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March 27 - April 2, 2013

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3/22/13 11:07 AM


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN JENNIFER ADELSHEIMER

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hat do a Norwegian cruise ship worker, a baby nurse and a head pastry chef have in common? They are all part of Jennifer Adelsheimer’s career path. These days, Adelsheimer is sticking with cooking as head pastry chef at Broad Street Bakery. A native of Marietta, Ga., Adelsheimer found her way to the Jackson scene in 2010. The 27-year-old pastry chef credits her aunt, Diane Varner, with starting her on the baking journey with recipes for strawberry cake and chocolate chess squares. Baking pastries isn’t the thing only that is second nature to Adelsheimer. While attending Furtah Prep School in Acworth, Ga., she played four sports—basketball, volleyball, tennis and softball—and became valedictorian. She says her coach Eugene Fries inspired her. “(He taught) team ethics and taught me how to be a leader,” Adelsheimer says. These days, those qualities enable her to lead a team of a different kind—a cooking team that accomplishes feats such as feeding 3,000 to 3,700 people during last year’s Mistletoe Market Preview Gala or keeping up with the recent frenzy for king cakes during Mardi Gras. With a varied career before entering the bakery world, Adelsheimer has shown she is adaptable. She credits her 102-year-old greatgrandmother with instilling in her the resolve to go after what she wants in life. “She’s been

CONTENTS

through the Great Depression … I think I have that instinct of what she has done,” Adelsheimer says of her great-grandmother. Before landing employment with Broad Street, Adelsheimer worked as a server on a Norwegian cruise ship. The cruise ship was understaffed, so Adelsheimer had to work extended shifts—to the tune of 102 hours. Following the chaotic but educational experience aboard the cruise, Adelsheimer worked as a baby nurse with Happy Baby Solutions, an Atlanta-based agency that provides professional baby nurses and nannies until she decided to attend culinary school in 2009. Adelsheimer attended Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Arts School in Atlanta, Ga., where she studied under chef instructor Lisa Fernandez-Glenn. “She was always very firm and never backed down from any challenge as a teacher, but I appreciate the fact that I knew I could always call on her—even now,” Adelsheimer says, adding that the school had great, hands-on instructors and excellent networking opportunities. She finished her program in 2010 and, after completing an internship, came straight to Jackson. Adelsheimer says she loves being a pastry chef because every day is a challenge, and the options are limitless. To see what’s cooking in Adelsheimer’s kitchen, visit Broad Street Bakery in Banner Hall at 4465 N. Highway 55, Suite 101, or call 601-362-2900. —Nneka Ayozie

Cover photograph by flickr/rainydayknitter/Molly Elliott

10 Cleaning Up

“Ward 5 has suffered crime. Our streets are not safe or clean, and small businesses are moving out of west Jackson to north Jackson. We have to, first of all, meet the needs of the citizens, and we’ve gotten away from that.” —Plavise Patterson, “ Patterson: Southern Hospitality Values”

27 Get Dirty

Making your own organic potting soil gives crops and produce the best start to the growing season.

42 String Along

Bust out a hammer, nails and twine for a fresh, bold bit of personalized DIY décor.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 ............... EDITORIAL CARTOON 14 .................................. STIGGERS 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 27 ............................. LIFE & STYLE 28 .......................................... GEEK 30 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 32 .......................................... ARTS 33 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 34 ............................... JFP EVENTS 36 ....................................... MUSIC 37 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 38 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 41 ............................. CLASSIFIEDS 42 ............................................ DIY

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL; FLICKR/USDAGOV; TRIP BURNS

MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 29

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EDITOR’S note

by Kathleen M. Mitchell Features Editor

Lessons from the Press

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hen I was a freshman at Millsaps College, I thought about quitting my role as news editor of our campus newspaper, the Purple & White, at least a dozen times. Probably more. I would return frustrated to my dorm room on the second floor of Sanderson Hall late Tuesday evenings, after we sent the paper to the printer, knock on my best friend’s door and proceed to spend the next 15 minutes or so venting about how I was ready to leave the paper and all its thankless responsibilities. So how is it that I found myself Monday night, after working 10 hours in the JFP office, gobbling down a dinner of cold cereal and heading to Millsaps to advise the next generation of Purple & White staff members? I’m still not sure I know. I have always enjoyed writing and, moreover, people always just sort of told me I’m good at it (although I often struggle to believe them), so I applied to the paper between fall and spring semesters of my first year at college. The editor-in-chief appointed me news editor. The role quickly terrified me. Keeping up with everything on campus, being editor to students older and wiser than I, making sure that every single week my two pages were filled with content … I was a big stress bucket. Yet, every Monday I returned to the planning meetings. Every Tuesday I went to layout meetings, sometimes staying until midnight to get the paper done. And when my year was up, I did what I thought I would never do: I applied for another position, another year. And the year after that, too—in all, I went on to serve in four different editor positions over the years. In that way, the Purple & White became one of my longestlasting college activities. In fact, it shaped my future, as I applied to journalism school after

graduation and, after finishing my master’s, came to the Jackson Free Press. Members of the P&W became like my weird, quirky family. Years later, the bond we formed still means the world to me, and the inside jokes and YouTube videos we laughed at in an exhausted haze on those Tuesday nights still crack me up. This week, the latest staff of the Purple

We don’t all have to be newspaper people. But we can all find that niche, that way to contribute. & White publishes their first issue, which is also the first issue since the paper took a nearly six-month hiatus. After several years of budget cuts and declining staff interest, the former editors hit their breaking point and ceased producing the paper. The demise of the paper made me— and many of my contemporaries—sad, possibly more so than those on campus seemed to be, because we saw a bit of our legacy dying. I was proud to be a part of the paper. Yes, even if half the campus only picked it up on the way to the Caf’ so they could scan the photos and see if their sorority sister or fraternity brother made the Features page. Yes, even if some weeks the staff had to write all the content. Yes, even on weeks we were in that room at midnight on press night.

It made me scrappy. It made me strong. I am thankful for it. Luckily, with almost a whole new staff and a new adviser (yours truly), the paper is returning and finding its feet again as a biweekly paper rather than the weekly it once was. Monday, as the new staff plunged headfirst into the chaos of putting out a first paper, I couldn’t help but laugh, remembering all the things we went through those years ago. And it occurred to me that if more community groups resembled newspaper staffs, we might get a lot more accomplished in Jackson. Putting out a newspaper—a good newspaper—requires different personalities that work together, respectfully. It requires folks who are organized enough to plan ahead, while still being flexible and creative enough to solve the issues that pop up suddenly. It requires left-brained people to manage the money, the numbers and the deadlines, but it also needs right-brained people to put together a compelling story and a visually appealing look. It takes a strong leader with both vision and command, who can keep everyone on the same track while respecting them, listening to their input and allowing their individual talents to shine. Good newspapers have diverse staffs, with people from different backgrounds and social groups. Those people can offer insight, brainstorm ideas and give feedback that benefits the whole, rather than simply agreeing statically. They can introduce each other to folks and ideas they might not find otherwise. Most of all, it takes people who care. In today’s media environment, the vast majority of people who put out quality news will never become millionaires doing it, no matter how smart or creative they are. (Trust me, no one at the JFP is drafting plans for

the next Hearst Castle.) Rather, a good paper (or online news outlet) needs people who want to do it because they think it is important. Because they see the value even when no one else seems to. Fixing the ever-pothole-ridden roads is a similarly thankless job—no one is going to put up a statue of the guy that smooths the roads, even if he deserves it. Bettering the schools without a huge influx of cash requires a similar meeting of left-brained and right-brained minds. An effective leader working with and respecting a contributing population? Well, if that doesn’t sound like what we need in a governor, a mayor, city officials and the public at large, I don’t know what does. We don’t all have to be newspaper people. But we can all find that niche, that way to contribute. Do it because you care, not because it will bring you money or notoriety (it probably won’t). Years from now, no one on campus will remember that I was on the student newspaper. No one will remember that I came back to advise. But, maybe the changes I help instill now will make the paper better for years to come, and that will make it all worthwhile. When the new staff of the Purple & White left Monday night, some of them well after midnight, a few may have gotten back to their dorm rooms, knocked on their best friends’ doors and vented about quitting the paper, just like I did years ago. But even though this first attempt was rough—and the result may be flawed—I hope they come out of it with the attitude to make things better, to tackle the next issue with vigor, a little wiser than the last time. Because some things—newspapers, fixed potholes, schools and communities, to name a few—are worth the long hours.

March 27 - April 2, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Andrew Dunaway

ShaWanda Jacome

Jessica Mizell

Molly Lehmuller

R.L. Nave

Trip Burns

Larry Morrisey

David Rahaim

Andrew Dunaway knew his friends and family were tired of hearing him talk constantly about food, so he took to writing about it. He’ll do his best to keep it to a dull roar. He wrote for the cover package.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary librarian at JPS. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband and son, Michael and Mateo. “May the odds be ever in your favor.” She wrote for the cover package.

Jessica Mizell’s interests include watching “Love & Hip Hop,” crawfish boils, couponing and her poodle Lola Belle. She is the current JFP New Orleans liaison. She wrote for the cover package.

Molly Lehmuller is an MBA student at Millsaps College. Her hobbies include creating vivariums for her Giant Gippsland Worms, <Bryce> and Magosten. She wrote for the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote stories on the Legislature.

Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He enjoys the films of Stanley Kubrick. He took many of the photos in this issue.

Larry Morrisey is the director of grants programs for the Mississippi Arts Commission. He also serves as one of the hosts for “Mississippi Arts Hour,” the agency’s arts interview radio show on MPB. He wrote a music feature.

Account Executive David N. Rahaim migrated to Mississippi from North Carolina in 1989. He earned a Creative Writing BFA from Belhaven, enjoys building his library and has a first novel in the works.


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Sumatran Tiger Panthera tigris sumatrae The Sumatran tiger is the smallest of the remaining five subspecies of tiger and lives exclusively in the tropical rainforests on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. These large carnivorous cats are critically endangered with fewer than

PUT THE JACKSON ZOO AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. GO MOBILE AT JACKSONZOO.ORG Turn your zoo experience into a smartphone safari with the new Jackson Zoo mobile website. Enhance your visit with easy access to zoo maps, insider information on the animals, and more!

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March 27 - April 2, 2013

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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DISH AT A LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT IN THE JACKSON AREA? (WHAT AND WHERE?)

FILE PHOTO

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Thursday, March 21 The Joint Legislative Budget Committee votes to raise the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s revenue forecast by about $97 million for fiscal year 2014, which starts July 1. â&#x20AC;Ś The College Board approves plans for Ole Miss to spend $6 million to design a 10,000-seat sports venue and garage. Friday, March 22 The U.S. Justice Department announces a deal with the Meridian School District to end discriminatory disciplinary practices in which black students face harsher punishment than whites. â&#x20AC;Ś The Landmark Group, a North Carolina development group, declares its interest in renovating the former Forrest County jail complex into affordable housing. Saturday, March 23 New Jerseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $338.3 million Powerball lottery has a winner for the fourthlargest jackpot in Powerball history. â&#x20AC;Ś Military officials release the identity of the shooter and two victims in a Virginia Marine base shooting. One victim, Cpl. Jacob Wooley, is from Guntown, Miss. Sunday, March 24 Rep. Jessica Upshaw, R-Diamondhead, a legislator since 2004, dies from a gunshot wound, an apparent suicide, at her boyfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. â&#x20AC;Ś Mississippi golfer Michael Allen shoots a 67 to win the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic.

March 27 - April 2, 2013

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Tuesday, March 26 State Sen. Nicky Browning of Pontotoc switches to the Republican Party. â&#x20AC;Ś Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announces the expansion of the StrikeForce initiative, intended to reduce poverty and improve life in rural areas. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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All Roads Lead to Motion Sickness by Tyler Cleveland

T

he condition of city streets may be the hottest issue during the 2013 Jackson mayoral campaign. It has become a running joke among Jacksonians, but in reality, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge problem with few answers. But that could change. After voting down a $10 million bond issue to repave Jackson streets just a month ago, the Jackson City Council voted Monday to capitalize on low interest rates and borrow $10 million to $12 million to be repaid over 10 years. Work will be conducted in all seven wards and could start as early as this summer. The measure passed 3-1, with the lone vote in opposition coming from Ward 2 Councilman and mayoral candidate Chokwe Lumumba. He asserted that he was more likely to vote for the bond this time around, but ultimately favored sending the motion back to the budget subcommittee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The thing that makes me feel a little bit different about this than the last time we broached it is the explanation of the interest rates and how they might change, so I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to note that we should take advantage of those,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the other hand, my slogan is that the people must decide, and so what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to do is make sure that the people have a voice on this issue, because it is a question of putting the city into some additional debt on top of the $27 million, and I believe we already refinanced some of that, that the city already has.â&#x20AC;? Lumumba also pointed to the absence of three council membersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes, Ward 4 Councilman and mayoral candidate Frank Bluntson, and Ward 5 Councilman Charles

swered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason I do not, at this point, is that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had issues getting folks to come to work over the past three months, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not so sure we should be bidding to people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come to work, and hoping they come to work next time. You come to work, and I come to work, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to vote on this today.â&#x20AC;? The city will pay off the bond over a 10-year period with money allocated to normal street resurfacing. Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell expressed concern over diverting all of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funds for street repairs to repaying that debt. Johnson assured the council that money would be diverted from other areas to refill those resurfacing funds so that work can continue over the next decade. Jackson has spent $26 million to pave 87.3 miles of streets The Jackson City Council voted Monday to approve since 2009. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough to cover a proposal by Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. to inject $10 roughly 7.5 percent of the nearly million into street repaving. 1,200 miles of streets Johnson says lie within the city limits. Tillmanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as reason to shelve the issue unJohnson held a teleconference til the next full council meeting. He noted town-hall meeting last week, and in a poll that the four representatives in attendance of the more than 3,500 participants, roads were the minimum required for a vote, and rated as the top concern, just ahead of crime. that such a significant motion should not be Johnson seized the opportunity to tout his voted on in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;special session.â&#x20AC;? record on reconstruction and paving, and he But the session has been on the calendar talked about future, planned projects. The since before the new year, and City Council mayor said the city has $25 million reserved President Tony Yarber called the vote. for reconstruction of major thoroughfares. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Councilman Lumumba, typically I â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone sees the project on Fortificawould agree with you on that,â&#x20AC;? Yarber an- tion (Street) going on, but we are also

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Complicated

PIKO EDWOODZIE

Monday, March 25 A Palestinian official announces that the U.S. is seeking to restart IsraeliPalestinian negotiations that broke down more than four years ago. â&#x20AC;Ś A U.S. House committee led by Missouri Rep. Jay Barnes hears testimony on President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market-based Medicaid plan.

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TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, March 20 Gov. Phil Bryant signed a law to allow Mississippians to brew beer. â&#x20AC;Ś Former three-term state Rep. Jerry E. Wilkerson, a spokesman for the propane, petroleum and convenience store associations for 25 years, dies at age 68.

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he South has a complicated relationship with food, and an even more complicated ways to describe our affinity for food. Here are a few expressions Southerners uses to give our approval to dishes we love, and a few we should start using. â&#x20AC;˘ S/he put her foot in it. â&#x20AC;˘ Sweeter than a Sweet Potato Queen! â&#x20AC;˘ Delicious enough to make Jackson municipal candidates file campaign-finance reports! â&#x20AC;˘ So good, Gov. Phil Bryant would change his mind about Medicaid expansion.

â&#x20AC;˘ Better than not having to drive down Fortification Street at rush hour. â&#x20AC;˘ Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make you wanna slap yo mama.


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Lynch Street, Northside Drive, State Street, Watkins Drive, Flag Chapel Drive, Meadowbrook Road and Ridgewood Road. The mayor also plans to repave 28 other streets as part of the regular Residential Resurfacing Program by the first week of April. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lofty goal, and some are greeting the timingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just a few months before municipal electionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with suspicion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too little, too late,â&#x20AC;? Democratic mayoral challenger Jonathan Lee said Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mayor has been saying for four years that the bond issue is not the best way to pay for fixing the roads, so why now is he saying we need to do it?â&#x20AC;? Lee insisted his stance against the bond is not a vote against roads, but against massive spending to fix a problem that, in his eyes, should have never been such an issue in the first place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to create a measure that makes paving streets a more disciplined activity. We have to prioritize streets, so what we plan to do is move the roads budget out of the general fund and put it into a protected special fund. That gives us the discipline to keep our hands off of it. This is nothing new. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You should be able to go online and click on your street and see when is the last time it was repaved and when is it due for repaving.â&#x20AC;? Attorney Regina Quinn, another mayoral candidate, issued a release Tuesday in response to the city councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday vote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The citizens are tired of Harvey Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s election-man plans.â&#x20AC;? Quinn wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was pleased when the council originally said no City Council President Tony Yarber called for a to his reactive political plan to levy vote on the $10 million street resurfacing measure a $10 million bond for paving roads against the wishes of mayoral candidate and Ward 2 City Councilman Chokwe Lumumba. just to bolster his re-election bid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś His timing seems very politically convenient, and he is usa condition that we need a big injection of ing long-term debt for a short-term fix.â&#x20AC;? cash,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said last week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś What I Quinn called Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paving record was proposing is work on three or four ma- â&#x20AC;&#x153;significantly misleading,â&#x20AC;? writing that Johnjor thoroughfares in the city of Jackson, like son was not the force behind many projects. State Street between Shepherd and NorthNot so, Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Campaign Comside Drive, or Northside between State and munications Director Melissa Faith Payne (Interstate 55) or Capitol (Street) between said. She said that Johnson first proposed the Rose and Crandit. â&#x20AC;Ś Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I was pro- bond in August, and she cited low interest posing, but that was rejected. rates as the reason for Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I still want to do that. We need to do â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mayor has had a repaving program something about streets right now. I am pre- for years,â&#x20AC;? Payne said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of this is brand pared to do it, but I really need some coop- new. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always put aside money to repave eration from the city council to do it.â&#x20AC;? streets, and his record stands for itself. â&#x20AC;Ś The Johnson got that cooperation Monday. mayor has his duty to answer to the citizens, The paving projects in the bond mea- and they have told him they want him to fix sure include work on high-traffic areas on the streets. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing.â&#x20AC;? Mill Street, Jefferson Street, Mayes Street, Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Ellis Avenue, McDowell Road, Capitol Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. Street, Clinton Boulevard, Robinson Road,

VIRGINIA SCHRIEBER

going to be on West Street between Adelle and Woodrow Wilson,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to extend the Jesse Mosely Drive down on Bloom Street between Farish Street. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to work on Lynch Street from Wiggins Road to Ellis Avenue. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to extend on West County Line Road from the entrance to Tougaloo all the way down to North Field. We have a lot of reconstruction projects going on.â&#x20AC;? The proposal the city council voted down in February would have allotted the city $10 million for street repairs in February. The lack of oversight and a list of streets targeted were among council concerns. Ward 4 Councilman Frank Bluntson said he was concerned the proposal allowed funds to go beyond streets and sidewalks, and Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell said the annual millage would have to go toward repaying the bonds for the next 10 years if the proposal passed. That, he said, would take away all of the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power over street projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(A bond) is not the best way to pay for street repairs, but our streets are in such

   

Most classes begin the week of April 1. For more information, call 601-974-1130 or go online at www.millsaps.edu/conted Series

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Alternative Processes & Digital Negatives Basic Glass Fusion Beginning Knitting I & II Beginning Photography Botanical Drawing Digital Photo Editing From Photo to Fiber How Not To Be a Starving Artist Illustrating for Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Publications Let Your Inner Painter Sparkle More Enameling on Copper Paint & Antique Furniture Like a Pro Oil Painting Workshop Pottery/ Sculpture Spring/Summer Oil Painting Watercolor Painting

Mary Quin Laura Tarbutton Donna Peyton Ron Blaylock Dain Hayes Ron Blaylock Rhonda Blasingame Tracie & James Wade Chuck Galey Beverly Keaton Smith Laura Tarbutton Latresa Enns Tom Morrison Tom Morrison Laurel Schoolar Laurel Schoolar

Health and Fitness liveRIGHTnow Tabatas Kickboxing Rebellion Tai Chi Yoga for Everyone ZumbaÂŽ

Terry Sullivan Jeremy Gordon Mike Chadwick Sally Holly Ashleigh Risher

Home and Garden Bamboo Solutions Creating a Mississippi Cottage Garden Easy Container Gardening Landscape Design Practical Lawn Care - And Alternatives

Rob Mendrop Felder Rushing Felder Rushing Rick Griffin Felder Rushing

Language and Literature Compelling Telling: Crafting Stronger Stories Conversational French Introduction to Practical Spoken Chinese Jane Austen Book Club: Happy Anniversary, Pride & Prejudice! To Tell the Truth: Creative Nonfiction Writing and Selling Short Stories Part I &II Writing for Children Writing From Your Life

Beth Kander Robert Kahn Chia-lun Ho Carolyn Brown Ellen Ann Fentress John Floyd Chuck Galey Steve Kistulentz

Money and Business Basics of Investing Exploring Entrepreneurship Starting a Nontraditional Business Starting and Operating Your Own Business

Mark Maxwell Joe Donovan Joe Donovan David McNair

Music Adult Group Piano for Beginners Beginning Guitar Beginning Harmonica

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Jim Fraiser Luke & Charlotte Lundemo Cassandra Hawkins-Wilson Rehenuma Asmi

Special Offerings ACT Test Prep Course An Introduction to Southern Studies Backyard Astronomy Sci-Fi, Monsters & Movie Mayhem Wine 101 - The Basics

Leonard Blanton Nell Knox Jim Waltman Sim Dulaney John Malanchak

Summer Enrichment for Kids Discovering the Young Artist Kenny Richardson Advanced Drawing for the Young Artist Kenny Richardson Character Animation Workshop Sim Dulaney Cheer Dance Basics Lamorneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Studio Praise and Worship Dance for Youth Lamorneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Studio Dance Team Basics Lamorneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Studio Chamber Music Day Camp Rachel Heard Song and Stage Chrissy Hvirnak Summer Guitar Workshop Jimmy Turner Puppets and Plays Peter & Jarmila Zapletal / Lawerence & Lesley Raybon Manners with Ms. Wright DeAnn Wright Reading and Writing in College Anita DeRouen

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DISH | Ward 5 Candidate

Patterson: Southern Hospitality Values by Tyler Cleveland

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March 27 - April 2, 2013

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lavise “Patti” Patterson may have not a voice for people who don’t get out— are high because kids don’t feel like they grown up in Michigan, but she mainly our seniors and our children. have to graduate anymore. Let’s bridge that became an adult in Jackson. Now I’m very concerned about the youth. gap. School and community are too far she’s trying to return the favor and I’ve been working closely with a young apart. … help bring Jackson to a role of prominence person who aged out of foster care and has If we keep getting superintendents as Ward 5 councilwoman. nowhere to go, and I’ve been working with without a plan, we’ll keep having these Patterson moved from Detroit to him to be sure he can mainstream into problems. I haven’t seen one come in Jackson in 1980 at age 18, but she was normal society. A passion of mine here is with a comprehensive plan since Robert familiar with the city long Fortenberry (who served from before. As a child, her moth1973 to 1990). er made sure she spent her summers learning about her Does the city needs to fix some of its infrastructure Mississippi heritage with her and educational problems grandparents right here in the before we can focus on big capital city. development projects such She spent time on the as Farish Street and Old Jackson State University camCapitol Green? pus, learning about the rich history of civil rights, music We do have to fix our and excellent culinary expeproblems first. We want to riences Jackson had to offer. bring in developers; developers Patterson said the lessons she make money. We have small learned all those summers ago businesses that are struggling have stuck with her. because big businesses just left It was a foregone concluour city. If we focus on small sion she would attend JSU, business expansion, then we near her grandparents. The can entertain these big busidaughter of a single-parent Plavise “Patti” Patterson is running for Jackson City Council in nesses. household that survived on her Ward 5 to help to bring back the cultural spirit of togetherness she I do support Old Capimother’s modest wages as a De- remembers so fondly from her childhood. tol Green. I support any positroit hotel manager, she found tive development that comes her niche in Jackson and gradin that can grow our city and uated with a degree in business in 1986. to bring Jackson back to the way it was bring more attraction to our city. So, first She grew a foot-care specialist busi- when I used to come down in the sum- of all, we need to look at why we are losness in west Jackson for 22 years, con- mer. I never got this far into the commu- ing all our businesses, whether it’s crime tracting with local hospitals and nursing nity then, but I was always on the campus or there’s not enough support, we have to homes to care for patients, particularly because I had cousins who brought me to fix that. You can bring in Capitol Green, seniors, who suffered from diseases that Jackson State. … We always came down you can bring in One Lake, but where are affect the feet such as diabetes. Mill Street, and that’s the same route I you going to get the people from? I’ve seen “It’s very rewarding work,” Patterson take today. I’ve just seen a lot of things the Capitol Green project, and I know said. “Because I get to meet so many peo- just go downhill. My main thought, and they understand the problems of the city. ple who need help, especially those who I contemplated this a while, is that I have They’ve lived here, and they understand cannot afford normal health care. We worked with the current councilman, and our problems. That’s why I support that work with them to make sure they get the he’s done a great job, but the voices of particular project. care they need.” the community have become silent, and Patterson watched her 26-year-old I think I can give them a voice again and When it comes to crime, are Jackson’s problems more related to the number son, Aundreus, leave the city for bet- make this a better ward and a better city. of badges on the street or is it a ter opportunities in New York City, and watched the economic and social decline Jackson Public Schools seem to always systemic problem? around the city until she could stand it no be in the headlines for the wrong It’s an organizational thing. We need more. Now, the 50-year-old has a vision reasons. If elected, what can you and to communicate with law enforcement. for Jackson that she wants to implement the council do to stem the tide on a Any effective law enforcement has to inrising drop-out rate? as Ward 5 Councilwoman. volve the people. Police need to commuI’ve worked with JPS for years. First nicate with the citizens, and we’ve gotten Why are you running for city council? of all, we have to quit talking about alter- away from that. I’m running because I care about natives until we fix our own problem. I’m west Jackson. I became an adult in west talking about charter schools. Even if we The Environmental Protection Agency Jackson. This community, at present, isn’t start charter schools, we still have to fix has fined Jackson for past sewage like it used to be. There are a lot of things our city schools. Start at the top. We need disposal methods, and the price tag that have changed. The heart of Jackson a leader at the top that can come in with for repairs and legal expenses are now has changed. Nobody cares about each a strategic plan. Schools are not about the near $400 million. How should the city raise funds to pay for crumbling other anymore. We have a tendency to core inside the school. You have to get out infrastructure? go about our own business, and you don’t into the community and reunite the comcare about your neighbors now. There’s munity with our schools. Drop-out rates First of all, we have to know where

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our budget is. We have to budget for that. There’s money out there for infrastructure within our existing budget. We have to find areas to tighten the belt and find a way to pay for the repairs and fines. We certainly don’t need to raise taxes. So you do not support the 1-percent sales-tax increase?

I do not. We’ve been taxed enough. I’ll leave it at that. What changes would you like to see made specifically in Ward 5?

Ward 5 has suffered crime. Our streets are not safe or clean, and small businesses are moving out of west Jackson to north Jackson. We have to, first of all, meet the needs of the citizens, and we’ve gotten away from that. It seems our best and brightest leave for better opportunities in bigger cities. How can Jackson retain some of the talent we see going to bigger urban areas?

My son left. He left because he said, “Mom, my talents, I have to take them elsewhere, and then I’ll come back.” And I said, “Well, if you do that, you better come back with a vengeance. Come back knowing that young people want to stay here, but they aren’t for several reasons—the jobs situation, the interest in the arts.” A lot of young people (who) are leaving are interested in the arts. Technology is here, no doubt. Health care is here, no doubt. So now we have to figure out where we can build a relationship with our youth. Do we do it through the schools or through the arts? We have to let the children of Jackson see the children from our surrounding cities. We have to cultivate our children and let them see other communities and how things are done. If we get a few involved, one will follow the other. We have to culture our kids so they can see there are things they can create here. A lot of our crime is committed by youth. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

Plavise “Patti” Patterson Born: Detroit, Mich. Age: 50 Family: Son, Aundreus, 26 Education: Graduated Wayne High School, 1980; graduated Jackson State University School of Business, 1986


TALK | education

Dems: Reprioritize to Fund Schools by Ronni Mott

society values most, Brown said. short the formula. In the past 15 years, law- ing the rainy-day fund and capital expense “The most important part of the edu- makers have provided full funding only twice, funds, and revenue is up—the Legislature cation system is the teacher,” Brown told the in 2003 and 2007. This year, the shortfall is is adding $97 million to its 2014 budget Jackson Free Press, adding that attracting nearly $300 million. Cumulatively, the Leg- this year (the Senate declined to raise 2013 good teachers takes money. islature has shorted public schools nearly $1 spending by another $60 million). Mississippi paid K-12 Democrats also say teachers, on average, $45,896 that millions in tax credits in 2011, the National Center and benefits given to busifor Education Statistics estinesses have not paid off. mates. The Atlantic magazine In January, Mississippi’s ranked the state sixth from unemployment rate was the bottom in teacher pay for 10.7 percent, 2.2 percent 2011; however, the state has higher than the national one of the lowest average costs average. Two counties, of living. Over the last sevClay and Tunica, reported eral years, Mississippi has lost unemployment rates of more than 800 teachers due to more than 20 percent. budget cuts, Brown said. “The key to ecoHouse Education Comnomic development and mittee Chairman John social development in The Mississippi Legislature does not lack the money to fully fund Moore, R-Brandon, told this state, in this couneducation; it lacks political will, Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, says. the JFP Tuesday that if try, in this world, is school districts had their providing the resources priorities right, they wouldn’t cut teach- billion, and all districts feel the effects. so that every child has an opportunity to ers, they would cut administrative costs. “There are those of us who believe that get an adequate education,” Brown said. Rufus Straughter, D-Belzoni, who public education is under attack,” Straughter “... Nobody’s suggesting that we guaranchaired Monday’s hearing, spent 25 years said at Monday’s meeting. tee outcome—but everybody has to have teaching math in the Delta. In Straughter’s With full funding over the last five an opportunity to achieve … and it takes district, schools struggle to recruit and train years, Mississippi schools could have had an resources to do that.” teachers to deal with children raised in eco- additional 4,814 teachers, said Rep. John Brown said that he’s not asking to make nomically challenged households, he said. Hines, D-Greenville. Mayor Connie Moran up the entire shortfall in one session, but In 1997, the Mississippi Legislature of Ocean Springs said that municipalities the state can work toward closing the fundmoved to level unequal educational oppor- make up the funds through increases in car- ing gap. By adding $50 million per year to tunities caused by lower tax bases in some tag fees and school and property taxes. MAEP from unallocated funds, the state communities. The law—the Mississippi “There needs to be a total analysis of could ramp up to full funding in six years. Adequate Education Program, or MAEP— how school districts allocate the money “With kids, you’ve got to look at it long provides additional funds to poorer school and where it’s being spent,” Moore said, term,” he said. “That’s part of the deal. Othdistricts so that those children can have a indicating that local governments need to erwise, you’re going to wind up 25 years from shot at receiving a decent education. push back on school districts that ask for now with another (poorly educated) adult “The key word in MAEP is ‘adequate,’” too much. “School districts are receiving an population and say, ‘Why didn’t we do that?’” Brown said. “It’s not ‘Cadillac.’” Anything ample amount of money,” he said For more information on what not fully less than full funding means inadequate eduBrown disagrees, and says that Missis- funding MAEP has cost your school district, cation for many children, Brown said. sippi has the money to fully fund MAEP, visit keeppublicschoolspublic.com. Comment This school year, like most years since Right now, the state has more than $409 at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@ they passed it, lawmakers are proposing to million in cash that is not allocated, includ- jacksonfreepress.com.

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ake a trip to Madison Central High School, and you’ll find students with decent textbooks and buildings in good repair. You’ll likely see classes of fewer than 20 students. Go to a public school in Sunflower County, on the other hand, and you’ll probably find textbooks in sad shape and short supply—if the kids have textbooks at all. Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, former chairman of the House Education Committee, told the Jackson Free Press that he has met English teachers who have no books for their students and biology teachers with no lab equipment. Rep. Linda Whittington, D-Schlater, said that in Leflore County, she’s seen classes with more than 30 kids. When it rains, the buckets come out to catch leaks. On Monday, Mississippi Democrats made a case for what it really means to the state’s public-school districts not to have enough money to educate their children. Then, they revealed sources of funding that could eventually make up the difference. The House Democratic Caucus, Mississippi Legislative Black Caucus and Mississippi Democratic Trust held a public hearing on full funding of the state’s public schools March 25. Because lawmakers have has not provided sufficient funding, they said, every school district has suffered, whether from inadequate numbers of teachers or higher local taxes. The conservative argument is that the economy is slowing down and the state needs to keep money in reserve for future lean years. Republicans also say they can’t or won’t raise income taxes. “You have to subscribe to the view that money is going to solve the problem in a certain area, and I don’t subscribe to that view,” House Speaker Philip Gunn, a Republican, told The Associated Press.” While it may not solve every problem for schools, public funding points to what a

(601) 879-8189

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LEGISLATURE: Week 11

Shotgun Blues by R.L. Nave

D

AMILE WILSON

emocratic lawmakers are questionDowntown Jackson had been a front- Gunn wanting to keep the agency close ing why the Mississippi Legislature runner for the agency’s headquarters, espe- to his Clinton district. It appears that he is getting a funding boost when cially after a 2011 report commissioned by has flexed enough political muscle to make other agency budgets are shrink- then-Gov. Haley Barbour said buying the that happen. ing. Democrats point to this year’s $30 mil- Landmark Building would be the cheapest In a news release, DOR said that leaslion legislative operations budget. option for cash-strapped Mississippi. ing the former WorldCom Building, now Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, exEarlier this year, at the request of Sen- called South Pointe, for 20 years would cost plained that the legislative budget usually ate Public Property Committee Chairman the state $41.4 million, which “represented increases for the first year of a the lowest total cost to the state.” four-term session, which is 120 days long. In subsequent years, Gunn and the Big Guns when the legislative session In January, after a shooting lasts just 90 days, legislative oprampage in Newtown, Conn., erations, the budget to run the reenergized the national gunLegislature decreases. control debate, House Speaker That did not happen this Philip Gunn of Clinton and session, Brown said. other Republican officials made “At a time we’re cutting a public appeal for gun makers the budget and we’re not fundto relocate to Mississippi. ing education, why are we It was unclear at the time spending another $5 million whether the plea would have (on legislative operations)?” any effect, but last week, two Brown, a legislator since 2000, Speaker Philip Gunn racked up some big political and legislative companies wrote to Gunn that wins this week, getting a gun maker to consider moving to asked the Jackson Free Press. they were open to exploring and getting the Department of Revenue to remain in “I thought we were sup- Mississippi Mississippi. Beretta USA and his Clinton district at the expense of downtown Jackson. posed to lead by example,” said Remington both sent Gunn Rep. Johnny Stringer, the forletters, which he posted on his mer House Appropriations Chairman. David Blount, a Democrat whose district Facebook page. Stinger declined to speculate on what includes downtown Jackson, analysts from Ugo Gussalli Beretta, the Italian firethe extra money would be used for and Millsaps College’s Else School of Manage- arm maker’s president and chief executive referred questions to Senate and House ment determined that the state could save officer, said he was interested in considering Appropriations Chairmen, Eugene “Buck” $30 million in cash flow over two decades Gunn’s proposal and that a Beretta attorney Clarke and Herb Frierson, respectively. by moving to the Jackson building, which is would follow up to talk about the details. Clarke and Frierson did not return phone listed just above $7 million. Gunn could not contain his excitemessages left Monday. The Millsaps study shows that Mis- ment. “As you know, gun manufacturers sissippi spends about $15.5 million every are under continued threat while the naDOR’s Closed to Jackson year on leased office space. Cutting the total tional media cheerleads the radical efforts State officials dealt the city of Jackson square footage of office space would save the of liberal states to strip 2nd Amendment a big blow this week when the Mississippi state $5 million per year. Blount said pur- rights,” he wrote on Facebook. Department of Finance and Administration, chasing the Landmark Building—which “That’s why I wrote them a letter urgwhich oversees the operation of state build- AT&T vacated in 2012—would come with ing them to bring their jobs to Mississippi ings, recommended the former WorldCom the added bonus of the state acquiring an as- where we respect the constitutional right to Building in Clinton as the permanent home set once it is paid off. keep and bear arms.” for the Department of Revenue, now housed The issue has since become politically Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. in what’s practically a shed, also in Clinton. charged with Republican Speaker Philip Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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What is an “Old” Catholic?

March 27 - April 2, 2013

Don’t let the name fool you . . .

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Learn more about this inclusive and progressive Independent Catholic Church and its origin . . . The Old Catholic Community of

St. Mary Magdalene - the Apostle

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TALK | business

Hail in a Hand Basket by R.L. Nave

In a scantly publicized meeting of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee Thursday, the 14-member bipartisan panel voted

slashed 20 percent in the past five years. Former House Appropriations Chairman Rep. Johnny Stringer, D-Montrose, said not accepting the $60 million increase for the current year was a mistake considering that many agencies are dealing with budget gaps. Among the shortfalls, Stringer said, are $44 million for the Olivia Y settlement against the Department of Human Services to correct problems in the fostercare system, $33 million for the Department of Corrections and $3 million for the Low-paid state workers whose private cars received hail Mississippi Highway Patrol. damage could be a metaphor for Mississippi’s budget woes. “We’ve got real problems,” Stringer said during a to raise the revenue forecast by about $97 Democratic budget hearing March 21. million for the coming fiscal year, which With Republican Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves commences July 1. leading the charge, the Senate committee Forecasters said that another $60 mil- voted against raising the revenue estimate for lion could be added to the current 2013 fis- fiscal year 2013. cal-year budget, which would help offset def“No matter what the revenue estimate icits and shrinking budgets facing a number is, it’s always going to be wrong. It’s impossiof state agencies, including the Department ble to get it exactly right,” Reeves told reportof Mental Health, whose budget has been ers in his Capitol office Thursday afternoon.

Reeves, a former state treasurer, said the fact that the bulk of state revenue collections occur in the last quarter of the fiscal year, combined with Mississippi’s slow rate of growth, leads him to the conclusion that the additional $60 million won’t materialize. The House and Senate have passed versions of budget bills for the coming year and, at this point, the Senate has proposed spending slightly more than the House. Lawmakers must agree on a budget by April 1. Speaker Philip Gunn, R-Clinton, has a different view of the potential for more revenue. “The good news, to me, is the economy appears to at least have stabilized,” Gunn told reporters March 21. “I don’t know how quickly it’s improving, but it is at least not getting any worse, and it appears that revenues are increasing.” State agencies have requested millions more dollars than the state has available to spend, even with the increase. Still, Gunn said the higher estimate would make it easier for lawmakers to distribute money among state agencies. “More money is good,” Gunn said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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tate workers were hit especially hard when a hailstorm marched recently through the capital city. At the Mississippi State Hospital at Whitfield and the Hudspeth Regional Center, an estimated 800 employees took on hail damage, Mississippi Department of Mental Health officials said. At Central Mississippi Correctional Facility in Pearl, about 140 employees’ had damage to their cars. Brenda Scott, president of the Mississippi Alliance of State Employees/Communication Workers of America, said state workers are already suffering with poor wages, shrinking budgets and pay freezes. Direct-care workers at Whitfield earn from $7 to $8 per hour, about $16,640 per year. With such low salaries, Scott said many workers cannot afford auto-insurance coverage beyond basic liability, which does not cover hail damage. The hospital’s insurance does not cover employees’ cars, either. The woes of workers are a metaphor for the state’s larger budget issues. Both the Mississippi House and Senate have passed early versions of a roughly $5.5 billion budget, which lawmakers must pass along to Gov. Phil Bryant by July 1.

13 JCV7210-43 Event Week March 25 JFPress 9.25x5.875.indd 1

3/25/13 11:35 AM


Get Your Ghetto Ring-Tone Cell Phone

B

rother Hustle: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to use these remaining days of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month to honor Aunt Tee Tee Hustle and her Sequestration Survival and Affordable Technology Initiative. Currently, Aunt Tee Tee is dedicating her information-technology skills to empowering and inspiring financially challenged individuals. Also, she is about to make ghetto science community history with a resourceful innovation of cell phone and smartphone technology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ghetto Science Community, I am proud to announce Aunt Tee Tee Hustleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Affordable, Refurbished Ghetto Ring Tone Cell Phones and Smartphones program. Aunt Tee Tee and her staff of ghetto telecommunications-technology specialists have spent countless hours repairing and refurbishing hundreds of busted, older-model cell phones to give away free. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With a limited supply of free refurbished ghetto ring-tone cell phones and smartphones, representatives from my Compensatory Investment Request Support Group will set up booths in various parts of the ghetto-science community. If you need an affordable ghetto ring tone phone plan, Aunt Tee Tee will offer basic pay-as-you-go 4G talk, text and web-surf sequestration survival plans. See representatives for details and prices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each refurbished ghetto ring-tone cell phone and smartphone will have various musical, ghetto-themed ring tones, such as Donny Hathawayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Ghetto,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Spinnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ghetto Child,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Courtney Pineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Children of the Ghetto,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Elvis Presleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In The Ghetto.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aunt Tee Tee invites the Ghetto Science Community to celebrate Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month by chatting with a friend using an affordable, refurbished ghetto ring-tone phoneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;created by a woman.â&#x20AC;?

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March 27 - April 2, 2013

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14

Why it stinks: Since 2010, House Republicans have unsuccessfully tried to repeal the ACA, aka â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obamacare,â&#x20AC;? 36 times. Setting that aside, Bachmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basis for the emotional appeal is the thoroughly debunked â&#x20AC;&#x153;death panelâ&#x20AC;? meme that first raised its ugly head during the 2008 presidential campaign. The law does include a Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board, which cannot ration care, change eligibility or restrict benefits to seniors. Its purpose is to cut waste and inefficiencies. Her rhetoric ignores the many improvements the ACA has already provided. For example: coverage for 22 preventive health services for women without additional costs, including mammograms and cervical cancer screenings; 50 percent discounts on name-brand drugs for many seniors; extended funding for the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Insurance Program through 2015. Bachmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hysterical opining also ignores studies that show lack of health insurance is responsible for thousands of premature deaths each year, of which, many can be attributed to treatable conditions that can be avoided or managed with appropriate medical care, such as diabetes and heart disease. Without insurance, however, patients do not receive preventative care or treatment in a timely manner.

Show Us That Clinton is Better for DOR

T

he Department of Finance and Administration has finally made its long-awaited recommendation for a new permanent home for the Department of Revenue, which is now housed in a Quonset hut in Clinton. Overseers of state buildings, DFA announced this week that DOR should sign a 20-year lease for the old WorldCom Building, now called the South Pointe Building, also in Clinton. Doing so will cost the state $2.9 million upfront and $41.2 million total over the course of the lease. Two other sites were in competition for the DOR home: The Landmark Center in downtown Jackson and the longer shot Ergon-owned Diversified Technologies Building, in Madison County. The Landmark Building, which housed AT&T up until November 2012, seemed like the most attractive option, for taxpayers, state government operations and for Jackson. Gov. Haley Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administration even gave its blessing to the downtown location by accepting the findings of an independent consultantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report that said purchasing the Landmark Building would be the cheapest of all the alternatives. Since that report came out in 2011, the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s price has dropped precipitously and now hovers just above $7 million. Earlier this year, business experts from Millsaps College determined that regardless of whether DOR moved to the Landmark Center, the state should consider consolidating more state office space, which could save $30 million over two decades.

Putting more state offices into the capital city would breathe life into Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy as well as ongoing downtown revitalization efforts, which not only represent potential new tax revenues but a more attractive place for state employees and others already working in the business district. Choosing the WorldCom building appears to bear the imprimatur of House Speaker Philip Gunn, who, as a Clinton representative, was in an understandably tough political spot. But Gunn and other Republican officials have also statedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in no uncertain termsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that they are unwilling to budge on either full funding for Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public schools or Medicaid expansion because the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treasury is too small to afford either. This is to say nothing of the innumerable tax breaks doled to businesses to ostensibly spur job creation that will divert money away from Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffers. In a statement, local businessmen and downtown boosters Leland Speed and Ben Allen said they want state officials to unseal the other proposals for the DOR HQ for public scrutiny. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We feel that several discrepancies are very obvious in the confidential executive summary issued by the DFA, and that the public has a right to have access to these proposals for public vetting before the process can be considered complete,â&#x20AC;? Allen and Speed wrote. We agree, and we call on Mississippi officials provide a full accounting for their decision not to relocate the Department of Revenue in Jackson.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


ALEXANDER BARRETT

About Charter Schools EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Editorial Assistant Leigh Horn Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Angelica Allen, Nneka Ayozie, Bethany Bridges, Krista Davis Amber Helsel, David Joseph, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Kira Cummings, Ariss King, Melvin Thigpen ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers David Rahaim, Brad Young Sales Assistant Samantha Towers Marketing Intern Tamika Smith BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Distribution Manager Richard Laswell, Distribution Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Robert Majors, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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harter schools are on their way to Mississippi, but passing legislation is just the beginning. As the process moves forward, I urge our policy makers and educational leaders to consider three things about charter schools. First, charter schools should strengthen our public schools, not gut them. The coalition of strange bedfellows who back charters in Mississippi include those who believe deeply in the importance of public schools and those who see charters as a step toward privatizing public education. Which outcome proves true depends largely on whether our public schools are willing to see them as a model and a resource rather than as a threat. Our governing institutions have a stubborn habit of disregarding evidence of progress that happens outside Mississippi. Lessons from hugely successful reforms—charter schools among them, in Cincinnati, Oakland, Calif., and New Orleans— have been slow to trickle down to Jackson Public Schools where I work. When charter schools in Mississippi start delivering results that blow our public schools out of the water, our school boards and superintendents will have no choice but to turn and ask, what are they doing right? Second, if Mississippi charters are to provide any lessons worth learning, we need to be discerning about whom we allow to operate here. Here again, we can look beyond our state borders to see what has been accomplished and therefore, what we can expect to happen here. We should only invite to Mississippi charter-management organizations with proven records of success. Such organizations, typically nonprofits, perform vigorous self-reflection and continually refine their best practices. A recent study by Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes showed that while great charters outperform the average public school, plenty of existing charter schools deliver results no better than the traditional public schools they replaced. Moreover, the study found, an organization’s performance in its early years—whether good or bad—remains consistent over time. It should not be difficult to anticipate a charter school’s success before it opens, provided each district does due diligence and carefully examines the CMO’s track record elsewhere. Third, if Mississippi offers charter schools as an alternative (rather than a re-

placement) to traditional public schools, they may well end up drawing an above-average group of students. An inevitable result of being able to choose one’s school is that the students who exercise that power come from families with the savvy and motivation to navigate the enrollment process. Even if students are selected by lottery, someone has to be there to put in their names, and some charters have even more stringent requirements for parent participation. In this way, while charter schools may be tuition-free, they may still be out of reach for a district’s neediest families. It is a common criticism of successful charter schools, therefore, that they are not due quite as much credit for the results they deliver because their student body is self-selecting. As many charter opponents fear, this self-selection could mean an exodus of the best students from public schools to more desirable charter schools. But what of the students who, by choice or lack thereof, remain in their public schools? Their public, non-charter schools could see a drop in average test scores, as well as other important indicators like graduation rates, simply by virtue of the departure of the most driven students. Even more damaging would be a shift of the best teachers from around the district to the charter school. This would seem to punish the students who do not end up in charter schools by making their non-charter schools worse off—even as it provides potentially life-changing benefits opportunities for the students in the charters. What does this mean for Mississippi, already home to a stratified K-12 education system if ever there was one? For one thing, it reminds us that a change in policy can only do so much. Improving our worst public schools will be a lot harder than improving our best ones. The former will require change in every classroom, teacher-by-teacher and principal-by-principal. Our public schools could learn a lot from the nation’s best charter networks, which I hope to see operating in Mississippi soon, but they can only better all our students if public-school leaders are willing to ask the hard questions and look for best practices wherever they can be found. Alexander Barrett was raised in New York City and joined Teach for America after college. He teaches high-school math in Jackson Public Schools and would be happy to help you with your homework.

While charter schools may be tuition-free, they may still be out of reach for a district’s neediest families.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


ANDREW DUNAWAY

BREAKING

UP THE

BOYS

CLUB

Enrika Williams is one of many female chefs on the rise in Jackson.

by Andrew Dunaway

G

ermaine Greer, the renowned Australian journalist and feminist, once said, “There are only two things that women don’t do as well as men, and that’s design dresses and cook.” Although that statement first sounds absurd—many of us have the Rockwell-styled mental image of mothers and grandmothers weaving magic in the linoleum-tiled kitchens of the American home— men do dominate the stainless-steel counters and fire-breathing ranges of commercial kitchens. When it comes to classically trained chefs, it’s a boys club, steeped in regimentation and tradition, and still a hostile environment to the fairer sex. But plenty of women are sharpening their knives and stepping into the heat of the kitchen to challenge the male-dominated field. In Jackson, one chef who knows the uphill battle women face in a professional kitchen is 37-year-old Enrika Williams. A graduate of the culinary program at the Arts Institute of Atlanta, Williams cut her teeth in the very traditional and very French kitchens of Au Pied du Cochon at the Intercontinental Buckhead Hotel in Atlanta and is now a sous chef at Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St., 601-360-0090). Curious to hear her take on the idea of female chefs in the modern culinary world, I had the opportunity to sit with her and ask a few questions.

ny, what are you doing, why are you doing this?” I would pull my chair up (and) play with biscuit dough. I’ve always been around it and enjoyed it. It’s one of those things that drive me. Did you have a mentor, such as a professional chef or cookbook author that you looked up to?

Goodness, I grew up watching PBS so, obviously, Julia Child, Martin Yan, John Folse, Justin Wilson. I used to watch cooking shows all Saturday. My grandmother had the red-and-white Betty Crocker cookbook. She got Southern Living, and so those things are nostalgia for me. I studied those books, looked at those pictures and remembered things. What really prompted me to go to culinary school was the need to know more. What I was reading in books and seeing in magazines wasn’t enough. I wanted to do this seriously. I want to throw myself in and absorb everything. When I got to culinary school, I was a sponge— any opportunity, people, culture, I absorbed it all. I just spiraled (up) from there. In a quest to learn more, is there a dream restaurant you’d like to work at?

I like food trucks and people that are more into food—chef-driven restaurants where the integrity of the food is so important. They are putting out simple, minimal, classic, tasty local food.

March 27 - April 2, 2013

Did anyone inspire you to become chef? Who?

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I grew up in West Point, and it was a really small town. My grandmother had chickens in her backyard; my grandfather had his own garden. My grandmother would have these club meetings and card parties where she would pull out her china, her tea service and punch bowl. I was always around food, and I enjoyed it. I don’t think I ever had a choice. I think from a small age, I would pull my chair up to the counter and help—get in the way actually. Were you made to help, or did you want to help?

They encouraged it, and they told me to come on. I was like, “Gran-

So you prefer James Beard Awards to Michelin stars?

I prefer James Beard to Michelin awards, but the Michelin stars like Alinea (restaurant), in food towns like Chicago and San Francisco, I desire to go there, too. I love food in all aspects. I’m not bound by southern food. I’m not a food snob where I only want to eat foie gras and caviar; I just like food. Whatever is good, I like it. When it comes to food, most women are bakers. How did that affect you becoming a sous chef at Parlor Market?

It affected me a lot. I would always see, in different publications,


TRIP BURNS

the best-of lists, and the chefs would always be male. If they threw a woman in it, she was a pastry chef. So, I think that was part of my reasoning to go to school because I knew I was a female, and it was already going to be more difficult for me. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Enrika Williams a boys club, and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get boxed into salads or puts her French pastries. I actually avoid those things if I can. I would rather training to use do savory and sauces and grill. as sous chef at Parlor Market. French kitchens are very regimental, but you never hear about female French chefs.

In the French kitchen it was a base system, very strict and lots of testosterone. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak or talk; you do what the chef tells you to do. The challenge can either make or break you. I wanted them to judge me on whether Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing a good or bad job, not (on) my gender. I wanted to prove them wrong, and I wanted to do it even though theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re telling me to be quiet and just stay in the back. It made me work that much harder. Are there any advantages to being a woman in a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world?

Sometimes it helped to be associated with chefs that are really good at their craft. People will look at you and think: Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not there by accident; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to the level of the others. So, in a sense, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of an acknowledgement. Maybe you are a pretty good chef. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fake it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten used to being one of the few female chefs in the kitchen. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helped me to be comfortable in my own skin because I have to sustain looks, snarls, attitudes and egos. PRUH:,//,$06VHHSDJH

by Jessica Mizell scallions, chives, parsley lemon, horseradish and salt, leaving her to sit overnight and be paired with a radish salad. (What does that radish have that she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t? Why must he mess with that ruby-colored hussy?) No vegetable or fruit could make her angrier though than that insufferable Julia Child. It was she who made Mr. Blades into a foodie, she who inspired him to make truffle butter, and it was she who taught him how to spatchcock a chicken like no one ever has before. I particularly enjoyed the chicken fricassee with prosciutto, tomatoes and sweet peppers; and stuffed chicken with chorizo stuffing. Even the more complicated recipes are extremely easy to follow with illustrations (shirtless illustrations, as aforementioned) scattered throughout. The book gradually progresses in technique and difficulty of dish, focusing on each part of Miss Hen from her breasts and thighs all the way down to her liver and giblets. The great thing about this book is that the author uses pretty much the same ingredients throughout the book, and most of the spices are common to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cupboards, with only a few that the average home cook would have to shop for. So go and make poultry artâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the chicken may thank 17 you afterward.

jacksonfreepress.com

love affair of a man and his chicken in a tone Blades has worked with other ingredients that makes this cookbook one youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll actually before and has a penchant for thinking the enjoy reading from start to finish (that is, if the photographs throughout of shirtless men cooking havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hooked you first). Written in the steamy style of another certain â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifty Shadesâ&#x20AC;? tale, the cookbook marauds as a novel interspersed with recipes (such as vanilla chicken and chicken chili) and useful tips for cooking, seasoning and even trussing your own chicken. The basics of this cookbook slowly evolve to more advanced recipes, all while continuing the steamy saga of Mr. Blades and Miss Hen. Follow as they explore common kitchen techniques from how to correctly stuff your chicken (to Miss Henâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delight by the way) to the correct way to butterfly a breast, to how to make â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifty Shades of Chickenâ&#x20AC;? entertains while educating about cooking poultry. beer-can chicken, to cooking tender chicken pot pie and all the side dishes to go with it. You follow the emotional turmoil Miss more the merrier. She is green with jealousy Hen experiences when she learns that Mr. as he coats her with a marinade of garlic,

COURTESY CLARKSON POTTER

A

seductive play on words is one way to describe their torrid love affairâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe even poultry erotica? She is a simple and slightly underweight free-range organic chicken with a yet-to-be-met sell-by date. He, a selfproclaimed â&#x20AC;&#x153;hard cookerâ&#x20AC;? and foodie who has to complicate things with ingredients other than her, has a 50-piece knife set that sends her liver quivering (which, by the way, will be turned into a delightful chicken liver crostini dish later on in the book). Inspired by Julia Child, he has a knack for multi-ingredient dishes, something that will rub her body cavity raw with jealousy. Miss Hen finds herself plucked from the obscurity of the Sub-Zero double-wide refrigerator into the strong and capable hands of a man she only knows at Mr. Blades. She will be marinated, stripped, steamed, butterflied, baked and seasoned to perfection, his hands stuffing her cavity with Spanish sausage stuffing and, though she never had a taste for things that were too spicy, she will find herself hooked on his hands and the way he pats her dry with multiple paper towels to leave her skin crispy after baking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifty Shades of Chicken: a Parody in a Cookbook,â&#x20AC;? by F.L. Fowler (Clarkson Potter, 2012, $19.99) is a fiery and flirtatious (and hilarious) read that follows the edible


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by ShaWanda Jacome SHAWANDA JACOME

There are some guys, even in this day and age, who think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not supposed to be in the kitchen. In general, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a consensus that I should be making salads and cakes.

7 Up pound cake. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly (what it sounds like)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pound cake made with 7 Up soda. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicious. You use 7 Up, butter, cream and eggs but the texture is the standard pound cake. My grandmother and mother would make it for special occasions and the holidays. I told myself that I had to learn how to make it because when I tried it would collapse or I would burn it. Finally, I mastered it. What is your ingredient?

Celery. I love celery, especially the smell. I use the leaves as salad greens, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pickle the hearts, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll use the roots and the parts to make stock out of them, (and) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make a broth out of that. I like to braise celery, I like it raw, I like it pickled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my new favorite ingredient. What is your least favorite ingredient?

A

s an elementary librarian at Woodville Heights Elementary in south Jackson, I get the opportunity to share books with kids on a plethora of topics. They keep me on my toes, and I never know what questions or comments will come bursting from their little noggins. I recently read, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?,â&#x20AC;? written by Christine Butterworth and illustrated by Lucia Gaggiotti, to one of my first-grade classes. The book is a colorful behind-the-scenes look at how food makes its way into kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lunchboxesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;because food doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow in grocery stores. Afterward, we went out to look at the garden the kids maintain with the help of Martha Jenkins from the National Women in Agriculture. During our time together, we had a lively discussion about the book, food, gardens and superheroes. I asked: What might you find in a lunchbox? They said: Underwear. (Terrell, age 7)

Eggs. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat them. I like to cook them, but as far as eggs exciting me, no, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to avoid that unless Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m making an aioli or hollandaise (sauce).

I asked: If you were a food superhero, what would you be? They said: Bananahead Man. He can shoot bananas at you. (Tiearra, age 6)

If you could cook for or serve anyone in America, who would it be?

I asked: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the funniest thing that has happened to you at lunch? They said: A food fight. We were throwing food at each other. (Elzy, age 6)

I have a few in mind, but I would say the president. Julia Child would have been the second. What is one piece of advice you would give anyone wanting to become a chef?

Read, travel, eat, talk to people, meet people, see things, just expound on what you already know. You think you know enough, learn some more. Just continue to push that. The more knowledge you (gain), the more you have in your repertoire, the more you can use that in any instance whenever you work in the kitchen.

I asked: What was your favorite part of the book? They said: The cookies, because I learned how they make chocolate chips. (Gabrielle, age 7)

Tailored to young girls?

I asked: What did you learn from the book? They said: About applesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they grow in trees. (Chase, age 6)

Pace yourself, but be prepared to work harder for less money, less accolades. Make sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing it for yourself, because sometimes that drive isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to come from someone else eating your food; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to come from you. Sometimes people will make you feel like you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be here, but you will have to prove to yourself that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to be here.

I asked: What do you do when you go out to work in the garden? They said: We plant seeds. We dig up mud. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun! (Simya, age 7)

COURTESY CANDLEWICK

When I got to culinary school, I was a spongeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; any opportunity, people, culture, I absorbed it all.

favorite

Teaching kids the truth about food can be an adventure in itself.

jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

What was the first recipe you mastered?

19


Beatty Burger with Secret Seasoning (serves four)

CASEY PURVIS

1.5 pounds lean ground beef 1 tomato, sliced Lettuce, shredded Condiments to taste (mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup) Pickles 4 slices American cheese 4 white-bread buns

J

ust outside the declared limits of downtown, near where the water starts at the Hinds-Rankin line, Mary Harden mans the cash register in Beatty Street Grocery (101 Beatty St., 601-355-0514). The little white building has been a part of her family since her grandparents, Mack and Irene Baldwin, founded it 73 years ago, when the area was full of families and small homes. As south Jackson industrialized and the customers moved away, Beatty Street added a small, home-cooking restaurant to the groceryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back end. It was a genuine hole-in-the-wall: Harden remembers plates passing through an opening created in the wall dividing the meat market and the main shopping area. Now co-owner, Harden oversees a

The Secret Seasoning is what makes Beatty Street Groceryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burger irresistible.

close-knit group of women serving up old-fashioned baloney-egg-and-cheeses, chopped roast beef, and steaming burgers to grateful clientele from nearby offices and construction sites, who can eat at converted tables made of old stock shelves. Items such as canned goods, cigarettes, medicine, snacks and soap are still available at the market, and Tommy Boyles hand-slices cold cuts at the deli. Though a local haunt, Beatty Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had some celebrity attention when Hardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter Skylar Laine was a finalist on last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idol.â&#x20AC;?

March 27 - April 2, 2013

-AKE9OUR %ASTER$INNER#OMPLETE

20

Secret Seasoning: â&#x20AC;˘ 2 tablespoons lemon pepper â&#x20AC;˘ 2 tablespoons garlic salt â&#x20AC;˘ 2 tablespoons onion salt â&#x20AC;˘ 2 tablespoons kosher salt â&#x20AC;˘ 2 tablespoons black pepper â&#x20AC;˘ 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning (such as Tony Chachereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s)

La Marca Prosecco paired with soft cheese is a fine start and also compliments a baked salmon dinner, as does Bodini Chardonnay with its hint of oak. Starborough, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #1 Sauvignon Blanc, compliments baked chicken with crisp fruit notes. Acrobat Pinot Gris pairs well with baked ham as does the lush balance of Belle Glos Meiomi Pinot Noir. The fullness of Seventy-Five Wine Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Sum 2008 is perfect with a flavorful leg of lamb.

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CULT

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Having grown up at Beatty Street Grocery, Harden compares her connection to the business to that of Darth Vaderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authoritative prediction of Luke Skywalkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lot in life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always felt the calling to be here â&#x20AC;Ś The Lord said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is your destinyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; when I was putting up soup cans when I was 5 years old with my grandfather.â&#x20AC;?

Shape beef into thin patties and press flat onto griddle. Sprinkle liberally with Secret Seasoning on each side, and cook until well-done. Toast the buns lightly. Assemble with desired condiments (but use all for the real Beatty style!) and give a generous shake of Secret Seasoning before completing the burger.

Artist Series: Wyatt Waters

DRIVE-IN {z}Â&#x201A;ÂŁ 46ÂŁ {ÂŁ ÂŻÂŁ !&0,+Â&#x2021;ÂŁ ÂŁ ÂŻÂŁ Â&#x20AC;z{Â&#x2039;Â&#x201A;Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2039;zÂ&#x192;}{

3016 NORTH STATE STREET - FONDREN ARTS DISTRICT 601.982.2633 - WALKERSDRIVEIN.COM


Kristin Gazaway is promoting healthy eating in local elementary schools.

R

ecently I had an opportunity to meet a newbie to Jackson who is shaking up the world of school food: Kristin Gazaway. I am working with her to plan a Family Fun Night at Woodville Heights Elementary School, where I work. During her visit, she will talk to families about portion control, whole grains, fresh ingredients and how to eat healthy on a budget. As parents and students snack on fruit nachos, prepared during her cooking demonstration, she will share nutritional tips to help students as they enter the grueling test-taking season. Gazaway, who is the regional executive chef for Morrison Healthcare Food Services, currently stationed at the Central Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, has been passionate about cooking since she was a youngster growing up in Paragould, Ark. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When my parents would come home at night, my brother (Jason) would do a salad, and I would do a side. â&#x20AC;Ś Someone would set the table, and we all had duties,â&#x20AC;? she said. Over time, it progressed to where she and Jason would rotate cooking nights. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They loved what I would fix. The time that I put cinnamon in my spaghetti sauceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe not that night. But for the most part they loved what I was experimenting with,â&#x20AC;? she said. While in high school Gazaway researched a handful of top culinary schools and decided to apply to one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I prayed, and I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;God, if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not meant for me to be in this field, then donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let me get accepted.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Because at that point it was very hard to get into these schools with a seven-to-one stuPRUH*$=$:$<VHHSDJH

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY KRISTIN GAZAWAY

by ShaWanda Jacome

21


*$=$:$<IURPSDJH

March 27 - April 2, 2013

Mcdadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine & Spirits has Northeast Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest showroom!

22

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm â&#x20AC;˘ Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-366-5676 â&#x20AC;˘ www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly

dent-teacher ratio. They only took like 20 students a semester,â&#x20AC;? she said. Despite having little experience aside from some catering work, she got in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never looked back. I graduated high school on a Monday night, and Friday, my parents shipped me to Vermont.â&#x20AC;? In 1998, Gazaway graduated from the New England Culinary Institute in Burlington, Vt., with an associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in food and nutrition. After completing a culinary internship and working for restaurants in Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas, she joined Morrison Healthcare in June 2009 as a retail manager at Baptist Memorial in Memphis. In March 2011, she moved to Jackson to assume her current role at CMMC. With 13 hospitals in Mississippi and Tennessee under her wing, she manages food cost, troubleshoots obstacles, helps organize and control inventory, creates special menus, and trains cooks and staff on new culinary techniques. Recently, she developed one of her line cooks into a sous chef role. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My team inspires me. My team at CMMC has been incredible. â&#x20AC;Ś Their energy inspires me to be better at what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing and to help them grow. I want them to grow. I believe in my team. â&#x20AC;Ś I let them experiment with their own ideas,â&#x20AC;? she said. Her visit to Woodville Heights is not her first involvement with the Jackson Public Schools. After a visit to a health class last year, where students eagerly inquired about the culinary arts field, she piloted a six-week after-school culinary program at Peeples Middle School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like the hot career to be in (right now). When I went to culinary school in 1996, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a clue. I just knew that I loved to cook, and it was my passion. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand really the different opportunities that this industry has. I was not a strong student in high school, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think a traditional college would have been the best choice for me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very hands-on. â&#x20AC;Ś My brain works very hands-on. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very creative. I just have that personality. So when the kids started asking questions, I was like well these kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to go to a traditional college. â&#x20AC;Ś They could go to culinary school and have a great career,â&#x20AC;? she said. Currently, Gazaway is working with eighth graders to develop their knowledge of fresh ingredients, different cooking methods and healthier choices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It started off as me introducing the culinary field to the 12 kids that I work with, and it changed halfway through,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m focusing on (things like) making healthier choices, learning portion control, how to make ranch (dressing) with Greek yogurt (rather than) mayonnaise and how to make things healthy on a budget.â&#x20AC;? Due to the success of the program at Peeples, she is working with senior corporate executive chef at Morrison headquarters, Kevin Dorr, on a curriculum that can be replicated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully, by the end of this year, I can roll it out so that (Morrison) chefs across the country, that want to get involved in schools, they can,â&#x20AC;? she said. At 35, Gazaway is excited about the direction her career is going. She was recently selected to attend the Culinary Institute of America through Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Masterworks programâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;only one chef is chosen from each region. She will spend one week this April in San Antonio, Texas, with top corporate chefs learning new things. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like chef boot camp! â&#x20AC;Ś Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge honor to be selected,â&#x20AC;? she said. Gazaway is not letting a historically male-dominated field slow her down. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that nationally, 79 percent of chefs and head cooks are men. Gateway Gourmet reports that 25 years ago, women made up only 10 percent of students in culinary arts programs. Today the number of men and women in those same programs is about equal. Yet, the median base salary for male executive chefs is nearly $18,000 more than that of a woman, based on 2011 data released by the American Culinary Federation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always worked really hard and could get in there and scrub an oven just like a guy could. (I could) be busy on a Friday night and keep up. I never got in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;weedsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; so to speak. I was very strong. â&#x20AC;Ś Society has embraced women in culinary (arts) and has been supportive,â&#x20AC;? Gazaway said. For young women who might consider going into the field, she says youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to stick to your guns, continually educate yourself and keep up with culinary trends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t back downâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;ever. â&#x20AC;Ś If you know the trends and whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, you can hold a conversationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;speak your game,â&#x20AC;? Gazaway said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I went to culinary school in 1996, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a clue. I just knew that I loved to cook, and it was my passion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;


FLICKR/STU_SPIVACK

Desserts, such as apple crisp, are Two Sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; deadly weapons.

T

wo Sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kitchen is the downtown home of arguably some of the best fried chicken in the Metro, and devotees sing praises of its tomato gravy, fried steak and angel biscuits. Owner Diann Irving Alford started out in the country cookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; business more than two decades ago; the 24-year-old restaurant is named, aptly, in honor of Alfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two siblings. Two Sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; has seen an upswing in out-of-town customersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even a few tourists from out of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sparked by a visit Adam Richman of The Travel Channelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man v. Foodâ&#x20AC;? and a televised appearance with folks from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Warrior Dash that has aired extensively in Canada. Alford impressed Richman with Two Sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; distinctive light and flavorful fried chicken, but the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desserts are a secret weapon, from pies to cakes to apple crisps.

Apple Crisp 2 cups thinly sliced Gala or Delicious apples 1 cup white sugar Pinch cinnamon 1/2 cup water 2 sticks unsalted butter, divided 1 1/2 cups light brown sugar

Spread the apples evenly in a quiche dish. Cover with 1 cup of white sugar and sprinkle cinnamon over top. Pour the 1/2 cup of water over the sugar and apples. In a separate bowl, mix flour and brown sugar, then add one stick of butter. Mix well to create the crispâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topping. Cover apple mixture with 1/4 of the topping mixture. Dot the surface of the crisp with the pieces of the second stick of butter. Bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned and bubbly at the edges.

Celebrate Easter

with family and friends at our  delectable holiday brunch with a visit  from the Easter Bunny! Celebrate !"#"$%&'()%$*+%,-#$+'%./001 2-'3"04%5$-$"(0%6%5+-&((7%.-' 2*"87'+0#9%./:+$%6%.'+-;&-#$%./:+$ <)+8+$%5$-$"(0%6%5+-#(0-8%=($%,0$'++# =(8"7-1%>0#?"'+7%@+##+'$# A")(#-#%B%CD%6%.8((7%A-'19#%B%CEFGG

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JHUVXQQLHUGD\VPHDQPRUHWLPHWRJULOORXW VLGHZLWKIULHQGVRUMXVWSDWLRVLWIRUKRXUVDWD IDYRULWHORFDOUHVWDXUDQW$QGIUHVKLVWKHZRUG RIWKHVHDVRQZLWKDEXQGDQWSURGXFHÂżOOLQJXS JURFHU\VKHOYHVDQGUHIULJHUDWRUV  ,Q -DFNVRQ VSULQJ EULQJV SOHQW\ RI IRRG HYHQWV DV ZHOO 7DVWH RI 0LVVLVVLSSL DQG WKH QHZ7DVWH RI )RQGUHQ D VHFRQG 3RS 8S 3L]]D DW6DO 0RRNLHÂśVJXHVWFKHIGLQQHUVDQGPRUH 3OXV QHZ UHVWDXUDQWV DUH WKURZLQJ RSHQ WKHLU GRRUV DFURVV WKH PHWUR RIIHULQJ HYHU\WKLQJ IURP-DSDQHVHWR,WDOLDQ6WD\XSWRGDWHRQDOO WKHWDVW\WLGELWVDERXWWKHVHHYHQWVDQGPRUHDW MISPVDQGMISHYHQWVFRP

Join Us 5/07-1H%A-'I*%JKH%LGKJ% %%KK-)%B%L?) $2795* ADULTS

Children under 4 are free  *Plus 22% service charge and tax Reserved Seating Not Available

$13.95* KIDS 4-12

HILTON JACKSON HOTEL I-55 N AND COUNTY LINE ROAD

(601) 957 - 2800

|

HILTON-JACKSON.COM

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FILE PHOTO

plus Easter tr eats!

23


March 27 - April 2, 2013

Whatever Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re In The Mood For!

24


FX]VBc^_ on State Street

CdTbSPh=XVWc

WEDNESDAY 3/27

Pub Quiz with Andrew

THURSDAY 3/28

Legacy

FRIDAY 3/29

Diesel

SATURDAY 3/30

Larry Waters Duo

â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

CWdabSPh=XVWc

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no

SUNDAY 3/31

sharing, no carry out

MONDAY 4/1

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B

Wine Tasting Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 4/2

$2 Pints

Open Mic with A Guy Named George

601.960.3008 Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

$7.98

Hď?Ąď?°ď?°ď?š Hď?Żď?ľď?˛

Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 4 - 7pm â&#x20AC;˘ Drink Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Special Food Menu

koinoniacoffee.net

Easter

Sunday Brunch

March 31st 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Includes Meal & Beverage $15 For Adults $10 Children 12 and Under

      This May, Jackson Free Press will hold the inaugural JFP Chef Week featuring local chefs, signature dishes and  :   prizes for charities! Call Bookmark jfpchefweek.com for details.

x11 2-6121 601-36 icipate! t to par

jacksonfreepress.com

136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

25


5A44 FX5X

TRY OUR

Join us for Happy Hour

CRABCAKES now on the menu

Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

ALL CRAB, NO FILLER

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013

601-919-2829

DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood

601.932.4070

$7.99 Daily Lunch Specials 2nd Location

Grand Opening April 1st

900 Suite E. County Line Rd Former AJ’s

Cedar Creek Ramblers Sat | March 30 | 9 pm | $5

3rd Annual

Crawfish Boil Saturday | April 28 festivities start at 2pm featuring

George McConnell and the Nonchalants

Blues & BBQ

D’Lo Trio | Every Thursday 7-10 pm | No Cover

601-362-6388

March 27 - April 2, 2013

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson www.cherokeedrivein.com

26

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra, Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes! Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Hwy 80 E in Pearl, 601-932-8728 and 149 Old Fannin Rd in Brandon, 601-992-6686) A culinary treat traditional Mexican. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads. COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. ASIAN AND INDIAN Mr. Chen’s (5465 I 55 North, 601-978-1865) Fresh authentic Chinese Food, located within an actual grocery store with many unique produce offerings. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made springrolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry. VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-veganfriendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.


LIFE&STYLE | geek

Return of the ‘Thrones’ by Kathleen M. Mitchell

Warning: Major spoilers for the first two seasons, but no serious ones for the upcoming season.

March 27 - April 2, 2013

!"#"$%%&#'()**+,-(*./0( +"#%"1(231(4567"&8"1,-(9#:( :"8"#%&9(1"-"91;7< =&-&%(>88;7"95%7<;38?*./0

COURTESY HBO

I

t might not be obvious, but underneath my valley-girl vocal tendencies and classic black stilettos lives a pretty hard-core nerd. I grew up loving fantasy novels and tales of magic and science fiction. Luckily, these days geek is chic, and none is more popular than ratings darling “Game of Thrones,” the HBO television series based on George R. R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” book series. (My husband and I asked the string trio at our wedding to play the intro music to “Game of Thrones” while our groomsmen and bridesmaids walked down the aisle—I told you my geekery went beyond average). The show’s first two seasons were critical and commercial successes, and the third season begins Sunday. Now, I’ve read the books through the third installment and—without revealing anything—fans are in for a roller coaster. When we last saw our intrepid Starks, Baratheons, Lannisters and, of course, the Mother of Dragons, they were engaged in various battles for the Iron Throne of Westeros. (Seriously, stop reading now if you don’t want spoilers for the first two seasons). One of the five kings vying for the Iron Throne is dead— Renly Baratheon, whose death his own brother Stannis arranged. King Joffrey (the crazy bastard son of incest between his twin parents) rules from King’s Landing, but Stannis, Balon Greyjoy and Robb Stark challenge his right to the throne.

Robb won several key battles, even capturing the great Jaime Lannister as war prisoner (until his mother Catelyn Stark sent her female knight Brienne to trade Jaime). The other Stark children are scattered across Westeros—

“Game of Thrones” returns to HBO March 31.

Sansa in the Lannisters’ clutches, Arya in the wild posing as a boy, and Bran and Rickon fleeing Winterfell. Tyrion Lannister proved himself a capable Hand of the King, with cunning war planning that held King’s Landing during Stannis’ attack (although his father Tywin rode in to

@A3#-31":(BC

28 mind_bp_4.5x5.875.indd 1

3/14/13 1:57 PM

claim credit at the last minute). When we last saw Daenerys Targaryen, she was across the sea trying to build her own army to take the Iron Throne. And of course, beyond the Wall where Jon Snow toils, mysterious White Walkers are waking. I’m endlessly excited that the producers decided to have this 10-episode season cover only the first half of the third book, “A Storm of Swords.” They managed to fit the first book (“A Game of Thrones”) into the first season of the show beautifully, with great pacing while still staying true to the story. But in the second season, which covered the entirety of “A Clash of Kings,” the plot felt rushed at points, and they drastically changed several key scenes or story arcs to fit the book into one season. It was still highly entertaining, but knowing the producers can take their time with the third novel—which is even longer than the first two—gives me hope for more plot nuance and detailed exploration of this world. The other thing that really intrigues me is the news that “Song of Ice and Fire” author Martin penned one of the episodes, the seventh, titled “The Bear and the Maiden Fair.” Those who have read the third book talk amongst yourselves about predictions for this particular episode’s plot. It airs May 12. Personally, my bet is that the season finale will cover That Really Intense Thing That Happens roughly midway through the third book. (Hey, I promised no spoilers!) It’s entitled “Mhysa” and airs June 2. And, as always, winter is coming.


29

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LIFE&STYLE | girl about town for the publications readers love to read.

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by Julie Skipper

Spring Forward TRIP BURNS

Write stories that matter

leigh@jacksonfreepress.com

119 S. President Street

601.352.2322

www.Underground119.com

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, March 27th

ERIN CALLIE

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover,

Thursday, March 28th

STEVE WILKERSON

(Boowgie Piano) 8-11, No Cover,

Friday, March 29th

HAPPY HOUR! A

Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade feels like the kickoff to spring in Jackson.

TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG! Till 7 Wednesday -Friday

2-FOR-1 • DRAFT BEER • WELL DRINKS • WINE

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND (Brass Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, March 30th

BOOKER WALKER

March 27 - April 2, 2013

(Jazz) 9-1, $10 Cover

30

Monday, April 1st

April Fool’s Comedy Show

with Intellectual Bulimics

starts at 7pm, $5 Cover

COMING

SOON King Edward April 6th, 2013

s I write this, it’s spring break week—which, sadly for those of us who are childless and do not work in the education sector, means just another work week. I say sadly because it seems to me that a break is warranted after February. February is a hard month. It’s cold, it’s still winter and, other than Valentine’s Day, it just really doesn’t have much going for it. I don’t seem to be alone in that sentiment; countless friends the past few weeks seem to echo the refrain, “I’m just … tired.” So here we are. Spring break. Except that as grown-ups, we don’t get one. Luckily, we do get the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade, which is the true harbinger of springtime and the Rite of Spring celebration for countless Jacksonians (and friends of Jackson … or just friends of fun times). It’s a sign that we have made it through the winter and headed into the newness of spring, and we are going to have a good time doing so. This year, I marched for the first time with the newly formed Nugget League of Mayhem. I really can’t think of a better way to bid farewell to the winter blahs than to traipse through the streets of downtown filled with thousands of happy revelers while wearing a fringed cape and a tiara. Then as I sat awake trying to adjust to daylight-saving time, I realized that, as happens every year on the heels of St. Paddy’s, springtime activities just keep coming. Local distillery Cathead (601-667-3038, catheadvodka.com) welcomes the season with the return of its honeysuckle vodka. Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St., 601-

360-0090) will host a spring and summer guest chef series—the first installment last week featured Halle Magee from Satterfield’s in Birmingham, Ala. Plus, restaurants all over town debut new spring foodand-drink menus. Fresh spring fruits and veggies appear at the farmers markets. The Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515) opened a new exhibit, “Old Masters to Monet,” March 23. The Crossroads Film Festival (crossroadsfilmfestival.com) brings fresh filmmakers to the state. And Easter in March this year brings an even earlier opportunity to quite literally shed the heaviness of winter and bust out the lighter, brighter spring clothes and accessories—as the displays and social media feeds of local boutiques remind us. In April, even more events fill the social calendar, and it will grow ever warmer outside, which—coupled with the aforementioned daylight-saving time—means my favorite springtime activity: patio-sitting. No doubt, the open spaces at places like Babalu Tacos and Tapas (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757), Walker’s Drive-In (3016 N. State St., 601-982-2633, and Que Sera Sera (2801 N. State St., 601981-2520) will be packed with locals who’ve caught the spring fever. So, maybe we don’t get a spring break any longer. Maybe that’s OK. Maybe all we need is a parade and a patio. They let us know that we’ve made it through the winter, and that it doesn’t require a week off to go party in Cancun to take a little time out to let loose, enjoy ourselves and celebrate the new season.


ARTS p 32 | 8 DAYS p 33 | MUSIC p 36 | SPORTS p 38

Longing for Love by Larry Morrisey

COURTESY UNWED TEENAGE MOTHERS

T

Oxford’s Unwed Teenage Mothers play loud but they have hearts of pure pop.

months out of the year really made it hard to do anything else with another band,” he says. Since leaving that band last year, Sneed has pushed the Teenage Mothers with full force. The band recently bought the requisite old van, and they are planning tours to the Midwest and East Coast. While it’s important for them to play in Chicago and New York, Sneed’s favorite out-of-town shows have been in smaller cities. One of the most memorable was The Garden Center, a temporary venue in Starkville. “I think it was somebody’s parent’s actual garden center. Last time we played there, there were over 350 kids at the show,” Sneed says. “Those are always the most fun places to play, the cities where bands don’t usually go.”

The Unwed Teenage Mothers will play a record release party for their latest EP, “Forever Until You Are Bones,” at Morningbell Records and Studios (622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, 769-233-7468) this Friday, March 29, at 7 p.m. The $5 cover includes food. Unwed Teenage Mothers’ record is the latest release from Hiss Lab, a label run by Jackson music devotees David McCarty, Wes and K.C. Williams, and Chaney Nichols. It features cover artwork by McCarty and a hand-sewn cover created by K.C. Williams. Jackson stalwarts Los Buddies will open the show.

Morningbell Turns 1! The March 29 show with Unwed Teenage Mothers and Los Buddies is also a celebration of Morrningbell Records and Studios’ first birthday.

jacksonfreepress.com

he Unwed Teenage Mothers remember what it’s like to be broken-hearted. The Oxford-based group plays noisy garage rock with yearning pop songs tucked inside. Their recordings feature distorted drums and heavily treated vocals like many of their garage rock contemporaries, but the group’s melodies and lyrics hearken back to classic ’60s pop songs. Singer and guitarist Colin Sneed started the band as a solo recording project in 2008. An Oxford native, Sneed grew up in musical opposition to the jam bands and “white boy blues” that prevailed in the local clubs. Starting out as a punk rocker in high school, he was later influenced by the garage and punk sounds of Oxford bands like The Preacher’s Kids. He also admits to an affection for the Top 40 pop songs masterminded by legendary ’60s music producer Phil Spector. Wanting to get his own music down, Sneed began borrowing computers from friends in mid-2007 to record his songs. After sharing some of his initial tracks on Myspace, the guitarist began hearing from record labels from around the country, resulting in the steady release of his solo music. Sneed has three vinyl EPs to his credit—two alone and one with the Unwed Teenage Mothers, with another EP set for release this week. “I just kind of stumbled into putting out records and it’s pretty fun,” Sneed admits. The band is doing more recording as a group these days, too. The latest EP, “Forever Until You Are Bones,” is from an older session that Sneed recorded by himself at his apartment, but the full band (which also includes Clinton natives Landon Boyle on guitar and Shane Prewitt on drums, as well as bassist Johnny Valiant, formerly of Amory) recently finished up an album-length project at Beau Bourgeois’ (a member of Oxford’s E-Meters) home studio. It’s called “If You Think You Are Lonely Now.” “It’s still home recording, but it’s in a better home,” Sneed says. The band started playing live in 2010, but it has been a side project for Sneed up until recently. For the past few years he has spent a lot of time on the road as the drummer for Bass Drum of Death, an Oxford-based garage rock duo. “Being on tour with Bass Drum of Death for nine

31


DIVERSIONS | arts

Paint by Numbers by Kathleen M. Mitchell

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

I

April 23 & 24 Jackson’s Thalia Mara Hall @ 7:30 pm Ticketmaster.com

March 27 -April 2, 2013

1-800-745-3000

32

f anything can improve my painting prowess, it’s wine. Of course, having a real artist guide me through the process can’t hurt, either. For me, it’s easy to get hung up on the details of the painting, or take too long to choose the perfect hue. By then, I’ve lost my steam and another half-finished canvas joins the others in a semi-painted cemetery in our house. So thank goodness for the trendy painting-with-wine studios popping in Jackson and around the country. We have two in the metro, Artful Hours in Madison and Easely Amused in Ridgeland (formerly on Lakeland). Variations on the theme have popped up around the country: “Pinot’s Palette,” “Painting with a Twist” and “Paint by the Glass,” to name a few, but the concept is essentially the same: bring your own wine and leave with a completed painting. My friend Liz and I had been eyeing the classes for a while and recently jumped at the chance to paint one of our favorites: a streetlight scene, set on Bourbon Street in New Orleans and rendered in bright, primary colors. When we arrived at Artful Hours, the canvases were already neatly set up on small easels in rows. The staffers instructed us on how much paint to get (three pumps of black, one of light blue, three of dark orange, etc.) and offered a corkscrew to anyone who might need it (which, of course, we did). I was surprised to see a black Sharpie outline already sketched on most of the canvases. A few were completely blank, by special request, but the basic shape was already on most of them. The instructor, perched on an elevated platform at the front of the room, led us through the painting, slow enough to keep everyone on track but quick enough to keep people like me from second-guessing our work. Many of the instructors have art degrees and use the classes as a way to support the creation of their own art. The instructors come up with the original paintings (unless they are emulating a famous work of art, such as Vincent van Gogh’s

Leaving with a finished painting is one of the best parts about classes at Artful Hours or Easely Amused.

“Starry Night”), and then teach students to recreate their work. In some classes, students create the same basic image (say, a fleur de lis) in colors of their choosing. Other times the instruction is even looser—paint your favorite animal, for example, and the instructor offers more individualized advice. Of course, participants are welcome to deviate from the rest of the class as much as they’d like—it is, after all, your painting to take home at the end of the night—but most of us followed along pretty closely, only adding minor changes or individual touches. One student on my row painted the scene backward—a mirror image rather than direct copy of the instructor’s example. Both Artful Hours and Easely Amused offer special events, such as date nights for couples. At these couple sessions, each person might paint half of a diptych painting (two painting panels meant to hang next to each other to show the full image, or paint each other a particular style, such as Picasso’s). Kids’ classes and private bookings are also options. The class isn’t a place for art snobs. After all, close to 100 (or more) other people in the Jackson metro have a version of the painting that now rests atop my bookshelf. (The Bourbon Street painting is one of the more popular classes). Some of them are much, much better than mine. But a finished painting that I created now sits in my house, and that’s what matters to me—plus, I had a blast with a good friend. It’s really more about the experience. An adult paintby-numbers project, if you will. To find out more about Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland, 601-707-5854), visit easely amused.com or email paint@easelyamused. com. For more on Artful Hours (111 Colony Crossing, Suite 200, Madison, 270604-3418), find Artful Hours on Facebook or email artfulhours@gmail.com for more information.


WEDNESDAY 3/27

SATURDAY 3/30

Inky the Clown is at the Performing Arts Festival at the Ag Museum.

Several Easter egg hunts take place in the greater Jackson area.

MONDAY 4/1 Taste of Mississippi is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village.

BEST BETS

JOSH FRANER

The Mississippi Puppetry Guild’s Performing Arts Festival for Children is from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. today and tomorrow at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Presenters include Puppet Arts Theatre, Sherman Lee Dillon, Ben Woods, Chiquila Pearson, Inky the Clown, Hilda Faye Hill and Rosia Crisler. $8, $7 per child in a group; call 601-977-9840; mspuppetry.com. … Downtown Jackson Partners president Ben Allen speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Fleet Feet Sports’ Pub Run is at 6 p.m. at Soulshine Pizza Factory (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Free; call 601898-9696.

from 2-7 p.m. today and March 30 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Brandon Civic Center (1000 Municipal Drive, Brandon). Enjoy shopping, food, pictures with the Easter Bunny, face painting, a fashion show and more. Free; call 601824-4578. … Charlie Mars performs at 8:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. Cocktails at 7:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

SATURDAY 3/30

Breakfast with the Easter Bunny and Animals is from 8-9:30 a.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Advance tickets only. $15, $11 children 12 and under, $5 members; call 601-352-2580; jacksonzoo.org. … The Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) gives an Easter egg hunt for children ages 7 and under from 9 a.m.-noon. Includes pony and train rides, and pictures with the Easter Bunny. $6, $4 ages 3-18; call 601-432-4500. … The Easter Celebration at the Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive) is from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Enjoy an egg hunt, crafts and volcanic egg dyBY LATASHA WILLIS ing. $8, children 12 months and under free; call 601-981-5469. JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM … The Family Easter Bash is from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Spencer FAX: 601-510-9019 Perkins Center (1831 RobinDAILY UPDATES AT son St.). Enjoy field games, an JFPEVENTS.COM egg hunt and music from P. Lo Jetson, Jerrell Moore and Radical Praiz, Chad Perry, Laurie Walker, Joanne Bell and more. Proceeds benefit the center’s after-school program. Free admission, $5 iPad Mini raffle ticket; call 601-354-1563. … The City of Jackson Easter Egg Hunt is at noon at Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.). For children ages 5-10. Bring a bag or basket. Free; call 601-960-0471. … The Foolish Comedy Show with Joe Clair, Shawty Shawty, Marcus Honer and Comedian Nardo is at 9 p.m. at ISH Grill and Bar. After-party follows. $20 through March 29; foolishshow. eventbrite.com. … Jazz artist Cliff Hines performs at 9 p.m. at Yellow Scarf. Purchase beer and light wine, or BYOB. $15 in advance online, $20 at door; call 347-754-0668; yellowscarf.ojahmediagroup.com.

EVENTS@

Rock artist and Mississippi native Charlie Mars performs at Duling Hall March 29 at 8:30 p.m.

THURSDAY 3/28

At Hal & Mal’s, the Democrats on Tap Happy Hour is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Oyster Bar Room (no cover, donations welcome; rankindemocrats.net), and the Howlin’ Brothers and Sound Wagon perform at 7:30 p.m. with cocktails at 6 p.m. (for ages 18 and up, $5 in advance, $8 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net).

FRIDAY 3/29

The City of Brandon Kaleidoscope Spring Market is

SUNDAY 3/31

See works from Judd Meaders and Marcus McClamrock at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (107 N. Union St., Canton) through April 30. Free, artwork for sale; call 601-391-3066; lisette.co.

Local gospel artist Laurie Walker performs at the Family Easter Bash March 30 at the Spencer Perkins Center. The event is from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

MONDAY 4/1

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Taste of Mississippi is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy gourmet dishes and a silent auction; Hunter Gibson and the Gators, and Pryor Graeber and the Tombstones perform. Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services. $65 in advance, $80 at the door; call 601-353-2759; atasteofms.org.

TUESDAY 4/2

Taylis Encinas and John Paul perform during Music in the City at 5:15 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Free, donations welcome; call 601-960-1515. … The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents “When Cletus Met Elizabeth” from 6-9 p.m. at Char (4500 Interstate 55 N.). RSVP. For ages 18 and up. $49; call 601-937-1752; thedetectives.biz. … The play “Shipwrecked! An Entertainment: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive) in Theatre 151. Runs through April 6. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for Belhaven employees and students; call 601-965-7026.

WEDNESDAY 4/3

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 3/27

KEN GORDON PHOTOGRAPHY

MARCH 27 - APRIL 3, 2013

MDAH staff members Amanda Lyons and Will Morgan present “Dutch Fliers of Jackson, Part 2” during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. 33 More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Blue Cross Blue Shield Taste of Mississippi April 1, 7 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy gourmet dishes, a silent auction and live music. Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services. $65 in advance, $80 at the door; call 601-353-2759; atasteofms.org.

(/,)$!9 Resurrection Gala and Anchor Community Awards Banquet March 29, 7 p.m., at Mount Helm Baptist Church (300 E. Church St.). Enjoy live entertainment and guest speakers including Dr. Robert Smith, Pastor Jerry Young of New Hope Baptist Church, and Billy Redd of the Boys and Girls Club. $40, $320 table of eight; call 601353-3981; email admin@mthelm.org. The Bunny Photo Experience through March 30, at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Children may visit and take a picture with the Easter Bunny. Photo packages start at $19.95, $5 online credit available for additional items; call 601-956-3438.

#/--5.)49 American Board Teaching Career Information Sessions. Sessions are at 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Learn how to earn a professional teaching license. Bachelor’s degree required. Online registration available. Free; abcte.org. • April 2, at Flowood Library (103 Winners Circle, Flowood).

• April 3, at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Events at Corner Bakery, Madison (149 Grandview Blvd., Madison). • What You Need to Know: The Adult Child’s Guide to Being a Financial Caregiver March 28, 11:30 a.m. Certified financial planner David Russell facilitates. Lunch included. Seating limited; registration required. Free; call 601-957-0323; pinnacletrust.eventbrite.com. • Montessori Academy of Jackson Information Session April 2, 6-7 p.m. Learn about the academic program for children ages eight weeks to sixth grade. Free; call 601-607-7377. Spring Community Enrichment Series at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Registration required. Call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. • Auditioning and Acting for Film April 1, 5:30-7 p.m. Gain confidence to survive the competitive audition environment. Acting veteran and director Jim Fraiser is the instructor. Classes are Mondays through April 22. $75. • Basics of Investing April 1, 6-7:30 p.m. Mark Maxell is the instructor. The class meets Mondays through April 29. $70. • Starting and Operating Your Own Business April 1, 6-8 p.m. David McNair is the instructor. The class meets Mondays through April 15. $70. • Exploring Entrepreneurship April 2, 6-7:30 p.m. Joe Donovan is the instructor. The class meets Tuesdays through May 7. $100. Canton Youth Employment and Training Summit March 28, 9 a.m., at Canton High School (634 Finney Road, Canton). Discuss career oppor-

tunities with companies, receive information from colleges and universities and attend seminars. Free; call 228-324-2946. Teen Time (7th-12th Graders) March 28, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). The program includes activities related to pop culture and current events. Free; call 601-856-4536. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting March 28, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0004. How to Succeed in Business March 28, 6 p.m., at Sal and Mookie’s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St.). LABA-Link is the host, and Jeff Good, president of Mangia Bene Restaurant Management Group, is the presenter. Includes networking and Latin music. RSVP. Free, food for sale; email labalink@gmail.com. Youth Fishing Rodeo March 30, 7 a.m., at Turcotte Lab (506 Highway 43 S., Canton). The program is for youth ages 15 and under. Bring fishing gear, catfish bait and stringers. Free; call 601859-4358 or 601-432-2200; mdwfp.com. Holi Festival of Colors March 30, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., at Hindu Temple of Mississippi (173 Vernon Jones Ave., Brandon). The Hindu spring festival includes Indian food stalls, henna tattoos, arts and crafts vendors, games, face painting and color splashes. Free admission; call 601-918-8712, 601-519-5656 or 601-278-0154; find Jackson Holi Mela 2013 on Facebook. Celebrate Women’s Month Workshop March 30, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). The theme is “The Collective

Soul of the Human Race: Dismantling the Walls that Divide.” Breaking Free Ministries shares a presentation and leads group discussions about the content. Free; call 601-214-6140 or 601960-3008; email swinton2@gmail.com. Relationship Recovery Workshop April 1, 6-8 p.m., at Grace Christian Counseling Center (1414 Cherry St., Vicksburg). The 10-week workshop is for adults recovering from broken relationships such as divorces, separations or breakups. Sessions are Mondays from 6-8 p.m. Registration required. Limited partial scholarships available. $50 (includes materials); call 601-636-5703. 90 For Life Health Seminar April 1-2, 6:30 p.m., at Mississippi Public Broadcasting (3825 Ridgewood Road), in the auditorium. Author and biomedical researcher Dr. Joel Wallach gives advice on getting healthy, saving money and creating wealth. Registration is at 6 p.m. Space limited; RSVP. Free; call 601-540-7497. City of Jackson Mayoral Candidates Forum April 2, 5:30 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Women for Progress is the host. Meet and listen to the candidates for mayor of Jackson. Free; call 601559-5755 or 601-259-6770; email mail@ womenforprogress.com. Columbus Spring Pilgrimage through April 13, at Columbus. The program includes tours of antebellum homes and historic churches, carriage rides, music and the “Tales from the Crypt” cemetery tour. Visit the website for specifics. $10-$20 tours, $3-$5 cemetery tour, $5 carriage rides, $5-$8 double decker bus; call 662-329-1191 or 800920-3533; columbus-ms.org.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

St.
Alexis

Episcopal
Church Where
All
Are
Welcome
 650
E.South
Street
•
Jackson 601.944.0415

Holy
Week
Services
 Maundy
Thursday
(March
28): Maundy
Thursday
Liturgy &
Mediterranean‐Style
Dinner 6:00
p.m. March 27 - April 2, 2013

Good
Friday
(March
29):


34

Listings 3/29 –

for Thur.

3-D G.I. Joe: Retaliation PG13

The Call

G.I. Joe: Retaliation (non 3-D) PG13 Tyler Perry’s Temptation: Confessions… PG13 The Host

PG13

3-D The Croods PG The Croods (non 3-D) Olympus Has Fallen

PG R

Fri. 4/4 R

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone PG13 3-D Oz: The Great And Powerful PG Oz: The Great And Powerful (non 3-D) PG Jack The Giant Slayer (non 3-D) PG13 Snitch

PG13

Safe Haven PG13 Identity Thief

R

Stations
of
the
Cross
traveling
 through
downtown
Jackson.

 Begin
in
the
Hal
&
Mal’s
parking
 lot
at
noon.

Admission PG13

Good
Friday
Liturgy
(Church):

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

6:00
p.m.

Easter
Sunday:
Holy
Eucharist (March
31) 10:30
a.m.

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311


#2%!4)6%#,!33%3

Heartburn: The Painful Facts March 27, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. Dr. Ronald Kotfila explains causes and treatments for frequent heartburn. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262.

Shut Up and Write, Create, Sell! Sign up now for one (or more) of JFP Editor Donna Ladd’s upcoming writing and creativity classes. All classes meet Saturdays. Sign up for two classes and get a 10 percent discount. Your fee will reserve your space and is not refundable. Gift certificates available. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 15 or email class@ jacksonfreepress.com for more information. • Shut Up and Sell! March 30, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. This workshop teaches the art of selling your writing, including writing query letters, nonfiction proposals, networking and researching markets. You’ll also learn tricks to success for the freelance life. $50 includes materials, light lunch and a follow-up critique. • Shut Up and Write! April 6-June 1. Six classes, every other Saturday, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn to write sparkling non-fiction stories, memoir and essays. $150, includes materials. • Shut Up and Create! April 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Ladd’s newest workshop will benefit any artist, writer or anyone who wants to be more creative. This interactive workshop will involve games, exercises and tools to help you be more creative long after the class. $50 includes materials and light lunch.

Fit Fest Week through March 30, at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). The center holds events to promote wellness such as a health fair March 27 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and the “Sweetness” Fight Against Obesity 5K March 30 at 8 a.m. Fees vary for race, other events free; call 601-979-1368; active.com. Women’s Health Expo April 2, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). The American Cancer Society is the host. Get information on breast cancer screenings and prevention. Includes health screenings. The first 250 women to arrive receive a gift. Free; call 601-321-5514. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings Fridays, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children every first Friday. Appointment required. Free; call 601-707-7355.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Arsenic and Old Lace” March 29-31, 7:30 p.m., at Strand Theatre (717 Clay St., Vicksburg). The Westside Theatre Foundation presents Joseph Kesselring’s black comedy. $12; call 601618-9349; westsidetheatrefoundation.com. Student Directed Showcase April 2-6, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in Theatre 151. Belhaven senior Anna Rebmann directs two shorts. Belhaven students may queue for available free seats. $10, $5 students and seniors; call 601-974-6494.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. • “Here I Am: The Story of Tim Hetherington, War Photographer” March 28, 5 p.m. Alan Huffman signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. Events at Off Square Books (129 Courthouse Square, Oxford). Call 662-236-2828. • “Long Gone Daddies” March 28, 6 p.m. David Wesley Williams signs books. $24.95 book. • “Washington: A Life” April 3, 5 p.m. Ron Chernow signs books. $20 book. Applause! Writer Series March 28, noon, at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.), in the Ellen Douglas Room. Editorial cartoonist and author Marshall Ramsey is the speaker. Light refreshments served; sack lunches welcome. Free; call 601-968-5820. Visiting Writers Series: Jehanne Dubrow March 28, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215. Dubrow, the author of four poetry collections, gives a lecture and reading. Free; call 601974-1305.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Artist and Jewelry Artisans Exhibit through April 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). Reception April 2 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4056 or 800-647-7542. “Pieces of the Past: Civil Rights in Jackson” through April 7, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The rotating artifact exhibit provides insight into the causes, violence and resistance that occurred during the movement. Free; call 601-576-6920; oldcapitolmuseum.com.

"%4(%#(!.'% Fit 4 Change 5K March 28, 6 p.m., at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Includes participation from state legislators. Registration required. Proceeds benefit Victory Sports Foundation’s obesity-prevention efforts. Free, donations welcome; call 601-398-0950; paullacoste.com. Clothing Giveaway March 30, 9-11 a.m., at Sheppard Brothers Park (1355 Hattiesburg St.). Gently-used items for adults and children. Free, donations welcome; call 769-257-8494.

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/27:

New Bourbon Street Jazz Band (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 3/28:

The Howlin’ Brothers Show 7:30pm 18+ (Red Room) Swing de Paris (Restaurant)

FRIDAY 3/29:

Crossing Dixon (Red Room) Monty Russell (Restaurant)

SATURDAY 3/30:

Miles Flat (Red Room) Brian Jones (Restaurant)

MONDAY 4/01:

Central MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays (Restaurant)

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

WEDNESDAYS

03/27

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL • MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM THURSDAYS

03/28

$4 APPETIZERS • 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

03/29 DINNER

WITH LIVE MUSIC BY

FURROWS

10PM

SATURDAY

03/30

STATIC ENSEMBLE WITH NAIVE M ELODY (TALKING HEADS TRIBUTE BAND)

MONDAY

04/1

TUESDAY 4/02:

2 FOR 1 DRAFT

(Restaurant)

LAZY MAGNOLIA, MAGIC HAT, LUCKY TOWN, LAUGHING SKULL, BLUE MOON, ANDY GATOR, AND ALL OF YOUR FAVORITES.

Pub Quiz w Erin and Friends

Coming Soon

4/04: Scott Albert Johnson 4/05: North MS Allstars 4/06: RTB2 4/11: Matthew Hoggatt

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Southern Poverty Law Center Advocacy Training March 30, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Road). The topic is “Ending Mass Incarceration in Mississippi: Privatization and Community Oversight.” Lunch included. Free; call 334-322-8218 or 917-535-3041. Day of Hope 2013 March 30, 12:30 p.m., at The Church Triumphant (Odyssey North, 731 S. Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland). The event includes free food, a clothing giveaway, a blood drive and a concert. Performers include the Triumphant Singers, Venson Moore, Jerrica Stimage, Ladyink, Sam-U-El, The Messenger and Anointed by God. Free; call 601-977-0007.

WEEKLY EVENT CALENDAR

ALL DAY

OPEN MIC 10PM

TUESDAY

04/2

SHRIMP BOIL • 5 - 10 PM

MATT’S LATE NITE

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$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS • 10 - 12pm

Howl at the Moon w/ Hunter Gibson

Request Night WEDNESDAY

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Minnesota, Protohype & DCarls (18 & Up) UPCOMING SHOWS

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35


DIVERSIONS | natalie’s notes

by Natalie Long

Jackson by Southwest love to move there one day (even though there are signs ture of indie films and music to our fair city. My wish is to throughout the city that say, “Welcome to Austin. Please see Crossroads become a mini-SXSW for Jackson. We have don’t move here.” or “Thanks for visiting Austin. Don’t been blessed with great talent in this city, both musically forget to leave.”), I couldn’t and in filmmaking, as well as help but ask why more Missismultiple venues that could sippi bands didn’t play at the showcase a variety of bands festival this year. I mean, we from the state. are the birthplace of AmeriOf course, I’m not saying can music—we should have that I don’t want our state’s talbands playing all over Austin, ented musicians playing at the the Live Music Capital of the world’s largest singers/songWorld. writers festival in Austin. If it I got to talking with were up to me, I’d have every friends back in Jackson, singer and band in Jackson and they brought up that it and the state playing at every costs an exorbitant amount festival imaginable. I want loof money—in gas, lodging, cal and state bands to get out food, equipment—to get a there and get their music out band out to Austin, especially to the masses instead of using if it is on its last leg financialsocial media as the only outly. Sadly, a lot of bands don’t let to get heard by a national The author paused to chat with Sam Williams of Mississippi band The Weeks, at SXSW. have the money to travel out audience. As I heard someone of state and play for a crowd say long ago: “Time is too that doesn’t know them; howshort to waste the pretty.” ever, that doesn’t mean that You still have a couple of this situation can’t be reconciled right here in Jackson. weeks to get in touch with one of the wonderful Crossroads I am a huge fan of the Crossroads Film Festival here committee members or volunteers to see if your band can in Jackson, and sadly, I’ve missed a few years due to playing play at one of the shows. For more information, visit cross gigs out of town. The festival always brings in a great mix- roadsfilmfestival.com, and get your music out there! COURTESY NATALIE LONG

A

s some of you may know, I was fortunate to attend the South by Southwest Music Conference and Festival (SXSW) in Austin, Texas, during my spring break a couple of weeks ago. I thoroughly enjoyed seeing the sights of Austin, hearing some great regional, national and international bands, and enjoying the Texas cuisine that is hard to come by east of the Mississippi. It was awesome to listen to legendary record producer Clive Davis’ interview and to the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl’s emotionally charged keynote speech. Running toward the microphone stand to ask Stevie Nicks and Depeche Mode a question at their Q&A interviews was a memorable experience, and listening to a panel of singers/songwriters (Rodney Crowell, Ron Sexsmith, Robyn Hitchcock, etc.) explain the influence of The Beatles for the past 50 years was fascinating. It was also fun to spot celebrities at SXSW enjoying the festival’s highlights. I was proud that Mississippi had great singers/songwriters and bands playing at this year’s festival. Roscoe Bandana from the Gulf Coast, Cary Hudson from the Pine Belt (he opened for Texas singer/songwriter Alejandro Escovedo), Charlie Mars, The Weeks from Florence and Jackson (who opened for one of my favorite bands, The Polyphonic Spree), Como Mamas, Grady Champion, Water Liars and Dent May all performed. Mississippi digital record label This is American Music also hosted parties in support of its regional bands playing at the festival. While I had a complete blast out in Austin and would

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|
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April 2

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner & DVDJ Reign

Wednesday

April 3

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MUSIC | live

37


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

Squat, Press, Jerk by Bryan Flynn

O

FLICKR/CROSSFIT FEVER

ver the last 30 years or so, fitness to teach CrossFit, which means he knows fiber. When starting any new exercise protraining has changed a lot. These the nine fundamental movements. He also gram, always consult your doctor first. days, fitness fiends have more ways takes classes to learn more in-depth training. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our number-one goal is injury prethan ever to get into shape. A newcomer to CrossFit has the work- vention, and we offer an introductory course As we learn more about the most effi- outs scaled down to his or her fitness level. to teach the nine fundamental movements cient training methods from scientific stud- Instead of building the workout around the and what is a workout of the day,â&#x20AC;? Allen says. ies, the way people train is evolving. Greg person, the person progresses through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;The introductory course is used to teach Glassman developed one of the newest ways same workouts as everyone else by slowly and train, and as participants get better at the to train and took it mainstream when he building up their fitness. workouts, (they move) to a higher class that fostarted his company, CrossFit Inc., in 2000. In other words, a beginner to CrossFit cuses more on training and less on teaching.â&#x20AC;? Over the next decade, gyms sprang up all starts out with the same workout of the day, Classes are normally an hour long over the U.S. and the world as Crossand the WOD usually takes five to Fit gained popularity. 35 minutes, depending on skill level. CrossFit is the idea of complete Allen suggests starting off with four physical fitness built around strength, straight days of workouts, then takendurance and flexibility training. ing three off. Then, as athletes progThe nine fundamental movements ress, he suggests shifting to three conof the program are squat, front squat, secutive days of workouts with one overhead squat, standard shoulder day off in between. press, push press, jerk, dead lift, sumo One of the interesting things dead lift and clean. The program can about CrossFit is the benchmark be scaled to different fitness levels. workoutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; titles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Benchmark workFormer Belhaven football player outs are given womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s names, Chris Allen, 26, started doing Crossbecause like a spectacular woman, Fit to supplement his college training these workouts leave you flat on your routine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started training in 2007, ass, covered in sweat and wonderoff and on, while playing college ing what the hell just happened to football as a way to keep in shape (you),â&#x20AC;? Allen says. between spring training and summer Allen has several goals for workouts,â&#x20AC;? Allen says. CrossFit at P360, including starting Allen started doing CrossFit as CrossFit follows nine fundamental movements, including a kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; program. his workout full time in 2009 and is squat, front squat, overhead squat, standard shoulder One benefit of CrossFit, Alcurrently the head trainer at Perfor- press, push press, jerk, dead lift, sumo dead lift and clean. len says, is that it can push an athlete mance 360 MS CrossFit (or P360) off past a plateau. Sticking with the same County Line Road. He says CrossFit workout just because it works isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the is a program that builds well-rounded ath- or WOD, as all the other members of the motto there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you are on the fence about letes and promotes everyday health. class. Everybody does the same exercises, but doing it (remember), sooner or later, your â&#x20AC;&#x153;CrossFit is a simple formula of func- each person progresses to do more as their health is all you got,â&#x20AC;? Allen says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tional movements performed at a high in- fitness improves. steal home if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave third base.â&#x20AC;? tensity,â&#x20AC;? Allen says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All CrossFit athletes CrossFit, like every workout program, For more information about taking strive for complete physical preparedness is not without its detractors. Some claim CrossFit classes, visit P360 (853 Wilson Drive, and should be ready for the unknowable or that the program poses an elevated risk of Ridgeland, 601-991-3360). You can also get unknown of any physical situation.â&#x20AC;? rhabdomyolysis, which is a condition where updates on the P360 Facebook page and at Allen is a level-one trainer and certified intense athletic activity breaks down muscle mscrossfit.blogspot.com.

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

March 27 - April 2, 2013

T

38

The Madness So Far

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by Bryan Flynn

Ole Miss fans will wonder what might have been for the rest of this week and years to come after the way they lost to La Salle. What if Andy Kennedy had used a timeout? What if Marshall Henderson wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t on the bench in the final 2.5 seconds? THURSDAY, MARCH 28 College basketball (9-11:30 p.m., TBS): Stay up late and see which Cinderella advancesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;La Salle or Wichita State in a 13-seed versus 9-seed matchup. FRIDAY, MARCH 29 College basketball (8:30-10:30 p.m., TBS): The Florida Gators will look to avoid being the third team in the tournament to be bounced by 15-seed Florida Gulf Coast. SATURDAY, MARCH 30 College basketball (11 a.m.-4 p.m., ESPN 2): Take time to check out the 2013 NCAA Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball Tournament with games most of the day on ESPN 2. SUNDAY, MARCH 31 MBL (7-10 p.m., ESPN 2): The Houston Astros move to the American League and open the 2013 Major League Baseball season against division rival the Texas Rangers. MONDAY, APRIL 1 MLB (6-9 p.m., ESPN 2): National League East rivals kick off the full opening day of MLB when the Atlanta Braves host the Philadelphia Phillies. TUESDAY, APRIL 2 NBA (7-9:30 p.m., TNT): The New York Knicks get a chance on the road to try to stop the Miami Heatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest for the most wins in a row in NBA history. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3 NHL (6:30-10 p.m., NBC Sports Network): Your weekly hockey fix is the current top seed in the Eastern Conference, the Pittsburgh Penguins, against the current eighth seed, the New York Rangers. Ole Miss fans might also wonder what might have been if they had used their size advantage more against La Salleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; or if they posted better numbers than 10 for 21 from the free-throw line.

Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


: JOBS Project-Coordinator (Part-Time) Jackson 2000, located in Jackson, Mississippi, is looking for an individual who can oversee Dialogue Circlesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a project of Jackson 2000. Dialogue Circles advance Jackson 2000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission to pursue racial harmony through dialogue and understanding. You can assist us with this important work. Duties may include: â&#x20AC;˘ Developing systems through which the public can sign up for and receive info about Dialogue Circles. â&#x20AC;˘ Publicize Dialogue Circles through, among other means, presenting the program to groups and community based organizations of various sizes. â&#x20AC;˘ Developing materials that can be used for the implementation and marketing of the program, as well as for grant-seeking. â&#x20AC;˘ Assisting with administrative tasks. Candidate will report to subcommittee on a regular basis through written reports and in-person supervision. This is a part-time position for now, with the potential to move to full-time based on funding and need. A strong applicant will be reliable, have administrative experience and basic computer skills. A strong applicant will also be personable and enjoy working in collaboration with others.

The Jackson Free Press is looking for freelance writers interested in covering the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music scene. Please e-mail inquiries to

kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.

To apply, send rĂŠsumĂŠ and cover letter to Bevelyn Branch, bevelyn_branch@att.net

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String & Nails

T

his is a craft that has been on my list since I saw a similar creation on a blog I frequent. I love ampersands and use them as a motif wherever I can. I also love simple, graphic art and mixing interesting textures into my collection of more traditional flat prints. This piece hits all the marks. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already got requests to recreate it in a fun, cheery yellow.

1

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

Step one:

Sand the board, going in the direction of the grain, until smooth as desired. (I got a 1-foot by 3-foot board at the local hardware store, and an employee helped me cut it down to three 1-foot square pieces. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about an inch thick.)

Step two:

Wipe off the sanding dust and then, once the board is fully dry again, stain it following the instructions for your stain. In my case, that meant â&#x20AC;&#x153;paintingâ&#x20AC;? on the stain with a brush in the direction of the grain. You can also use old rags or towels to apply the stain. Let it soak in for a few minutes, then wipe off the excess.

2

Step three. 3

Let dry. I was supposed to wait more than eight hours, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m impatient so I only waited about five.

Step four:

Create shape template. I freehand drew an ampersand on paper (it took a couple tries until I was satisfied), then used a ruler to ensure that it was 1-1/2 inches wide all the way around the shape. I cut it out and placed it on the board.

Step five:

Nail! Hammer in small (mine were a little less than an inch long) nails all around the shape. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t measure this part, I just tried to get them a fairly even distance apart all the way around. They average 1/4-inch or 1/2-inch apart.

4

Step six:

Supplies: Wood board Sandpaper Stain Brush Hammer Small nails Twine, string or embroidery floss

5

Take off the template. Start winding your string (mine is black-and-white bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twine) around the nails. I just wound it randomly, but you could create a pattern as well depending on the shape you choose. Be sure to get string around all the outer lines, or the shape wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be clearly defined.

Step seven: 6

To secure the ends, I just hot-glued the string to itself (using only a tiny amount of glue so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show) and cut off the excess once the glue dried.

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v11n29 - The Spring Food Issue 2013: Female Foodies, Healthy School Food & A Steamy Saucy Cookbook