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TICKETS: Adult Season: $20 • Adult Day: $12 Student Season: $10 • Student Day: $7 • Ages 5 & Under: Free Duck Dynasty Experience - Tickets $10 while supplies last Pre-fair reduced rates available June 24, 2013 to July 7, 2013 at PRR Welcome Center.

C h o c taw , M i s s i s s i p p i

Wednesday, July 10 11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests 2013 Choctaw Indian Princess Pageant World Series Stickball

Thursday, July 11 11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Jana Mashonee Josh Turner World Series Stickball

Friday, July 12 10:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Kari & Billy Pat Green World Series Stickball

Saturday, July 13 7:00am 10:00am 1pm-4pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

REZ RUN 2013 Gates Open Si & Alan Robertson of “A&E’s Duck Dynasty” Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Plateros Justin Moore World Series Stickball Championship

July 3 - 9, 2013

Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-8486

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For More Information: 601.650.7450 www.ChoctawIndianFair.com This is a family, non-alcoholic event. For More Information on REZ RUN: 601.650.1765 www.racesonline.com

Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren 601-366-5273 English Village 904 E. Fortification St. 601-355-9668 Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089 NEW LOCATION Yazoo City 734 East 15th Street 662-746-1144


MELANIE BOYD

JACKSONIAN CRAIG HENDRY

W

hen beer aficionado Craig Hendry is asked what his favorite brew is, he always hesitates. “My favorite style is imperial stout, which is common in Belgian beers, but I don’t really have a favorite (beer),” Hendry says. The Gilbertown, Ala., native and Jackson resident enjoys drinking locally and, until recently, some of his favorite beers couldn’t be bought at home in Mississippi. “As I traveled, I saw a wide beer selection,” Hendry says. “I always wondered why Mississippi was lacking. I always had to buy my beer out of state and bring it home.” So in 2007, Hendry, 41, and a few of his fellow beer lovers started Raise Your Pints, an organization committed to bringing high quality beers to Mississippi. The nonprofit has grown rapidly in recent years, partly thanks to last year’s grassroots campaign to raise the alcohol limit in beer sold in Mississippi. After that legislation passed last July, Hendry took over as president of Raise Your Pints. Hendry, who graduated from the University of South Alabama with a degree in information science in 1997, says the beer-brewing process fascinates him even more than the array of styles and flavors. He has been a great advocate of homebrewing for many years, after getting interested in the hobby himself. “It was a case of liking beer so much that I was given a homebrewing kit for Christmas—it just snow-

CONTENTS

balled from there,” Hendry says. In addition to actually brewing the beer, Hendry also builds many of the parts needed in the homebrewing process. A self-proclaimed craftsman, the hobby allows Hendry to display his workmanship as well as his beer—to be a part of the brewing process “from start to finish.” Hendry’s eyes light up when he recounts his favorite brewing moment: winning Best in Show at a home-brewing competition in Hattiesburg, just one of the many competitions he’s taken part in. As he puts it, if there’s a competition, he’s probably there. “It’s a challenge to make great homebrew,” Hendry says. So when his home state of Mississippi was left being one of only two states that had yet to legalize homebrewing, Hendry rose to the challenge. “I spent a lot of time at the Capitol,” Hendry says. “I put on a coat and tie and shook a lot of hands. We were just amateurs going down to the capitol, trying to change a law.” Hendry isn’t the type of guy to waltz around in a suit on a regular basis. An IT analyst by day and homebrewer by night, Hendry is more of a T-shirt and jeans type of guy, but spreading the gospel about his favorite past time was more than reason enough to pull out his Sunday best. “Homebrewing is a safe, fun hobby,” Hendry says. “It helps build an appreciation of craft beer.” —Rebecca Docter

Cover photo by Melanie Boyd

10 What’s Next for Johnson

Harvey Johnson talks about his 12 years in office and what his future holds.

30 What’s Old Is New Again

Our resident Girl About Town explores the new places in town breathing life into old traditions and treasures.

38 Friday Night Lights

“Mississippi Gridiron Gold” explores the glory and the guts of high school football, and the South’s obsession with the sport.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 ................................ EDITORIAL 14 .................................. MIKE DAY 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 28 ...................................... TRAVEL 30 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 32 .......................................... FILM 33 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 34 ...................................... EVENTS 36 ....................................... MUSIC 37 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 38 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 ....................................... ASTRO 42 ...................................... FLY DIY

FLICKR/TOM NEWBY PHOTOGRAPHY; JULIE SKIPPER; TRIP BURNS

JULY 3 - 9, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 43

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EDITOR’S note

by Kathleen M. Mitchell Features Editor

Join the Conversation

A

s I sat down to write this column, I really struggled with what to say. I spent the last week wrapped up in thoughts of Texas Sen. Wendy Davis and the Defense of Marriage Act. Dialogue between and about race has also been on my mind, especially after we received some feedback on our last issue focusing on the subject—an anonymous sender informed us that our highly researched and well-cited statistics were “racist propaganda bullsh*t.” I’ve thought about the media, too, based on conversations with a group of communication studies graduates from Millsaps College about what it means for the news world when CNN and all the major 24-hour news sources ran reruns about muffins and the like while one of the most important and dramatic filibusters in recent years took place in Texas. At the same time, I’ve spent a big chunk of the last week preparing for a vacation to Pennsylvania for my brother’s wedding and to visit some friends in Philadelphia and New York City. I know it will be a thought-provoking week. I’ll have the chance to spend time with folks all the way from conservative religious adults to liberal gay 20-somethings. But despite all these thoughts swimming around in the fishbowl of my brain, not one specific thought came through. They all just kept swirling, crashing together in new ways and coming up for air again. While driving back to Jackson from a short trip last weekend, my husband and I listened to a couple of things that kept me thinking about Sen. Davis. The first was an NPR podcast that explored the filibuster in the national Senate. Essentially, the filibuster used to only exist in that Hollywood sense: one person

standing for hours, refusing to yield the floor—much like Davis. But now, due to several changes, clarifications and adjustments in the vast Senate rulebook, senators can “filibuster” simply by calling the Senate floor and saying they’d like to. I’m not sure how this rule translates on a state-by-state level, but it made what

It’s not necessarily what I have to say; it’s the conversation itself that matters. Sen. Davis did all the more inspirational. She didn’t (quite literally) call it in—she did the work. The second thing we listened to came on the radio shortly after we passed into Alabama. We accidentally found ourselves tuned in to a conservative Christian talk radio station, where the radio host was going on about Davis stopping a bill that would “make it illegal to kill babies.” The host’s tactics framed the conversation in such a way that closed the door for any real discussion. Obviously, the fight for reproductive rights doesn’t come from a desire to “kill babies.” Saying so is the equivalent of sticking your fingers in your ears and shouting “I can’t hear youuuu!” Race popped up in my conversa-

tions throughout the weekend as well, helped in no small part by Paula Deen’s recent unfortunate confession. It’s a genuinely debatable topic. Some folks I know take the stand that such slurs are never OK, and her firing is warranted. Others, though, suggest that she is being unfairly punished for being honest about something she did a while ago. Although I certainly have my point of view, neither side of the argument is particularly offensive to me. What I find interesting, though, is the truths about race as a larger subject that inadvertently come up when people talk about Deen’s situation. For example, I got to talking about Deen’s predicament with some older born-and-raised southerners, who still use the descriptor “colored.” And while they genuinely didn’t mean anything offensive by the word, it made me stop every time I heard it. But, even though the word choice was jarring, I made an effort to listen, and I actually heard a story of racial reconciliation, even if on a small scale. It was a story of overcoming the differences in skin tone. I guess, in the end, I took so long to figure out what to write in this space because I couldn’t decide what I wanted to bring to the conversation—what I could bring to the conversation. As a heterosexual person in a marriage that is legitimate in all 50 states, as well as every country on earth, what can I say about my joy for my gay and lesbian friends that will even compare to the feelings they could put to words themselves? I can’t know what it’s like to come out, to feel the weight of society’s judgment upon me. I can only feel second-hand the pain of parents that don’t understand or of the prejudice of former friends. Similarly, the electricity I felt scroll-

ing through the tweets marked with #standwithwendy the morning after her filibuster surely can’t compare to the accounts and posts and videos and thoughts from those in attendance. And as a white person from a background of opportunity with a college education and a steady job, how can I contribute to a conversation about racial inequality? As I started writing out my thoughts, I realized it’s not necessarily what I have to say; it’s the conversation itself that matters. Although my specific views may not be unique or groundbreaking, they are still a valid part of the conversation. I do add something to the discussion. Every voice should matter (yes, even those that don’t take my side, although I certainly wish they could be a bit more polite about it). As I pack for my trip, these thoughts still swirl. I wonder who I’ll talk to in the next week about these issues and others. The topics can be difficult and awkward, but opening the channels of discussion is vital. It’s what we were getting at with our GOOD Ideas issue (although our dear unnamed mail responder seemed to miss that point). It’s about talking, sure, but it’s about listening, too. After all, Wendy Davis stood and talked for 11 hours, but I believe it was tied to a hope that someone in that room or someone tuning in would take their fingers out of their ears and actually listen. So I’m speaking my mind. I’m standing with Wendy. I’m marching for pride. But I’m also listening. Even when I want to brush it off. Even when I disagree. Even when I vehemently disagree. The conversation is the only way we’ll ever get anywhere.

July 3 - 9, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Brinda Fuller

Rebecca Docter

Amber Helsel

Kristin Brenemen

Briana Robinson

Micah Smith

Jesse Houston

RL Nave

Brinda Fuller Willis often plays tricks on people with her identical twin. She’ll go anywhere to hear the blues, and she is a real farmer’s daughter. She wrote the travel story.

Editorial Intern and Flowood native Rebecca Docter is a journalism major at Louisiana State University. She enjoys listening to new records and hanging out with her daschund, Louis. She wrote a music story and the Jacksonian.

Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel graduated from Ole Miss with a degree in journalism. Her most favorite activity is filling her mind with random facts. She loves new music, the internet, and living a healthy life. She wrote the DIY piece.

Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dystopianism. At night, she fights crime. Hit her up @wyldkyss to trade Animal Crossing codes. She designed most of the issue and contributed to the cover package.

Music Editor Briana Robinson wants to become an expert on everything music. She also loves dance and photography. Send her music and the scoop on music happenings at briana@jacksonfreepress.com. She wrote a music story.

Micah Smith recently graduated from Mississippi College where he studied English and Journalism. When not writing reviews or his music column, he performs with the local band Sun Ballet. He wrote the Diversions cover story.

Jesse Houston is a chef and graduate of the Texas Culinary Academy. He is currently consulting, launching exciting pop-up restaurants, and plans to open his own restaurant in Jackson soon. He contributed to the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote talks for this issue.


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jacksonfreepress.com


MELANIE BOYD

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Name: Lynn Ross Age: 71 Photo Location: Ace Hardware How long have you lived in Jackson? 50 years. How long have you read the JFP? As long as I can remember. What’s your favorite part of Jackson? The Fondren area.

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

Favorite quote: “Always be available to help others.� Secret to life: Love others and be healthy.

WE NEED YOU!

Time is dwindling to get your donation in for Chick Ball 2013. This year we are fighting sex trafficking in Mississippi. We are taking donations of art, furniture, jewelry, clothes, sporting goods, home dĂŠcor, gift certificates, vacation getaways, wine and liquor baskets, and more for our silent auction. We also accept any monetary donations. All proceeds go directly to the Center for Violence Prevention. Call Amber at 601-3626121, extension 23, to find out how to help. Donations received by July 10 will run in the silent auction guide in the big Chick ball issue of the JFP, out July 17.

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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CRAFT BEER AND YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL PLACE TO DRINK IT? Garrad Lee Dale’s Pale Ale, at my house because I have to drive it in.

Louren Reed Crooked Letter’s Gipsy IPA. Absolutely delightful.

Ian Hanson Shift Pale Ale, also at Garrad Lee’s house, because his brother drives it in.

Brian Williams (Lazy Magnolia’s) Indian Summer, and anywhere I’m with a group of my besties.

Marika Gunnels Cackett Le Fin du Monde, and on Todd Parkman and Katie Parkman’s deck.

Michael W. Sacknoff Sam Adams and Lucky Town, depending on my mood.

Duncan Betzalel Crooked Letter’s Mystery Romp!

Ben Street Timber Beast at Buffalo Wild Wings.

MeLinda Bell I just discovered Luckytown’s Ballistic Blonde. Best beer I ever tasted, and my favorite place to drink it would be anywhere I could. Israel Martinez Sierra Nevada at Buffalo Wild Wings, every Thursday night. Barak Gunter New Belgium Fat Tire, at my house since it’s not in Mississippi, yet.

Tim Murphy Lucky Town Brewing Company Flare Incident and Ballistic Blonde! And it’s tough to beat The Bulldog’s patio on a summer evening. Brooke Wilson Jones Lucky Town’s Ballistic Blonde! I had it at Burgers and Blues this weekend. Good times. Ed White Crooked Letter, Mystery Romp at the Bulldog.

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July 3 - 9, 2013

 

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CUPSESPRESSOCAFE.COM


9th Annual THERE’S STILL TIME TO HELP! To donate money or items for the silent auction, or join the committee, call 601.362.6121 ext. 23, or email the chick crew at chickball@jacksonfreepress.com

Musical guests:

• Caroline Herring • The Amazing Lazy Boi Band featuring Maya Kyles • Opposite Day • Pam Confer and Jazz Beautiful • Wink and the Signal • Melody Moody and Valley Gordon • Static Ensemble

Sponsors Include:

July 20, 2013

starts at 6pm @ Hal & Mal

Other entertainment by: • Burlesque by Jezabelle Von Jane of the Magick City Sirens • Spoken word by Soul • Spoken word by Eric Spann • Joyce Brewer - emcee

Chism Strategies, LLC • Neel-Schaffer • Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz Tom Head • Brandi Stuart • Lithic, Inc. • Natalie Maynor • Pink Blush • Nola Gibson George and Anne Schimmel • SE Lock & Key • Susan Shands Jones • Acey Salon SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE:

PROCEEDS HELP FIGHT SEX TRAFFICKING IN MISSISSIPPI Make checks payable to Center for Violence Prevention or use your credit card at http://www.mscvp.org

jacksonfreepress.com

Imperial Highness - $5,000 • Diva/Devo - $2,500 • Goddess/God - $1,000 • Queen/King - $500 Princess/Prince - $250 • Duchess/Duke - $125• Chick/Rooster - $50

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Wednesday, June 26 The U.S. Supreme Court rules to eliminate part of the Defense of Marriage Act, allowing married gay couples to receive the same tax, health and pension benefits as other married Americans.

Friday, June 28 Hinds County Circuit Judge Winston Kidd grants a temporary injunction to stop Mississippi’s new open-carry law, calling it vague. ‌ Kris Perry and Sandy Stier of Berkeley, and Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo of Burbank, the two gay couples, who sued to overturn California’s Proposition 8, get married. Saturday, June 29 U.S. senators threaten trade retaliation if Ecuador harbors Edward Snowden. Vice President Joe Biden asks Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa to turn down asylum requests. ‌ Two of San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit’s largest unions go on strike. Sunday, June 30 Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy rejects a last-ditch effort by opponents to stop gay marriages in California. ‌ Hundreds of thousands of protesters march on the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt in an attempt to force out Islamist president Mohammed Morsi.

July 3 - 9, 2013

Monday, July 1 The Hinds County Board of Supervisors approves interim appointments to the vacant District 2 and District 4 seats. ‌ More than 2,000 people attend Chokwe Lumumba’s inauguration as mayor of Jackson.

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Tuesday, July 2 55 hospitals in 21 states agree to pay $34 million to the U.S. government to settle allegations that they used more expensive inpatient procedures to get more from Medicare. ‌ A suicide truck bomber, followed by heavily armed men, storms a NATO supplier’s compound in Kabul, Afghanistan. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Chokwe Lumumba is Jackson’s New Mayor by Tyler Cleveland

I

f Jackson is divided over the election of that brings us here today. At a wonderful Lumumba called gentrification “nothing Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, you couldn’t moment where we are prepared to recount more than a war on the people who already tell it at the inauguration ceremony at where we’ve been and where we’ve come and live in the community.� the Jackson Convention Complex. what we’ve done and where we must go. He “We’re open for business, y’all,� LuAt least 2,000 Jacksonians mumba said. “But we’re going from all walks of life came to to do it right. If you want to take part in an inauguration come to Jackson and set up ceremony that included perfora business, then you better mances by the Mississippi Mass be ready to hire the people Choir and opera singer DeAnna of Jackson. If you’re going to Tisdale, as well as speeches from work in Jackson and develop Lumumba and Myrlie Eversin Jackson, you better be ready Williams, the widow of slain to hire contractors in Jackson. civil-rights icon Medgar Evers. We don’t want to use our tax “With me, what you see is dollars to send them to some what you get,� Lumumba said other communities.� to wild applause. “People have The newly inaugurated said a lot about me being too mayor left the crowd with a radical or too militant, all that call to action to become amstuff. If you get to know me, bassadors for Jackson. I’m a pretty nice guy. But I’m Later, Lumumba took passionate. I’m passionate as a in the People’s Inaugural Relawyer, and I’m passionate as a ception, hosted by Ward 6 Mayor Chokwe Lumumba and Jackson’s seven City Council human being.� Councilman Tony Yarber and members were sworn in Monday afternoon at the Jackson The incoming mayor anEvelyn Reed, who worked on Convention Center. nounced his nominations of Lumumba’s campaign team. Deputy Police Chief Lindsey The event featured two-time Horton to head the Jackson Police Depart- who does not know his history is bound to Grammy award-winning jazz singer and ment, and Willie Owens to serve as fire chief repeat it. It is also so important that we are songwriter Cassandra Wilson, singers Rhonfor the Jackson Fire Department. Lumumba now joined by all the men and women who da Richmond and Tawanna Shaunte and said he chose both men because of their expe- are here of goodwill and good mind, in order the Musicians Jazz Ensemble. rience and credentials, but also because they to forge this unified city as we move forward Lumumba made his entrance nearly 30 commanded respect among their colleagues. into the future.� minutes into the event to the beat of the AfLumumba was stoic as he took to the Lumumba addressed his biggest per- rican drums of local drummer Jerry Jenkins, podium after being sworn in, but slipped ceived weakness, his relationship with and led by traditional African-style dancer easily into comfort when talking about the Jackson’s white business community, by Chiquila Pearson. familiar subject of race. saying Jackson will be business-friendly, Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler “It’s precisely (Medgar Ever’s) story but would not tolerate gentrification. Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. TRIP BURNS

Thursday, June 27 A special session of the Mississippi Legislature convenes to reauthorize the Medicaid program days before it was set to expire July 1. ‌ The U.S. Senate passes an immigration bill to open the door to U.S. citizenship to millions.

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11 ways to use Neverwet this summer This new fantastic new spray this summer makes anything waterproof. Here’s 11 ways to keep your summer dry. See a video demonstration by searching Rustoleum Neverwet on youtube and see for yourself.

1 2 3 4 5 6

Spray a cardboard box. Throw in your canned drinks and fill up with ice. Bam. Instant ice cooler. Spray your cellphone down. Might help when you jump in the pool with it in your pocket. Again. Spray the outside of your grill so you can keep going during a flash summer shower. Douse a checkered blanket for the quickest post picnic cleanup ever. You know someone always spills the lemonade. Waterproof your Brazilian wavy weave to fight the humidity frizz! Put it on your umbrella to do away with the shake-shakeshake maneuver before you go inside. Rain just rolls off!

7 8 9 10 11

Make wearing white practical. Spray your head-toe white ’fit down to deflect spills and stains. Now you have no excuse not to wear that new white skirt. Spray down your whole house to pet- and toddler-proof your house. Everything will now just sweep up and not stain! Grandma can get rid of the plastic covers on the couch at last! This spray will let you sit on the couch in the summer without sticking to the seats. I know your AC is out in your car, and I hate it for you. Spray down the seat to roll off the sweat. Never do dishes again.


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In Delbert We Trust? by R.L. Nave

I

f there existed a university devoted to voter suppression and disenfranchisement before the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, Mississippi would have graduated with Latin honors. Tactics ranged from the relatively humdrum Jim Crow instruments of the time, such as poll taxes and impossible-to-pass oral tests, to the famously violent practice of murdering voting-rights workers in cold blood. Those practices, commonplace in Mississippi and throughout the South, help usher in the VRA and its primary enforcement mechanism, a federal oversight process called preclearance. On June 25, the U.S. Supreme Court nullified the formula outlined in Section 4 of the act that determines TRIP BURNS

Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann expects the state’s voterID law top be in effect by the 2014 midterm elections.

the cities, counties and states that must receive federal permission to change even minor election procedures. Mississippi’s top elections official, Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, applauded the decision, saying Mississippi has worked to cross beyond government-sanctioned policies that excluded blacks from the voting process until relatively recently. “Those achievements are made by the fact that we trust each other. We trust each other to conduct our elections and to conduct our legislative affairs and that trust was confirmed by the Supreme Court,� Hosemann told reporters in his Capitol office the day the Supreme Court handed down its 5-4 ruling. The ruling in the VRA case, Shelby County, Ala., v. Eric Holder, wasn’t terribly

surprising given the court’s composition. The jurisdictions covered under preclearance—Section 5 of the act—include mostly southern states with a history of racial discrimination affecting elections, but also applies to some northern cities such as New York City and the state of Alaska, with its record of Native American discrimination. The court did not address the constitutionality of Section 5, which means that Congress could develop a new formula that meets constitutional muster. Civil-rights advocates nationwide let out a collective moan of disapproval believing the ruling will open the floodgates on renewal of voter suppression. That includes voter-identification laws, many of which were held up for preclearance but now can be implemented. Hosemann, one of the key backers of Mississippi’s voter-ID law, is not running a victory lap, yet. In a May interview with the Jackson Free Press, he said that even without preclearance, Mississippi would still have to comply with Section 2 of the act, which bars the state from implementing discriminatory voting laws. “For example, you couldn’t say that Catholics can’t vote, which we tried to do in Mississippi, or that women can’t vote, which we tried to do—or the Jim Crow laws, which we also did. “There’s a whole series of things that have impeded people’s right to vote and that comes under the constitutionality portion (of the Voting Rights Act). So the preclearance would go away, but individuals who may challenge voter ID would still have the ability to question the constitutionality of it,� Hosemann said. State Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson, and a member of the state’s Legislative Black Caucus, called the ruling “a sad day in the United States� and said he would eat his hat if anyone could prove that voter discrimination is indeed a thing of the past. He dismissed Hosemann’s statement that Mississippians trust each other to no longer need the federal check-and-balance of preclearance. “This will have a chilling effect,� Horhn told the Jackson Free Press. Sen. Kenneth Wayne Jones, D-Canton, who chairs the Legislative Black Caucus, views the VRA ruling another way: “It seems like America is going backwards.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

1st Annual

Jackson Rhythm & Blues Festival June 26 - August 15

Blues Happy Hours Blues Man 6.26 Wed • 5:30-7:30 • Fenian’s 901 E. Fortification, Jackson

Malcolm Shepherd & Band 7.17 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Downtown CafÊ 105 E. Capitol, Jackson

Jewel Bass (Blue Monday) 8.12.13-Mon. 7:30 Hal & Mal’s 200 Commerce St., Jackson

Scott Albert Johnson 7.3 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Sophia’s (inside of Fairview Inn) 734 Fairview St., Jackson

Tim Allen & Housecat 7.24 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Olga’s 4760 N. Hwy 55 Suite D, Jackson

Live Music 8.13 Tues • 5:30-7:30 Underground 119 119 S. President St., Jackson

Blue Monday Band 7.6 Sat • 8-midnight Club Ebony 400 Second St., Indianola

Chris Gill 7.31 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Sal & Mookie’s 565 Taylor St., Jackson

Live Music 8.14 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Que Serå 2801 N. State Street, Jackson

Jarekus Singleton 7.10 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Last Call 1428 Old Square Rd., Jackson

Pat Brown (Blue Monday) 8.5 Mon • 7:30 • Hal & Mal’s 200 Commerce St., Jackson

Sherman Lee Dillon 8.15 Thurs • 8-10 F. Jones Corner 303 N. Farish, Jackson

Love Notez 8.7 Wed • 5:30-7:30 Time Out 6270 Old Canton Rd., Jackson

A Promotion of The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau With the Central Mississippi Blues Society

jacksonfreepress.com

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DISH | exit interview

Johnson: Barns, Zen and the Tax Base by Ronni Mott

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July 3 - 9, 2013

TRIP BURNS

couple of weeks before the end of progress is being made at all. I think, clearly, the city is going to see Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr.’s third “Zen and the art of barn building,” he challenges with the infrastructure—water term in office, we sat together for said softly. and sewer. People are concerned about the about 45 minutes talking about streets, but water and sewer run under the his accomplishments, the campaign, what Looking back now over the 12 years streets, so we’ve got to fix those. the future holds for him and the challenges that you’ve served, are there lost facing the city of Jackson. It was no surprise opportunities? It’s not sexy stuff, is it? that Johnson sees the Jackson Convention Being in this position for 12 years, you No. It’s not sexy. It’s stuff that doesn’t get a Center Complex as the greatest achievement learn—I’ve learned—that you take advan- lot of play. When we’ve spent, what $20, $30 of his 12 years as mayor. It was part of his tage of all opportunities that you’re able to. million dollars putting a 54-inch water line plan to make Jackson a destination city. When you say “lost” opportunities, there are from O.B. Curtis down to Fewell? I mean, who “The Convention Center is knows about it? Who really cares something that I’m very proud of about it—until we have major wabecause of the way that it came ter-line breaks and your water is off? about,” he said. “It’s something So, it’s not like fixing a I envisioned for many years; it street or a pothole or even fixing took a number of years to make a drainage problem. That’s going it happen. … My vision was to to be challenging, and finding put it downtown.” the resources to do it is going to A few days after our interbe challenging. view, Johnson and then-MayBut what’s missing in the or-elect Chokwe Lumumba whole narrative here in Jackson announced jointly that the city is the extent that poverty impacts had signed a deal to build a our abilities. Our percentage of convention-center hotel. That poverty in the city of Jackson is big hole in the center of downhigher than it is in the state of town will finally get the muchMississippi. It’s about 30 percent. needed hotel to complete the Johnson vision. That plays into other issues, am I correct? Johnson spoke realistically about the election. He’s Housing—it plays into disappointed in the outcome, education. It plays into a lot of Harvey Johnson poses with one of the seven new fire trucks he unveiled at his final press conference in June. but another term “wasn’t in the stuff. I mean, when it comes to cards.” With typical dry humor, children, the poverty rate is even he answered my question about higher. It’s like 34 or 35 percent. whether he could have done anything differ- situations, there are projects, there are things People don’t talk about that enough, and ently with a nearly straight-faced one-liner: that you’re not able to do. You don’t have the that’s why I really came up with this Jobs for “Yeah. I could have won.” resources to do them; you don’t have time to Jacksonians program, to try to focus on putThe mayor was vague about what the do them. ting people to work, addressing the issue of future holds for him—beyond a vacation— poverty in a way that would be sustaining. but he admits not being built for taking time Give me an example of that. I mean, we can talk about social programs off. “Maybe I’ll make 30 days,” he said. “I A baseball stadium downtown would and all that, but to put people to work is don’t know.” He mentioned the possibility of have to compete with the convention how you address poverty. writing a book about his time in office. center. We couldn’t come up with the $65 I say all that to say that when dealing with “I think the city has been transformed million dollars for the convention center the issues of infrastructure, improvement and over the last 16 years since I’ve taken office, and another $25 million for a baseball sta- development, you’ve got to also be mindful of and most of the projects that have been dium. So you have to have a choice, and I the fact that a third of your population is poor. transformative have been started by me or think I made the right choice. If we’d had That’s a tough hill to climb. Realistically, how finished by me. In terms of legacy, I hope the the resources to do all of it, well. ... Anoth- much can you burden the ratepayers, the taxpeople can see the difference that has been er example is an arena downtown—$117 payers in the city of Jackson? made over the last 16 years—not just down- million. Well, you know, there’s an opAt the same time, we are burdened by town but all over our city.” portunity there to develop that, but do we tax-exempt property here in the city, to the Before I turned on my recorder, we have the resources to do it? I don’t think extent that no one else is, certainly in the talked about his horses. Johnson has five, in- so. Now, the domed stadium (planned by metro area, and I would dare say in the state. cluding a 2-year-old filly that’s ready to start Jackson State University) may be the anher training. swer to all of this. So, it becomes a matter That includes government, churches … As I left his office, he brought up the sometimes of resources. I’m not sure the Government, churches, yeah, nonprofdifference between building a city and build- opportunity is lost, but if you had more its. In a suburban community … that’s beting a barn where, every day, Johnson could resources, you certainly could create more ter off than the inner city or the central city, see the progress of raw lumber turning into a opportunities, I think, particularly for de- 5 percent of the property is tax exempt. I’m viable shelter for his horses—the walls going velopment in the city. just using that as an example. That’s the post up, then the roof. It’s not like development office and churches and city hall. In Jackson, in Jackson, he said, where projects can take How do you see resources play into that number is around 30 percent. So you a long time. So long, it’s easy to forget that Lumumba’s challenges? can see the disparity. You’ve got a commu-

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nity whose taxpayers can afford taxes, but … (they collect taxes) on 95 percent of their property. Then you’ve got a community with a high poverty rate but also a high rate of taxexempt property, which puts more burden on those poor people. It’s crazy. I’ve heard people say, “Jackson needs to take care of its own,” but we’re the state capital. In half the state capitals in this country, state government actually writes a check to the local government to offset some of these disparities. That would be payment in lieu of taxes?

Right. That’s what it’s typically called. Have you made attempts to make that happen?

Yeah, we’ve talked about it with the Legislature. It hasn’t gone anywhere. We were receiving $200,000 as a fire fee from the University of Mississippi Medical Center on an annual basis, but they stopped that last year. It started when I was in office before, and it stopped. Then, when I came back in, we had it for two or three years, then it stopped again. But that’s a handshake deal, that’s not any legislation or any requirement. Hattiesburg, Starkville, Oxford, all the cities with state schools within their borders (get payments in lieu of taxes), and we have two—Jackson State and UMMC. I know that the whole issue of tax base has been an issue for decades.

It’s not uncommon to see the central city, the tax base of the central city, being impacted by increases in opportunities in the suburban areas. That happens all over. People don’t want to hear it, but it’s driven by transportation. So it may seem like a great idea to six-lane Lakeland Drive, trying to get to and from Rankin County. You’ve got Dogwood Festival and different developments popping up, residential development along Highway 25, all driven by transportation. We have a tax base that’s dwindling, but the overall metropolitan area is increasing 2 or 3 percent, something like that. It’s not increasing a lot because it’s just moving people around, moving businesses around in the metropolitan area. Mr. Lumumba didn’t get much support from the business community during the campaign. Do you think it will be harder for him than it was for you to further economic development?

I don’t know. My crystal ball isn’t that clear. What I do know is that the city of Jackson is capital of Mississippi, and this whole notion that people are just going to pick up and leave is not realistic. We have a lot of things going for us in the city of


Certainly, the whole issue of race has come up strongly.

Well, yeah. I guess “come up” may be a way of looking at it. I’m not sure it was ever buried that deeply. And I’m speaking from the perspective of being the first African American mayor of Jackson. To say that it’s come up just because of this … I posed that badly, but I think you know what I’m talking about.Where ever that spotlight was before, if it was diffused, it got very pinpointed as far as racial differences in the city.

It may create an opportunity for us to come to grips with that issue. When you start asking yourself questions like, “Why is it that there’s never a Republican primary?” and what does that mean? Why is it that the Republican candidate from Ward 1 never has a challenger? How does that happen? And how do you get 95 percent of a segment of the city voting for one candidate, and that’s OK, but when 80 percent of another segment of the city vote for one candidate, it’s racial? This is going to require some deep discussion and soul searching on the part of the city of Jackson. Perhaps we’ll get some of the things that were not so transparent previously when it comes to race relations, maybe now they’re going to have to be dealt with. I think that would be a good thing, personally.

Well, you know, I do, too. Hear the entire unedited interview and comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

Sex Trafficking: The Portable Crime by Ronni Mott

“Y

our toes will definitely curl,” screams the ad’s headline on Backpage. com. “I get the job done.” Backpage is one of several online classified-ad sites—similar to Craigslist—that filters ads based on locations. The online ad appeared on the site’s Jackson adult escort service ads category, although the contact phone number has a Tampa, Fla., area code. The ad’s text is accompanied by mostly neck-down shots of a scantily clad young woman. The one photo that displays anything from the neck up shows a woman with her long brown hair obscuring her facial features. It’s impossible to tell whether the half-dozen photos are of the same woman, and if they are, how old she is. The ad claims she is 25. “Perfection at its best,” claims another ad with similar, neck-down photos of a woman who claims to be 23. “Super thick, hourglass curves, stunning beauty.” The contact phone number begins with 214, a Dallas, Texas, area code. “These are girls that are getting moved around,” said Heather Wagner, director of the domestic-violence office in the state attorney general’s office. Traffickers—pimps or madams—frequently move from major event to major event to capture the prevailing market, or move to stay at least one step ahead of law enforcement. “They all put their ages out there. Right. Really?” Wagner asked as she picked a Backpage ad at random. The girl—one could hardly have called her a woman— could have been anywhere from 13 to 16 years old. “Does she look 21 to you?” Wagner related one case where authorities tracked one of the girls brought into Louisiana for the Super Bowl through a contact number on her ads. “They tracked her from (Washington) D.C., right after the inaugural ball.

Sex traffickers frequently move girls around.

in 2010. The case has yet to be solved. In a June 29 New York Times editorial titled “The New Prostitutes,” Kolker wrote: “It had seemed enough, at first, for some to say that the victims were all prostitutes, practically interchangeable—lost souls who were gone, in a sense, long before they actually disappeared. That is a story our culture tells about people like them, a conventional way of thinking about how young girls fall into a life of prostitution: unstable family lives, addiction, neglect. “But in the two years I’ve spent learning about the lives of all five women, I have found that they all defied expectations. They were not human-trafficking victims in the classic sense. They stayed close to their families. They all came to New York to take advantage of a growing black market—an underground economy that offered them life-changing money, and with a remarkably low barrier to entry. The real

temptation wasn’t drugs or alcohol, but the promise of social mobility.” In the editorial, Kolker outlined how ads on Craigslist helped one of the women, Maureen Brainard-Barnes, make up to $2,000 a day offering her services. The Internet is, “transforming the way people shop for everything, and commercial sex has been no exception,” he wrote. Craigslist stopped posting adult ads in 2010 after considerable public pressure and at least one lawsuit—despite reportedly earning $44.4 million that year from such ads. Backpage, though, continues to run “escort” ads. An attorney for the site has said that sex shoppers would simply go elsewhere. Backpage is one of many sites that law enforcement agencies—including the Mississippi Attorney General’s office—keep an eye on for evidence of sex trafficking. In September 2012, Arizona State University researchers monitored the site for a week. Out of 1,145 postings, the study found that more 900 advertisements offered sex or prostitution in Phoenix, and the authors believe many of the girls were younger than 18. In May of this year, authorities in central Florida busted three sex-trafficking rings operating there in three days. They implicated Backpage in all three cases. “It’s abundantly clear to us that they are facilitating organized prostitution.” Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd told reporters. “They are facilitating human trafficking.” Help the Jackson Free Press raise funds for the victims of sexual trafficking in Mississippi. The ninth annual JFP Chick Ball is July 20 at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.), and all proceeds go to the Center for Violence Prevention. The Chick Ball is now accepting all kinds of donations, from art and other silent auction items, to donations of time and services. Cash is always welcome. Email chickball@jackson freepress.com, call 601-362-6121 ext. 23, or visit jfpchickball.com for more information.

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All are welcome! We look forward to meeting you.

Register now for JFP Editor Donna Ladd’s popular creative nonfiction fall class series. All levels welcome in the 101 class series, the last in 2013. Class runs every other Saturday from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 21, Oct. 5, 19, Nov. 2, 16 Meets in the JFP classroom in Fondren $150, includes snacks and materials

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And she moved her way through the South snaking her way to New Orleans,” she said. “Same phone number, same (headline), ‘New to Town, New to Town.’” New York magazine journalist Robert Kolker is writing a book about five young women—all escorts—whose bodies turned up on a beach in Long Island, N.Y.,

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Jackson, good things, a lot of assets—assets for the business community. They’ve taken note of that; they know that. I think that there’s going to be a way for all of the interests here in the city of Jackson to work together. Finding it may be a challenge, but I’m sure there’s a way for it to happen.

TALK | violence

FLICKR/VICTOR BEZUKOV

Harvey

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TALK | business

Pub, Jobs and Gumbo, Oh My by Tyler Cleveland

TRIP BURNS

Fondren Public Making Progress neighborhood bar,” Kehoe said. “We want The festival already has several bands Fondren is closer than ever to having to get to the point where when a regular scheduled to perform, including Good it’s own pub, thanks to a group of local walks in, our bartender pours their beer for Enough For Good Times, Honey Island businessmen behind soon-to-be-open them and sets it in front of them without the Swamp Band, Jimbo Mathus and the TriFondren Public. customer having to ask.” State Coalition, Southern Halo, Star and The pub is still in the construction Micey, and the Wild Magnolias Mardi phase, but general manGras Indians. ager Andrew Kehoe said Beer will be available the goal is to host a grand for purchase, and Barnett said opening before the end of they are working with the city the summer. on acquiring a liquor license “We are looking to for the event, so they can serve take advantage of the spemargaritas and other libations. cialty-brewed beer move“We have to give kument,” Kehoe said. “We dos to the city for giving us want to offer products an exemption on the alcohol,” (and) work with southBarnett said. “They have been eastern breweries, whether great to work with so far, and it’s Lazy Magnolia or Yait’s really going to help us put zoo up in Nashville, and on a great event, right here in just be a neighborhood bar the heart of the city.” for all of the young profesBankPlus, Polks’ Meats, sionals of Jackson.” Howard Wilson, Capital City Fondren Public, the Fondren area’s first pub, is set to open before The inside of the bar, Beverage and Clear Channel the end of the summer. which Kehoe said is someradio stations have signed on where in the neighborhood to sponsor the event. All proof 1,600 square feet, has a ceeds go to the Harold T. and rustic feel to it. The long draw features doz- Gumbo Fest Returns Hal White Memorial Scholarship Fund, ens of taps, which are soon to be hooked up Local music promoter Arden Barnett which funds one scholarship each year in to kegs of beer from brewers in Louisiana, and event producer Bill Bissell are teaming the Hinds Community College hospitality Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama, among up to bring back the International Gumbo management program. It is named for Hal others. The back patio, which workers roofed Festival after a decade-long hiatus. and Mal’s owner Malcolm White’s late fathis past week, will include several bocce ball Barnett and Bissell announced the ther and brother. courts and outdoor seating. The menu will event Tuesday, June 25, alongside Mississippi “I’m really glad to see this festival come include traditional bar staples like hamburg- Director of Tourism Malcolm White on the back to Jackson,” White said. “We used to ers and sandwiches. patio of White’s restaurant, Hal and Mal’s. have a lot of fun with it, and I’m sure with Kehoe said the idea for the pub came The festival date is set for Sept. 28. Arden and Bill in charge, it’s going to be a from the investors’ experiences from all “We’re proud to announce the return of first-class event.” over the country, including trips to pubs the International Gumbo Festival,” Barnett White recalled the last year they held in Nashville, Atlanta, Chicago and Seattle. said. “We are looking forward to bringing the event, which he used to promote. His The business is going through the process back one of Jackson’s favorite events, right brother Hal and he set out to cook the bigof passing city inspections, but the kitchen here, downtown at Smith Park.” gest pot of gumbo on record. They even equipment is in place. The event will feature a gumbo cook- checked with the folks at the Guinness Book “We want to attract patrons from all off, which begins at 7 a.m. and ends just be- of World Records, but he can’t recall whether over the city, but we also want to be a true fore lunchtime; the gates open at 11 a.m. they got there or not.

July 3 - 9, 2013

Ingram Barge Company, the leader in the inland marine community has openings for:

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• Deckhands • Culinary Cooks • Vessel Engineers • Towboat Pilots (Fleet & Line Haul) Candidates must possess a minimum of a valid Driver’s License and High School Diploma/GED. Generous wages, bonus plan and advancement opportunities, along with a comprehensive benefit package, (paid retirement, 401K, medical, life & AD&D, etc.) Interested candidates must apply on-line at www.ingrambarge.com. EOE, M/F/V/D

“With Hal manning this huge crawfish-cooking contraption, we cooked the biggest pot of gumbo any of us had ever even heard of,” White said. “I don’t know whether we got the record or not, but we had so much gumbo left over, we couldn’t find enough people to give it all away.” Advance tickets for the International Gumbo Festival are $10. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit jacksongumbo.com. Bryant Ranks 14th in Job Creation Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant ranks 14th out of 45 governors in total number of jobs created in the private sector, according to The Business Journals “On Numbers.” “On Numbers” analyzed private-sector employment levels for the 45 governors who were in office before this year using seasonally adjusted data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor. The list, published June 27, scored each governor based on a comparison of the annual job growth rate for his or her respective state, and the corresponding figure for the other 44 states. Bryant came in behind 10 other Republicans and three Democrats. Republicans Jack Dalrymple (North Dakota), Rick Perry (Texas), Gary Herbert (Utah), Bill Haslam (Tennessee) and Bobby Jindal (Louisiana) topped the list. Democrat John Hickenlooper (Colorado), was ranked sixth. Mississippi ranked just behind South Dakota and just ahead of Minnesota. Matthew Mead (R-Wyoming) was ranked last. The list did not include governors Steve Bullock (D-Montana), Maggie Hassan (D-New Hampshire), Jay Inslee (D-Washington), Pat McCrory (R-North Carolina) and Mike Pence (R-Indiana) because they entered office earlier this year. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.


Knowledge and Phone Tapping

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r. Announcement: “On this episode of the award-winning daytime-television soap opera ‘All God’s Churn Got Shoes,’ Aunt Tee Tee Hustle, computer and electronics nerd, accidentally taps into an interesting phone conversation between Shirley Sherrod and Paula Deen. Paula Deen: “Hello, Ms. Sherrod. This is Paula Deen. I’m in a big pickle because the darn media found out that I said the “N� word. As soon as the news was out, things got worse. Folks posted viral videos talking about me, calling me the “B� word and “R� word. The Food Network fired me, sponsors dropped me like a hot potato, and I’m the pork butt of jokes on Twitter and Facebook. I heard you had the same experience. Do you have any advice for me?� Shirley Sherrod: “Yes, Ms. Deen. I had a similar experience in 2010; however, I just viewed a 2012 video interview you did where you defended your attitude toward race. My first response was: ‘Okay, that’s Ms. Deen’s opinion.’ But what really surprised me was after defending your view, you mentioned a special friendship with a ‘dark as a black board’ African American friend. Then, in an unknowing and condescending manner, you said something like this: ‘Come out here my good ole’ friend. We can’t see you standing beside that blackboard.’ My second response was: ‘Epic Fail.’ Therefore, my advice to you, Ms. Deen, is to ride this wave out and deal with the debris.� Aunt Tee Tee: “Wow! Knowledge and phone-tapping is power.�

Open-Carry Laws Will Test Lumumba

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July 3 - 9, 2013

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Why it stinks: The estimated costs of Southern Company’s largely experimental coal gasification plant in Mississippi seems to have no ceiling. Including the associated pipeline and the mine for the low-grade lignite coal that the plant will burn, the plant’s costs are now in the stratospheric range of $4.5 billion, nearly double the cost of the plant alone, and $1.1 billion more than the estimate for the whole project. Bentz, a Republican whose district includes Kemper County, has been a strong proponent of the plant since its inception. Much of the development costs fall to Mississippi Power ratepayers (Southern is MP’s parent company), which is substantially increasing their electric bills long before the plant is finished. Plans for the plant barreled along despite environmental concerns and potential issues with the as-yet-untested technology. Spending $4.5 billion on a shiny new coal plant in the 21st century is difficult, at best, to justify in light of the myriad of sustainable clean-energy options available. We can imagine a world where such astronomical amounts of money could work to power the entire country instead of one little corner of Mississippi.

ne of the most interesting things in Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s administration of Jackson will be how he manages the Jackson Police Department. Forty years ago, as a young man and member of the Republic of New Afrika, Lumumba was engaged in armed resistance against what was then a racist and oppressive police force. Lumumba went on to build a practice as a defense attorney for criminal defendants accused of running afoul of the law. In the immediate offing, a big test for Lumumba and other municipal commanders-inchief around Mississippi looms as state courts figure out what to do about the new open-carry gun law. The law has touched off a firestorm of fear and confusion among both private citizens and law enforcement officials. A recent opinion from Attorney General Jim Hood in support of the law makes it clear that private business owners have the right to prohibit guns on their property. Hood also said that open carry would not be allowed in such sensitive areas as schools, stadiums, airports and events. Sheriffs also have the discretion to bar guns from courthouses. Which pretty much just leaves city streets and sidewalks as the most logical places where we are likely to see Mississippians packing heat in plain sight. That’s disconcerting, if not downright terrifying, not just because the law could put more

armed people in contact with one another, but also because it could put more people in contact with the police. Hood’s opinion contains an appendix on so-called “Terry stops� in which police can stop, question and frisk citizens. The term originated from a 1968 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Terry v. Ohio, where the court held that police could briefly detain someone whom they reasonably suspect may be involved in criminal activity. Such suspicion falls short of the police burden for making an immediate arrest. The AG’s opinion states that carrying a non-concealed weapon is not enough to create reasonable suspicion of criminal activity. The same opinion states: “However, there could be circumstances in which in which the carrying of such a weapon could be a factor which, when taken together with other factors, could give rise to a reasonable suspicion of criminal activity. What does that mean? That’s a question that the courts will have to sort out. In the meantime, a Hinds County judge’s restraining order temporarily halted the open-carry law from taking effect, but a challenge from Hood seeks to lift that order immediately. Whatever happens with the implementation of the law, we hope that the Jackson Police Department under Lumumba’s leadership will be judicious in enforcing the law in a way that does not feed Mississippi’s already necessarily overcrowded

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn� and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


JOE ATKINS

Free Market China EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Nneka Ayozie, Mark Braboy Bethany Bridges, Rebecca Docter, De’Arbreya Lee, Kimberly Murriel, Khari Johnson, Emmanuel Sullivan, Dominique Triplett, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Interns DeNetta Fagan Durr, Anna Russell, Brittany Sistrunk Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations Photo Interns Melanie Boyd, Jessica King ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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ONG KONG—Chinese junks backs of its workers, and those workers deno longer dot Victoria Harbour. serve a fair share of it, Lee says. A foot-powered rickshaw is even “Workers’ rights should be entrenched harder to find. Skyscrapers now everywhere in the world,” he says. “We have dwarf the stately colonial-era buildings at to support independent unions. At the same the heart of the old city. time … we also need to support democStill, this is the same Hong Kong I visit- racy in China. Unless there is democracy in ed as a young soldier on R&R from Vietnam China, it will be far more difficult for Hong four decades ago. Busy Nathan Road still Kong to have a real democracy.” teems with orange-robed Buddhist monks The recent strike on Hong Kong’s and bearded Sikhs, along with businessmen, docks pitted workers against Asia’s richest women in mini-skirts and high heels, Indian man, billionaire Li Ka-shing, who controls hawkers peddling suits and watches, con- more than 70 percent of the city’s port trafstruction workers—and Westerners like me. fic. Workers hadn’t received a pay raise in Frenetic energy is everywhere, and more than a decade, yet they worked 12not only because of whistle-blower Edward hour or longer shifts with no breaks. Snowden. He was holed up in a hotel here In a city without collective bargaining during my stay after exposing U.S. cyber- laws, the striking dockworkers secured a surveillance of practically 9.8 percent pay raise and everyone in the world, a commitment to better including U.S. citizens. working conditions. PubMao ZeDong would lic support for the strikers Seven million people are crowded into this tiny was widespread. roll over in his corner at the southeastern “It touched a nerve grave if he knew tip of China. It was a Britwith people,” says Geofwhat the People’s ish colony last time I was frey Crothall, communihere. It’s part of Commucations director with the Republic tolerates nist China now, but Mao China Labour Bulletin in these days. ZeDong would roll over Hong Kong, a non-govin his grave if he knew ernmental organization what the People’s Repubfor labor rights in China. lic tolerates these days. No little Red Books “Property prices are stratospheric. Just going in Hong Kong. No Red Guards shouting to a local café or vegetable market is hurting the Chairman’s famous dictum: “Political ordinary people. People understand when power grows out of the barrel of a gun!” dockworkers have not have a pay raise in Nope, Hong Kong remains the citadel 10 years. They can relate to that. They see of capitalism that Imperial Britain created af- it as an injustice, particularly when the emter extracting it from Imperial China in the ployer is the richest man, not only in Hong aftermath of the Opium Wars. Of course, Kong, but in all of Asia.” there’s an edge, an unanswerable question: The irony is that labor-hostile billionJust how long and to what extent will Bei- aires are as tolerable today to Hong Kong’s jing allow autonomy? After all, Mao’s por- Communist overseers as they were to colotrait still looms over Tiananmen Square, and nial-era British leaders. Beijing believes the his successors still pledge loyalty to his party. model of “colonial government really works “Hong Kong has always idolized the well for them. As a one-party, authoritarian free-market economy,” says Hong Kong La- regime, they have no problem with that. … bour Party Chairman Lee Cheuk-yan dur- The capitalists support the Communist reing my interview with him at his office in gime, and the Communist regime supports the city’s Legislative Council Complex. “We the capitalists in Hong Kong,” Lee says. let the market rule everything, and then we The June 4 vigil Lee organized—atdon’t intervene, and that’s it. That’s the mod- tended by thousands—was the only such el for Hong Kong.” large-scale commemoration of the 1989 Not that Lee thinks that’s a wonderful crackdown in all of China. In fact, Hong thing. In fact, he’s arguably Hong Kong’s Kong reporters were detained in Beijing top critic of both its capital-worshiping neo- June 4 during the daily flag-raising ceremoliberalism and Beijing’s hidden hand in its ny at Tiananmen Square. politics and business practices. Lee is general Still, the strikers in Hong Kong did secretary of the Hong Kong Confederation get a pay raise, and the fact that activists like of Trade Unions—the city’s largest indepen- Lee Cheuk-yan can speak as openly and as dent labor organization—and he was key critically as he does is impressive. Perhaps organizer of both the city’s recent 40-day even Mao would have to admit that politidockworkers’ strike and the giant June 4 vigil cal power today is as likely to come out of a marking the 24th anniversary of the brutal stuffed wallet as the barrel of a gun. crackdown of the 1989 pro-democracy rally Joe Atkins is a veteran journalist and a in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. professor of journalism at the University of MisHong Kong’s wealth was built on the sissippi. Email him at jbatkins@olemiss.edu.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


ER E B & D O O F R E M SUM

JESSICA KING

2013

New business Brewhaha provides homebrewers a local place to purchase ingredients, share tips and build a community.

E U S IS

A Homebrewing Wave? by R.L. Nave

July 3 - 9, 2013

16

the Mississippi Department of Revenue, a Association. Many craft brewers started brew law will lead to more competitions and pittance for large commercial brewers but out as home brewers. Mississippi becom- festivals taking place in Mississippi. When a huge burden on beer hobbyists. The new ing the last state where homebrewing is the law’s legality remained clouded, busilaw, sponsored by Jackson Sen. nesses were reluctant to host such John Horhn, carves out an exevents, Outlaw said. emption from the state beer regThose events could mean ulations for home brewers who big bucks for Mississippi’s tourmake fewer than 100 gallons and ism economy. In Oregon, one households making less than 200 of the paragons of craft-beer culgallons of suds per year. Hobbyture, the state’s largest beer festival ists still won’t be able to sell their spurs an estimated $23.2 million homemade concoctions, and the in economic activity for the city law will not apply to “dry” counof Portland. ties, where any sale of alcohol One researcher found that is illegal. the average local attendee at the Combined with a law festival spent $104 at the festival,s passed last year that raised the lewhile tourists spent roughly $750 gal alcohol content limit in beers, on average. Jonas Outlaw (far right, with other members of the Raise the homebrewing law promises In Bangor, Maine (populaYour Pints group) says a healthy homebrewing culture and festivals can boost a city’s economy. to help Mississippi cash in on tion: 33,000), a city-sponsored America’s craft-beer renaissance. beer festival was projected to The craft beer industry bring in between $250,000 and grew 17 percent in 2012 over 2011. In retail legal means tremendous opportunity for $350,000 to the local economy. dollars, craft beer sales rose to $10.2 billion the industry to grow. Outlaw, as home-brew association in 2012, compared to $8.7 billion the pre“I can’t help but be optimistic,” said president, said he attends craft-beer festivals vious year. More than 2,300 craft brewer- Mac Rusling, who owns Brewhaha, a home- around the nation and educates people on ies—which include brewpubs, regional craft brew supply shop in Jackson. the exciting things going on in Mississippi’s breweries and microbreweries—operated As July 1 approaches, Rusling has no- beer world. during 2012 and 409 new breweries opened ticed an uptick in his business. Novices can “We’re able to enjoy this phase in Misin 2012. purchase a starter kit for about $80 and sissippi that other states went through 20 About 750,000 people homebrew in spend up to $45 on ingredients to make one years ago, which makes it a pretty cool scene the United States, according to the Boul- 5-gallon batch of beer. in Jackson right now. It’s kind of nice to be der, Colo.-based American Homebrewers Outlaw said he expects that the home- in Mississippi right now,” Outlaw said. MELANIE BOYD

A

bout eight years ago, Jonas Outlaw’s now-father in-law introduced him to the hobby of homebrewing. Outlaw remembers his first batch of home-brewed beer, an American pale ale. “At the time, I thought it was great. But, looking back, it probably had a lot of flaws,” said Outlaw, now the president of the Home Brewers Association of Middle Mississippi. Back in those days, the malt, hops, yeast and other ingredients needed to brew beer at home were relatively scarce in the state. Part of the reason for this was Mississippi’s less-than-sophisticated beer culture; another reason were laws that limited the amount of alcohol in beers sold in the state and made homebrewing questionably legal. Over time, as Mississippi’s beer culture has improved and state officials loosened beer restrictions, home brewers like Outlaw have also improved their craft. Today, Outlaw has graduated to more complex beer recipes, such as rye double India Pale Ale, containing a variety of malts and hops. Outlaw hopes that another change in the law will improve the state’s beer culture even more. Starting July 1, following legislative action to clarify the existing muddled home-brewing laws, the hobby will officially become legal in Mississippi. Before the change, anyone making beer in the state needed a $1,000 permit from


2013 Summer Food & Beer Issue

1.

Soak malted barley or malted wheat in hot water to release the malt sugars. Some homebrewers start with a malt extract to skip the step of creating their own mash (boiling the grains in water until the starches turn to sugar).

A basic homebrew kit usually contains: • A fermentation jug or bucket with cap and airlock • Auto-siphon and tubing • Bottle fillerg • Bottle capper and caps

5.

You'll also need a large pot, clean water, malt, hops and yeast. Remember to sanitize all your equipment thoroughly before you use it! You only need four ingredients to make beer: malt, hops, yeast and water. How much of each ingredient, where they come from and what you do with them are what create the vast array of different beers out there. Many brews these days contain other ingredients as well to add flavor—often fruits like strawberries or lemon, but also additions such as bacon or maple syrup. The brewing process isn't long, but the waiting period is. Brewing typically takes a couple of hours, fermentation a couple of weeks and bottling another hour or so. Then, the beer must rest in the bottle to finish the fermentation and carbonation process. The basic steps for brewing beer are:

After the main fermentation is complete, bottle the beer with a sugar solution to finish fermentation and provide carbonation.

2.

Boil the malt sugar solution, and add hops and, if desired, other flavoring ingredients.

ANNA RUSSELL

H

omebrewing is on the rise in the United States and, now that it is legal in Mississippi, expect the chatter among your beerloving friends to rise even more. Unsurprisingly, homebrewing follows much of the same principles as industrial breweries, just on a smaller scale. The entire process isn’t a complicated one, but dozens, if not hundreds, of how-to guides exist, each with its own advice on what is vital and what isn’t. Confused about what goes into making beer at home? We’ve got you covered.

3.

Cool the solution, strain it, pour it into a sanitized container and add yeast to begin fermentation.

4.

FLICKR/SPORKIST

The yeast ferments the sugars, releasing CO2 and ethyl alcohol.

Spicy Balsamic Beer Marinade for Beef

W

hen the weather turns hot, most cooks enjoy cooling off with a favorite beverage while taking the heat outdoors and firing up the grill. You won’t need to wait to light the coals to break out the brews, though, with these recipes featuring Mississippi beer. Beer can add rich, smoky caramel tones, a lively floral essence, or a note of bright citrus to food. Not only does it provide a wide range of taste opportunities, but beer is a great tenderizer, with enzymes that help to break down tough, sinewy fibers. One of the most effective ways to tenderize and flavor meat is using beer in a marinade or brine. The best part: Beers from Mississippi’s own breweries flavor these recipes.

This is a bold, zesty marinade that makes all taste buds snap to attention. Balsamic vinegar and soy sauce pack extra punch for tenderizing cheaper cuts of meat. You can also use light beer or lager. 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 12-ounce bottle Lazy Magnolia Deep South Pale Ale 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon Worcestershire 1 teaspoon hot sauce 4 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon onion, grated 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper

Combine ingredients and mix well. Pour over meat and marinate overnight. This marinade works well with chuck steak, flank steak, flatiron steak, top round steak and sirloin steak. Makes two-and-a-half to three cups.

See more of Dawn Macke’s recipes using local beer on page 26 and throughout this month.

jacksonfreepress.com

Beer adds complexity to a great meat marinade.

17


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July 3 - 9, 2013

Fri. 7.26: Archnemesis

18

Fri. Aug. 9: Grammy Award Winning Nappy Roots w/ Special Guest Sat. Aug. 17: Alvin Youngblood Hart’s Muscle Theory Sat. Aug. 24: Water Liars

Sat. Sept 28: Good Enough For Good Times (Members Of Galactic)

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON


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up once again with Raise Your Pints for the Second Annual JFP/RYP Craft Beer Taste-Off, this time to try some of the newest or most popular local brews. Our tasters tested 10 brews, provided by Southern Beverage, Capital City Beverage and Lucky Town Brewery.

MELANIE BOYD

Southern Prohibition Brewerys Suzy B (a blonde)

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Your Pints to introduce our readers to some of the types of beers they might not have ever tried before. At this point, hopefully yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all have all gotten out to local restaurants and bars to sample some higher-grav beers. But the market doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show signs of slowing down, so we met

MELANIE BOYD

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n the year since the Mississippi Legislature approved higher-gravity beers, our beverage economy has seen an explosion of new brews to try, from local and regional microbreweries to innovative undertakings from the big industry boys. Last year, we met up with a crew from Raise

19


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Lucky Town Flare Incident

July 3 - 9, 2013

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20

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BEER:

Tallgrass Ethos IPA $SSHDUDQFH -RQDV*ROGHQ\HOORZZLWKQLFH WKLFNRIIZKLWHKHDG /DFH\%HDXWLIXOFDUDPHOZLWK IURWK\KHDG (PLO\1HRQRUDQJH²GR,UHDOO\ ZDQWWRWU\WKLV" 7\OHU/RRNV FDUERQDWHGOLNHD PRIR .ULVWLQ%DFNWRRU DQJHZLWKKHDOWK\ IRDP $URPD -RQDV+XJHGLV SOD\RI$PHULFDQ KRSV)ORUDO FLWUXV\SLQH\KRS DURPD (PLO\6PHOOVOLNH DQXQRSHQHGFDELQDWWKHODNHWKDW KDVEHHQYDFDQWIRUVL[PRQWKV DQGZHWWRZHOVKDYHEHHQOHIWRQ WKHÃ&#x20AC;RRU &UDLJ6ZHHWVZHHWKRSV 7\OHU6PHOOVKRSWDVWLF .ULVWLQ%DDDDE\KRSV%XQQ\ KRSV 'DYLG2UDQJHDQGFHOHU\6OLJKW ELWWHUQHVVLQPLGGOH 7DVWH -RQDV%DODQFHIDYRUVKRSÃ&#x20AC;DYRUWR $PHULFDQ,3$VW\OH6OLJKWVZHHW QHVVRQWKHEDFNHQG (PLO\$FWXDOO\VXUSULVHG²OHPRQ\ ZLWKDJRRGEOHQGRIOLJKWKRSV $QGUHZ1RWQHDUO\DVSURQRXQFHG DKRSFKDUDFWHUDVWKHDURPD$F WXDOO\YHU\ZHOOEDODQFHGEHWZHHQ PDOWDQGKRSVIRUDGRXEOHGU\

BEER:

Southern Prohibition Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Harvest pale ale $SSHDUDQFH -RQDV3DOH\HOORZZLWKDVOLJKWFKLOOKD]H 7KLOH7KH\KDYHQLFHFDQV6OLJKWEURQ]H RUDQJHKXHQRKHDG *LQD&ORXG\JROGHQFRORU $QGUHD7KHFDQUHPLQGVPHRI)-RQHV /RYHLW5HDOO\FORXG\DPEHUOLTXLG $URPD (PLO\+RSVDQGPDOWVZLWKDOLWWOHFLWUXV EDFNJURXQG &UDLJ*UDSHIUXLW .ULVWLQ2RRRKDJDLQ,¶PVWDUWLQJWRVPHOO KRSVDQGLQGRRUSLQH *LQD2UDQJHFLWUXVELWWHU 7DVWH -RQDV*RRGEDODQFHRIKRSÃ&#x20AC;DYRUDQGELWWHUQHVV5LJKW RQWKHWKUHVKROGRIDQ,3$ (PLO\1LFHEOHQG/LJKWRQWKHKRSVZKLFKVKRFNHGPH DELWEDVHGRQWKHVPHOO+DVDELWRIDFKHUU\XQGHUWRQH $QGUHZ7RQVRIKRSFKDUDFWHUEXWVXEGXHGÃ&#x20AC;DYRUV *UHDWELWWHUQHVVXSIURQWIROORZHGE\DWUDQVLWLRQWR VZHHWJUDSHIUXLWDQGPDOWFKDUDFWHU 7\OHU6WURQJ2QHRIP\IDYRULWHSDOHDOHV 'DYLG*UDVVEHKLQGIXOODWWUDFWLYHELWWHUQHVVZLWKVRPH VSLFHDWHQG $QGUHD+LWVWKHEDFNRI\RXUWKURDWZLWKDVPRN\ IHHOLQJ KRSSHG,3$)UXLW\VZHHWQHVV FRPHVWKURXJKDVPDLQÃ&#x20AC;DYRU .ULVWLQ6WURQJHUDQGGU\HUWKDQ H[SHFWHG+RSEDE\SXQFK *LQD)ORUDO $QGUHD7DVWHVZRRG\ %RG\0RXWKIHHO /DFH\0HGLXPJRRGFDUERQDWLRQ 7KLOH&DUERQLFELWH+RSELWWHU QHVVLVQLFHDQGUHVWUDLQHG &UDLJ:HOOEDO DQFHGJUHDWEHHU 7\OHU7DQJ\DQG LQWHUHVWLQJ *LQD$WDGELWWHU 'DYLG)XOOPRXWK JRRGFDUERQDWLRQ )LQLVK /DFH\%LWWHUQHVV OLQJHUVLQDSOHDVDQW ZD\ (PLO\'RHVQ¶WOLQJHU ORQJZKLFKLVJRRG $QGUHZ%LWWHU¿QLVKMXVWDVDQ ,3$VKRXOGKDYH 7\OHU+DVVWD\LQJSRZHUEXWLWV HQMR\DEOH *LQD1RDIWHUWDVWH $QGUHD0DNHVPHFRXJK 7KH)RRG,·G3DLULW:LWK -RQDV*\URZLWKJULOOHGIHWD /DFH\6SLF\IRRGVZHHWIRRG DQ\WKLQJFKHHVH (PLO\*RHVJUHDWZLWKKDPDQG FKHHVHVDQGZLFKHV $QGUHZ7RQVDQGWRQVRIFKHHVHV .ULVWLQ%ODFNHQHGEXUJHUV 'DYLG%XUJHUURDVWFKLFNHQ 2YHUDOOVFRUH 5<3 -)3

%RG\0RXWKIHHO /DFH\0HGLXPZLWKPRGHUDWHFDUE (PLO\&RDWVWKHPRXWK0DNHV\RXZDQWPRUHOLNH *DWRUDGHGRHV .ULVWLQ&DUE\DJDLQ 'DYLG)XOODQGIDLUO\EXEEO\ $QGUHD0DNHVPHFRXJK )LQLVK -RQDV+RSÃ&#x20AC;DYRUODVWVEXWKDVDFOHDQ ¿QLVK 7KLOH%LWWHU¿QLVKZLWKDFLGLFFDUERQLF ELWH (PLO\$OPRVWWDVWHVOLNHEDQDQDVDQG FKHUULHV $QGUHZ1RWGU\QRWVZHHW2QO\OHDYHV ELWWHUQHVVRQWKHEDFNRIWKHWRQJXH 7\OHU6WURQJDIWHUWDVWHWKDWJDYHPHELW WHUEHHUIDFHEXW,¶PQRWFRPSODLQLQJ .ULVWLQ6RXURQWKHFHQWHURIWKHWRQJXH 7KH)RRG,·G3DLULW:LWK -RQDV6SLF\7KDLQRRGOHV (PLO\:K\ZRXOG,HDWZLWKWKLVEHHU",WVGLQQHUDQG GHVVHUWDOOLQRQH7KHGHYLOPDGHPHGRLW &UDLJ$JDUOLFGLVK .ULVWLQ0RUHEHHU 'DYLG7DPDOHV 2YHUDOOVFRUH 5<3 -)3

BEER:

Lazy Magnolia Timber Beast $SSHDUDQFH /DFH\'DUNFDUDPHOZLWKD JUHDWIURWK\KHDGDQGODFLQJDV ,GULQNLW (PLO\&RSSHUOLNHDOORIWKH %HOKDYHQSRUFKODQWHUQV 7\OHU/LNHZKDW EHHULVVXSSRVHG WRORRNOLNH 'DYLG7KLQWR PHGLXPKHDG 'DUNUHGDPEHU FOHDU $QGUHD7KHSHU IHFWJROGPXFK OLNHDQ2O\PSLF PHGDO MELANIE BOYD

$URPD -RQDV6ZHHWELVFXLW\PDOW (PLO\9HU\OLJKWFRULDQGHUDQGFDUDPHO $QGUHZ*UHDWPDOW\VZHHWQHVV²VRPH ZKDWOLNHRYHUULSHQHGDSSOHV .ULVWLQ&DUDPHO"3HUKDSV 'DYLG6ZHHWIXOOVWURQJKRSV

)LQLVK /DFH\-XVWDOLWWOHVSLFH (PLO\'RHVQ¶WOLQJHU<RXFRXOGGULQND SDFNEHIRUH\RXUHDOL]HGLW $QGUHZ)LQLVKHVVRPHZKDWPDOW\EXWQLFH IRUP\WDVWHV7KHOLQJHULQJVZHHWQHVVLV QRWFOR\LQJ 7\OHU*UHDWDQDIWHUWDVWH,FDQGHDOZLWK .ULVWLQ$ELWVRXUEXWDWWKHVLGHVRIWKH WRQJXHWKLVWLPH *LQD&ULVSQRDIWHUWDVWH

MELANIE BOYD

$SSHDUDQFH -RQDV*ROGHQDPEHUZLWKJUHDWFODULW\ &UDLJ%URQ]H $QGUHZ%ULOOLDQWFODULW\1LFHRUDQJH DPEHU7LQ\EXEEOHVRIKHDGFRQWLQXHWR HIIHUYHVFH *LQD&RORURIFRJQDF9HU\SUHWW\JROG DPEHU9HU\FOHDU $QGUHD'DUNJROGOLNHDQROGFRZER\ ERRW

MELANIE BOYD

Yazoo Gerst Amber ale

MELANIE BOYD

(PLO\1RWKLQJVWDQGVRXWH[FHSWWKHZRQGHUIXOEOHQGHG OLJKWDLU\WDVWH $QGUHZ0HGLXPERG\DQGPHGLXPKLJKFDUERQDWLRQ 7\OHU1RWWRROLJKWQRWWRRKHDY\ *LQD6KLQ\DQGVSDUNO\ 'DYLG/RWVRIFDUERQDWLRQKROGVWRJHWKHUZHOOLQPRXWK 7RXFKHVEDFNRIWRQJXHDQGWLSRIWRQJXH

BEER:

$URPD -RQDV+RSV IRUZDUGZLWKVOLJKWU\HVSLFLQHVV SUHVHQW 7KLOH6OLJKWO\KHUEDOSXQJHQF\ &UDLJ6PHOOVOLNHSLQHWUHHV 7\OHU/LNHZKDWEHHULVVXSSRVHG WRVPHOOOLNH .ULVWLQ7KH5RFN\0RXQWDLQV FDOOPH $QGUHD:RRG\ 7DVWH /DFH\7DVWHVOLNHDZHVRPH.LQG RIH[SORGHVLQ\RXUPRXWK (PLO\'R\RXOLNHU\HEUHDG" &UDLJ&UHDP\VZHHWPDOWÃ&#x20AC;DYRU $QGUHZ+RSVDUHSURPLQHQW FLW UXVIUXLWVDQGVRPHOLJKWSOXPV  EXWLWLVEDODQFHGZHOOZLWKPDOW\ EDFNERQH 7\OHU/LNHZKDWEHHULVVXSSRVHG WRWDVWHOLNH

*LQD%LWWHURQIURQWHQG 'DYLG1LFHIXOOELWWHUQHVV(QGV LQFDUDPHO %RG\0RXWKIHHO (PLO\5\HU\HU\H &UDLJ%LWWHUEXWQRWWRRELWWHU 7\OHU/LNHZKDWEHHULVVXSSRVHG WRIHHOOLNH .ULVWLQ*RRGEDODQFHRIKRSELWH DQGFDUEªDQGWUHH 'DYLG+ROGV WRJHWKHUZHOO )LQLVK -RQDV+RSÃ&#x20AC;DYRU OLQJHUVZLWKDOFRKRO ZDUPWKRQWKH EDFNHQG 7KLOH5HVLGXDOKRS ELWWHUQHVVFDUERQLF ELW$OFRKROZLWK IDLQWZDWHUPHORQ $QGUHZ6ZHHW ELWWHUKRSS\¿QLVK <XP 7\OHU/LNHZKDWEHHULVVXSSRVHG WR¿QLVKOLNH *LQD$OFRKROEXUQRQWKHZD\ GRZQ $QGUHD1R 7KH)RRG,·G3DLULW:LWK (PLO\&RUQHGEHHI5HXEHQ &UDLJ&DUDPHOFDNH $QGUHZ%UHDGDQGEXWWHURU ZKDWHYHUHOVH\RXFDQ¿QG 7\OHU2[\JHQ .ULVWLQ%OXHFKHHVHEXUJHUDW6DO 0RRNLH¶V $QGUHD*RXGDDQGFUDFNHUV 2YHUDOOVFRUH 5<3 -)3


You’re Invited!

July 15

th

119 S. President Street

601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

Wednesday, July 3rd

CHRIS GILL’S AMERICAN BIRTHDAYEVE PARTY

(Blues) starts at 6:30 pm, No Cover

Thursday, July 4th

CLOSED

Happy Fourth of July!

Friday, July 5th

LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND

Taste portions of best shrimp dish, best tomato sandwich, local beers,

and more.

biggest farmers market set-up ever - nearly 40 local vendors

You get to vote:

who has the best tomato sandwich/shrimp dish? REGISTER ON-LINE AT WWW.MSRA.ORG

Saturday, July 6th

VASTI JACKSON

(Blues) starts at 9pm, $10 Cover

Tuesday, July 9th

SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON

(Blues Harmonica) starts at 6:30 pm, No Cover

NEW HAPPY HOUR

4:0 0 -7:0 0 • Tu e s d ay - Frid ay 2-for-1 On All Drinks Plus Food Specials

Full Outside Bar

Open Every Friday & Saturday jacksonfreepress.com

Free to attend!

(Blues) starts at 9pm, $10 Cover

21


       

2013 Summer Food & Beer Issue

Taste-Off

from page 20

BEER:

*LQD0\IDYRULWH,3$VRIDU $QGUHD,WKLQNWKHRQO\,3$VRIDUWKDW,ZRXOGGULQN

$SSHDUDQFH /DFH\&DUDPHOZLWKVRPHODFLQJWKDWIDGHV 7KLOH*ROGHQRUDQJHVOLJKWEXEEOH (PLO\2VWULFKVNLQVKRHVFRPHWRPLQG .ULVWLQ2UDQJHDJDLQWKLQZKLWHIRDP

%RG\0RXWKIHHO 7KLOH&DUERQLFZHOOURXQGHG (PLO\,IHHOOLNH,QHHGDSHFDQSLH &UDLJ%LWWHUQHVVIDGHVTXLFNO\ 7\OHU+HDYLHUWKDQ,WKRXJKW $QGUHD+HDY\

Muddle sliced lemon, fresh mint, and a strawberry in a glass. Add ice and fill with Prosecco. Add simple syrup to taste then finish with a lemon wheel & strawberry garnish.

 

{z}‚£ 46£ {£ ¯£ !&0,+‡£ £ ¯£ €z{‹‚€‹zƒ}{

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MELANIE BOYD

Yazoo Hop Project, Batch #72

7DVWH /DFH\6SLF\RYHUORDGRIGHOLFLRXVKRSV (PLO\+HDY\SHFDQWDVWH+RSVDUHQ¶W KHDY\5HDOO\VPRRWK²,FDQGULQNPRUHWKDQRQHRI WKHVH &UDLJ0LOGKRSWDVWH $QGUHZ+RSVDUHFLWUXV\DQGDOLWWOHJUDVV\EXWJRRG 1XWW\ELWWHUQHVVDQGVOLJKWVZHHWQHVVLQEDFNJURXQG 7\OHU'HOLFLRXVHDV\RQWKHSDODWH .ULVWLQ/LJKWHUWKDQWKH7LPEHU%HDVW

7KH)RRG,·G3DLULW:LWK -RQDV&KLQHVHKRWSRW /DFH\(YHU\WKLQJ 7KLOH+RS3URMHFWRUD6DO 0RRNLH¶V 6WURPEROL $QGUHZ0RUHEHHU .ULVWLQ2OLYHV:HLUGULJKW" *LQD%DFN\DUGEDUEHFXHDQGZLQWHUFRPIRUWIRRGV 2YHUDOOVFRUH 5<3 -)3

NOLA Hopitoulas

.ULVWLQ7KHVXQLVVHWWLQJWKHZHDWKHULVZDUPLQJWKH EHHULVFRRO<HDK *LQD%LWWHUDW¿UVWEXWJUHDW¿QLVK

$SSHDUDQFH -RQDV<HOORZDPEHULVKZLWKJRRGFODULW\3RXUHGDQ RIIZKLWHKHDGWKDWIDGHGTXLFNO\ (PLO\%URQ]HQLFHKHDGZRQGHUIXOODFLQJ $QGUHZ9HU\QLFHFODULW\IRUDQ,3$*RRGRUDQJHDPEHU FRORU2IIZKLWHKHDGWKDWSHUVLVWV .ULVWLQ7KHVLOYHUFDQLVGHFHLYLQJ:KLWLVKIRDPJROGHQ FRORUEHHU *LQD3UHWW\DPEHUFRORUFOHDU $QGUHD2RRRKDWUXHEHHU3HUIHFWO\ JROGHQ

%RG\0RXWKIHHO 7KLOH0DOW\FLWUXV ELJFDVFDGH  (PLO\/LJKWFRDWLQJEXWJRHVDZD\EHIRUH\RXUVHFRQG VLS &UDLJ7LQJO\ $QGUHZ)LQLVKHVVRPHZKDWWDUWDQGDVWULQJHQW SXFNHU\  .ULVWLQ&DUE\VSDUNOHLQWKHPLGGOHRI WKHWRQJXH $QGUHD1RIRDPEXEEOHV

$URPD -RQDV%LVFXLW\PDOWZLWKVOLJKWKRSV 0RUHLQOLQHZLWK(DVW&RDVWVW\OH,3$ /DFH\0DOW\VZHHWQHVVSUHYDLOV (PLO\6PHOOVOLNHZDWHUPHORQDQG VWUDZEHUULHV²QRKRSVDWDOO &UDLJ%,*&$6&$'( $QGUHZ6ZHHWDQGWDUWFKHUULHV6RPH EUHDG\FUDFNHUOLNHJUDLQFKDUDFWHUV SUHVHQW .ULVWLQ6PHOOVOLNHJUDVV $QGUHD0DOW\

MELANIE BOYD

BEER:

7DVWH /DFH\$OLWWOHPDOW\IRUP\WDVWH 7KLOH9HU\QLFHPDOWKRSEDODQFH $QGUHZ6RXUFLWUXV\KRSVDQGDQLFHWULVFXLWEDFN JURXQGIURPWKHPDOW1RWPXFKVZHHWQHVV

)LQLVK -RQDV&ULVSKRSELWHWKDWOLQJHUV /DFH\6SLF\ (PLO\'RHVQ¶WODVWH[FHSWDIHZVHFRQGV RIKRSV .ULVWLQ%DFNRIWKHPRXWKVSDUNVPRRWK RWKHUZLVH 7KH)RRG,·G3DLULW:LWK -RQDV6SLF\JXPER 7KLOH+RS3URMHFWDQGD6DO  0RRNLH¶V6WURPEROL (PLO\:DWHUPHORQRUFKLFNHQIHWWXFFLQL .ULVWLQ1RWROLYHV $QGUHD)LVKWDFRV 2YHUDOOVFRUH 5<3 -)3

July 3 - 9, 2013

See more photos from the Taste-Off at jfp.ms/beertasteoff2013.

22

Meet Our Experts

The Raise Your Pints team consisted of Raise Your Pints President Craig Hendry Jonas Outlaw and his wife, Lacey, Emily McLarty, Brad “Thile” Justice and Andrew Oswalt. Team JFP was Kristin Brenemen, Tyler Cleveland, Andrea Thomas, Gina Haug and David Rahaim.


Save yourself a 4 hour drive!

Daily Specials Monday : Millsaps Tuesday : The 904 Wednesday : BBQ Chicken Thursday : Popeye Friday : Meatball Saturday : Surprise

Lunch Specials Monday - Saturday 11 am - 2 pm

1/2 CHEESE

OR PEPPERONI + side salad $7.50 1/2 DAILY SPECIAL + side salad $8.75

Real Food Tastes Good

Your favorite beach restaurant has come to you!

Happy Hour

Mon-Fri 2-4pm

Live Music in the

oyster bar on Thursdays

904B E. Fortification Str. â&#x20AC;¢ Located Inside Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 904 in Belhaven 601.352.2002 â&#x20AC;¢ glennfoods.com â&#x20AC;¢ Monday - Saturday â&#x20AC;¢ 11 am - 9pm

TAKE THE SIZZLE OUT OF SUMMER , .

BEST G B R E A D AM B I N O P NORT O-BOYS H OF T COAS HE T

AND RELAX ON OUR NEW SHADED COOLER PATIO

THE ORIGINAL WINE DOWN WEDNESDAY ALL DAY EVERY WEDNESDAY HALF-PRICE BOTTLES OF WINE

$5 STARTERS & SUSHI EDAMAME, GARLIC & CHIVE POTATO CHIPS, PAN-ASIA LETTUCE WRAPS, VIETNAMESE SPRING ROLLS & CALIFORNIA ROLL AVAILABLE IN THE BAR OR PATIO ONLY. NOT AVAILABLE FOR CARRY-OUT.

GET A FREE APPETIZER TODAY! & EXCLUSIVE TEXT DEALS SENT STRAIGHT TO YOUR PHONE TEXT PANASIA TO 601.990.2176 (STANDARD DATA RATES APPLY)

CLOSED JULY 4TH

,EVFSYV4SMRXI'VSWWMRKÂ&#x2C6;6MHKIPERH17 Â&#x2C6;[[[TEREWMEGSQ

Vacation never ends at the Islander Maywood Mart â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson, MS (601) 366-5441 www.islanderoysterhouse.com

jacksonfreepress.com

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY - FRIDAY FROM 4 - 6 PM HALF-PRICE DRAFT BEER HALF-PRICE WINE BY THE GLASS

23


Medical Personnel & Students Receive 10% Off Every Day & 50% Off Every Monday! MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

APPETIZER

HAPPY HOUR Appetizers 1/2 OFF! 2:00 - 4:00

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bonus Bucks time again!  ­Can be used on up to 50% of the total sale, before tax.          ­Redeemable from Saturday, June 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 31. ­Good for use on anything at GARDEN WORKS!  *Exceptions: Landscape Services â&#x20AC;˘Â Delivery â&#x20AC;˘Â Urban Home â&#x20AC;˘Â Sale items

Completely Remodeled â&#x20AC;˘ Cozy Interior â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wifi â&#x20AC;˘ Open 7 days a week, 6am - 10pm 2601 N. State St. Fondren (across from UMC)

650 Hwy 51, Ridgeland | Interiors Market, Fondren www.MartinsonsMS.com | 601.856.3078 www.facebook.com/martinsonsms | Instagram: MartinsonsMS

Individually cooked to order on a real grill â&#x20AC;˘ We only use North American Black Angus Beef



Rock-N-Roll Hibachi & Sushi

FARMERS MARKET TIME!

Specials Monday - Friday Start at

July 3 - 9, 2013

11:00 - 2:00

24

$7.95

Crazy Happy Hour

CdTbSPh=XVWc

Closed July 4th

OPEN 4:00 - 8:00PM

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc

CORNER OF HIGHWAY 463 & HIGHWAY 22

 ÂŁÂŁ  Guest Chef Reynolds Boykin, Parlor Market Music By Zach Lovett

Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

CWdabSPh=XVWc

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no sharing, no carry out

$2 Pints

Specials Start at Mon - Fri 4:30 - 6:30 Sat & Sun 3:00 - 5:00

2560 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood 601.420.4058 â&#x20AC;˘ like us on

on State Street

â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

 ÂŁ  

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lunch

FX]VBc^_

    Livingston Community Foundation   

   

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B


Sal & Mookie’s Presents…

Southern Prohibition Brewing Co. & Crooked Letter Brewing Co. Beer Dinner Monday, July 22, 2013 $55 per person | 6 PM Pecan-crusted, fried Brie with a dried cherry marmalade Southern Prohibition Suzy B Dirty Blonde Ale Salad of baby spinach, summer berries, goat cheese and spiced pecans in a strawberry vinaigrette Crooked Letter Crooked Heffy Sicilian style pizza of heirloom tomatoes, shrimp, ricotta-lemonbasil pesto spread, Virginia bacon, fresh mozzarella and smoked sea salt Southern Prohibition Devil’s Harvest Extra Pale Ale

Chocolate Peanut Crunch Bar in a pool of vanilla crème Anglaise Crooked Letter Mystery Romp

E-mail MaggieB@SalandMookies.com or call 601.368.1919 to make your reservations today! facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

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Chicken Makhori (Indian Butter Chicken) over Basmati rice Southern Prohibition Mississippi Fire Ant Imperial Red Ale

25


I MELANIE BOYD

remember my father giving me sips of beer when I was a child as most men probably do. I hated it. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drink in high school, and it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until my mid-20s that I started drinking beer on my own, and usually only in social settings. When I lived in Austin, Texas, and was working an internship at a local Italian trattoria, the cooks and I would go to a bar down the street and order up a pitcher of Lone Star. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t particularly good, but it was cold and cheap and led to good conversation while talking shop about the nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Bottle shares and beer tastings among friends are great ways to explore beers you might not discover on your own.

TER

service. On good nights, and when we wanted to splurge a little, someone would pony up for a pitcher of Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #4. Austin had several local breweries, and I enjoyed trying their offerings but still wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much of a beer drinker. When I moved back to Dallas, I landed a job as the opening sous chef for a fun gastro pub where we had 40 beers on tap and countless more by the bottle. The policy for the restaurant was that everyone was entitled to a free â&#x20AC;&#x153;shift beerâ&#x20AC;? and could purchase anything else at 50 percent off, so letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just say I made my way through the extensive list fairly quickly. The beer that was my â&#x20AC;&#x153;gatewayâ&#x20AC;? beer, the one that hit my lips and made me say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow! Beer can be like this?â&#x20AC;? was Delirium Nocturnum from Belgium. Not available in Jackson (hopefully soon!), this beer has flavors of fruit and caramely malts with a brilliant carbonation and mouthfeel. From that point forward, I tried as many different va-

rieties as I could. Being a chef, my favorite beers were those four years before it made its way to our beer tasting. Everyone brewed with interesting culinary ingredientsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fruits, herbs, eyeballed the beautiful label of the beer with anticipation. Not spices, coffee, chocolateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as long as I could taste them. If a all beers age well, but this one was around 15 percent alcobeer said it was brewed with pecans, holâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;typically, higher-alcohol beers and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taste them, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care will stand the test of time when celfor it. But at this point, I still didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lared around 55 degrees and out of fully understand what to look for in a the light. beer or how to properly enjoy it. We opened the bottle and KHQWDVWLQJZLWKIULHQGVLWÂśVDJRRG When I moved to Jackson in poured the dark liquid into snifter LGHDWRWDNHQRWHVRQZKDWDSSHDOV WR\RX RUGRHVQÂśW 0RVWIRONVXVH 2010, before our beer laws changed, glasses. We stood around the kitchen ÂżYHFDWHJRULHVZKHQHYDOXDWLQJDEHHU I really enjoyed Lazy Magnoliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offercounter and swirled the beer in our ings, and my beer of choice was Inglasses before taking in the aroma. Appearance 1RWHWKHEHHUÂśVFRORUFDUERQ dian Summer. But before long, I had Figs, plums, cocoa and brandy waftDWLRQKHDGDQGLWVUHWHQWLRQ,VLWFOHDURU FORXG\"'RHVLWORRNODFNOXVWHUDQGGXOORUDOLYH exhausted the variety of beers available ed up into my nostrils. The beer had DQGLQYLWLQJ" in our area and, due to our strict limia smooth and chewy texture, and tations, found myself focusing more flavors of toffee and caramel with Smell -%ULQJWKHEHHUWR\RXUQRVH1RWHWKH on classic cocktails than beer. Fortubourbon notes mixed in with the EHHUÂśVDURPDWLFTXDOLWLHV0DOWVVZHHWURDVW\ VPRN\WRDVW\FKRFRODW\QXWW\FDUDPHOO\ELVFX nately, local laws concerning beer are dark fruits. I said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guys, we need LW\"+RSVGDQNRUUHVLQ\KHUEDOSHUIXP\VSLF\ changing. Each month brings a new to sit down to enjoy this beer.â&#x20AC;? And OHDI\JUDVV\Ă&#x20AC;RUDOSLQH\FLWUXV\"<HDVWZLOODOVR brewery to Mississippi, higher-gravity sit down we did. The only thing to FUHDWHDURPDV<RXPLJKWJHWIUXLW\RUĂ&#x20AC;RZHU\ DURPDV HVWHUV IURPDOHVDQGYHU\FOHDQDURPDV beers, new flavors and experiences. We come out of my mouth for the next IURPODJHUVZKLFKZLOODOORZWKHPDOWDQGKRS even have incredible new Mississippi several minutes was â&#x20AC;&#x153;wowâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;inVXEWOHWLHVWRSXOOWKURXJK breweries (go out and support them!). credibleâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;unbelievable.â&#x20AC;? Once again I was able to get excited Thus began my obsession Taste - 7DNHDGHHSVLSRIWKHEHHU1RWHDQ\ Ă&#x20AC;DYRUVRULQWHUSUHWDWLRQVRIĂ&#x20AC;DYRUVWKDW\RX about beer in a whole new way. with finding more of these beers. I PLJKWGLVFRYHU7KHGHVFULSWLRQVZLOOEHVLPLODU Through the new craft-beer am now cellaring two versions, one WRZKDW\RXVPHOO,VWKHEHHUEXLOWZHOO",V movement, I was able to make some from 2011 and one from 2013, WKHUHDEDODQFHEHWZHHQWKHLQJUHGLHQWV":DV great friends and organize beer tastwhich received additional aging in WKHEHHUEUHZHGZLWKDVSHFLÂżFGRPLQDQFHRI FKDUDFWHULQPLQG"+RZGRHVLWÂżWWKHVW\OH" ings and bottle shares. This is a great bourbon barrels. way to try a bunch of different beers You can discover incredible, Mouthfeel - 7DNHDQRWKHUVLSDQGOHWLWZDQGHU in small quantities without spending world-class beers if you just look. 1RWHKRZWKHEHHUIHHOVRQWKHSDODWHDQGLWV tons of money (or getting too drunk). When you travel, drink as many ERG\/LJKWKHDY\FKHZ\WKLQRUZDWHU\VPRRWK RUFRDUVH":DVWKHEHHUĂ&#x20AC;DWRYHUFDUERQDWHG" As a result of these bottle shares, I of the local brews as possible. Visit have now tried beers from all over the a beer store and pick up something Overall -<RXURYHUDOOLPSUHVVLRQRIWKHEHHU world, new styles and flavors and aroyouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never tried. Ask the sales per6RPHSHRSOHDOVRMXGJHWKHÂżQLVKRIWKHEHHU SOURCE: BEERADVOCATE.COM mas. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found a new favorite beer at son for suggestions. Organize beer one of these tastings. A beer that made tastings and bottle shares. Keep me sit down. And shut up. tasting notes to remember the beers A friend brought a bottle of 2009 Papier from The Bru- youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried (several great mobile apps are out there to help ery located in California. This beer is brewed in the old ale you do this). Over time, your palate will expand and become style, and then aged in barrels. When The Bruery released more developed and experienced. Above all else, trust your this beer, someone purchased it and cellared it for another palateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a good beer as long as you enjoy it!

W

R/S

PEW

KN IT

Beer Candied Bacon

CK FLI

July 3 - 9, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pig candyâ&#x20AC;? adds a bit of sweetness to

26 classic bacon.

Take Notes

N

eed a snack to tide you over while you grill? You may have heard about the decadence known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;pig candy,â&#x20AC;? which is bacon baked with a coating of brown sugar. It only gets better in this addictive variation, glazed with hints of orange peel and coriander from Lazy Magnolia Indian Summer and a bite of spice. Final texture will depend on the quality and fat content of your bacon, but it will continue to crisp as it cools. And if notâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no worries. Spiced bacon taffy is pretty good, too.

2 ounces Lazy Magnolia Indian Summer Wheat Ale 1/2 cup light brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 teaspoon ginger 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 pound bacon

Heat oven to 350 degrees Farenheit. Combine everything

but the bacon in a small bowl, mixing well. The glaze will be a thin syrup. Cook bacon on a rack for 10 minutes, then flip. Cook another 10 minutes, and flip once more. Brush with glaze. Cook an additional 20-30 minutes, brushing frequently, until bacon is deep red and crisp.


Beat The Summer Heat Margarita Mondays • All Margaritas $4 All Day! Martini Tuesdays • All Martinis $4 All Day! Happy Hour • M-F! • 3:30 to 6:30 $4 Well Drinks & $2 Bud Lite & Miller Lite Draft Party on the Patio • Live Music Every Thursday 6:30 PM

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2801 North State Street • Fondren District 601-981-2520 • www.QueSeraMS.com

27


GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 30

Not Just Another Package Store by Brinda Fuller Willis

N

July 3 - 9, 2013

BRINDA FULLER WILLIS

atchez holds a little sweet secret that has been a trampled others in the midst of the madness. The Rhythm made it and where to buy it via word-of-mouth. Stores part of the historic landscape since 1979. It’s the Club fire was called the Natchez Dance Hall Holocaust that sold alcohol had to blacken their windows so passersOld South Winery, which uses one of the state’s because 209 people, mostly African Americans, died. by couldn’t see what was going on inside. They had to sell perfect fruits: muscadines. At the time, the fire was the second most deadly alcohol in plain brown paper bags so not to advertise in Scott O. Galbreath Jr., the son of a soybean and cot- building fire in the nation, behind the Iroquois Theater any way. This is how the name “package store” came about. ton farmer-turned veterinarian from Lorman, Miss., had fire in Chicago in 1903. Blues greats that had played at the Finally, after the laws relaxed, Galbreath was able to some free time every year after the crops were laid. He club, such as Leonard Caston and Willie Dixon, John Lee advertise the winery on the highway. “The sign that’s out started making a little wine that tasted pretty good—at Hooker, Stompy Jones, Cab Calloway and Gene Gilmore, there now is the only sign I ever put up out there,” he says. least to him and his childhood friends. later immortalized the fire in song. A memorial marker of “It’s kind of small. I didn’t want to upset the Baptist across On a recent trip to Natchez, my twin and I went to the event sits in Natchez Bluff Park and, on Nov. 6, 2010, the road by putting up a big sign. The people in Mississippick up a few bottles of wine (a little “communion” as the Rhythm Club Museum opened to commemorate the pi are known for being beer and whiskey drinkers, but the we call it in the Hill Country) from the Old South Win- tragic fire. people in Louisiana just across the bridge are wine drinkery. While there, we got the rare opportunity to sit down Galbreath got his first muscadines from a guy who ers. (Sometimes) the Cajuns would come over here on and chat with Galbreath, day trips to my winery, the founder and owner of playing that good music, the winery. and have a party on their Galbreath, an 88bus drinking wine. That’s year-old retired veterinarhow I knew we’d be sucian, like his father, moved cessful in this wine-makto Natchez when he was ing business.” about 15. On Friday The Galbreath and Saturday nights, he family now boasts a used to hang outside the three-generation operRhythm Club listening to ation at the Old South local blues singers, some of Winery in Natchez whom would later become (65 S. Concord St., the greatest blues musi601-445-9924). Galcians of all time, such as breath’s daughter DiJohn Lee Hooker, Gene ane is the lead sales and Gilmore and Stompy marketing person. Son Jones. Galbreath and his Scott III is the winemakfriends often drank homeer, and his sons Scott IV, made muscadine wine 19, Dylan, 17, and Lane, while they listened to or 14, carry on the business played music. under the watchful eye of “(We) had a little ole its patriarch. band,” he says. “We were The wine is availso bad, we once had to able in any liquor stores The Galbreath family (clockwise from top left: Dylan, Scott Galbreath III, Scott Galbreath IV, Diane, winery founder pay a man down in Louiin Jackson that sell wine. Scott O. Galbreath Jr. and Lane) still own and operate the Old South Winery today. siana to play at his place.” The top sellers are Miss On the night of April Scarlett, Sweet Noble, 23, 1940, a fire broke out Sweet Magnolia and Blue at the Rhythm Club, and more than 200 people lost their paid his father, also a vet, with them. “That man gave my Bayou, in that order. Scott III reports sales of approximatelives. “It was a bad time,” Galbreath says. “There’s no way daddy 10 tons of muscadines and threw in two extra tons ly 90,000 bottles a year of pure muscadine wine with all to describe it. They let us out of school to see if we could for good measure. We had no machinery at that time so we grapes (six different kinds of muscadines) grown in Missisidentify anybody.” ended up unloading them by hand in tin buckets,” he says. sippi without the use of pesticides. The Rhythm Club, which was located at 1 Saint It was some of the hardest work he ever did. Galbreath Visit oldsouthwinery.com for more information regardCatherine St., reportedly burned because some guys got made his first muscadine wine when he was 15 years old. ing brands and directions. Call 601-445-9924 to arrange into an argument. The police arrested five black men after Later, Galbreath decided to open Old South Win- a tour of the winery. The Old South Winery is open daily drunkenly threatening to burn the building down. The ery. Back then, Mississippi liquor stores weren’t allowed to except Sunday, so perk up your taste buds, because wine tastcharges against the men were later dropped. Some people advertise alcohol. Interested buyers found out about who ing is free.

28


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami. STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Nick’s (3000 Old Canton Road, Fondren, 601-981-8017) Brunch, lunch and Southern-inspired fine dining from seafood and beef tenderloin to quail, pork belly, lamb and duck. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma.

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4654 McWillie Dr. Jackson, MS Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 9PM Friday & Saturday: 10AM - 10PM Sunday: CLOSED

The Original

Comeback Dressing

We Now Offer Gouda & Harvati Cheese! Cool Al’s

Voted #1 by Delta magazine.

$6.99 per bottle + tax Available only at The Cherokee.

CoolAlsJxn

601.362.6388

601.713.3020

Closed July 4th Open July 5th In Town & in the USA

1410 Old Square Road

www.cherokeedrivein.com

7KDL)RRG $W,WV%HVW

PGG"OZPSEFS 'PSB-JNJUFE5JNF0OMZ

-Best of Jackson 2003-2013-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (862 BlvdDr., @ Flowood County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) (2560Avery Lakeland 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi. VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-veganfriendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

Join us for Happy Hour Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013 Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

Call Us For All Of Your Catering Needs! BBQ Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2 lbs pork/beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw, 6 slices Texas toast/10 buns)

Rib Party Pack Serves 4 - $52.15 (2 whole ribs, 1 pint of baked beans, 1 pint of slaw, 1 pint of potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra, Manager Since 1996 -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

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COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

29


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

Old is New Again Top of the Hops Official After Party July 27th

THIS WEEK

UPCOMING THURSDAY 7/11:

(Restaurant)

THURSDAY 7/11:

Swing de Paris

T.B. Ledford & Friends

MONDAY 7/8:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

FRIDAY 7/12:

Magnolia Drive FRIDAY 7/12:

Evans Geno w Kenny Davis

TUESDAY 7/9:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends

SATURDAY 7/20:

(Restaurant)

JFP’s Chick Ball

MONDAY

thru FRIDAY Blue Plate

Lunch

Bringing back some old favorites and creating new items daily like: Roasted Duck Sandwich, Crawfish Etouffee, Crystal Scallops, Homemade Chicken Salad

with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. *Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

BUY GROWLERS OF YOUR FAVORITE BEER TO TAKE HOME $24 for first time fill for high gravity beer. Refills are $20.00

July 3 - 9, 2013

$19 for first time fill for regular beer. Refills are $15.00

30

Don’t forget to contact us about hosting your event or party! Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule 601.948.0888 • 200 S. Commerce St. • Downtown Jackson

JULIE SKIPPER

FRIDAY 7/5:

ARdenLand presents: Sturgill Simpson

I

’ve written here before about my affin- Cathead vodka and gin. ity for old things. I like when an object The crowd was steady and included or a place has a history. To me, it cre- a mix of young and old, neighborhood ates a sense of place and makes some- folks and others who made a special trip thing unique, and I’m always on the hunt in, stopping in before or after dinner at one for such treasures and stories. Things with of Fondren’s many restaurants. After some stories get people talking, and I love to hear members of our group departed, I moved the conversation. to the bar to chat some more and watch the So last Saturday, after swinging bartenders. Blackboards above their heads through the Mississippi Farmers Market, proclaimed that they craft their drinks with I crossed High Street and headed to Old pride, and it’s immediately evident. It also House Depot (639 Monroe St., 601- serves as a gentle reminder that the drinks 592-6200, oldhousedepot.com). Thanks to architectural salvage, my apartment furnishings include a mantle repurposed to house my television, an old door that’s been turned into a table and a ladder put to work as a bathroom towel rack. Even when I don’t necessarily need something in particular, I like to wander through the warehouse getting inspiration for future projects. From the rusted patio chairs and bathtubs to antique signs, windows and even old doorknobs, Old House Depot is a veritable treasure trove for someone like me. Owner Jim Kopernak helpfully engaged me in conversation, offering suggestions on how to incorporate reclaimed wood into new features, and telling me about the sources for some of the The Old House Depot is a treasure trove of current inventory—he knows where undiscovered old and repurposed delights. everything came from and is happy to share. Among the stock that day: a mail slot from the Electric Building downtown, marble from the former are worth any wait—things done well take Bank of Mississippi building on Capitol time and care. Street and a period light fixture used in I enjoyed my visit so much that the the filming of “The Help.” What stories following week, I returned with my fellow. these objects could tell if they could talk. This time, while he sampled from the bar’s After spending my morning looking craft-beer selection, I tried two more craft through some of our city’s architectural cocktails. With a creative list of beverage past, it seemed fitting that night to meet offerings and word from Brent’s manager up with friends at one of the latest old Leslee Foukal that they plan to keep it fresh spaces to receive new life: The Apothecary by changing the menu regularly, there’s at Brent’s Drugs (655 Duling Ave., 601- plenty to keep returning for. 366-3427). After years of being relegated Like Duling School and other Fondren to storage, this backroom space is now properties, it’s fun to see a new aspect of reborn into a speakeasy-inspired bar with Brent’s come alive. I imagine older guests nods to the drugstore’s history. sitting over drinks and reminiscing about Walking through the curtain to join the neighborhood, the characters they’ve my group nestled at a corner table, I no- known and the memories they made here, ticed thoughtful touches throughout the while younger patrons talk about the lives space. Most notably, above the bar, draw- they want to make for themselves and ers from an old pharmacy serve as cabi- their children. netry. The glassware evokes days gone by. Acknowledging the past while creatThe drink menu features “Prescription ing something new continues to be a theme Cocktails” that can cure what ails you after running throughout our city, and it’s one a long day. I started with a Campari Mar- that helps ensure that we retain what’s special tini—made with Campari, Manzanilla and remember our individual and collective sherry and lemon—and served in a coupe stories. It keeps us talking. And that’s someglass with a sidecar refill, before moving thing I’ll continue to look for, support and on to a Mississippi Martini, mixed with raise a (prescription) glass to.


by Micah Smith

F

rom the Civil War to civil rights and beyond, the Old Capitol Museum offers Mississippians a rare visual retrospect on the complex past of the capital city with “Jackson: A Photographic History.” The exhibit, which launched March 12 and will run until July 7, contains a comprehensive collection of pictures from the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, covering more than a century of Jackson’s greatest achievements and gravest hardships. “I think this reminds us of where we’ve been, how far we’ve come, and what we can still become,” says Mike Stoll, the education historian for the Old Capitol Museum and the person responsible for the collection. “Jackson is a city that always had a lot of potential. It had a solid past in terms of the prosperity of its people, but it also had a dark side.” Jackson’s darkest days can be found in some of the photos in the collection, depicting the most dangerous and turbulent times for the state capital, including photos of massive civil-rights demonstrations, devastating natural disasters and the early demise of Mississippi landmarks. “The aerial shots that we have are interesting because they show just how extensive the damage was to Jackson, like in the Easter Flood in 1979,” Stoll says. One of the single most destructive occurrences in Mississippi history, the flooding of the Pearl River, left much of Jackson underwater and resulted in around $500 million in damage and nearly 15,000 displaced citizens. Another example of the few haunting historical disasters that the exhibit presents is the destruction of the Bowman House, a four-story, hundred-room hotel destroyed in the Civil War, not by enemy bombardment or a hail of bullets, but by a simple fire. “The Bowman House would have been on the corner of Amite Street and State Street and was used as a headquarters for both the northern and southern officers at times during the Civil War until it

was burned down by accident in 1863,” Stoll says. The photograph, taken in 1869, shows the Bowman in utter ruins. “For photos like these, it’s not always what’s in the picture; it’s about the story and people behind it.” What “A Photographic History” accomplishes best, Stoll says, is providing visitors with a sense of the incredible differences in form that Jackson has adopted throughout the years. “There are obvious differences, of course, like the dirt roads that the city was built around in 1800,” Stoll says, “but more than anything, it shows how we’ve grown. We see features of the city’s historic sites and familiar landmarks change. Then, you find a modernized Jackson, with paved roads and electricity, and places like the Lamar Life Building skyscraper, which, at the time of its creation in 1929, was one of the largest reinforced concrete structures in the world.” “Jackson: A Photographic History” is peppered with such century-long transformations and for Stoll, this element makes the collection most interesting. “We have early photos from the University of Mississippi Medical Center with only around 300 beds,” he says. “Now, they have over 9,000 employees and represent 10 percent of the economy for the Jackson metro area. We also have photographs from the building of the Mississippi Coliseum, which actually sits 2,000 feet above Jackson’s extinct volcano.” This is the last weekend Stoll says that visitors to the Old to catch “Jackson: A Capitol Museum’s newest attraction can Photographic History” at the Old Capitol Museum. expect “a better appreciation of what has happened and what our city has. Jackson is more than a small, southern state capital. The Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St., 601-576-6920) and “Jackson: A Photographic You get an underHistory” are free to visitors of all ages and open Tuesday to Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and standing that our city Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. was once extremely prosperous, and with the knowledge that comes from considering our past, we can be prosperous again.”

jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson in Retrospect

JESSICA KING

FILM p 32 | 8 DAYS p 33 | MUSIC p 36 | SPORTS p 38

31


6A0=3E84F DIVERSIONS | film A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 7/5 – Thur. 7/11

by Anita Modak-Truran

3-D Monsters University G

3-D Despicable ME 2 PG

Monsters University (non 3-D)

Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain R

G

Man Of Steel (non 3-D) PG13 This Is The End R

White House Down PG13

The Internship PG13

The Heat

Now You See Me PG13

R

3-D World War Z PG13 World War Z (non 3-D) PG13

Fast & Furious 6 PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf Npoebz

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 2 • 7:00-8:00 pm Yoga for Runners/Athletes

Uvftebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) • 6-7:15 pm Level 1

July 3 - 9, 2013

Xfeoftebz

32

• 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Classical Hatha Yoga • 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

The Lone Ranger PG13

Despicable ME 2 (non 3-D) PG

Bust a Gut

Uivstebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

• 9-10:15 am Classical Hatha Yoga • 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

• 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy are at the top of their game in “The Heat.”

“T

he Heat” isn’t for people who are disturbed by four-letter words or candid discussions on the pros and cons of Spanx. If Spanx is a five-letter word you never heard of before, then you will definitely be squeezed into a new direction in this film directed by Paul Fieg (“Bridesmaids”), starring the bosom-buddy cop team of Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. In an impromptu undercover operation, Boston cop Mullins (McCarthy) tries to get Special Agent Ashburn (Bullock) dressed for the part by reworking her conservative pinstriped suit into something appropriately fetching for the lackey of a drug lord. The jacket gets removed. The shirtsleeves get ripped. After sheering the slacks into hot pants, Mullins points to the fleshcolored underwear that Ashburn is wearing and demands clarification. Ashburn’s chokes out: “They’re Spanx. … They hold everything together.” A bit mystified, Mullins bursts out: “Why? What’s gonna come popping out?” In this film, you never know what’s going to come popping out of Mullins’ foulmouth, and frankly, it’s hysterical. It’s raunchy, rude, crude and not for all moviegoers, but gut-bustingly funny, because McCarthy’s Mullins lacks a filter, and Bullock’s Ashburn lobs back the jokes with the ease of a master straight man. Except for the opening scene, where Ashburn engages in obvious and unsubtle brown-nosing techniques in New York, the core action takes place in Boston, which is strictly Mullins’ territory. Mullins scares her co-workers, shames her boss on the size of his manly parts and doesn’t play well with others. Ashburn is the perfect partner for Mullins, because she’s alienated all members of the FBI teams except the boss, who has a soft spot for her old fashioned charm. “The Heat” is a movie without fuss. The movie formula is blatant, and the con-

clusion is obvious. But Fieg’s fluid direction accounts, in part, for the warmth and likeableness of the performances of McCarthy and Bullock. These two ladies are at the top of their comedic game. This film has the matter-of-fact, one-thing-after-another pitter patter of an R-rated Abbott and Costello movie, but this time we have a feminized version. Well, it’s half feminized, because one of the running jokes is Mullins and her doppelganger at the local bar. The tension that keeps the movie spinning forward is that we have a nice cop, who’s not really all that likeable, and mean cop, who is really pretty sweet under all the bravado. While, at times, the comedy drains away and leaves only tawdriness, these two actors are better than the material. Many parts of this film have a shocking comic power because of the chemistry between Bullock and McCarthy. These two have the conversational rhythm of best friends. It’s good, at times bad and definitely ugly when Mullins’ opts for the ball-busting approach to interrogation. The story takes shape after the bonding bender at the local dive bar. The ladies chug. They hug. They dance, and they get to know each other’s weaknesses. Ashburn’s weakness is obvious; no one likes a prissy, self-serving braggart. She lugs around her trophies for support. Mullins snitched on her brother and had him imprisoned for dealing drugs. Her family wants nothing to do with her, but she’s a family girl at heart. The film maintains a quick tempo. The dialogue lifts the filter from the banal into curses of fun. It is the best-bosom buddy flick of an epic popcorn movie summer. (Admittedly, there hasn’t been another “bosom” buddy flick this summer). Moviegoers agree. It stomped out the competition at the box office this weekend. It took “White House Down” … down. You go girls!


WEDNESDAY 7/3

SATURDAY 7/6

TUESDAY 7/9

Sombra Mexican Kitchen hosts a Margarita and Sangria Tasting.

“The Baddest Show on Dirt” is at the Mississippi Coliseum.

The Jackson Metro Cyclists Time Trial starts in Madison.

BEST BETS J U LY 3 -10, 2013

COURTESY MARY STRIPLING

WEDNESDAY 7/3

The Margarita and Sangria Tasting is at 6:30 p.m. at Sombra Mexican Kitchen (1037 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 100, Ridgeland). $25; call 601-707-7950. … An Independence Day Celebration with a fireworks show is after the Mississippi Braves game against the Mobile Bay Bears at 7 p.m. at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl). $8-$15; call 601-932-8788 or 800-745-3000; milb.com.

THURSDAY 7/4

The Jackson Audubon Society hosts a bird walk at LeFleur’s Bluff State Park on July 6.

FRIDAY 7/5

Saxophonist Amos Brewer performs from 11 a.m.3 p.m. at The Penguin Restaurant & Bar (1100 John R. Lynch St.). Free; call 251-5222; email info@thepenguinms. com. … The King of Southern Soul, Sir Charles Jones, performs at 8 p.m. at Masonic Temple (1072 W. John R. Lynch St.). Doors open at 7 p.m. $24; call 800-745-3000. … The AraBY BRIANA ROBINSON bian Dance Party with a bellydancing performance as well as JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Arabian and Greek dancing with plate breaking is at 7:30 p.m. at FAX: 601-510-9019 Petra Cafe (2741 Old Canton DAILY UPDATES AT Road). No cover, food prices JFPEVENTS.COM vary; call 601-366-0161.

EVENTS@

SATURDAY 7/6

The Southern Komfort Brass Band performs at the Old House Depot’s annual July 4 Party.

601-592-6200; oldhousedepot.com. … The Canton Gospel Fest Homecoming featuring Lee Williams and the Spiritual QCs. True Faith Fellowship Choir is at 6 p.m. at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse Square, Canton). Free; call 800-844-3369; cantontourism.com.

Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk is at 8 a.m. at LeFleur’s Bluff State Park (2140 Riverside Drive). An expert birder leads the walk. Adults must accompany children under 15. Free, $3 car entrance fee. Free; call 601-832-6788. … Christmas in July Arts and Crafts Show is at 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). $4, ages 12 and under free; email steinhauerproductions@charter.net.

SUNDAY 7/7

“Jackson: A Photographic History” photography exhibit at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.) closes. Open

Tuesday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-5 p.m. Free; call 601-576-6920. … Wanderer, Steadfast, Hit the Ground Running, Ozona and Charlie Does Surf perform at 7 p.m. at Rampage Extreme Park (931 Highway 80 W.). $7; find Rampage Extreme Park on Facebook.

MONDAY 7/8

Susan Crandall signs copies of “Whistling Past the Graveyard” at 5 p.m. Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. Call 601366-7619.

TUESDAY 7/9

The Right Way to Start a Nonprofit is from 9 a.m.4 p.m. at the Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). Guidebook included. Registration required. $139, $99 members; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits. org. … Riders try to complete a 6.75-mile course in the shortest time at the Jackson Metro Cyclists Time Trial at 6-6:30 p.m. at Xerox Building (384 Galleria Parkway, Madison). Helmets required. Free; call 601-988-2422; jacksonmetrocyclists.com.

WEDNESDAY 7/10

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba speaks on the topic “My Vision for the City” at the Jackson 2000 July Discussion Luncheon from 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). RSVP. $12, $10 members; call 960-1500; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org.

jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

Cyclists ride 10, 33 or 62 miles with rest stops and snacks during the Cruisin’ Clinton Bike Ride at 7 a.m. at Traceway Park (200 Soccer Row, Clinton). Lunch included. $10. 601-924-6082; clintonparksandrec.com. … A Fourth of July Celebration, which includes craft demonstrations, a Choctaw Indians’ Red Water Social Dancers performance and live music, is from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Free; call 601856-7546; mscrafts.org. … A July 4 Party with refreshments and music from the Southern Komfort Brass Band is at 5-8 p.m. at Old House Depot (639 Monroe St.). Free; call

33


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 July Discussion Luncheon July 10, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba speaks on the topic â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Vision for the City.â&#x20AC;? RSVP. $12, $10 members; call 960-1500; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org. Ninth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 20, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to fight sex trafficking. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. $5 cover, $5 door prize entry; call 601-362-6121, ext. 23; chickball@jacksonfreepress.com. Also see jfpchickball.com.

(/,)$!9 Family Fireworks Extravaganza July 4, 5-9:30 p.m. at Traceway Park (200 Soccer Row, Clinton). The family-friendly event features music from Little Big Town and the Kimberlee Helton Band, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, food, fireworks and more. Free admission, $8 parking fee. Call 601924-6082; clintonparksandrec.com. Independence Day Celebration July 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The museum is open for holiday-related activities. $8, children under 12 and members free; call 601981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. Broadmeadow Neighborhood Association Fourth of July Parade July 4, 10:30 a.m., at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk the Red, White, and Blue Carpet.â&#x20AC;? Celebrity costumes encouraged. Bicycles and wagon floats welcome. Prizes given for best costume or float. Refreshments, games and crafts after the parade. Free; email maureencatherinesmith@gmail.com or pushthepig@gmail.com; topoffondren.com.

Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest July 4-7, at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse Square, Canton). Also at Canton Multipurpose Complex. Includes hot air balloons, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, food and entertainment. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. The Golf Ball Drop Fundraiser is July 6. Visit ballooncanton. com for a schedule. Free admission, $10 golf ball drop ticket; call 601-859-4358 or 800-844-3369; ballooncanton.com. Celebrate America Balloon Glow July 4, 6-10 p.m., at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy watching hot air balloons, food vendors, live music and fireworks. Free; call 800-468-6078; visitridgeland.com.

July 3 - 9, 2013

Madison Family Fireworks July 4, 9 p.m., at Liberty Park, Madison (Liberty Park Drive, Madison). Every year, the town of Madison celebrates with a fireworks display. Family friendly. Free; call 601853-9109; madisonthecity.com.

34

#/--5.)49 Events at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Boys and Girls Summer Camp July 8-11, at the Bowl. The soccer camp includes morning sessions for ages 5-12 and all-day sessions for ages 8-17

â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Soccer Boys and Girls Team Camps July 8-11. The camp takes place at the Bowl. Meals and lodging included. Call for rates for commuting campers. Registration and $100 deposit required. $285; call 601-968-8708; email jsabillon@belhaven.edu; belhaven.edu. â&#x20AC;˘ Belhaven Football Kids Camp July 8-11 and July 15-18. The camp for ages 4-15 meets at the practice fields from 8 a.m.-noon. Registration required; space limited. $100; call 601-965-7024; email jthrasher@belhaven.edu; belhaven.edu. Events at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. â&#x20AC;˘ ROBOTS! July 6, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Learn how robots work with the Team 456 Siege Robotics. $8, children under 12 and members free. â&#x20AC;˘ Under the Sea Camp July 8-12, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children entering grades 1-5 learn about ocean science though crafts, projects and more. Registration required. Bring or buy lunch. $175 (discounts for multiple children). â&#x20AC;˘ 12 Days of Summer July 9-21. The museum gives out prizes to one person each day, and winners are featured on social media. Free; follow Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum on Facebook. Jackson State University Tiger Baseball Camps, at Grove Park (4126 Parkway Ave.). JSU Head baseball coach Omar Johnson is the facilitator. Ages 8-12 meet July 8-10, and ages 13-high school meet July 10-12. Registration required. T-shirts included. Call for a list of required equipment. $60, $75 with lunch, $5 late fee (start date of camp); call 601-979-3930; email omarkjohnson@yahoo.com. Zoo Camp July 8-12, at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Includes zoo hikes, games and animal encounters. Registration required. For ages 6-12, ages 6-8 may attend half-day or full-day sessions. $90, $85 members; full day: $175, $165 members; call 601-352-2580; jacksonzoo.org. History Is Lunch July 3, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Terrence Winschel of the Vicksburg National Military Park talks about the 150th anniversary of the Surrender of Vicksburg. Free; call 601-576-6998; oldcapitolmuseum.com. Watermelon Classic July 4, 7:30 a.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The annual race includes a 5K run/walk, a one-mile wellness run and a Tot Trot for children ages 3 and under. Watermelon served after the race. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Register by July 1. Registration fees vary, free Tot Trot; call 601-982-8264; msfame.com. MAC Mississippi Sports Medicine All-Star Basketball Games July 8, 6 p.m., at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in A.E. Wood Coliseum. The girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; games start at 6 p.m., and the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; games follow. $5; call 601-924-3020. OASIS Summer Enrichment Program July 8-26, at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). In suite 3415. Arts Klassicalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program for ages 5-13 includes playwriting, painting, crafts, acting, drama, choir, mathematical games and field trips. Registration required; scholarships available. Call 769-257-6413 or 601-664-8671; email georgia12@live.com. Summer Advanced Placement Institute July 8July 12, at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.).

The program is required for high school teachers to teach AP courses. Registration required. $550; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. Common Core State Standards Boot Camp July 8-Aug. 12, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at PERICO Institute (Jackson Medical Mall, 350 W. Woodrow Ave., Suite 300). The camp for children in grades 6-12 covers math and English/language skills. Held weekdays. Registration required. Limit of 12 students. $50 per week; call 769-251-1408; priydems.com.

with neighbors, and discuss ways to support the Fondren Neighborhood. RSVP. Free; call 601942-8175; email smbarrett1@comcast.net; ourfondren.com. History Is Lunch July 10, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Dr. Michael Trotter talks about the history of health care in the Delta. Free; call 601-576-6998.

Miss Mississippi Parade July 8, 7 p.m., at Washington Street, Vicksburg . See this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contestants in the annual parade. The pageant is July 10-13. Free; call 601-634-4527; vicksburg.org.

Miss Mississippi Pageant July 10-13, 7 p.m., at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St., Vicksburg). Contestants compete for a chance to participate in the Miss America Pageant Sept. 15 in Atlantic City, N.J. $125 all four nights, $30 July 10-11, $40 July 12, $50 July 13; call 601638-6746; missmississippipageant.com.

Career Development Center Programs Registration July 9, 7-9 p.m., at Career Development Center (2703 First Ave.). Career and technical education classes are two nights a week for 10-12 weeks and are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Free; call 601-960-5322; jackson.k12.ms.us.

Summer Feeding Program through July 12, at participating JPS schools . The Food Service Department of the Jackson Public School District offers lunch on weekdays to youth ages 18 and under, excluding July 5. Free; call 601-960-8911 for a list of schools; jackson.k12.ms.us.

Choctaw Indian Fair July 10-13, at Choctaw Reservation (Highway 16 W., Choctaw). Includes the Choctaw Indian Princess Pageant, stickball games, music and more. Performers include Josh Turner, Pat Green and Justin Moore. July 13, the Rez Run is at 7 a.m., and meet Si and Alan Anderson of A&Eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duck Dynastyâ&#x20AC;? from 1-4 p.m. $12 one day, $20 four days, $7-$12 students, children 5 and under free, $10 Duck Dynasty Experience, $15-$25 Rez Run; call 601-650-7450 (fair) or 601-650-1765 (Rez Run); choctawindianfair.com.

Dog Day Afternoons, noon-5 p.m. through Sept. 29, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Bring your dog to the Art Garden for an afternoon of play. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

OFNA Party With A Purpose - Code Enforcement/Beautification July 10, 6-8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.), in the auditorium. OurFondren Neighborhood Association encourages Fondren residents to enjoy refreshments, socialize

34!'%!.$3#2%%. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gold in the Hillsâ&#x20AC;? July 5-20, at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Set in the 1890s, the play features a relentless hero, a winsome heroine, a ruthless villain, and the wilder side of city life in the infamous New York Bowery. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. $10, $5 ages 12 and under; call 601-636-0471; vicksburgtheatreguild.com.

Beauty in Nature

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COURTESY JOHNNIE MABERRY

Mississippi Family Festival July 4, noon-8 p.m., at Westside Community Center (1650 Wiggins Road). The event includes games, a space jump, food and fireworks. Free; call 601-398-2433.

(includes lunch). Discounts for siblings available. $85 day camp, $150 extended camp; call 601968-8708 or 601-609-4575; email jsabillon@ belhaven.edu or sabillon3@yahoo.com.

Frank Robinson returns to the Tougaloo Art Colony as an instructor.

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Nameless Open Mic July 6, 9 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). On first and third Saturdays at 9 p.m. Poets, singers, actors and comedians are welcome. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640. Oxford Shakespeare Festival through July 7, at Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts (100 University Ave., Oxford). Plays include “Love’s Labour Lost,” “MacBeth” and “Hello, Dolly!” $14-$18; call 662-915-7411; shakespeare. olemiss.edu.

7%,,.%33 First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children every first Friday of the month. Appointment required. Free; call 601707-7355.

Visual Arts and Dance Center (1500 Peachtree St.). Learn to draw what you see accurately and grasp basic skills. Held weekdays. Registration required. $250; call 965-7026; email dwestart@ gmail.com. Creative Craft Camp, Ages 5-8 July 8-12, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Topics include pottery, wire sculpture, mosaics, fused glass and more, and campers write stories to accompany their artwork. Registration required. $175, $150 each additional child; call 601-856-7546; mscrafts.org. Young Artists July 8-12, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The art camp is for ages 8-10. Limit of 15 students per session. $240 per week; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

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• Storytellers Ball Juried Art Exhibition through Aug. 31, in the main galleries. The theme is “Studio 54: I Love the Nightlife.”

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 United Way Summer Reading Middle School Book Clubs July 3, 6 p.m., at Richard Wright Library (515 W. McDowell Road). The sessions are part of the JPS Summer Reading Program. Free; call 601-948-4725. Find Waldo in Oxford through July 31, at local Oxford businesses. The children’s book character is visiting 25 local businesses, and those who spot him can win prizes. Free; call Square Books Jr. at 662-236-2207

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Summer Arts Camp July 8-19, at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.). The two-week camp for children ages 5-13 features art, music, theater and dance activities. Meets on weekdays. Registration required. $750; call 601-974-6478; email bmcnair@belhaven.edu; belhaven.edu. Summer Drawing Intensive July 8-26, 9 a.m.11:30 a.m., at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby

4 Mile Run - 2 Mile Walk & Kids One Mile Fun Run

A fundraiser for The Good Samaritan Center

Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. • Kirk West Photography Exhibit through Aug. 31. The rock-and-roll photographer shares his images from the Studio 54 Era (1977-1981). Artist talk July 9 from 6-8 p.m. during the Storytellers Ball Artist Reception.

Blue Wednesday Happy Hour Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m. through Aug. 14, at Library Lounge (Fairview Inn, 734 Fairview St.). Enjoy live music every Wednesday leading up to the Jackson Rhythm and Blues Festival Aug. 16-17. Free; call 601-960-1891.

Balloon Chase

Adult Summer Reading Program: Craft Night July 9, 6 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Attendees make artwork with stamps created from their doodles. Free; call 601-932-2562.

Kardio by Kimberly Mondays, 6:30 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Kimberly Griffin instructs the weekly kickboxing fitness class. $30 for eight weeks, $5 drop-in fee; call 601-884-0316.

B.B. King Homecoming Festival July 3, 1-9 p.m., at B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center (400 Second St., Indianola). Blues Legend B.B. King headlines the music festival. The music lineup includes Bobby Rush, Lil’ Ray Neal, Grady Champion, the Peterson Brothers, On the Run, Jimmy “Duck” Holmes, and Russell Baxter and the 21st Century Band. No tents or coolers. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; call 662-887-9539; bbkingmuseum.org.

Inaugural

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • “Medgar Evers: Honor His Life, Live His Legacy” Student Art and Writing Exhibit through July 31. See works from Mississippi students in grades K-12 in Trustmark Grand Hall. Free. • “Mississippi Hill Country Blues: Photographs by George Mitchell” through Sept. 8, in the Barksdale Galleries. See 75 of Mitchell’s photographs that includes portraits of Mississippi blues artists. Includes admission to the Old Masters to Monet exhibit. $12, $10 seniors, $6 students, free for members and children ages 5 and under. Cedars Juried Art Exhibition Call for Artists through July 31, at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). The Fondren Renaissance Foundation seeks artwork for its annual exhibit Sept. 5-30. Artist Alan Flattman is the juror. Artists may submit up to three pieces, and all work must be for sale. The deadline is July 31. $25 entry fee; call 601-981-9606; fondren.org.

"%4(%#(!.'% Battle Tested 5K Run/Walk July 6, 8 a.m., at Liberty Park, Madison (Liberty Park Drive, Madison). Includes a one-mile fun run. The first 250 adult registrants receive T-shirts, and children receive military dog tags. Proceeds benefit the C.J. Stewart Foundation’s efforts to operate a military-themed adventure camp. $25; call 601-624-8258; email danielle.beddia@gmail.com; active.com. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

Mississippi Black Rodeo July 6, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). The Real Cowboy Association hosts “The Baddest Show on Dirt.” Cupid and Noel Gourdin perform. $16; call 800-745-3000; realcowboyassociation.com.

35


DIVERSIONS | music

Moving On and Up by Briana Robinson

It’s like having your own app… without the trouble of building an app!

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July 3 - 9, 2013

Visit http://www.pushlocal.com to sign up for free. It takes less than five minutes!

36

R

reflecting on this darker time, Turner stays optimistic in knowing that with a bit of effort, things will inevitably be better. COURTESY JASON TURNER

Non-profits, churches, sports teams – Pushlocal is FREE for you to use!

eleasing a new album is always a funny thing to Jason Turner because he writes so much. By the time his albums come out, he has usually written dozens more songs. His fifth and latest album “Apology on Repeat,” released June 18, features songs he wrote over the course of several years that producer Steve Blaze handpicked from about a hundred. With a theme of hope, “Apology on Repeat” is an album that has confused (and perhaps delighted) music classifiers. Many peg “Apology on Repeat” as a country album, but Turner doesn’t even listen to country music. He’s more of a ’90s rock and ’80s new-wave guy. Although he was listening to a lot of Ryan Adams and Jason Isbell while recording this album, he says that he listens to Soundgarden and Pearl Jam all the time. Perhaps it’s those influences —and the southern drawl—that help Turner’s music sound like a mix between ’90s rock and country. Short melodies from classic ’90s rock songs such as “Closing Time” by Semisonic and “Everything Falls Apart” by Dogs Eye View come to mind throughout the album. In “Apology on Repeat,” Turner uses the ups and downs of romantic relationships to represent other hardships in his life that he has overcome. One listen reveals the top layer, but listen closer, and the deeper message of hope and perseverance shines through. “I hate to say that it’s a hopeful record because there’s a lot of dark stuff on there, but for me it really is,” Turner says, acknowledging that some of the tracks may be misleadingly solemn. “This album is me dealing with a rough part of my life.” Journaling almost every day and reading keep Turner’s songwriting gears turning, even through hard times. He uses writing as a coping mechanism to bring closure to situations. “I could have an argument today and sit down tonight and write about it,” Turner says. “When I’m writing down the story, it’s almost like I’m closing a chapter.” “Call Me When You’re Lonely” reflects on one closed chapter of Turner’s life. In it, he openly admits to drinking too much. Looking back, it all seems like a waste. “So vague and meaningless,” he sings. “I can’t remember what was fun about all of this.” Like most of the songs on the album, this one has an element of outward love or longing for someone else. For the chorus, he sings, “Call me when you’re lonely/I’ll be home.” On the previous track, “Can’t Let Go,” Turner muses more on the process of getting out of the slump that he was once in. “I get kind of hermity and stay in my house when I get in a bad spot,” he says. The song is about getting out of that habit, realizing that it’s pointless and that life goes on. While

Jason Turner used writing the songs for his newest album, “Apology on Repeat,” as a therapeutic process.

Another hopeful-despite-the-circumstances track on “Apology on Repeat” is “No Substitute.” It seems to be one of the more confessional and personal tracks, opening with the lines, “Well there ain’t no satisfaction/In the way the tears fall from my eyes.” In some ways, “Apology on Repeat” seems to chronicle a broken relationship that a newer, healthier one eventually replaces. During the chorus of “No Substitute,” Turner sings, “I know one day I’ll find someone to treat me better than you.” On the other hand, he uses the accessible language of love and loss to address personal and deeper hardships that he has had to overcome. “They aren’t so much about one person as they are about actions,” Turner says. Two of the album’s gems, “Lose You” and “Summertime,” act as admissions of being a flawed man. Turner says they are two of his favorite tracks. “Lose You” is a prediction of the end of a relationship because of his faults. One of the more country-leaning tracks of the album, “Lose You” still sounds contemporary—reminiscent of Jason Mraz and his fast-paced delivery. “Summertime” may also evoke the country label for some listeners, if only due to the conspicuous harmonica playing in the foreground. When approaching such personal topics some artists opt to hide behind cryptic metaphorical language. In contrast, Turner, actively tries to be open and honest in a simple way. He has created an album which can serve hopeful purposes, from releasing oneself of self-doubt to feeling comfortable in moving on from a hard breakup. Jason Turner’s album, “Apology on Repeat,” is available to download at itunes.com and amazon.com and is available for streaming on Spotify. Visit jasonturnerband.com, or find Jason Turner Band on Facebook.


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9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2& bottled for 1domestic house wine beer

starting at •

pm

Thursday

July 4

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday

July 5

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Tues: Karaoke at 7 pm Wed: Open Mic at 8 pm Thur: Ralph Miller 5 - 7 pm

Happy Hour

Every Day 5-7pm

Fri: Mike & Marty’s 5 -7 pm

Lady’s Night

Acoustic Crossroads 9 pm - Until

Free Cover & Happy Hour Prices For The Ladies All Night!

Sat:

Diesel 255 9 pm - Until

Dinner Is Served

StoopKids Saturday July 6

Light Beam Rider with England 1819 Tuesday

July 9

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner

Wednesday

July 10

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

Whether it’s thick cut onion rings, Philly cheesesteak with spicy mayo, a loaded shrimp poboy, the Baja chicken sandwich, cream cheese and chicken stuffed jalapeño peppers, or a 12 oz. steak you’ll be sure to find something you crave.

Weekend Cover: Free til 8:30 After 8:30 $5 Cover

642 Tombigbee St. 601.973.3400 Hours Tuesday - Saturday 3pm - 2am Sundays 2pm -

jacksonfreepress.com

-8/<:('1(6'$<

COURTESY LARRY BREWER

MUSIC | live

37


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, JULY 4 Special (11 a.m.-noon ESPN 2): Start your 4th of July celebration by watching the 2013 Nathanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest and see how many dogs one person can eat in 10 minutes. FRIDAY, JULY 5 Boxing (7-8 p.m. ESPN 2): Relive the fight that shook up the boxing world as Buster Douglas pulled off a stunning upset over Mike Tyson in a 1990 World Heavyweight Title Bout. SATURDAY, JULY 6 NASCAR (6:30-11 p.m. TNT): The stars of NASCAR try to avoid rain on two consecutive Saturday nights to race under the lights in the Coke Zero 400. SUNDAY, JULY 7 Tennis (7-11 a.m. ESPN): Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Gentlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Final at the All-England Tennis Club for the 2013 Wimbledon Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship. MONDAY, JULY 8 MLB (6-9 p.m. ESPN): The Philadelphia Phillies try to catch the Washington Nationals for second place in the National League East. Both teams are chasing the Atlanta Braves.

July 3 - 9, 2013

TUESDAY, JULY 9 Documentary (7-8 p.m. ESPN U): â&#x20AC;&#x153;Roll Tide/War Eagleâ&#x20AC;? looks at football-crazy Alabama and the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two SEC schools. They make for an interesting rivalry.

38

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 Soccer (7:30-10 p.m. ESPN 2): The summer soccer series returns with the Chicago Fire facing off against Club America out of Mexico City, Mexico. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to enjoy a grilled hamburger, homemade ice cream and shoot off some fireworks to celebrate the holiday. What your plans are for the 4th of July. Tell me @jfpsports. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

by Bryan Flynn

T

he Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame Football teaches kids across the state Madison Central coach Bobby Hall was the site for a pep rally of sorts. As important life lessons and offers many of made a great point in the film. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m paraI walked through the doors, cheer- them a way of getting into college. Whole phrasing here, but he said that faith, family leaders from all over the metro area towns can rally around the sport. and football are the three major things peogreeted me. On Friday nights, in many small towns ple care about in our state. They came from Provine, Murrah, across the South, high school football is But he also went on to discuss the fact Pearl, Brandon, Germantown, Ridgeland more than a game. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a weekly canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t-miss that sometimes those priorities can get out and other areas surrounding the of whack; football can become allmain hall of the venue, and they consuming. For many, it has bewere excited and bubbly as they precome a 365-day-a-year obsession. pared to cheer. In the clip we watched at the The pep squads certainly set Sports Hall of Fame, one coach the stage, but they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only talked about how most people reones there. Media from around the member the superstars, but that state gathered at the Mississippi it is often other players that beSports Hall of Fame for a sneak peak come important. at the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi Gridiron Those players, the coach Gold,â&#x20AC;? which takes a look at high explained, come back after colschool football in the state. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taglege and start families in the very line: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Towns, Big Football.â&#x20AC;? same towns they grew up in, and Coaches from area colleges and they provide the next generation high schools were on hand, too, as of players. The kids who grow up well as coaches who appeared in the and come home to teach, run busifilm. The Mississippi Sports Counnesses and more are the ones who cil announced the release of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gridiron Goldâ&#x20AC;? documents the history of football in keep the football program going. film, which Terry Duffie and Ennis Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-schools. They also connect the future Proctor (a Mississippi Sports Hall of with the past. Towns across the Fame member) directed, and X.M. state have seen generations of the Frascogna Jr produced. event. There is an old saying when it comes same family play high-school football for Through â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gridiron Gold,â&#x20AC;? I learned to football: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last one out of town, turn the same school. Those legacies make our that Yazoo CIty claimed victory in Mississip- out the lights.â&#x20AC;? state special. piâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first football game played in Winona in Every August, you can count on stadiThe film has been made possible 1905. Now, 112 high schools play football ums filled to the brim with fans. Hope runs through partnering sponsorships with State across the stae. high each new season with players and fans Farm, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of MissisThe film includes interviews about the alike dreaming of reaching Jackson to play sippi, Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orimpact of football across Mississippi with for a state title at Mississippi Veterans Me- thopedic Center, Coca-Cola, St. Dominic coaches such as Lace Pogue of South Panola, morial Stadium. Hospital and D1 Jackson. Bobby Hall of Madison Central and Willie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gridiron Goldâ&#x20AC;? got its start in 2006, After a private showing of the film at Collins of Provine. when the Wharton Business Initiative at the Malco Grandview Cinema for the MissisCoaches often act as father figures and University of Pennsylvania distinguished the sippi Association of Coaches on July 18, the mentors to young men from single-parent state of Mississippi for having the best high- film will then be available to the public. families, and troubled neighborhoods and school football in America. The Magnolia Stay updated at msgridirongold.com, homes. The impact these coaches have often State was considered a better state for high- and be on the lookout for show times. If the determines what kind of adults these young school football than California, Georgia, rest of the film is as good as the clip I got to men will become. Alabama, Florida and even Texas. see, it will be worth the watch. FLICKR/TOM NEWBY PHOTOGRAPHY

I hope everyone has a happy 4th of July. Enjoy all the great events out there to celebrate Independence Day.

Small Towns, Big Football

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

M

Hernandez, the Patriots and the Media

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41


AMBER

HELSE

L

Materials

Confetti Tumblers by Amber Helsel

I

July 3 - 9, 2013

have Champagne taste on a beer budget. At least, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what my dad always says. It translates to a need for me to have nice things in my houseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;nice things, not expensive ones. When I lived in my apartment in Oxford, Miss., I had a few plastic cups (mostly plastic margarita glasses), but I also had an eight-count set of tumblers, glasses, what have you. That was my go-to for when I had company because, to me, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a hostess without the proper tools. I kept them in a special cabinet, and even now, living with my parents, I keep them on display in a glass cabinet. The prospect of a new place to live is always on my mind, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a while before my beer budget can afford it. Meanwhile, I love looking at fun DIYs to make my future house a home. And because I spend a lot of my time in the kitchen (mostly eating), I especially love kitchen projects.

42

â&#x20AC;˘ Enamel acrylic paints in whatever colors youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I used red, white, yellow and blue â&#x20AC;˘ Stemless wineglass tumblers â&#x20AC;˘ Paper towels â&#x20AC;˘ Newspaper â&#x20AC;˘ Cotton swabs â&#x20AC;˘ Parchment paper â&#x20AC;˘ Baking sheet

The other day, I found one on savvysugar.com that piqued my interestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;making confetti tumblers. I loved it because not only would it provide me with new dishes, but it would also ignite my artistic side that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come out much since high school. This is an easy project, although a lengthy one, but it was relaxing to listen to The Lumineers while dotting glasses. I mostly just painted, ignoring the instructions to wait until the first layer dried. My four glasses were each pretty uniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;there was a primary color glass (my favorite color scheme), a random color one, a green one, and one that ended up looking similar to Van â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starry Night.â&#x20AC;? I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep these because I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the space, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m giving them to someone else. When my beer budget can finally afford an apartment, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll revisit this idea for a quirky way to make a house a home.

STEP 1 /D\RXW\RXU VWDWLRQ,UHFRPPHQG SXWWLQJDQHZVSDSHU GRZQ6TXLUWVRPHRI HDFKSDLQWRQWRDIROGHG SDSHUWRZHORUSDSHUSODWH 3OD\ZLWKPL[LQJWKHFRORUV STEP 2 6WDUWLQJDWWKHEDVH GRWWKHÂżUVWOD\HUXVLQJZKDW HYHUFRORUVFKHPH\RXZDQW :KLOHRQHJODVVLVGU\LQJVWDUW WKHÂżUVWOD\HURQDQRWKHU STEP 3 $IWHUÂżQLVKLQJWKHÂżUVWOD\HURIGRWV RQDOOWKHJODVVHVJREDFNDQGDGGDVHF RQGOD\HU5HSHDWXQWLO\RXOLNHWKHDPRXQW RISDLQWRQHDFKJODVV/HWWKHJODVVHVGU\ IRUPLQXWHV STEP 4 3ODFHJODVVHVXSVLGHGRZQRQD SDUFKPHQWOLQHGEDNLQJVKHHW3XWWKH VKHHWLQWRDFROGRYHQDQGKHDWLWWR GHJUHHV)DKUHQKHLW/HWWKHJODVVHVEDNH IRUPLQXWHVDVWKHRYHQKHDWVXS STEP 5 7XUQWKHRYHQRIIDQGOHWWKHJODVVHV FRROLQWKHRYHQIRUDQRWKHUKRXU


                                            

THIS JULY 4TH VISIT THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART!

DINE AT THE PALETTE CAFÉ BY VIKING AND SHOP THE MUSEUM STORE! MILITARY

FAM ILIES ARE

ADMITTED FREE OF CHARGE.  O N V I E W  The Mississippi Story Old Masters to Monet: Three Centuries of French Painting from the Wadsworth Atheneum Portraits of Medgar and Myrlie Evers by Jason Bouldin and Paintings by Mary Lovelace O’Neal 

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART 380 SOUTH L AMAR STREET  JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39201 WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG 601.960.1515 1.866.VIEWART

!LL$#$$$3

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WE’RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE.

For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800 STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

d16':A==9O [F\H'RA22106;0'];A7'^'_/5>3@<2LE'-+'D`[aF' [baHHbH[cb`[Jc'^'2/812.A4>8/5>3@<2LO5;M

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1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA ©2013 Hilton Worldwide

Untitled - Page: 1

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

jacksonfreepress.com

Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel!

43


Trace Station 500 Hwy 51 Suite L Ridgeland, MS 601.427.5163

• Pedicure & Manicure • Gel Acrylics • Shellac/Gel Polish • Dresses & Shoes • Accessories • Formal Dresses • Bridal Parties • Much more… Nail services by appointment only.

Where fashion meets beauty… Danny

Hair Studio LLC

601.868.2040 Specializing In

Extensions • Natural Hair Care • Cuts & Color 4436 North State Street • Suite A5 • Jackson tstylezdesignz@gmail.com tstylez_studio Tiffany Turner CEO of TStylez Virgin Hair

Summertime Sweets & Ice Cool Treats

maywood mart • 601-362-9553

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Carpenters doing the work of The Carpenter! Dan & Diane Schmitz

601-613-5227

2 LOCATIONS FOR THE FOOD YOU LOVE 2481 Lakeland Drive | Flowood 601.932.4070

SOCIAL SECURITY AND DISABILITY LAW Many people come to me, virtually without hope, after they have been paying into the Social Security system for years - only to be rejected by the Government for disability benefits when they become sick or severely injured.

Serving the Jackson Area for over 10 years.

Free Inspections & Estimates

REMEMBER IT’S YOUR MONEY

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900 Suite E. County Line Rd. Former AJ’s | 769.251.2657

232 Market Street, Flowood www.dndhelpinghands.com Check Us Out On YouTube

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The fastest growing social network for men who like men

Not just for bachelors. (With our bachelorette party supplies and goodies you’ll have to redefine ‘ladies’ night!)

Romantic Adventures Jackson’s very nice, naughty store. 175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p www.shopromanticadventures.com

v11n43 - Summer Food & Beer 2013  

Hops & Homebrewing • Your Craft Beer Cheat Sheet • The Beer Jesse Houston Can't Forget p 16-26 In Delbert We Trust p 8 Jason Turner's Album...

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