Issuu on Google+


July 24 - 30, 2013

DELTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

2


MELANIE BOYD

JACKSONIAN LYDIA HALL

L

ydia Hall, a 19-year-old graduate of Madison Central High School, has been a volunteer teacher at an orphanage in El Salvador for the past five summers. “I knew someone who had an organization down there, so I went one summer. I ended up falling in love with the teenage girls who were sold into prostitution and who had children,” Hall says. “It hit me really hard because they weren’t given opportunities like other people were given. I liked being down there. I liked getting to know them, and I liked trying to help them. I just kept going back.” Hall has five major goals:: to make a difference teaching, to live in El Salvador at some point, to be a foster parent, to raise children with Christian values and to live in New York City. “I think that our generation, especially, is very focused on themselves … Having the nicest things, having fame, finding love—that’s all very self-centered,” Hall says. “I wish I could make people see the people who don’t get to focus on that stuff and are just focused on their day-to-day living. I wish more people wanted to help out, not just in other countries, but here in Mississippi, too.” “I found out last year that Mississippi has one of the lowest literacy rates.” Hall says. The Mississippi Department of Education states that 52 percent of third-graders and 50 percent of eighth-graders read at or above grade level.

Seventy-eight percent of the state’s fourth-graders are below proficient in their reading skills. “(Many) newspapers are written at a fifth-grade reading level, and I think that is because there aren’t enough teachers who are willing to work hard. A lot of people think that teaching is just an easy major to get.” Although Hall was born in Jackson, she has also lived in Indiana and Miami, returning to Madison with her family in 2007. “I love southern hospitality, but I also just love Jackson,” Hall says. “I think that the buildings in downtown Jackson are so pretty … I wish we could fix (the city) up some, but I love it. I love the kids here; the way that southern children are raised … I love everything about Mississippi.” In the fall, Hall will be a freshman at the University of Mississippi, to which she received a full scholarship. She plans to major in education and English so she can be a ninth-grade English teacher. Hall has also volunteered at the Mississippi Children’s Museum where she was one of the original Learning Librarians who read to children at the museum. “I take a class at the Vocational Center called Teacher’s Academy. We have been kind of student teaching in the elementary schools for the past two years. I spend a lot of my time working on stuff for that class, like learning how to write lesson plans and doing competitions for the organization that we work with.” —Adria Walker

CONTENTS

File Photo

8 Not Vigilantes

“With a committed core of 10 members, Bennie Jones is able to do two patrols a week. During a patrol, members dress in the familiar Guardian Angels uniform of T-shirt, black cargo pants and the signature red beret, then gathers and walks through the neighborhoods of Jackson. They are not vigilantes. The men and women of the Guardian Angels go through three months of training that includes Tai Kwon Do, CPR training, basic criminal law and instruction on how to make a citizens arrest. It’s intensive training, but after 20 years, Jones can count on one hand the number of times he has used it while on patrol.” —Tyler Cleveland, “Angels on Patrol”

26 Hotel Greenery

Chef Nick Wallace is growing an urban garden outside the historic King Edward Hotel downtown, with fresh ingredients such as lettuce, mint and okra.

27 Quit, Jane, Quit

Fondren Theatre Workshop joins forces with The Warehouse Theatre to present a new original play, “See Jane Quit.”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 21 ........................................... FOOD 24 ...................................... HITCHED 26 ................................. WELLNESS 27 .............................. DIVERSIONS 28 .......................................... ARTS 28 .......................................... FILM 29 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 30 ............................... JFP EVENTS 32 ....................................... MUSIC 33 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 34 ..................................... SPORTS 35 .................................... PUZZLES 37 ....................................... ASTRO

HALEY PALMERTON/COURTESY WAREHOUSE THEATRE; MELANIE BOYD; TRIP BURNS

JULY 24 - 30, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 46

3


EDITOR’S note

by Kathleen M. Mitchell Features Editor

It’s Cool to Be a Nerd

I

f you want to talk about education in Mississippi, you need to prepare for a pretty depressing conversation. We’re either in the top five or bottom five of every national education-related list— whichever end you don’t want to be, there we are. Early childhood education is nonexistent in much of the state, starting our children with an automatic disadvantage. Abstinence-only sex education continues to be the norm; while, strangely enough, teenage pregnancy continues to affect young people across the state. College preparedness is dismal in many areas. My best friend works for Education Services Foundation and travels to high schools across the state, bringing back horror stories of kids who still haven’t even heard of the ACT. Meanwhile, university tuition is only becoming more expensive, and as the wealth divide continues to grow, the ability to earn a college degree (not to mention a graduate degree or higher) is becoming less attainable than ever. But I want to take a minute to appreciate a few good things about Mississippi education. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, Jackson State University, the University of Mississippi Medical School and Murrah High School are all making their way onto national lists for quality education. And then we have my alma mater, Millsaps College. Back-to-school season stirs a lot of different emotions, depending on who you are. Dread at losing the long, lazy freedom of summer days. Anticipation at returning to regularly scheduled sports events. Excitement at the prospect of seeing friends every day. Most likely, people feel some combination of these emotions and others. For me, the arrival of freshly bound

sheaves of college-ruled paper on store shelves and bombardment of ads for dorm-room décor brings a yearning to go back to freshman year of college—to relive four of the best years of my life and to re-immerse myself in an environment dedicated to learning. I have always loved learning. I checked out as many books as they would let me

I found kindred souls there, people of all walks of life who crave knowledge the way I do. from my local library as a kid (literally, I reached the maximum check-outs and remember having to sit and choose which books I would leave behind). I remember the first time I really understood a calculus problem in high school—the moment when I wasn’t just following the professor’s instructions, but each step made sense in my head, leading me to the next step and on to the correct answer. That feeling of triumph, the thrill that goes through you when something clicks into place—that feeling is awesome. I’ve never been much of an athlete, but I imagine its something like scoring a touchdown. Let’s just call a spade a spade: I’m a nerd (but, you know, a cool one). And after high school, I was lucky to find myself in cool nerd heaven: Millsaps College.

It’s the kind of place where teachers don’t look at students as vessels to dump the requisite amount of information into before sending them out into the world. Rather, the best professors there see their students as collaborators and fellow discoverers. It often becomes the sort of relationship where mentor and peer begin to merge. It’s not uncommon to see Millsaps professors having a beer at Fenian’s with current or former students, discussing anything from religion to politics to pop culture. I’m part of a group of graduates working in communication-related fields in Jackson who get together with the communication-studies professor about once a month to discuss news, media and more. At Millsaps College, my professors’ primary goal wasn’t to teach me to construct a well-thought-out essay or analyze works of fiction, although I certainly became good at those things along the way. They didn’t set out to teach me how to juggle five things at once and to manage when another got thrown at me, although I can certainly do that now, too. The people at that school taught me to think for myself. They demanded nothing less. I learned to care about the world both across the globe and across the road. I learned about myself and what is important to me. Of course, Millsaps is not perfect, and it may not even be the same school it once was. But when I attended, it was a school where people loved to learn. I found kindred souls there, people of all walks of life who crave knowledge the way I do. Don’t get me wrong. I understand that the cost of a private college such as Millsaps is prohibitive to many, many people (including some of the students

that wind up there and end up leaving). It is an expensive school, and only becoming more so. The yearly tuition is up many thousands of dollars today from when I matriculated. The vast majority of students are those who can pay the high price tag, or those that are able to get scholarships. So I’m not saying that the solution is for everyone to find a way to go to Millsaps College or even other schools like it, because a lot of students wouldn’t get what I got out of the school. What I wish is for everyone to have that same thrill I felt when calculus finally made sense, or when I started writing a paper and surprised myself with my own insights on a novel. I wish for them to look up from deep in a good book and realize two hours have passed without them noticing. I wish for people to find the school that fits them, that both supports and challenges them. That school may be different for each person. Money for education in this state simply isn’t where it should be, and people have drastically different opinions on how to fix that. The conversation will be hard, but to even get to that conversation, we have up decide once and for all that education is important—no, vital—to us. Students have to want to learn. They have to treasure education. It’s not something that can be taught, but it can be instilled. It takes all of us: students, teachers, parents, peers, friends. We have to seek out teachers and professors who are exceptional and lift them up. We have to press upon our children the value of education. Show them the thrill of putting something together, of coming to a conclusion after real mental work. Tell them its cool to be nerdy. If kids can learn to love to learn, they’ve conquered half the battle.

July 24 - 30, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

R.L. Nave

Dustin Cardon

Amber Helsel

Tyler Cleveland

Zilpha Young

Adria Walker

Andrea Thomas

ShaWanda Jacome

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601362-6121 ext. 12. He contributed to the Talk section.

Copy Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. An English major from Brandon, he enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day. He wrote the Week in Review.

Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel is an Ole Miss graduate with a degree in journalism. She is all about random facts, new music and striving to live a healthy life. She wrote the Hitched piece.

City Reporter Tyler Cleveland loves sports, good music and soul food. He can be found around Fondren when he’s not being herded around the JFP office like a cat. He contributed to the Talk section.

Design Intern Zilpha Young is a graphic design student and soon-to-be graduate of Delta Sate University. Her favorite doodle subjects are skulls and octopi. See examples of her work at zilphacreates.com. She helped design the issue.

Editorial Intern Adria Walker is a 10th grader at Murrah High School and an aspiring writer. You can find her reading novels or debating the greatest film saga ever, “Star Wars.” She wrote the Jacksonian and the Wellness pieces.

Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland. Andrea is a lover of all genres of music, fashion and good food. She spends her free time exploring everything Jackson has to offer. She created many ads for the issue.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary librarian in JPS. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband, Mike, and son, Mateo. One of her favorite scriptures is Psalm 34:4. She wrote for the cover package.


JCV7741-33 Main Festival JFPress FULL COLOR.indd 1

jacksonfreepress.com

Tickets available at Ticketmaster outlets, online at TICKETMASTER.com or by calling 800-745-3000.

5 7/22/13 3:25 PM


¹7E´REDEALINGWITHTHESAME PEOPLEWHOROBNEIGHBORHOODS ANDRAPEANDBURGLARIZENEIGH BORHOODS² ²+LQGV&RXQW\6KHULII 7\URQH/HZLVUHVSRQGLQJWR UHFHQWLQFLGHQWVDWWKHFRXQW\ GHWHQWLRQFHQWHU

Thursday, July 18 The Jackson City Council unanimously confirms Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s nominees for police and fire chief, Lindsey Horton and Willie Owens, respectively. ‌ Detroit becomes the biggest U.S. city ever to file for bankruptcy protection. Friday, July 19 The Mississippi Board of Education votes to return three school districts to local control that the state took over for failure to meet state standards. ‌ U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announces that Israel and the Palestinians have agreed on a basis for returning to negotiations. Saturday, July 20 The JFP hosts its ninth annual Chick Ball to raise funds to support victims of sex trafficking. ‌ Five stars of A&E’s “Duck Dynastyâ€? reality show help raise at least $280,000 for a Hattiesburg children’s home. Sunday, July 21 A Hinds County SWAT team and K-9 unit respond when 10 to 15 people incarcerated at the Raymond Detention Center exit their cells due to malfunctioning locks. ‌ Chris Froome wins the 100th Tour de France.

6

Tuesday, July 23 The White House releases a statement urging swift passage of a bipartisan compromise on student loans that would lower interest rates for the next few years. ‌ A blowout on a natural gas drilling rig 55 miles off the coast of New Orleans forces the evacuation of 47 workers. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Abandoned Housing Two-Step by Tyler Cleveland

I

nez Jenkins had just about enough. The lot at 2941 Morton Ave., right across the street from her house, was overgrown, and it was embarrassing when her friends from church came over after services on Sundays. Her grandson even, as she said, killed “a big ol’ fat snake� on the lot. A pair of the unlikeliest partners rode to her rescue: Republican Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann and District 5 Hinds County Supervisor Kenneth Stokes, a Democrat. Hosemann’s office donated the lot, which was repossessed for non-payment of taxes, to Hinds County, which agreed to finance construction of a community walking trail. The renovation of the previously useless lot is a story that’s becoming more and more common, as abandoned lots and dilapidating housing remain one of the biggest problems in the city of Jackson. At a July 18 meeting of the Jackson City Council, newly appointed police and fire chiefs, Lindsey Horton and Willie Owens, respectively, explained why abandoned homes are such a blight to the community. “Besides being a visual detriment, people squat in the abandoned houses and use them for drugs and prostitution,� Horton said. “In the winter, they start fires inside to stay warm, and when they leave, it starts fires and becomes a real public-safety issue.� “In the old days, we used to burn them,� Owens chimed in. “But the Environmental Protection Agency put a stop to that, because of the chemicals that were released into the air when we did it.� For many of the properties, the process to clean them up is caught up in a nearly endless cycle of letters by mail, empty threats

from the city and legal tangles that take months and even years to resolve. When a complaint is made on a property, the city sends someone to assess whether the property is in violation of city codes. If it

property are absentee landlords,� said Kimberly Hilliard, executive director of Jackson State University’s Office of Community Engagement. “They are not locally invested in the city. They own the land or house, and

Abandoned and dilapidated houses, such as this one on Farish Street, are common in parts of Jackson and neighbors are fed up.

is, the city issues a warning to the property owner, who has 90 days to respond, but that can be done with a simple letter and one-time compliance. If, for example, the violation is due to an unkempt lawn, the owner can have the grass cut once. If he or she then fails to keep up the lawn again, another complaint must be filed, and the 90-day process starts over. In that way, the laws benefit the landowners and make it difficult for the city to wrest abandoned properties from owners who aren’t caring for them. “Many of these people who own the

they are paid up on their taxes, but they don’t live here and aren’t keeping up the property.� Hilliard has researched the problem of blight and abandoned housing as part of her role in Vision 2022, a Greater Jackson Chamber of Commerce initiative aimed at improving the metro area. She explained that when the state repossesses property from the owner, it isn’t necessarily a bad thing. “It’s sometimes a great thing when that happens,� Hilliard said. “These absentee owners aren’t keeping up the yards or keeping the house up to code at all, and it brings

READ ON by ShaWanda Jacome

K

ids still have time to finish up their summer reading books. The Jackson Public Schools program “One Jackson, Many Readers, Summer Reading 2013� encouraged students to read at least three books (one from the required reading list and two of their choice) this summer. Research shows that students who read throughout the summer continue to

grow academically. Those who do not read can lose up to three months of academic growth. Through the summer reading program, JPS students earn incentives for reading and turning in reading logs when they return to school. For detailed information, including required reading list, visit jfp.ms/jxnsummerreading. For more features on heading back to school, turn to pages 14-17.

COURTESY JACKSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

July 24 - 30, 2013

Monday, July 22 Pope Francis arrives in Brazil for a visit to his native South America. ‌ An earthquake in northwest China destroys or damages thousands of homes, killing at least 75 people and injuring more than 400.

7KH*XDUGLDQ $QJHOVDUHRQ SDWUROWRNHHS -DFNVRQVDIHS

TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, July 17 The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau estimates that national outstanding student debt is at $1.2 trillion, up 20 percent over the last two years. ‌ A wildfire pushes toward southern California mountain communities, forcing the evacuation of more than 2,200 homes and 6,000 residents.

¹4HEMAYORMENTIONED BEINGCOMMITTEDTOWORKING FOR*ACKSON ANDWE´RE CERTAINLYCOMMITTED² ²6LHPHQVVSRNHVPDQ &KULV0F1HLORQKLV FRPSDQ\œVSOHGJHWRVXE FRQWUDFWZLWKPLQRULW\DQG -DFNVRQEDVHGEXVLQHVVHV


¹!TTHEVERYLEAST )THINKIT´STIMEFORSOMETOLERANCEINTHEPUBLIC DISCOURSEREGARDINGTHEMANYSCIENTI½CVIEWPOINTSONCLIMATECHANGE 2ESPECTSHOULDBESHOWNTOTHOSEWHOHAVEDONETHERESEARCHANDCOMETO ADIFFERENTCONCLUSION² ²866HQ5RJHU:LFNHUFDOOLQJIRUWROHUDQFHRIFOLPDWHVNHSWLFVDWD 6HQDWHKHDULQJ

down the value of not only that home, but all the others around it. If the taxes aren’t paid, and the state takes over the property, at least they keep it up—up to a certain dollar amount. They’ll at least cut the grass and keep it looking presentable.� The secretary of state’s website lists some 3,000 empty lots and abandoned houses in Hinds County alone. The properties range in price from free to more than $400,000, but the site lacks an easy search function. Private citizens can purchase the property directly from the state, but the city of Jackson has also had some success in the past by asking the state to give the property to the city. The law prevents the secretary of state’s office from donating the properties directly to non-profit organizations, but it doesn’t prevent them from donating them to a municipality.

The Jackson Free Press featured one such project June 12 in a story about Voice of Calvary Baptist Church, which had obtained properties from the city for the purpose of refurbishing them, then assisting and subsidizing low-income families to get them through the buying process. Under that program, Jackson gave Voice of Calvary several dilapidated homes that the state had donated to the city. Hilliard and her partners on Vision 2022’s neighborhood beautification subcommittee have recently been in contact with the Center for Community Progress, a non-profit organization with offices in Flint, Mich., Washington, D.C., and New Orleans, which has helped communities around the country reclaim blighted areas and turn vacant spaces into vibrant areas. It’s an uphill battle, but other cities have

done it with varying levels of success. Just last year, the White House honored Center for Community Progress fellow Steve Mantle for turning a state-owned, run-down Flint warehouse into a park along the Flint River. But solutions for Jackson don’t have to be that grand. As Hilliard pointed out, if the city, county and state all worked together, and neighbors were aware the lots were available at a reasonable price, the number of vacant properties could be cut down significantly. “Right now, we have a system where the county, city and state all have their own processes for dealing with the abandoned properties,� Hilliard said. “If they were all pulling in the same direction, or had one central plan for dealing with them, they could make some serious progress.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

Ready ... Set ... Scan by R.L. Nave

After a long delay, the state is implementing a controversial fingerscanner program for poor parents. In fall 2012, child-care providers and parents rallied at the Capitol to protest the plan.

vices) to correct the problems.� In her letter, Dent said her agency had learned a lot from the finger-scan pilot program. “We have been testing this system with licensed providers for several months, and are confident in this program’s ability to accurately capture attendance of children in your care and speed up the payment process,� Dent states in her letter.

Aside from the buggy computer systems, providers cite privacy concerns and say that piling on extra restrictions could force some parents to stop working to care for their kids at home. Even after two public hearings, capitol rallies and a lawsuit, Burnett said child-care providers still say they are having problems with the technology. The state will pay ACS approximately $1.2 million for 1,815 finger scanners and VeriFone scanners, which resemble credit-card readers, and up to an additional $12.8 million to service the equipment through 2017, a contract between the state and ACS shows. Burnett calls the way the program is being implemented heavy-handed. Dent’s letter advises child-care providers to tell DECCD whether they will continue accepting the low-income subsidies or opt out of the certificate program no later than Aug. 15. Centers that do not respond by the deadline would be automatically dropped. Child-care providers have long believed that the finger scanners were a backdoor way to reduce the number of people helped by the child-care subsidy. Dent said that streamlining the payment system would enable the state to help more families. Burnett calls the scanners a deterrent for parents and child-care centers. “It’s a bother that people would just rather not deal with,� she said. Comment www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

   

        

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com 601.487.8710

jacksonfreepress.com

said. “I haven’t seen any real effort from (the Department of Human SerTRIP BURNS

N

ine months after state officials holstered a plan to require all parents receiving federal child-care assistance to scan their kids in and out of day care every day, Mississippi is moving forward with the controversial plan. In July 2012, Mississippi’s Division of Early Childhood Care and Development, which administers the federal child-care subsidy, or certificate program, started testing a new system to pay child-care centers. The pilot program, designed to streamline the way child providers get paid, requires lowincome parents to scan their fingers into a database when picking up and dropping off their children. In the early implementations, the pilot program touched off many complaints about technical problems with the finger-scanning equipment and software, and resulted in a lawsuit from one child-care provider that remains pending. DECCD then held public hearings last fall on the program and decided to delay its full rollout. Jill Dent, who oversees the state’s childcare program, sent a letter to centers that accept certificates for federal low-income child-care subsidies. In the letter, dated July 15, Dent said DECCD would launch Mississippi eChildare statewide Oct. 1. Carol Burnett, executive director of the Low-Income Childcare Initiative, concedes that the providers she represents do get paid faster but said the electronic reports often contain errors. “I still have concerns,� Burnett

7


TALK | city

Angels on Patrol

Bennie Jones and his guardians patrol a neighborhood after one of its residents called and asked if they would spend some time in the area.

day talk-radio shows in New York City. Critics characterize the organization as a group that goes out looking for trouble, but JPD Assistant Chief Lee Vance said that hasn’t been the case in Jackson. “From my experience and understanding, they pretty much act as an extra set of eyes or ears in the community,” Vance said. “That’s something we’ve always advocated. It’s good to see citizens that want to get out there and be a part of the solution, instead of part the problem. I’ve only known them to try and be helpful to us.” With a committed core of 10 members, Jones is able to do two patrols a week. During a patrol, members dress in the familiar Guardian Angels uniform of T-shirt, black cargo pants and the signature red beret, then gathers and walks through the neighborhoods of Jackson. Guardian Angel recruits go through three months of training that includes Taekwondo, CPR training, basic criminal law and instruction on how to make a citizens arrest. It’s intensive training, but after 20 years,

Spotting the Criminals byTyler Cleveland

July 24 - 30, 2013

T

8

ake Back Jackson, organized by local attorney Ashley Ogden, is another group taking matters into its own hands. Regular Jackson residents, which Ogden calls citizens’ patrols, walk the streets and patrol the parks of northeast Jackson, particularly around Parham Bridges Park and the Interstate 55 corridor. He said his group aims to take back Jackson from “the criminals.” “It’s not hard to spot a criminal because they are usually doing something that the rest of us aren’t,” Ogden said. “While we’re going about our daily lives, they are standing around looking for an opportunity to take. You go to a park, and everybody is jogging or playing on the playground except for one guy, who is walking through the parking lot looking in car windows. That’s a suspicious person, so we call

Jones can count on one hand the number of times he has used it while on patrol. “We’ve gone down to the New Orleans to help out that chapter and got into some hairy situations, breaking up fights and stuff,” Jones said. “But here in Jackson, everything is pretty quiet most of the time. It’s more about trying to help people to feel safe in their own neighborhoods.” It was quiet Thursday afternoon when the group allowed this reporter and Jackson Free Press photographer Trip Burns to tag along on a patrol. The neighborhood was off Northside Drive between Brook Drive and Manhattan Road. The people were friendly, and one police officer rolled down his window and made a point to thank the group for what they were doing before he passed by. “Glad to see you guys out here!” he shouted from his cruiser. “Keep up the good work!” The crew for this particular patrol is five—four men and one woman. Jones stands about 5-foot-10-inches and is stout.

He looks like he could bench press a Toyota. Anthony Hayes (a member since the early ‘80s as well) and Larry Carter (six years in the group) are both tall and muscle-bound. Danny Bolden, who joined about the same time as Carter, has an easy smile and a quick high-kick, which he demonstrates at the end of the watch. Arlena Perry, the lone woman in the group, has been in the organization 10 years. In May, a concerned citizen had invited the Angels to her neighborhood. This citizen said she hadn’t felt safe lately, and wanted the group to patrol her neighborhood. Jones said he’d like to see the group get involved with charities that benefit the elderly and the homeless. The key to getting into these programs, Jones said, could be working with Jackson’s Mayor Chokwe Lumumba. Jones met Lumumba at a COPS meeting in Ward 2, which Lumumba represented as a Jackson City Council member for the past four years. “I commend any group of citizens that is trying to reduce crime and doing it in the right way,” Lumumba said. “The anticipation is that they will be willing to do a good watch program, and make sure people aren’t able to run amok with crime. We’re going to need that.” Lumumba added that meeting with the group and getting them involved in some charity events “is definitely on the agenda.” In the future, Jones would like the group to expand from safety patrols to charity work and to see them take advantage of speaking opportunities at Jackson high schools and middle schools. “You just see so many kids taking the wrong path,” Jones said. “My son is in ‘Little Angels,’ a program through Guardian Angels that teaches kids to make the right decisions.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

the police and say ‘There is a suspicious person at Parham weapons permits, and can and should carry,” Ogden said. Bridges Park can you come check this out?’” “If you live in Jackson, you need to be carrying a gun right Ogden said he and other volunteers patrol the north- now to assist the police and to assist yourself and neighbors east neighborhoods and parks wearing Take Back Jackson until we control of the crime problem. I advocate people T-shirts and act as extra “eyes and ears” for regular police pa- with concealed weapons permits carrying... but I don’t make trols, which Ogden believes are too spread out. that a selling point of Take Back Jackson.” Unlike the Guardian Angels, Ogden said he encourages JPD assistant chief Lee Vance said the department benTake Back Jackson volunteers to carry firearms. efits from citizen patrols similar programs. It’s a controversial topic, especially since the “We don’t have a problem with it at all,” 2012 shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin Vance said. “We’ve always encouraged citiin Sanford, Fla. A coordinator for a neighborzens to be mindful of their neighborhoods hood watch program, George Zimmerman, and help be the eyes and ears of the police shot and killed Martin, and Zimmerman was department.” acquitted of second-degree murder. Regarding concealed weapons, JPD’s Ogden said nobody in his group is looking stance doesn’t change. “The issue is whether to shoot anyone, but added that he does not disyou are operating legally,” Vance said. “(If) TakebackJackson.com courage his volunteers from carrying weapons. you go outside the law, you have to pay the “A lot of these people have concealed- founder Ashley Ogden. consequences like anyone else.” COURTESY TAKING BACK JACKSON

B

ennie Jones was sitting alone at his Jackson home watching the news night after night in the summer of 1981 as the story of the Atlanta child murders unraveled. To jog readers’ memories: 28 African American children, adolescents and adults were killed in over an 18-month period between spring of 1981 and summer of 1982. Jones watched in disbelief as horrible details about the murders came to light, but then he saw something that moved him to action. “I was watching TV, and I see these guys in red berets patrolling the neighborhoods,” Jones said. “They had flown down from New York, and they were there to try to make a difference. It was inspiring.” What Jones saw was the Guardian Angels, a group of red beret-clad men who had traveled to the Peach State to make the rounds of the neighborhoods and, if not to prevent crime, at least to provide the people a sense of safety. The sight inspired him so much that he started a Jackson Guardian Angels chapter. “When we first got it going, there were a handful of us,” Jones said. “People didn’t know what to think, but eventually we got good responses from the public and the police.” Jones, who works two jobs—at the Courthouse Racquet and Fitness Center during the day and a nursing home at night—did not do any work for the group from 1993 through 2006, but got the ball rolling again in 2007. Now, the Angels are becoming more visible. As a group, Guardian Angels have a history of controversy since Curtis Sliwa founded it in 1979 in New York City. Sliwa staged a number of subway rescues to promote the group, leading the group to be tagged as fakes and vigilantes. He has since apologized, and now hosts two week-

TRIP BURNS

by Tyler Cleveland


TALK | rights

Lawsuit Highlights Child-Support ‘Disarray’ by R.L. Nave

lawmakers passed a bill that they believed would lower the caseload. Under the law, which was effective July 1, DHS can contract all or part of its child-support collections to private firms. That plan drew criticism from parent groups and state-worker advocates who believed that privatizing collections would make things worse, not better. Plaintiff Christopher E. Kelly Patton believes the culture of the child-support division needs to change. He said that he began

856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

We Think We Have the Best Local Lunch in North Jackson!

We Think We Have the Best Local Lunch in Madison!

Vote For Us… jfp.ms/bestlunch

TRIP BURNS

Join us for Happy Hour

Best Downtown Local Lunch Vote today! jfp.ms/bestlunch

Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013 Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

601-919-2829 Windell Blount is the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit against the Mississippi Department of Human Services that alleges sloppy management of the agency resulted in child-support orders that plaintiffs would not have otherwise had to pay.

paying child support in 1998 and had never missed or been late with a payment until fall 2012. Patton said he had been sending the checks directly to his ex-wife, but when she applied for state public assistance, state law requires child-support checks to be processed through the DHS system. Patton said his wife didn’t tell him she started receiving state benefits, so he continued to pay her directly. Kelly produced a copy of a $200 check he wrote to his ex-wife in November 2012, which is included as evidence in the lawsuit. In almost 15 years of paying child support on time, the one time a question arose about his promptness, he said child-support collectors met him with “grave disrespect.” “Everyone has an adversarial attitude— as if I’m a deadbeat dad,” he said. Scarier, he said, is the thought of what would happen if, after so many years of prompt payment, he lost his job and was unable to pay. In that sense, he sympathizes with people who simply cannot afford to pay child support. Although it is possible to renegotiate child support when someone falls on hard luck, doing so requires hiring an attorney. “If a person could pay, a person would pay,” he said. The lawsuit described in this story represents only one side of a legal dispute. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

IT PAYS TO BE BILINGUAL! On average bilingual employees make 5%-20% more.

Now registering for Fall semester, adults and children.

Classes start in August English and Spanish Free language demo and open house the first Friday of each month at 7 pm

NEW LOCATION! 6712 OLD CANTON RD SUITE 10 RIDGELAND | 601.500.7700 | LINGOFEST.COM

jacksonfreepress.com

C

hild custody cases are messy affairs. Take the case of Windell Blount, a May 2013 graduate of Tougaloo College, who has been embroiled in a he-said-she-said tug-of-war with his ex-wife over visitation of their 9-year-old son for about four years. Blount’s ex-wife reported Blount to state officials for alleged sexual abuse of the boy when he was about 5; Blount says his son told him that someone in Blount’s ex-wife’s home was abusing him. In the meantime, as a result of the allegations against Blount, the Mississippi Department of Human Services stripped him of joint custody and visitation privileges and ordered Blount to pay $588 a month in child support. “I’m amazed,” he said of the state’s handling of his case. Blount contends in a federal class-action lawsuit against DHS filed April 30 that he should not have to pay the support and accuses DHS employees of conspiracy to take away his parental and constitutional rights. Cathy Sykes, director of field operations for DHS, said she could not comment on the lawsuit. However, Sykes said the state has 360,000 child-support cases representing about $1.1 billion in child support. On average, each child-support enforcement officer handles about 1,500 cases at a given time. Sykes added that DHS’ job is to collect child support, not to sort out disputes over custody or how the parent who receives the payments uses the money. “Some absent parents want to look at it like every penny is going to the child. It is hard to convince people (that the custodial parent has) to use it to support the child,” by paying rent, mortgages and utilities, Sykes said. In early 2012, DHS’ child-support enforcement division sent Blount letters saying that he owed more than $1,400 in back support. The agency’s letter told him that if he failed to pay up within 15 days, DHS would report him to credit bureaus and would have his drivers’ license suspended. In December 2012, Blount reported what he called DHS’ intimidation and harassment to the Federal Bureau of Investigations. Also, in 2013, a man from Albuquerque reported that Mississippi, a state where he has never lived, attempted to collect back support for a child he never fathered. Sykes explained that the New Mexico man previously had his identity stolen by someone who lived in Mississippi. DHS eventually fixed the mistake, but somehow the New Mexico man ended up back in DHS collections system. “I hate to say it, but it was a computer issue,” Sykes, the field operations director, told the Jackson Free Press. During this year’s legislative session,

(a very high-class pig stand)

1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

9


TALK | business

Jackson Zoo Keeping Options Open by Tyler Cleveland

could possibly be used for an African savannah exhibit. The location also has its drawbacks. It’s distant from the city’s other tourism destinations, including LeFleur’s Bluff State

events, including International Tiger Day July 27 and Back To Zool Aug. 3, and Poff said she’s going to concentrate on those and let the board worry about the future. “We won’t conclude the study at the

TRIP BURNS

J

ackson Zoo Director Beth Poff said the organization and its board of directors are keeping all options open as the zoo continues to adapt and change to meet the needs of new exhibits and an expanding number of annual visitors. That includes the option to move to a new facility, which has been widely speculated since an April 12, 2013, Mississippi Business Journal editorial that called for, among other things, the zoo to relocate to the area near LeFleur’s Bluff State Park at the site now occupied by LeFleur’s Bluff Golf Course. Speaking at Friday Forum at Koinonia Coffee House July 19, Poff answered a question from an audience member about a possible move, saying, “Everything is on the table.� “What we’re doing with a consultant study is looking at the criteria of what a move involves,� Poff said. “But it wouldn’t really be moving the zoo, because what we’d be doing is building a new zoo from scratch at a new location.� Poff explained that many factors will go into the decision-making process, including the cost of a new facility, which she estimates would be anywhere from $20 million to $30 million an acre (the current zoo occupies 35 acres), and the question of what would happen to the facility the zoo is in now. To that end, the zoo board—which is made up of 10 members plus a secretary, a vice president and President Eric Stracener—is in the throes of a consultant study, which could conclude in early fall, to determine which path the zoo should take to continue to grow. There is room for growth at the current location in west Jackson, at 2918 W. Capitol St., including an additional 20 acres the zoo could access through its lease with the city. That space

The Jackson Zoo is keeping its options open as it continues to adapt to meet the challenges of a modern facility on a controlled budget.

Park, the Children’s Museum, the Mississippi Museum of Art, the Agriculture Museum, the Old Capitol Museum, the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and the planned Civil Rights Museum, in addition to the Convention Center. If the city moves forward with plans to connect all of these other destinations via a walking and biking trail, the zoo would be left out. “If I take a step back and look at it from a purely tourism-impact point of view, it makes sense,� Poff said. “You would have a tourism Mecca right there off of the interstate, where we would be very visible. Suddenly, we’d have joint-ticketing package possibilities with other destinations and a chance to do some things that other zoos around the country are doing, like developing a quality restaurant facility and possibly even tree-top overnight stays.� The zoo has a couple of upcoming

end of the summer and say, ‘OK, this is what we’re going to do,’â€? Poff said. “I think we’ll end up with an idea of what strategy we want to explore further. ‌ Rumors are out there, but the fact is, we’re going through a study. As far as I’m concerned, I’m running this zoo at this location.â€? Jobless Rate Dips Mississippi’s June unemployment rate of 9 percent remains considerably higher than the national average of 7.6 percent, but trends show it’s moving in the right direction. At 9 percent, the rate is down from May’s 9.1 percent, and June marks the fourth month in a row the rate has shown improvement. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 117,513 people who were actively seeking employment in June, but that’s 2,220 less than it had this time a month ago

and 5,444 less than it had at this time last year. A breakdown of the June numbers by county was not available at press time, but unemployment data from May show most of the state’s unemployment centered in west and northwest Mississippi. Then, the highest rates were in Clay County (18.5 percent), Jefferson County (18.3 percent) and Holmes County (16.6 percent), and the lowest were Rankin County (5.5 percent), Lamar County (6.5 percent) and Madison County (6.7 percent). The Magnolia State has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, ahead of only Illinois (9.2 percent) and Nevada (9.6 percent). South Dakota has the nation’s lowest unemployment rate at 3.5 percent. BP Gets Day In Court On Friday, July 26, lawyers representing oil-giant BP will argue on the company’s behalf to temporarily block settlement payments to Gulf Coast businesses and residents affected by the company’s 2010 oil spill. BP has requested a moratorium on payments while former FBI Director Louis Freeh investigates alleged misconduct by a lawyer who helped administer the multibillion-dollar settlements, the Associated Press reports. U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier appointed Freeh to investigate the allegations, and scheduled the hearing for Friday. The investigation centers on a former staff attorney for court-appointed claims administrator Patrick Juneau. In June, Juneau admitted that his office was investigating allegations that Lionel H. Sutton III might have benefitted from settlement proceeds for claims he referred to a law firm before he started working on the settlement program. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

       

July 24 - 30, 2013

 

 10



                    

    

CUPSESPRESSOCAFE.COM


Best Local Lunch Places 9RWHIRUWKHEHVWOXQFKUHVWDXUDQWLQHDFKFLW\RUQHLJKERUKRRG5HPHPEHUWR7KLQN/RFDO

Overall Downtown South Jackson West Jackson North Jackson Belhaven/Fondren/Midtown Flowood Brandon Pearl Byran Clinton Ridgeland Madison Canton Vicksburg <RXPXVWYRWHLQDWOHDVWFDWHJRULHVUHVWDXUDQWVQRWLQWKHFRUUHFWQHLJKERUKRRGZLOOQRWEHFRXQWHG

Mail this Ballot Or vote online at: jfp.ms/bestlunch/ <RXPXVWLQFOXGH\RXUQDPHDQG DYDOLGSKRQHQXPEHUZLWKDUHD FRGHIRU\RXUEDOORWWRFRXQW &DXWLRQ:HFDOOPDQ\YRWHUVWR FKHFNEDOORWDXWKHQWLFLW\1RIDNH SKRQHQXPEHUV

1DPH 3KRQH (0DLO

5HWXUQEDOORWWRWKHDGGUHVV EHORZE\-XO\ -DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVV 32%R[ -DFNVRQ06

´%HVWRI-DFNVRQ¾LVDUHJLVWHUHGVHUYLFHPDUNLQWKHVWDWHRI0LVVLVVLSSL

Voting ends July 31st at midnight; winners announced in Jackpedia on Aug 14.

Jackson Convention Complex Wednesday July 3,10am, 2pm, 6pm

JOB FAIR pitality!

Security

Are you between the ages of 18-65 years and experiencing withdrawal symptoms? If so, you may be eligible to participate in a research study of an investigational medication for the treatment of opioid dependency. All research-related care and study medication will be provided at NO COST to those who qualify.

Utility Services Maintenance

For More information, call:

Cooks

105 E. Pascagoula Street Jackson, MS 39201 1.855.960.MEET(6338) or 601.960.2321 www.jacksonconventioncomplex.com

3531 Lakeland Drive Brentwood Plaza â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Suite 1060 Flowood, MS 39232 (601) 420-5810

jacksonfreepress.com

H

d e k oo

s o H n o

Food Services

Do You Suffer From Opioid Dependence?

11


0LNH'D\ZLOOUHWXUQVRRQ

The Swimsuit Body

S

ummer brings one of my least-favorite times of the year: skimpy clothes and swimsuit season. As a curvy woman, finding a suit that I like and that fits properly is a challenge. I am not sure why it is so hard to make an attractive, affordable swimsuit for a plus-size woman under 50, but apparently it requires a team of NASA scientists. I used to hate this time of year because I was self conscious and uncomfortable in summer clothing. I felt like too much of my big, socially unacceptable body was showing. Those days passed long ago, thankfully. These days, my strong dislike for this time of year has to do with other people. I rarely have anyone say to me that my summer dress is inappropriate for a larger woman. The uncomfortable things are much more oblique, such as all the â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;fat girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wore itâ&#x20AC;? memes, and social-media comments about seeing some â&#x20AC;&#x153;fat cowâ&#x20AC;? dressed in shorts and a tank top with her rolls showing. My personal favorite is, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who would want to see that ?â&#x20AC;? For some reason, people think that commenting negatively on othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bodies is appropriate behavior. I guess plus-size women should hide in shame all summer long, right? I challenge myself to question the judgments I make about people, including what makes people attractive, and why I think someone should or shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear something. When I push back against fat shaming and size judgments on social media and in other spaces, I get arguments. Most of them are caught up in writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perceived need for women to dress to be attractive (to them)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;or at least not offensive. They say fat people need to be healthy. Certain things are attractive and OK for some women to show but gross when others show them. It is a challenge to insist that women and men of diverse body types are also people who have the right to exist without ridicule. Our popular media and culture tell us what the standard of beauty is. Many feel compelled to not only comply but also to punish those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. For me, I have been working at something different for several years: radical self-love. It is a wonderful space to occupy, and I encourage everyone to try it. Everyone can have a swimsuit body. Just buy a swimsuit and wear it!

â&#x20AC;&#x153;benefitâ&#x20AC;? Âł(DFKGD\WKDW+RXVH%LOOUHPDLQVHQMRLQHGLUUHSDUDEO\KDUPVWKHVWDWHRI 0LVVLVVLSSLE\GHQ\LQJWKHFLWL]HQVWKHEHQHÂżWRISROLFLHVGHHPHGWREHLQWKH EHVWLQWHUHVWRIWKHVWDWHE\WKH/HJLVODWXUH´

July 24 - 30, 2013

°-ISSISSIPPI!TTORNEY'ENERAL*IM(OODINHISAPPEALOF(INDS$ISTRICT#OURT *UDGE7INSTON+IDD´SDECISIONTOBLOCKTHESTATEFROMIMPLEMENTING(" WHICH SEEKSTOCLARIFYWHATCONSTITUTESACONCEALEDWEAPON

12

Why it stinks: Few issues bring out the hyperbolic â&#x20AC;&#x153;bestâ&#x20AC;? in politicians than guns, regardless of party affiliation. Last week, state Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, opined that Judge Kidd was threatening Mississippianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitutional rights. Now, Hood is saying he is doing irreparable harm. Meanwhile, Kidd simply said that the law is vague. The rational solution may be to revisit the language rather than argue in courtrooms. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be clear. First, no one is taking away anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to own or carry a gun. Second, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get real: If citizens need to strap guns to their hips, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got bigger problems than a little unclear language. Since the Newtown, Conn., massacre that ended the lives of 20 first-graders Dec. 14, 2012, Centers for Disease Control statistics show that nearly 19,000 Americans have died from gunshots. The last laugh goes to the National Rifle Association.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wrong With the GOP?

T

here is something wrong with the Republican Party. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s platform, although it could use some tweaking. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not even Republican policies, though they cause many women and minorities to flee. No, this problem has to do with the GOPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spiritâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a spirit that has gone from proud and unforgiving to downright mean. Earlier this month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a farm bill, as it does most years. This year the House left out entirely one of two major components of every farm bill since the 1970s: food stamps. The house expanded the other component, billions in subsidies that largely end up in the pockets of big agri-business corporations. Over the years, food stamps, aka the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, have become an integral part of our social safety net. Nearly 46.6 million low-income Americans receive them monthly, up from the roughly 32 million who received them when President Barack Obama took office. The cause for that increase is easy to see. America is still recovering from the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, though at better-than-expected rates. Low- and middle-income wages are stagnant or falling; long-term unemployment remains a big issue. But Republicans in the U.S. House are pushing austerity in a fragile recovery, pulling the rug out from under the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poorest people. They passed the stripped farm bill 216-208, without a

single Democratic vote and with 12 Republicans voting no. Make no mistake: Eliminating SNAP would effectively kick the working poor while they are down. Conservatives make a familiar argument: that the federal government is funding the lazy and feeding people who wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. Never mind that the average amount of assistance per person in Mississippi is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;lavishâ&#x20AC;? $123 a month or $4.04 a day for the nearly 660,000 Mississippians who receive it. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t confuse this issue with race, either. While the popular narrative may be that food stamps are the government redistributing your tax dollars to people of color, that story is so full of holes, it makes Swiss cheese blush. The truth is, as The New York Times pointed out last week, nearly half of all Americans who receive SNAP assistance are white. In many places, even in the South, the majority of people on food stamps are white. In Tennessee, for example, 63 percent of program enrollees are white. Republicans arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dumb, but they do play to a base that they believe is ignorant, and they seem to want to keep them that way. All three of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Republican representatives supported this bill. So letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get it straight: In Mississippi, a state at or near the top of the list of poorest and most unhealthy Americans, the Republican leadership is actively trying to prevent the federal government from helping people gain access to food and health care. Shame on them.

#/22%#4)/.7KH&KLFNV:H/RYHIHDWXUHRQ6KHUUL)ORZHUV%LOOXSV 9RO,VVXH PLVWDNHQO\VWDWHGVKHEHFDPHWKHÂżUVW IHPDOH+LQGV&RXQW\SURVHFXWRULQ,WZDVLQ7KH-DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVVDSRORJL]HVIRUWKHHUURU

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


ROMMEL W. BENJAMIN

Race Still Matters EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Nneka Ayozie, Mark Braboy Bethany Bridges, Rebecca Docter, De’Arbreya Lee, Kimberly Murriel, Khari Johnson, Emmanuel Sullivan, Dominique Triplett, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Interns DeNetta Fagan Durr, Zilpha Young Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations Photo Interns Melanie Boyd, Jessica King ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

W

hen one examines racial and ethnic relationships in America, the idea that race is not a salient factor is, at best, indefensible. Mississippi is no exception: We gave the world an in-your-face view of how many Mississippians feel about race following the election and re-election of our first black president, Barack H. Obama. It only takes a few extremists to elicit displays of suppressed racism. The residues of pre-civil-rights thinking are still potent. They are less visible than in the ’50s and ’60s, but they aren’t any less virulent. In Mississippi, some politicians—who freight their racial views with moral and religious values—constantly align blacks and whites against each other. The recent mayoral race in Jackson is an example: Harvey Johnson Jr.’s detractors portrayed him as too slow and too deliberate. Those who desire quick fixes to 200-year-old problems want knee-jerk activity when they experience inconveniences or have vested interest in change. With school integration and blacks moving into white neighborhoods came the exodus of white residents and businesses, resulting in an erosion of the city’s tax base. “When blacks come, whites go,” is an occurrence repeated in cities throughout the country. Blacks, however, continue to patronize businesses even when they move to the hinterlands. (If blacks refuse to follow, the burden of support would fall to smaller suburban populations without the numbers needed to sustain them.) In Jackson, this trend placed an increasing burden on a shrinking black middle class, while those who comprised the relatively larger low-income population have had difficulty simply meeting minimal survival needs. An appreciable number of black residents also left Jackson. Integration gave some black Mississippians access to vertical social mobility, increasing the black middle class. Those who sacrificed personal safety, economic security, and their mental and physical health made those opportunities possible. Many lost their lives trying to break down some of the barriers to black participation in social processes. But in the lull that followed the Civil Rights Era, many young blacks became directed toward self-aggrandizing efforts, conspicuous consumption and competition for economic opportunities. It has also given those who hold on white-supremacist ideology time to re-promote their cause. Blacks and whites who continue the struggle for

human rights are targets for black opportunists and white conservatives alike. Conservatism frequently serves as a cloak for racism and ingratiating behavior. Some would regress rather than progress, and Mississippi needs to be vigilant to that threat. The state has a noteworthy number of black elected officials, but I question their effectiveness on the state’s persistent and pervasive socioeconomic and racial problems. Jackson contains a relatively large black middle-income segment, but it has a larger lower-income population. The mayor is black with a predominately black city council; nevertheless, its power is limited in maintaining and revitalizing the city’s infrastructure. These tasks rely heavily on businesses and on the citizens’ tax dollars. Absentee home ownership, deserted businesses, a low-income population, and distance between racial and ethnic groups are all contributing factors to the city’s deteriorating infrastructure. Negative racial attitudes encourage barriers that prevent and circumvent remedies. Custom weakens efforts to modernize the state. Black Americans tend to poll much lower than whites in areas that enhance quality of life and opportunities. This is a consequence of many variables. In Mississippi, the negative social evaluation of black people has resulted in “separate but equal” in practice—in educational institutions, social conveniences, health care, judicial processes, economic processes, etc. The state cannot actualize a system with equity and parity for the people where two subsystems exist. A few blacks and some whites have made small fortunes pandering to ideologues striving to maintain traditional distance between the races. But change is in progress and it continues despite efforts to thwart it. Many Mississippians are willing to cooperate to enhance life chances and quality of life for all in our state. It is the responsibility of all races and ethnicities to join together on a path toward justice, tolerance and the acceptance of the national ethos for all. Blacks and whites who argue that race is no longer a potent variable in human relationships must first acknowledge its lingering presence. It is only after we recognize a problem that the remedy and solution become possible. Yes—race still matters. Rommel W. Benjamin is a retired sociology professor living in west Jackson. He taught at numerous universities throughout his career, including Southern Illinois, Mississippi Valley and Jackson State universities.

In Mississippi, the negative social evaluation of black people has resulted in “separate but equal” in practice.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 7/26 – Thur. 8/1

3-D The Wolverine PG13

Pacific Rim (non 3-D) PG13

The Wolverine (non 3-D) PG13

The Lone Ranger PG13

Fruitvale Station R

Despicable ME 2 (non 3-D) PG

The To Do List R

Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain R

Red 2

PG13

The Conjuring R

White House Down PG13

3-D R.I.P.D. PG13

The Heat

R.I.P.D. (non 3-D) PG13

World War Z (non 3-D) PG13

3-D Turbo PG Turbo (non 3-D) PG Grown Ups 2 PG13

Monsters University (non 3-D)

R

G

Opening Wednesday 7/31 Smurfs 2

PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

Movieline: 355-9311 13


We Achieve More Together by ShaWanda Jacome

FLICKR/MDGOVPICS

is less likely to take the teacher seriously if the parent openly shows lack of respect for the teacher, thus hindering the student from learning.

Price, high-school physics teacher • Understand that the teacher's goals and your goals are the same for your child. You just may disagree with the method. • Email the teacher when you have concerns. Don't jump straight to administrators to solve problems. • Don't undermine the teacher in front of other students. Parent/teacher issues should be worked out in private without the student's involvement. Students should always see a good relationship between a teacher and his or her parents.

Meg, K-6 Interventionist Parents, kids and teachers must all work together to ensure a student gets the most out of school.

July 24 - 30, 2013

A

14

s an educator and a parent, I understand how important it is to have a good parent/teacher relationship from the beginning of the school year. All of my son’s teachers know that I am only a phone call, text or email away if they need anything—good or bad. I am there to help in the classroom, bring things for parties and attend field trips. I am also there if they are experiencing any issues with my son, whether behaviorally or academically. As a parent, I know that, first and foremost, it is my responsibility to make sure my child is getting the education he needs. I polled a group of my educator friends from different schools and districts in Mississippi and even out-of-state about parent/teacher relationships. I asked them: What can parents or guardians do to establish a good relationship with their child’s teacher and school? These are the things they came up with.

Savanah, 6th grade teacher • Parents should attend as many back-to-school events as possible to create a positive rapport with all staff and create relationships with fellow parents. • Parents should listen to the teacher's expectations and

talk to their child about why the teacher expects these things to happen at school. Let your child know you share these expectations with the teacher. • The parent should make themselves available for conversation. Also, it never hurts to initiate the conversation; as a parent you may only have one or two kids to focus on; your child's teacher has 20 to 30.

Marissa, 7th and 8th grade math and resource teacher • Maintain communication with the teacher. Tell the teacher any expectations and concerns you have for your child and listen to the teacher's expectations as well. Ask questions. • Get involved. There are several ways parents can be a part of the learning process: field trips, PTA, fundraisers, open houses, award/talent shows, etc. • Send your kids to school ready to learn. Arrange either breakfast at home or school, get them to bed at a proper time and make sure that they have needed supplies. If it’s not possible to do these things, tell us. We would rather know ahead of time so we can be prepared. • Be on the teacher's side if an issue arises. A student

• Maintain constant communication. Be involved. Ask how you can help in the classroom and how you can assist your child reach his or her goals. Follow through.

Lynne, high-school English and journalism teacher • Use email and texts and initiate communication when you need information from the teacher. Don't demand time-consuming phone calls when there are more convenient tools available. • Utilize the teacher's communication tools, like a web page or online gradebook, to stay on top of your child's progress and assignments. • Communicate any illnesses or special needs to the teacher. Don't let the teacher learn your child has asthma, diabetes or another health problem by surprise.

Katina, 3rd grade teacher • First impressions are important.

Michael, elementary librarian and former 2nd grade teacher • Realize we always have your child’s best interest at heart. • Support the teacher and always get both sides of a story before blaming the teacher.


BACK TO GREEN

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Do Lunch

by Kelly Bryan Smith

1

Rethink the Carpool Line Long lines of idling cars every morning is not the most eco-friendly system on the planet, but it is a necessity for many schools and families. Buy Durable and Reusable You can do a few things, though. Some Rather than going with the research suggests that it is actually more latest trends for backpacks and fuel efficient to turn your car off and then lunchboxes, think outside the replaceon again if you are going to be idling for every-year mode. Buy something more more than 10 seconds. However, that Partner with your kids and durable, such as a strong, neutral-colored schools to create a sounds potentially very obnoxious in a their backpack that you could personalize each whole team of lean, green, pick-up line situation, so perhaps it is bet- planetary superheroes! year with new sew-on patches or other ter to open the windows and turn off the decorative elements. Or consider a sturdy, car simply if you arrive early before the hard-sided lunchbox that can be redecocarpool process begins, shaving off a few minutes of car- rated with cool new stickers every few months providing bon-dioxide emissions. Other possibilities include riding longevity of at least a few years. Invest in a selection of the school bus more frequently or sharing the carpool load small, washable containers to use to pack healthy choices with another family, taking one car out of the idling-car line. with less waste.

3

"ACK TO 3CHOOL"OOK,IST E\.HOO\%U\DQ6PLWK

/,$%2+)$3 Â&#x2021;´0RFNLQJELUGÂľE\.DWKU\Q (UVNLQH 3XIÂżQ

Â&#x2021;´+DUU\3RWWHUDQGWKH 6RUFHUHU¡V6WRQH´E\-.

E\$PEHU+HOVHO COURTESY SCHOLASTIC

5RZOLQJ 6FKRODVWLF  

Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;´7RP %URZQ¡V 6FKRRO 'D\V´E\ 7KRPDV+XJKHV &UHDWH6SDFH IUHHRQ.LQGOH  '2/7. 503 Â&#x2021;´%H\RQGWKH%DNH6DOH7KH (VVHQWLDO*XLGHWR)DPLO\ 6FKRRO3DUW QHUVKLSVÂľ E\$QQH +HQGHUVRQ 1HZ3UHVV  

COURTESY NEW PRESS

COURTESY HARPERCOLLINS

9/5.'%2+)$3 Â&#x2021;´'DYLG*RHVWR6FKRROÂľ E\'DYLG6KDQQRQ %OXH6N\ 3UHVV  Â&#x2021;´,I<RX7DNHD0RXVHWR 6FKRROÂľE\/DXUD1XPHURII DQG)HOLFLD%RQG +DUSHU&RO OLQV  Â&#x2021;´3HWHWKH &DW5RFNLQJ LQP\6FKRRO 6KRHVÂľE\ (ULF/LWZLQ DQG-DPHV 'HDQ +DUS HU&ROOLQV 

3TART3TRONG

T

KHVWDUWRIDQHZVFKRRO\HDULVMXVWDURXQGWKHFRUQHU DQG-DFNVRQZDQWVLWVVWXGHQWVWREHUHDG\  0D\RU&KRNZH/XPXPEDDQQRXQFHG-XO\WKDW WKHFLW\DORQJZLWK-DPVDQG.L[LHZLOOKRVWWKH %DFNWR6FKRRO&HOHEUDWLRQ 6XSSO\*LYHDZD\DW0HWURFHQ WHU0DOO$XJXVW  ³7KHFLW\DQGHYHQWSDUWQHUVDUHORRNLQJIRUZDUGWR H[SUHVVLQJRXUVXSSRUWWRWKH\RXQJSHRSOHRI-DFNVRQDQG HQFRXUDJLQJWKHPWRUHDFKIRUHYHU\DFDGHPLFJRDOWKLV VFKRRO\HDU´0D\RU/XPXPEDVWDWHGLQDSUHVVUHOHDVH  7KHHYHQWZLOOKDYHJLYHDZD\VDQGDFWLYLWLHVIRU HYHU\RQHDVZHOODVWKHVFKRROVXSSOLHVIRU-DFNVRQ VWXGHQWV7KHVXSSOLHVZLOOEHJLYHQRQD¿UVWFRPH ¿UVWVHUYHEDVLV3DUHQWVDQGFKLOGUHQZLOODOVREHDEOH WROHDUQDERXWHGXFDWLRQDOVHUYLFHVDQGYROXQWHHUDQG DWKOHWLFSURJUDPVIRUVWXGHQWV  7KH%DFNWR6FKRRO&HOHEUDWLRQ 6XSSO\*LYH DZD\LVIURPWRSP$XJDW0HWURFHQWHU0DOO  +LJKZD\: &DOOIRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ

B

ack-to-school time means back to packing lunches. It can be all too easy to get into a rut, packing a virtually identical lunch every day just before the family flies out the front door in all directions. But with a little advance planning the night before, or even over the weekend, you can mix and match a variety of tastes and textures, vitamins and minerals to create lunches that are healthy and kid-approved.

Food preparation and presentation can be half the battle for pickier lunchtime eaters.

Supplies you will need â&#x20AC;˘ Durable lunch box â&#x20AC;˘ Thermos or water bottle â&#x20AC;˘ A variety of reusable containers and cutlery â&#x20AC;˘ Cloth napkins â&#x20AC;˘ Frozen ice packs Healthy drink options â&#x20AC;˘ Unsweetened herbal iced tea in a kid-friendly flavor (our favorite is peppermint) â&#x20AC;˘ Dark-chocolate almond milk â&#x20AC;˘ Water â&#x20AC;˘ Homemade juice blend, such as apple-carrot â&#x20AC;˘ Coconut water Non-sandwich mains â&#x20AC;˘ Almond butter with apple, carrot and celery dippers â&#x20AC;˘ Black bean dip with whole-grain tortilla chips â&#x20AC;˘ Peeled hard boiled eggs â&#x20AC;˘ Tortellini-veggie salad â&#x20AC;˘ Hummus with sugar snap pea and pita dippers â&#x20AC;˘ Vegetable-loaded mini pizzas Favorite kid sides â&#x20AC;˘ Trail mix (experiment with different combinations, such as pistachios, gogi berries, whole-grain sesame sticks, apricots and a few dark-chocolate chips) â&#x20AC;˘ Squeezable greek-yogurt tubes â&#x20AC;˘ Healthier bar choices, such as Kind bars or Lara bars â&#x20AC;˘ Cut fruit and cheese cube shish-kabobs â&#x20AC;˘ Shelled edamame â&#x20AC;˘ Healthy homemade muffins that pack some nutritional punch, such as blueberry-zucchini muffins

jacksonfreepress.com

KELLY BRYAN SMITH

2

Go Scavenging As delicious as freshly sharpened, brand new pencils can be, the truth is that kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a new everything in order to learn. Look under couch cushions, in desk drawers and in the bottom of your purse. Sharpen pencils, use cap erasers and even sharpen crayons. Test markers to see whether they need to be disposed of or replaced before raiding the Crayola aisle. Pull out a hand-soap refill bottle with a scent you are tired of to add to the back-to-school supplies box.

KELLY BRYAN SMITH

T

here is something exhilarating about the process of filling a shopping cart full of fragrant new crayons and crisp new paper and the coolest backpack characters of the season. Such back-toschool sprees and other school-year habits can be hard on the wallet, thoughâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the planet. Here are a few ideas to get your school year off to a greener start.

by Kelly Bryan Smith

15


WANT TO MAKE A

Whoever said class isn’t fun hasn’t…

DIFFERENCE? UNITED WAY IS CREATING LASTING CHANGE BY FOCUSING ON

Guitar • Drums • Piano • Bass Voice • Banjo • Mandolin

EDUCATION, INCOME & HEALTH.

YOU CAN HELP.

Start Rocking Today 601.362.0313 607 Fondren Place | Jackson, MS www.fondrenguitars.com Buy

JOIN HANDS.

OPEN YOUR HEART. LEND YOUR MUSCLE.

FIND YOUR VOICE.

United Way of the Capital Area

WWW.MYUNITEDWAY.COM

GIVE 10% GIVE 100%

REACH OUT A HAND

GIVE AN HOUR.

INFLUENCE

GIVE 110%. TO ONE AND THINK OF WE BEFORE ME.

THE CONDITION OF ALL.

LIVE UNITED

Sell

Travis Sledge LMT 1876 ure/ Acupressge Massa /t Alignmen

Trade

Consign

Lessons

s e m i t e “YSoou m B N e e d To e Kn e a d e d ”

Repairs

Jo Guillo LMT 437 t Swedish Massage/ Refelexolo gy

601.842.8221 | 3670 Lakeland Lane Suite #23 JacksonPostureCenter@gmail.com | www.JacksonPostureCenter.com By Appointment Only

MEET THE ALL NEW 2013 HONDA

July 24 - 30 2013

NEW FEATURES: * Lane Departure Warning * Front Collision Warning * Honda Lane Watch˙ * HondaLink˙ * Smart Entry

16

Tambra Cherie Patty Peck Honda Driver Radio Personality

Visit Patty Peck Honda for a test-drive today

555 Sunnybrook Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 601.957.3400 www.pattypeckhonda.com Find Us On Facebook


FROM PAGE 15

ISSUE SPOTLIGHT:

Undocumented, Unafraid and Back to School

COURTESY NEW LINE CINEMA.

BACK TO SCHOOL

by Ingrid Cruz

FLICKR/SCHWGLR

For undocumented high school students, the prospect of getting into college after graduation can be daunting.

sponse to the Board of Regentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ban affecting Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s undocumented youth. For those who may not know, the state of Georgia bans students who are not citizens from the top five most competitive state schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;these are the same schools that banned African Americans during the Jim Crow era. Freedom University, based in Athens, Ga., offers college-level courses to undocumented high-school graduates free of cost, as well as providing rides, giving students books, and assisting students with the college application process. In January, Gutierrez learned about an opportunity at Tougaloo College from Freedom U. Tougaloo student Alex Ortiz encouraged other undocumented students to apply to his HBCU, and Gutierrez was able to enroll. She is now planning to move to Mississippi, because Georgia also denies in-state tuition and access to financial aid to students without citizenship, even if such students have been approved to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program set up by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services department in June 2012. Gutierrez has lived in the United States since age 2, and grew up in Decatur, Ga. She became involved with Freedom University last year when she heard of it through her mother, who found it in a Spanish-language Atlanta newspaper, Mundo HispĂĄnico. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you see an opportunity, you take it and see how it works,â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez says of her decision to come to Mississippi. At 19 years old, she is beginning her freshman year at the school.

Just because Mississippi students do not face a ban like the one in Georgia (or Alabama and South Carolina, where probably fare worse), does not mean that undocumented students have easy access to educational resources. Many students who are undocumented feel despair. In November 2011, Joaquin Luna, a student in Texas, committed suicide. DACA, a plan to help DREAM-Act-eligible youth like Luna was announced approximately seven months after his death. The DREAM Act (Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors) is a law that has been proposed but never passed. No statistics indicate that a Mississippi undocumented student has ever committed suicide, and I hope such a thing never happens here. Students in Mississippi, so far, can attend any school, though tuition rules are sketchy, and I know at least three DACA recipients who are attending community colleges at in-state rates with no financial aid. I have met only one young lady who is paying the outof-state tuition rate, and she declined to comment on the reason why. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many students at Freedom U. were angry and went through a phase where they gave up,â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I told teachers that I was undocumented, they would ask me why I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have my citizenship.â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez adds that teachers need to understand why immigration reform is needed instead of bombarding students with questions that make them feel bad or ashamed about their status. Gutierrez now has to worry about not only surviving in a new state and a new school, but also about the pending immigration-reform talks, which will have an impact on all undocumented people in the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I (will have to) pay attention to the news more because before, my parents used to give me that information,â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez says of navigating college while the policies are still being written around her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go broke, because ever since I got DACA, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been saving for Tougaloo and possibly the immigration reform. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably be more open (about my status) than I was before. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll maybe get a little help from other people ... across the state.â&#x20AC;? Back to school is a stressful time for undocumented students, given the record-setting deportation policies of the Obama administration, anti-immigrant attitudes in the Deep South, and lack of information from both high schools and universities alike. If you are undocumented, know that you are not alone and that no university can deny you entry based on your status. Visit facebook.com/MississippiYIR for advice and assistance. Ingrid Cruz is a community organizer and advocate for human rights. Over the past year she has concentrated on organizing the immigrant community in north Mississippi. You can read her thoughts at http://comomaquinita.tumblr.com or reach her on Twitter and Instagram @ingridiswriting. Email her at ingridcruzj@gmail.com to be connected to other undocumented students who have successfully applied to schools throughout the state.

Read the Book First by ShaWanda Jacome

M

y husband and I have struck a deal with our 11year-old son, Mateo, regarding the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potterâ&#x20AC;? series: To see the movie, he has to read the book. So far he has read the first five books and has two to go. We did this because we felt strongly that he needed to experience the beauty of the books first before getting swept up in the movies. Due to the success of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potterâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilight,â&#x20AC;? turning books geared toward young adults into movies has become a big trend. During the 2013-2014 school year, a slew of movies spanning various genres com out. Use this as an opportunity to get your pre-teens and teens excited about reading again. Âą4IGER%YES²E\-XG\%OXPH 'HOD FRUWH%RRNVIRU<RXQJ5HDGHUV UHSULQWHGLWLRQ

0RYLH3UHPLHUH-XQH 6WDUULQJ:LOOD+ROODQG$P\-R -RKQVRQDQG7DWDQND0HDQV ±2)0$² %RRNJUDSKLFQRYHO  E\3HWHU/HQNRY 'DUN+RUVH VHFRQGHGLWLRQ

0RYLH5HOHDVH'DYH-XO\ 6WDUULQJ5\DQ5H\QROGVDQG-HII %ULGJHV ¹#ITYOF"ONES² 7KH0RUWDO ,QVWUXPHQWV%RRN E\&DVVDQGUD &ODUH 0DUJDUHW.0F(OGHUU\ %RRNVUHSULQWHGLWLRQ 

0RYLH3UHPLHUH$XJ 6WDUULQJ/LO\&ROOLQV-DPLH &DPSEHOO%RZHUDQG-RQDWKDQ 5K\V0H\HUV

0RYLH3UHPLHUH2FW 6WDUULQJ+DLOHH6WHLQIHOG3DXO *LDPDWWLDQG'DPLHQ/HZLV ¹#ATCHING&IRE² +XQJHU*DPHV %RRN E\6X]DQQH&ROOLQV 6FKRODVWLF3UHVVUHSULQWHGLWLRQ 

0RYLH3UHPLHUH1RY 6WDUULQJ-HQQLIHU/DZUHQFH-RVK +XWFKHUVRQ/LDP+HPVZRUWK :RRG\+DUUHOVRQ(OL]DEHWK%DQNV 6WDQOH\7XFFLDQG3KLOLS6H\PRXU +RIIPDQ ±%NDER´S'AME² (QGHU%RRN  E\2UVRQ6FRWW&DUG 7RU6FLHQFH )LFWLRQ

0RYLH3UHPLHUH1RY 6WDUULQJ+DUULVRQ)RUG$ELJDLO %UHVOLQDQG+DLOHH6WHLQIHOG

±4HE3EAOF-ONSTERS² 3HUF\ -DFNVRQDQGWKH2O\PSLDQV%RRN  E\5LFN5LRUGDQ 'LVQH\+\SHU LRQUHSULQWHGLWLRQ

0RYLH3UHPLHUH$XJ 6WDUULQJ/RJDQ/HUPDQ$OH[DQGUD 'DGGDULRDQG-DNH$EHO

Âą4HE(OBBIT²E\-557RONLHQ +RXJKWRQ0LIĂ&#x20AC;LQ+DUFRXUWUHSULQW HGLWLRQ

0RYLH3UHPLHUH'HFDQG 'HF 6WDUULQJ+XJR:HDYLQJ(OLMDK :RRG&DWH%ODQFKHWW%HQHGLFW &XPEHUEDWFK(YDQJHOLQH/LOO\ /XNH(YDQVDQG2UODQGR%ORRP

¹4HE3PECTACULAR.OW²E\7LP 7KDUS (PEHUUHSULQWHGLWLRQ 

0RYLH3UHPLHUH$XJ 6WDUULQJ6KDLOHQH:RRGOH\0LOHV 7HOOHUDQG-HQQLIHU-DVRQ/HLJK

¹4HE-AZE2UNNER²E\-DPHV 'DVKQHU 'HODFRUWH3UHVVUHSULQW HGLWLRQ

0RYLH3UHPLHUH)HE 6WDUULQJ'\ODQ2Âś%ULHQDQG 7KRPDV%URGLH6DQJVWHU

¹2OMEOAND*ULIET² 6KDNHVSHDUH 0DGH(DV\0RGHUQ(QJOLVK /DQJXDJH6LGHE\6LGHZLWK )XOO2ULJLQDO7H[W E\:LOOLDP 6KDNHVSHDUH %DUURQœV(GXFDWLRQDO 6HULHV

¹$IVERGENT²E\9HURQLFD5RWK .DWKHULQH7HJHQ%RRNV 

0RYLH3UHPLHUH0DUFK 6WDUULQJ6KDLOHQH:RRGOH\.DWH :LQVOHWDQG$VKOH\-XGG

jacksonfreepress.com

F

or many of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high school juniors and seniors, back to school means taking AP courses, doing research on what college or university to attend, and maybe even planning for a trip abroad. But not everyone in the state can leave the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;nor can everyone in the South count on attending his or her state college campus. I first heard of Jessica Gutierrez through Freedom University Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a two-year civil disobedience re-

Although â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hobbitâ&#x20AC;? is taking over the movies for the next couple holiday seasons, it will always be first and foremost a great family-friendly book.

17


Real Food Tastes Good 14â&#x20AC;? Oblong Light & Crispy

Crust

904B E. Fortification Str. Located Inside Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 904 in Belhaven 601.352.2002 glennfoods.com Monday - Saturday 11 am - 9pm

Your

Fashion

Inspiration Location

Wď?Ľď?¤ď?Žď?Ľď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2021;

Pub Quiz with Andrew

Tď?¨ď?ľď?˛ď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;

Spirits Of The House Fď?˛ď?Šď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2030;

Honeyboy & Boots

Sď?Ąď?´ď?ľď?˛ď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x160;

Larry Waters Duo

Best Lunch

Deal in Belhaven? Decide for Yourself!

jfp.ms/bestlunch

Lunch Specials Monday - Saturday 11 am - 2 pm

1/2 CHEESE

OR PEPPERONI + side salad $7.50 1/2 DAILY SPECIAL + side salad $8.75

Daily Specials Monday : Millsaps Tuesday : The 904 Wednesday : BBQ Chicken Thursday : Popeye Friday : Meatball Saturday : Surprise

Pizza 101:

1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

10% off every day for students with valid school ID

Mď?Żď?Žď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x152;

Karaoke w/ Matt Tď?ľď?Ľď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x160;/ď&#x2122;&#x2020;ď&#x2122;&#x192;

Open Mic

!"# Vote For Our

BLACK BOARD LUNCH

SPECIALS

July 24 - 30 2013

jfp.ms/bestlunch

18

!"#

136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

Think We Have the Best Lunch in West Jackson?



FARMERS MARKET TIME!

 ÂŁ  

Uivstebz-!Kvmz!36 !Xjmm!Cspxo!'!Ujn! NdHvjsf !)Qjbojtu!'!Tbypqipojtu*

CORNER OF HIGHWAY 463 & HIGHWAY 22

Gsjebz-!Kvmz!37 KK!Uibnft!'!Uif!Wpmu

Guest Chef Alex Eaton, The Manship Music By Jason Turner

jfp.ms/bestlunch

Mjwf!Nvtjd

OPEN 4:00 - 8:00PM

Â&#x2DC;  ÂŁÂŁ 

 

Cftu!pg!Kbdltpo!Xjoofs!3123.3124!

)Ofp!Tpvm0S'C*

Tbuvsebz-!!Kvmz!38 KK!Uibnft!'!Uif!Wpmu )Ofp!Tpvm0S'C*

Cftu!Mvodi!'!Nvtjd!Mjofvq Jo!Xftu!Kbdltpo

Wpuf!Vt!Cftu!Mvodi!

    Livingston Community Foundation   

   

!kgq/nt0cftumvodi

2211!Kpio!S/!Mzodi!Tusffu!}!Tvjuf!B Kbdltpo-!NT!}!87:/362/6333 uifqfohvjont/dpn


19

jacksonfreepress.com


20

July 24 - 30, 2013


LIFE&STYLE | food

Beer Exploration

Mississippi

Craft Beer Week

I

MELANIE BOYD

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good weekâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and summerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to love beer in Jackson. After and Pairing Beer with Food, among others. last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passage of the higher-gravity beer law, and this year seeOne new element for the festival is the Tin Roof Cornhole ing the homebrewing ban lifted once and for all, beer lovers are Tournament, sponsored by a Baton Rouge Brewery. Sixteen teams seeing a big surge in new brews coming to Mississippi. Closing of two will compete for the chance to win a custom cornhole set out Mississippi Craft Beer Week is the fourth annual Abita Top of from the Tin Roof Brewing Co. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done cornhole at some of the Hops Beer Fest, with our other beerfests and it more than 150 beers just kind of becomes a mini waiting for hopheads unfestival within the festival,â&#x20AC;? der the roof of the Jackson Wilson says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We set up Convention Complex. like the March Madness Jay Wilson, who basketball tournament.â&#x20AC;? does marketing and events Throughout it all, for Red Mountain and expect live music from Blue Goose EntertainGrateful Dead cover band mentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the event producOtis Lotus and other eners behind the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; tertainment throughout says Top of the Hops is the convention complex. special because of the care Wilson says the festithat goes into choosing val appeals to a wide range the beers. of people and taste buds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just spent a lot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done almost 25 of time choosing good beer fests all over the counTop of the Hops Beer Fest is meant to appeal to beer aficionados as well beers,â&#x20AC;? Wilson says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try, and what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen is as newcomers to the craft-beer scene. donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just mail in a list to that there is a good crossthe distributors and say, section,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pick 100 beers.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; We spend a lot of time with the distributors to plan are the beer aficionados that get there early, get the festival guide, they a well-thought-out portfolio and selection of beer. Hopefully, people go through the descriptions, they zero in on several breweries that will not have heard of some of them. They will be brand new to theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve read about in Draft Magazine or whatever, and they will go the state. Hopefully, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve challenged the distributors to bring in straight to those booths and try samples, talk about it, take notes. new stuff.â&#x20AC;? Then there is the person who likes craft beer but isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t maybe hardEach attendee will receive a two-ounce mini mug to sample the core about it and grabs their buddies, who are just kind of getting more than 150 beers available. A Samuel Adams Brew University area PRUH%((5VHHSDJH will be set up to host seminars on Cooking with Beer, Brewing 101

Smoky Ballistic Blonde Salmon

Salmon Brine

by Dawn Macke FLICKR/GKDAVIE

Instead of letting your salmon swim in wine to infuse flavor, try beer.

W

hereas some fancy recipes might suggest poaching your fish in wine with vegetables, I suggest letting it swim in a nice, cold citrus bath with beer, and then cook over a low fire infused with apple wood. You can buy Lucky Town Ballistic Blonde, available primarily on tap, in a growler from Hops and Habanas in Madison ($10.99 per fill, $6.50-$45 for a 64ounce growler; 601-853-7449)

5 cups water 1/2 cup salt 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/4 cup raw local honey 1 tablespoon whole peppercorns, crushed 4 garlic cloves, minced 4 large bay leaves 1 orange, halved 1/2 lemon 1/2 lime 1 tablespoon chopped ginger 2 tablespoons soy sauce 32 ounces Lucky Town Ballistic Blonde 1-1/2 to 2 pounds salmon filet, approximately 1-inch thick

Combine all ingredients except beer and fish in a large non-reactive stockpot. Bring to a boil, stirring until

salt and sugars dissolve. Remove from heat; cool to room temperature. Add beer and chill brine to between 40 and 45 degrees. Submerge fish in brine, adding water if needed to cover. Chill and soak for 10 to 12 hours. Do not over-soak. Not only will the salmon be too salty, but it also will lose texture as the citrus breaks it down further. Remove from brine 12 to 24 hours before smoking, reserving brine. This allows time for the fish to dry and flavors to distribute through the fillet. Rub filet with olive oil. Prepare smoker, using reserved brine in the drip pan. Smoke filet at 230 to 250 degrees Farenheit for 40 to 60 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

T

his yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mississippi Craft Beer Week, the fourth annual, continues to grow in scope and number of events. The week, organized by Raise Your Pints and its sponsors, kicked off Sunday, July 21, but plenty of events remain in the second half of the week. For more events across the state, including Ocean Springs, Gulfport, Meridian, Starkville and Tupelo, visit raiseyourpints.com. Wednesday, July 24 -DFNVRQ/XFN\7RZQ3LQW1LJKWDW 7KH%XOOGRJ 5LGJHZRRG5RDG  

Thursday, July 25 -DFNVRQ0&%:3DUW\DW+DO 0DO¶V 6&RPPHUFH6W  ²2QKDQGZLOOEHEUHZV IURP<D]RR$ELWD (DVW.HQW-RFNDPR ,3$ &DVWHOODLQ*UDQG&UX 9DQGEHUJ 'HZXOI DVZHOODV<D]RR*HUVW /XFN\7RZQ3XE$OHDQG/D]\ 0DJQROLD%DFNZRRGV%HOJLDQ  +DWWLHVEXUJ12/$¿UNLQ SP±SPDW7KH.HJDQG %DUUHO +DUG\6W+DWWLHVEXUJ ² &HOHEUDWHZLWKD¿UNLQIURPRXU &UHVFHQW&LW\QHLJKERUV12/$ %UHZLQJ  -DFNVRQ6RXWKHUQ3URKLELWLRQ 3LQW1LJKWSP±SPDW7KH %XOOGRJ 5LGJHZRRG5RDG  

Friday, July 26 +DWWLHVEXUJ6DP$GDPV)OLJKW 1LJKWDW7KH0DKRJDQ\%DU +DUG\6W+DWWLHVEXUJ    +DWWLHVEXUJ6RXWKHUQ3URKLELWLRQ )LUNLQ3LQW1LJKWDW7KH.HJDQG %DUUHO +DUG\6W+DWWLHVEXUJ ² &KHFNRXWDRQHWLPHRQO\¿UNLQRI 6R3UR¶VQHZHVWEHHU0LVVLVVLSSL)LUH $QWZLWKFLQQDPRQUDLVLQVDQGFRFRD QLEV/LPLWHGHGLWLRQ.HJ6R3URSLQW JODVVHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOH  -DFNVRQ/D]\0DJQROLD3LQW1LJKW DW7KH%XOOGRJ 5LGJHZRRG 5RDG 

Saturday, July 27 -DFNVRQ7RSRIWKH+RSV%HHUIHVW SPÂąSPDWWKH-DFNVRQ &RQYHQWLRQ&RPSOH[ ( 3DVFDJRXOD6W   -DFNVRQ%HHUIHVW$IWHU3DUW\ SPDW+DO 0DOÂśV 6 &RPPHUFH6W 

jacksonfreepress.com

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

21


%((5IURPSDJH

Rock-N-Roll Hibachi & Sushi

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lunch

Specials

Monday - Friday Start at 11:00 - 2:00

$7.95

Remember to Vote for Best Lunch Around! jfp.ms/bestlunch

Specials Start at Mon - Fri 4:30 - 6:30 Sat & Sun 3:00 - 5:00

2560 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood 601.420.4058 â&#x20AC;˘ like us on

FX]VBc^_ on State Street

CdTbSPh=XVWc â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

CWdabSPh=XVWc

July 24 - 30, 2013

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no

22

sharing, no carry out

$2 Pints

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B

into craft beer and come along for the experience. And then there are those that think Bud Light and Miller Lite are their beers of choice, and somebody had an extra ticket so all the sudden they are More than 150 beers will be introduced to craft beers.â&#x20AC;? Jackson isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only city to available at the fest. host a Top of the Hops festival. Wilson says that, although each festival is structured essentially the same, each city has its own personality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since Mississippi just passed the high-gravity law last year, the state of Mississippi is just now being exposed to a lot of great craft beers,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the lifespan of craft beer, Mississippi is kind of in its infancy. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot to look forward to in Mississippi in the discovery phase of exploring new beers.â&#x20AC;? Top of the Hops is July 27 at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St., 601-960-2321) from 4 to 8 p.m. General admission tickets are $35 in advance. VIP tickets are $75 in advance and give ticketholders entrance to the festival an hour early, and access to a VIP area, special beers and free food. Designated

Brine, Baby, Brine

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Tap?

The 4th Annual Top of the Hops Jackson Beer Festival will offer more than 150 beers from across the globe, including: $ELWD%HHU $QFKRU%UHZLQJ $QJU\2UFKDUG +DUG&LGHU $WODQWD%UHZLQJ &RPSDQ\ %DFN)RUW\%HHU &R %D\RX7HFKH %LHUH %DFN)RUW\%HHU &R %D\RX7HFKH %LHUH %OXH0RRQ

&DUOVEHUJ &RYLQJWRQ %UHZKRXVH &ULVSLQ &]HFKYDU 'LDPRQG%HDU %UHZLQJ &RPSDQ\ *XLQQHVV +HLQHU%UDX .LULQ /D]\0DJQROLD /HLQHQNXJHOÂśV 0LNHÂśV+DUG /HPRQDGH

1HZFDVWOH 1RUWK&RDVW %UHZLQJ&R 3DXODQHU 5HG+RRN 5RJXH 6DPXHO$GDPV 6DPXHO6PLWKÂśV 6KLQHU%HHUV 6KLS\DUG%UHZ LQJ&R 6KRFN7RS 6LHUUD1HYDGD 6SDWHQ 6WHYHQV3RLQW

%UHZHU\ 6WUDQJIRUG /RXJK%UHZ LQJ&R 7DOOJUDVV%UHZ LQJ&R 7RPP\NQRFNHU %UHZHU\ 7ZLVWHG7HD :LGPHU%URWK HUV :RRGFKXFN +DUG&LGHU <D]RR%UHZLQJ &R

driver tickets are also available, $15 in advance for general admission and $25 in advance for VIP. Purchase tickets at the Coliseum Box Office, BrewHaHa Homebrew Supply Co., ticketmaster.com or topofthehopsbeerfest.com/jackson. FLICKR/LIFESUPERCHARGER

Crazy Happy Hour

MELANIE BOYD

LIFE&STYLE | food

Dirty (Blonde) Bird by by Dawn Dawn Macke Macke

by Dawn Macke

W

ith brining, salt water enters the meatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cells while water flows out. As the salt flows in, it begins to break down some of the cell proteins, making it possible for more water to flow into the meat. This process results in more flavor and less moisture loss during cooking, yielding meat that is deeply seasoned and extra juicy.

Beer Brined Pork Chops

5 cups hot water 1/3 cup kosher salt 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 2 tablespoon raw honey 1 tablespoon cracked pepper 3 garlic cloves, minced 3 bottles Lazy Magnolia Southern Pecan Nut Brown Ale 4-6 pork chops, at least 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches thick

Mix all ingredients except beer and pork chops. Stir until the salt, sugar and honey dissolve. Add beer and cool to room temp. Chill brine to 40 to 45 degrees Farenheit and add pork chops. Refrigerate. Soak in brine four to six hoursâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; but no longer, or you run the risk of salty chops. In this case, more isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t better! Remove from brine, rinse, and allow to dry. Grill 15 to 20 minutes, or until done (145 to 150 degrees Farenheit for medium).

Southern Prohibitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Suzy B blonde makes a sweet and tangy glaze for chicken.

T

his is a chick youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to take home to mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;she has great taste in spite of her name! You can find four-

Dirty Blonde Honey BBQ Sauce

3 tablespoons butter 1 small onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup Southern Prohibition Suzy B Dirty Blonde Ale 1/4 cup vinegar 1/2 cup ketchup 1/2 cup raw local honey 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons lemon juice (½ lemon) 1 tablespoon dry mustard (or yellow prepared) 1 tablespoon chili powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 bay leaves

SautĂŠ onion and garlic in butter until soft. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 15 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer an additional 10 to 15 minutes, or until thick. Let cool.

packs of Suzy B Dirty Blonde Ale from Hattiesburg brewery Southern Prohibition at Hops and Habanas in Madison.

Dirty Blonde Honey Chicken Marinade

1 cup Southern Prohibition Suzy B Dirty Blonde Ale 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Juice of 1/2 lime (1 rablespoon) 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper 2-3 pounds chicken wings

Mix ingredients well and pour over chicken. Marinate eight hours or overnight. Prepare a medium-hot fire. Remove wings from marinade. Place directly over coals, cover, and grill for about 15 minutes. Turn, cover, grill another 15 to 20 minutes, or until done. Just before removing from grill, brush the honey barbecue sauce.


Danny

DELICIOUS LUNCHES SERVED DAILY JFP.MS/BESTLUNCH

10% OFF lunch & dinner • with this ad

2481 Lakeland Drive | Flowood 601.932.4070

Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri • 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun • 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun • 5 - 10pm

900 Suite E. County Line Rd. Former AJ’s | 769.251.2657

862 Avery Blvd • Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 • ruchiindia.com

DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E • Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 • Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

Exercise Your Right To Vote…

For Us!

Best Lunch In Belhaven/Fondren/Midtown

jfp.ms/bestlunch

jacksonfreepress.com

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. • Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122

23


LIFE&STYLE |

My Best Friend’s Wedding by Amber Helsel

M

July 24 - 30, 2013

XX

CARRIE HOBEN (SOUTHERN PHOTOGRAPHY)

y childhood best friend’s wedding served as a huge reminder of the passage of time. Just yesterday, Lindsey and I were dressed as cats together on Halloween. We were making Christmas cookies together and playing at day care. Our moms were best friends. We were best friends. Then suddenly, I found myself at her wedding, both of us years older, as she walked down the aisle toward a man named Hunter Lewis. The tiny bit of decoration in the barn at Cotton Market gave the venue a rustic but elegant feel. Sheathes of white tulle hung in soft V-shaped drapes from the entrance to the altar. Guests sat in white folding chairs, and as always, the place filled up so quickly that people had to stand in the back. The ceremony started with the matrons of the couple’s families lighting candles for the bride and groom. I recognized most of the women from my childhood—Lindsey’s mother, Paula, and her Lindsey Ponder and Hunter Lewis went for a rustic barn feel for grandmothers Honey and Velma, each their summer nuptials. lighting a candle to bring another family into the mix. As the first country song played, Lindsey’s younger sister and maid of honor, Taylor, cutting of the cake. I happened to be standing nearby, walked in, and the rest of the bridesmaids—most of looking at the many Instagram photos of the wedding, them family members—followed in navy blue strapless when all of sudden, I heard Lindsey yelling. dresses and cowgirl boots. As the bridesmaids walked I looked up to see Lindsey in that incredible dress, down the aisle, the room was still full of the low hum with her face covered in white icing. She walked over to of chatter, but when the barn doors shut, the talking me and said, “Can you believe ...” I didn’t let her finish stopped. because I had my iPhone out taking a photo. She smiled A woman pushed the doors open for that perfect for the camera and went to wash off her face. photograph of the bride and her father. After a second, It was strange to be around these people again, like the bride finally got to make that journey down the aisle. an odd joining of selves—my child self, and my (kind Hunter’s face lit up when he saw Lindsey walking toward of ) adult self. I saw my old life in all those people from him in a vintage-looking mermaid-hem dress. Though my childhood, and then saw how far I’ve come. she complained later about being too warm in it, the I wanted to be able to sit and talk with Lindsey, aking ther, m dress fit her like a glove. just for a second, but she was occupied for most of up toge w e r g e. d bride The couple lit a unity candle and returned to the the night. perienc thor an The au ial wedding ex ec altar to recite their vows. Before the final kiss, the groom Instead, I sat back and watched as my childhood for a sp brought out a gift for his bride—a gold necklace with best friend danced with her father, and then her new her new initials monogrammed on it. As he was trying to husband, as she took the first steps toward her new life. put it on her, he seemed to be having trouble and ended up in an awkward embrace. Finally, Taylor stepped up to finish the job. A light chuckle from the audience turned to clapping when Lindsey and Hunter kissed. I sat there thinking how strange it was to still reDay-of coordinator: Christy Groom’s and groomsmen’s attire: Caterer and Florist: Fresh Cut member Lindsey as my childhood best friend, while at Ponder Tuxedo Junction (locations in Catering & Floral the same time, seeing her before me as an adult, tying Officiant: Todd Sanders Jackson, Flowood and Ridgeland, (108 Cypress Cove, Flowood, the knot. Reception location: Cotton tuxedojunction.com) 601-939-4518, wendyputt.com) Everyone piled into the adjacent reception area Market (2644 South Pearson Bride’s attire: Allure Bridal Photographer: Carrie Hoben quickly, most moving toward the endless tables of Road, Richland, 601-906-5499) from Imaginations (119 W. (southernphotographyinc.com) food—barbecue pork sliders, cheese cubes (my perCake: Cakes by Iris (cakesbyiris. Cherokee St., Brookhaven, 601Invitations: Etsy sonal favorite) and lemon-pepper chicken. The recepcom) 833-6280) Sound: DJ Reign tion area even had a really neat mashed potato bar with the tastiest bacon. My favorite part of the night, though, was the

24


g

and Face Paintin

WE’RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE. Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel! For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800 STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2012 Best of Jackson -

Gloss & Cut

Only $85.00 (Limited Time Only)

LACEY’S S

1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA

L

O

N

Hair & Accessories

601.906.2253 1935 Lakeland Dr.

©2013 Hilton Worldwide

Untitled - Page: 1

A

www.snaphappyphotoboothms.com

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

PERFECT FOR ANY EVENT!

s Wedding Family ns Reunio Birthdays Corporate Events

CUSTOMIZED FTO!R YOUR EVEN 601.366.4686

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

YOUR SPECIAL DAY CAR SERVICE When only the best will do!

SUMMER FOR

Make your special day even more special when you use our classic 1954 Rolls-Royce in your wedding photos or to leave your ceremony in style. weddings@flyinglawyer.com | Ph 601.956.8002 | Fax 888.571.4812 W W W. Y O U R S P E C I A L D AY C A R S E R V I C E . C O M Follow us on Twitter: SpecDayCarSvc

Pay for a year membership in full, and we’ll give you an additional 3 months free.

901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 Flowood, MS (in front of Walmart) flowood@anytimefitness.com

601.992.3488 2155 Highway 18, Suite E

Brandon, MS (across from Home Depot) brandon@anytimefitness.com

Jackson’s Premier Provider of Custom Formal Wear since 1990.

4465 I-55 N Suite 203 Jackson, MS 601.981.0106

601-706-4605 4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 Jackson, MS (in front of Kroger) jacksonms@anytimefitness.com

601-321-9465 www.anytimefitness.com Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

jacksonfreepress.com

Like us on Facebook: Your Special Day Car Service

FREE!

25


LIFE&STYLE | wellness Follow Us

4654 McWillie Dr. Jackson, MS Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 9PM Friday & Saturday: 10AM - 10PM Sunday: CLOSED

Bes t o f

Cool Al’s

by Adria Walker MELANIE BOYD

Vote For the Best North Jackson Lunch jfp.ms/bestlunch

9RWH8V 7KH%HVW/XQFK ,Q)ORZRRG

All Natural

MISPVEHVWOXQFK

CoolAlsJxn

601.713.3020

Our Lunch Specials Make People Happy!

Chef Nick Wallace is cultivating an urban garden downtown to provide natural, organic ingredients to people in the neighborhood.

jfp.ms/bestlunch

Blues & BBQ

D’Lo Trio | Every Thursday 5-7 pm | No Cover

601.362.6388

1410 Old Square Road

www.cherokeedrivein.com

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

Jackson Rhythm & Blues Festival June 26 - August 15

Blues Happy Hours Best Burger = Best Lunch

Vote Today! jfp.ms/bestlunch

live music july 24 - 30

wed | july 24 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar” Smith thur | july 25 | 5:30 - 9:30

Tim Allen & Housecat 7.24 Wed • 5:30-7:30 • Olga’s Chris Gill 7.31 Wed • 5:30-7:30 • Sal & Mookie’s Pat Brown (Blue Monday) 8.5 Mon • 7:30 • Hal & Mal’s Love Notez 8.7 Wed • 5:30-7:30 • Time Out

Jason Turner fri | july 26 | 6:00 - 10:00

Shawn, Kenny & Richard sat | july 27 | 6:00 - 10:00

Acoustic Crossroads sun | july 28 | 4:00 - 8:00

Cassie & Stacy July 24-30 2013

mon | july 29 | 6:00 - 9:00

26

Karaoke tue | july 30 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar” Smith 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

A Promotion of The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau With the Central Mississippi Blues Society

W

hen it comes to farm-to-table eating, chef Nick Wallace is putting his money where his green thumb is. The 34-yearold executive chef of the historic King Edward Hotel recently planted an urban garden on the grounds of the downtown hotel, growing many of the ingredients he will use in the kitchen there. Wallace says growing food was part of his upbringing. “I knew I loved being in the kitchen starting at age 5. I grew up on a farm in Edwards, Mississippi, so I knew what it was like to live on the land,” he says. “We used to walk with no shoes on. We knew which plants hurt and which didn’t. We knew we could walk around our blueberry bush, and we knew that we were going to squish blueberries that were already on the ground while we were picking some. We had fresh chicken and fresh chicken eggs. The pigs were all natural. It wasn’t like the slop-fed pigs that people are really scared of.” In the community where Wallace grew up, no one went grocery store shopping; they all shared their foods. If a family wanted Georgia collards, and one of the neighbors was growing them, the neighbor would share their collards. One of Wallace’s goals is to share his knowledge. “I’m not going to be here forever, but now my staff knows how to garden,” Wallace says. “We will forever have fresh food at the King Edward. I want to start a community garden. I want to start doing herb boxes, or gardening boxes all over downtown Jackson. I don’t want to do it just to take the product off of it, or just for the profit.” Wallace says the garden is open to the community. Chefs or home cooks are welcome to come clip ingredients they need. “If they need chives or things like that,

instead of going to the store and getting a pound of them, you can come and see Chef Nick and get a sprig,” he says. The chef plans the garden around seasonal produce. It always has lettuce and some essentials, but he plants and harvests other foods, such as watermelon, seasonally, before using the soil for another ingredient the next season. “I have a calendar that all my staff gets excited about because they can’t wait for planting,” Wallace says. “We’ve planted about 20 times already in the same soil, and it grows like Miracle-Gro.” So far, the garden has produced what Wallace calls “the big boy tomatoes,” along with micro celery, four different types of tarragon, five different types of mint (including chocolate mint and pineapple mint), radishes, okra and more. Soon, Wallace plans to begin introducing bees. “We need the pollen to drop off from that and enrich the soil,” he says. “I have a guy in Carthage that is going to help me with the bees. We’re going to start producing our own honey.” Wallace has some advice for novice and seasoned gardeners alike. “Stay organic. Stay chemical free. I wanted to start a garden, but I didn’t want to lose my roots. I wanted a piece of Edwards, Mississippi, at the King Edward. I went and got dirt from (Edwards) and potted it with the soil from Green Oak, which is one of our sponsors. Everything grows in the garden. I have to clip the leaves from my squash because it’s growing so fast. It’s crazy. Everybody comes in and asks what chemicals I use, but I don’t put any chemicals in it. It’s all natural.” Natural is something that means a lot to Wallace. “I think you should live the natural lifestyle,” he says. “I don’t just think you should eat the natural lifestyle, I think you should live it. Period.”


ARTS p 28 | FILM p 28 | 8 DAYS p 29 | MUSIC p 32 | SPORTS p 34

HALEY PALMERTON/COURTESY WAREHOUSE THEATRE

(Left to right) Juniper Wallace, Matt Faries, Malaika Quarterman, Michael Kinslow and Deja Abdul-Haqq star in Warehouse Theatre’s latest show, “See Jane Quit.”

A Door-Slamming Farce by Genevieve Legacy

house, the group also produced “The Monster Monologues” and “Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And then Some).” “We usually produce three plays a year,” Howell says. “The board gets together a few times a year to figure out who has a passion for what. The best productions are always the shows someone has a passion for.” This summer, FTW is producing “See Jane Quit,” a raucous new comedy by longtime Workshop member, Beth Kander. Originally from Michigan, Kander attended the FTW’s first informational meeting in 2003. When she came to Jackson, she interned at The Institute for Southern Jewish Life. Eventually, she returned to Michigan, got her master’s degree in social work, then made her way back to Jackson and her cohorts at Fondren Theatre Workshop. As the title suggests, “See Jane Quit” centers on a 30-something waitress who is trying to quit smoking. Jane, played by feisty Malaika Quarterman, a teacher at Power APAC, has a secret reason for giving up her bad habit. Her

prim and proper Grandma Bessie and her sister in-law, Diane, take turns prodding or protecting her from their own life-changing secrets. Juniper Wallace, a teacher at Northwest Rankin High School, portrays Grandma Bessie with wit and wry humor. Meanwhile, Deja Abdul-Haqq, a project manager for the youth-centered non-profit organization Project CHANGE, renders sister-in-law Diane in full-spectrum light. Michael Kinslow, a Crossfit coach, brings life and physicality to the part of Jane’s spiritually conflicted brother James. In contrast, Matt Faries, who goes to Mississippi College, brings a lighter touch to the part of Charles, Jane’s youngest brother. Tensions mount with hilarious results as everyone in the close-knit family tries to keep their secrets. “See Jane Quit” runs July 25 to 28 and August 1 to 4 at The Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Seating is limited. For information and reservations, call 27 601-301-2281. jacksonfreepress.com

W

hat do two high-school teachers, a Crossfit trainer and a worker from Hederman Brothers Printing have in common? If you guessed they spend the evening pretending to be someone else, you’re right. These members of Fondren Theatre Workshop shrug off their day jobs and take over New Stage Theatre’s Warehouse Theatre for “See Jane Quit.” Fondren Theatre Workshop was the first company to produce at the Warehouse Theatre. “In fact, when New Stage was thinking about buying the space, Francine (Thomas Reynolds) called and asked me, ‘If we buy this thing, would y’all be interested in renting it once in a while?’” says Diana Howell, one of FTW’s directors. Needless to say, the answer was yes. FTW’s first production at the Warehouse, in August 2011, was Steven Sondheim’s “Assassins.” Later that year, though not at the Ware-


DIVERSIONS | books

A State of Color by Marilyn Trainor Storey

“It’s not about photography really, asked him to go, to capture the beauty of Smith says. “At a signing there might be one it’s about capturing your vision.” Smith Mississippi. “I wanted to portray the state person or 100. Either way I am humbled.” says. “It’s about stepping out, taking a in a different light,” he says. “I didn’t want The resulting tome, “The Color chance and doing what you always of Mississippi,” is a sketchpad-sized wanted to do.” coffee-table book, which opens from That essentially is what Smith is the top instead of the side. The cover doing with his foray into professional features a predominantly tomatophotography. “I was non-taught,” red scene of a sunset seen through a Smith says, recalling the photo of the bridge. Smith has several additional tulip. “All I ever wanted was one good books planned, including “The Color picture. I started with low expectaof the South,” which will include photions. … I really went on blind faith, tographs from Mississippi, Alabama just shooting what I like.” and Georgia and will be a little smaller As he developed his photographin dimension. ic style, Smith started adding in text to When the series is complete, Smith record his thoughts and views at the says the stack will visually create a colPaul Smith will discuss his photography book “The Color of Mississippi,” at History is Lunch. moment he takes his photos. or wheel for a library or coffee table. “I write whatever I see with my Paul Smith’s “History Is Lunch” eyes and my imagination, using lots of workshop is July 24, from noon until adjectives,” he says. In his book, he describes to just capture shotgun houses and indigent 1 p.m. at the William Winter Building (200 that original yellow tulip with one tiny red people. I wanted to capture the color. Color North St., 601-576-6850). It is free. tear on its petal: “Coming to life after the is beautiful.” Ultimately, he pieced together To see more of Paul Smith’s work, visit cold, gray winter, fragile petals nod softly in a sample book and showed it to several in- lensframe.com or find Paul R. Smith Photogthe cool gentle breeze.” dependent bookstores. Oxford’s Neil White raphy on Facebook. “The Color of Mississippi” After discovering photography, Smith decided he wanted to publish it. is available at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate travelled the state, going wherever anyone “Books are a humbling experience,” 55 N., Suite 202, 601-366-7619). COURTESY NAUTILUS PUBLISHING

I

t all began with a single tulip. Paul Smith, a Clinton native who now makes his home in Brandon and is close to retiring from UPS, decided he wanted to try something different, something he had never done before. He liked photography. His wife asked him to take a photograph of a yellow tulip she admired at Jackson’s wellmanicured Highland Village. Now Smith has published his first photography book, “The Color of Mississippi” (Nautilus Publishing, 2012, $38), and is working on a second, “The Color of the South.” Smith also gives workshops around the state, including one on July 24 for History is Lunch, a series sponsored by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Smith’s workshops don’t really focus on technical skills. Rather, he talks about seeing, exploring ways to capture inner vision, to slow down and embrace the creativity that most people possess, but don’t always tap into. He wants his workshop attendees to find what they love, do what they love and ultimately find inner peace.

film

Just Slightly Looney by Anita Modak-Truran

28

his mother’s latest relationship.” Owen (Sam Rockwell) gives the kid a break and hires him to work at Water Wizz water park. SYCAMORE PICTURES

July 24 - 30, 2013

T

om Rice instinctively understood what he had in common with characters different from himself in “The Way Way Back,” which opens nationally Friday. “Everyone in this film has his or her reasons,” he said in a phone interview from his Hollywood office. The Mississippi native described the characters as multi-dimensional and “relatable to all audiences.” Duncan (Liam James), the film’s 14year-old protagonist, sits in the way, way back of a wood-paneled station wagon. He faces the wrong way, while the car moves forward, winding its way through the coastal community of Marshfield, Mass. Trent (Steve Carell), his mother’s boyfriend, goads him: “On a scale of 1 to 10, what do you think you are?” “A 6,” Duncan replies in the deadpan voice of woe-is-me adolescence. Trent doesn’t miss a beat. “I think you’re a 3! Since I’ve been dating your mom, I don’t see you putting yourself out there, bud!” Just a few minutes into the film, we know that Duncan is way, way out of the inner family circle. “Duncan’s a fish out of water, trying to be taken seriously while masking his insecurities,” Rice said. “Trent bullies him, and Duncan’s trying to understand and survive

Liam James nails the comedic scenes in “The Way Way Back.”

Rice and his partner, Ben Nearn, founders of Sycamore Pictures, look for the right projects to develop and produce. “I like producing so much more than directing,” Rice said about his career since his feature-film debut of “The Rising Place,” which won 16 film festival awards and took center screen at the Crossroads Film

Festival more than a decade ago. Rice and his team know what they are doing. “The Way Way Back” rocked Sundance crowds and was the highest-sold film at the Utah-based festival earlier this year. Faxon and Rash, who wrote, directed and act in this film, brought Allison Janney to the project. Janney plays the riotously funny and inebriated summer neighbor. Sam Rockwell then joined the cast as the raffishly loveable water-park owner. Rockwell, a fine comic actor, gets the opportunity to let whole scenes play out wordlessly across his face, followed by long streams of vocalized consciousness. The production team brought in kids from all over the country to audition for Duncan. “I wasn’t originally convinced that Liam James was right, but I kept an open mind,” Rice said. “Liam killed the audition. He nailed the comedic scenes and physically changed from a shoulders-hunched kid to a confident young man. Toni Collette, who plays Duncan’s mom, was shooting “Hitchcock” and came in to do a chemistry read with Liam. That’s when Rice knew they had their Duncan. “Nat and Jim really wanted Steve Carell. They sent him a long letter,” Rice said. But

Carell couldn’t sign on because their schedule conflicted with his summer family time in Boston. “The solution was to move the entire circus to Carell’s backyard,” Rice said. On the first day of the location scout, Rice and his team found a water park named “Water Wizz” an hour south of Boston. The owner graciously signed on to the film because “Sam Rockwell reminded her of her husband, who had passed away,” Rice said. The perfect beach house for the main action sat within a short walk of a house owned by Carell’s in-laws. The cast and crew moved into Marshfield and, within a month, they shot the film. Other than a couple of heavy thunderstorms, nothing marred the production. “Making a film is a business. It can be tired, exhausting work. But it is above and beyond so enjoyable,” Rice said. You won’t see a better acted, and better cast, movie this summer than “The Way Way Back.” The characters are slightly looney, the way we all are, but they’re not weirdos. Their eccentricities are just offshoots of normal. The actors (and their directors) grasp how unspoken reactions can be funnier than dialogue or punch lines. This is a smart comedy without a speck of sitcom aggression.


WEDNESDAY 7/24

SATURDAY 7/27

WEDNESDAY 7/31

Jackson Insight Meditation Group Meetings is at Wolfe Studio.

Big K.R.I.T. performs at Dreamz JXN at the Blackout All-Black Party.

“Hooked on Hospitality” Job Fair is at the Jackson Convention Complex.

BEST BETS J U LY 24 - 31, 2013

COURTESY SHAMEKA L. REED

WEDNESDAY 7/24

Jackson Insight Meditation Group Meetings for silent meditation and Dharma study is from 6:30-8 p.m. at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road). Free, donations welcome; call 601-201-4228; email bebewolfe@juno.com.

THURSDAY 7/25

FRIDAY 7/26

COURTESY PEYTON WOFFORD

Al Jefferson’s Benefit Week All-White Party is at 7 p.m. at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). DJ Mannie Fresh and 112 perform. Wear white attire. After-party at Freelon’s (440 N. Mill St.). Free; call 979-1368.

Zach Lovett performs at Cups’ 20th Anniversary Celebration on July 31.

Fondren Fashion House hosts the Rustic Meets Chic Fashion Show July 25 at The South.

801-1275; find Power of the Mic on Facebook. … Back to School Jamboree is from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at Wayside Church of Deliverance (1504 Clinton-Raymond Road, Clinton). Includes giveaways of school supplies and child ID kits. Enjoy food, games and music from Twiceborn, The Messenger and the Wayside Youth Department. Free; call 601-573-4422; email waysideclinton@gmail.com. … Top of the Hops Beer Festival is from 4-8 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Includes seminars, games, live music and BY BRIANA ROBINSON more than 150 beer samples. For ages 21 and up. $33, $73 VIP, designated driver: $13, $23 VIP; JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM call 800-745-3000; topoftheFAX: 601-510-9019 hopsbeerfest.com/jackson. … Al Jefferson’s Benefit Week BlackDAILY UPDATES AT out All-Black Party is at 9 p.m. at JFPEVENTS.COM Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). Hip-hop artist Big K.R.I.T. performs. Wear black attire. $10 before 10 p.m.

EVENTS@

SUNDAY 7/28 SATURDAY 7/27

Power of the Mic Comedy Show is at 10 p.m. at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Comedians include Marvin “IceDog” Galloway and Childish Corbino. Enjoy music from No Script featuring Kerry Thomas, DJ Sean Mac and JesMove2. $10; call 646-

The Jackson Music Awards are at 6 p.m. at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Hip-hop and soul artists receive awards. $20, $30 reserved; call 601-981-4035; jmaainc.com. … “Iron-Jawed Angels” Film Screening is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road) in the plaza. The film is about the women’s suffrage movement in the United States during the 1910s. Free; call 601-366-1602; rainbowcoop.org.

MONDAY 7/29

Misfit Monkeys Comedy Troupe’s Improv Comedy Show is at 8 p.m. at Musician’s Emporium Bar & Grill (642 Tombigbee St.). Members of the troupe perform short routines incorporating audience suggestions. $5; call 818-645-4404. … Light The Night Kickoff Luncheon Registration ends today. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s luncheon for the fundraising event is Aug. 6 at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St.). Free; call 888-290-0945; email leslie.bosworth@lls.org; lightthenight.org/msla/register.

TUESDAY 7/30

Remembrance: Pregnancy Loss and Early Infant Death Support is from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at University Physicians Pavilion (1410 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) in room MO-16. Free; call 601-984-1921; email remembrance@umc.edu.

WEDNESDAY 7/31

Cups’ 20th Anniversary Celebration is from 7 a.m.-9 p.m. at Cups: An Espresso Café (2757 Old Canton Road). Enjoy free drip coffee, espresso giveaways, brewing demonstrations, tastings and live music. Performers include Zach Lovett, Spirituals, Cody Cox and others. Free; call 601-362-7422. … The “Hooked on Hospitality” Job Fair is at 10 a.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Job openings include banquet servers, cooks, security officers, receptionists and bartenders. Internships 29 available for college students. Free; call 601-960-2321. jacksonfreepress.com

Hometown Hero and SUMITT Awards are at 4 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau hosts the program to acknowledge individuals who have contributed to the city. RSVP. Free admission, $100 table of eight; email lpeyton@visitjackson.com. … Rustic Meets Chic Fashion Show is at 7 p.m. at The South (627 E. Silas Brown St.). Fondren Fashion House hosts, and Mrs. Quad emcees. Buy tickets at Fondren Fashion House (310 Mitchell Ave.). $25, $50 VIP; call 601-362-9090.


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00

Plus free snacks at the bar!

(*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, July 24th

CHALMERS & BABY JAN (Americana) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, July 25th

KING STREET

(Blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, July 26th

JAREKUS SINGLETON (Blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

Saturday, July 27th

STATIC ENSEMBLE

(Blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

Tuesday, July 30th

SPEAKEASY NIGHT WITH THE BARREL HOUSE RAMBLERS (Jazz) 6:30, No Cover

COMING SOON VOO DAVID FROM CHICAGO

Saturday, August 17

Now On July 24 - 30, 2013

Weekends

30

Outside

Bar & Tables 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

Top of the Hops Beer Festival July 27, at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The annual event includes more than 150 beer samples, seminars, games and live music. For ages 21 and up. VIP ticket includes entry at 3 p.m., a souvenir mug and food. $33, $73 VIP, designated driver: $13, $23 VIP; call 800-745-3000; topofthehopsbeerfest.com/jackso

#/--5.)49 All-star Al Jeffersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fifth Annual Benefit Week Comedy Show July 25, 8 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). J. Anthony Brown of the Tom Joyner Morning Show is the host. Performers include J.J. Williamson, Huggy Lowdown, Chris Paul and Lenny Moore. $10-$15; call 601-353-0603 or 800-745-3000; Find Al Jeffersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Benefit Week on Facebook. Events at Library Lounge (Fairview Inn, 734 Fairview St.) Call for details. No cover; call 601-948-3429; fairviewinn.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Quiz Night Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m. The winning team gets a special prize. â&#x20AC;˘ Game Night Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Play board games with current and new friends. Events at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Wet-n-Wild Adventure Camp July 29Aug. 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children entering grades 1-5 learn about animal species and their habitats. Includes water games; bring a bathing suit. Registration required. Bring or buy lunch. $175 (discounts for multiple children). â&#x20AC;˘ Question It? Discover It! Saturday July 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Learn how your brain works and how to keep it healthy. $8, children 12 months and under free. Events at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Call 601576-6000; msnaturalscience.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Project Flying WILD July 25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The bird-conservation workshop is for educators who teach grades K-12. CEU credits available. Registration required. Bring lunch. $15. â&#x20AC;˘ Rock On! Earth Sciences Workshop July 26, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The workshop on fossils, weather and more is for middle school teachers. CEU credits available. Registration required. Bring lunch. $15. â&#x20AC;˘ Fun Friday July 26, 10 a.m.-noon. Learn more about reptiles through interactive, hands-on programs. Adults must accompany children. $4-$6. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch July 24, noon. Photographer Paul Smith presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colors of Mississippi.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. â&#x20AC;˘ Artifact and Collectible Identification Program July 31, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The MDAH staff is on hand to review and assist in identifying documents and objects of historical value. Free; call 601-576-6850. â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch July 31, noon. Millsaps College Library director Tom Henderson presents

The Funniest Man in America

J

DPHV*UHJRU\JUHZXSZDWFKLQJ VWDQGXS FRPHG\ RQ SURJUDPV VXFKDVWKHÂł(G6XOOLYDQ6KRZ´ Âł7KH -DFN %HQQ\ 3URJUDP´ DQG Âł7KH %XLFN%HUOH 6KRZ´ $IWHU FRQWLQXRXV HQFRXUDJHPHQW IURP KLV SHHUV KH GHFLGHGWRVWDUWGRLQJRSHQPLFQLJKWV WKURXJKRXWWKH$WODQWDDUHD7KHUHVW LVKLVWRU\  +H QRZ SHUIRUPV WR FURZGV DW VROGRXWVKRZVDFURVVWKHFRXQWU\+H ZRUNVZHHNVRXWRIWKH\HDUWHOOLQJ VWRULHV DERXW KLV IDYRULWH IRRGV DQG IXQQ\IDPLO\PHPEHUV  *UHJRU\LVDUHJXODUJXHVWRQUD GLRVKRZVVXFKDVÂł7KH%REDQG7RP 6KRZ´Âł7KH%LJ6KRZZLWK-RKQ%R\ DQG%LOO\´DQGÂł7KH5LFNDQG%XEED 6KRZ´ ZKLFK EURDGFDVWV WR PRUH James Gregory brings his family-friendly brand WKDQFLWLHVQDWLRQZLGH of standup comedy to Duling Hall July 26.  ,Q WKH EHJLQQLQJ RI KLV FDUHHU *UHJRU\ VDLG SHRSOH GHHPHG KLP  Âł7RPHVRXWKHUQFRPHGLDQVDUHJX\VZKRJHW DV WKH Âł)XQQLHVW 0DQ LQ $PHULFD´ EXW KH FODLPV WKDW ÂłDW WKDW WLPH WKHUH ZHUH RQO\ RQVWDJHDQGWDONDERXWSLFNXSWUXFNVULĂ&#x20AC;HUDFNVDQG  VWDWHV´ 8QOLNH RWKHU FRPHGLDQV KH KDV NHSW FRZWLSSLQJ´ *UHJRU\ VD\V Âł, GRQÂśW WDON DERXW WKH KLV MRNHV FOHDQ Âł0\ PRWKHU ZRXOGQÂśW OHW PH WHOO 6RXWKMXVWGHOLYHUP\PDWHULDOZLWKDVRXWKHUQDF WKHP LI WKH\ ZHUHQÂśW´ KH VD\V 7KLV LV WKH NLQG RI FHQW0\FRPHG\LVEDVHGRQWKHUHDOOLIHWKHSHRSOH VKRZ WKDW \RX FDQ IHHO FRPIRUWDEOH PDNLQJ D GDWH , JUHZ XS ZLWK 0\ QRWLRQV DERXW IRRG FDPH IURP QLJKW RI RU JRLQJ WR VROR *UHJRU\ ZRUNV WR PDNH WKHP7KH\DOOHDWIULHGIRRGVDQGPDQ\RIWKHPDUH LQWKHLUV0HDQZKLOH\RXUHDGLQWKHQHZVKRZ HYHU\RQHODXJK  +LVFRPHGLFDQHFGRWHVKDYHZLGHVSUHDGDSSHDO VRPH KHDOWK QXW NLFNHG WKH EXFNHW MRJJLQJ RQ WKH WRDOPRVWHYHU\JHQHUDWLRQ+HLVERXQGWRUHPLQG ZD\KRPHIURPWKHKHDOWKIRRGVWRUH´ *UHJRU\VWDUWHGKLVVRXWKHDVWWRXU0D\ZLWK \RXRIVRPHRQHLQ\RXURZQIDPLO\+LVVWRULHVRQH  VWRSVLQ%LUPLQJKDP$OD&KDUORWWH1&1DVKYLOOH DIWHUDQRWKHUKDYHDOLJKWKHDUWHGXQLYHUVDOLW\  $OWKRXJKKHPDNHVDOLYLQJMRNLQJDERXWVRXWK 7HQQDQGRWKHUV+HSHUIRUPV-XO\DW'XOLQJ+DOO HUQZD\VRIOLYLQJERWKJRRGDQGEDGLWLVQRWIDLUWR 'XOLQJ$YH )RULQIRUPDWLRQRU WRSXUFKDVHWLFNHWVYLVLWIXQQLHVWPDQFRP FODVVLI\KLVDFWDVUHJLRQDO ²-DFTXHO\QQ3LOFKHU

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding Hooch and Homicide on the Gold Coast: Liquor and Crime in East Jackson.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting July 25, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). The forum is designed to help resolve community issues or problems. Free; call 601-960-0004. Friday Forum July 26, 9 a.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Operation Understanding representatives speak. Operation Understandingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to develop a group of young African-American and Jewish leaders in Philadelphia, Pa., who are knowledgeable about each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s histories and cultures. Free; email koinoniafridayforum@gmail.com. Mississippi Sales Tax Holiday July 26-27. Purchase eligible tax-free items such as clothing or footwear that cost less than $100 in participating cities and towns. Free; call 601-923-7015; dor.ms.gov. Craftsmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guild of Mississippi Call for Members through July 26, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Membership is open to anyone whose work reflects professional standards and a high degree of competence in creating fine handmade crafts. The standards review is Aug. 3. $75 annual membership dues ($100 with a studio); call 601-856-7546; email nancy@mscrafts.org; mscrafts.org. Community Bike Ride July 26, 6 p.m., at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Bikers ride to a different destination. Jackson Bike Advocates is the sponsor. Free; find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook. Emancipation Homebrew Competition July 26, 6-9 p.m., at Wingstop (952 N. State St.). Lucky Town Brewing Company and Brewhaha host

COURTESY JAMES GREGORY

New Happy Hour!

â&#x20AC;&#x153;See Jane Quitâ&#x20AC;? July 25-28 and Aug. 1-4, 7:30 p.m, at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). Local playwright Beth Kanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedy is about a neurotic waitress who attempts to quit smoking. For mature audiences. $12, $10 seniors and students; call 601-301-2281; email fondrentheatre@ hotmail.com; fondrentheatreworkshop.org.

the competition in honor of Mississippi Craft Beer Week. Includes wings and a tasting glass. $10 general admission, $5 to enter homebrew competition; call 969-6400; email angela@ luckytownbrewing.com; luckytownbrewing.com Farm to Table Dinner July 26, 7-8:30 p.m., at High Noon Cafe (Rainbow Plaza, 2807 Old Canton Road). Enjoy your choice of a vegetarian or vegan three-course organic meal prepared with local ingredients by Chef Troy Woodson. Open seating; BYOB. Tickets can be bought online or at the customer service desk through July 24. $35 in advance; call 601-366-1602; rainbowcoop.org. International Tiger Day July 27, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Learn fun facts about tigers, talk to keeper staff and enjoy craft projects. Pre-registration required for access to breeding grounds. $10, $9 seniors, $6.75 children ages 2-12, members and children under 2 free; call 601-352-2580; jacksonzoo.org. BIG EGO: Expressions of the Alter Ego July 27, 4-6 p.m., at Smith Park (302 E. Amite St.). The natural hair exhibition featuring creations from hairstylist K. Sirah includes entertainment, food and giveaways. Buy tickets at Regis Salon in Northpark Mall. $5 in advance, $10 at the entrance; call 601-307-5796 or 601-956-4633; regisconnect.com. Castle Rock Wine Tasting July 29, 6 p.m., at Amerigo Italian Restaurant (6592 Old Canton Road). Sample four wines from Castle Rock Winery with bruschetta and tiramisu. $20 plus tax and tip; call 601-977-0563; amerigo.net. Lunch and Learn Series July 31, noon, at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The topic is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding Nonprofit


7%,,.%33 St. Joe’s Bruin Burn 5K July 27, 7 a.m., at St. Anthony Catholic School (1585 Old Mannsdale Road, Madison). Registration is at 6 a.m., and the run, walk and one-mile fun run start at 7 a.m. Online registration open through July 25. Run/walk: $20 through July 20, $25 after; $10 fun run; $75 team (up to five, must preregister); call 601-856-9385 or 601-953-1817; email crandall84@comcast.net; active.com Question It? Discover It! Saturday July 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Learn how your brain works and how to keep it healthy. $8, children 12 months and under free; call 601981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. Sudden Cardiac Arrest July 25, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison). In the Community Room. Dr. F. Earl Fyke explains the condition and what can be done about it. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262; mbhs.org. Jackson Heart Kids Study Family-A-Fair July 30, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) at the UMMC Conference Center. Includes health screenings and cooking demonstrations. Free; call 601815-9000; email ghamilton@umc.edu. Kids Run July 27, 10 a.m., at Millie D’s Frozen Yogurt (140 Township Ave., Suite 112, Ridgeland). Fleet Feet Sports is the host. Run a half mile or a full mile on fourth Saturdays, and enjoy frozen yogurt afterwards. Free; call 601899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com. Pub Run July 31, 6 p.m., at Soulshine Pizza Factory, Township (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Fleet Feet Sports is the host. Run two or four miles. Register for door prizes before the race at Fleet Feet Sports. Free; call 601-898-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. James Gregory July 26, 7:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The stand-up comedian is known as the “Funniest Man in America.” Cocktails at 6:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $32.50 in advance, $38 at the door, $175 table of four; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net. Funny Friday July 26, 8:30 p.m., at Fondren Hall (4330 N. State St.). Pierre Edwards headlines the comedy Show. Other performers include Bo P, Whodi and Jackson native Q. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. $15 in advance (limited tickets), $20 at the door; call 601-672-0442 or 601-7097894; email collabojxn@gmail.com; funnyfridays-pierre.eventbrite.com. “Where There’s a Will ... There’s a Way” Dinner Theater July 30-31, 6-9 p.m., at Char (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 142). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the fouract comedy “whodunnit.” Includes cocktails

before the show (separate price) and a threecourse meal. For ages 18 and up. RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752; thedetectives.biz.

-53)# Mississippi Gospel Music Awards July 29, 5 p.m., at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Recipients receive awards in several categories plus a Pastor of the Year award. $20, $30 reserved; call 601-981-4035; jmaainc.com. Truth & Salvage Co. July 27, 8:30 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). The band plays music with country and rock influences. Wes Sheffield also performs. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $8 in advance, $12 at the door; call 601-292-7121; email jane@halandmals.com; ardenland.net. Musicians’ Appreciation Program July 28, 10:15 a.m., at St. Mark M.B. Church (1638 Clinton-Raymond Road, Clinton). Performers include James Crump, Tanya Smith, Melissa Johnson and Rev. Roy C. Nichols. Free; call 601-488-4513 or 601-214-8283. Mississippi Boychoir Auditions July 30, 4-8 p.m., at Covenant Presbyterian Church (4000 Ridgewood Road). For ages 6-18. No experience necessary. Free; call 601-665-7374; mississippiboychoir.org. Singer-songwriter and Band Competition through July 31, at Mississippi Music Foundation (2130 Highway 301 S., Hernando). The Mississippi Music Foundation and Tunica County sponsor. Enter via mail, email or online. The chosen contestants compete at the Tunica Music and Arts Festival Aug. 17 for the chance to record a six-song album. Free; call 662429-2939; email msmusicfoundation@gmail. com; mississippimusicfoundation.org.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Cereus Readers Book Club July 25, noon-1 p.m. through Oct. 24, at LemuriaBooks.com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). The book club meets to discuss works from Eudora Welty and her favorite authors, as well as authors who considered Welty to be an inspiration for their work. Free; call 981-4424; email lisa@ lemuriabooks.com for a reading list. Brown Bag Luncheon Series July 26, noon, at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). John Floyd signs and reads from his book “Deception.” Bring lunch; drinks and desserts provided. Free; call 601-932-2562. Readings at the Library July 30, 6:30 p.m., at Library Lounge (Fairview Inn, 734 Fairview St.). Matthew Guinn reads from his book “The Resurrectionist” ($25.95 at Lemuria Books). Free; call 601-948-3429; fairviewinn.com.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Portrait Studio Workshop July 25, 6-9 p.m., at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (107 N. Union St., Canton). Learn how to take beautiful portrait photos using studio lighting and Photoshop retouching. Registration required. $99; call 601-497-2899; email oterophoto@gmail. com; lisette.co. Painting Workshop July 26-July 28, at Allison’s Wells School of Arts and Crafts (147 N. Union St., Canton). Pat Walker is the instructor. Registration required; space limited. $295 ($150 deposit required); call 662-873-4003; email ritsartist@aol.com; patwalker-workshops.com.

Jewelry Making Workshop Registration through Aug. 9, at Brighton Park (530 S. Frontage Road, Clinton). Learn to make earrings, bracelets and paper beads in the class on Aug. 15. For ages 8 and up. $20; call 601924-6082; clintonparksandrec.com. Adult Acrylic Painting Class Thursdays, 7-9 p.m., at Daniel MacGregor Studios (4347 Lakeland Drive, Flowood). Daniel MacGregor teaches. Bring one 11-by-14-inch canvas for a $5 discount. $15; call 601-992-6405; email theartist@danielmacgregorstudios.com; danielmacgregorstudios.com. Write to Change Your World Sept. 7, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m., at Jackson Free Press classroom in Fondren. JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd teaches the creative non-fiction class series. Class meets every other Saturday through November. Only 11 seats available. $150, includes snacks and materials; call 601-362-6121 ext 15; email class@writingtochange.com.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). • “Medgar Evers: Honor His Life, Live His Legacy” Student Art and Writing Exhibit through July 31. See works from Mississippi students in grades K-12 in Trustmark Grand Hall. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • Museum After Hours: Mad about Monet July 25, 5 p.m. Includes a cash bar at 5 p.m., guided tours of the Old Masters to Monet exhibit at 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., wine flights for sale, admission discounts and giveaways. Admission fees apply for exhibit ($12, $10 seniors, $6 students); call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. “Contemplations” Art Exhibit through Aug. 29, at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). Exhibitors include photographer and designer Gretchen Haien and woodworker Fletcher Cox. The opening reception is July 25 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4056 or 800-647-7542; mlc. lib.ms.us.

Vote Our Lunch Best Around! jfp.ms/best lunch

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ happy hour m-f 4-7 pm

starting at

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

July 25

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday

July 26

Mark Mann

& His Marked Men with Vanity Furr Saturday July 27

"%4(%#(!.'% Charity Taco Night July 25, 5-10 p.m., at Jaco’s Tacos (318 S. State St.). 50 percent of food sales go to the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. Call 601-961-7001 or 601-987-0020. Pink Ta-ta Party July 25, 5 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood), in the bar. Proceeds from sales of the signature cocktail benefit the American Cancer Society. No cover; call 601420-4202; tableonehundred.com. Backpack and School Supply Giveaway July 27, 10 a.m., at The Word Center (5305 Executive Place). Free; call 601665-5555; email info@thewordcenteronline. com; thewordcenteronline.com. Hollingsworth Gospel Concert July 27, 6 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Hogg Auditorium. Performers include the Born Again Quartet, Jack Hollingsworth, Hunter C. May and the MS-TN Trio. Proceeds benefit the Robert Wallace Hollingsworth Family Law Enforcement Scholarship Fund. Donations welcome; call 800-446-3722. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Liam Catchings & The Jolly Racket with Christian Lee Hutson

Tuesday

July 30

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner

Wednesday

July 31

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

jacksonfreepress.com

Financial Statements.” Lunch included; registration required. $15, members free; call 601968-0061; msnonprofits.org. Military Appreciation Day July 31, 1-6 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Rankin Campus (3805 Highway 80 E., Pearl), at the Muse Center. The college honors active service members, veterans and their families through familyfriendly activities, refreshments, and information on education benefits and support groups. Free; call 601-857-3226; email ryan.braswell@hindscc.edu; hindscc.edu.

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

31

FREE WiFi

601-960-2700


DIVERSIONS | music COURTESY DAVID BURNS

A Greater State of Being by Rebecca Docter

R

The Greater States spreads its musical positivity Saturday at Morningbell Records.

ocking with the aura of a new-wave version of Modest Mouse, The Greater States bring a heavy hit to the Jackson scene. Emerging from vocalist and guitarist David Burns and drummer Brandon Gardiner’s thrashing hardcore effort, Coffin Breath, The Greater States was an impromptu idea transformed into a full-time project. “We would show up to practice early or hang out late. I wouldn’t be ready to stop playing drums, and (David) would want to jam out, not really planning on taking it anywhere,” Gardiner says. “He’d start playing some progressions, and I’d find a beat to go with it. Next thing we knew, it was 15 or 20 minutes later.” Taking cues from psychedelic greats Pink Floyd, The Greater States’ live performances often take on that losing-track-of-time mindset. One of the band’s non-negotiables is to make a show last as long as possible and, between songs, the band “doesn’t really stop making noise,” Burns says. This phenomenon is also evident in The Greater States’ recorded work. “Instead of making a set like a collection of songs, it kind of connects everything into one big piece of work,” Gardiner says.

The Greater States is not simply encompass a name, but also a philosophy. To Burns and Gardiner, along with a new addition, bassist Alyson Adcox, the band goes deep in everything from music to name. The band was started in an effort to promote forward thinking and to play music that was “more than what was on the radio or what was going around in the scene,” Burns says. But the main purpose of the band is more than just a message of positivity. “Just hearing the music and feeling like you’re taken to another place—that’s The Greater States,” he says. The secret to what makes The Greater States tick lies in the relationship between Gardiner and Burns. “We have a history, and we have a chemistry with each other, so it’s very easy for us to work together. I had these parts that I wanted to work out and turn into songs, and he happened to be the drummer that was hanging around. He happened to be the guy that I knew would bring out the best in these songs,” Burns says. The Greater States perform at 8 p.m. July 27 at Morningbell Records (622 Duling Ave., Suite 205A, 769-233-7468). Moving Machines also perform. Find The Greater States on Facebook.

DIVERSIONS | music in theory

by Micah Smith

Pop: A Social Mirror

July 24-30, 2013

32

classic rock band should be booted from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and slapped on OLLIE ATKIN

S

ome decades in history are inseparable from the bands that they spawned. You can’t have the ’50s without Elvis Presley. You can’t have the ’60s without The Rolling Stones, and strangely enough, you can’t have the ’70s without the womanly voiced “women’s men” of the Bee Gees. This is a phenomenon that seems decidedly absent in modern music, and when people question why our generation lacks gratifying and truly defining artists, pop music usually gets the brunt of our bitterness. Most music listeners, no matter their genre of preference, have a skewed understanding of pop. Technically speaking, it’s not just Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry and Rihanna doing staircase vocal runs, dance moves or any other assorted actions for the delight of ‘tweens. “Pop music” is a generalization that describes a multitude of genres— from the rock ‘n’ roll of Buddy Holly and Elvis, which employed elements of country and rhythm and blues, to the dance-inducing disco of the ’70s Swedish group ABBA. (And apologies in advance for this fact, but at the start, The Beatles were most definitely pop music.) Before you pull your torches and pitchforks from storage, I’m not suggesting every

What does Elvis have in common with Daft Punk? Pop music holds the answer

the charts alongside Nicki Minaj’s signature brand of personality-swapping insanity. But then again, I’d greatly enjoy hearing “American Top 40” host Ryan Seacrest discuss the news on the latest Justin Bieber outburst followed by, “And coming up next is ‘Comfortably Numb’ by Pink Floyd.” Though “pop” is a vague and term,

the style is most often categorized as a combination of agreeable vocal melodies, nonspecific lyrics and a repetitive verse-chorus structure. This all-encompassing, definition explains why it’s so easy to heap Elton John and Fall Out Boy into a single genus. However, modern audiences tend to add the foundations of soul associated with contemporary R&B and, recently, the pulsing electronic dance beats of house music. So then, why has pop music served as such a versatile descriptor for the better half of a millennium? The answer lies not with the genre, but with the listeners. Pop music was named in a rather simple-minded manner, like “fish sticks” or “Snakes on a Plane.” It means whatever is popular. This goes farther than basic musicality, applying to the lyrical content and to the method in which it is delivered. I’ll intentionally skirt the issue of America’s mutable morality meter here and just ask you to look at the titles of today’s pop hits. It isn’t difficult to see a pattern. We have Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky,” Maroon 5’s “One More Night,” and—Walt Disney help us all—Selena Gomez’s “Come & Get It.” To put it plainly, our society likes sex and partying, so songs talk about sex and partying, as subtly or blatantly as they please.

Our pop music doesn’t have anything to say because, essentially, we don’t have as much to say—at least not in comparison to past generations that faced wide-scale warfare. Not every popular song dealt with the concerns of the day. Some of the more chipper songs intentionally side-stepped the issues, such as the Lovin’ Spoonful’s “Do You Believe in Magic?” or Percy Sledge’s “When a Man Loves a Woman.” These artists were aware of the problems plaguing their fellow man, and they chose to write cheerfully, about girls and cars and singleminded men in love. Sometimes you write about little heartbreaks to get you through the big ones. I make no pretense that calling this information out is going to create a musical renaissance or redefine pop music to be poignant again. It’s probable that if you adore current pop music, you’ll continue to adore current pop music, and the same applies for those who despise rising pop acts like the pseudo-country Florida-Georgia Line or revamped and virulent-looking Miley Cyrus. But next time you’re flipping through radio stations and pondering how poorly pop music is faring, consider the fact that, for better or worse, that’s exactly what most people want to hear.


0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQSULQW DQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP

%XIIDOR:LOG:LQJV-DVRQ7XUQHU %DQGSP %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 6PLWK &DSLWRO*ULOO+XQWHU*LEVRQSP 'D6KDN7%)0RQH\*DQJSP 'UHDP]<XQJ&HDVDUSP +DO 0DO¶V1HZ%RXUERQ6WUHHW -D]]%DQG +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP 0%DU&HQW:HGQHVGD\VZ'- 'XUG\&RVWHOORSPIUHH 2OJD¶V7LP 0HOYLQ´+RXVHFDWµ +HQGUL[SP-RVHSK /D6DOODSP 5DPSDJH([WUHPH3DUN$JLWDWRU SP 6RXO:LUHG&DIp6XJDU:DWHU 3XUSOH-D]] %OXHV 8QGHUJURXQG%DE\-DQ $OO 7KDW&KD]]SPIUHH

-8/<7+856'$< %XUJHUV %OXHV-DVRQ7XUQHU SP &DSLWRO*ULOO$DURQ&RNHUSP &KHURNHH,QQ'·OR7ULR )-RQHV&RUQHU$PD]LQJ/D]\%RL %DQGPLGQLJKW )HQLDQ¶V6SLULWVRIWKH+RXVH SP )LW]JHUDOG¶V%DUU\/HDFKSP *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG.HQQ\ 'DYLV *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ6KDXQ 3DWWHUVRQ +DO 0DO¶V-DPHV%XUNHWWSP +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP ,6+/LYH-D]]SPDIWHU SP -DFNVRQ<DFKW&OXE'RXEOH6KRW] SP .DWKU\Q¶V7KH6RID.LQJVSP 0%DU.DUDRNH7KXUVGD\VZ'- -R1DVW\SPIUHH 3DQ$VLD/DUU\%UHZHUSP 7KH3HQJXLQ:LOO%URZQ 7LP 0F*XLUH 4XH6HUD6HUD7ULSOH7KUHDW 6KXFNHU¶V)XOO0HDVXUH SPIUHH 6RXO:LUHG&DIp5RRWV5RFN  5HJJDH1LWH 8QGHUJURXQG.LQJ6WUHHW SPIUHH

+XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP -XOHS-DPHV%XUNHWWSP 0%DU)OLUW)ULGD\VZ'-IUHH 0DUWLQ¶V$UFKQHPHVLVSP 2OH7DYHUQ0DUN0DQQ +LV 0DUNHG0HQZ9DQLW\)XUU 2OJD¶V+XQWHU*LEVRQ 5RQQLH 0F*HHZ-RKQ3RZHOOSP 7KH3HQJXLQ--7KDPHV 7KH 92/7 5HHG3LHUFH¶V%\UDP6RXWKRI SPIUHH

5HHG3LHUFH¶V%\UDP%DFN SPIUHH 6DP¶V/RXQJH+RRNHUV0DGH2XW RI&RFDLQH 6KXFNHU¶V$QGUHZ3DWHV GHFN  SPIUHH0HPSKLV<DKRRV SP0LNH 0DUW\ GHFN  SPIUHH 6RXO:LUHG&DIp6WULFWO\6RXO 6DWXUGD\V 8QGHUJURXQG6WDWLF(QVHPEOH SP

-8/<681'$<

%XUJHUV %OXHV&DVVLH 6WDF\ SP &KDU%LJ(DV\7KUHHDP )LW]JHUDOG¶V$QG\+DUGZLFN DP +D]HO&RIIHH)LOWHU7KH1RLVH SP +RW6KRWV%\UDP0LNHDQG 0DUW\·V-DP6HVVLRQ Barry Leach .DWKU\Q¶V'RXEOH6KRW]SP 3HOLFDQ&RYH'LHVHOSP 6KXFNHU¶V5HIOHFWLRQVSPIUHH 6KXFNHU¶V0HPSKLV<DKRRV 6RPEUD-RKQ0RUDDPSP SP-DVRQ7XUQHU%DQG 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ.QLJKW GHFN SPIUHH %UXFHDP 6RXO:LUHG&DIp0,1'JDVP(URWLF 7DEOH5DSKDHO6HPPHV 3RHWU\ 2SHQ0LF1LWH DPSP 6RXOVKLQH5LGJHODQG%DUU\/HDFK SP 7ZR5LYHUV&DQWRQ'RXEOH6KRW] -8/<021'$< SP +DO 0DO¶V&HQWUDO06%OXHV 8QGHUJURXQG-DUHNXV6LQJOH 6RFLHW\ UHVW SP WRQSP .HPLVWU\6DOVD0RQGD\VSP 7KH<HOORZ6FDUI%LOO(DVOH\ /DVW&DOO6SRUWV*ULOO,/RYH SPDGYDQFHGRRU\HO 0RQGD\VZ'-6SRRQDIWHU ORZVFDUIRMDKPHGLDJURXSFRP SP 0DUULRWW+RWHO7KHWK$QQXDO -DFNVRQ0XVLF$ZDUGVSP -8/<6$785'$< 0DUWLQ¶V2SHQ0LF)UHH-DP $PHULVWDU%RWWOHQHFN%OXHV%DU 7KH3HQJXLQ0HOORZ0RQGD\V 9LFNEXUJ.LQJ(GZDUGSP

IUHH %RWWRPV8S±'-'DQFLQJ 6KRZ SPDPFRYHU %XUJHUV %OXHV$FRXVWLF&URVV URDGVSP &DSLWRO*ULOO'LHVHOSP &HUDPL¶V5RQ6HQQHWWSPIUHH &OXE0DJRR¶V1DNHG(VNLPRV 'UHDP]%LJ.5,7SP )-RQHV&RUQHU3DW%URZQ 7KH 0LOOHQQLXP%DQGPLGQLJKW )HQLDQ¶V/DUU\:DWHUV'XRSP *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG6KDXQ 3DWWHUVRQ *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ-RQDWKDQ $OH[DQGHU -8/<)5,'$< +DO 0DO¶V7UXWK 6DOYDJH&R Z:HV6KHIILHOGSP $PHULVWDU%RWWOHQHFN%OXHV%DU DGYDQFHGRRUDUGHQODQGQHW 9LFNVEXUJ.LQJ(GZDUGSP +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR IUHH SP %RWWRPV8S'-'DQFLQJZ6SH ,6+&DOODZD\+LJK6FKRRO&ODVV FLDO(YHQWVSPDP RI7KURZEDFN3DUW\Z'- FRYHU 3KLQJDSULQWSP %XUJHUV %OXHV6KDZQ.HQQ\  -XOHS/DUU\%UHZHUSP 5LFKDUGSP .DWKU\Q¶V5HQHJDGHSP &OXE0DJRR¶V1DNHG(VNLPRV 0%DU6DWXUGD\1LJKW/LYHZ'- 'UHDP]0DWW3DSDSP 6KDQRPDNIUHH 'XOLQJ+DOO-DPHV*UHJRU\´7KH 0DUWLQ¶V&HGULF%XUQVLGH3URMHFW )XQQLHVW0DQLQ$PHULFDµ SP SPDGYDQFHGRRU 0HGLWHUUDQHDQ)LVK *ULOO3RZHU 9,3DYDLODEOH DUGHQODQGQHW RIWKH0LF&RPHG\6KRZ )-RQHV&RUQHU3KLOOLS&DUWHU SP 7KH%OXHV8QGHUJURXQG 0RUQLQJ%HOO5HFRUGV0RYLQJ PLGQLJKW 0DFKLQHVZ*UHDWHU6WDWHV )HQLDQ¶V+RQH\%R\ %RRWVSP SPIUHHDOODJHV *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG%ULDQ 2OJD¶V%DEV:RRGSP -RQHV *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ+ROO\ZRRG 7KH3HQJXLQ--7KDPHV 7KH 92/7 1RUPDQ&ODUN 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]/DUU\8QGHU +DO 0DO¶V:HVW:LQG UHVW 'H[ ZRRG +RXQG'RJ/XF\SP WHU$OOHQ 55

-8/<78(6'$< %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 6PLWK )HQLDQ¶V2SHQ0LF 0DUJDULWDV-RKQ0RUDSP 2OH7DYHUQ2SHQ0LF 3HOLFDQ&RYH/DUU\%UHZHUSP 6DO 0RRNLH¶V)LOWHU7KH1RLVH SPIUHH 6KXFNHU¶V%DUU\/HDFK*URXS SPIUHH 7LPH2XW2SHQ0LF 8QGHUJURXQG6SHDNHDV\ 1LJKWZ%DUUHO+RXVH5DPEOHUV SPIUHH

-8/<:('1(6'$< %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 6PLWK &XSV)RQGUHQ&XSV·WK$QQL YHUVDU\&HOHEUDWLRQ +DO 0DO¶V7KH6DWXUGD\*LDQW SP +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP .DWKU\Q¶V%DUU\/HDFKSP 0%DU&HQW:HGQHVGD\VZ'- 'XUG\&RVWHOORSPIUHH 6RXO:LUHG&DIp6XJDU:DWHU 3XUSOH-D]] %OXHV 8QGHUJURXQG.LUVWHQ7KLHQ SP *HWUHJLRQDOSLFNVQHZUHOHDVHV DQGRWKHUPXVLFQHZVHYHU\ ZHHNDW7KH0XVLF%ORJDW MISPVPXVLFEORJ  9HQXHLQIRMISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

THIS WEEK Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget to Vote Us

Best Downtown Lunch jfp.ms/bestlunch

WEDNESDAYS

7/24

LADIES NIGHT 2-for-1 Wells & Domestic 5pm - close

THURSDAYS

7/25

GYPSY CAMP TOUR

WEDNESDAY 7/24:

New Bourbon St. Jazz (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 7/25: T. B. Ledford & Friends (Restaurant) MS CRAFT BEER WEEK CELEBRATION-PATIO New Beers from Abita & Yazoo, Lazy Mag, Lucky Town & Castellain Grand Cru 6pm

Featuring Blackfoot Gypsies, The Gills, The JAG, & Swaze 9 p.m $4 APPETIZERS â&#x20AC;¢ 5 -9PM

WestWind (Restaurant) Dexter Allen w/ Mr. Sipp (Red Room)

2 FOR 1 DRAFT

SATURDAY 7/27:

FRIDAY

7/26

ARCHNEMESIS )

SATURDAY

7/27

CEDRIC BURNSIDE

MONDAY

7/29

2 FOR 1 DRAFT ALL DAY

LAZY MAGNOLIA, MAGIC HAT, LUCKY TOWN, LAUGHING SKULL, BLUE MOON, ANDY GATOR, AND ALL OF YOUR FAVORITES.

OPEN MIC 10PM

TUESDAY

7/30

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S KARAOKE 5 - 9 & 10 - close $1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

UPCOMING SHOWS

FRIDAY 7/26:

Top of The Hops After Party with music by Leo Moreira (Restaurant) Rooster Blues (Patio) Fearless 3 (Big Room) Truth & Salvage (Red Room) MONDAY 7/29:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

VoteBestFor Us! Lunch

jfp.ms/bestlunch NOW AT HAL & MALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

8.3: Flinghammer 10 p.m. 8.9: Grammy Award Winning Nappy Roots 8.28: Black Flag advance tickets @ Ticketmaster 9.28: Good Enough For Good Times (Members Of Galactic)

SCAN

ME!

SEE OUR NEW MENU

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

jacksonfreepress.com

-8/<:('1(6'$<

COURTESY VAMPS.COM

MUSIC | live

33


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf Join us for a FREE class at the lululemon athletica Fondren Showroom Thursday, August 1st at 9 am!

Npoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 pm Level 2 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00-8:00 pm Yoga for Runners/Athletes

Uvftebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Level 1

Xfeoftebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 10-10:45 am Tabatas â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Restorative Yoga â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

Uivstebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-12:45 pm Tabatas â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 9-10:15 am Level I â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

In Jurgen We Trust

I

I\RXKDYHQœWEHHQSD\LQJDWWHQWLRQ\RXPD\ KDYH PLVVHG WKH UROO WKH 86 0HQœV 6RFFHU 7HDPKDVEHHQRQUHFHQWO\$IWHUGHIHDWLQJ(O 6DOYDGRU-XO\WKHWHDPXSSHGLWVZLQ QLQJVWUHDNWRQLQHPDWFKHV  6LQFHEHDWLQJDEDFNXS*HUPDQVTXDG-XQH WKH86KDVJRQHRQWKHORQJHVWZLQQLQJVWUHDN LQWHDPKLVWRU\7KUHHRIWKHZLQVKDYHFRPHLQ :RUOG&XSTXDOLI\LQJPDWFKHVDVWKH86EHJLQV WRSXWDVWUDQJOHKROGRQDELGIRU%UD]LO  7KH8QLWHG6WDWHVKDVKDGDJRDOH[SORVLRQLQ WKLV\HDUœV*ROG&XS²VFRULQJDQDYHUDJHRIIRXU JRDOV SHU JDPH²WKH VRFFHU HTXLYDOHQW WR WKH 1HZ2UOHDQV6DLQWVRIIHQVH  1HZ FRDFK - UJHQ .OLQVPDQQ VWDUWHG URFNLO\ DIWHUWDNLQJRYHUIRU%RE%UDGOH\EXWVRPHWKLQJ KDV¿QDOO\FOLFNHGIRU.OLQVPDQQ%UDGOH\ZDVD JRRG FRDFK EXW WKH WHDP QHYHU VDZ PXFK SUR JUHVVLRQ XQGHU KLP 7KH 86 SOD\HG WRXJK DQG FRXOGHYHQVFDUHVRPHRIWKHWRSWHDPVEXWHY HU\JDPHZDVDVWUXJJOHWRZLQ  (YHQZKHQPDWFKHGZLWKLQIHULRUIRHVWKDWWKH\ VKRXOGQœW KDYH KDG WR VWUXJJOH WR GHIHDW %UDG OH\œVWHDPWHQGHGWRZLQRU.OLQVPDQQœV WHDP LV EHFRPLQJ EHWWHU DW SXWWLQJ DZD\ OHVVHU WHDPVZLWKURRPWRVSDUHDVVHHQE\WKHZLQ RYHU%HOL]HDQGZLQRYHU&XED  7KH86WHDPKDVDOZD\VSOD\HGJRRGGHIHQVH DQGKDVDKLVWRU\RIVROLGJRDONHHSLQJ6FRULQJ JRDOV ZDV WKH ELJJHVW SUREOHP IRU WKH 8QLWHG 6WDWHVEXWLWORRNVOLNH.OLQVPDQQLV¿[LQJWKDWLI

WKH*ROG&XSVFRUHVDUHDQ\LQGLFDWLRQ  %UD]LO  ZLOO EH .OLQVPDQQœV FKDQFH WR VKRZFDVH WR WKH ZRUOG ZKDW KH KDV GRQH ZLWK WKH86WHDP,WZLOODOVREHWKHFKDQFHWRGH¿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œV VRFFHU ¿QDOO\ KDV D FKDQFHWRFRPSHWHZLWKWKHWRSVTXDGVDWVRPH SRLQW XQGHU .OLQVPDQQ²EXW WKDW GRHVQœW PHDQ WKH86LVUHDG\IRUSULPHWLPH\HW  7KH ODVW $VTXDG WKH 86 IDFHG LQ D IULHQGO\ ZDV%HOJLXPDWHDPPDQ\FRQVLGHUDGDUNKRUVH WRZLQWKH:RUOG&XS7KDWJDPHZDVQRWNLQGWR WKH86DV%HOJLXPUROOHGWRDZLQLQGRPL QDWLQJIDVKLRQ  7KH .OLQVPDQQ HUD ZLOO EH VXFFHVVIXO LI WKH 86FDQNHHSEHDWLQJOHVVHUWHDPVZLWKHDVHDQG EXLOGWKHLUZD\WREHVWLQJWKHWRSVRFFHUVTXDGV LQWKHZRUOG5LJKWQRZWKHLQGLFDWLRQLVWKH86LV RQWKHULJKWWUDFN

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

The Dallas Cowboys and the Miami Dolphins have started training camp. You know what that meansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we are one step closer to the return of football.

THURSDAY, JULY 25 CFL (6:30-9:30 p.m., ESPN 2): Bide your time with more football from north of the border, this time featuring the Edmonton Eskimos against the Montreal Alouettes.

MONDAY, JULY 29 MLB (6-9 p.m., ESPN): American League West foes go head to head as the Texas Rangers host the L.A. Angels in a matchup of second and thirdplace teams.

FRIDAY, JULY 26 Boxing (8-10 p.m., ESPN 2): Friday Night Fights presents Juan Carlos Burgos versus Yakubu Amidu as the top card of boxing action.

TUESDAY, JULY 30 Poker (8-10 p.m., ESPN): The National Championship of the 2013 World Series of Poker kicks off in two parts.

SATURDAY, JULY 27 WNBA (2:30-5 p.m., ESPN 2): The elite of the WBNA from the East and the West face off in the 2013 WNBA All-Star Game.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 MLB (6-9 p.m., ESPN): The St. Louis Cardinals, currently in first place in the National League Central, collide with the Pittsburgh Pirates. The rest of the NFL will start training game this week. Dallas and Miami get to start early because they are playing the 2013 Hall of Fame Game.

by Bryan Flynn

Requests For Proposals

July 24 - 30, 2013

Jackson Convention Complex SMG, manager of the Jackson Convention Complex, has issued Requests for Proposals (RFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) for the following services:

34

â&#x20AC;˘ Annual Auditing Services â&#x20AC;˘ HVAC Service & Maintenance â&#x20AC;˘ Audio Visual Services For more information and instructions on how to respond to each RFP, please visit

http://jacksonconventioncomplex.com/ about/business/

SUNDAY, JULY 28 NASCAR (12-4 p.m., ESPN): The stars of NASCAR hit one of the most historic tracks in America, as they race in the Brickyard 400 from Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


METRO JACKSON OPEN HOUSES 168 CROSSOVER DR BRANDON, MS 39042 (3/2, $142,900) Traditional 1 Story, Laminate, Tile, Wood, Fireplace, Master Bath, Walk-In Closet, Walk-Up Attic 2-Car Garage Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES, PAULA RICKS

Shower, Walk-In Closet 2 Car, Attached, Paved Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM GO FLAT FEE REALTY, LLC 546 FLORENCE DR MADISON, MS 39110 (4/3, $414,500) Ashton Grove section of Cypress Lake, French Acadian, 1-1/2 Story, Brick/Pavers, Carpet, Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Walk-In Closet, 2-Car Garage Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES PAULA RICKS

17 PINE CREST PL BRANDON, MS 39042 (4/2, $179,900) Ranch, 1 Story, Carpet, Linoleum/Vinyl, Tile, All Window Treatments, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Walk-In Closet, Walk-Up Attic, 2 Car, Attached, Garage Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES PAULA RICKS

108 CARRINGTON DR MADISON, MS 39110 (4/3/1, $450,000) Traditional 1-Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Garden Tub, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Split Plan, Walk-In Closet, 3+ Cars, Attached Garage Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES PAULA RICKS

282 ROCKBRIDGE DR MADISON, MS 39110 (3/2, $195,300) French Acadian, 1 Story, Carpet, Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Split Plan, Walk-In Closet, 2 Car, Attached, Garage Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES PAULA RICKS

115 CHARTRES DR MADISON, MS 39110 (4/3/1, $472,000) Traditional 1-1/2 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Attic Floored, Beamed Ceiling, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Garden Tub, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Walk-In Closet, Walk-Up Attic, 3+ Cars, Parking Pad Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

1914 EASTRIDGE DR MADISON, MS 39110 (3/2, $199,900) French Acadian, 1 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, All Window Treatments, Attic Floored, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Garden Tub, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Walk-In Closet, 2 Car, Attached, Garage, Parking Pad Open Date: 7/28/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM GO FLAT FEE REALTY, LLC

142 BURNE RUN MADISON, MS 39110 (4/3, $499,000) French Acadian, 1-1/2 Story, Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Walk-In Closet, Walk-Up Attic, 3+ Cars, Attached, Storage Open Date: 7/27/2013 1:00 PM-6:00 PM MCINTOSH & ASSOCIATES

417 NORTHBAY DR MADISON, MS 39110 (4/3/2, $324,000) Colonial 2 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, All Window Treatments, Attic Floored, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Garden Tub, Separate

Information courtesy of MLS of Jackson Miss. Inc. ,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS ³+HUFXOHV7KH/HJHQGDU\ -RXUQH\V´VSLQRII &DWVWKDWORRNOLNHELJSXIIEDOOV 6SLQDURXQG 6QDFN 6LQJOHVEDUWKRXJKWLQ3UDJXH" $OWHUQDWLYHWRDZDY¿OH +DUROG¶VIULHQGLQDPRYLH 6KHZDV³7KH/LWWOH0HUPDLG´ &KDUDFWHULQD79HSLVRGHFDOOHG ³6SDFH0DGQHVV´ /D]LHVWRIWKHGHDGO\VLQV %HVW3LFWXUHQRPLQHHRI

$OWN

&RVE\VKRZUHGRQHDVD(GGLH 0XUSK\PRYLH &RPLFVWULSZLWKDQDOOELUGFDVW 6XIIHUVGLVFRPIRUW +HPRJORELQGHSULYHGFRQGLWLRQ /DERUOHDGHU&KDYH] +RRGZLQNSROLWLFDOO\LQFRUUHFWO\ ³*RRGE\HBBB´ 'L[LH&KLFNVVRQJ

&XLVLQHZLWKSHDQXWVDXFH .QRFNRQWKHKHDG ±%URO7INNER²²SODFHVHYHU\RQH 2[FROODUV %HVWSDUWVRIWKHWHQQLVUDFNHWLQ 2YHUWKURZDWWHPSWV !CROSS 8SSVDOD" 5XOHURQFH 2OGHVWPHPEHURI+DQVRQ %UDQGRIFHUYH]D 3LHBBBPRGH -XVWEDUHO\PDNHLW 2QHZKRZRQ¶WVKDUHDVZLWK )ORJEXWJRRG ,QVW EODQNHWV 0RYLHZLWK*HRIIUH\5XVKDV'DYLG ³-HRSDUG\´XEHUZLQQHU-HQQLQJV 6QDNHPHQWLRQHGLQ³%DE\*RW ³0DU\4XHHQRI6FRWV´ELRJUDSKHU %DFN´ +HOIJRWW )UDVHU %UDQGQDPH\RGHOHGLQDGV 6KRZRSHQHU +RRWHUVPDVFRW ,W¶VSLWFKHGZKLOHFRXUWLQJ :RUNHGLQDPDLOURRP ³6RLWZRXOGVHHP´ 3OD\V$SULO)RROVRQLQ.UDNRZ" %RYLQHRIEXUGHQ 7XEWHPSHUDWXUHWHVWHU 5RZLQJPDFKLQHXQLW %XOO¿JKWLQJVKRXW 0DNHUVRIWKH*LDQW5XEEHU%DQG %LJFURRQHULQ&RSHQKDJHQ" 6PLWKHUVHJ DQG'HK\GUDWHG%RXOGHUV +RZDKDUGZRUNHUZRUNV 5WHUXQQLQJIURP.H\:HVW)/WR ³+DYH,JRWBBBIRU\RX´ 1HVWHJJVRIVRUWV 3RUW.HQW0( ,'¶VXVHGLQLGHQWLW\WKHIW BBBVWHDOHU 1LNRQFRPSHWLWRU ³7KH%HOO-DU´SRHW 7DONVOLNHWKLVKHGRHV 7KH\JX]]OHDEXQFK

<HVLQ<RNRKDPD 6LORVWXII *RWWKHPHGDO (OHFWULFJXLWDULVW3DXO 'XFNGRFVSHUKDSV 6KRZXSDVLQDYLVLRQ 6SOLWLQWZR ³0RGHUQ+XPRULVW´JHQUH %DFNZRRGVW\SHV /LNHSRLQWVDW]HURDPSOLWXGHRQ ZDYHV

!"

#$

!) !%

#%

(

)

!

!%

)

!

!%

#%

#

!%

!"

!'

* !"

##

#

!*

#"

#&

)

!#

#

#

#&

) !*

!

' !'

)

)

!'

!'

#$

#

#&

!%

'

##

#

!* )

) )

#"

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOOFHQWVSHUPLQXWH0XVWEH 2UWRELOOWR\RXUFUHGLWFDUGFDOO5HIHUHQFHSX]]OH

' #

!* #"

#

!%

!

!

!& #&

!$ !$

#&

!( #

!'

!*

#&

#

!

# )

!%

%OXHLQ%ROLYLD )LVKLQD3L[DUSLF 5DWKHUJURVVIHWLVK 1RW³IHU´WRKLOOELOOLHV 6RPHJRYWDJHQWV 6RUWD¿VK\VRUWDVQDN\ $EEUIRUDNLQJRUTXHHQ Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU#MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

#$

#&

#!

!

! #

)

! !

## !

!%

!(

##

##

!'

!

&

!!

! "

!%

039#(/35$/+5°±+AIDOKU²

#

!$

#

#* #%

'

! !"

!"

!" #&

,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

$

#% !%

%<0$77-21(6

! !!

!' )

! !%

#!

# !(

!(

## !

!

!!

(DFKRIWKHOHWWHUVRIWKHDOSKDEHWLVUHSUHVHQWHGLQWKLVJULGE\DQXPEHUEHWZHHQDQG8VLQJOHWWHU IUHTXHQF\ZRUGSDWWHUQUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKHQXPEHUVDV\RXUJXLGHV¿OOLQWKHJULGZLWKZHOONQRZQ(QJOLVK ZRUGV +,17VLQFHD4LVDOZD\VIROORZHGE\D8WU\KXQWLQJGRZQWKH4¿UVW 2QO\ORZHUFDVHXQK\SKHQDWHG ZRUGVDUHDOORZHGLQNDLGRNXVR\RXZRQ WVHHDQ\WKLQJOLNH672&.+2/0RU/21*/267LQKHUH EXW\RX PLJKWVHH$)*+$1VLQFHLWKDVDQXQFDSLWDOL]HGPHDQLQJWRR 1RZVWRSZDVWLQJP\SUHFLRXVWLPHDQG 62/9(SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP

jacksonfreepress.com

%<0$77-21(6

35


July 24 - 30, 2013

Try Some Thing New

36

facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-366-5676 www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Always Drink Responsibly


BULLETIN BOARD: Classifieds

³,ZDVVL[\HDUVROGZKHQP\SDUHQWVWROGPHWKDWWKHUHZDVDVPDOOGDUNMHZHOLQVLGH P\VNXOOOHDUQLQJWREHPH´6RVDLGWKH/HRVFLHQFH¿FWLRQZULWHU*UHJ(JDQLQKLV VWRU\³/HDUQLQJWR%H0H´/HW¶VSUHWHQGWKDW\RXWRRKDYHDVPDOOGDUNMHZHOLQVLGH \RXUVNXOOWKDW¶VOHDUQLQJWREH\RX,W¶VDJRRGPHWDSKRUIRUZKDW,EHOLHYHKDVEHHQ KDSSHQLQJDOOWKHVH\HDUV<RXKDYHEHHQJUDGXDOO\PDVWHULQJWKHDUWRIEHLQJWKHEHVW /HR\RXFDQEH,WKDVQ¶WEHHQHDV\<RXZHUHQ¶WERUQNQRZLQJKRZWREH\RXUEHDXWLIXO UDGLDQWFRXUDJHRXVVHOIEXWKDYHKDGWRZRUNKDUGWRDFWLYDWH\RXUSRWHQWLDOV1RZ \RX¶UHPRYLQJLQWRDQHVSHFLDOO\FULWLFDOSKDVHRIWKHSURFHVVDWLPHZKHQ\RXKDYHWKH FKDQFHWROHDUQKRZWRORYH\RXUVHOIZLWKJUHDWHULQJHQXLW\

6)2'/!UG 3EPT 

³'HDU$VWURORJ\*X\3OHDVHWHOOPHZK\,KDYHWR ZRUNVRKDUG²PHGLWDWHUHÀHFWUHDGDQDO\]HSRNH SURGLQYHVWLJDWH²WRGLVFRYHUWUXWKVDERXWP\VHOI WKDWPXVWEHREYLRXVWRRWKHUV:K\LVLWVRKDUGIRU PHWRVHHZKHUH,QHHGKHDOLQJDQGZKHUH,QHHGWROHW JR":K\LVLWVXFKDQRUGHDOWRJUDVSZKDWLVLQWHUIHULQJ ZLWKP\ZKROHQHVVZKHQ,FDQTXLFNO\SLQSRLQWZKDW RWKHUSHRSOH¶VLVVXHVDUH"²2YHUZRUNHG9LUJR´'HDU 2YHUZRUNHG,¶PKDSS\WRUHSRUWWKDW\RX9LUJRVZLOO VRRQEHRIIHUHGDJXVKRIUHYHODWLRQVDERXWZKR\RXDUH KRZ\RXFDQKHDODQGZKDWVWUDWHJLHVZLOOEHVWVHUYH \RXUTXHVWWRPLQLPL]H\RXUDQ[LHW\$UH\RXSUHSDUHGWR DEVRUEVRPHLQWHQVHWHDFKLQJV")RUEHVWUHVXOWVPDNH \RXUVHOIH[WUDUHFHSWLYH

DQGDSSO\LWWR\RXURZQ¿HOG$TXDULXV:KDWHYHUVNLOORU VXEMHFW\RXZDQWWRPDVWHUH[SRVH\RXUVHOIODYLVKO\WR WKHHIIRUWVRIRWKHUSHRSOHZKRKDYHDOUHDG\PDVWHUHGLW )ORRG\RXUVHOIZLWKZHOOFUDIWHGLQVSLUDWLRQ

0)3#%3&EB -ARCH 

6KRXOG\RXEHZRUULHGWKDWDYHQRPRXVVSLGHUKDV FUDZOHGLQWR\RXUVKRHZKLOH\RXZHUHVOHHSLQJ"-XVW LQFDVHVKRXOG\RXÀLS\RXUVKRHXSVLGHGRZQEHIRUH SXWWLQJLWRQHDFKPRUQLQJ"0\VWXGLHGRSLQLRQKHOO QR7KHFKDQFHVRI\RXEHLQJELWWHQRQWKHIRRWE\D YHQRPRXVVSLGHUOXUNLQJLQ\RXUVKRHDUHHYHQOHVVWKDQ WKHSRVVLELOLW\WKDW\RXZLOOEHDEGXFWHGE\DQDOLHQZKR ORRNVOLNH(OYLV3UHVOH\DQGIRUFHGWRVLQJDNDUDRNH YHUVLRQRI%H\RQFH¶V³6LQJOH/DGLHV´DWDQH[WUDWHUUHVWULDO EDU$QGLI\RXDUHJRLQJDURXQG¿OOHGZLWKGHOXVLRQDO DQ[LHWLHVOLNHWKDW\RXZLOOGH¿QLWHO\LQWHUIHUHZLWKOLIH¶V ,)"2!3EPT /CT  2QHRIWKHZRUOG¶VEHVWUDFHFDUWHDPVLV0F/DUHQ,WZLQV FXUUHQWSUHGLOHFWLRQZKLFKLVWRJLYH\RXDFOHDQVLQJ UHVSLWHIURP\RXUIHDUVDVZHOODVLPPXQLW\IURPKDUP DERXWSHUFHQWRIWKHHYHQWVLQZKLFKLWFRPSHWHV,WV VNLOOHGGULYHUVDFFRXQWIRUPXFKRILWVVXFFHVVEXWLWV WHFKQLFLDQVDUHDOVRSUHWW\VHQVDWLRQDO'XULQJDSLWVWRS !2)%3-ARCH !PRIL  LQWKHPLGGOHRIDUDFHWKH\FDQFKDQJHDOOIRXUWLUHVRQ ³,KDYHWULHGLQP\ZD\WREHIUHH´VLQJV/HRQDUG&RKHQ WKHFDULQOHVVWKDQWKUHHVHFRQGV'R\RXKDYHKHOSHUV LQKLVVRQJ³%LUGRQD:LUH´,QRWKHUZRUGVKHKDVGRQH OLNHWKDW/LEUD",I\RXGRQ¶WLW¶VWLPHWRLQWHQVLI\\RXUHI WKHEHVWKHFDQWROLEHUDWHKLPVHOIIURPKLVXQFRQVFLRXV IRUWVWRJHWWKHP$QGLI\RXGRLW¶VWLPHWRFDOORQWKHP SDWWHUQVEDGKDELWVDQGVHOIGHOXVLRQV+HKDVQ¶WEHHQ WRJLYH\RXDQH[WUDERRVW SHUIHFWLQKLVHIIRUWVEXWWKHZRUNKHKDVGRQHKDV HDUQHGKLPDPHDVXUHRIGHOLYHUDQFHIURPKLVVXIIHULQJ ,UHFRPPHQG\RXIROORZKLVOHDG$ULHV'R\RXUEHVW 3#/20)//CT .OV  WREULQJPRUHUHOLHIDQGUHOHDVHLQWR\RXUOLIH*HWULGRI /HW¶VWU\DQH[SHULPHQW,W¶VULVN\EXW,¶PKRSLQJ\RX WKLQJVWKDWKROG\RXEDFN2YHUWKURZDSLQFKHGH[SHFWD ZLOOGRLWZLWKVXFKÀDLUWKDWWKHUHZLOOEHQRNDUPLF WLRQDQGLJQRUHDVRFDOOHGOLPLWDWLRQRUWZR%\WKLVWLPH EORZEDFN:KDW,SURSRVH6FRUSLRLVWKDW\RXKDYH QH[WZHHN,KRSH\RXZLOOEHDEOHWRVD\VLQFHUHO\³, IXQH[SUHVVLQJPRUHFRQ¿GHQFHWKDQXVXDO,LQYLWH\RX KDYHWULHGLQP\ZD\WREHIUHH´ WRVWUXWDELWHYHQVZDJJHUDV\RXGHPRQVWUDWH\RXU FRPPDQGRYHU\RXUFLUFXPVWDQFHV(QMR\DFWLQJDVLI WKHZRUOGLV\RXUSOD\WKLQJDVLIHYHU\RQHDURXQG\RX 4!5253!PRIL -AY  VHFUHWO\QHHGV\RXWRULVHXSDQGEHDELJJHUEROGHU ³7KHUHDUHVRPHWKLQJV\RXOHDUQEHVWLQFDOPDQGVRPH YHUVLRQRI\RXUVHOI7KHWULFNRIFRXUVHZLOOEHWRDYRLG LQVWRUP´ZURWHWKHQRYHOLVW:LOOD&DWKHU$FFRUGLQJWR JHWWLQJSXIIHGXSZLWKJUDQGLRVHGHOXVLRQV<RXUFKDO P\UHDGLQJRIWKHDVWURORJLFDORPHQV7DXUXV\RX¶UHLQ OHQJHLVWREHPRUHZLOGO\GHYRWHGWRHPERG\LQJ\RXU DSKDVHRI\RXUF\FOHZKHQVWRUPOHDUQLQJLVQ¶W\RXU VRXO¶VFRGHZLWKRXWODSVLQJLQWRDUURJDQFH SULRULW\7KHHGXFDWLRQDOH[SHULHQFHV\RXQHHGPRVWZLOO XQIROGZKHQ\RX¶UHH[SORULQJWKHP\VWHULHVRISHDFHDQG VHUHQLW\,QIDFW,VXVSHFWWKDWWKHGHHSHU\RXUHOD[WKH 3!')44!2)53.OV $EC  PRUHOLNHO\LWLVWKDW\RXZLOODWWUDFWOLIHFKDQJLQJWHDFK ,VXVSHFWWKDW\RXDUHORQJLQJWRWDNHDTXDQWXPOHDS LQJV²OHVVRQVWKDWFDQWUDQVIRUP\RXUOLIHIRUWKHEHWWHU RIIDLWKEXWDUHDOVRDIUDLGWRWDNHWKDWTXDQWXPOHDSRI IDLWK<RXVHQVHWKHSRWHQWLDORIH[SHULHQFLQJDYHU\FRRO DQGIXHO\RXIRUDORQJWLPH H[SDQVLRQZKLOHDWWKHVDPHWLPH\RXKHVLWDWHWROHDYH \RXUFRPIRUW]RQHDQGJLYHXS\RXUIDPLOLDUSDLQ,QOLJKW '%-).)-AY *UNE  RIWKHFRQÀLFWZKLFKPD\QRWEHHQWLUHO\FRQVFLRXV, ,VWKHUHDPHVVDJH\RX¶YHZDQWHGWRGHOLYHUIRUDORQJ VXJJHVW\RXKROGRIIRQPDNLQJDJLJDQWLFTXDQWXPOHDS WLPHEXWKDYHQ¶WEHHQDEOHWR"$UH\RXEXUVWLQJZLWK RIIDLWK,QVWHDGH[SHULPHQWZLWKDIHZEXQQ\KRSVRI WKRXJKWVRUIHHOLQJVWKDW\RX¶YHEHHQORQJLQJWRH[SUHVV IDLWK%XLOGXS\RXUFRXUDJHZLWKVRPHSOD\IXOVNLSVDQG EXWFDQ¶W¿QGWKHULJKWZD\WRGRVR"+DYH\RXVSHQW VNLWWHUVDQGERXQFHVWKDWLQFUHPHQWDOO\H[WHQG PRQWKVFDUU\LQJDURXQGDSRLJQDQWWUXWKWKDW\RXKDYH \RXUSRVVLELOLWLHV IHOWZDVQ¶WULSHHQRXJKWREHUHYHDOHG",I\RXUDQVZHU WRDQ\RIWKRVHTXHVWLRQVLV\HV,EHOLHYHWKHWLPHZLOO VRRQEHDWKDQGWRPDNHDPRYH%XWLW¶VLPSRUWDQWWKDW #!02)#/2.$EC *AN  \RX¶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ÀRZHUVWKH\ EHFDXVHLI\RX¶UHQRWXSWRWKHFKDOOHQJH\RXPD\VFDUH GHWHFWGHVLJQVRQWKHSHWDOVWKDW\RXDQG,FDQQRW)RU DZD\WKHWUDQVIRUPDWLRQV6RVWHHO\RXUUHVROYH&DSUL H[DPSOHWKHHYHQLQJSULPURVHDSSHDUVFRPSOHWHO\ FRUQ0RELOL]H\RXUZLOO'RZKDW¶VQHFHVVDU\WRKDUYHVW \HOORZWRXVEXWLWFDOOVVHGXFWLYHO\WREHHVZLWKDÀDVK\ WKHXQUXO\EOHVVLQJV VWDUSDWWHUQDWLWVFHQWHU0DQ\RIWKHVHFUHWVLJQVWKDW ÀRZHUVRIIHUWKHSROOLQDWRUVDUHPHDQWWRJXLGHWKHP WRZKHUHWKHSROOHQDQGQHFWDUDUH/HW¶VXVHWKLVDVRXU !15!2)53*AN &EB  7KH)UHQFKQRYHOLVW)ODXEHUWGHFODUHGWKDWLI\RXKRSHWR PHWDSKRURIWKHZHHN&DQFHULDQ,DPQRWSUHGLFWLQJ ZULWHDERRN\RXVKRXOG¿UVWUHDGERRNV$5RPDQ WKDW\RXZLOOEHDEOHWRSHUFHLYHDEURDGHUVSHFWUXPRI OLJKW%XW,GREHOLHYH\RXZLOOGLVFHUQFXHVDQGFOXHV DXWKRUQDPHG3HWURQLXVEHOLHYHGWKDWWKHLPDJLQDWLRQ WKDWDUHKLGGHQIURPPRVWSHRSOHDQGWKDWKDYHEHHQ GRHVQRWZRUNDWLWVSHDNSRZHUXQOHVVLWLVLQXQGDWHG LPSHUFHSWLEOHWR\RXLQWKHSDVW ZLWKUHDGLQJPDWHULDO,VXJJHVW\RXDGRSWWKHLUDGYLFH +RPHZRUN:KDWGR\RXZDQWVREDGO\WKDW\RX¶UHGULYLQJLWDZD\"+RZFDQ\RX¿[WKHSUREOHP" 7HVWLI\DW)UHHZLOODVWURORJ\FRP

As low as $20! jfpclassifieds.com HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE

$IRECT46IS(IRING

!,,!2%!3 2//--!4%3#/-

',5(&79LVFXUUHQWO\UHFUXLWLQJIRUWKHIROORZLQJ SRVLWLRQLQ-DFNVRQ6DWHOOLWH,QVWDOODWLRQ7HFKQL FLDQ,I\RXDUHQRWDEOHWRDFFHVVRXUZHEVLWH ',5(&79FRPPDLO\RXUUHVXPHDQGVDODU\ UHTXLUHPHQWVWR',5(&79$WWQ7DOHQW$FTXLVLWLRQ ,QYHUQHVV'ULYH:HVW(QJOHZRRG&27R DSSO\RQOLQHYLVLWZZZGLUHFWYFRPFDUHHUV(2(

(ELP7ANTED

PDNHH[WUDPRQH\LQRXUIUHHHYHUSRSXODUKRPH PDLOHUSURJUDPLQFOXGHVYDOXDEOHJXLGHERRN 6WDUWLPPHGLDWHO\*HQXLQHZZZ HDV\ZRUNIURPKRPHFRP $$1&$1

SERVICES

%URZVHKXQGUHGVRIRQOLQHOLVWLQJVZLWKSKRWRV DQGPDSV)LQG\RXUURRPPDWHZLWKDFOLFNRIWKH PRXVH9LVLWKWWSZZZ5RRPPDWHVFRP $$1 &$1

MISCELLANEOUS 3EEKING

)HPDOHLQWHUHVWHGLQD0DOH\UV ROG&DOO

3EEKING

0DOHLQWHUHVWHGLQ)HPDOH\UVROG&DOO 

#HEAP4RASH#OLLECTION

6PDOOEXVLQHVVHVDQGFKXUFKHV:HSURYLGHWZR JDOWUDVKFDUWVDQGHPSW\WKHPHYHU\ZHHNIRU PRQWK&DOO  

RETAIL 2EBECCA2OSE&LEA-ARKET

+RPHGHFRUFROOHFWLEOHVIXUQLWXUHMHZHOU\TXLOWV YLQWDJHLWHPVDQWLTXHV PXFKPRUH2YHU VTIWRILQGRRUVKRSSLQJ2UJDQL]HGFOHDQIULHQGO\ VHUYLFH&UHGLW'HELWFDUGVDFFHSWHG&+Z\ 65LFKODQG06  

$)3(462ETAILER

6WDUWLQJDWPRQWK IRUPRV  +LJK 6SHHG,QWHUQHWVWDUWLQJDWPRQWK ZKHUH DYDLODEOH 6$9($VN$ERXW6$0('$<,QVWDOODWLRQ &$//1RZ

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: Post an ad at jfpclassifieds.com, call 601-362-6121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-510-9019. Deadline: Mondays at noon.

NOTICE: SPILL CLAIM

Did you know?

Regardless of Location All Mississippi Businesses and Charities May Be Eligible to file an Oil Spill Claim. Do you Qualify for Compensation? Finding out is Free and Easy with the MySpillClaim® Causation Calculator. Is it worth 5 minutes to find out?

1-855-REV-CALC

jacksonfreepress.com

,%/*ULY !UG 

Williams Kherkher Hart Boundas, LLP Principal Office in Houston, Texas

37

MySpillClaim.com


NE

W

STOR E

WIDE SALE!

Julyâ&#x20AC;Š26thâ&#x20AC;Š&â&#x20AC;Š27th

â&#x20AC;ŠSaveâ&#x20AC;ŠBigâ&#x20AC;Šonâ&#x20AC;Šnameâ&#x20AC;Šbrandsâ&#x20AC;Šlike WonderWink,â&#x20AC;ŠCarhartâ&#x20AC;Šandâ&#x20AC;ŠCrocs.

25%â&#x20AC;ŠOffâ&#x20AC;ŠStorewide 50-75%â&#x20AC;ŠOffâ&#x20AC;ŠSelectâ&#x20AC;ŠItems Andâ&#x20AC;ŠShop

PRIMOS SHRIMP BLT summer on a bun

!"#$%&'()*#+,-.,#/01234,5#"6,#2,7"#08#7911,:#34#09:#)6:31;#<=>?# !#"0@7",5#+60A,#+6,@"#/3@2@""@#294#;3A,5#63B6#+3"6#B:3AA,5#76:31;*# .34,C:3;,4,5#'3773773;;3#"01@"0,7*#A,@8#A,""9/,#/:37;D#2@/04*#@AA# "0;;,5#088#+3"6#09:#$%&'()#601,1@5,#:,109A@5,#7;:,@5?#

TAXâ&#x20AC;ŠFREE!

3500â&#x20AC;ŠLakeland,â&#x20AC;ŠDr.â&#x20AC;Šinâ&#x20AC;ŠFlowood,â&#x20AC;ŠMS Mon-Friâ&#x20AC;Š10-6â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;ŠSatâ&#x20AC;Š10-2â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;Š

601.790.9003

PRIMOSCAFE.COM

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bonus Bucks time again!  ­Can be used on up to 50% of the total sale, before tax.          ­Redeemable from Saturday, June 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 31. ­Good for use on anything at GARDEN WORKS!  *Exceptions: Landscape Services â&#x20AC;˘Â Delivery â&#x20AC;˘Â Urban Home â&#x20AC;˘Â Sale items

650 Hwy 51, Ridgeland | Interiors Market, Fondren www.MartinsonsMS.com | 601.856.3078 www.facebook.com/martinsonsms | Instagram: MartinsonsMS

Last Week for our July Tag Sale! 50% Off Green Tags &  25% Off Purple Tags at our  Neat Used Things for Sale Fondren & Midtown Locations!!! a different kind of resale store

NUTS Fondren

July 24 - 30, 2013

Specializing in upscale clothing and home decor

38

/4UBUF4USFFUt+BDLTPO .4   .PO'SJBNQN 4BUVSEBZBNQN

NUTS Midtown

Something for Everyone!

.JMMTBQT"WFOVFt+BDLTPO .4   8FE'SJBNQN NUTS is a fundraiser for The Good Samaritan Center, 4BUVSEBZBNQN helping families in crisis for 40 years!

Pint Night

Thursday, July 25

featuring the new Abita Strawator Beer a mix of Abita Strawberry & AndyGator

Live Music by Triple Threat â&#x20AC;˘ Abita Beer $4 Free Abita Pint Glass with every Abita draft purchase Pint Night Starts at 6 pm â&#x20AC;˘ Happy Hour 3:30 - 6:30

2801 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ Fondren District 601-981-2520 â&#x20AC;˘ www.QueSeraMS.com


!KK%$%%%3

$X'V&bN&cbd%

bNP#&#G"XN &'()*+*,

%>.,&-,2.+-/&,7*L&& ECM&-,2.+-/&-4-.5&#8,3>5B& G7,3>5&>,3&N8-/3>5L

6

!"# %%% $

!"#!"$%& '(&!"#)&

&'()*+*,

?=@/3=32AB=2.3=4933 AB:48/374653C=2.>

Thursday, July 25, 2013

O-P00&/-0-12&2*7&*+,,-./&& -4-.5&678.&27&*+,&@EQCK& ',&"8H8/2&RSB&>00&*+,,-./&>.-& -0+H+<0-&27&T7>2&7,&37*,&27&26-& U.>,3&V.+W-&$.>*+,HB&*6-.-&& 7,-&081:5&*+,,-.&;.--&;>00/&+,27&& @QBCCC&!>/6K D8/2&90>5&578.&;>47.+2-&2><0-&H>J-/& *+26&578.&X+4-.<>,:&X-*>.3/&1>.3& 27&Y8>0+;5L

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

AFTER HOURS JOIN US IN JULY F O R

Mad about Monet

U-2&6>995L RCZS&O>..-,27,&X7>3&[&\+1:/<8.HB&G#&A]R^C& R_^SS_SRQ_]REQ&[&.+4-.*>0:4+1:/<8.HL17J

\+/+2&V0>5-./&!08<&;7.&J7.-&3-2>+0/L&G8/2&<-&ER&5->./&7;&>H-&7.&74-.L&G>,>H-J-,2&.-/-.4-/&>00&& .+H62/&27&>02-.&7.&1>,1-0&9.7J72+7,/&>2&>,5&2+J-&*+26782&,72+1-L&U>J<0+,H&9.7<0-J`&!>00&R_^^^_FFF_]S]SL&& aECRA&X+4-.*>0:&!>/+,7&[&)72-0L&"00&.+H62/&.-/-.4-3L

5 PM

cash bar

6 PM & 6:30 PM

exhibition tours

Come explore the Museum with a member of our curatorial staff or join your friends for an afterwork cocktail. Held one Thursday evening a month. Programming is designed for young professionals but all ages are welcome. C OST: Occasional exhibition admission fees apply

380 SOU T H L AMAR ST R EE T n JAC K SON, MIS SIS SIPPI 39201 W W W. M S M U S E U M A RT. O R G n 6 0 1. 9 6 0 .1515 n 1. 866. V I E WA RT

jacksonfreepress.com

IA;J?79478.

;JOA;

"&*+,,-.&/-0-12-3&-4-.5&678.& *+00&3.79&981:/&;7.&<81:/&7,&26-& !0+,:7&=7>.3&?&89&27&@ABCCC&& +,&Bonus ',&D805&EF&>2&G+3,+H62B&7,-& *+,,-.&*+00&3.+4-&>*>5&+,&>&& =.>,3&I-*&#J>.2&!>.K

D079=E23F G=6:09=E23 743H:BE

D079=E2 L5MJ3 *:8:263KN NA

-./0/123456.74839:;<3 =<5:6376>

39


Butler’s

SOCIAL SECURITY AND DISABILITY LAW Many people come to me, virtually without hope, after they have been paying into the Social Security system for years - only to be rejected by the Government for disability benefits when they become sick or severely injured.

REMEMBER IT’S YOUR MONEY 2906 North State Street, Suite 320 Phone: (601) 982-2900 • Fax: (601) 982-2999 • www.mattgreenbaum.com

SOUTHLAND

AUTO SERVICE

E

AM

G

In Business since 1971

! N O

Magic, Heroclix, & More

5448 North State Street Jackson, MS 39206

601-362-2253 Monday-Friday 7:30 - 5:30

SERVICES • A/C & Heating • Starting & Charging • Electrical Problems • Brakes & Clutches • General Maintenance • Tune-Ups & Oil Changes • Transmission Service and much more!

S

A

L

O

N

Comics, Toys, Collectibles, Supplies & More

419 Mitchell Ave|Jackson 601.982.5575

579 HWY 51, Suite D Ridgeland 601.856.1789 comiccommander@gmail.com

Tuesday - Friday|9:00 - 6:00 Saturday|9:00 - 2:00 Walk-Ins Welcome. Appointments are preferred.

COMIC COMMANDER

with the purchase of a hair color service Mention this ad from July 17th - 30th.

GET HIM ON THE LINE. LINE. TRY FOR FREE!

601-709-7084

Market Cafe

“Bargain Hunting Makes You Hungry” Offering Breakfast & Lunch Over 36,000 sq ft of antiques, architectural salvage, collectibles and furniture.

More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en Español / 18+

The fastest growing social network for men who like men

1325 Flowood Dr. • www.fleamarketms.com Sat: 9am-5pm • Sun: 12pm-5pm • $1 Admission Mention This Ad For Free Admission!

When you get something super hot… reveal it.

175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl  *  601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p  *  www.shopromanticadventures.com


v11n46 - Back To School!