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TICKETS: Adult Season: $20 • Adult Day: $12 Student Season: $10 • Student Day: $7 • Ages 5 & Under: Free Duck Dynasty Experience - Tickets $10 while supplies last Pre-fair reduced rates available June 24, 2013 to July 7, 2013 at PRR Welcome Center.

C h o c taw , M i s s i s s i p p i

Wednesday, July 10 11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests 2013 Choctaw Indian Princess Pageant World Series Stickball

Thursday, July 11 11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Jana Mashonee Josh Turner World Series Stickball

Friday, July 12 10:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Kari & Billy Pat Green World Series Stickball

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REZ RUN 2013 Gates Open Si & Alan Robertson of “A&E’s Duck Dynasty” Chief Phyliss J. Anderson & Guests Plateros Justin Moore World Series Stickball Championship

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August 11 Thalia Mara Hall

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT • Ticketmaster.com • Mississippi Coliseum Box Office • Charge by phone 601.353.0603

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www.racesonline.com

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B E A V E R

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JESSICA KING

JACKSONIAN TODD ALLEN

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odd Allen’s mother has been a member of the Tea Party in Mississippi since its beginning. He graduated middle school from a (White) Citizens’ Council academy, where his diploma had a seal for “racial integrity.” His grandparents have always hired black help, and Allen says he never knew their last names. It’s easy to imagine that this tall, fair man with sandy-blonde hair could fall into the same patterns of white privilege. But 49-year-old Allen, who recently worked on Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba’s campaign, has never shied away from racial integration or open dialogue about differences. “Very early in my life, I felt that division,” he says. “I was the first generation here in 1970 to go to an integrated school, and so I had these three worlds. … I had the school that was integrated, the church that was in denial and society that was in upheaval.” A Jackson native, Allen started working at a soup kitchen after high school, where he saw a whole new side of the city. “I feel like from that point until now, I’ve been introducing Jackson to Jackson,” he says. After graduating from Belhaven University, Allen worked for many years as a chaplain in prisons, hospitals and then in the Army. “I got a wonderful education doing that,” he says. “I really saw people at all points in their life, and how society can care for society.” In 2003 he left the chaplaincy to work as a teacher. It was a period of finding himself and

CONTENTS

reconnecting with the world after his marriage ended. “I think the best thing that helped me in life was to be marginalized as a gay man. When I was in the courtroom during my divorce, to be marginalized on the basis of something that I think is inherent in who I am, and to be told by basically all of society that I was less than adequate as a father. And it was nothing I did, it was who I was,” he says. “So, I feel I have gained a deeper empathy with people who are marginalized based on things they did not create, they cannot alleviate, they cannot change.” Allen volunteered for Lumumba’s mayoral campaign after seeing a commercial attacking the candidate’s theology. “When I saw it, I thought it was a sinister form of religious bigotry,” Allen says. “As a gay minister, I have had to prove that my relationship with God is legitimate, and when I saw that (Lumumba’s) relationship with God was being used as a political campaign, it just infuriated me. So the next morning I was in the campaign headquarters.” The outcome of the race surprised and excited Allen, who says it was revolutionary for the city. “It really felt good, too, because Jackson is 80 percent black. This is my hometown, but I am a minority here,” he says. “However, we (whites) have tried to function as if we still are the majority, and we have all the authority.” Allen’s latest endeavor is starting the People’s Seminary of Mississippi, centered around bringing social action and theological activity back together. —Kathleen M. Mitchell

Cover design by Kristin Brenemen; photography by Trip Burns

8 Breaking the Cycle

The reality of sex trafficking isn’t all kidnappings in foreign countries. It can stem from subtle manipulation and hit close to home. Learn how you can help.

33 Popcorn Apocalypse

“When discussing a zombie film, even Forster’s version filled with special effects, one cannot really pretend that it is anything more than summer popcorn entertainment. It’s not really a discourse on Darwin or survival of the fittest dead. “What you see in this film is what you get. And what you get is grunge-grunge Pitt trying to save the world from zombies. And for what it is, this is a taut film with roller-coaster thrills. It’s the perfect picture for the movie drive-in.” —Anita Modak Truran, “Grunt, Grunt, Shuffle, Grunt”

36 In the Hill Country

Bluesmen such as Kenny Brown, Robert Belfour and Bobby Rush perform at this year’s North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ........................................ GOOD 21 ................................. GIVE BACK 26 .................................... HITCHED 29 ......................................... FOOD 30 ................................. WELLNESS 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 32 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 33 .......................................... FILM 34 ...................................... EVENTS 36 ....................................... MUSIC 37 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 39 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 ....................................... ASTRO 42 ............................................ GIG

FLICKR/GRAFFITI PHOTOGRAPHIC; COURTESY SYNCOPY; FLICKR / PINK SHERBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 42

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Breaking The Silence

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hen James Ford Seale finally went on trial for his role in the 1964 kidnapping and deaths of Henry Dee and Charles Moore in Meadville, our reporting staff was blown away by the jury-selection process. The voir dire process, as it’s called, turned out to be like a many truth and reconciliation commission, as federal attorneys asked one after another potential juror from the southern half of Mississippi to talk about their racial attitudes and memories. It was as if the floodgates opened on decades of bottled-up shame and pain as one juror after another, first a white one, then a black one, burst into tears as they had to sit in a courtroom in front of a federal judge, who happened to be black, to talk about horrible actions by or toward their own relatives. Judge Henry Wingate’s staff went through a lot of tissues during those handful of days as people couldn’t hold the tears in. What struck me then was the evidence of what I’ve always believed: Packing away our state’s race history, which is so personal for so many of us and our relatives, is dangerous and divisive. Maybe it seems easier at the moment to not talk about, say, your black grandmother being locked inside the nasty livestock pens at the state fairgrounds as a teenager because she marched for freedom. Or maybe it was your white grandfather who guarded her, making her keep her hands raised above her, not allowing her to have a drink of water in a 100-degree facility. Either way, these actions during my own lifetime, not to mention those that came before, have bruised and bloodied our entire state. Not only has the effort to lock them away forever made it harder for many of us to look “the other” in the eye, but they have created awful situations that all of us must deal with every day. The dissolution of the black family during slavery, Jim Crow and current drug war

tactics? Kids who commit crime due to desperation, boredom and hopelessness. Neighborhoods left to rot when the people with access to wealth fled to the suburbs, taking their tax dollars with them? Expensive cycles of poverty and, thus, crime. Public schools that fell out of favor with the majority of the state’s whites when the

We heal our divisions with knowledge, never with ignorance. Supreme Court demanded integration? Less will to fund good public education, resegregation, and political battles over even the need for public schools (and a 98-percent black Jackson Public Schools). White children attending private schools with only those of similar socioeconomic status? Minimal understanding of how it all happened in the first place and a willingness to blame people of color for the problems white supremacy created. Schools and media and institutions designed for one race or the other? “Two Nations, Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal,” as political scientist Andrew Hacker entitled his 1992 book. That divided scenario means that people of different races too often point fingers rather than come together to squarely face what our damned past has done to our present, and will do to our future if we don’t started talking about it more. I learned this lesson when I was 14. Even though the Ku Klux Klan ambushed

and killed freedom fighters James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in my hometown when I was 3—the mostpublicized civil-rights murders in our history (because two of them were white)—I did not know about it until I was 14. After the media and the FBI and the attorneys cleared out, the town clammed up. The horrible memory was locked away. But, suddenly, a TV movie brought it to my teenaged attention. I was flummoxed; how could I not know such a thing happened, and that perpetrators were friends of my family? It felt like I was living a lie, and my state was conspiring to keep me ignorant and, because I was white, part of the silent conspiracy to downplay the horribleness of the murders and the fact that neither local nor state authorities (who were white back then) would even try to prosecute the murderers of these men. It was as if a wall of shame crashed down upon me, brought down by the attempts to hide our past. As I grew older, I became more determined to sniff out the facts that had been hidden from me, including in schools that tried to tell me the Civil War wasn’t about slavery (read the dang Mississippi Articles of Secession) and to factcheck all the awful lies about black people I heard growing up. Like many of you, I did not want to be lied to, especially in defense of such awfulness. Most vitally, I prayed that I could somehow use the truth to help keep these things from happening again. And because I was white, I believed (and still believe) that I bear a piece of that responsibility to reverse the legacy. As I grew older and learned more, I realized how much more there was to it. Even though I grew up poor and often lived in trailer parks, I could see that I was offered chances that equally intelligent black friends were not. I was rough around the edges, but I was also white, and as a result, enjoyed invisible bootstraps that made it much easier to

get out of the tough cycle I grew up in. Along the way, somehow, I realized that I had grown up swimming in a dirty fishbowl, and that it was up to me to learn what I didn’t know and what others didn’t want me to know. I also made what some consider a controversial decision: The history of black America and Mississippi is also my history—precisely because white people oppressed people of color on my behalf. I am a white woman, and more than one old Klansmen has told me that they were convinced to do awful things in order to “protect” white girls from what they believed to be the dangers of African Americans. I need to know our nation’s and state’s entire history so that I can play my role in its future. History teaches, of course, that the ultimate irony is that white supremacy created the poverty, the family dissolution and, ultimately, the crime (often by example) that so many African Americans battle against today. My compassion and faith tell me that I must help, whether I am asked to or not, and I must do that by encouraging truth and dialogue, however uncomfortable for some. We heal our divisions with knowledge, never with ignorance. And the pride in how far we’ve come only can happen if we know just how violent and oppressive our race history was—and Mississippi was the worst. To me, that means we’ve come the farthest, although we’re not done. That gives me hope. As you go forward into this special issue on race dialogue, please have an open mind. Remember that the keepers of the dirty fishbowl want us to remain blind, deaf, angry and quick to blame “the other.” And if race dialogue is new territory for you, allow me to dangle this carrot: There is simply remarkable love and forgiveness and hope waiting on the other side of the dirty water. Please take a deep breath, say a little prayer for strength and dive in. I promise you won’t regret it. But take some tissues.

June 26 - July 2, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Ronni Mott

Tyler Cleveland

Tamika Curley

Dustin Cardon

De’Arbreya Lee

Kimberly Murriel

Trip Burns

David Rahaim

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-winning writer and the JFP’s news editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She contributed to the cover story.

JFP city reporter Tyler Cleveland loves sports, good music and soul food. He can be found around Fondren when he’s not at City Hall watching Tony Yarber try to herd cats. He wrote talks.

Tam (Tamika) Curley has lived in more than a few places from Dallas to Oakland to Jackson. She enjoys talking and blogging about natural hair at http:// tam-mynaturalself.blogspot. com. She wrote the wellness piece.

Copy Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. An English major from Brandon, he enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day.

Editorial Intern De’Arbreya Lee is a recent JSU graduate from Pittsburg (yes, Pittsburg without the “h”), Calif. She enjoys the comfort of family, art, fighting for the people and quoting the film “Love Jones.” She wrote the Diversions feature.

Editorial Intern and Jackson native Kimberly Renae Murriel is a journalism major at Mississippi State University. She loves reading, writing, shopping and karaoke. She wrote the Gig feature.

Staff Photographer Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He enjoys the films of Stanley Kubrick.

David Rahaim is an account manager. One day David will finish his first novel. He promises. It may just be after he finishes his second.


THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013!"!DOWNTOWN JACKSON 11AM - 1PM

FREE LUNCH in Smith Park Entertainment by Dexter Allen

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Featuring: Jackson Fire, Jackson Police, Hinds County,

WDBD, WLBT, WJTV and US 96.3

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THE OLD CAPITOL MUSEUM featuring a Firework Display

Performances by: Ms. Lannie Spann McBride, First Baptist Church of Ridgeland, Anderson Sanctuary Choir and Southern Komfort Brass

SPONSORED BY: JACKSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & DOWNTOWN JACKSON PARTNERS

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Wednesday, June 19 A report reveals that Mississippi spent nearly $7.5 million for salaries and expenses of state lawmakers during the 11 months that ended in early April. ‌ Thousands of people remain stranded by torrential rain and landslides in India. The death toll is reported to be 120.

Friday, June 21 The Senate unveils an agreement to vastly increase fencing, patrols and hightech monitoring along the U.S.-Mexico border. ‌ North Korea’s United Nations envoy demands the dissolution of the United Nations command in South Korea. Saturday, June 22 Activists attending the annual Netroots Nation political conference jeer Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-California, when she says National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden violated the law, and that government needs to balance security and privacy. Sunday, June 23 Edward Snowden arrives in Moscow after leaving Hong Kong. ‌ The arrest of an extremist Sunni cleric in Beirut starts some of the deadliest violence yet seen in the Syrian civil war, where deaths near 100,000.

June 26 - July 2, 2013

Monday, June 24 Mississippi State loses to UCLA in the first of a best-of-three game series for the 2013 College World Series National Championship. ‌ Ecuador confirms that it is considering granting asylum to Edward Snowden. ‌ The U.S. Supreme Court sends an affirmative action case back to the lower court.

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Tuesday, June 25 The U.S. Supreme Court rules 5-4 along ideological lines to invalidate Section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, rending section 5 moot. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Convention Center Hotel Plans Announced by Tyler Cleveland

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ame-duck periods in politics are usually we’re going to get out of this versus what we Along with co-chairs Dr. Safiya Omari, just that—lame. That apparently does have to give up; $9 million is a lot less than a Jackson State University professor, and not extend to Jackson. we thought it was going to be, but it is still Synarus Green, a legislative aide to U.S. Rep. Outgoing Mayor Harvey Johnson $9 million. We have to make sure in the ex- Bennie Thompson, the committee includes Jr. is working in front and behind the scenes citement that we don’t get carried away.� businessman Akil Bakari, Mississippi Immito wrap up loose ends before he leaves office Later Tuesday, Johnson put at least one grant Rights Alliance Executive Director Bill in a week. On June 25, at a joint press con- controversial agenda item before the Jackson Chandler, Kerimax Communications owner ference with Mayor-elect Chokwe William Dilday, Howard Law Firm seLumumba, he announced that the nior partner Barry Howard, former state city has reached an agreement for the ACLU Director Nsombi Lambright, low-awaited convention center hotel. who is also a founding member of the Jackson Convention Hotel Mississippi Prevention of Schoolhouse LLC., operated by father-and-son To Jailhouse Coalition, Habitat for Huteam Robinson and Andre Callen, manity Resource Development Director will develop a $16 million, 305-room Merrill McKewen, JSU Vice President hotel across the street from the Jackson Michael Thomas and local radio personConvention Complex and connected ality Latrice Westbrooks. to it via a skywalk. The developers are “The citizens of Jackson deserve a working in conjunction with Hyatt seamless transition as well as a transparHotels to build a first-rate establishent government,� Lumumba said in a In a joint press conference, Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., ment with meeting areas, a full-service release. “I have selected a group reflecand Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba announced a deal restaurant and parking. tive of the make-up of the city of Jackson to build a convention center hotel. The city will be on the hook for that is diverse. The diversity is represent$9 million in loans once the building ed in the gender, age, professional skillis constructed, but that money can only be City Council that will have effects after he sets, community involvement and yes, race.� used to cover budget shortfalls for the first leaves office. The first was the appointment The 10-member group is made up of five years of operation. After that period, of local businessman Patrick Harkins to the four women and six men; two are white and Hyatt has agreed to pay back any money Jackson Public School Board, representing eight black. Lumumba said he chose the it has borrowed, in full. The Jackson Rede- Ward 7, for a five-year term. group carefully, and pointed out that the velopment Authority was set to vote on apLumumba, who still represents Ward 2 makeup of his team closely resembles the proval of the plan June 26. until July 1 as its council member, was not actual makeup of Jackson’s population. Lumumba voiced his support for the present at the council’s work session MonLumumba announced his team on the plan at the Tuesday press conference. day, but showed concern last week when same day Jackson Police Chief Rebecca Cole“We still have to do our own vetting,� Harkins was first mentioned as a possible man announced she would retire after four years Lumumba said. “To the extent that we have, candidate for the school board. at the helm of the Jackson Police Department the company seems to be a viable one, and The mayor-elect has been busy as well. and nearly four decades of public service. the deal looks promising. We have to make Last week, Lumumba introduced his TransiComment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler sure the numbers are right in terms of what tion Executive Committee. Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. TRIP BURNS

Thursday, June 20 Protesters gather for a new wave of massive demonstrations in Brazil. ‌ The House rejects a five-year, half-trillion-dollar farm bill that would have cut $2 billion annually from food stamps and allow states to impose new work requirements on those who receive them.

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Alternatives to the Jackson-Kush Plan Since the suburbs like to poke fun at Chokwe Lumumba’s Jackson-Kush Plan, here’s what some of their own plans could look like. The Madison-Posh Plan - JSU’s Madison campus must charge poll tax - Mayor Mary now known as “dear leader�

The Ridgeland-Rush Plan - Taxes are abolished ‌ all of them - Punishments: Sitting on County Line Road during rush hour

The Flowood-Flush Plan - Flowood Police to carry hand grenades - Building of Paula Deen restaurant at Dogwood

The Byram-Bash Plan - Immediate secession from Hinds County - City history must be expanded to two pages of text

The Clinton-Clash Plan - Commission building of “Great Ditch of Clinton� - War declared on Jackson proper

The Canton-Crash Plan - Nissan takes over all government functions - Movies must include Matthew McConaughey


•••••••••••••••••••••••• Monthly Discussion Luncheons Second Wednesday, 11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. In July and August, Jackson 2000 invites you to join us to “lunch and learn” with provocative speakers and discussions held at the Mississippi Arts Center in downtown Jackson. - July 2013 topic: “My Vision for the City” Invited Guest: Mayor Chowke Lumumba - Aug 2013 topic: “A Plan for West Jackson” Duvall-Decker and Associates

Mississippi Hill Country Blues: Photographs by George Mitchell June 29 – September 8, 2013

•••••••••••••••••••••••• 2013 Dialogue Circles

Featuring images

Ongoing for adults and youth - see website

from the Mississippi Hill

Jackson 2000 presents dialogue circles, a series of facilitated, curriculum-based discussion sessions that can open minds, change hearts and build lasting friendships.

Jessie Mae Hemphill, Ada

Country and Blues artists

Mae Anderson, R.L. Burnside, and Joe Callicott George Mitchell (born 1944), Joe Callicott on his porch, 1967. archival pigment print, copyright © the artist.

More information: www.jackson2000.org

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

Admission to Mississippi Hill Country Blues: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $6 students, FREE children 5 and under, FREE for Museum members (includes admission to Old Masters to Monet: Three Centuries of French Painting from the Wadsworth Atheneum)

www.jackson2000.org Bringing the Community Together Promoting Racial Harmony and Facilitating Understanding

6/25/13 3:20:46 PM

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TALK | trafficking

Sex Trafficking: It’s Not About Sex by Ronni Mott

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FLICKR / PINK SHERBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

y the time she was 17, Sarah had police who took her to a hospital and con- are the ‘girl next door,’� Wagner said. “A lot run away from home a few times. tacted the Polaris Project. of people have misconceptions� about who Her mother and stepfather drank, It’s an old story and one that happens gets involved. “Usually, it’s a prolonged relaand they ignored her. One day, as frequently in Mississippi. Heather Wagner, tionship� involving force, fraud or coercion,� she was walking alone in the rural Ohio town assistant attorney general in charge of the she said. where she lived, a man “We’ve heard of girls pulled up beside Sarah. He who are coerced into staytold her how pretty she was ing in prostitution because and asked why she looked there were threats to tell her so sad. Sarah told him she family back home,� she said, was angry with her mom. emphasizing that the force The man, who was doesn’t need to be physical. 30, offered to take Sarah to Some industries atget her nails done—just to tract practitioners of the socheer her up—and Sarah called “oldest profession.� agreed. He paid for the Gambling is a magnet, as are manicure while continuing sporting events because they to flatter her. He told Sarah attract men away from home he wanted to see her again. and looking for a good time. For two months, the “What happens in Las older man picked Sarah Vegas stays in Las Vegas; what up, bought her meals and happens at the Super Bowl more manicures, and lavstays at the Super Bowl,� ished her with his attention Wagner said sardonically. and praise. She began callWagner’s office is just ing him her boyfriend, and Sex traffickers lure vulnerable young people by plying them with “love.� beginning its efforts to stem Sarah was his girlfriend. sex trafficking in Mississippi. Sarah moved in with him. Law enforcement is aware of Another month went by, and then he domestic violence unit in the state attorney the problem but, until this year, the state’s told her that he couldn’t make the rent pay- general’s office, says it’s unclear just how big laws haven’t given them much to work with. ment. That’s when he asked Sarah to go on the problem is in the state. During the most recent legislative session, “dates� with other men and have sex with “What we’re finding is that we think lawmakers strengthened the state’s human them for money. we know what it is, and we think we know trafficking laws to go after those behind “Sarah felt uncomfortable but agreed where it is, but we’re playing a game of catch- it—and those buying sexual services—rather because she would do anything not to return up trying to pinpoint it and trying to pin it than just busting prostitutes. home and wanted to make him happy,� the down,� she said. Last year, before the state Legislature story continues on the Polaris Project website The problem includes prostitution, ex- passed the new laws, Vancouver, Wash.(polarisproject.org). The Washington, D.C.- otic dancing, pimping, massage parlors and based Shared Hope International gave Misbased nonprofit leads the global fight against brothels, she said. With prostitution, you sissippi a “D� because of the weakness of human trafficking and modern-day slavery. also frequently find pornography. its laws protecting victims. Shared Hope is Sarah’s “boyfriend� told her it was OK, “Victims may be forced to have the acts another organization working to eradicate that he didn’t mind if she had sex with other filmed or something of that nature,� Wagner sex trafficking. Mississippi’s 2013 human men to raise money for the rent. Once she said. “It’s also used as a training tool� to show trafficking laws are partially based on the started selling her body, it simply continued. the victims what’s expected of them. organization’s recommendations. Then, a “client� raped her. Sarah called the “Unfortunately, the majority of victims Wagner says that she’s finding law en-

forcement agencies eager to get training and information. The state law-enforcement academy has asked her to develop a curriculum for their officers, for example, and to create an investigator’s course. “You really have to hit the demand. If you reduce the demand, simple economics tells you that the supply will go down,â€? she said. Of course, increased law-enforcement attention on the issue means more victims will be identified who need assistance to put their lives back together. With the help of Polaris, Sarah got away from her “boyfriendâ€? and received the emotional support she needed, along with a part-time job. “Within four months, Sarah saved enough money to move into her own apartment,â€? Polaris states. “She continues to work part-time and attend classes in the evenings. She hopes to attend college next year and eventually own her own business.â€? Locally, the Pearl-based Center for Violence Prevention is at the forefront of victim advocacy and protection in the state. Serving as a shelter and safety net for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, the center is expanding to serve victims of sex trafficking as well. All of these issues involve using power and control to victimize others, said Sandy Middleton, the center’s executive director. It’s not about the sex. “The traffickers, they’re manipulators,â€? Wagner said. “They know how to sense the vulnerabilities. ‌ (Victims) can be anybody.â€? Help the Jackson Free Press raise funds for the victims of sexual trafficking. The ninth annual JFP Chick Ball is July 20 at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). All proceeds go to the Center for Violence Prevention. The Chick Ball is accepting donations, from silent auction items to time and services. Cash is always welcome. Email chickball@jacksonfreepress.com, call 601-362-6121 ext. 23, or visit jfpchickball. com for more information.

June 26 - July 2, 2013

       

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CUPSESPRESSOCAFE.COM


TALK | health

Obamacare Stumps Small Biz by R.L. Nave “They’re not getting that ‘where-therubber-meets-the-road’ information,” Buttle said. If lack of clarity at the federal level did not present enough challenges, uncertainty about the future of Mississippi’s Medicaid program—a main ingredient in the ACA’s success—is further muddying the waters for businesses in the state. Mississippi lawmakers are divided about expanding Medicaid to provide health insurance to more than 300,000 Mississippi residents.

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Small-business owners are unsure what the Affordable Care Act means for them.

Lately, the debate has devolved into all-out partisan warfare. In recent weeks, legislative Republicans and the Mississippi Republican Party have blitzed the Internet and social media with anti-Obamacare messages ahead of the state’s July 1 Medicaid reauthorization deadline. At odds over whether the state should expand Medicaid under the ACA, lawmakers couldn’t come to a consensus on renewing Medicaid before the legislative session ended this spring, leaving the future of the program up in the air. The Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, a Democrat, recently issued an opinion stating that the governor cannot lawfully run the Medicaid program if the Legislature fails to reauthorize the program. Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, requested the opinion. Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, who opposes Medicaid expansion, said previously that he would run the program himself if Democrats, who support the expansion, refuse to back down from their request for a legislative debate on the subject. Bryant and other Republicans accuse Democrats of standing in the way of Medicaid’s reauthorization. Hood’s opinion this week relies on a similar opinion the attorney general issued in 2009, which states that “a governor cannot create or re-create a state agency that has been repealed by operation of law, nor can a governor divert funds which may be appropriated to a statutorily repealed agency to some other agency.” Some business-owner questions could be answered soon. Bryant called a special session of the Legislature for Thursday, June 27 at 10 a.m. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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eff Good has crunched the numbers. The Jackson restaurateur has consulted with attorneys specializing in labor-relations and healthcare law and ordered extensive reports from the firm that processes payroll checks for his companies’ 205 employees. Recently, Good traveled to Washington, D.C., for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Small Business Week event that featured an hour-long panel dedicated to answering business owners’ questions about how the federal healthcare law will affect their companies. “The bottom line is that there are still a lot of questions,” Good said. “Nobody knows what the deal is.” Good is not alone in his confusion about the Affordable Care Act. Starting Jan. 1, 2014, the law requires individuals to obtain health insurance or face tax penalties. The law also makes employers share the responsibility of insuring their workers by requiring certain businesses to offer healthcare coverage or pay Internal Revenue Service penalties. The law requires that businesses with more than 50 full-time equivalent workers, or FTEs, offer their employees health insurance or be penalized $2,000 per FTE, although the law exempts the first 30 FTEs to soften the blow. To provide an incentive for businesses to offer employees insurance, the health law also gives small businesses a tax credit worth 50 percent of employee premiums; starting next year, the credit will be worth 35 percent of the premium costs for tax-exempt workers. It sounds straightforward, but business owners say figuring it all out has been a nightmare. For one, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will not publish the rules for administering the ACA until the end of July, leaving small businesses in limbo to sort through the complex law. Supporters of the health law say both workers and small businesses—and by extension, Mississippi’s economy—will benefit from the health law. A recent report from the Washington, D.C.,-based Small Business Majority points out that 61 percent of small businesses nationwide already offer their employees health insurance. Small businesses account for 49 percent of Mississippi’s private-sector jobs. Expanding Medicaid would add $673.8 million in labor income, which includes wages and benefits, to the state economy and level the playing field between small businesses that struggle to compete with larger companies that can afford to offer health insurance benefits. Rhett Buttle with the Small Business Majority said small businesses—like everyone else in America—have received a deluge of political information about the ACA, which has made it difficult to understand how the law affects them.

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TALK | business

Costly Objection to Siemens Deal Withdrawn by Tyler Cleveland

“We won’t know the final cost until we close the transaction but, as of Friday, our additional debt service costs over the life of the bonds would have been $6 million more than it would have been on June 5, when we were originally scheduled to go to market,” Hill said the morning of June 24. “It’s like trying to hit a moving target.” Hill added that the total cost of the delay could end up costing the city even

Lululemon Moving to Fondren Lululemon Athletica is moving into the soon-to-be-vacated spot where Fischer Galleries was formerly located in Fondren on Duling Street between BankPlus and Miso restaurant. The name might not be familiar to Jacksonians, but the company, founded in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1983, has hundreds of stores and showrooms across the United States and Canada that cater

TRIP BURNS

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dvanced Technology Business Solutions has withdrawn a complaint filed in Hinds County Chancery Court regarding a contract the city of Jackson awarded to Siemens Company. District 3 Judge Denise Owens ruled Thursday, June 20, to allow the city to issue bonds to pay for the $90 million sewer and water improvement project with Siemens. ATBS and its president, Don Hewitt, withdrew its complaint after it got a closer look at the deal, said attorney Herbert Irvin, who represents Advanced Technology Business Solutions. The complaint accused Siemens of promising savings it couldn’t possibly deliver. “When the energy savings proposal was presented to the City Council of the City of Jackson, Mississippi, project representatives stated that the City of Jackson would realize an annual savings of approximately $8 million during the 15-year period of the loan. In reviewing the preliminary official statement for the bond transaction, we find that there will not be any appreciable, discernible savings generated by this project—only increased collections from these users of the water system due to more accurate metering,” the complaint stated. “After looking at the contract and the details, we saw the economic impact of the temporary and permanent jobs, and realized the positive economic impact the deal with have on the city,” Irvin said. Jackson Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. was not able to comment on the legal dispute, but said the Siemens deal should set the stage for Jackson’s infrastructure to become and remain sound in the coming years. Rick Hill, Jackson’s deputy director of administration, said Hewitt’s suit— even though he withdrew it—could cost the city roughly $6 million in interest because of the delay.

Big Lots is moving to north Jackson from its Interstate 55 location.

more, depending on what the prices are on the day the city actually sells the bonds. Hewitt has another lawsuit pending against the city, in which he accuses Johnson and the city of Jackson of violating “the natural right of a person to do business” by blocking his attempts to develop three real estate projects in Jackson, most notably the Deposit Guarantee Building, now known as the Regions Building. Johnson, the city of Jackson and the Jackson Redevelopment are named as defendants in that suit. Hewitt could not be reached for comment on either suit.

mostly to yoga and Pilates devotees. Showrooms, such as the one opening in Fondren, are usually open only part of the week, and carry only Lululemon’s “key styles” instead of its full line of workout gear. “A showroom is similar to the original Lululemon store,” local manager and owner Kyla Weems said. “It was created in conjunction with a yoga studio by the company founder Chip Wilson. That store kind of set the mold for a lot of things we do, basing our business on customer feedback.” The showroom will feature a small boutique-style store, but will only be open Thursday through Saturday. The rest of the time,

employees will be out in the community at gyms and events, promoting its products and, as Weems explained, “getting to know the athletes and fitness gurus in our area.” Weems stressed that Lululemon is a grassroots company, relying on customer feedback to fuel what the outfitter stocks in its locations. “Again, as opposed to the store, the showroom will be community-driven,” Weems said. “We chose Fondren because of the great people in that community. They are health-conscious, worldly and just the clientele we are looking for.” Weems has set a goal for an August opening, and is cultivating a Facebook following where she will post updates. Box Stores Do the Shuffle One Jackson big-box store is changing locations, and another is coming to Dogwood in Flowood. The Big Lots store located at 5465 Frontage Road on the south-bound side of Interstate 55 is packing up and moving to the old Circuit City location near the corner of Ridgewood Road and County Line Road in North Jackson in July. In Flowood, Dogwood Festival Mall is set to welcome the state’s second Home Goods store to the 25,000-square foot building that once housed Borders Books. Borders went out of business in 2011. Home Goods’ parent company is Framingham, Mass.based TJX, which operates 1,940 T.J.Maxx or Marshalls stores, and 415 Home Goods stores in the United States alone. “It’s great for us,” Flowood mayor Gary Rhoads said. “It’s a 30,000-square-foot space that has sat empty for the past year. It should also be productive in terms of jobs.” Rhoads added that Flowood did not have to offer any incentives to lure the store. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

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Jackson, Mississippi Remembers Fifty years ago, the world was a very different place. We invite you to join us as we pay tribute to Medgar Evers and the many others who battled so bravely for justice, freedom, and equality for all. SIGNATURE EVENTS This is Home: Medgar Evers, Mississippi and the Movement, May 1-Oct 31 William F. Winters Archives and History Building Life Into Fiction—The Murder of Medgar Evers, May 15-Dec 15 Eudora Welty House Education and Visitors Center The Medgar Wiley Evers’ Retrospective Gallery, Permanent Exhibit Opens June 9 Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center

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5/29/13 3:31 PM


Who’s Moral Now?

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n my last column, I wrote about the importance of Medicaid expansion to our state—and specifically to me. Sometimes we pay a price for publicly sharing a story; my price was being told that I have no right to health care from complete strangers on social media. I have been told repeatedly if I am too poor, too stupid and too fat to be healthy, that is my fault—and if I die then that’s just too bad. These people are echoing the private and public statements of many lawmakers. It is strange to be attacked by the same people who claim to be moral standard bearers for everything from guns to my uterus in Mississippi. Most will tell me they stand on the side of the Christian God, yet, when it comes to policies affecting their fellow citizens’ health, they seem to have traded Jesus for Ayn Rand. One bright spot has been watching video of events in North Carolina, which has a lot in common with Mississippi, politically. It has a GOP-controlled House, Senate and governor’s mansion, just like us. North Carolina’s Republican elected officials are absolutely against expanding Medicaid, and they rail against Obamacare. The difference in North Carolina, though, is that every Monday since April, faith leaders and community members have held protests against these policies. They’re calling the days Moral Mondays, directly challenging the GOP’s assertion that it is the party of Christian values and morality. To Moral Monday protesters, it is immoral to disregard the condition of your fellow citizen. Instead, they believe the Christian God directs us to care for the least among us. For those Mississippians who believe that the GOP lawmakers in control don’t speak for them, it is time to speak up. Let Republicans know they aren’t the only voice for morality in this state. Lots of us—from theistic and non-theistic beliefs—believe it is immoral to let working Mississippians go without health care. If you believe that these policies are wrong, write letters, make phone calls and start organizing. It’s time to put boots on the ground. There is an old saying, “Closed mouths don’t get fed.� Lawmakers can’t hear what we do not say. When we don’t have money or a lobbyist, our power is our bodies and our voices. It’s time we use them, Mississippi.

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Why it stinks: Humphrey mentioned monthly Ku Klux Klan marches at the University of Mississippi in several tweets, said he saw “white people in white night gowns� on campus and that Ole Miss picked a black homecoming queen for the express purpose of not looking racist. Trying to downplay complaints from Ole Miss fans, he tweeted, “KKK rallies hahaha I’m weak.� The last KKK rally at Ole Miss was in 2009, with about a dozen in attendance. Later the same day, Humphrey apologized, also via Twitter, in two separate tweets. “This tweet is to the Ole Miss Coaching Staff and the Ole Miss Family. I have not been on your campus as a recruit. I have not felt any racism from anyone on your campus. I am sorry for misleading anyone in thinking that there is any racism coming from the Ole Miss family.�

Transparency for Citizens’ Sake

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or the past few days, the Jackson Free Press has been working on a story about Mayorelect Chokwe Lumumba’s transition to officially take the reins at city hall on July 1. It’s one of the bread-and-butter stories that newspapers often write when there is a change in power. First comes the campaign, then the transition, then the new administration’s first 90 days in office, so forth and so on. As we have stated before, Mr. Lumumba and his surrogates were always generous with his time during the campaign, and we have expressed our appreciation for that. We are appreciative not because Mr. Lumumba helped us fill the space in our print newspaper and on our website, but because our most important job is to inform the public. We are thus aggrieved at the lack of transparency displayed in Mr. Lumumba’s transition apparatus. Last week, the mayor-elect announced and introduced the members of his transition team at a press conference. This week, Lumumba’s interim communications director told us that the members of that team, which are advising Mr. Lumumba so that he can hit the ground running when he is sworn in July 1, would be off-limits to the members of the news media. It is not idle curiosity that motivates us, but recognition that although Lumumba won election by receiving a majority of votes in the recent election, members of his appointed transition team

did not. As advisers for public policy, therefore, they warrant vigorous scrutiny. Politicians’ lack of transparency is a troubling and pervasive trend in Mississippi. Earlier today, a local elected official joked that he does not return phone calls to Jackson’s daily newspaper, The Clarion-Ledger. It’s no secret that we’re not that publication’s biggest fans, either, but there is a problem when officials pick and choose which media they will engage. The Jackson Free Press is no stranger to this brand of journalistic prejudice. Gov. Phil Bryant’s communications staff will not so much as send us press releases. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann’s spokeswoman recently told us that she would only accept email questions from JFP reporters, stating we had misquoted her. She declined, however, to say where or when. Again, we are not asking for asking’s sake. In our view, news organizations and government officials represent the same constituency and serve the same function—to arm citizens with information about how their elected representatives are spending their tax money and upholding the tenets of democracy on which our Republic rests. It doesn’t matter what they think of an outlet. Failure to communicate with the media is a failure to communicate with the citizenry, and it’s time that officials in our state, from Mayorelect Lumumba to Gov. Bryant, recognize that.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn� and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


TOM HEAD

It’s Not a Pity EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Nneka Ayozie, Mark Braboy Bethany Bridges, Rebecca Docter, De’Arbreya Lee, Kimberly Murriel, Khari Johnson, Emmanuel Sullivan, Dominique Triplett, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Interns DeNetta Fagan Durr, Anna Russell, Brittany Sistrunk Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations Photo Interns Melanie Boyd, Jessica King ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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hile doing some research earlier this year, I had the dubious opportunity to read pretty much every major southern segregationist speech ever delivered. What surprised me about them was that I didn’t see much explicit hate there—or pride, either. What I mostly saw was self-pity. It was pretty pathetic. Take former Gov. Ross Barnett’s September 1962 pro-segregation speech, for example. He doesn’t have anything particularly negative to say about black folks as a group, but what he has to say about southern whites no doubt brought tears to some poor idiot’s eyes. He assured his audience that the well-fed and well-paid all-white state Legislature, though oppressed into a state of “crisis” by “an ambitious federal government employing naked and arbitrary power,” would “never submit to the moral degradation, to the shame and the ruin which have faced all others who have lacked the courage to defend their beliefs.” It’s hard to read that without smiling when you remember how Barnett, like every other southern segregationist governor, politely stepped out of the way as soon as the federal government started talking about putting him in handcuffs. The remarkable “courage” on his part included ordering the arrest of 300 Freedom Riders a year earlier. But that is the way the very southern tradition of white self-pity defines a crisis: In Ross Barnett’s world, the intimidation, disenfranchisement and outright lynching of black voters, and those who try to register them, isn’t a crisis; federal encroachment on state sovereignty is. We see this pattern play out in much of what passes for racial discourse among many white Mississippians. White callousness isn’t a crisis; white “guilt” is. Actual racism isn’t a crisis; “reverse” racism is. There may be no greater example of this than the words of Judge Robert Zimmerman, the father of Trayvon Martin’s killer, who wrote recently that he “thought racism was a thing of the past”—until he encountered the black Civil Rights Movement, where the “real racists” are. In Judge Zimmerman’s world, chasing down, cornering and kill-

ing a black teenager for walking around in a white neighborhood doesn’t create a crisis; putting his killer on trial does. Rep. Millicent Fenwick of New Jersey, a great Republican congresswoman and civil-rights advocate, no doubt spoke from a place of well-informed disgust when she wrote that self-pity is “the most destructive emotion there is.” Fenwick went on to say, “How awful to be caught up in the terrible squirrel cage of self.” It’s a powerful metaphor. The squirrel keeps scratching—frantically, pathetically—but it never gets out. Self-pity enables every other negative human trait and poisons every attempt we make to be decent human beings. White self-pity has done more to destroy the South than any war or natural disaster. And it seems to go on forever—a contagious, incurable and permanent disease of the human soul. Institutional racism is held together by inertia, but white supremacism, the ideology that supports it, is held together by self-pity. It was self-pity that provided the true ideological foundation behind Nazi Germany, whose leader, Adolf Hitler, was not ashamed to write a memoir called “Mein Kampf” (“My Struggle”). When the Bible speaks of hell, the only emotion it identifies there is selfpity. When the wicked are banished into the outer darkness, in the words of the 112th Psalm, all they really want to do is keep wailing and gnashing their teeth. I’m coming to believe that rational argument is powerless against the horrific toxic power of this white self-pity. Shame and ridicule, though effective at silencing it, only drives it deeper within us. I believe the only force capable of destroying it, completely and forever, is love. But, “Love without truth,” as former Jackson Free Press columnist Natalie Collier once put it, “is weak.” Maybe our first step in confronting white self-pity should be to stop taking it seriously—to stop treating it as if it were dignified, and start treating it as the self-destructive, other-destructive spiritual disease that it is. Tom Head, Ph.D., has written or co-written 24 nonfiction books, is a civil liberties writer for About.com and is a grassroots progressive activist.

White self-pity has done more to destroy the South than any war or natural disaster.

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13


Let’s Talk About Race

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o we still need to talk about race? Yes. And no. First and foremost, there can’t be any discussion about race and racism unless you’re willing to entertain the notion that it still exists—that we’re not living in a “post-racial� society—and that racism continues to cause serious problems in America. If we can grasp that race is still an issue in our society, then honest, open dialogue can help us understand ourselves and each other, which can help to lessen the destructive impact of racism—individually and as groups. But just talking isn’t enough. The most important thing that we can bring to a dialogue is our willingness to listen and learn from one another, and then take what we learn to others. Dialogue isn’t debate. If you’re in it to win, the conversation can’t move forward, because you’ll be too busy defending yourself. To authentically engage means being willing to face your own biases (many of which you’re probably not even aware of, yet), and to learn and grow. Those conversations—respectful, open, caring—are often difficult. But they are so worth having. That is, if we care about social justice. —JFP Staff

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DISTRIBUTED BY THE WILLIAM WINNTER INSTITUTE FOR RACIAL RECONCILIATION�

Question It

June 26 - July 2, 2013

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think the root of racism, it’s out of vogue and out of style in this country to even use that kind of language, but I believe it and so I say it. You know, I believe that the root of racism is nothing but a very sinful and a very black and dark heart. ‌ [A]s relationships are formed in communities, as people come to trust each other, as people come to spend time with one another, get to know one another, and that’s when the stereotypes are dispelled, that’s when people have the opportunity to set aside their preconceived notions, their prejudice, and they get to know each other as individuals.� —Kay James, Dean, Regent University School of Government, 1998 One effective way to begin to understand our racial biases is to examine where they came from. When you’re ready to engage in the race conversation, here are some questions to get your juices started. • What are your first memories of learning that there was something called race?

• Have you ever felt different because of your race? If so, what was your first experience of feeling different? • How much contact do you have now with people from other races? What type of contact is that? • What was your first exposure to messages that concern racial stereotypes? Who told you about them? • When did you first discover that some people thought about race differently than you? • What experiences have shaped your feelings and attitudes about race and ethnicity? • What did you believe about race relations in your community growing up? • What is your family history concerning race? Did racial issues affect your parents and grandparents? • What early experiences have shaped your feelings and attitudes about race? SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE “COMMUNITY DIALOGUE GUIDE: CONDUCTING A DISCUSSION ON RACEâ€?


Dialogue circles are people coming together to openly discuss issues affecting their community. Locally, Jackson 2000 (jackson2000. org) regularly holds free dialogue circles about race. Over six weeks, participants explore different aspects of race using an Everyday Democracy-designed curriculum and study guide, “Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation.� “These conversations will touch on issues of power and privilege, fear and anger, hope and disappointment,� the authors write. “But they are well worth the effort. We have seen that many people are ready to take the risk. They tell us that honest listening and sharing are powerful forces for making change.� Participants deepen their understanding through topic areas such as Making Connections; Our Ethnic Backgrounds and Racism; Our Unequal Nation; Why Do Inequities Exist? and Looking at Our Community. Everyday Democracy, based in Connecticut, “helps people of different backgrounds and views talk and work together to solve problems and create communities that work for everyone,� the organization writes on its website (everyday-democracy.org). For additional resources, see page 20.

Dialogue is not Debate

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t’s easy to fall into a debate about race and racism, but debate usually hardens our positions, instead of opening us to the possibility of change. To understand the difference, take a look at chart below; then decide how you want to proceed. SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE “COMMUNITY DIALOGUE GUIDE: CONDUCTING A DISCUSSION ON RACE�

Debate ‌

Dialogue ‌

• is oppositional: two sides oppose each other and attempt to prove each other wrong

• is collaborative: two or more sides work together toward common understanding

• has winning as the goal

• has finding common ground as the goal

• lets one side listen to the other side to find flaws and to • lets one side listen to the other side to understand counter its arguments: “listening to refuteâ€? • defends assumptions as the truth

• reveals assumptions for reevaluation

• causes critique of the other position

• causes introspection of one’s own position

• defends one’s own positions as the best solution and excludes other solutions

• opens the possibility of reaching a better solution than any of the original solutions

• creates a closed-minded attitude, a determination to be right

• creates an open-minded attitude, an openness to being wrong and an openness to change

• prompts a search for glaring differences

• prompts a search for basic agreements.

• involves a countering of other position without focusing on feelings or relationship and often belittles or deprecates the other person

• involves a real concern for the other person and does not seek to alienate or offend

Putting a Toe in the Water of the Race Conversation The top two things that emerged as we researched how people talk about race are: We have to keep talking about it—at least until blatant disparities and myths are eliminated.

1. 2.

Racism is really hard to talk about, especially in bi- and multi-racial groups. So how do you start? How do you engage without offending? Here are a few tips: • Understand your motives. Are you in the conversation to learn or win? Are you trying to convince or persuade someone else that you’re right and he or she is wrong? If winning is your goal, you’re looking for a debate—or an argument. Stop, and rethink. • Be respectful; avoid criticizing or accusing. Everyone has different experiences—your point of view doesn’t have more validity just because it’s yours. Coming out of the gate with, “You are so racist!â€? probably won’t do much for the conversation. • Tell your story. Keep the conversation on a personal level instead of a statistical or theoretical one. When did you first realize other races exist? Have you been a victim of racism? Do people of another race assume you’re a racist because you’re white?

• Learn the history and its effects. Most school children—regardless of race—are taught the dominant model of history, i.e., a Euro-centric white version. Columbus discovered America; Native Americans were all savages; the Civil War wasn’t about slavery. Don’t believe it just because you’ve always thought it was true. Learn to questions. • Avoid the blame game. Focus on results instead. What’s the context of your conversation? What do you want to achieve? At some point, you may need to find out what isn’t working to fix it, but that’s different from dumping on one person (or group) and laying blame. Try harder than that. • Develop the skill of “deepâ€? listening. Deep listening requires, first, that you stop talking. Listen without looking for an opportunity to inject what you want to say next. Actually hear the words, see the gestures, feel the pain of another. When you can listen like that, you create a “safe spaceâ€? for others to speak their truth. You may find that you’ll discover your own truth there, too. • Be willing to be uncomfortable out on the skinny branches of your personal tree of knowledge—all that stuff you already know. You might say the wrong thing. You might not be the smartest person in the room. You might feel silly or embarrassed or mortified. You might have to learn to apologize, but it’ll feel great when you do.

THINK ABOUT IT

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jacksonfreepress.com

DIALOGUE CIRCLES

15


What Is Racism?

Why meanings matter in conversations about race

G

enerally speaking, semantics of race falls into two categories. Those who wish that conversation about it cease, arguing that â&#x20AC;&#x153;all that is behind us,â&#x20AC;? tend to define various forms of prejudice, bigotry and racism as the exact same thingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;usually followed by arguing that â&#x20AC;&#x153;everyone does itâ&#x20AC;? as a way to end the effort at dialogue. This may or may not be done on purpose. People who are more serious about race understanding, which requires dialogue and empathy (not sympathy), understand that defining all these things the same just provides an excuse to shut down further talk. Experts on race relations and historic discrimination define the terms quite differently; you can be racist, prejudiced and bigoted, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that all bigots are racist. Confused, yet? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look at the most respected and specific definitions of these terms, to consider why the differences matter. Essentially, none of these attitudes is a good thing, but one is much worse than the others. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think American young people are going to be redefining the very stolid, old Crayolas that we have been coloring America.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Richard Rodriguez

The Glossary: â&#x20AC;˘ Prejudice: Garden-variety prejudice is an attitude: a personal judgment of another person based on a characteristic such as ethnicity, social standing, etc. You are essentially prejudging a person based on a characteristic. Most people are prejudiced in some way, and it does not mean that you participate in discrimination or racism even though you may stereotype certain people in your own head. Many can control their own prejudices simply by recognizing them and working to overcome them without ever vocalizing them. â&#x20AC;˘ Bigotry: Bigotry tends to be an adamant form of prejudice, and a bigot usually expresses it out loud. Still, it may not be racism if the bigoted person does not (a) have the power to use the bigotry to hurt members of a group with less power or (b) is not used to support policies or affect that groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position, access or fortune in some way. â&#x20AC;˘ Racism: This is the big boy and the term that is most often confused. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;ismâ&#x20AC;? in the word is a clue about its real meaning: It is a system of efforts by people with power to hold another race back. If a prejudiced or bigoted person is a member of the majority race (which means white in the United States currently), they have the power to affect another full race for generations. The tricky part is that some people allow prejudice or bigotry that they may not recognize as such to prompt them to vote or act in ways that contribute to racism. Or they just do not know that a certain action has a racist outcome. Most tragically, they are not clear that lack of action to right historic wrongs can prolong or increase racism and its outcomes.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we need a vocabulary that embraces Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s present and past on this race issue. And we need to know when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making distinctions, and then we need to fess up to the fact that ... if we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do something fairly dramatic, the future is going to be like the past for too many people.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;President Bill Clinton

SOURCES INCLUDE EDCHANGE.ORG, U.S. CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION, DIVERSITYINC.COM

3HUFHQWEHORZSRYHUW\OHYHO

June 26 - July 2, 2013

THE HOUSE OF RACISM

Prejudice/Bigotry + Privilege/Power + Discrimination



16

,PDJLQHWZRSHRSOHRQHZKLWHDQGEODFNERUQWKHVDPHGD\6WDUWLQJDWELUWKWKHEODFNSHUVRQLVKDQGHGD EULFNGXHWRDFKDOOHQJHKHIDFHVEHFDXVHKHLVQRWDSULYLOHJHGPHPEHURIWKHPDMRULW\FXOWXUH VHHSDJH  7KDWPHDQVWKHEODFNSHUVRQLVORDGHGGRZQE\EULFNVE\KLVWKELUWKGD\7KRVHEULFNVFDQEULQJZLWK WKHPQHJDWLYHSXEOLFDQGPHGLDSHUFHSWLRQVVHOIGRXEWFULPHULGGHQQHLJKERUKRRGVXQIXQGHGVFKRROVWKH LQFUHDVHGOLNHOLKRRGRILQFDUFHUDWLRQIRUOHVVHUFULPHVWKDQZKLWHVDQGPDQ\RWKHUURDGEORFNV  2QWKHLUWKELUWKGD\ERWKNLGVJHWDEULFNDQGDUHWROGWKH\DUHHTXDODQGDUHZDONLQJRQDOHYHOSOD\LQJ ¿HOG7KH\¶UHQRWEXWDZKLWHSHUVRQPLJKWDUJXHWKDWWKH\DUHEHFDXVHWKHEODFNSHUVRQLVSUHMXGLFHGDJDLQVW WKHZKLWHSHUVRQ¶VSRZHU5HJDUGOHVVWKH³PLQRULW\´FKLOGLVVORZHGE\WKHEULFNV  ,IWKHEODFNSHUVRQVOXUVWKHZKLWHSHUVRQLQVRPHZD\GLVSOD\LQJELJRWU\RUSUHMXGLFHWKHZKLWHSHUVRQ FODLPVLW¶V³UDFLVW´  1RWKHEULFNVDUHWKHUDFLVWEXUGHQPDQ\GRQRWFDUHWRDFNQRZOHGJH $GDSWHGIURPKWWSUDFLVPVFKRROWXPEOUFRP

Racism is a System with Multiple Parts

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The 3 Levels of Prejudice

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HOW NON-ACTION INCREASES RACISM















POVERTY FIGURES FROM THE U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

1. Cognitive: What a person believes; stereotypes of others. 2. Emotional: The feelings and emotions that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the otherâ&#x20AC;? causes in a person. 3. Behaviorial: When a person converts prejudice into discriminatory behavior. The two result in racism. SOURCE: EDCHANGE.ORG

DISCRIMINATION, DEFINED â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discrimination is the unequal treatment of individuals or groups on the basis of some, usually categorical, attribute, such as race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age or social class membership.â&#x20AC;? SOURCE: EDCHANGE.ORG


Racism Affects Families from Generation to Generation ,QWKHVDQGÂśVXQLYHUVLW\ VHJUHJDWLRQSUHYHQWHGPDQ\EODFN DQG/DWLQR*,VIURPREWDLQLQJKLJKHU HGXFDWLRQSURPLVHGE\WKH*,%LOO

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Phillip

Thomas

Juan

Family status: Low-income, White

Family status: Low-income, Black

Family status: Low-income, Latino

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Education Status: White veteran, high school diploma, from Philadelphia, Pa.

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Education Status: Black veteran, high school diploma, from Philadelphia, Pa.

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Education Status: Latino veteran, high school diploma, from Texas

GI Bill: FHA& VA loans: Able to use low-interest provisions to move from public housing to segregated suburban home ownership

GI Bill: FHA& VA loans: Could not access home loan because of racially restrictive underwriting criteria; family remained in rental housing in the city

GI Bill: FHA& VA loans: Could not access home loan because of racially restrictive underwriting criteria; family remained in rural rental housing

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well-being: Family borrowed from home equity mortgage to support childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college education (first in family to go to college)

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well-being: Family could not afford to send child to college; high school diploma is from segregated, under-resourced school

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well-being: Family could not afford to send child to college; high school diploma is from under-resourced language segregated and racially segregated school

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adulthood: Philip gets professional job, buys own house, inherits appreciated house when father dies

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adulthood: Thomas works in minimum-wage jobs, continues to live in family home, considers joining the Army, has to borrow money when father dies to give him decent funeral

Consequences for the Next Generation: â&#x20AC;˘ Philip gives children his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appreciated house â&#x20AC;˘ They live in thriving communities â&#x20AC;˘ Their college educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paid by home equity â&#x20AC;˘ Philip establishes trust fund for grandchildren

Consequences for the Next Generation: â&#x20AC;˘ Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; children have no houses to inherit â&#x20AC;˘ They live in disinvested communities â&#x20AC;˘ At work, they complete college on work study and student loans, with subsequent starting debts to pay back â&#x20AC;˘ Thomas has few personal assets to leave grandchildren

Consequences for Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adulthood: Juan works in minimum-wage jobs, continues to live in family home, marries newcomer Latina, sends part of familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limited income to her extended family in Mexico Consequences for the Next Generation: â&#x20AC;˘ Juanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children have no houses to inherit â&#x20AC;˘ They live in disinvested communities â&#x20AC;˘ At work, they complete college on work study and student loans, with subsequent starting debts to pay back â&#x20AC;˘ Juan has few personal assets to leave grandchildren SOURCE: THE ANNIE E. CASEY FOUNDATION â&#x20AC;&#x153;RACE MATTERS TOOLKITâ&#x20AC;?

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Crimes Against (Some) Americans

I

n the past 30 years, Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prison population has exploded. Since 1970, our prison population has risen 700 percent, and the U.S. now houses roughly 25 percent of all prisoners in the world, despite having only 5 percent of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population. People of color constitute 60 percent of our prison population while remaining a distinct minority of the general population. Of the 2.3 million incarcerated people in the United States, black men make up more than 1 million people in jail. Black men are jailed six times more frequently than white men. One in four black males will be incarcerated in his lifetime. In an American Civil Liberties Union

study released June 3, researchers found â&#x20AC;&#x153;staggering racial biasâ&#x20AC;? in its report â&#x20AC;&#x153;The War on Marijuana in Black and White.â&#x20AC;? Among its findings, marijuana use is roughly equal among blacks and whites, yet blacks are 3.73 times as likely to be arrested for marijuana possession. The difference in who goes to prison for cocaine also illustrates the inequity. When Congress enacted mandatory sentencing for cocaine, it decided that crack is distinct from powder (favored by more upper-crustâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; users). The five-year mandatory sentence for powder cocaine is 500 grams, but only 5 grams for crack. That means a dealer could sell 100 times more powder before going to prison. SOURCE: AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION

LQHYHU\ZKLWHPDOHVDJHRUROGHULVLQFDUFHUDWHG LQHYHU\KLVSDQLFPDOHVDJHRUROGHULVLQFDUFHUDWHG

 LQ HYHU\  EODFN PDOHV DJH  RU ROGHU LV LQFDUFHUDWHG SOURCE: THE ACLU

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jacksonfreepress.com

SOURCE: SOJOURN MAGAZINE

17


QUIZ: White Privilege Checklist How many of these advantages are in your knapsack?

What Is White Privilege?

On a daily basis, as a white person: 1. If I need to move, I’m confident that I can rent or buy a home in an area where I both want to live and can afford. _____

The problem with white privilege is that those who enjoy it usually don’t know it, or want to know. It takes a deliberate effort to see through the dirty water of privilege, but it’s worth it for deeper racial understanding and meaningful dialogue.

2. In that neighborhood, I’m pretty sure the neighbors will be either nice to me or neutral about my presence. _____

“S

12. I can disagree with someone politically without being called an “angry (insert race) person.” _____

14. If I ask to speak to the “person in charge,” I expect to see a person of my own race. _____ Antiracist writer Peggy McIntosh coined the phrase “knapsack of privilege” to refer to the “unearned assets” that members of our majority white culture enjoy, usually without knowing it.

ANNA RUSSELL

3. I can go shopping in any area of the metro at any time without feeling like I will be profiled, harassed or assumed to be a shoplifter. _____ 4. Most media represent people who look like me in positive ways in most coverage. _____ 5. When I am taught history or heritage in school, I’m told that people who look like me created the positive aspects. _____ 6. I’m certain that my children will see people like them in their curriculum and books treated in positive ways. _____ 7. I can go into most salons and find someone who can and will do my hair. _____ 8. I’ve never had to give a thumbprint at the bank to cash a check. _____

The challenge for white Americans is to see through the murky water of privilege they swim in.

s e m i t e “YSoou m N e e d To B e Kn e a d e d ” June 26 - July 2, 2013

11. I can accomplish something without being called a “credit to my race.” _____

13. I’m never assumed to be a spokeperson for all people of my race. _____

ometimes, white privilege isn’t about stuff. It’s not always about better opportunities, or more money, or even greater access to those things than people of color. Sometimes, white privilege is as simple as knowing that, generally speaking, if you’re white, you’ll be perceived as competent and hard-working until proven otherwise, while people of color—even those who have proven themselves competent and hard-working—will still be subjected to presumptions that they just might not be, and that somehow, they (but not you) need to be reminded of the importance of hard-work and personal responsibility, lest they (but never you) revert to some less impressive group mean.” — Tim Wise, Antiracist Essayist and Author

18

10. No one ever points out that I am “articulate.” _____

9. I can curse, dress in shabby clothes or miss a deadline without people believing it is because of bad parenting, poverty or illiteracy of my entire race. _____

15. I am seldom, if ever, the only person of my race in a room. _____ 16. If the police pull me over, I don’t assume it’s because of my race. _____ 17. Most greeting cards, toys, magazines, picture books and such routinely feature people of my skin tone. _____ 18. The media routinely interview people of my race for stories that have nothing to do with race (or crime or sports or music). _____ 19. If I take a bandage out of a first-aid kit at work, it likely matches my skin tone. _____ 20. When I get a new job or other honorific, no one would suspect it is because of my race. _____ 21. I’m more likely to assume that a “wanted” teenager of color is a thug, and an accused white teen “made a mistake.” _____ 22. I often wonder why or lament that people “still” talk about race. _____ This list is adapted from Peggy McIntosh’s essay, “Unpacking the Knapsack of White Privilege,” also the source of the following quote.

“I think whites are carefully taught not to recognize white privilege, as males are taught not to recognize male privilege.”

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ANNA RUSSELL

Facts Matter; So Do Stereotypes

D

isparities between whites and people of color in the United States, and Mississippi, are still wide, and they result from years of historic racism and inequality. Whether you’re white or not, before you attempt a dialogue about race, study up on some uncomfortable realities you may not already know. Be sure to seek knowledge, not false equivalency. And watch the stereotypes and rumors; nothing good can come from them. Here’s a random list of did-you-knows that might surprise you, and help dialogue:

Taking Jobs from Blacks? Not so Much.

W

hen Chokwe Lumumba was a new member of the Jackson City Council, he went looking for an answer to the dubious adage that undocumented immigrants performing low-skill jobs in the U.S. take jobs away native-born African Americans. Lumumba, who sponsored an anti-racial-profiling ordinance, turned to Dr. Steven Pitts, a labor policy expert at the University of California Berkeley Center of for Labor Research and Education. “To many casual onlookers, a glance at construction sites, day-laborer gathering places, or restaurant kitchens shapes the impression that immigrant workers have little difficulty of obtaining employment. At the same time, unemployment in black communities has risen dramatically since the onset of the Great Recession; particularly hit hard are youth and people who are formerly incar-

cerated,” Pitts writes in “A Note on the Research Concerning Blacks, Immigrants and Employment.” The observations leads to the common perception that immigrants take jobs from blacks. But the facts fail to support that perception, Pitts finds. To start, Pitts looks at black unemployment rates in a dozen southern cities with foreign-born workforces ranging from 4.3 percent (Birmingham, Ala.) to 45.7 percent (Miami). If it were true that foreign-born workers displaced African Americans, the black jobless rate should be higher in cities with large numbers of immigrants in the workforce. However, Pitts’ analysis finds no such trend. Memphis, which has a foreignborn workforce of about 6 percent, had a black unemployment at the height of the Great Recession of 28.3 percent. Meanwhile, Miami had the highest percentage of foreign-

born workers, 45.7 percent, and a black unemployment rate of 10.4 percent. Using the same cities, Pitts compared the proportion of foreign-born workers to the percentages of blacks working full-time jobs that earn less than $30,000 per year. Regardless of the number of immigrant workers, the levels of black full-time workers making less than $30,000 varied only slightly. In the city with the highest percentage of foreign-born workers, Miami, 51.5 percent of black workers earned less than $30,000. That figure is nearly identical in New Orleans, where only 7.7 percent of the workforce is foreign born. Increases in Latino presence in the workforce and certain occupations frequently held by blacks caused blacks to increase their level of education, which resulted in higher wages, Pitts wrote.

Black Unemployment, Low-Wage Work and Immigrant Workers, 2005-2007 City

Foreign-born in the workforce:

Black unemployment rate:

Black full-time workers earning less than $30,000:

Birmingham

4.3%

12.3%

47%

Memphis

6.1%

28.3%

48.9%

Richmond

7.5%

10.1%

41.2%

New Orleans

7.7%

15.6%

52.2%

Atlanta

16.2%

12.1%

36.4%

Houston

27.4%

13%

40.4%

Dallas

22.7%

15.5%

38.2%

Miami

45.7%

10.4%

51.5%

Did Columbus discover America? Of course not.

Was it European settlers’ “manifest destiny” to take over America from the natives? Nope.

Was the Civil War fought over slavery?

Absolutely. (Read the first sentence of the Mississippi Articles of Secession to anyone who tries to tell you otherwise.)

Are African Americans “better off” because slavemasters brought them to America?

The question is offensive on its face. First of all, it is absurd to argue that current problems in Africa would exist without the ravages of both the slave trade and colonialization by European interests.

Why do these myths matter?

Because kids grow up either being told that their people discovered and made everything (if you’re white) or where a big part of the problem, were lazy and lacked initiative (if you’re darker-skinned). Both races distrust each other, as a result. This feeds myths that affect our communities today and our ability and will to solve the problems and inequalities (from crime to poverty) that directly result from historic racism. Not to mention, kids need to grow up feeling good about themselves and people who look like this and believe in possibilities. People become what they think they can become. That’s why history books matter so much.

jacksonfreepress.com

• From 1932 to 1972, the U.S. government performed devastating Tuskegee experiments on 399 black men with syphilis, mostly poor sharecroppers, without their permission in order to collect data from their autopsies. (Good to know if a person of color is worried that, as Rev. Jeremiah Wright famously said, the government spread AIDS to hurt black people.) • The American eugenics movement began before that of Nazi Germany, forcing at least 60,000 women—mostly black women and immigrants, as well as poor whites—to be forcibly sterilized, including in Jackson. Progressives and conservatives alike pushed the program that continued into the 1960s and, for many, was a way to keep purity of the races intact. • At least seven known white people died fighting for equal rights for black Americans: William Moore, Rev. Bruce Klunder, Mickey Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, Rev. James Reeb, Viola Luizzo, and Johnathan Daniels. (Source: crmvet.org) • The practice of “redlining” non-white neighborhoods so that banks and lenders would deny the residents access to loans, homes and, thus, the ability to create wealth went on in America until the early 1990s. • The state Legislature set up the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission in 1956 to spy on any person, including whites, who did anything to help black people achieve equality in the state. One report lists the name of a service-station owner who allowed a black man to use his bathroom so that the Citizens Council (prominent businessmen) could boycott the business. The MSC fed the license-plate number of the COFO car of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner to the KKK in 1964 so they could find and kill them. The taxpayer-funded agency did not close until 1977. Search its files online at jfp.ms/spyagency. • White Mississippians voted in the 1960s to close the public schools rather than integrate them. They loved them until then. • The Choctaws long had a very organized form of government, adopting its first constitution in 1825. In 1829, the Mississippi government voted to abolish Choctaw government. The removal of much of the tribe began two years later. • In order to keep blacks from voting in the 1960s Mississippi, the state government asked poll questions including, “How many bubbles are in a bar of soap?” The answer was slippery and constantly changing, to say the least.

19


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O

ne of the uglier memes that popped up during the recent Jackson mayoral campaign was the comparison of then-candidate Chokwe Lumumba to former Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett. The charge was that one was just as â&#x20AC;&#x153;racistâ&#x20AC;? as the other.

Barnett, who died in 1987, was a Jackson attorney and governor of the state from 1960 until 1964. Mayor-elect Lumumba has worked as a civil-rights attorney for decades. He was a co-founder of the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement and served one term on the Jackson City Council. He helped found the Republic of New Afrika, a black-power group.

Jackson Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba

Former Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett &LYLODWWRUQH\

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,Q/XPXPEDFRIRXQGHGWKH0DOFROP; *UDVVURRWV0RYHPHQW³DQRUJDQL]DWLRQRI$IUL NDQVLQ$PHULFD1HZ$IULNDQVZKRVHPLVVLRQLV WRGHIHQGWKHKXPDQULJKWVRIRXUSHRSOHDQG SURPRWHVHOIGHWHUPLQDWLRQLQRXUFRPPXQLW\´

,Q%DUQHWWRUGHUHGWKHDUUHVWVRI)UHHGRP 5LGHUVZKRFDPHLQWR0LVVLVVLSSLWRUHJLVWHU $IULFDQ$PHULFDQYRWHUV ,Q%DUQHWWGHQLHG-DPHV0HUHGLWK DGPLVVLRQWRWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI0LVVLVVLSSL8QGHU SUHVVXUHIURPWKH.HQQHG\DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ %DUQHWW\LHOGHGEXWQRWXQWLOWZRSHRSOHZHUH NLOOHGDQGKXQGUHGVLQMXUHGRQWKH2OH0LVV FDPSXVLQVHJUHJDWLRQLVWULRWV $IWHUKHOHIWWKHJRYHUQRUÂśVRIÂżFH%DUQHWWFRQWLQ XHGVSHDNLQJRXWDJDLQVWLQWHJUDWLRQ SOURCE FOR BARNETT: NEW YORK TIMES OBITUARY, 1987 SOURCES FOR LUMUMBA: JACKSON FREE PRESS INTERVIEWS; MXGM.COM; SPEECHES

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RESOURCES

If you are interested in exploring and learning more about race in Mississippi and in America, here are a few resources to get started:

June 26 - July 2, 2013

Everyday Democracy 111 Founders Plaza, Suite 1403, East Hartford, Conn., 06108 860-928-2616 everyday-democracy.org

20

TRIP BURNS

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

In Town & in the USA

Case Study: False Equivalence

MISS. DEPT. OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY

VASILIOS

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

Mission Mississippi 120 N. Congress St. 601-353-6477 missionmississippi.com Tim Wise Antiracist essayist, author and educator timwise.org

William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation University of Mississippi P.O. Box 1848, University, Miss., 38677 662-915-6734 winterinstitute.org U.S. Department of Justice Community Relations Service 950 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C., 20530 202-514-2000 justice.gov/crs/

The Frameworks Institute 1776 I St., N.W., 9th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20006 info@frameworksinstitute.org frameworksinstitute.org The Annie E. Casey Foundation 701 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md., 21202 410-547-6600 aecf.org Jackson 2000 bevelyn@jackson2000.org jackson2000.org


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section FreePress2_Layout 1 6/24/13 3:27 PM Page 1

  

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CONTACT the Crisis Line ÂŽ

We Listen in More Ways than One

CONTACT

Im-In-Crisis.org

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(601) 713-HELP (4357) an interfaith ministry of LISTENING and AVAILABILITY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nonjudgmental, confidential, anonymous. If you are in crisis (any kind of crisis) we first listen, and then help you to explore options, provide information and referrals when needed.

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in crisis and arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t comfortable talking on the phone, visit www.Im-In-Crisis.org for a live, real-time chat with a trained Chat Specialist. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ONLINE emotional support, a safe place to find support for any issue you may be facing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; relationship problems, suicidal thoughts, domestic violence, job loss, grief, depression, loneliness or ??. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confidential, secure, and anonymous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a way of reaching out for help when you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where else to turn.

Trained volunteers make daily calls to elderly or disabled persons who live alone. The Reassurance calls: â&#x20AC;˘ Check on the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-being. â&#x20AC;˘ Affirm that someone cares about them, by sharing a few minutes of friendly conversation. â&#x20AC;˘ Provide emergency follow-up if needed.

All Services Are Free Of Charge.

For more information call the office: 601-713-4099 or 601-982-9888

Volunteer!

Classes begin Tuesday, September 10, 6:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45pm. Pre-register at www.contactthecrisisline.org

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Since 1971, CONTACT volunteers have answered the crisis line 24/7. We are

21


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

Love to sing? Auditions begin July 1 for your Mississippi Boychoir

Grades 1st â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12th Sign up at www.MississippiBoychoir.org Or call 601-665-7374

June 26 - July 2, 2013

(no experience necessary)

22

601.960.2300 l info@msopera.org Table for 10 ($1500) l Table for 8 ($1200) Individual Tickets ($150) Sponsorships available, starting at $2500


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

Over 50,000 Animals Adopted

Come see the wonderful dogs, cats & horses at MARL! We find more homes for more animals than any shelter in Central Mississippi!

601-969-1631 www.msarl.org

       

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITES

  

Do you have a great IMAGINATION? Are you fun, CREATIVE & interested in making a big difference in a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life?

Making A Difference One Party At A Time.

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10% of the Rental Fee will be donated to the charity, church or school of your choice in your honor.

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1.877.793.KIDS (5437)

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123 Jones Street Madison, MS 39110 Diana Cole Saxon 601-862-1763

A signature project of the Junior League of Jackson.

JFP MCM VolunteerAd 4.5x5.7542.indd 1

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If you answered YES to these questions and are at least 13 years old, then you should volunteer at MCM! For more information on becoming a PRICELESS museum volunteer, contact MCMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@mcm.ms.

23

6/21/13 2:58 PM


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

Donate $30 for a life vest and enjoy your membership at the Y this summer with no joining fee. Expires July 31, 2013

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The Y teaches swim lessons to save lives. The Y STILL teaches more swim lessons than any other organization in the nation. Offer good at all 5 YMCA locations: Deville Plaza, Downtown, Clinton, Flowood and Reservoir Metropolitan YMCAs of Mississippi | www.metroYMCAms.org

100% Of Your Donations Help People Within 10 Miles of Your Home

Volunteer

People who need food, shelter, clothing and love are helped become responsible citizens again. We need your financial support and volunteer time.

Worsh

ip

Stewpots Daily Work On a typical day Stewpot will directly touch the lives of over 700 individuals, free of charge, who are in-need or homeless

Flowers Shelter for Women and Children

Play

Give

Nightly, provides an average of 6 women and 12 children shelter and supper and breakfast. The Shelter also purchases school clothes and provides transportation to school and after-school programs

Matt’s Emergency Shelter for Women

Provides an average of 15-20 women a night with shelter, supper and breakfast

Food Pantry

Serves 25-30 people each weekday providing groceries for families and individuals

Your Summer Checklist Could Change A Child’s Future.

After-School Program

Provides a daily after-school program to approximately 105 inner-city youth

June 26 - July 2, 2013

Sims House

24

Nightly, provides an average of 6 women and 12 children shelter and supper and breakfast. The Shelter also purchases school clothes and provides transportation to school and after-school programs Much, much More

1100 West Capitol Street Jackson, MS 39203 (601) 353-2759 www.stewpot.org

STEWPOT community services

805 North Flag Chapel Rd. Clinton, MS 39060­0066 • www.mchms.org Contact Vernon King at 601.853.5000 ext. 222 or vking@mchms.org


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

Show Some Love For The Zoo! The Jackson Zoological Park is an important asset to our city and the west Jackson community where it has been located for over 90 years.

9th Annual

The Zoo Area Progressive Partnership (ZAPP) is a non-profit whose mission is to support the Jackson Zoo through community improvement projects and to promote the revitalization of the Capitol Street corridor and surrounding communities.

July 20, 2013 starts at 6pm

@ Hal & Mal’s Red Room

ZAPP holds monthly meetings the second Tuesday of each month at the Jackson Zoo Education Center at 12:00 noon. Our activities include two major community improvement workdays each year, ZAPP Out Trash in the spring and Make a Difference Day each October. Several smaller events and projects are planed during the year. Ongoing plans include the continuing development of Claiborne Park near Provine High School, a new flower bed and sign for the Zoo at the corner of Capitol Street and Parkside, and being an advocate for development and clean up along the Capitol Street Corridor.

DIFFERENCE? UNITED WAY IS CREATING LASTING CHANGE BY FOCUSING ON

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United Way of the Capital Area

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PROCEEDS HELP FIGHT SEX TRAFFICKING IN MISSISSIPPI

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WANT TO MAKE A

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Shop for our Chick Silent Auction!

GUYS: Dress your best

Join us at our monthly meetings, and follow Zoo Area Progressive Partnership ZAPP on Facebook.

JOIN HANDS.

To donate money or items for the silent auction, or join the committee, call 601.362.6121 ext. 23, or email the chick crew at chickball@jacksonfreepress.com

25


LIFE&STYLE |

Worth a Thousand Words by Kathleen M. Mitchell

tain things, I think about Adam, and I look to see where he’s at.

COURTESY ADAM + ALLI PHOTOGRAPHY

W

hen it comes to wedding photography, Adam and Allison Hudson have a bit of an edge. The couple are partners in life before partners in work, which allows them a distinct approach to working with brides and grooms. When Alli began helping her husband Adam shoot weddings, engagements and the like under the moniker Adam Hudson Photography, she realized she shared his passion. As Allison became more and more vital to the process they developed, the duo changed their studio’s name to Adam + Alli Photography to better reflect the teamwork that their photography style thrives on. Adam and Alli shared what makes them among the most sought-after shutterbugs in town.

Adam: I think all couples fight at some point, and I think for us, the fact that every weekend, even if we were fighting before the wedding or the day before or something like that, you go and you see two people at a point where they are overly exuberant and showing their emotion. It’s reaffirming. What tips do you have for couples when it comes to being photographed on the big day?

Alli: For us, we send out a questionnaire beforehand so we know their likes and dislikes. So we can have things that make them comfortable, a favorite drink or food. It also helps us have things to talk to them about, to calm them down, to take their minds off the actual pictures. Sometimes it helps if we have activities, so they don’t even realize they are in front of the camera taking pictures. They are just spending time together, and we’re there to capture it.

Did you discover photography independently, or did you get into it together?

Adam: Photography had always been a hobby of mine when I was young. I was kind of an introvert as a child and as an adolescent, and I just did still lifes and stuff, and slowly progressed into people liking my work and asking me to take pictures of their family friends, and it snowballed from there. And then I think Allison had an interest in it like a lot of people, (so) right before we got married, we shot two weddings together, and it just kind of picked up from that point. There’s only been one wedding that I’ve shot by myself that Allison wasn’t there. Other than that, for the past seven years, we’ve shot every wedding together. It’s been interesting. For me, I have more of a technical mindset, and Allison has a background in social work. She’s very much a people person, so she approached photography from the people/emotional side of it. We both play off each other’s strengths and it really works. We work well as a team.

Wedding photographers Adam and Alli Hudson (above) need to connect with the couple in order to capture genuine personality.

June 26 - July 2, 2013

How do you approach shooting? What’s the benefit of working together?

26

Adam: I think the duality of personalities is a real benefit. Of course, for things like the ceremony and reception, we’re not going to be right there next to each other (so we can capture two angles), but I think what really works well for us is that when we’re dealing with couples, we’re usually not both shooting. It’s usually one of us shooting and one of us interacting or directing. It can sometimes be an awkward situation because people don’t have their picture taken every day, so (…) with two people there, especially with Allison being so emotion-based, she can really talk to them, coax them, kind of get the emotion we’re looking for out of them. Allison: I think the biggest thing for us, more so than shooting, is to make them feel comfortable and taken care of while they’re there.

Adam: I really tell them not to think about of it as taking pictures, just to think of it as, in the hustle and bustle of planning, a respite, time you can take out and just spend with each other and just be together. Also, we tell people not to try to do anything that’s not your personality. Sometimes we’ll have people that like to do picnics or things like that (during engagement shoots). We might exaggerate an experience, but we don’t want to fake it. Not everybody has picnics every weekend, but maybe it’s something they like to do or did once on a date. It’s something that is them as a couple; that helps put them in the right mindset. Do you have a most memorable wedding?

What’s different about photographing a wedding compared to anything else?

Alli: I think a wedding is real emotion happening right then. You can’t recreate it, and you don’t get a second chance. It’s a one-time thing. You don’t get a chance to redo anything. Adam: It’s definitely a sense of heightened emotion for most people. Ninety-nine percent of the time, people are super happy and energetic, and it’s a great environment for us to work in, to see people happy and in love. And then, as Allison said, it’s a once in a lifetime thing, so there’s a bit of an adrenaline rush to shooting a wedding as opposed to anything else. Alli: It’s kind of been a help for us because its been a refresher when we hear the vows at every wedding. When I hear cer-

Alli: We shot a wedding in the Bahamas. It was a surprise proposal. They went to the Bahamas not even engaged, and he was going to say, “Will you marry me right now?” And if she said yes, have us and the minister pop out. And the coordinator, Shanna Lumpkin, talked him into giving her at least a few moments to change, because she was in a two-piece swimsuit at the beach all day. So he said, “Will you marry me now?” And she said yes, and they rushed her straight away to the salon and did hair and makeup. Shanna brought three dresses, one of them fit her perfectly. She came right back out and was married. So it was very intense and nervous for us, because we didn’t know if she was going to say yes, or if she was going to say, “I wanted to plan my own wedding,” but it went perfectly. She was so excited. She was in love with him and she was OK with the way he did it. To find out more about the Hudsons’ photography, visit adamplusalli.com or call 1-888-519-5025.


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YOUR SPECIAL DAY CAR SERVICE When only the best will do!

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Visit the Urban Home booth at Interiors Market  in Fondren to view

Mississippi inspired original artwork by  local artist

RYAN WAGNER. Make your special day even more special when you use our classic 1954 Rolls-Royce in your wedding photos or to leave your ceremony in style. weddings@flyinglawyer.com | Ph 601.956.8002 | Fax 888.571.4812 W W W. Y O U R S P E C I A L D AY C A R S E R V I C E . C O M Like us on Facebook: Your Special Day Car Service

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jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson’s Premier Provider of Custom Formal Wear since 1990.

27


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DINEJackson

LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

Melon for All Seasons by Dawn Macke

W

ith cantaloupes in season in Mississippi June through September, you will find them a frequent feature as a produce sale item and prime for selection. This recipe for cantaloupe bread is a perfect and unexpected use of everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite melon, but has an understated taste more reminiscent of apple. Much like ripe bananas, cantaloupe adds flavor and moisture while replacing fat in this sweet, spicy, fruity breadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but no one will believe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cantaloupe. Buy your melons while on sale and in season, then puree and freeze in preportioned bags to make cantaloupe bread year-round. Additionally, the bread itself freezes well. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of my 7-year-oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite sweets, so I cut it into thick slices and freeze individually in snack bags. This makes for a quick snack or dessert to

toss into his lunch bag straight from the freezer. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thawed by snack or lunchtime, and helps keep his lunch cool, too!

(EALTHYAND,IGHT

&DQWHORXSHVDUHDJUHDWKHDOWK\VXPPHU VQDFN+HUHDUHDIHZRIWKHYLWDPLQVDQG PLQHUDOV\RXÂśUHJHWWLQJZKHQ\RXDGGWKH VZHHWPHORQWR\RXUSODWH â&#x20AC;˘ &OLATE²DZDWHUVROXDEOH%YLWDPLQPLFUR QXWULHQWWKDWPDLQWDLQ VWKHERG\ VFHOOV â&#x20AC;˘ #AROTENOIDS²D\HOORZRUDQJHRUUHGGLVK SLJPHQWWKDWFDQGHFUHDVHULVNRIFDUGLR YDVFXODUGLVHDVHDQGLPSURYHSURSHUH\H IXQFWLRQ â&#x20AC;˘6ITAMIN#²DYLWDPLQDQGDQWLR[LGHQWWKDW KHOSVWLVVXHVJURZDQGUHSDLUDVZHOODV KHOSVSUHYHQWHDUO\DJLQJ â&#x20AC;˘ 0OTASSIUM²DQHOHFWURO\WHWKDWFRQGXFWV HOHFWULFLW\ZLWKLQWKHERG\DQGLVHVVHQWLDOIRU JDVWURLQWHVWLQDOIXQFWLRQ SOURCE: LIVESTRONG.COM

Cantaloupe Bread Ingredients

3 eggs 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 cups white sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 2 and 3/4 cups cantaloupe, peeled, seeded and pureed* 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 3/4 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger *Extra cantaloupe puree replaces more fattening oil in this recipe, but you can also substitute applesauce for up to 3/4 cup of the cantaloupe puree.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees Farenheit. Lightly grease and flour two 9-inch by 5-inch bread pans. Beat together eggs, oil, sugar, vanilla and cantaloupe in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon and ginger. Gradually stir flour mixture into cantaloupe mixture. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake for one hour, or until toothpick inserted into the center of a loaf comes out clean. Cool on wire racks.

PIZZA 904 Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami. STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (3000 Old Canton Road, Fondren, 601-981-8017) Brunch, lunch and Southern-inspired fine dining from seafood and beef tenderloin to quail, pork belly, lamb and duck. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads. COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Hole in the Wall,â&#x20AC;? has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the fries! Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (862 BlvdDr., @ Flowood County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) (2560Avery Lakeland 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi. VEGETARIAN High Noon CafĂŠ (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own strict vegetarian (and very-veganfriendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

jacksonfreepress.com

FLICKR/RICHARD_NORTH

Try your hand at an unusual canteloupe recipe or two while they are in season.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches. For Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

29


LIFE&STYLE | wellness

Pain in the Brain FLICKR/TEARSXINTHERAIN

by Tam Curley

If you suffer from chronic headaches, something in your diet may be the culprit.

I

n 2005, I began treatment with prescription medication for my headaches. The doctor wasn’t sure whether the headaches were migraine or tension-related, but she decided to initially treat me for tension. She said she would conduct a sleep study sometime in the future if the headaches worsened, or if other signs and symptoms accompanied them. I moved from Texas to California in December 2006, so that sleep study never happened. The pain continued. I participated in a memory study at University of California at Berkeley, which included a MRI, which I as-

sumed would find anything abnormal, if it was there to find. The results showed no red flags to indicate the need for further treatment. Still, the headaches continued. I went to a nurse practitioner who treated me with drugs, but I insisted on alternative treatment, so she referred me to a neurologist who specialized in migraine and tension headaches. The neurologist suggested I keep a journal of my sleep habits—time I got into bed, time I actually fell asleep, time I woke in the middle of the night, time it took to fall back to sleep, and time I woke in the morning—as well as the foods I ate. We wanted to see if the headaches were related to a habit. I kept a journal for a few months, but I went back to the general practitioner who referred me to physical therapy. Physical therapy seemed to be the answer, at least temporarily. Apparently, I had a lot of tension that was turning into migraines, and the muscles in my neck and shoulders were the root cause of my brain pain. I was told that specific exercises and ergonomic improvements would help solve some of my headache issues. I realized the importance of tracking what I ate to determine if my headaches were food-linked, and I recommend you do the same if you have gone through what I have. I don’t get headaches near as often as I used to, and I believe that adding certain foods to my diet has decreased my headache episodes. For example, I haven’t eaten beef or pork for about six years but recently re-in-

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troduced small amounts of red meat into my diet. So, what’s causing your headache? I can’t diagnose you, because I am no medical doctor or nutritionist, but I can tell you to start at home by keeping a food, exercise and headache journal. If you can eliminate headaches by eliminating certain foods, then problem solved.

Headache-Food Connection Different foods can act as triggers for different people, but some foods are more likely culprits than others. Here are some foods to take note of when trying to determine if something in your diet causes your headaches: Aged Cheese including blue cheeses, Brie, English Stilton, feta, Gorgonzola, mozzarella, Muenster, Parmesan and Swiss Alcohol Food preservatives additives such as the nitrates in hot dogs, ham, sausage, bacon, lunch meats and deli-style meats, pepperoni and other cured or processed meats Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Peanuts, peanut butter, other nuts and seeds Pickled foods (pickles, olives, sauerkraut) Caffeine Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners

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8 DAYS p 32 | FILM p 33 | MUSIC p 36 | SPORTS p 39

MELANIE BOYD

Doctor’s Orders

The Apothecary is open Tuesday through Thursday from 5 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., with extended hours to 12:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

by De’Arbreya Lee

G

Leslee Foukal works behind the bar at Jackson’s newest speakeasy.

Wanting to go back to the golden days of cocktail making, The Apothecary has incorporated into its menu many of the same methods and recipes from Thomas’ days. Although time-consuming, The Apothecary choosing to go through the extra labor of hand-squeezing lemons and other fruits for fresh juices, and using draft arms to create their own soda water. “It may take a little more time, and it may cost a little more, to be honest, but in the end, you come out with a better product,” Reeves says. “It’s worth it to us, and we think that there are enough people out there that will appreciate that.” The lounge offers a variety of drink selections, ranging from strong and light alcoholic beverages to nonalcoholic beverages. On the “prescription cocktails” menu lies The Doc Noble, a drink named after Brent’s very own pharmacists, Shermon “Doc” Noble, known for his enjoyment of whiskey. The Apothecary’s Doc Noble combines cayenne and pecan infused rye whiskey, demerara sugar, and lemon. With creative mixologists pushing flavor profiles and creating new combinations, the menu changes nearly nightly. Like the dedication to keeping the menu era-appropriate, almost every detail of the lounge points to a specific time in history. The wood covering the walls of The Apothecary’s entrance is the original wood of the pharmacy, with a pharmacy cabinet from Massachusetts framing the bar and antique pharmacy lamps lighting the tables. “We wanted to leave it raw,” Reeves says. Any inquiring minds who would like to catch a tasteful history lesson, just ask Reeves. His enthusiasm for the topic is contagious. “A lot of people want something old and authentic. Brent’s still maintains its character as Brent’s, (but by) using the space in the back, we can add more to Brent’s,” 31 Reeves says.

jacksonfreepress.com

MELANIE BOYD

uests enter through the front door into the darkened atmosphere of an after-hours Brent’s Drugs. No one is there to greet them. But those in the know don’t hesitate. They head for a narrow hallway off the back of the soda fountain, through a curtain and into one of Jackson’s newest—and most innovative—bars. The Apothecary at Brent’s Drugs, brainchild of attorney Brad Reeves and designer Jonathan Shull, delivers on its promise of speakeasy ambiance and Prohibition flair. The Apothecary didn’t open with a grand opening ceremony or red-ribbon cutting, playing on the speakeasy theme. It seemed to just show up one day. Reeves had no set deadline for the arrival of The Apothecary at all. Avoiding the added pressures of due dates, Reeves had one goal in mind: to do the right thing. “We said that if we’re going to do this, we’re going to The decision making called for discussions between do it right,” Reeves says. After two years of planning and Reeves met with longtime friend Shull, which later led to thorough thinking and a quiet arrival, Brent’s Drugs’ new business consultations with industry leaders of the cocktail addition is gaining popularity—the bar had a line out the scene, Neal Bodenheimer and Kirk Estopinal of Cure, a door most nights in its first week. highly acclaimed bar on Freret Street in New Orleans, La. Owner Reeves, who bought Brent’s Drugs four years Bodenheimer and Estopinal, recognized for their work ago, wanted to find a balance between the family-oriented with a 2013 James Beard Foundation’s Outstanding Bar vibe of the diner while adding something new. “It’s an old program award, took a trip to Jackson and, while exploring building that has some character, and we wanted to embrace the Fondren area, were impressed with what the area had to that,” Reeves says. In all of this, one question was in his mind: offer. The two expressed to Reeves that his space and timing How do you balance the fact that this was once a drugstore? was perfect for creating an establishment like The ApothThe ingredients used to ecary. With the visit to Cure create such a concoction like and the advice of Bodenheimer The Apothecary included a and Estopinal, Reeves and Shull large amount of research—digwent to the drawing board. ging into the pre-Prohibition Striving to be a purist by period, the early beginnings of remaining true to the original the pharmaceutical industry essence of a pharmacy and and understanding the cocktailsoda-fountain scene, Reeves making business. looked to several books and Reeves’ research led him documents, such as Daniel to some interesting findings. Okrent’s “The Last Call: The “Mississippi was the first state to Rise and Fall of Prohibition” voluntarily go into Prohibition and “Jerry Thomas’ Bartendand the last to come out of Proer’s Guide.” hibition,” Reeves says. He also “He (Thomas) was the learned that soda foundations first person to actually write The Pink Phosphorescent were introduced by way of pharand publish (a book about is one popular drink macies, when pharmacists would cocktail mixing). Now, everyon the “prescription mix drinks for patients to help downplay the body’s going back to his book,” Reeves says. cocktails” bitter taste of the medications. From his research, Reeves found that early menu. “There were certain syrups that they knew a bartenders created codes to maintain secrecy of child couldn’t take so they would make it up into a the ingredients of their sought-after drinks. “Bardrink,” Reeves says. Out of this came phosphate drinks. tenders were only as good as their drinks,” Reeves says.


THURSDAY 6/27

SATURDAY 6/29

WEDNESDAY 7/3

The Cereus Readers Book Club listens to recordings of Eudora Welty’s short stories.

The Magnolia Roller Vixens compete at the Jackson Convention Complex.

B.B. King performs at the B.B. King Homecoming Festival in Indianola.

BEST BETS JUNE 26JULY 3, 2013

COURTESY JACKSON BIKE ADVOCATES

WEDNESDAY 6/26

Lunch and Learn Series is at noon-1 p.m. at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The topic is “Advancing Your Cause Through Lobbying.” Lunch included; registration required. $15, members free; call 601-9680061; msnonprofits.org.

THURSDAY 6/27

Cereus Readers Book Club Listening Session is at noon1 p.m. at LemuriaBooks.com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). Enjoy listening to audio recordings of author Eudora Welty reading some of her short stories. Bring lunch. Free; email lisa@lemuriabooks.com. ... Dialogue performs songs from the group Chicago at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Cocktails at 6 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

FRIDAY 6/28

June 26 - July 2, 2013

COURTESY JASON TURNER / R. RAULSTON PHOTOGRAPHY

John Maxwell’s Fish Tale Group Theatre presents “The Prodigal” at 9 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Free; find “The Prodigal” at Koinonia on Facebook. … The Inaugural Kickoff Block Party for

The Jackson Bike Advocates’ monthly Community Bike Ride starts at Rainbow at 6 p.m. on June 28.

SATURDAY 6/29

We Are the Cure Conference: Preventing and Reversing Diabetes is at 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Scholar and clinical researcher Dr. Neal Barnard speaks. The reception with vendor booths is from 10-11 a.m., and the lecture and book signing is from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $25 in advance, $30 at the door (cash only); call 601-487-6894; pathway2wellness.org. … Magnolia Roller Vixens Roller Derby: BY BRIANA ROBINSON “Independence Slay” against the Hub City Derby Dames of Hattiesburg is at 7 p.m., at JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Jackson Convention ComFAX: 601-510-9019 plex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Doors open at 6 p.m. $12 in DAILY UPDATES AT advance, $15 at the door, $5 JFPEVENTS.COM children; call 601-960-2321; email info@magnoliarollervixens.com; magnoliarollervixens.com. … Jason Turner’s CD Release Party is from 6-10 p.m. at Pelican Cove Grill (3999A Harborwalk Drive, Ridgeland). Free; $10 CDs; call 601-605-1865; jasonturnerband.com.

EVENTS@

Jason Turner’s CD release party for “Apology on Repeat” at Pelican Cove Grill is June 29 at 6 p.m.

Jackson Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba is from 3-7 p.m. at Smith Park (Yazoo St.). Open to the public. Free; call 877-799-2773; email cojinauguration2013@gmail.com. … The Jackson Bike Advocates sponsor the Community Bike Ride at 6 p.m., at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative 32 (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; find on Facebook.

SUNDAY 6/30

Jerrod Partridge instructs the portrait drawing workshop from 1 p.m.-4 p.m. at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (107 N. Union St., Canton). Call 601-668-5408; email painterjerrod@gmail.com.

MONDAY 7/1

The People’s Inaugural Ceremony is at noon at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.) with U.S. Congressman Bennie Thompson and Myrlie Evers-Williams, and the People’s Inaugural Celebration is at 7 p.m. Open to the public. Free; call 877-799-2773; email cojinauguration2013@gmail.com. … The Jackson Insight Meditation Group Meeting is from 6-7 p.m. at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road) at the Dojo for metta (lovingkindness) meditation practice. Free, donations welcome; call 601-201-4228; email bebewolfe@juno.com.

TUESDAY 7/2

‘Grounds’ Coffeehouse/Teen Time Topic is at 3:30 p.m. at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). The topic is “Using Social Media to Connect with Readers.” Free; call 601-856-4536.

WEDNESDAY 7/3

Blue Wednesday Happy Hour featuring Scott Albert Johnson is at 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Library Lounge (Fairview Inn, 734 Fairview St.). Free; call 601-960-1891. … B.B. King Homecoming Festival is from 1-9 p.m. at B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center (400 Second St., Indianola). Blues Legend B.B. King headlines the music festival which includes Bobby Rush, Grady Champion and Jimmy “Duck” Holmes. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; call 662-887-9539; bbkingmuseum.org.


DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Grunt, Grunt, Shuffle, Grunt

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

COURTESY SYNCOPY

Listings for Fri. 6/28 – Thur. 7/4

White House Down PG13

The Internship PG13

The Heat

The Purge

I

n “World War Z,” a virus of unknown origin infects the world’s population and creates a zombie pandemic. The zombie virus acts fast. Within minutes of being chomped by a zombie, the unfortunate victim gruesomely transforms from human to living undead. The process is complete when the eyes roll back and forth, snap shut and then open with a dull gleam. The new zombie immediately joins the shambling herd and thuds senselessly into glass windows, searching for living flesh to feed on. You might be thinking what I did: Zombies? Again? Since 1910, filmmakers have released 492 zombie movies, writes Cecil Adams on his blog “The Straight Dope.” The largest spikes in zombie pictures occurred in 1973 and 2003. After that, zombies took a back seat to vampires until this year when “Warm Bodies” took a romantic take on the brain-suckers. I suspect that there was a memo sent from the accounting department to studio bosses advising them that vampires were out and zombies were in. And it probably has to a lot to do with cost-effectiveness. To wit: • No wardrobe changes. A born-again zombie wears the same clothes forever. Think of the savings in costumes. • Zombies don’t speak. They grunt. This opens up casting opportunities for non-actors and it makes the writer’s job easier. Grunt, grunt, shuffle, grunt. • Zombies don’t think. They amble along like killer sheep and take direction without questioning why. Zombies are a director’s dream. • Also, vampires have been done until death do us part. After the “Twilight” franchise and “Dark Shadows,” what’s left for our blood-sucking friends? Zombies are the freshest produce in the monster bin, and they are not really all that fresh. Marc Forster (“Quantum of Solace,” “Finding Neverland,” “Monster’s Ball”) directs this zombie apocalypse—which is based on Max Brooks’ novel “World War

Z”—as if it’s a globetrotting, James Bond spy thriller. The James Bond figure in this film is a grunge-grunge version (as in the 1990s movement) of Brad Pitt. Here, Pitt plays Gerry Lane, a former United Nations employee who gave up the tough missions in third-world countries to be a house dad taking care of his wife (Mireilles Enos) and two daughters (Abigail Hargrove, Sterling Jerins). Before he’s sucked into the zombie nightmare, Gerry’s a scraggly daddy dude, with long hair and scruffy whiskers on his cheeks (better to tickle the girls). Once he’s been called into action, though, Gerry wears that slept-in, pickedup-off-the-floor, swapped, scrounged and ragbag look like he’s … well, like he’s Brad Pitt from the inscrutable Chanel No. 5 commercial. Pitt, a fine actor whose good looks have overshadowed his acting talent, gives an enigmatic and engaging performance. One of the best scenes is the opener. A montage of news footage tells the story: pastoral images cycle to insects and hyenas gorging themselves. Later, we learn from the sole scientist trying to work through the virus issue that “Mother Nature is a serial killer. She wants to get caught, she leaves breadcrumbs, she leaves clues. ... Mother nature knows how to disguise her weakness as strength.” When discussing a zombie film, even Forster’s version filled with special effects, one cannot really pretend that it is anything more than summer popcorn entertainment. It’s not really a discourse on Darwin or survival of the fittest dead. What you see in this film is what you get. And what you get is grunge-grunge Pitt trying to save the world from zombies. And for what it is, this is a taut film with rollercoaster thrills. It’s the perfect picture for the movie drive-in, but sadly, those are things of a nostalgic past. But, unlike drive-ins, zombies are not a thing of the past. Don’t be surprised if next summer we get a return of the shuffling dimwits. But then, Brad Pitt will be back, and all will be right with the world.

R

3-D World War Z PG13

Now You See Me PG13

World War Z (non 3-D) PG13

Fast & Furious 6 PG13

3-D Monsters University G

Star Trek: Into Darkness (non 3-D) PG13

Monsters University (non 3-D) Brad Pitt fights to save his family from the zombie apocalypse in “World War Z.”

R

G

Opens Wednesday, 7/3

3-D Man Of Steel PG13

Despicable Me 2 PG

Man Of Steel (non 3-D) PG13

The Lone Ranger PG13

This Is The End

Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain R

R

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

by Anita Modak-Truran

33


9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2& bottled for 1domestic house wine beer

starting at •

pm

Thursday

June 27

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday

June 28

*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 “Thursday Morning Breakfast (and Murder Club)” July 20, 1-3 p.m., at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Liz Stauffer signs books. Book price TBA; call 601-366-7619. Ninth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 20, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this year’s goal is to fight sex trafficking. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 23; chickball@jacksonfreepress.com. Also see jfpchickball.com.

(/,)$!9 Red, White and Jackson June 27, at Smith Park (Yazoo Street) and Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Enjoy free hot dog lunch and music from Dexter Allen at Smith Park from 11 a.m.-1 p.m., and kids’ activities, food vendors, live music and fireworks on grounds of the Old Capitol Museum and War Memorial from 7-9 p.m. Free; call 601948-7575. Independence Day Celebration June 29, 2-10 p.m., at Old Trace Park (Post Road, Ridgeland) and Lakeshore Park (Lakeshore Drive, Brandon). Includes food vendors, music from Steze Azar and the Chill, children’s activities, a classic car show, an air show, a boat parade and fireworks. Free admission; call 601605-6880 or 601-605-6898; email smcmullan@therez.ms or cford@therez.ms; barnettreservoirfoundation.org.

Maggie

Koerner Saturday June 29

Deltamatics Tuesday

July 2

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner

Wednesday

July 3

June 26 - July 2, 2013

KARAOKE

34

with DJ STACHE 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

#/--5.)49 Events at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). • Mississippi Law Enforcement Employment Expo June 29, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Governor’s Job Fair Network is the host. Several agencies seek applicants for available positions such as police departments, the Mississippi Department of Corrections and the FBI. Free; call 601-321-6122; jobfairs.ms.gov. • Capital City Roller Girls Roller Derby June 29, 6:30 p.m. The team takes on the NSRD Lethal Ladies. $12, children under 12 free, $50 vendors; call 601-383-4885; email capitalcityrollergirlsms@gmail.com or info@ capitalcityrollergirlsms.com; find Capital City Roller Girls on Facebook. Sam E. Soil June 26, 10:30-11:30 a.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). Sam E. Soil from the Natural Resources Conservation Service teaches children about how plants grow. Free; call 601856-4536. Ballroom Latin Swing Dance Party Fridays, 8-10 p.m., at Applause Dance Factory (242 Stephens St., Ridgeland). Enjoy dancing, soft drinks and snacks on the padded dance floor. $10, $5 students with ID; call 601-8566168. Homebuyer Education Class June 29, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., at Jackson Housing Authority Homeownership Center (256 E. Fortification St.). Registration required. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Free; call 601-398-0446.

Mbongi: Seeking SOULutions and Community-level Healing June 29, 5:30-8 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). In the Community Meeting Room. Attendees meet to discuss ways to resolve community problems in Jackson. RSVP. Free admission, $2 donation for food; call 601918-5075 or 601-608-8327. Camp Stars Theater Summer Camp July 1-28, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in McCoy Auditorium. Classes include creative writing, acting, dance, stage makeup and set design. Meets weekdays excluding July 4. Registration required. $400 plus $5.70 insurance; call 601979-4309, 601-979-2872 or 601-979-9072; jsums.edu/speechandtheatre. Burn the Dance Floor Saturdays, 9 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Saturdays, enjoy a free salsa class at 9 p.m. and a salsa party from 10-2 a.m. $10, $5 with college ID; call 601-213-6355. Mississippi 4-H Horse Championship June 26-29, at Kirk Fordice Equine Center (1207 Mississippi St.). Youth compete for a chance to go on to the Southern Regional 4-H Horse Championship held in July in West Monroe, La. Free; call 662-325-3515; msucares.com/4h_youth. Mississippi Central State Troopers Coalition 40th Anniversary Celebration June 29, 6 p.m., at M.W. Stringer Grand Lodge (1072 John R. Lynch St.). Social hour is at 6 p.m., and the banquet is at 7 p.m. Honorees include Walter Crosby, Lewis Younger, Richard Williams, Shirlene Anderson and Doris Holt. $40, $400 table of 10; call 601-353-8452; email zsummers@uniteonevoice.org. Pre-Ramadan Celebration June 28, 8 a.m.9 p.m., and June 29, 8 a.m.-11 p.m., at Masjid Muhammad (6100 Floral Drive). The event includes games, workshops and conferences. The banquet is June 29 at the Clarion Hotel (5075 Interstate 55 N.) and includes live jazz music. Free admission, $40 banquet, call 601397-1671. Fatherhood Awareness Conference June 28, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). The fathers-only session is from 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., and the session for fathers and mothers is from 1-3 p.m. Special guests include Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant and actor Tommy Ford (“Martin”). Lunch included. RSVP. Free; call 601-359-4861; email mdhs. fatherhood@mdhs.ms.gov. Fun Fridays Fridays, 10 a.m.-noon through July 26, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Learn more about reptiles through interactive, hands-on programs. Adults must accompany children. $4-$6; call 601-576-6000; msnaturalscience.org. Brown Bag Luncheon Series June 28, noon, at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). An archaeologist from the Mississippi Department of Archives and History talks about archaeology in Mississippi. Light desserts and refreshments provided. Free; call 601-932-2562. History Is Lunch July 3, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Terrence Winschel of the Vicksburg National Military Park talks about the 150th anniversary of the Surrender of Vicksburg. Free; call 601-576-6998; oldcapitolmuseum.com. Gridiron Gals Ladies Football Clinic June 29, 8 a.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Sta-

dium (2531 N. State St.). Women learn football basics such as lingo, player positions and safety information. Lunch included. Registration required. $25; call 601-979-2295; jsutigers.com. Arabian Dance Party Fridays, 7:30 p.m., at Petra Cafe (2741 Old Canton Road). Fridays at 7:30 p.m., watch a belly dancer perform, and enjoy Arabian dancing and Greek dancing with plate breaking. No cover, food prices vary; call 601-366-0161. Caregiver Educational Series July 2, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at St. Matthew’s United Methodist Church (7427 Old Canton Road, Madison). The Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi is the host. Topics include community resources, family dynamics and end-of-life issues. Free; call 601-987-0020. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). • History Is Lunch June 26, noon. Filmmaker Wilma Mosley-Clopton presents her film “In Spite of it All: The Ollye Brown Shirley Story.” Free; call 601-576-6998. • Artifact and Collectible Identification Program June 26, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The MDAH staff is on hand to review and assist in identifying documents and objects of historical value. Free; call 601-576-6850.

7%,,.%33 Bokwa Fitness Classes June 26, 7-8 p.m., at Dance Unlimited Studio (6787 S. Siwell Road, Suite A, Byram). Join Certified Bokwa Instructor, Paula Eure. $5 per class; call 601209-7566; bokwafitness.com. Free Adult Counseling Consultation Mondays-Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m., at Middleway Counseling Practice (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 221, Ridgeland). Schedule free 20minute counseling consultation with professional counselor Angela Essary. For ages 18 and up. Free; call 601-421-9566; schedulicity.com. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings Fridays, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children every first Friday of the month. Appointment required. Free; call 601-707-7355.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Steel Magnolias” June 28-29, 7:30 p.m., and June 30, 2 p.m., at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl) The Robert Harling play is about the trials and triumphs of six Louisiana women. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-664-0930; actorsplayhouse.net. “Munch: Munch 150” June 27, 7:30 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The film highlights artist Edvard Munch’s works at the National Museum and the Munch Museum in Oslo, Norway. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601936-5856; cinemark.com.

-53)# Gospel Artist Showcase June 29, 9 a.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). Local artists compete for a chance to perform at the Jackson Music Awards July 28. Registration required for performers. Free; call 601927-7625; email pcjdavis@att.net; woad.com.


Town of Livingston Concert Series June 30, 5:30 p.m., at Town of Livingston (129 Mannsdale Road, Madison). Performers include Kellie Pickler, Samantha Landrum and Highroad III. $35; call 601-898-0212; revivermusic.com. Mississippi Gospel Choir Invitational Showcase June 30, 6 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at McCoy Auditorium. Enjoy music from several choirs and “Sunday Best” contestant Alexis Speight. $20; call 800-745-3000.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. • “The Son” June 26, 5 p.m. Philipp Meyer signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $27.99 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. Children’s Book Signing and Reading June 30, 1-3 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Author Ricci Casserly signs “Kathy’s Adventures” in the upper atrium. $8.99 paperback, $15 hardcover; call 601-960-1557. Summer Storytime June 27, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at Eudora Welty House and Museum (1119 Pinehurst Place). At the Education and Visitor Center. Children in grades K-3 listen to a story and make a related craft. Free; call 601353-7762; email info@eudoraweltyhouse.com. United Way Summer Reading Middle School Book Clubs July 3, 6 p.m., at Richard Wright Library (515 W. McDowell Road). The sessions are part of the JPS Summer Reading Program. Free; call 601-948-4725.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Applause Dance Factory (242 Stephens St., Ridgeland). $10, $5 students with ID; call 601-856-6168. • Latin Dance Class: Rumba June 28, 6-7 p.m. Learn the general characteristics and style of the slow-rhythm dance. • Latin Dance Class: Cha Cha Thursdays, 7-8 p.m. through June 27. Learn the basic foot patterns, timing and more.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515. • “Blue White Red, Red White Blue: French and American Art from the Permanent Collection.” through Aug. 18, in the McCarty Foundation Gallery. See artwork from French artists who lived during the Baroque period, and works from American artists from the 19th century to today. Free. • “Mississippi Hill Country Blues: Photographs by George Mitchell,” through Sept. 8, in the Barksdale Galleries. See 75 of Mitchell’s photographs that includes portraits of Mississippi blues artists. Includes admission to the Old Masters to Monet exhibit. $12, $10 seniors, $6 students, free for members and children ages 5 and under.

Events at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Call 601576-6000. • Back to Nature Photography Contest. Submit wildlife or nature images through Dec. 31. Images including people must include a signed release. Winners announced at the 2014 NatureFest. Registration form available online. Adults: $5 for every two photos, youth: $2 per photo. • “Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly” through Jan. 12. The traveling exhibition features snakes, turtles, lizards and other reptiles. $4-$6. Cedars Juried Art Exhibition Call for Artists through July 31, at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). The Fondren Renaissance Foundation seeks artwork to feature in their annual exhibit Sept. 5-30. Artist Alan Flattman is the juror; awards given. Artists may submit up to three pieces, and all work must be for sale. The deadline is July 31. $25 entry fee; call 601-981-9606; fondren.org.

"%4(%#(!.'% “Putt It Forward” Golf Tournament June 28, noon, at Bay Pointe Country Club (800 Bay Pointe Drive, Brandon). Lunch is at noon, and the shotgun start is at 1 p.m. Proceeds benefit ARF of Mississippi. Registration required. $125 per player; call 601-951-0929; find “Putt It Forward” on Facebook. Outward Bound Auction Fundraiser June 29, 2-4 p.m., at Chateau Ridgeland (745 S. Pear Orchard Road, Ridgeland). Includes a summer market, auction, refreshments and entertainment. Proceeds benefit Outward Bound for Veterans. Free admission, donations welcome; call 601-956-1331. “Quarter Moon in June” Progressive and Jam Band Rock Benefit June 29, 4-9 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.), in the Red Room and the Big Room. Performers include M.O.S.S., Slychosis, Ceci Whitehurst, Filter the Noise and Memphis band Mind. Proceeds benefit Prevent Child Abuse Mississippi and Gulf Restoration Network. For ages 18 and up. $7; call 601-310-7067; email ceciwhitehurst@ gmail.com. Clothing Giveaway June 29, 9-11 a.m., at Sheppard Brothers Park (1355 Hattiesburg St.). The Greater Is He Outreach Ministry is the host. Gently-used clothing and shoes for adults and children available. Donations welcome. Free; call 769-257-8494. 9 Lives for $9 Cat Adoption Event through June 30, at Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA) (960 N. Flag Chapel Road). Cats ages 9 months and older are available for adoption at a discounted price. $9 per cat; call 601-842-4404; email denise.cantrell@ thinkvss.com. Mississippi Youth Hip Hop Summit and Parent/Advocate Conference Call for Volunteers through July 20. Volunteers ages 19 and up with youth not participating in the summit are welcome. The conferences are July 20-21 at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Free; call 601-3543408 ext. 104; email ddenney@aclu-ms.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 6/26:

New Bourbon St. Jazz (Restaurant) THURSDAY 6/27:

Ryan Dishen (Restaurant) Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show (Red Room) FRIDAY 6/28:

Deeb’s Blues (Restaurant) The Avon Suspects (Red Room) SATURDAY 6/29:

New Happy Hour! 2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00

Plus free snacks at the bar!

(*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, June 26th

RAPHAEL SEMMES TRIO (Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

Jacquelynn Pilcher (Restaurant) Slychosis, Mind & MOSS Benefit (Red Room)

(Genre) 8-11, No Cover

MONDAY 7/1:

Friday, June 28th

(Restaurant)

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday TUESDAY 7/2:

Thursday, June 27th

BARRY LEACH

(Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

Saturday, June 29th

NOW AT HAL & MAL’S

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

MONDAY - FRIDAY Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$825

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. *Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

KING EDWARD

Tuesday, July 2nd

SPEAKEASY NIGHT WITH ARTHUR JONES

(Jazz) 6:30 -9:30, No Cover

COMING SOON July 6

Vasti Jackson

Now On Weekends

Outside

Bar & Tables 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Wink and the Signal June 29, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., at Time Out Sports Cafe (6720 Old Canton Road). The Afro-country band from Pittsburgh performs. Free; call 601-978-1839; soundcloud.com/wink-7.

35


DIVERSIONS | music

Blues That Never Left Home by Greg Pigott

a similar style to other Mississippi blues artists, but the harmonica is replaced by a heavy African-influenced drum and fife melodies that include slide guitar riffs and fewer chord changes than the Delta Blues that gained more national exposure. Today, the Holly Springs area is still considered the unofficial home of Hill Country Blues, and the nearby community of Waterford will once again host this year’s Hill Country Picnic. The rural farming community represents the inspiration and background of the Hill Country Blues sound that still lives on today. Besides live music, the festival will feature local food and art vendors as well as guitar lessons from the artists themselves. The picnic celebrates and passes on to new generations something truly exclusive to our state. For ticket prices and more information on the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic, visit nmshillcountrypicnic.com.

FLICKR/GRAFFITI PHOTOGRAPHIC

M

ississippi is often called the “Birthplace of America’s Music,” but one genre in particular never left the state—Mississippi Hill Country Blues. This summer, the genre returns to its roots with the North Mississippi Hill Country picnic in Marshall County June 28-29. The picnic features famed Mississippi blues artists Kenny Brown, North Mississippi All Stars, Robert Belfour and Bobby Rush, just to name a few. This festival is significant as it celebrates a genre of music that has stayed true to its roots in the Mississippi Hill Country, the northern part of the state just south of the border to Tennessee. Unlike the Delta Blues made famous by Robert Johnson, Muddy Watters and B.B. King, the Hill Country Blues stayed in Mississippi while the Delta Blues traveled to Chicago and other American cities. Hill Country Blues pioneer artists such as R.L. Burnside and Fred McDowell have

Bobby Rush performs at this year’s North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic.

DIVERSIONS | music in theory

by Micah Smith

Internet Killed the Video Star

36

TRIP BURNS

June 26 - July 2, 2013

I

f you’re a certain age, I expect that music we find one, the attached song automatically videos played an important role in your gains tremendous amounts of attention. development, whether defining romance Take, for example, Israeli singer-songwriter by how many candles are lit in the back- Oren Lavie’s hit single “Her Morning Elground or by constructing your ideals of egance.” Now, you may not recognize the female perfection based on the model sliding hither and thither on a car hood in Whitesnake’s “Here I Go Again.” But regardless of the impact, at least an impact existed. After the ’80s, it seems like music videos went flatter than a wet perm, though the ’90s offered a handful of memorable visualizations of popular songs and singlehandedly ushered in Michael Bay’s directing career, including Lionel Richie’s flow- YouTube has made it all too easy to see any music video, any time, changing the way we see the art form. ing-curtain-filled video for “Do It To Me.” Occasional success (and hilarious failure) aside, the current music market all but disregards the artist or song title, but I’d be surprised if a formerly popular format. While it’s fun to friend or co-worker hasn’t played the “Have look back at the triumphantly cheesy tropes You Seen This on YouTube?” game with that of the genre, we’re still left to wonder exactly music video at some point. In the video, Lawhy that formerly popular form of music vie and a woman occupy opposite ends of a consumption has dwindled down into boil- bed, which, through stop motion, shifts to ing oblivion. allow some sleep-frolicking. Pillows become OK, that was probably a bit dramatic, clouds, socks become fish, shirts become but the point still stands. It’s become so rare birds, and viewers say, “That looks cool.” In to see an entertaining music video that, when 2009, though, “cool” managed to win the

relatively unknown Lavie a Grammy nomination for “Best Short-Form Music Video.” I didn’t mention that video so that you would sprint to the computer (or smart phone) and search for it, although you are certainly welcome to do so, but to present yet another point about modern-day music videos: The Internet made it too easy. Think back, if you can, to the golden age of MTV, before there was an “MTV 2,” before 16-year-olds got paid for being pregnant and reality shows were more common than Jheri curls. If you really loved the video for one song, you would sit through countless ads and music videos from bands you weren’t familiar with just for a chance to see it one more time. In this way, music videos were absolutely essential for the music economy. They introduced new artists, brought commercial endorsements and generally greased the bearings that kept the cogs of music consumerism in motion. That wouldn’t do the trick anymore, of course. We have services like Facebook keeping us up-to-date with notifications and YouTube letting us hear the newest song long before a TV channel could buy their way through the legal barricades, let alone the fact that you can cut through the commercials and unknown artists to get to that one song you wanted. Also, as far as YouTube is concerned, you have the opportunity to

watch innumerable live videos of your favorite musicians. So, why would you choose to watch a music video instead? If you don’t have an answer to that question, you and the record labels of today would get along great at a pool party, which is nothing against you, or them, for that matter. They’ve simply streamlined the process. Most record labels won’t drop enough cash to have a quality music video filmed unless they are certain that investment will pay off. One way they do this is by producing a video after a song has already proven its popularity. It’s not uncommon for a video to be released after a hit single has backslid a ways, potentially rejuvenating the song with a star cameo appearance and eking even more money. And while it’s not a charitable practice, it is good business. Luckily, music videos have survived in a corner where they couldn’t exist in the early days of costly and cliquish production: the alternative music genre. Though cable music channels won’t flaunt this fact, a majority of the videos today are created for alternative musicians like Sigur Rós, Passion Pit and The National. As smaller or independent labels try to capitalize on their acts, these are the sources that place tremendous effort into making their music videos engaging and fun, which makes for some of the most inventive audio-visual mash-ups to date.


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New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

HAPPY HOUR! Mon-Fri •1 - 3:30pm $2 Domestics • $3 Wells

WEDNESDAYS

6/26

live music

LADIES NIGHT

wed | june 26 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30 - 9:30

2-for-1 Wells & Domestic

june 26 - july 2

thur | june 27 Mike and Skip 5:30 - 9:30 fri | june 28 Jesse “Guitar” Smith Band 6:00 - 10:00 sat | june 29 Evans Geno 6:00 - 10:00 mon | july 1 Karaoke 6:00 - 9:00 tue | july 2 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30 - 9:30

1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

5pm - close

THURSDAYS

6/27

$4 APPETIZERS • 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

6/28

DJ WITNESSE OF LORD T & ELOISE

with CREW )

SATURDAY

6/29

STATIC ENSEMBLE (members of furrows & iron feathers)

MONDAY

7/1

2 FOR 1 DRAFT ALL DAY

LAZY MAGNOLIA, MAGIC HAT, LUCKY TOWN, LAUGHING SKULL, BLUE MOON, ANDY GATOR, AND ALL OF YOUR FAVORITES.

OPEN MIC 10PM TUESDAY

7/2

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

MATT’S KARAOKE

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat)

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE

Spank the Monkey

UPCOMING SHOWS

Friday June 28 & Saturday June 29

5 - 9 & 10 - close

$2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

7.5: Southern Komfort Brass Band 7.6: Sipsy Fires 7.12: Otis Lotus 7.13:Caroline Rose 7.18: Gypsy Camp Tour 7.26:Archnemesis 8.9: Nappy Roots

SCAN

ME! 214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

jacksonfreepress.com

MUSIC | live

37


Cftu!pg!Kbdltpo!Xjoofs!3123.3124!

Mjwf!Nvtjd

Happy Hour

Mon:Closed

Every Day

Tues: Karaoke at 7 pm Wed: Open Mic at 8 pm

Thur: Ralph Miller 5 - 7 pm

Fri: Triple Threat

5-7pm

9 pm - Until

Stimulation 9 pm - Until

Five DJs!

One Amazing Show! DJ Adam e c n a h DJ C 2 Mangum R DJ Libra DJ Tony C

Every Night This Week is Steak Night!

June 26 - July 2, 2013

Offer Valid June 26th thru July 2nd

38

A 12 oz. one-inch thick Angus beef steak marinated and seared. Served with hand-mashed buttered potatoes, steamed asparagus in butter, lemon, and garlic; red and green bell peppers with onion and caramelized in Worcestershire, and a dinner roll for $19.99.

Weekend Cover: Free til 8:30 After 8:30 $5 Cover 642 Tombigbee St. • 601.973.3400 Tues - Sat • 3pm - close Sun • 2 pm - close

W /

Pub Quiz with Andrew

T /

Jil Chambless F /

Blind Dog Otis S /

Brian Jones M /

Karaoke w/ Matt T /

Open Mic

with A Guy Named George

!"# Try our

BLACK BOARD

SPECIALS

Monday throug h

Friday. !"#

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Uivstebz-!Kvof!38 KK!Uibnft!'!Uif!Wpmu )Sizuin!'!Cmvft0Ofp.Tpvm*

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Butler’s

SOUTHLAND

AUTO SERVICE In Business since 1971

5448 North State Street Jackson, MS 39206

601-362-2253 Monday-Friday 7:30 - 5:30

SERVICES • A/C & Heating • Starting & Charging • Electrical Problems • Brakes & Clutches • General Maintenance • Tune-Ups & Oil Changes • Transmission Service and much more!


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

by Bryan Flynn

Gridiron Ladies

,

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THURSDAY, JUNE 27 Soccer (1:30-4 p.m., ESPN): Confederations Cup action continues with two soccer powers meeting on the pitch as Italy and Spain collide. FRIDAY, JUNE 28 Tennis (6 a.m.-4 p.m., ESPN): Rafael Nadal is out in a stunning upset, so the question of who will make it into the second week of Wimbledon at the All-England Club is wide open. SATURDAY, JUNE 29 NASCAR (6:30-11 p.m., TNT): The stars of NASCAR go racing under the lights in the Quaker State 400 from Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky. SUNDAY, JUNE 30 Soccer (1-3 p.m., ESPN 2): Relax on Sunday afternoon with some Major League Soccer as the Houston Dynamo host the New York Red Bulls. MONDAY, JULY 1 MLB (6-9 p.m., ESPN): The Cincinnati Reds look to climb in the

The dog days of summer are here. The NBA and NHL are done. Now the long wait for football to return begins. NL Central standings while hosting the San Francisco Giants, who are hoping to catch the Arizona Diamondbacks in the NL West. TUESDAY, JULY 2 WNBA (7-9 p.m., ESPN 2): The Seattle Storm, currently struggling in the Western Conference, hopes to get on track against the Chicago Sky, second in the Eastern Conference. WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Documentary (8-9 p.m., ESPN 2): Catch a replay of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;30 for 30â&#x20AC;? film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unmatched,â&#x20AC;? about the oncourt rivalry and later friendship between two tennis legends, Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova. Football season is still more than two months away. Hopefully, we will be celebrating Mississippi Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national championship win at the College World Series to occupy our minds during these long months. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports. ,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

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39


All-American Summer Sip In Style!



  

 

 

  â&#x20AC;¢5Kâ&#x20AC;©run/walkâ&#x20AC;©beginsâ&#x20AC;©atâ&#x20AC;©7:30â&#x20AC;©a.m.â&#x20AC;©â&#x20AC;© â&#x20AC;¢Oneâ&#x20AC;©Mileâ&#x20AC;©Fun/Wellnessâ&#x20AC;©Run,â&#x20AC;©allâ&#x20AC;© agesâ&#x20AC;©immediatelyâ&#x20AC;©followingâ&#x20AC;©theâ&#x20AC;©5Kâ&#x20AC;© â&#x20AC;¢Totâ&#x20AC;©Trotâ&#x20AC;©agesâ&#x20AC;©3â&#x20AC;©&â&#x20AC;©underâ&#x20AC;©-â&#x20AC;©freeâ&#x20AC;© â&#x20AC;¢Overâ&#x20AC;©166â&#x20AC;©awardsâ&#x20AC;©willâ&#x20AC;©beâ&#x20AC;©awarded REGISTERâ&#x20AC;©ATâ&#x20AC;©RACESONLINE.COM ORâ&#x20AC;©MSâ&#x20AC;©SPORTSâ&#x20AC;©HALLâ&#x20AC;©OFâ&#x20AC;©FAME CALLâ&#x20AC;©601-982-8264 WWW.MSFAME.COM Otherâ&#x20AC;©Corporateâ&#x20AC;©Sponsors;â&#x20AC;©Baptistâ&#x20AC;©Healthâ&#x20AC;©Systems,â&#x20AC;©Blueâ&#x20AC;©Crossâ&#x20AC;©Blueâ&#x20AC;©Shieldâ&#x20AC;©ofâ&#x20AC;©MS,â&#x20AC;© Mississippiâ&#x20AC;©Sportsâ&#x20AC;©Medicineâ&#x20AC;©andâ&#x20AC;©Orthopedicâ&#x20AC;©Center,â&#x20AC;©Fleetâ&#x20AC;©Feetâ&#x20AC;©Sports

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E â&#x20AC;¢ Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 â&#x20AC;¢ Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

APPETIZER

HAPPY HOUR Appetizers 1/2 OFF! 2:00 - 4:00

FX]VBc^_ on State Street

CdTbSPh=XVWc â&#x20AC;¢ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;¢ Live Music â&#x20AC;¢ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;¢ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;¢ $2 Pint Abita

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;¢ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;¢ $2 pint

June 26 - July 2, 2013

CWdabSPh=XVWc

40

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ 601-366-5676 www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Always Drink Responsibly

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no sharing, no carry out

$2 Pints

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B


BULLETIN BOARD: Classifieds

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41


BULLETIN BOARD: JOBS

advertise here starting at $50 a week

KIM MURRIEL

Gig: Southern Yogi by Kimberly Murriel

As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? An artist.

Describe your workday in three words. Busy, unpredictable and different.

What tools could you not live or work without? My creativity, passion, inspiration and my studio.

What steps brought you to this position?

NAME: DEBI LEWIS AGE: 52 JOB: YOGA INSTRUCTOR AND CERTIFIED YOGA THERAPIST

It took me finding out what I didn’t like to discover what I really wanted to do. I hated working a 9-to-5 job, being in an institutional-like setting and being told what to do. A while back I got fired from a receptionist job, and my boss told me, “This is not where you need to be.” From then on I kept searching until I found yoga and my calling.

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June 26 - July 2, 2013

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42

601.362.6121 x11

4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 Jackson, MS (in front of Kroger) jacksonms@anytimefitness.com

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What’s the strangest aspect of your job? Teaching yoga in Mississippi. People have different ideas of what yoga is. A lot of people think that yoga is for the pretty, flexible, acrobatic gymnasts they see on the front cover of magazines, and many people think yoga is going to conflict with their Christianity.

What’s the best thing about your job? I get to be me. I get to be barefoot and be comfortable. I like being able to do what I want, and I also deal with lots of wonderful people.

What advice do you have for others who would like to become a yoga instructor? Take it seriously. It’s a way of life. Take a lot of yoga classes, and do a lot of yoga on your own. And keep your day job. If you have a great job, or know someone who does, suggest it to kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.


   

  

  

 

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Danny

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v11n42 - Good Issue: Shut Up And Talk! Engaging 'the Other'