show Up to Show Out” Aug. 24, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., at Last Call (3716 Interstate 55 N. Frontage Road). The event includes music from the Partystarters Band and open-mic. Registration is a 7:30 p.m. $5-$10; call 404-465-2292. Black Flag Aug. 28, 10 p.m., at Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 S. State St.). The hardcore punk band from California has been performing

since 1976. Doors open at 9 p.m. For ages 21 and up. $20; call 800-745-3000; blackflagofficial.com.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. • “The Storied South: Voices of Writers and Artists” Aug. 24, 4 p.m. William Ferris signs books. $35 book. • “Mississippi Hill Country Blues 1967” Aug. 21, 5 p.m. George Mitchell signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $40 book. Cereus Readers Book Club Fourth Thursdays, noon-1 p.m. through Oct. 24, at LemuriaBooks. com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). The book club meets to discuss works from Eudora Welty and her favorite authors, as well as authors who considered Welty to be an inspiration for their work. Free; email lisa@lemuriabooks.com for a reading list.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Registration required; space limited. Call 601-707-5854; email paint@easelyamused.com; easelyamused.com. • “Groovy Grove/Jumpin’ Junction” Painting Class Aug. 26, 7-9 p.m. Paint your tailgating spot with any school colors you want. $28. • “Have a Little Faith” Painting Class Aug. 25, 2-4 p.m. Learn to paint a country church with local artist Cliff Speaks. $30.

Write to Change Your World Sept. 7-Nov. 16, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Reserve your spot for Donna Ladd’s popular creative non-fiction six-class series. Meets every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Includes snacks and materials. Space limited. $150; call 601-362-6121, ext. 15; email class@ writingtochange.com.

Fused Glass, Textiles and More Exhibit through Aug. 31, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Exhibitors include Marcy Petrini, Jac Lynn Sharp, Candy Spurzem and Jenny Thomas. Free; call 601-856-7546; email blastjac@ gmail.com; mscrafts.org.

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Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • “Pieces and Strings: Mississippi Cultural Crossroads 25th Annual Quilt Exhibition” through Sept. 1, in the public corridor. See award-winning quilts. Free. • “Old Masters to Monet: Three Centuries of French Painting from the Wadsworth Atheneum” through Sept. 8, in the Donna and Jim Barksdale Galleries for Changing Exhibitions. See 50 masterpieces from the collection of the Wadsworth Athenium in Hartford, Conn. $12, $10 seniors, $6 students. • “Mississippi Hill Country Blues: Photographs by George Mitchell” through Sept. 8, in the Barksdale Galleries. See 75 of Mitchell’s photographs that includes portraits of Mississippi blues artists. Includes admission to “Old Masters to Monet.”

Youth Know Your Rights Workshop and Convening Aug. 24, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). Topics include the Trayvon Martin trial, law enforcement engagement and images of black youth in the media. RSVP. Free; call 601-398-3441, 601-354-3408 or 334-322-8218; email jhardwicklaw@gmail.com, jriley-collins@aclu-ms.org, cwelchlin@hotmail. com or jed.oppenheim@splcenter.org; tinyurl. com/NotHereNeverAgainMS.

“The Legacy of Timbuktu: Wonders of the Written Word,” at International Museum of Muslim Cultures (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See ancient manuscripts, interactive media and artifacts. Includes access to the companion exhibit “Islamic Moorish Spain: Its Legacy to Europe and the West.” $13, $10 seniors, $7 students with ID, free for ages 0-5

Tailgating with Hospice Angels Foundation Aug. 24, 6-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). Wear your team colors to the fundraising event with a football theme. Tour the museum and participate in raffles for football tickets, NFL autographed items and more. $25, $5 ages 5 and under; email tsmith@hospiceadvantage.com. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Anita Modak-Truran

39


DIVERSIONS | music

Water Liars’ ‘Different, Bigger Sound’ DANIEL DRINKARD

by Larry Morrisey

Water Liars builds a distinctive sound featuring sparse instrumentation, strong harmonies and Justin KinkelSchuster’s plaintive vocals.

W

ater Liars is not wasting any time. The Water Valley-based group, made up of Justin Kinkel-Schuster on guitar and vocals, and Andrew Bryant on drums and vocals, has only been around since 2011 but has been highly prolific in that short time. The duo released its second album, “Wyoming,” this past spring on Oxford’s Big Legal Mess Records, and it

is currently recording its third record. Between these, it also squeezed in a just-released 7-inch single. The group’s music, primarily Kinkel-Schuster’s writing, is sparsely arranged with a strong emphasis on the guitarist’s plaintive voice. Although the music is rooted partially in folk styles, the group likes to work the entire dynamic range— from hushed to blaring—into its music. “Wyoming” features everything from quiet, almost traditional-sounding songs with acoustic guitar and harmony vocals, to distorted garagerock leads and crashing drums. The influence of books and literature runs throughout the band’s music. Its name comes from the title of a short story by the late Mississippi writer Barry Hannah, and songs mention writers such as John Milton. Listeners can also hear the influence through Kinkel-Schuster’s ability to fully set a scene through his lyrics. The guitarist was an English major in college, and reading affects his songwriting. “The influence is huge, although not necessarily conscious,” he says. “Books have been some of my best and most loyal friends. There are definitely a few writers who have helped me out immeasurably along the way, and I always want to make sure that, whether it’s conscious or not, I’m paying service to them.” Another distinctive component of Water Liars’ sound is its vocal harmonies. The duos’ voices blend together naturally and help boost the emotional impact of Kinkel-Schuster’s lyrics. He admits that they have an instinctual approach to sing-

ing together, rather than anything being worked out. It’s also his favorite part of their live shows. “When we’re actually playing, (harmony is) one of the things that gives me the most joy. I feel a thrill every time,” Kinkel-Schuster says. “It doesn’t even feel like me—or us, really. It just feels like a different, bigger sound that I get to hear.” Since the release of “Wyoming” this spring, Water Liars kept a steady presence on the road, playing shows throughout the country. Highlights of the band’s travels have included recording for the famed Daytrotter Sessions in Iowa and being filmed for a high-school media class in Kansas. While the schedule is full, shows can sometimes be mismatches, sharing bills with groups with which Water Liars don’t have much in common. “At this point, it’s sort of a crapshoot,” Kinkel-Schuster says. “It depends a lot on places that we’ve been and people we meet who are kindred spirits.” Even when these situations come up, Kinkel-Schuster and Bryant don’t change their show or their approach to performing. “We’re going to do what we’re going to do regardless of the surroundings,” Kinkel-Schuster says. “We have enough faith in what we’re trying to do that we’re going to put it out there and hope that it comes across.” Water Liars performs at 10 p.m. Aug. 23 at Martin’s Lounge (214 S. State St., 601-354-9712). Visit waterliarsmusic.tumblr.com. Also, visit jfp.ms/phantomlimb for the 2012 JFP review of “Phantom Limb,” the group’s first album that Fat Possum Records recently re-released.

music in theory

by Micah Smith

Tallhart Offers Something Different

August 21 - 27, 2013

40

ter than many of their peers’ records, even those with music-scene tenure. COURTESY RORY RECORDS/EQUAL VISION

A

s the first full-length and second studio record from Florida’s Tallhart since it signed to Equal Vision Records, “We Are the Same” comes with substantial concerns. For one, Tallhart was the first act to sign to Say Anything-frontman Max Bemis’s Equal Vision imprint label, Rory Records. Uber-experimental indie-pop Pretty & Nice, the acoustic folk duo Merriment, and XO, a side project from Say Anything sibling musicians Jake and Jeff Turner later joined the Rory roster. Tallhart faced an even greater hurdle than fronting an entire label, though. Its first studio album, “Sister of Mine,” dropped in January 2012, only a month prior to its union with Rory Records. The band then immediately released six new songs for the EP “Bloodlines” in April 2012 to meet label requirements. Despite the impressive amount of product that Tallhart generated last year, the band punched the clock yet again to work on a whole CD’s worth of completely new songs. Lucky for this Tampa trio, Tallhart can quickly yield indie-rock tunes that, while not always inspired, are bet-

Tallhart’s “We Are the Same” offers a genuine sound, not overly catchy.

Though Tallhart only began in 2010, originally performing under the name Marksmen, “We Are the Same” is not trialand-error experimentation. The songs are often musically dynamic and diverse, from guitar riffs to vocal tone. The lyrical content combines the best of both worlds, frequently

featuring a definable narrative but remaining abstract enough for interpretation. The members of Tallhart play in a manner conducive to the whole group: If driving guitar need not be used, then you won’t hear it drowning out the more intricate details like tambourine and atmospheric backing vocals. It certainly doesn’t hurt that lead singer Matt Segallos has a penchant for the folksy. Oddly enough, songs like the near-acoustic shout-out to compunction, “Holy Coast,” and the Americana-tinged verses of “Mexico” use the familiar to keep the album from falling into over-used patterns. These instances of self-imposed sincerity—remnants of classic-roots rock—are welcome in the indierock genre, which occasionally falls from the realm of the real into what sounds cool. In fact, the word that best describes Tallhart’s “We Are the Same” is “genuine.” The band stays true to its recognizable sound but isn’t afraid to slide into anthem rock or the more intimate moments, in keeping with the some successful indie acts like Pedro the Lion and Band of Horses. In many ways, Segallos and his Tallhart cohorts create mu-

sic that is agreeable and inventive enough to help redefine the indie-rock nomenclature in the same way that their predecessors have. Unfortunately, potential is not equivalent to follow-through. “We Are the Same” comes up a bit short at times is in memorability—an issue that ranges in its source from song to song but, thankfully, also in terms of how prevalent the problem is. While songs such as “Fighter” display a proficiency in producing captivating, creative refrains, others struggle with it. In “Wandering Kind,” the culprit is a fairly forgettable chorus, one that is listenable but not nearly catchy enough to stay with you once the album presses onward. The same could be said for “The Fire,” which plays more like an old Gin Blossoms B-side than a contemporary rock song. Even at its worst, Tallhart delivers fine—if sporadically unremarkable—tunes, an achievement for a band of any age. With immense potential and a rare level of authenticity, when the members of Tallhart are able to turn out new music at their own pace, I have no doubt they’ll sand down those few rough edges to frictionless perfection.


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HAPPY HOUR! Mon-Fri •1 - 3:30pm $2 Domestics • $3 Wells

WEDNESDAYS

8/21

LADIES NIGHT 2-for-1 Wells & Domestic 5pm - close

THURSDAYS

8/22

$4 APPETIZERS • 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT FRIDAY

8/23

WATER LIARS With Special Guest

SATURDAY

8/24

GREEN HOUSE LOUNGE MONDAY

8/26

OPEN MIC/ TALENT

SEARCH NIGHT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft TUESDAY

8/27

SHRIMP BOIL

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00

Plus free snacks at the bar! (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, August 21th

BIG EASY THREE

(blues) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, August 22nd

LAZY BOI

(blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, August 23rd

KING EDWARD

(blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

Saturday, August 24th

JESSE ROBINSON

5 - 10 PM

(blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

5 - 9 & 10 - close

Tuesday, August 27th

MATT’S KARAOKE $1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

BARREL HOUSE RAMBLERS

UPCOMING SHOWS

(jazz) 6:30, No Cover

8.28: Black Flag advance tickets @ Ticketmaster

COMING SOON

9.13: Flowtribe 9.27: Up Until Now (on tour with STS9 & Umphrey’s McGee) 9.28: Good Enough For Good Times (Members Of Galactic) 10.4: Cosby Sweater 10.19: The Revivalists 11.8: Unknown Hinson 11.23: Zoogma

SCAN

ME! SEE OUR NEW MENU

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New Happy Hour!

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Jazz Lab

Thursday, August 29 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

MUSIC | live

41


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, AUG 22 NFL (7-10 p.m., ESPN): Last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Super Bowl champions, the Baltimore Ravens, look to prove they can defend their title as they host Cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers. FRIDAY, AUG 23 NFL (7-10 p.m., CBS): The Green Bay Packers and the Seattle Seahawks meet in preseason action. The last time they faced off, the last game for the replacement refs, resulted in one of the wildest finishes last season with what maybe was or wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a touchdown. SATURDAY, AUG. 24 NFL (7-10 p.m., CBS): The St. Louis Rams, with former USM quarterback Austin Davis, hit the road to face Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos. SUNDAY, AUG. 25 NFL (3-6 p.m., Fox): A chance to see how good the New Orleans Saints can be against a very strong Houston Texans squad highlights week three of the preseason.



WATER LIARS 



&LOW 4RIBE

August 21 - 27, 2013



42



2EVIVALIST 5NKNOWN (INSON For our entire live music calendar visit

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

MONDAY, AUG 26 Tennis (6-10 p.m., ESPN 2): The best tennis stars in the world are live in primetime for the 2013 U.S. Open from Arthur Ashe Stadium. TUESDAY, AUG 27 Documentary (7-8 p.m., ESPN): Part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nine For IXâ&#x20AC;? series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brandedâ&#x20AC;? explores the double standard in sports where women must be the best at their sport and attractive to earn endorsements and fame. WEDNESDAY, AUG 28 Tennis (6-10 p.m., ESPN 2): Live action continues from New York as the best in the tennis world look to win the 2013 U.S. Open, one of the four Grand Slams of tennis. We have only one more week until the college football season starts. It will be an exciting week for Bulldogs, Rebels, Tigers and Eagles as opening day draws near. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

Goodbye to the BCS

C

"LACK &LAG

Sitting here wondering if the Oakland Raiders are as bad as they looked Friday night, or if the New Orleans Saints are going to be as good as they looked? Week one against Atlanta should provide an answer.

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43


VOTE TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 2013

DARREL McQUIRTER DISTRICT 2 SUPERVISOR

With over 30 years of public service with the municipal and county government, I have the proven leadership and vision to move Hinds County forward. As Fire Chief for the City of Clinton, I managed a $3.1 million budget as well as the operations of four facilities and specialized equipment valued at $11 million. I coordinated the Emergency Operations for the city of Clinton and implemented the Storm Ready City Designation. As the Hinds County Director of Permit and Zoning, I enforce the ordinances and regulations governing the development and use of land, various codes pertaining to the construction of buildings, and County standards and regulations pertaining to infrastructure requirements. I am working to have all zoning maps and applications digitized for immediate online access.

Priorities:

CRIME PREVENTION: I will diligently seek regional solutions to assist in crime prevention; develop long term goals; identify short term solutions and implement deterrence.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: I will aggressively pursue economic development to reignite positive growth, identify needs of existing businesses, vote to fund and strengthen Hinds County Economic Dept., and create a Long Term Growth Team and strategy.

EFFECTIVE COUNTY GOVERNMENT: Requires me-

ticulously utilizing county resources and personnel. We need to identify areas of immediate need, encourage and support employee development, and create strategic plans for capital improvement in buildings maintenance, road improvements, bridge and infrastructure repairs.

August 21 - 27, 2013

DEPENDABLE LEADERSHIP: I genuinely desire to identify

44

common areas to unite and build pride in our leaders, pride in our community, pride in our county workplace and pride in our government. @DarrelMcQuirter

Darrel McQuirter

www.ElectMcQuirter.com â&#x20AC;˘ P. O. Box 1077, Clinton, MS 39060 Paid for by Friends to Elect Darrel McQuirter


BULLETIN BOARD: Classifieds

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115 W. Capitol St ! Jackson, MS 39201 601.360.0090 events@parlormarket.com www.parlormarket.com

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47


fondren cellars

HOME FOR SALE

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Located at Jackson, 2809 Greenview Drive

wine & spirits

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Now Open Until 10 633 Duling Duling Avenue Avenue・Next to Brent’s Brent’s • Next to 633 • fondrencellars.com 769 ・216・2323 ・ fondrencellars.com 769-216-2323

The Little Big Store Vinyl Records +45’s & 78’s

• CDs & Tapes Mon, Fri & Sat: • Posters 10am - 5pm • Back Issue Music Sun: 1 - 5pm Magazines & Books • T-Shirts & Memorabilia • Blu-Rays, DVDs, & VHS 601.857.8579 201 E. Main Street Raymond, Ms www.littlebigstore.com

I’ve enjoyed serving you and look forward to seeing you at my new location!

ACEY’S CUSTOM HAIR DESIGN 3015 North State Street •Jackson Shelly Burns • 601.213.6688 Walk-Ins & Appointments

SOCIAL SECURITY AND DISABILITY LAW

Market Cafe

“Bargain Hunting Makes You Hungry” Offering Breakfast & Lunch Over 36,000 sq ft of antiques, architectural salvage, collectibles and furniture. 1325 Flowood Dr. • www.fleamarketms.com Sat: 9am-5pm • Sun: 12pm-5pm • $1 Admission Mention This Ad For Free Admission!

Many people come to me, virtually without hope, after they have been paying into the Social Security system for years - only to be rejected by the Government for disability benefits when they become sick or severely injured.

REMEMBER IT’S YOUR MONEY 2906 North State Street, Suite 320 Phone: (601) 982-2900 • Fax: (601) 982-2999 • www.mattgreenbaum.com

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175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M­Th: 10­10p F­Sa 10­Mid Su: 1­10p * www.shopromanticadventures.com


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