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March 20 -26, 2013


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN JIM WILKIRSON

A

fter 20 years, the only thing that’s lasted longer than Jim Wilkirson’s marriage to his wife, Audrey, is his commitment to making things move and shake in the Jackson community. A Jackson native, 49-year-old Wilkirson attended St. Andrews through the sixth grade and then Jackson Prep. After graduating from Vanderbilt University with a bachelor’s in fine arts in 1985, he returned to Jackson and, for over two decades, owned or managed several companies in the clothing and interior design fields. Then in 2010, he joined the Fondren Renaissance Foundation as a consultant. After assisting with the redesign of the organization, Wilkirson became executive director of the foundation. FRF’s mission is positive change and economic impact in the Fondren area. “We want to be a catalyst for the whole neighborhood,” Wilkirson says. These days, all other local organizations and neighborhood associations fall under the foundation’s umbrella. “Our biggest thrust has been, in the last two years, arts and education in the neighborhood,” Wilkirson says. The foundation sends professional artists into schools to give the students art experience, and hosts the Symphony at Sunset concert in the fall and a concert series in the summer to expose young people to different types of music. Wilkirson focuses on the arts and education initiatives of FRF, but the foundation also assists with housing grants for

CONTENTS

people in need through a partnership with St. Dominic Hospital and Habitat for Humanity. Then, once a year, Wilkirson must turn his focus to helping throw a neighborhoodwide bash known as Zippity Doo Dah. “It really has taken a shape of its own,” Wilkirson says. Initially, the weekend started as an outlet for the Sweet Potato Queens to fundraise for the Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital, but it has grown into one of the most talked-about weekends in the community. Besides being coordinator of the weekend, Wilkirson has gotten personally involved in ZDD. All his children participate in the parade. His oldest daughter, 14-year-old Clarke, had her own float in the first Zippity Doo Dah parade. The following year, Wilkirson’s son, Hunter, now 13, led the jungle-themed parade with an albino snake wrapped around his neck. This year, Wilkirson’s youngest daughter, 9-year-old Fran, will march in the parade as “Queen Tiny.” Wilkirson takes pride in his role as coordinator of the weekend. He realizes the impact that it makes on the children the hospital benefits and the message it sends to the community. “It is very important for us as a neighborhood to support those that are in our neighborhood, and Blair E. Batson is here,” he says. For more information about the Fondren Renaissance Foundation or Zippity Doo Dah Weekend, visit fondren.org or call 601981-9606. —Nneka Ayozie

Cover photograph of Color Me Rad 5K courtesy Gretchen Willard; photo of Francis Smith by Trip Burns

11 Man of Many Hats

“Before you can lay a foundation for a better community, you have to create a better culture. We’ve got a rich history, and we just need to build on it. Other communities are growing. We can do the same thing. It starts with academics, business and community. Our schools are vital. How we (improve that) is linking our education system to our very survival, (making sure) children understand that your survival is linked to your education, and (that) the teacher understands your community survival is based on their ability to teach that child.” —De’Keither Stamps, “Stamps: From Veteran to Councilman”

32 Don’t Call ‘Em Yams

The sweet potato is an extremely versatile and vitamin-rich ingredient, well-suited for a range of dishes.

35 Just Dance

Belhaven University’s thriving dance program produces dancers of a talent beyond the school’s small size.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 9 ............................................ TALKS 13 .................................. BUSINESS 14 ............... EDITORIAL CARTOON 14 .................................. STIGGERS 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 22 ..................... ZIPPITY DOO DAH 29 ............................. LIFE & STYLE 30 ................................. WELLNESS 32 ......................................... FOOD 35 .............................. DIVERSIONS 36 .......................................... FILM 37 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 38 ............................... JFP EVENTS 41 ....................................... MUSIC 42 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 44 ..................................... SPORTS 47 .............................. ASTROLOGY 49 ............................. CLASSIFIEDS 49 .................................... PUZZLES 50 ............................................ GIG

COURTESY BELHAVEN DANCE ; COURTESY HOLLY CLEGG ; JACOB D FULLER

MARCH 20 - 26, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 28

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

No Means No

I

have read accounts of the now-infamous Steubenville, Ohio, rape with horror. I have seen the photo of kids passed around on social media of the boys who carried the drunk 16-yearold victim by the hands and feet like one might haul a hog to its slaughter. And I have listened with disgust to reports that the coach of the “promising” football players probably knew what happened and about the photos and tweets documenting the rape on social media—and did nothing immediately to report it. I have grimaced at accounts of a huge segment of Steubenville lining up behind the rapists. I have been shocked to hear that many teenagers (and apparently adults) don’t believe that pulling a drunk teen girl’s underwear down and violating her with one’s fingers is rape or even illegal. And I have observed with unmitigated disgust that many so-called reputable media outlets reported more positively about the rapists than the victim at the sentencing. CNN, FOX News and MSNBC even named the rape victim. As I’ve taken in all of this, I can recall hearing details of the gang rape in New Bedford, Mass., in 1983 when four men raped a young mother on a pool table with a crowd looking on, and no one responded to her screams for help. (Jody Foster later won an Oscar for her role in “The Accused,” which paid homage to the New Bedford case.) The men’s trial became widely known for the defense attorneys’ efforts to demonize the victim. No rapist served more than six-and-a-half years. I also think of the 1989 rape of a 17-year-old mentally handicapped girl in Glen Ridge, N.J., by members of the Glen Ridge High School football team. These rapists used a broomstick and a bat to perpetuate their crime while other

teens watched and encouraged them. Many people in the community backed those young men as well, saying that the young woman was “promiscuous.” One thing I can agree with is that the whole damn thing is tragic. From every direction and every angle. Up and down. Inside and out. Backward and forward. But here’s the thing: All of the men

It’s not possible for men to control themselves, we’re told, so women have to be very, very careful. and boys above somehow believed that what they were doing was OK. They were surrounded by other people who cheered them on and didn’t try to stop them. Once they went on trial, supporters lined up behind them, blaming the victims (for getting drunk, for stopping at the wrong bar for cigarettes, for trying to get people to like her, for being a whore or slut). It’s easy to shrug our shoulders and say, “Wow, what horrible boys/men those were.” And while we do that, let’s hope that no young men we know ever end up inebriated in a mob mentality where they somehow act on society-taught instincts that “boys will be boys” and that they can’t be expected to control themselves.

Bottom line: Our society is to blame. Every time someone blames a woman first for the violence that happened to her— Why did she stay? Why did she drink? Why did act sexy? Why did she go to the club?—that person reinforces the idea that it is up to women to avoid being a victim of sexual assault or violence. Because, you know, men and boys just can’t help themselves in certain situations. This complete disdain for crime victims is bad enough, and it’s sexism at its worst and most despicable. But that’s not all that royally sucks about this nasty societal habit. It’s also the ultimate insult of men and boys. All of them. This kind of caveman attitude—well, you know that men can’t help themselves if a woman excites poor him too much—lumps all males into the lowest common denominator of human being. It’s not possible for men to control themselves, we’re told, so women have to be very, very careful. Meantime, even women who are careful become victims, and if one of us slips up and has too much to drink, all bets are off. And if we’re victims, then we go on jail and our lace panties get passed around as evidence that we’re sluts. Every woman and every man should, must speak out against sexual violence and the really dumb, stupid, criminal-forgiving idea that men can’t control themselves if women step out of line somehow. The only people this serves are sexual deviants—and we might avoid some of that deviance if society didn’t preach that sexual assault is probably the woman’s fault. It’s hard to imagine a sexual-assault victim who doesn’t have to “prove” her own innocence before anyone will take her seriously. And you wonder why more women don’t come forward, allowing so many rapists to roam free and strike again, whether on dates or

in dark alleys or, later, with their own kids. Of course, you throw into this mix the look-the-other-way culture that permeates locker rooms, and we have a crisis on steroids. From Penn State to Steubenville to the Pittsburgh Steelers, we have learned that people willingly look the other way when the perpetrator is a football star on whatever level. Somehow, we think, if a dude can pass or block well, he gets a pass to do anything he wants to women or even young men. Because, you know, he has such a “promising” future. If the football coach at Steubenville knew about this rape and didn’t report it the second he found out, he should go to prison. Yes, the rapists clearly need to do time, but so does any adult who allows rape to go unreported. And the idea that someone in a position to teach and mentor young people would cover up such horror is just unspeakable. This is exactly why it continues: It’s called permission. But every one of us shares the responsibility here. We must do everything in our power to teach that rape is rape, whether with sticks, fingers or anything else. We all also must encourage men to stand up for their gender by not allowing these kinds of stereotypes about them to be perpetuated. Not all men are rapists, and anyone who treats them as such is practicing a disgusting form of reverse sexism and bigotry. So let’s break this down: If she (or he) says no, and you don’t stop, it’s rape. If she is too drunk to say no, assume no. It does not matter how “slutty” you think he or she is acting, or how the person is dressed, or how drunk. No matter if she came on to you and then changed her mind; we have the right to do that, too. Rape is rape. No is no. And rapists, and their accomplices, should go to prison. That includes those who don’t report it.

March 20 - 26, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Jacob Fuller

Ronni Mott

David Joseph

Brett Hearn

R.L. Nave

Kelly Bryan Smith

Meredith Sullivan

Kimberly Griffin

Freelance writer Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He wrote the news cover.

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-wining writer and the JFP’s news and opinion editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She wrote a news story.

Executive intern David Joseph is a former long-term restaurateur who now enjoys interning for the JFP. Great food, close family, his entrepreneurial spirit and the love of Jackson keep him going. He fact-checked for this issue..

Brett Hearn is a writer, comic, and actor currently on tour in the greater Jackson area. He likes feedback, but he loves chocolate. To send either, please e-mail him at sydekix@ yahoo.com. He wrote a music feature.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote the legislative update.

Kelly Bryan Smith is a busy mom, writer, brain tumor survivor, and nursing student living with her small son in Fondren. In her so-called spare time, she enjoys healthy cooking, swimming and reading. She wrote a parenting feature.

Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She did a FLY feature.

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.


5

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ProgressReport 2013

Reaching the Peak The Kemper County energy facility has reached peak construction and remains on schedule to open in May 2014. The plant’s positive economic impact continues to be felt across the region.

3,500 EMPLOYED, 300 MISSISSIPPI COMPANIES AT WORK A peak workforce of 3,500 is now on the job as we build Mississippi’s newest, state-of-the art power plant. The project is creating jobs: 12,000 direct and indirect during construction and more than 1,000 direct and indirect permanent positions once operational. Nearly 300 Mississippi companies are participating in the project and receiving more than $650 million for the services they are supplying.

MAJOR COMPONENTS INSTALLED The final lift of the facility’s 550-ton gasifier was completed earlier this month. This milestone marks the final work for the site’s massive 600-foot crane, which will be dismantled over the coming weeks. The gasifier, which is the heart of the plant, will be used to convert the plant’s affordable fuel source, lignite, into a synthesis gas to generate electricity. The first lignite-to-synthetic gas conversion is slated for early 2014.

INVESTING FOR THE FUTURE Just as today’s electric, transportation, water and other infrastructure was designed, built and put into service by

mississippipower.com/kemper

jacksonfreepress.com

the generations before us, the Kemper facility will deliver clean, reliable energy for each of us and our children. It’s an investment for the future of Mississippi and for a stable supply of energy to power our homes, businesses and economy.

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Friday, March 15 Olen Burrage, acquitted in the case of three civil-rights workers killed by Ku Klux Klansmen in 1960s Mississippi, dies at age 82. â&#x20AC;Ś The Pentagon says it will spend $1 billion to add 14 interceptors to a West Coast missile defense system in response to North Korean threats. Saturday, March 16 Firefighters contain a wildfire in Hancock County. â&#x20AC;Ś Hattiesburg residents sue the city for lack of infrastructure improvements. Sunday, March 17 The Mississippi Historical Society names Charles L. Sullivan, professor emeritus and archivist at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, as its new president. â&#x20AC;Ś Officials find guns and explosives in the room where University of Central Florida student James Seevakumaran committed suicide, indicating he planned an attack on the campus. Monday, March 18 Dan Gibson, Hinds Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insurance consultant, says the county doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the money to fix a Raymond Detention Center unit damaged during an inmate uprising last summer. â&#x20AC;Ś The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute reports that China is now the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fifth largest arms exporter. Tuesday, March 19 Gov. Bryant vetoes SB 2141, which called for a 13-member task force to study how Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local school boards are selected. â&#x20AC;Ś A wave of bombings in Iraq kills 65 people. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Candidate Reports Raise Questions by Tyler Cleveland

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ampaign-finance transparency has been a hot-button issue around the country, and Jackson appears to be a shining example of why reformâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; or enforcementâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is needed. Municipal records show that just two of the 14 candidates for the office of mayor, incumbent Harvey Johnson Jr. and Jonathan Lee, raised or spent money on their campaigns in 2012. One of those candidates, attorney and developer Regina Quinn, had a non-profit incorporated with her name on it July 18, 2012. Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, John Richard May Jr., also an attorney, incorporated â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson Unitedâ&#x20AC;? to Elect Regina Quinn Mayor, for the purposes of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Political Advocacy and Public Education.â&#x20AC;? Mississippi code prohibits incorporated committees, associations and companies from contributing more than $1,000 per year, directly or indirectly, to a candidate or the candidateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committee. Those entities are also prohibited from contributing more than $1,000 annually to any political party. The penalty for such action is a fine of no less than $1,000 or more than $5,000 against the corporation. Reached by phone Tuesday afternoon, May disputed whether the law prevents the incorporated organization from serving as the fund-raising arm of Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign. He said he received conflicting reports from the secretary of stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office regarding the legality of the political maneuver, but added that he was confident that everything the campaign had done was legal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look at the statute, there is nothing there that prohibits the organization from raising money for Reginaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign,â&#x20AC;? May

JACKSON MAYORAL CANDIDATES WORD FIND Find them!

Amos Bright Bluntson Griggs Johnson Lee Lumumba

Quinn Taylor Reeves Smith Chapman Williams Jones

Democrat Jonathan Lee is the only challenger to incumbent Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., who filed a campaign finance report for 2012.

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was set up as a non-profit so if we decided to drop out or the election turned out unfavorably we could give any excess money to charity.â&#x20AC;? Of the two candidates who filed the reports required under state election laws, Johnson has a lead in fundraising by far. But Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war chest is nothing to scoff at, even if he has only been raising funds since June 6. The Democratic challenger raised $54,349 between June 4 and Nov. 29, 2012, through his political committee, Friends of Jonathan Lee. The campaign spent $41,766.88, including $12,700 to Hendrix and Dometz Solutions, the company of Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign manager Tyrone Hendrix, and $9,500 to JW Turner Consulting. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the clarity stops. Another political-action committee,

Jackson 20/20, raised $25,925 between Feb. 18 and April 17, 2012, and paid out a total of $17,600 to Hendrix and Dometz Solutions, and JW Turner Consulting between Feb. 21 and July 1. The stoppage of payments from the PAC Jackson 20/20 and the beginning of those from Friends of Jonathan Lee seem to coincide, but Hendrix, both the sole proprietor of Hendrix and Dometz and campaign manager for Jonathan Lee, says the PAC and Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign are not affiliated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started the PAC earlier in the year because we saw Jackson headed in the wrong direction,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix said Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started raising money, and then when Jonathan announced his candidacy, I left the PAC and PRUH5(32576VHHSDJH

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jacksonfreepress.com

Thursday, March 14 Gov. Phil Bryant announces his opposition to government restrictions on food labeling or portion sizes because they interfere with business practices. â&#x20AC;Ś Ben Emmerson, the U.N. special rapporteur on human rights and counterterrorism, reveals that U.S. drone strikes killed hundreds of civilians in Pakistan.

¹)S THIS WHAT THE PEOPLE SENTUSDOWNHERETODO²

TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, March 13 Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires becomes the 266th pope, taking the name Francis. â&#x20AC;Ś Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lieutenant governor resigns, and officials charge nearly 60 people when a veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; charity is revealed as a front for a $300 million gambling operation.

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began raising contributions for him.â&#x20AC;? The timeline fits, but the ties between Jackson 20/20 and Friends of Jonathan Lee appear to be close. The biggest contributor to Jackson 20/20 in 2012 was prominent businessman and former Jackson State University professor William Cooley and his family, who gave $4,000, collectively, on March 21, 2012, according to the report. Cooley was also the biggest contributor to Friends of Jonathan TRIP BURNS

March 20 - 26, 2013

Regina Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign said she plans to file a report this week. Her husband formed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson Unitedâ&#x20AC;? to Elect Regina Quinn Mayor in 2012.

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Lee in 2012, giving $4,000 between July 18 and Sept. 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson 20/20 was started by a group of folks including a couple of guys who are now working for me,â&#x20AC;? Lee said Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They put together a PAC to elect progressive politicians in municipal races in Jackson. As I understand it, not only are they making donations to mayoral candidates, but they are giving money to city council candidates as well.â&#x20AC;? In all, four of Jackson 20/20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 29 contributors showed up on Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donor list, but those four made up more than 20 percent of all the money raised by the PAC in its short, two-month period of activity. Since Friends of Jonathan Lee was started, those same four contributors have given a total of $6,250 to his committee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am one of the candidates they are going to endorse,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubt about that, and I hope they contribute more money in the future. But the way I understand it, I am not the sole candidate at all. The idea is this group of folks wanted to get together to support progressive candidates.â&#x20AC;? As of Jan. 31, 2013, the PAC had not

donated to any candidate for the mayoral or city council races. Other major donors to the PAC include well-known businessman Leland Speed and several prominent Jackson lawyers. Hendrix said Tuesday he is no longer affiliated with Jackson 20/20, but there is no surprise thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to find anyone who is. Local realtor Mike Lewis is the treasurer listed on the campaign-finance report the PAC submitted Jan. 31, 2013. Reached by phone Tuesday morning, Lewis could not say whether or not he was still treasurer of the PAC, and referred questions to Democrat and attorney Dorsey Carson. Carson was in Washington, D.C., Tuesday morning and did not immediately return multiple calls to his cell phone. No law prohibits political action committees from raising or spending money on a particular candidate, but there is a law against not filing a report if a campaign raises or spends $200 or more in a calendar year. Phone calls to the office of candidate Chokwe Lumumba, who announced his candidacy long before the mew year but has not filed a report, were not returned by Tuesday. Aaron Banks, a spokesman for the campaign to elect Regina Quinn, said Monday that the paperwork for her report was being prepared to be submitted later this week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it speaks to the idea that there are serious candidates that are interested in transparency and operating in a way that complies with the law,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The law requires that you follow the rules, and I believe in following the rules. I was disappointed to find that certain other campaigns werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, but as I understand it, the law requires you to report if you raise money or spend money, and we have tried to comply with the law.â&#x20AC;? Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. reported contributions of $108,969 to his political committee Friends of Harvey Johnson between Aug. 10 and Dec. 31, 2012, with $49,800 coming in December alone. His biggest donor of 2012 was Robert Agbede, president and CEO of Chester Engineers of Pittsburgh, Pa. Agbede contributed $4,000 on Dec. 26. Johnson spent $16,220.62 in 2012, but reported a cash-on-hand total of $107,442. The next round of campaign-finance reports are due Tuesday, April 30, and must include everything raised from Jan. 1, 2013, through April 27. Comment at jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. Read mayoral candidate interviews at jfp.ms/mayorsrace.


DISH | Ward 4 Candidate

From Veteran to Councilman by Jacob D. Fuller

The culture here in Ward 4, specifically. Before you can lay a foundation for a better community, you have to create a better culture. We’ve got a rich history, and we just need to build on it. Other communities are growing. We can do the same thing. It starts with academics, business and community. Our schools are vital. How we (improve that) is linking our education system to our very survival, (making sure) children understand that your survival is linked to your education, and (that) the teacher understands your community survival is based on their ability to teach that child. How, specifically, can you change the culture?

Leadership. Our community is dwin-

You brought up education. JPS faced possibly losing its accreditation last summer. How could you work from City Hall to help change that negative culture in the education system?

If you’re elected, what will be your top infrastructure priority, and how will you look to fund it?

First, we’re not the only municipality who uses infrastructure in Jackson. We

cause that’s mostly our tax dollars. I want to make sure that those resources are put specifically for helping everyone, not just funneled to an outside community and still leaving Jackson with the bigger burden of the expenses. We definitely need more say in how the money is spent. How important is it for Jackson to put money into these developments that are aimed at making the city a tourist destination?

One-third of America lives within 500 miles of Jackson, a little over 100 million people. Jackson becoming a tourist destination is definitely possible. We can do it. We’re centrally located. We just have to have a reason for people to stop.

First and foremost, we’ve got to reward the teachers. We’ve got some quality teachers and administrators in the JPS system. We may not have the funds immediately to give them all a raise, but the city owns plenty of property. Why don’t we just Crime is always going to reward our teachers that we’re come up in Jackson. We De’Keither Stamps, a retired Marine, says he is ready take his losing because they’re not on have a crime perception leadership experience to City Hall. the tax roll? Even if we give it to problem, if not a major them, at least it would get back crime problem. How could on the tax roll, and give them a you, as a councilman, way to accumulate wealth and build a better must work together with our surrounding change that? future. It would let them know we appreciate cities, who also use the same infrastructure, People who have jobs don’t run around them with what we have. whether it be to travel on or to drink from. breaking into folks’ houses much. There are Rewarding our teachers is first and All of us have the problem. It’s not advanta- only three things you can do in America. You foremost. Like I said before, linking our very geous for Byram to go and fully fund their can work. You can get on welfare. And you survival to education, and everybody getting own water-treatment plant. Since it’s not, it’s can commit crime. Based on your economic that ingrained inside their minds—that we advantageous for them to continue with the situation, some people do all three at the will not survive unless we educate the chil- relationship, but shoulder some of this with same time. The majority of people in Jackdren and let these children learn. us, so that we can all solve all of our problem. son just want to work. If it all goes bad, everybody’s water stops. There’s only two types of people in JackAre you talking about taking these son: the people who could afford to leave and abandoned properties that the city has So what if you go to the leaders of didn’t, and the people who couldn’t afford to taken over and giving the houses and these other cities and ask for this, and leave and stayed. Regardless, we’re here and property to teachers? they ask why they would want to give we’re not going anywhere. We’re boiled down Exactly. It would solve several problems. money to Jackson? to the faithful, 174,000 people. We can build The city is paying to maintain it, and it’s not (I’d say) because they’re using the infra- a city right here, just focus on us. producing any money on the tax roll. That’s structure. It’s cheaper to help assist in shouljust one solution. I’ve got binders full of ideas dering the burden for infrastructure than to I guess you’re saying the answer to the and solutions. build your own. crime is to get people to work? Even beyond that, we’ve never fully Right. Economic development pushes funded education properly. There are ways The city has been looking to a crime out. It also builds our schools and we can do that. We can do things as a city local-option sales tax to fund the makes our communities better. government, (such as) all new hires must live infrastructure improvements. The Read all Jackson City Council interviews in the city of Jackson. That’s something that current mayor is refusing to start that to date at jfp.ms/citycouncilrace2013. we can do, because city council writes the tax process under the current system, rules. That will spur economic growth. In- where he does not have control over De’Keither Stamps stead of hiring people in other communities, who sits on the commission that Born: Jackson hire somebody that lives in Jackson. determines where the tax money goes. You talked about funding. Right now, it seems that the city may have trouble funding much of anything other than infrastructure, because we’re looking at hundreds of millions of dollars in water, sewer and street improvements.

Would you support the 1-cent sales tax under the current law?

If we are going to raise our taxes, but not have the full say in how we’re going to use that revenue? That’s not advantageous for the city of Jackson. I won’t support things that are not good for the city of Jackson, be-

Age: 36 Family: Divorced, three daughters: Jasmine, 15, Christian, 7, and Kennedi, 4 Education: Attended Forest Hill High School; graduated from Crystal Springs High School 1995

jacksonfreepress.com

If elected to the City Council, what will be your top priority once in office?

dling because we need more effective leadership. I’m here to provide that leadership, not just on the government side but in the community as well. We have a lot of organizations in the community that are for the community. We just have to corral them and point them in the right direction. JACOB D. FULLER

D

e’Keither Stamps has worn many hats: farmer, Marine, Army patrolman, veteran’s advocate and public speaker. This summer, he hopes to add Ward 4 Jackson city councilman to that list. Stamps grew up in west Jackson, not far from a farm where his family has raised cows and grown hay for generations. Stamps said he learned his work ethic on that farm, where he worked hard every day after school. Long before graduating from high school, Stamps knew what he wanted to do when he completed his secondary education: join the U.S. Marine Corps. Soon after signing up, Stamps joined the presidential security team for President Bill Clinton. He served four years in that role, including guarding Clinton during his 1996 re-election campaign. After leaving the presidential security team, Stamps spent time as a security officer at the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Nairobi, Kenya; Geneva, Switzerland; and London. Stamps got out of the Marine Corps in 2002, but when the Iraq War began in 2003, Stamps tried to join the fight. “I couldn’t be in the military and not be in the big show of my generation,” Stamps said. When the Marines wanted to send Stamps back to embassy security instead of Iraq, he stormed out of the recruiting office and slammed the door. “The Army recruiter was standing outside his office,” Stamps said. “He said, ‘Hey man, what’s wrong?’ I was like, ‘All I want to do is go to Iraq, man.’ … A few months later, I found myself as a patrol leader of a 17-man, 4-vehicle patrol in Tikrit, Iraq.” Today, Stamps is once again a retired veteran, and he is on his first campaign trail.

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LEGISLATURE: Week 10

Silent Prayers by R.L. Nave

quires high schools with graduation rates lower than 80 percent to file an improvement plan with the Mississippi Department of Education. The bill originally aimed to improve teacher quality by raising the admissions standards for teacher education programs to a 21 ACT score and a 3.0 gradepoint average. The Department of Mental Health could see a $6 million hit, The ACT score rewhich lawmakers say would be devastating for behavioral quirement sparked a huge centers such as Mississippi State Hospital in Whitfield. argument in the House where some lawmakers be‘Education Works’ lieved the bill was too stringent. A number of education-related bills saw Kevin Gilbert, president of the Missisactivity last week. Gov. Phil Bryant’s prized sippi Association of Educators, said the state Education Works bill cleared the Senate. It has too few teachers and he worries that the contains provisions for a reading program proposed standards could exacerbate the that will hold back students who don’t show shortage. “We understand that we have to adequate improvement by the end of third look at our standards,” Gilbert said. “We’re grade, establishes charter schools and re- not sure that a 21 and 3.0 (GPA) is going to

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e’ve reached that make-orbreak point during the legislative session where legislators are flying through the litany of spending bills for individual state agencies to build a framework for the budget. Despite the large amounts of money at stake—the Legislature is assembling a $5.5 billion budget—the vast majority of appropriations bills will pass with little or no real debate. However, lawmakers did tangle over a few key departments, most notably for the Department of Mental Health. The House passed SB2874, which included a cut to the mental-health budget, about $6 million in all, which drew rebuke from Democrats. “Our Department of Mental Health is in dire, dire, dire circumstances,” said Rep. Steve Holland, D-Plantersville, who questioned the compassion of Republican budget writers. “I don’t know how you can sleep at night,” he added from the House floor. Despite the acrimonious exchange, the bill passed the House 116-0.

get the result that you want to get.” Religiosity On March 14, Gov. Bryant signed the Mississippi Student Religious Liberties Act, which extends the right of student-led prayers to “limited public forums” such as athletic events, and prohibits schools from punishing kids for praying or expressing religious viewpoints in class work. Officials from the American Civil Liberties Union say they are monitoring the implementation of the law, which takes effect July 1, before determining whether the organization will pursue legal action. The Senate also commended the nation of Israel March 15. The vote followed about an hour of oddly heated Friday morning debate that included a lengthy discussion of where Israel’s boundaries lie. The resolution passed but not before Sen. Hob Bryan, D-Amory, asked, “Is this what the people sent us down here to do?” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Wins for Women and Children by Ronni Mott

March 20 - 26, 2013

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trade. Those companies could forfeit their assets or pay fines as high as $1 million. Trafficking victims are protected from prosecution under the new law. Heather Wagner, director of the domestic-violence division of the state attorney general’s office, is just one of the people in Mississippi who helped craft the language of the bill; her office worked for a year to revamp and strengthen the language. “The heavy burden is on us to inform law enforcement and victim-services providers,” Middleton said, referring to organizations like the CVP and to the attorney general’s office. “If we can’t do that, it won’t do us any good.” Also nearing the legislative finish line is “Erin’s Law,” named for Erin Merryn, a young woman from Illinois. This bill creates a task force whose purpose is to create ageappropriate, evidence-based curriculum for Mississippi’s school children from kindergarten through fifth grade designed to prevent sexual abuse by teaching children to recognize and report it. If passed, the curriculum would be ready for the 2015-2016 school year. In Mississippi, Rep. Tom Miles, D-Forest, sponsored Erin’s Law, and it is one of at least 10 such bills being introduced in state legislatures across the country this year. “It’s just something that’s pushed under the rug a lot in Mississippi,” he said in

January. “... We want to make Mississippi the safest state for all children.” House Bill 151 would seem to have a similar goal; however, at least one women’s advocate group believes it could do more RL NAVE

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omen and children may be a little safer in Mississippi after some successes this past week at the state house. One bill that is ready for Gov. Phil Bryant’s signature is SB 2631, which will create a 26-member task force on domestic violence in the state. “The governor really deserves all the credit for this,” said Sandy Middleton, executive director of the Center for Violence Prevention in Rankin County. Another bill Middleton identified as a win is HB 673, aka the Mississippi Human Trafficking Act, which has passed the House. The amendment to existing state law clarifies who the perpetrators of human trafficking are—anyone who receives something of value from the act of trafficking—and is aimed at getting “the big person in charge,” bill sponsor Rep. Kimberly Buck, D-Jackson, said during a hearing to introduce the bill in February. The bill substantially increases financial penalties and jail time for perpetrators, especially when victims are minor children. Persons convicted of trafficking minors can be jailed up to 30 years and pay a fine as high as $500,000 under the law. The bill added penalties for businesses engaged in trafficking, based on laws aimed at enterprises connected with the illegal drug

Gov. Phil Bryant is apparently the force behind a couple of bills helping women in Mississippi.

harm than good. The bill is an amendment to current laws relating to sex crimes against minors. The changes direct physicians and midwives to collect fetal tissue from an abortion performed on a minor younger than 14, or collect umbilical cord blood if they deliver a baby from a girl who was younger than 16 when she conceived.

Those samples could be used by law enforcement to determine and prosecute the father for sex crimes. Jamie Bardwell, director of programs at The Women’s Fund in Jackson, says the push to pass the bill comes from Gov. Bryant’s office, but the bill’s author is Andy Gipson, R-Braxton. “The governor believes that the main reason we have so much teen pregnancy in Mississippi is because of these older men preying on younger women,” Bardwell said, but the statistics don’t back this up. Bardwell said that there were 97 births in 2011 to women under 15 years old, 18 of those in Hinds County. “This really brings up the question of: Is this really the problem?” she said, adding that the Women’s Fund believes such a law is “really short-sighted.” Sixty-six percent of teenage births are to older teens, 18 and 19year-olds, she said. While not an attorney, Bardwell brought up the issue of probable cause. Can law enforcement use cord blood as probable cause to test men in the community to determine fatherhood? Will prosecutors be able to use such evidence in court? “I can imagine it’s even unconstitutional,” Bardwell said. “The means don’t justify the ends.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.


TALK | business

Food Fight by R.L. Nave

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billion and profits of $15.7 billion. In the recent years, part of the company’s growth was fueled by the expansion of its scaleddown community grocery stores known as Walmart Neighborhood Markets. While Walmart Supercenters average 182,000 square feet, neighborhood markets average approximately 38,000 square feet in size. Bill Simon, Walmart’s president and chief executive officer, told an investors’ conference in early March that the company plans to open 115 neighborhood markets nationwide, which are designed to compete with dollar stores, drug stores and supermarkets, by the end of 2013. By 2016, the company wants to open 500 such stores, Simon said. Walmart, which has moved into spaces vacated by @A3#-31":(BC Circuit City electronics stores !"#"$%%&#'()**+,-(*./0( in other cities, is also rumored +"#%"1(231(4567"&8"1,-(9#:( to be eyeing the capital city :"8"#%&9(1"-"91;7< for its neighborhood markets. =&-&%(>88;7"95%7<;38?*./0 Walmart officials declined to discuss any plans for Jackson, but the company has two regUnder a legislative proposal, areas that lack fullistered lobbyists, Steven Phillip service supermarkets could see more fresh fruits and Browning and Tice White, revegetables offered in those neighborhoods. mind_bp_4.5x5.875.indd 1 3/14/13 cords from the Mississippi Secretary of State records show. Have you or a loved one suffered a Barker refutes the claim HEART ATTACK R-Hattiesburg, the bill’s main sponsor. that his bill would be a windfall for Walmart or other heart conditions after undergoing Barker, who launched a business incuba- and other national chains, but asserts that tor in Hattiesburg, said small businesses often among those to benefit would be small busiDIALYSIS TREATMENT? The FDA has recalled the dialysis drug struggle to access capital. HB 798 could attract nesses and entrepreneurs in rural communinew grocers or help existing small businesses ties where the presence of Walmart SuperGranuFlo make improvements to expand their offerings centers, he said, have created food deserts. because studies show that it can cause of healthy foods, Barker said. Beneta Burt, executive director of the Misa number of potentially deadly health problems including: The Centers for Disease Control and sissippi Roadmap to Health Equity in Jackson, *Cardiopulmonary Arrest Prevention, which supports legislation such does not believe that the Healthy Foods Retail *Low Blood Pressure as HB 798, says people tend to be healthier Act would hurt existing businesses because *Cardiac Arrhythmia when they live close to supermarkets that offer many parts of Jackson could still benefit from *Sudden Heart Attack a variety of healthy foods. The CDC also says expanded healthy-food offerings. *Stroke low-income, rural and minority communities As an example, she cites the Jackson are least likely to have grocery stores. Medical Mall neighborhood where her orIf you or a loved one suffered injury or death as a result of the use “For residents in these areas, conve- ganization started a three-day-a-week farmof nience stores and other small grocery or cor- ers market in 2009. The following year, a GranuFlo or NaturaLyte ner stores may be more common than su- Save-a-Lot grocery store opened as the only during dialysis treatment permarkets,” states the CDC’s state-by-state supermarket in the neighborhood. overview of healthy foods legislation. Both Burt and Barker agree that just You May be Entitled to Compensation Forest Thigpen, president of the con- opening new grocery stores or simply stockCONTACT servative think tank Mississippi Center for ing more vegetables on the shelves alone will ATTONEY DENNIS C. SWEET III Public Policy, is dubious about the food des- not make people healthier. Burt’s organization THE LAW FIRM OF SWEET & ASSOCIATES ert concept and the role of a potential corpo- has a fitness center, offers cooking classes for rate beneficiary of the legislation, Walmart. families and educates students about nutrition “We must question whether a $250- issues through its Food Corps program. to discuss your case. billion company should be getting help “There is no guarantee,” Barker said. from Mississippi taxpayers,” Thigpen said. “But if you partner this with farm-to-school We can help you determine if GranuFlo or NaturaLyte were used in “Government shouldn’t be picking winners (programs), which educate children on the your case and if the injury or death could have been avoided. and losers. It distorts the market and tends to benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables, there’s invite inefficiency because (subsidized) com- a synergy that can happen.” FREE BACKGROUND INFORMATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST panies don’t have to compete.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. In 2012, Walmart had revenues of $447 Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

FLICKR/NATALIE MAYNOR

upporters of a legislative proposal that promotes healthy eating believe the bill is an oasis for foods deserts—communities with limited access to grocery stores. The Healthy Foods Retail Act (HB 798) authorizes the Mississippi Development Authority to make loans and grants to retailers, nonprofits, universities and government agencies that “increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables and other affordable food in underserved areas.” “The ultimate goal is to make the healthy choice the easy choice,” said Rep. Toby Barker,

jacksonfreepress.com

800-974-7714

1:57 PM

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Teach Your Sons

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athers are genetically driven to be overprotective of our daughters. We do the best we can to teach them how to demand respect, and we pray that we never catch them in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girls Gone Wildâ&#x20AC;? foolishness. But fathers and stepfathers to teenage boys has an even more daunting task: to teach his sons how to be men. Fathers, teach your sons what respect means. It seems to be a quality lost on a new generation of boys, and we all must collectively take responsibility for that. Too often we dismiss bad behavior as â&#x20AC;&#x153;just a guy thing.â&#x20AC;? Too often, we even reward bad behavior. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made stars out of YouTube idiots and social media fools, so much so that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in danger of creating a generation of men that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respect anything. They selfishly go through life thinking they deserve things instead of having to earn them. Fathers, teach your sons to respect women. Not just the â&#x20AC;&#x153;give them flowersâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;open doors for themâ&#x20AC;? kind of respect, but respect for women as human beings and equalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;intellectual equals who have valid concerns and opinions. Teach your sons that womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bodies do not â&#x20AC;&#x153;belongâ&#x20AC;? to men and that women are not playthings put here for our physical pleasure. Women are not here to be our servants, but our partners. Fathers, teach them that drunken consent is not consent. Teach them that rapists are scum of the earth, and that the two Ohio high schoolers have ruined their lives because they failed respect a fellow classmate. Teach your sons to have respect for the law and law-enforcement officers. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raising a black man, teach him that although he will probably be accosted because of his skin color, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give him the right to disrespect a badge. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen where that goes bad. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raising a white man, teach your son that the color of his skin doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that the law doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply to him equally. Teach him that being disrespectful to an officer may get him on the news as jackass of the week. Teach your son that being a man doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you deserve to be drunk, loud, obnoxious or â&#x20AC;&#x153;grabby.â&#x20AC;? Respect is everything, and you get what you give. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being a man. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the truth ... sho-nuff.

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March 20 - 26, 2013

°&ORMER!LASKA'OV3ARAH0ALINDURINGASPEECHATTHE #ONSERVATIVE0OLITICAL!CTION#ONFERENCE-ARCH

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Why it stinks: Palin was making fun of New York City Mayor Michael Bloombergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attempt to reduce obesity by limiting the availability of large sugary drinks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[I]ncreasing serving sizes are one of the causes of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obesity epidemic,â&#x20AC;? Think Progress reported. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As portion sizes have spiraled out of control, soft drinks sizes have seen one of the largest increases, ballooning by over 50 percent since the mid-1970s, just as rates of obesity nearly tripled. The average American child now consumes approximately 270 calories from soft drinks each day and nationally U.S. children drink about 7 trillion calories from soda each year.â&#x20AC;? The well-cited story says that the obesity epidemic accounts for 21 percent of national health-care spending, amounting to more than $160 billion per year and rising. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[W]hile Bloombergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ban wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t single-handedly slim down the nation, public health advocates believe that it will discourage people from consuming â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;excess quantities of sugar-sweetened beveragesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and change â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;social norms and unhealthy behaviors,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Think Progress added.

The Two-Way Street of Democracy

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ransparency in government is a big and often slippery subject that most media outlets only look at from the 10,000foot national level. When a presidential or congressional candidate has shady dealings on his campaign-finance reports, you can be sure to hear it trumpeted from the hills. The closer to the ground campaigns getâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as municipal council seats, mayors, clerks and so forthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the fewer media are interested. You can hardly blame CNN for not digging into the Jackson Ward 4 council race. If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;paper of record,â&#x20AC;? however, citizens would be right to look askance when those races arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t covered in depth. Every state has rules for campaigning. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign-finance reporting rules are pretty simple, and they apply to every candidate, whether running for governor or county dogcatcher. If you run, you have to file reports. State law levies fines on candidates who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t follow those rules. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be honest: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neither rocket science nor brain surgery. It seems, however, that every time thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a race in Jackson, the candidates need a reminder. Here it is: If you want to play, you need to learn the rules. Concerned citizens will take the fact that you filed a campaign reportâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as a sign of your integrity and reliability. Count on it. They may not insist on seeing your tax return or birth certificate, but they are inter-

ested in who is paying your bills. Politically savvy folks understand that those who butter your bread may well ask for a favor one day; the people candidates run with tend to be consistent with how office-holders govern. On the other side of the equation, citizens must hold candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; collective feet to the fire. You can demonstrate concern about how your city worksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by getting to know its problems and challenges, and then finding out what the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plans are for addressing them. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be satisfied with platitudes and feelgood rhetoric, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow a candidate to just repeat back what you already know. If you believe Jackson has a crime problem, for example, just saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to do something about crime!â&#x20AC;? in ringing tones wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t solve it. Democracy is a two-way street. Citizens should expect to benefit from it in direct proportion to how much they put into it. Elected officials should expect to take heat on every vexation in direct proportion to how much the citizens feel pain. Jackson has a really large field of candidates between the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race and all seven city wards. Gleaning the best men and women from this field may be daunting. But, if the candidates are open and honest, and if citizens take the time and energy to ask the probing questions, a well-run and wellmonitored campaign season will make Jackson a better, stronger city.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


JOE ATKINS

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"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

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luesman Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry isn’t really howling mad. Even when he opens the door of the Two Stick restaurant here for our interview, he has a grin on his face as wide as the swath of sunshine that follows him in. Sporting a black beret, a stud in each ear and a dark pullover proclaiming Clarksdale the Crossroads to the Blues, he shakes my hand like we’re old friends. It’s not long before he’s telling the story of how he got one of his nicknames: Meat Hog. He was a country boy accepting a challenge from his uncle to butt heads with a billy goat. “BAAAM! It seemed like boiling hot needles were burning! I knocked the goat down, and my head didn’t hurt,” he says. “It must have knocked my brains down to my ankles. My feet were on fire!” All of us at the table—Perry, his daughter “Shy,” Wendy Garrison, an Oxford musician and Ole Miss biology instructor, and me—are laughing. We laugh a lot during my two-hour interview with Perry, 65, a Lafayette County native bluesman who has been performing and recording since the 1960s. One story leads to the next, such as the time he and his family performed at “Big Mama’s Juke Joint” in Hong Kong. “Very elegant,” Shy recalls. “They spent $10 million on the place,” Dad says. “One night we had a tour group that flew down from Shanghai. They spoke no English except for the interpreter. Seeing those people clap their hands, getting up, hollering, dancing to the music, knowing they didn’t understand what we were saying …” He shakes his head and grins. “Of course, we were a good-lookin’ band!” We’re sitting just a short walk from the Blues Trail marker on Oxford’s Square. The marker includes Perry among the region’s blues greats. Over his long career he has performed and worked with the likes of T-Bone Walker, Freddie King, Clarence Carter and Little Milton. Today he teaches blues as well as performs it. Bill Perry’s blues trail has been long and winding. His sharecropping father, a gambler and moonshiner, won him his first guitar in a crap game. Young Bill sat in front of local bluesman Ned Bowles “like a bird dog that spotted a bird” to learn licks on a guitar. The Perrys were poor, but music and moonshine made their house a popular destination. “Our house was the boogie house,” he says. People bought moonshine and stayed to drink it and play music on the front porch. “I made up my mind I wanted to be an entertainer,” he said. “Guys who played the guitar were always the center

of attention. I never got attention.” Still, the Perrys were different from other folks. Bill had a black father and a white mother. “I was a tar baby with red hair,” he says. When the family moved from Mississippi to Chicago, life stayed hard. “You find out how cruel people can be. I guess that plays into what I call the blues.” His father kicked him out of the house when he resisted a beating. “My dad was a strict, super-duper country dude,” Perry said. “He believed in busting your butt if you got out of hand. I never was told I was loved. I was never hugged.” Perry’s mother cared for him and helped him, but his father laid down the law. He started out playing gospel, worked at Chess Studios, got to meet the great Willie Dixon. “I tried to learn every doggone thing I could about that studio,” he said. With the help of Little Milton, he switched to the blues and made his debut solo recording in 1970 with “I Was A Fool.” The song got on the Billboard charts. A long career of performing and touring followed. Perry “is able to tell of some awful things from touring in the segregated South in the ’60s while seeing humor in how ridiculous the people perpetrating the situation were,” says his friend Garrison, herself a fine slide guitarist. Perry moved back to Mississippi in the 1980s, a decision he has never regretted. “Here you got room. I’m not saying we’re perfect in Mississippi, but compared to Chicago we come about as close to perfection as you can get,” he says. “I had enough squeezed-up living, 27 years of my life.” Perry lives near the tiny town of Abbeville (population 421). “Oxford’s too big for me,” he says. “Abbeville would be too big!” Despite a stroke in recent years and near blindness, Perry travels constantly, performing solo or with other artists such as his wife, Pauline, daughter, Shy, and son, Bill Perry Jr., are all accomplished musicians. He also stays busy teaching young musicians at the Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale and other venues. He says one of his pupils, Christone “The Kingfish” Ingram, is a future great. “I try to pass on what I know to be the truth,” he says. “… This is my passion in life. My music and my family.” A veteran journalist who teaches at the University of Mississippi, Joe Atkins is author of “Covering for the Bosses: Labor and the Southern Press” and winner of the Mississippi Association for Justice’s 2011 Consumer Advocate Award. His blog is laborsouth.blogspot.com. Reach him at jbatkins@olemiss.edu.

jacksonfreepress.com

Not Saying We’re Perfect

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JFP INTERVIEW

Pastor & F

rancis Smith calls himself a nonpolitician. The pastor of Total Praise and Worship on Cedar Lane in south Jackson is taking to the campaign trail this spring though, as an independent candidate for the office of mayor in Jackson. “I’m running for mayor, simply, to bring Jackson out of the slum, out of the abyss, out of the pits of hell,” Smith told the Jackson Free Press. Though this is Smith’s first political campaign, he is no stranger to Jackson city government. He served as the Housing and Rehabilitation Manager for the city from 2002 through 2011 under Harvey Johnson Jr.’s first administration and the Frank Melton administration. In that position, Smith supervised the Housing and Rehabilitation staff as they enforced city codes, executed community improvement projects, assured recipients spent Community Development Block Grants funds properly, and assisted elderly and disabled citizens with housing needs, such as roofing, electrical, plumbing and foundational repairs. An ordained bishop in the Pentecostal Church, Smith came to Jackson in 2001 to assist his father in pastoring the Bethesda Temple, where his dad still preaches. “I’m running independent as a strategy,” Smith said. He went on to say that he has discussed the election with some other candidates, whom he wouldn’t name, and they have agreed to back him in June if they fail to earn the Democratic nomination in May. The JFP met with Smith in the lobby of the Hilton Hotel on County Line Road in February to talk about his campaign for mayor of Jackson.

March 20 - 26, 2013

In a nutshell, what makes you the best candidate for mayor?

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The best candidate would require integrity. I have 49 years of integrity. I plan, then I execute. I don’t stop until it’s complete. Track record: I’ve pastored over five churches. I am an ordained bishop. These churches are still in operation. We have a nice flow of attendance in our churches. (I have) organization skills,

Francis P. Smith

by Jacob D. Fuller

TRIP BURNS

Politician Born: Indianapolis, Ind. Family: Widowed, wife passed in 2003; one daughter, Quanisha, 17 Military Service: U.S. Navy 1983 to 1993 Government: City of Jackson Housing and Rehabilitation Manager 2002 to 2011 Party: Independent

management skills, and research and development (skills). You served as the housing rehabilitation manager. From your experience, what does the city need to do to about the growing number of abandoned houses that people are leaving to ruin in the city?

I’ve always stated that everything starts from a foundation; everything starts from a base. The city government of Jackson starts with the administration. When we deal with administration, you have a particular department, such as Planning and Development, which entails the office of Housing and Community Development (and) Code Enforcement. Literally, we need to take charge of our laws and execute them. Boarding up houses, allowing houses to remain abandoned—there’s a court system that’s in place. Just to even do the proper work, or the proper condemning of a house is so backed up, it’s backed up over a couple of years. We need to execute and expedite more aggressiveness toward dilapidated

homes. We need to make sure that the weeds and debris (are picked up). Be more aggressive: Write citations; bring people to court. (Tell people), “Either fix it, or we’ll take it.” So if the city does take the houses, what do you propose the city does with them?

It depends on the condition of the house. You do have some abandoned houses that are not dilapidated; they’re

just not taken care of. Depending on the condition of the home, we would keep it on the tax base, revitalize it, rehabilitate it (and) put what’s needed in it, if it’s economical—or tear it down. I believe in two things. If we tear it down, we need to put something in its place. At the same time, if we tear it down, we could also use it as means of helping someone to obtain property that would restore (it to the tax base). I believe if you take everything off the tax base, that’s eco-


Jackson, for quite a while now, has suffered from a crime perception. What steps could you take as mayor to help the city shed that perception?

Again, everything starts with administration. I think the golden number is 525 police officers on the streets of Jackson. I think proper training, proper education, continuous training, proper equipmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what is needed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to have a large, vast amount of police officers on the street, but I believe what we have now really needs to be curtailed and educated to change the perception from the citizens to the police. ... We just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look at the drug lords and the burglar, and the molesters, the rapists. Crime really starts from the perception of who is actually giving the citation. If the police are going to commit crime, so will the citizens. We have to show a stronger force in our police force to let our citizens know we are abiding by the law. And if you do the crime, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to do the time. Speaking of doing the time, the city is struggling with that because of overcrowding at the county jail. Some of the county supervisors want the city to build its own jail. What would be your approach to either building a new jail or dealing with the problems at the existing one?

I think that the city and the county need to collaborate. They need to work together. I think the city of Jackson needs to be a great part of helping with our housing infrastructure with the county. The city of Jackson is responsible for maintaining whom they arrest and who goes to jail. We have to make sure that we do our part as a city to hold the criminals behind bars, and not just push it off to the county. If we work together, not just with Hinds County, but work with Madison County and our surrounding counties. I think one of the biggest problems with Jackson is we think, through prior administrations, that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become an island to ourselves. If Jackson goes down

the drain, eventually our surrounding cities will go down the drain. The city of Jackson is the capital. The only way Madison, Flowood, Clinton, (and) Ridgelandâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the only way they are going to shine is Jackson, the capital, is going to have to shine as well. As long as Jackson is a bad dot on the map, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter what Madison builds. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter what Flowood builds. They will never be able to shine until Jackson becomes what it is designed to be, and that is the capital. As my job, as the mayor, I would definitely make sure that I would be collaborating and working with outside mayors to help us house criminals. I believe we can be assisted in that through federal funding (and) through private funding. Getting the criminal off the street, letting him do his timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Rankin County or in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is it a priority? Absolutely itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a priority, but again, it starts with the administration. You mentioned private funding. Would you support a privately owned and operated jail or prison in the city?

ing to non-profit organizations to help in the school system with after-school care. By doing that, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to keep the children off the street, giving them

A pastor, Francis P. Smith says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running for mayor to â&#x20AC;&#x153;bring Jackson out of the slum.â&#x20AC;?

Yes, I would. We have this perception of crime. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also got Jackson Public Schools recently facing losing its accreditation, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a perception of business leaving for the suburbs. How are these thingsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;crime, education and businessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;how are they connected, and how can we work to improve all of them together?

As education grows, so does the city. A lot of crime is contributed to lack of education. One of the things, as a mayor, that I would do is empower churches, faithbased organizations (and) non-profit organizations to do things that the school system cannot do. There are things such as after-school programs, day-care programs, night programs, housing children, helping them with their homework (and) giving them a meal to eat while that single parent is looking for a job. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of hard to watch children, look for a job and work. As mayor, I would implement fund-

an opportunity to be educated just like everyone else. If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put something in their hand (that is) positive, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pick up something negative and use it against society. As a pastor, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot that our churches can do in the community that the public school system just cannot do. Such as?

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say, midnight child care. The school system just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that, but we can. We can watch children through the night, while the parents work a decent job at night. Some jobs are only available at midnight. Every parent canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that. Some jobs are available on second shift. We have to have means to make sure the children understand they are loved, and that they can be a mayor, fireman (or) policeman. We have to instill in them and let them know that we as citizens do care. We need to let the parents know that there are organizations out here that will

assist them in raising their child while they look for work. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of unemployment here. One of the reasons is because of the economic situation. What can we do as a church? What can we do as a non-profit organization? We can assist. Your child doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be hungry. Your child doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to go without being educated. We can put teachers and tutors in these institutions, in these churches, in these non-profit organizations to help. If a child feels that he is not learning, if he feels that he is not with the rest of his peers, then heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to find something that he is going to be good at. Eventually, he is going to end up doing the wrong thing, (and end up) behind the cell or six feet under. I believe with all the churches in Jackson, Mississippi, this is a grand opportunity to do something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been done before. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to take charge of helping these parents raise their children through means of caring, loving and educating them through the church. You mentioned the lack of jobs and problems with the economy. There are several proposed developments in the city, from Farish Street to Old Capitol Green. The city recently had a study about a new arena. How much of a priority would you put on these major developments, and how, as mayor, would you balance helping fund that along with funding the other needs in the city, such as infrastructure?

I think that the priority for the city is to clean up the city, first, before we can bring anything in the city. We just spent $98,000 to market Jackson. Why would I put on a new suit on a dirty body? Why would I bring or try to market the city of Jackson, and we have not controlled the crime, we have not controlled the street, our infrastructure, our water and our sewer? I would hate to bring someone in and try to sell this city. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like trying to sell a lemon to someone. When they get out in the street, eventually theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to find out (that) they got a bad deal. $98,000 could have been spent more wisely than

jacksonfreepress.com

nomics thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving the city of Jackson. We would try to revitalize the house and put somebody in it.

PRUH60,7+VHHSDJH

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JFP INTERVIEW

trying to market or sell the city of Jackson. Our first priority is clean up Jackson.

March 20 - 26, 2013

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I believe every city should be marketed. I believe everybody deserves clothing on their back. I believe everyone deserves to eat food. However, what I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in is to try to present something that is not. Jackson is not ready to receive the world. Jackson is not ready to be exposed. We must get this city clean. We must clean up our streets. We must clean up our housing and neighborhoods. We must clean up the crime rate. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see bringing in a good entity or a good business, or trying to welcome someone in, and as soon as they get here, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being robbed or vandalized. If the city of Jackson wants the prostitutes and the drug dealers and the streets clean, it can happen. The only reason why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not happening is thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a strong desire. Yes, we want the crime to stop, but what are we really doing? We have the police that can only do so much. They can only do so much with the equipment they use. How are we saving money in the police department? How are we saving money throughout the city? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of money being wasted throughout the city. Nobody has talked about that. Nobody wants to talk about that. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of friendship within the city. Nobody wants to talk about that. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of under-handing going on. Who suffers? The city of Jackson suffers. Every time thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an election, we find that the streets start getting paved. You see more police on the streets. Every time thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an election, we see more presence of city government. This should happen 365 days a year. This should happen every day. Does it happen? No. We are not ready to market Jackson, whether we spent $98,000, whether we spent $1. We are not ready to market Jackson, because we first have to clean our house up before we can even invite anybody in. Do you think that, possibly, it would help with the crime problem, if we brought in big business that provided more legitimate jobs?

You said help with the crime rate?

has a requirement. We have to meet their have been done, if you put the right peoThat goes back to perception. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requirement. Where is the funding going ple in the right position. a word that we use called ignorance. Igno- to come from? Everything has a starting There are people in position that rance is not a bad word. If you had a knife point. I have to go back to the original. are carrying just a title, and know nothand you had a baby, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing wrong Everything starts with administration. ing about the position. If they even had a with the baby, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing wrong Yes, we can talk about grants. We can desire to learn more about their position with the knife. Because the baby has not talk about other types of funding. No one that would even be workable. We have been educated to use the knife, because of will want to assist Jackson if Jackson keeps folks that have titles (who) know nothing ignorance, the baby would do something horrific. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same way with Jackson. We have to be educated. Bringing businesses in: Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great thing. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing wrong with that. The citizens here in Jackson, they have to understand and be educated. Bringing businesses, in and of itself, is not going to stop crime. We have to, as an administration, be more aggressive towards crime. We have to take crime by its tail and let crime know it is not going to be tolerated in this city. Even as far as running a stop sign or running a light or speeding down the street. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do any good bringing businesses in here, because they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stay if the crime continues to grow. Bringing the business by itself will not stop crime. It will not even contribute to stopping crime. Francis P. Smith is one of just three mayoral candidates who are running as independents. I believe what needs to take place is we need to set standards in our administration, letting citizens know they are protected. We are out on the doing what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been doing. If we keep do- about the duties that go behind that title. streets, the city government is being what ing what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to My job, as a mayor, would be to look it is supposed to be: administrators to the keep getting what we are getting. at the police, planning and development, public. We are supposed to serve. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re We have to change an administra- public works, telecommunication, adnot serving. The city of Jackson, they tion. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to say we have to change ministrationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all of that needs to be measerve to a certain degree. personnel. No. As a mayor, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the last sured with a fine rule. We need to change When we took oath, when we took thing I would ever want to do is send our perception of how we do business and position to become civil servants, it was to someone home. To change administra- how we bring economic development be servants of our city. The city of Jackson tion is how we go about business, how we into this city to produce funds in this city has failed to do that. do business. to take care of the structures, such as our Contractors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do busi- water and sewer, crime, whatever the isMayor Harvey Johnson Jr. recently ness with the city of Jackson, because we sues are. announced the details of a long-term donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do business right with developers, or The Bible says money is the answer: master plan for the water system. the way we just do business in general. So Money answereth all things. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a witness: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at about $300 million of with that being said, what do we do? Money does answereth all things. If we do work over the next 20 years. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also We literally have to change the way it right, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll end up right. facing hundreds of millions of dollars we administer our city business. Once in sewage system and street repairs. How would you look to fund these we get that on track, then we can start What would you say to a business looking, inviting other businesses and owner who is thinking about coming major infrastructure projects? economic development, bringing projects into Jackson, but says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why would I move into a city that has these Everything has a starting point. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and putting them on our tax base. sad to say, this infrastructure problem has Where is this money coming from, problems with the streets and water? I need better streets. I need a better been going on for years (even) prior to me the $400 million? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out there. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s liter- water system to move into the cityâ&#x20AC;?? being brought into this world. ally out there. And I literally believe that However, we have to deal with in now. with grant systems and with bonds, things PRUH60,7+VHHSDJH The (Environmental Protection Agency) can be done a lot better than what they Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right.

TRIP BURNS

You mentioned the Celebrate Jackson campaign. I looked at the financial records. They havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spent the full $98,000, but they are still in the process of the campaign (and have now fired the PR firm behind it). What was your reaction to the way the city ran the campaign? It sounds that you would not choose to spend money marketing the city.

SMITH from page 17


Believing God’s Best For You In Resurrection

Bishop Dr. Cynthia King Bolden Gardner J.D.,D. Div.

Trailblazing, revelatory NEW legal and Christian nonfiction releases: Three C’s for the Seasoned Trial Lawyer is a tactical manual on commanding respect in, and controlling, the courtroom; Kingdom Seed consists of 6 books taking seed through the womb, systemic efforts to exterminate and/or control seed, generational blessings, curses and soul ties, internecine warfare and carnivorous ‘Christianity’ the faith struggle and eternal inheritance; Accepted is self-help for spiritual healing and development; Cakes, Crumbs and Pomegranate Perfection are an anthology of sermons or compilation of sermons. Seek Ye is a childrens’ scripture based poetic coloring book and Christ Preeminent deals with the sovereignty of God. Eastern Jurisdiction, National Regeneration Fellowship of Christian Churches, Greater Love & Liberty Christian Center

Pastor Bennie Cids Gardner, Sr.

They are available at: www.amazon.com • www.barnesandnoble.com • www.authorhouse.com www.xlibris.com • www.redleadpress.com • www.eaglespeaklogos-lex.com

Baptist Cancer Services presents the 10th Annual Run From The Sun® 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Run, benefitting The Leonard E. Warren Melanoma Foundation.

Saturday, April 6, 2013 Race begins and ends at Baptist Madison Campus, 401 Baptist Drive, Madison, Mississippi. All ages can participate on race day! Race day activities, including a free skin screening at Baptist Medical Clinic | Family Medicine - Madison, begin at 3:30 PM. The race gets underway at 5:30 PM. Pre-registration is $20 by April 1, 2013, and the race-day fee is $25. Family maximum is $50 (pre-registration only) and applies to immediate family only (parents and children).

jacksonfreepress.com

Learn more about the race and download a registration form at www.runfromthesun.com.

19 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 03/2013. 9.5” x 6.167”. Commissioned by Robby Channell.


JFP INTERVIEW

I would agree with that owner. Jackson needs to have incentives to bring businesses in and incentives to keep businesses here. That has not happened. We wait too late, before something happens, then we try to resolve it. Wholesale, retail industries (like) Sam’s (Club) are leaving to Madison. One would say it’s because of their infrastructure having problems. Others would say it’s a business decision. Regardless of what it is, regardless of what their reasoning was, I believe Sam’s is a great place to do business. Sam’s—every time I’ve gone there—seems to be doing very good. We don’t know the books, but there’s always a lot of people there. What’s going to happen with that is if Sam’s decides to move into Madison, (Sam’s) is going to lose a lot of small businesses (as its customers). They’re going to lose a lot of entities, such as churches. This is where a lot of small businesses and churches get their supplies from. They’re not too quick to go into Madison because of the distance. (Sam’s) would lose a lot of business that surrounds them here. If the structure was the problem for them, I don’t know if Jackson would have gone in to see if they could assist or help them, or help the owner of the building to get the structure together or not. The fact of the matter is: What did we try to do to keep them here in Jackson? What did we try to do? It’s one thing to try. It’s one thing just to wait, and then say, “Well, we could have.” What did we do before the event happened? I would invite businesses to come into this city, making sure that our street program has to be top-notch. We have bad soil. Everyone knows that. The soil shifts. We have to have a program, that when potholes happen, we have to have something to fill them right away. There’s a lot to talk about, even on the engineering portion of the streets. For someone to come in and say our streets are bad, our water is bad, our sewer is bad, it goes back to administration. This is why it’s very important to start with administration, getting these infrastructure problems under control. They have not been under control for some time.

SMITH from page 18

I hate to say it: We want the Taj Mahal here. We want golden streets here. We want what one would call the ‘blingbling.’ We really would enjoy that. We want big stores here. We want nice restaurants here. I would enjoy that as well. I’m sorry. It’s just like telling a child: “We can’t do that until we first clean our house. You cannot invite any company until you clean your room.” This is basically where Jackson is. We have to do it. I don’t expect Madison to do it. I don’t expect Flowood to do it. I don’t expect another city to do it, another state to do it. We have to show the state of Mississippi, we have to show Washington (D.C.) that we are trying our best to bring Jackson back on the map as the capital. What does that mean? We have to work hard at it. It’s going to take everybody to do it. It’s going to take every business, church, the public schools, the neighborhoods— it takes everybody to do this. What can we do? We can learn to work together and show love to one another. This is where I live. This is where I pay taxes. This is where I shop. We have to do better than what we’ve been doing. Where’s the money going? I don’t know where the money is going. I will say this: if I make $100, and I put it in the bank, it should do one of two things: It should either grow, or that $100 should remain there when I go back after it. For some reason, with the city of Jackson, we get money every month from the tax office. Where does the money go? We can say it goes here, here, here and here. The people of Jackson pay taxes; they want to see where the money is actually going. When we start putting $300, $400 million under the ground, we still won’t see it. Yes, we’ll get to flush our commodes. Yes, we’ll get running water. At the same time, we have to be wise. Even though we’re putting money under the ground that we’ll never see, we also have to put something on top of the ground to kind of pacify us while we’re making these great changes. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

March 20 - 26, 2013

I believe Sam’s is a great place to do business.

20

Read all the JFP mayoral interviews to date at www.jfp.ms/mayorsrace.


21

jacksonfreepress.com


Anatomy of a Sweet Potato Queen by Kathleen M. Mitchell

W

hen Jill Conner Browne dubbed herself a Sweet Potato Queen in 1982, she launched a brash, quirky, self-deprecating and, above all, sassy brand of feminism that people worldwide are still embracing three decades later. Browne, a Tupelo native and now Jackson resident, has since become â&#x20AC;&#x153;Head Boss Queenâ&#x20AC;? to the 6,313 registered Sweet Potato Queen chapters in more than 20 countries that have formed. Jackson remains the epicenter of the Queendom, with the Zippity Doo Dah weekend and parade bringing women and families from all over to town for four days jam-packed with events. Local chapters adopt their own themesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as the Queens of Nekkid Truth of Murfreesboro, Tenn., or the Ugly Mothers of Winston-Salem, N.C.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and design unique costumes, but there are several things that make a Sweet Potato Queen, no matter where she lives.

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SPQ Bookshelf

March 20 - 26, 2013

DWAYNE JONES

22

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Book of Love,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Three Rivers Press, 1999, $13.95)

by Jill Conner Browne (Three Rivers Press, 2003, $15)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;God Save the Sweet Potato Queens,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Three Rivers Press, 2001, $13.95)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wedding Planner/Divorce Guide,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Three Rivers Press, 2007, $13.95)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big-Ass Cookbook (and Financial Planner),â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Field Guide to Men: Every Man I Love Is Either

Married, Gay, or Dead,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Three Rivers Press, 2004, $13.95) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; First BigAss Novel: Stuff We Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Actually Do, but Could Have, and May Yet,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne with Karin Gillespie (Simon & Schuster, 2007, $22.95)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide to Raising Children for Fun & Profit,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Simon & Schuster, 2008, $22.95) â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Thighs: The Sweet Potato Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Preserving Your Assets,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (Simon & Schuster, 2008, $23)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fat Is the New 30: The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide to Coping with (the crappy parts of) Life,â&#x20AC;? by Jill Conner Browne (AmazonEncore, 2012, $14.95)


COURTESY JILL CONNER BROWNE

The Century Queen by Kathleen M. Mitchell

T

his yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grand Marshal, Sweet Potato Queen Aunt Faye of Texas, recently celebrated her 100th birthday. In her honor, the parade theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve still got a lotta zip in our doo dah!â&#x20AC;? Aunt Faye has seen a lot in her century on earth. Here are a few events that took place 100 years ago, in 1913.

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natalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notes - parade edition

by Natalie Long

Long Live The Queens

COURTESY CANTINA SWEET POTATO QUEENS

weekend at the Hilton Jackson. I was honored to sing with Chris Derrick at the Come On In Party, which is held the Thursday before all the elaborate SPQ events kick off. It was so exciting to meet the hundreds of women who came from near and far to partake in such fun events. Last year, I overheard a bride-to-be, whose nuptials were the weekend of the Zippity Doo Dah festivities, complain that she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want those â&#x20AC;&#x153;old ass Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;? marching around all over what was to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;herâ&#x20AC;? weekend. I think this woman, as well as many others, have the preconceived notion that the Sweet Potato Queens are nothing but aging women with nothing better to do than talk about hot flashes and who has racked up the most husbands. Not so. Women of all ages come every year to have a ball; get crazy; not worry about kids, husbands, boyfriends (or all three); find a little joy after a death in the family; or work through the process of a messy divorce or any other life emergency. I love the sense of belonging and sisterhood that I get from all those â&#x20AC;&#x153;old ass queens,â&#x20AC;? and I look forward to seeing all my friends again this year, as well as to getting acquainted with many new ones who are coming to Jackson for the first time.

For someone who was never in a sorority in college, this gives me the chance to feel a part of a special group of women who are not only split-your-sides hysterical, but also have dear hearts and souls. Two years ago, I had the honor of meeting a group of queenly gals from the Lone Star State, the Cantina Queens from Odessa, Texas. We quickly became instant friends. Last year, they even let me sit with them, wear a crown and don a fashionable Cantina Queen robe for the Sunday brunch at the Hilton Jackson, where Boss Queen Browne sends all the worn-out, but happy queens home with a rousing devotion as well as words of wisdom. These girls have quickly become some of my best friends I have ever had the honor of knowing, and I wait with baited breath on what fun and quirky ideas they bring with them to our capital city for the Zippity Doo Dah weekend. So, yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all, get your hot glue gun, your Bedazzler, your crown (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been eyeing a 20-pounder that just practically screams my name every time I see it at a local store), tons of rhinestones and feather boas ready for all things fit for a queen on March 21-24. For more information on this most queenly of weekends, visit sweetpotatoqueens. 23 com or zddparade.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

W

hen I first moved to Jackson self, because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d fit right in with Jill and 13 years ago, I was intrigued company), told me about Jillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hilarious first by what I had heard about the book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Book of Sweet Potato Queens: their Love.â&#x20AC;? I went right out and bought a copy. wild assortment of colorful costumes, semiI became an instant fan, raiding Lemdebaucherous antics and their leaderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the uria Books for all of Jillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other books, bewitty, fiesty, foul-mouthed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boss Queen.â&#x20AC;? cause, well, they hit home for me. Growing We all know her as up a country girl in Jill Conner Browne, south Mississippi by whose Sweet Potato God-fearing educaQueendom (which tor parents in a small started out with lotown, I could recal friends and family ally relate to a lot marching in the Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade about growing up back in the 1980s) in a small southern has led to a worldwide town in Mississippi. phenomenon. Queens And when I read her from all over the love advice, I had to United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and stop on several oceven globallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;have casions to catch my started SPQ Wannabe breath; I was laughchapters. ing and screaming I first became a so hard. fan of the Sweet PoA couple of years tato Queens when later, I was offered the my sweet â&#x20AC;&#x153;adopted opportunity (which I mama,â&#x20AC;? Mama Janie Meeting Sweet Potato Queens from jumped at) to be the (she really needs to all overâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as Cantina Queens O-fficial SPQ Restart a SPQ chapter from Texasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is one of the best parts of porter for their solo Zippity Doo Dah weekend. in Bogue Chitto herSweet Potato Queen


Zippity Doo Dah Schedule 2013

A

PATTON AVENUE HARTFIELD STREET

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 11 a.m. — The Big Hat Brunch starts at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919). Brunch is not included in the weekend pass—call 601-3681919 or email maggieb@salandmookies.com for reservations. Tickets are $21 in advance and $26 at the door. During brunch, cast your votes for local bakers’ creations in the cake decorating competition or compete in the best hat contest. 11 a.m. — The Unzipped Runway Fashion Show begins at The Cedars (4145 Old Canton Road, 601-366-5552). 2-5 p.m. — The Everyday Gourmet’s Annual Wannabe Welcome Party is at The Everyday Gourmet (1625 E. County Line Road, 601-9779258). The event is included in the weekend pass, and buses will transport guest between the Everyday Gourmet, the Hilton Jackson and Sal & Mookie’s from 10:45 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.

FONDREN

PLACE

RO AD TO N

AN DC

MAIN STAGE

OL

OXFORD ST.

Noon-midnight. The Come-On-In Party at Fitzgerald’s at the Hilton Jackson begins, featuring music by “Missicians” from across the state.

MITCHELL STREET

MORGAN PLACE

DULING AVENUE

THURSDAY, MARCH 21 5:30 p.m. — Arts, Eats and Beats begins in Fondren, featuring live music, battle of the bands, food specials and local art on display.

BATSON JUMP ZONE

STA TE S TRE ET

ll Zippity Doo Dah events take place in Fondren or at the Hilton Jackson hotel (1001 E. County Line Road). The hotel offers a special rate for visiting Sweet Potato Queens and guests. For the details, visit sweetpotatoqueens.com or call Billie Burns at 601957-2800. Mention the bathrobe brunch if you want to get the guest rate. Sweet Potato Queens Zippity Doo Dah weekend passes at $74. To order weekend passes, visit zddparade.com. Passes will be available for pickup at the Hilton Jackson at the beginning of the weekend.

LORENZ AVENUE LAKELAND DRIVE TAYLOR STREET PARADE LINEUP COLOR ME

RAD 5K LINEUP

CARNIVAL

STAGE SAL & MOOKIE’S CHILDREN’S CARNIVAL

JSU

STADIUM PARKING

3-7 p.m. — Chillin’, Gossipin’, Tellin’ Lies, with snacks and music in Fitzgerald’s at the Hilton. 6 p.m. — The Budweiser Clydesdales Restaurant Hop makes its way through Fondren.

March 20 - 26, 2013

9 p.m.-midnight. — Pearls, PJs & Pelo Grande takes over the Hilton Jackson grand ballroom. Attendees are encouraged to wear pajamas, jewels and their biggest hairstyles (Pelo Grande means oversized hair-dos). A prize will go to the best hairstyle. Kacey Jones, Raphael Semmes, Jewel Bass, These Days will perform. Admission is included in the weekend pass; no tickets will be sold at the door. Concurrently, Krazy Karaoke will also be held at the Hilton Jackson.

24

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 All Day — The Fondren area offers activities, music, sales, special events and more throughout the day. 9 a.m. — The Color Me Rad 5K begins at the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St., 601-354-6021), with waves of runners beginning every 20 minutes. Runners can pick up packets at the Cabot Lodge Millsaps (2375 N. State St., 601-948-

8650) Thursday, March 21, and Friday, March 22, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Registration is sold out, but spectators are welcome. Visit colormerad.com for more information. 10 a.m. — The Patty Peck Honda Doo Dah Day Blue Car Giveaway takes place at the stadium after the last wave of runners finishes. The winner will receive a new Honda Civic. Opportunities to purchase or win raffle tickets are available throughout the weekend. For details or to purchase raffle tickets, visit foch.org/events/zippity-doodah-parade-and-festival/. Proceeds benefit Friends of the Children’s Hospital. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. — Sal & Mookie’s Sixth Annual Children’s Carnival is held on the green space by the restaurant. Dusk —Third Annual Zippity Doo Dah Parade in Fondren

5 p.m. — Mini-float line up at the Stadium. 6 p.m. — Marchers line up at the Stadium. 7ish p.m. — The parade begins, led by the Budweiser Clydesdales. Visit fondren.org for the parade route. 9:30 p.m. — The Sweet Potato Queens Ball begins at the Hilton Jackson, featuring Chris Gill & the Sole Shakers. Attendees are encouraged to remain in their parade costumes. Admission is included in the weekend pass, no tickets will be sold at the door.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 8:30 a.m. — Bathrobe Brunch at the Hilton Jackson begins. Tickets are $20 advance purchase for Hilton Jackson room guests, $29 in advance for nonhotel guests and $39 at the door. Jill Conner Browne speaks at 9:30 a.m.


Run Bright

Xf!Bsf!Qpqqjoh!Vq bu!uif!Nfuspdfoufs!Nbmm

1 DAY ONLY

by Meredith W. Sullivan

Fri. March 22 • 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. •

J

ust because it’s a race doesn’t mean you can’t make a fashion statement—and let’s face it, when the Sweet Potato Queens get involved, everything becomes a show. The same is true of the Color Me Rad 5K, part of Zippity Doo Dah weekend. To prepare for the color explosion you’ll become by the end of the run, start with white basics and pile on the neon accessories. (Tutu optional.)

rers, Wayfa Yellow Muse, $12 en Fondr

Ra Fle inbow et F eet Swe Spo atb rts, an $12 d,

Remember to visit our store for a larger selection of clothing and home items. We carry everything from women’s trendy tops and cocktail dresses to maternity wear and business attire. Voted One of Jackson’s Best Consignment Stores.

COLONIAL MART SHOPPING CENTER 5070 Parkway Drive, Jackson

Spring Fashion Location The

1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

601.991.0500

Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sat 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

tars, All S -55 E S 5 VER c, $4 CON O-Phoni l Swel

Colorful Tie-Dye Headbands, Paperdoll, $6.50 for two

Where2Shop:

WIN Sports Detergent, Fleet Feet Sports, $10

Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-899-9696) Fondren Muse (3413 N. State St., 601-345-1155) Paperdoll Boutique (180 Promenade Blvd., Flowood, 601-919-2442) Swell-O-Phonic (2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601-981-3547) Stinky Feet Athletics (153 Ridgeway, Suite C, Flowood, 601-992-1439)

jacksonfreepress.com

Swiftwick Knee Socks, Stinky Feet Athletics, $34.99

25


Zippity Doo Dah Party on the Patio March 20 -26, 2013

Saturday, March 23rd

26

Double Shotz Band & Will and Linda Watch the Parade from the Patio!

2801 North State Street • Fondren District 601-981-2520 • www.QueSeraMS.com


Join Us!

In Fondren For

jacksonfreepress.com

McDade’s Market in Fondren is celebrating with a tent out in front of the store! Earl Bell, local musician, will be playing from 5 pm until 9 pm and we will have food samples as well.

MAYWOOD MART • 1220 E. NORTHSIDE DRIVE • 601-366-8468 WOODLAND HILLS SHOPPING CENTER • FONDREN • 601-366-5273 ENGLISH VILLAGE • 904 E. FORTIFICATION STREET • 601-355-9668 WESTLAND PLAZA • 2526 ROBINSON ROAD • 601-353-0089 YAZOO CITY • 734 E. 15TH STREET • 662-746-6005

27 EAT7760-1 ZippityDoDahJFP.indd 1

3/18/13 2:11 PM


Potties Fit For A Queen

McGraw Gotta Go Toilets Reserve One Today We deliver and pick up. All you do is call!

601-879-3969 | www.gottagotoilets.com O-fficial potty sponsor of the Zippity-Do-DahÂŽ Parade

fondren cellars wine & spirits

Wine Wednesday - 10% OFF!

This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Highlights 360 Vodka (All Flavors) $14.99 (reg. $17.99)

'!&5f]Z_X2gVZ_7`_UcV_ hhhdR]dR^dT`^m'!"#"$'$&&

Casa de Campo Malbec & Casa de Campo Torrontes $10.99

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Group Classes: Salsa, Zumba, Belly Dance, Hip Hop, Bachata, Contemporary Dance & Ballroom For our full class schedule check our website salsams.com.

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WELLNESS p 30 FOOD p 32

Taming the Television by Kelly Bryan Smith

I

KELLY BRYAN SMITH

f you are a parent, you have probably been there. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if you are single, married or divorced. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if you are a mom or a dad, old or young, rolling in it or just scraping by. Sometimes, you have just got to turn on the television for 20 minutes to finish getting dinner on the table, to have a private moment in the bathroom or to take a breather from the 342nd â&#x20AC;&#x153;whyâ&#x20AC;? since school let out for the afternoon. I live there, too. However, study after study shows that the amount of direct and indirect screen time is increasingly problematic for the our childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget, in our increasingly technological society, TV isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only screen to think aboutâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; computers and laptops, iPads and tablets, smartphones and even e-readers all contribute to the same issues. Spending more time watching television or playing computer games means less time is spent exercising, reading, getting fresh air, imagining, drawing, dancing, exploring, kicking a ball, building, having conversations, singing, studying, cooking or learning. Increased screen time is often correlated with things like decreased attention span, diminished academic performance and poor social relationships. In order to counteract the problems associated with the influence of television, parents can be cer-

Turn off the TV and take those kids exploring outside!

tain to spend plenty of quality time with their children having conversations, reading together and pursuing mutual interests. If television is a habit in your family, you may also want to consider ways to gradually incorporate other forms of entertainment and interaction that will boost your childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s developmental potential, making time for both Power Rangers and playing at the park.

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Making mini pizzas gets kids involved in dinner.

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any questions that might come up while they are working. Ask older kids to help entertain younger kids. Cook meals and freeze them ahead of time, or take a few hours over the weekend to get a lot of meal prep out of the way by chopping veggies, boiling rice, and getting organized with the help of a spouse, friend or babysitter to hang out with the little ones.

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Include your kids in meal prep. My 3-year-old loves to help pour and stir. Create simple make-your-own meals, such as tacos that kids can choose to fill with a variety of prepared fillings, or mini pizzas with a range of topping choices. Assign your kids duties such as setting the table and taking drink orders for the family. Set up some in-kitchen entertainment. Start a family kitchen dance party with older kids and an iPod. Give younger kids a bowl of dried beans with different utensils and containers to manipulate the beans and â&#x20AC;&#x153;cookâ&#x20AC;? a feast of their own. Make a chalkboard wall for budding artists to create on. Get the kids started with an independent art project, reading time or puzzle construction before starting to cook. Have the kids work on their homework at the kitchen table while you cook and help answer

FLICKR/AVLXYZ

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29


LIFE&STYLE | wellness

Sit, Jackson

Further Reading

CREDIT: FILE PHOTO

COURTESY TRUMPETER

for anxiety or impatience,” says Daniel Irby, who has been practicing meditation since 2007. Being aware loosens the grip of strong emotions such as anger and fear, he says. It isn’t that Irby doesn’t experience such emotions, but “I don’t get caught up in it,” he says. Even though Irby is a Buddhist, he says the benefits of meditation extend far beyond his faith. What all methods of meditation have in common is that you must slow down long enough to pay attention to what’s happening right now. That is harder than it sounds, and it’s easy

to get distracted. Still, the effort pays off. Meditation usually starts with noticing and slowing the breath. Some teachers recommend closing your eyes; others have practitioners concentrating on a single point, such as a candle flame, or listening to soothing music or a guide. Regardless, the goal is the same. “In general, it is waking up to the present moment, becoming aware of what’s actually happening right now, as opposed to what you’re afraid might happen in a few minutes or what you regret having done the day before,” Irby says.

MEDITATION STATION

March 20 - 26, 2013

J

30

ackson offers several ways to explore meditation. Local yoga studios often feature meditation classes. Millsaps College offers classes through its non-credit community enrichment series (millsaps.edu/news_events/enrichment_ series.php). The folks at Rainbow Computer Co-op meet Sundays for meditation and fellowship for an hour from 1011 a.m. It’s free to join. Call 601-981-6925. Irby’s Zen Buddhist group meets at a meditation dojo (literally, “place of the way”) just off Old Canton Road at Interstate 55, and he offers an orientation for newcomers on third Sundays at 9:30 a.m. Email him at jacksonzengroup@ gmail.com. The dojo also offers other types of secular meditation. Call Bebe Wolfe at 601-982-0402 or Katy White at 601-853-6142. Locally, several organizations offer ways to meditate alone or with others.

“Meditation for Beginners,” by Jack Kornfield (Sounds True, Incorporated, 2008, $14.95)

COURTESY TRUMPETER

Meditation is a great way to recognize and control negative emotions.

COURTESY TRUMPETER

“The Open-Focus Brain: Harnessing the Power of Attention to Heal Mind and Body,” by Les Fehmi and Jim Robbins (Trumpeter, 2008, $18.95)

“Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation: A 28-Day Program,” by Sharon Salzberg (Workman Publishing Company, 2010, $14.95)

COURTESY TRUMPETER

I

n our rush to meet deadlines, take care of our families and get stuff done, finding the time to do nothing may seem counter-intuitive. The research is piling up, though, proving that our brains and bodies crave quiet time to slow down and be still. It is just not possible to multitask our way to calm. When we hear “meditation,” some of us imagine Buddhist monks sitting for hours with eyes closed and legs crossed. But meditation requires neither twisting your knees nor subscribing to an Eastern religion. Numerous types of non-spiritual meditations are available to people who want to explore its benefits, and most do not require a large investment of time. Contemplative practices can make a huge impact on our ability to handle everyday stressors, from budgets to traffic jams. Physicians advocate meditation to ease tension and the health problems that come with it. It’s also a way to make lasting changes. When we dial down our activity enough to see how we react to stimuli and examine those reactions without judgment, we can act purposefully—mindfully—instead of thoughtlessly and automatically. Recognizing our reactions provides a doorway to changing our responses and can result in seeing the world in entirely new ways. “For me, the most obvious benefit has been that I’m able to be aware of what my mind is doing and where it is going when I’m in a situation where it could be very stressful or where there’s potential

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by Ronni Mott

“Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom,” by Joseph Goldstein, (Shambhala, 2003, $18.95)


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LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

Sweet Orange Tuber by Robyn Jackson

Sweet Potato Cornbread

COURTESY HOLLY CLEGG

6 cups sweet potato chunks, peeled 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1/2 cup green onions, chopped 1/4 cup dried cranberries 1/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons orange juice 1 tablespoon lime juice 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Sweet potatoes are a more versatile ingredient than they are given credit for—try something new, like sweet potato salad.

S

Sweet Potato Salad

weet potatoes are as southern as sweet tea and the Sweet Potato Queens themselves, but these orange-fleshed treats are a lot more versatile than that old standby, the Thanksgiving sweet potato casserole topped with mini marshmallows. They can be roasted and eaten with butter like an Irish baked potato, sliced and fried, or scooped out and the skins topped with a mixture of potato pulp and cheese for a quick hors d’ouevres. Sweet potatoes can also star in a variety of sweet and savory dishes from cornbread to potato salad. Sweet potatoes are native to Central and South America. Remnants of sweet po-

tatoes dating back thousands of years were discovered in Peru, and the first Europeans to sample them were members of Christopher Columbus’ expedition in 1492. They are distantly related to Irish potatoes, but are botanically distinct from a true yam, for which they are often mistaken. “True yams actually are a tough tuber (cream colored) grown in the tropics but not in the U.S., and a true sweet potato is an enlarged root of the sweet potato plant that is starchy when harvested but becomes sweeter after storage,” says Holly Clegg of Baton Rouge, La., author of the “Trim & Terrific” cookbook series, and a spokeswoman for the Louisiana Sweet Potato Commission.

1 6-ounce package yellow cornbread mix 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2/3 cup skim milk 1 egg, beaten 1/2 cup cooked sweet potatoes, mashed

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Farenheit. Coat an 8-inch by 8-inch pan (two inches deep) coated with nonstick cooking spray. In a bowl, combine cornbread mix, sugar and cinnamon. Stir in milk, eggs and sweet potatoes, mixing until moistened—but don’t over mix. Transfer batter into prepared pan. Bake 20 minutes or until top is golden brown. Makes 12 squares.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Farenheit. Line baking sheet with foil and coat with nonstick cooking spray. Toss together potatoes with ginger, cumin and one tablespoon olive oil. Roast about 30 minutes or until potatoes are crisp. Cool and transfer to a large bowl. Add green onions, cranberries and pecans. In a small bowl, whisk together maple syrup, orange and lime juices, nutmeg, and the remaining two tablespoons olive oil. Toss with potatoes. Serve or refrigerate. Makes 12 1/2-cup servings. SOURCE:“TOO HOT IN THE KITCHEN,” BY HOLLY CLEGG

“I use sweet potatoes to replace potatoes in any recipe for an added dose of nutrition and flavor,” Clegg says. “Sweet potatoes provide twice the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A and more than one-third of the requirements for vitamin C. They are an important source of beta-carotene, vitamin B6, iron, potas-

SOURCE:“KITCHEN 101,” BY HOLLY CLEGG

sium and fiber. Containing virtually no sodium, one medium sweet potato contains only about 150 calories.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that Mississippi produces 19 percent of the sweet potatoes consumed in the U.S. each year. The real beauty of this humble ingredient is its sweet flavor and versatility as an ingredient. Try these recipes and taste for yourself.

Easter Indulgences by JFP Staff

March 20 - 26, 2013

32

Another Broken Egg Café (Renaissance at Colony Park, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 1009, Ridgeland, 601-790-9170). Open from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Easter Sunday. In addition to the regular menu, three quiches will be available: spinach, feta, onion and tomato; ham, cheddar and broccoli; and bacon, jack cheese and mushrooms.

Bon Ami (Maywood Mart, 1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 230, 601982-0405). Enjoy Sunday brunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. with a menu that includes eggs Benedict, various quiches and two grits dishes. Easter Sunday specials TBA. No reservations accepted.

Babalu Tacos and Tapas (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757). Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Easter Sunday. Lunch specials from the regular menu include black beans and rice, grilled chicken, hamburger steak, pan-roasted redfish

BRAVO! Italian Restaurant and Bar (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., 601-982-8111). Serving Sunday brunch 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to the regular brunch menu including blackened redfish Benedict, New

and slow-braised pork with poblanocilantro rice.

Orleans style shrimp and grits, and specialty breakfast pizzas, a chef’s special will be offered. Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-420-4202). Daily specials are available on Easter Sunday. Served from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., the menu includes French onion soup, sausage and seafood gumbo, macaroni and cheese with Tripp country ham, crab cake Florentine, steak and eggs, croissant bread pudding and the Table 100 Signature Eggs Benedict.

Marys. The menu includes beignets, quiche, shrimp and grits, catfish tacos, bananas Foster French toast, shrimp toast and steak and eggs Benedict. FLICKR/LAUDU

B

esides its religious or spiritual meaning, Easter is a highly anticipated holiday for many because it means they can finally indulge in whatever they have been resisting since Fat Tuesday. Treat yourself on Easter Sunday at one of the many local restaurants offering brunch and lunch specials.

Char (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., 601-956-9562). Sunday brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. offers a menu featuring custard-fried French toast, chicken and waffles, shrimp Creole and more.

Several local restaurants are offering Easter Sunday specials.

Julep Restaurant and Bar (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., 601362-1411). Brunch is served Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Enjoy two-for-one mimosas and Bloody

King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St., 601-969-8550). The Easter brunch menu features pan-fried redfish, braised short ribs, vegetable mac and cheese, and whipped sweet

potatoes. Besides the main buffet, the restaurant will have stations for dessert, fruit, salad, soup, omelets, and a carving station featuring smoked prime rib, sliced to order. $29.95 for adults, $16.95 for children. Call for reservations. Que Sera Sera (2801 N. State St., Jackson, 601-981-2520) Serving brunch from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a menu featuring brabant potatoes, eggs Benedict and five types of omelets: seafood, Creole, crawfish, Italian, and ham and cheese, bleu egg Sardou and crawfish Benedict. Wellington’s at the Hilton (1001 E. County Line Road, 601-957-2800). Easter brunch is in the Grand Ballroom from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. featuring chef’s specials. Adult admission is $27.95 plus tax, children ages 4 to 12 $13.95; free for children under 4. See and add more at jfp.ms/Easter2013


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami. STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes! Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Hwy 80 E in Pearl, 601-932-8728 and 149 Old Fannin Rd in Brandon, 601-992-6686) A culinary treat traditional Mexican.

Join us for Happy Hour

Kern Pratt & The Accused

Sat | March 23 | 9 pm | $5

Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

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Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013 Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

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MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma.

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. ASIAN AND INDIAN Mr. Chen’s (5465 I 55 North, 601-978-1865) Fresh authentic Chinese Food, located within an actual grocery store with many unique produce offerings. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made springrolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry. VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-veganfriendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

Join Us For Easter Sunday Lunch In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-Food & Wine Magazine-

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BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

33


C E L E B R AT E E A S T E R with fresh-baked goodies from

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COURTESY BELHAVEN DANCE

Dance Class by Brent Hearn

COURTESY BELHAVEN DANCE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;(We) are the host for the international village; the competitors come and stay on our campus. They utilize our studios for their warm-up classes and then also for their individual rehearsalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; for preparing for all of their competitions.â&#x20AC;? Belhaven offers a bachelor of arts in dance and a bachelor of fine arts in dance, along with a dance minor and a certificate in dance. Beginning this fall, it will also offer a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of fine arts in dance, as well. Key factors in Belhavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program make The Belhaven dance department puts on performances of a caliber beyond its size. it different from others around the U.S., and Newland considers these â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we have guest artists that come, differences to be strengths. For one, Bel- theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re quite envious that we have all of these haven is a faith-based institution, affiliated males to work with,â&#x20AC;? Newland says. 5PCOMING with the Presbyterian Church. Newland However, the biggest strength of BelDANCE says that very few Christian universities have havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program may be one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intanPERFORMANCES dance programs. gible: its facultyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depth of personal interacAT"ELHAVEN Another statistic that makes Belhaven a tion with the students, which Newland says INCLUDE rarity among college dance programs is the is not as common at other institutions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  number of males who study there: In any care about them holistically: emotionally,  %HOKDYHQÂśV6SULQJ year, between 10 and 18 men are in the pro- spiritually (and) physically. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a part of 'DQFH3URGXFWLRQ4XHVW gram, which is a lot in a traditionally estro- our investment in the students that makes RIWKH'HVLJQHURQ$SULO gen-dominated discipline. us unique.â&#x20AC;? DQGDIDPLO\

Belhaven has close ties with the International Ballet Competition, which comes to Jackson every four years.

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jacksonfreepress.com

I

f you were to ask Mr. or Mrs. Random Citizen to name important cities in the world of dance, he or she would probably rattle off the usual suspects: cultural meccas like New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago. But Jackson has played, and continues to play, a role in the dance world that is disproportionate to its size, and Belhaven Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance department is one of the primary reasons for that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dance in the metro Jackson area is alive and well,â&#x20AC;? Belhavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance department chairwoman Cynthia Newland says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the last 10 years since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here in Jackson, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been wonderful to watch it grow.â&#x20AC;? Belhaven has roughly 110 dance majors, Newland says, making it the largest arts division in the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and one of the most popular programs on the campus. Recently, the department conducted a study finding that, in the last five years alone, students from 45 states and 12 different countries have studied dance at Belhaven. Many of these students have gone on to dance and teach in companies across the country and around the world. The international connection at Belhaven doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end with just its students, though. The university has a strong connection to the jewel in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance crown: the International Ballet Competition, which descends on the capital city every four years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The relationship between IBC and Belhaven University is a very close one,â&#x20AC;? says Newland, who is on the board of the IBC.

35


DIVERSIONS | film

‘Wonderstone’ Sparks and Puffs by Anita Modak-Truran

didn’t have time to bake a cake, but she provides Little Burt instructions for the mix. You get the picture. Little Burt has a most miserable childhood. But Burt’s birthday present, carefully wrapped by mom, makes up for all of the day’s shortcomings. It’s a super spectacular Rance Holloway magic kit. “Everyone loves a magician,” Holloway (Arkin) says in the introductory video. Burt’s eyes light up. The only kid Burt impresses with his new tricks is a pasty weakling named Anton (Luke Vanek). Burt and Anton make an odd couple, but they work misfit-well together and become superstar magicians ruling the Las Vegas strip. The lyrics to “Abracadabra” opens their act: “Every time you call my name, I heat up like a burnin’ flame. Burnin’ flame full of desire. Kiss me baby; let the fire get higher. Abra-abra-cadabra, I want to reach out and grab ya. Abra-abra-cadabra. Abracadabra.” As the music crescendos, Burt Wonderstone (Carell) and Anton Marvelton (Buscemi) fly in on gimmicky cable wires. Burt’s an orange-tanned, mullet-sporting sex maniac in a velvet ensemble of Elvis vintage. Anton

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings 3/22 –

for Thur.

3-D The Croods PG The Croods (non 3-D) Olympus Has Fallen

PG R

Fri. 3/28

Jack The Giant Slayer (non 3-D) PG13 The Last Exorcism Part II PG13

Admission PG13

Snitch

The Call

Safe Haven PG13

R

PG13

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone PG13

Identity Thief

3-D Oz: The Great And Powerful PG

G.I. Joe: Retaliation PG13

R

Opens Thursday 3/28

March 20 - 26, 2013

Oz: The Great And Powerful (non 3-D) PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

St.
Alexis
Episcopal
Church Where
All
Are
Welcome
 650
E.South
Street
•
Jackson 601.944.0415

Holy
Week
Services
 Palm
Sunday
(March
24): Liturgy
for
Palm
Sunday: 10:30
a.m.
&
6:00
p.m.

Maundy
Thursday
(March
28): Maundy
Thursday
Liturgy &
Mediterranean‐Style
Dinner 6:00
p.m.

Good
Friday
(March
29):
 Stations
of
the
Cross
traveling
 through
downtown
Jackson.

 Begin
in
the
Hal
&
Mal’s
parking
 lot
at
noon.

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Good
Friday
Liturgy
(Church):

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Easter
Sunday:
Holy
Eucharist (March
31)

36 Movieline: 355-9311

6:00
p.m.

10:30
a.m.

COURTESY WARNER BROTHERS

“T

he Incredible Burt Wonderstone” ignites a tiny spark of wonderment. But it’s like watching a Boy Scout trying to light his first fire with dry twigs. This film needs a match to ignite the screen and save the spark. The cast—led by Steve Carell and complemented by Steve Buscemi, Jim Carrey, Olivia Wilde, James Gandolfini, Alan Arkin, Jay Mohr, and Brad Garrett—do everything in their mighty comedic powers to start an inferno of laughs. But a conventional script, written by Jonathan Goldstein and John Francis Daley, snuffs out their creative sparks. The bits never get beyond a random puff of smoke. Dan Scardino (a seasoned television director with bunches of “30 Rock” credits) directed the movie, which starts with a pixie-cute boy (Mason Cook) running from a gang of suburban bullies. He eats tree bark to show them that there is nothing they can make him do that he didn’t think of first. When he gets home, he finds a note and a present. His mother apologizes, but she has to work another double shift and can’t be home for Little Burt’s birthday. She

Steve Carell (front) is “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone.” Steve Buscemi costars as his sidekick, Anton Marvelous.

is a bug-eyed, blonde-streaked back-up man. He’s the brains, and Burt’s the beauty. And their act is hysterically bad. But like all great magicians who have reached the pinnacle of success, there is only

one way left to go: down. And Burt and Anton crash hard, finding themselves out-dazzled by street magician Steve Gray (Carey). Their friendship breaks apart. I won’t spoil the what-happens-next for those who want a surprise. It’s all too predictable, but there is one little morsel of truth that almost—but not quite—redeems the senseless smoke-and-mirror tricks that pass for plot points. Burt loses his best friend and job because of complacency. The secret to being a great magician (indeed, to life itself) is to connect with and touch people in new ways, endeavoring always to keep reinventing oneself and giving back to the audience. Carell, with his wholesome boyish charm, connects with us. We can relate to Burt’s downfall. He forgot what was important. It takes a children’s birthday party for Burt to find his way back, to mend lost friendships and to pursue magnificent dreams again. As Guy Laliberte, co-founder and CEO of Cirque du Soleil, has written, “From a tiny spark, a great fire was kindled, and its flames warmed the world.” This film never ignites into a burning flame, but it does have a tiny spark.


THURSDAY 3/21

SATURDAY 3/23

The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus is at the Mississippi Coliseum.

The Sweet Potato Queens’ Zippity Doo Dah Parade is at 7 p.m. in Fondren.

SUNDAY 3/24 The annual Zoo Blues is at 4 p.m. at the Jackson Zoo.

BEST BETS

The All 4 Children Consignment VIP Pre-sale is from 5-8 p.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Regular sale March 21-22 from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and March 23 from 8 a.m.-noon. $10 pre-sale, free admission to regular sale; call 601-566-7046. … Desert Noises, Hollis Brown and the Giving Tree Band perform at 6:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $5 advance, $8 day of show; call 601-292-7121.

THURSDAY 3/21

FARMHOUSE MARKETING

The Third Thursday Art Reception is from 5-8 p.m. at View Gallery (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 105, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-856-2001. … The Jackson Irish Dancers perform with the Ceili Band at 6 p.m. at Belhaven Park (Poplar Boulevard). Free; call 601-352-8850. … The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum. Runs through March 24. $15$45; call 800-745-3000. … Arts, Eats and Beats is at 5 p.m. in Fondren. Free admission; call 601-981-9606.

Edwin McCain performs at the JAMboree and Crawfish Boil at Nick’s Restaurant March 23. Party starts at 11 a.m.

FRIDAY 3/22

The Unzipped Runway Fashion Show is at 11 a.m. at The Cedars (4145 Old Canton Road). Lunch included. Seating limited. Tickets held at will call. $55; zddparade.com. … Fight Before Surrender, Triple Stitch, Tonight Forever and more perform from 6-10 p.m. at Rampage Extreme Park (931 Highway 80 W.). $7; rampagextremepark.com.

SATURDAY 3/23

The Zippity Doo Dah Character Breakfast is from 8-10 a.m. at Walker’s Drive-in (3016 N. State St.). Meet

See the Budweiser Clydesdales in the annual Zippity Doo Dah Parade March 23 at 7 p.m.

Scooby Doo, Ronald McDonald and other characters. Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. Seating limited. $15; zddparade.com. … The Mississippi Pokémon Trading Card Game State Championships is at 8:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Training Academy (3791 Highway 468 W., Pearl). Free; call 601-720-6029; pokemon.com/play. … The annual Street Carnival is from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Sal & Mookie’s. Proceeds from game tickets and food sales benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Visit salandmookies.com (includes online silent auction). … The Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi Easter Egg Hunt is from 10-11 a.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.) at center court. For ages 8 and under. Arrive early. Proceeds benefit Camp Kandu. $5 donation; call 877-DFM-CURE. … Nick’s JAMboree and Crawfish Boil is at 11 a.m. at Nick’s Restaurant (3000 Old Canton Road). Edwin McCain headlines the concert. $10 at the door; call 601-981-8017. … The stage play “Behind the Pulpit” is at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Word and Worship Church (6286 BY LATASHA WILLIS Hanging Moss Road). $25 3 p.m. show, $30 8 p.m. show; call 601- JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM 713-3597 (after 6 p.m. day of show) or 800-745-3000. … The FAX: 601-510-9019 Zippity Doo Dah Parade is at DAILY UPDATES AT 7 p.m. in Fondren. See the Sweet JFPEVENTS.COM Potato Queens and the Budweiser Clydesdales. Visit zddparade. com. … Gospel hip-hop artist Daniel “MasterPEACE” Jones and Hahkua perform at 7 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe. $5. … DJ Young Venom, DJ Stephen Urquel and DJ Phingaprint play hits from Rick James, Prince and Michael Jackson at the RPM Party at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601-292-7121. … The Power of the Mic Comedy Show is at 10 p.m. at Suite 106. $5; call 646-801-1275.

EVENTS@

SUNDAY 3/24

The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents “When Cletus Met Elizabeth” at 7 p.m. at Anjou (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). RSVP. For ages 18 and up. $49; call 601937-1752. … Zoo Blues is at 4 p.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Performers include Willie Clayton, Cupid, Floyd Taylor and T.K. Soul. No tents, glass containers or outside food. $25; call 601-352-2580 or 800-745-3000. … The fashion show “Reserved: The Fashion Report” is at 7 p.m. at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). Includes items from local designers and boutiques. $10-$15; call 601-278-4169, 601-906-2713 or 601-372-3290.

MONDAY 3/25

Author Jamie Quatro signs her book “I Want to Show You More” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). $24 book; call 601-366-7619.

TUESDAY 3/26

The Three Ring Circus Fashion Show is from 4-7 p.m. at the Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Free, items for sale; call 601-856-7546.

WEDNESDAY 3/27

Downtown Jackson Partners president Ben Allen speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Fleet Feet Sports’ Pub Run is at 6 p.m. at Soulshine Pizza Factory, Township (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-898-9696. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 3/20

ANHEUSER-BUSCH.COM

MARCH 20 - 27, 2013

37


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Nick’s JAMboree and Crawfish Boil March 23, 11 a.m., at Nick’s Restaurant (3000 Old Canton Road). Enjoy crawfish, barbecue, beer, cocktails, and music from Edwin McCain, the Cadillac Three, Ashley Ray and Jason Miller. $10 at the door; call 601-981-8017.

(/,)$!9 Friends and Family Easter Open House March 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Virginia College (4795 Interstate 55 N.). Learn about the college’s educational opportunities, and enjoy an Easter egg hunt and other family activities. Refreshments and prizes included. Bring non-perishable items to donate to Stewpot. Free; call 601-977-0960.

#/--5.)49 Events at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Call 601-352-2580, ext. 240; jacksonzoo.org. • Animal Families Program March 23, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Families explore how animals raise their young. Pre-registration required. $15, $10 children, discounts for members. • Jackson Zoo Math Days March 25-29. Teachers may bring their classes for self-guided, mathbased activities. Registration required. Free with paid admission. Events at Old Capitol Inn (226 N State St.). • She Should Run Luncheon March 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The purpose of the program encourages women to run for public office. Reg-

ister by March 20 for lunch; limited seating. $10 lunch; call 601-559-5755 or 601-259-6770. • Jackson Mayoral Candidates Forum March 26, 6-9 p.m. Enjoy free food, a cash bar and a game-show style Q&A with the candidates. RSVP. Free; call 601-842-7237. Events at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Call 601-977-7914 or 601-9187809; mscivilrightsveterans.com. • Veterans of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement Conference March 20-24. The theme is “Looking Back to Move Forward: Sacrificing for Human Dignity, Securing Human Rights.” Speakers include Ellie Dahmer and Dr. Beverly Hogan. $100, $40 one day, $25 college students, $10 high school students. • Veterans Freedom Gathering Banquet March 22, 7 p.m., at the Kroger Activities Center. Civil-rights veteran Owen Brooks and the Scott Sisters are the honorees. Rep. Bennie Thompson and Dr. Beverly Hogan are the speakers. $30, $15 students, $300 table of 10. Minority Business Network Monthly Meeting March 21, 6 p.m., at Divine Ministries (1417 W. Capitol St.), in the Multipurpose Center. Learn ways to grow your business. Refreshments and door prizes included. Bring business cards. RSVP. Free; call 601-750-2367 or 601-316-5092. Precinct 3 COPS Meeting March 21, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0003. Senior Fashion Extravaganza March 22, 11 a.m.1 p.m., at Metrocenter Mall (3645 Highway

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf Npoebz

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 2 • 7:00-8:00 pm Yoga for Runners/Athletes

Uvftebz

March 20 - 26, 2013

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) • 6-7:15 pm Level 1

38

Xfeoftebz

• 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Classical Hatha Yoga • 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

Uivstebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

• 9-10:15 am Classical Hatha Yoga • 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

• 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

80 W.). The Department of Human and Cultural Services celebrates the lives of senior citizens. Entertainment included. Free; call 601-960-0335. Mississippi Humanities Council Public Humanities Awards March 22, noon-5:30 p.m., at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). The ceremony and banquet is in recognition of Mississippians who have contributed to the study and understanding of the humanities. $45, $340 table of eight; call 601-432-6752. Sistas2Daughters Mini-conference March 23, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., at Farish Street M.B. Church (619 N. Farish St.). Adult women advise girls and young women ages 13-19 on various topics. Preregistration required; space limited. Free; call 601918-5075; email afrikan_tbt@yahoo.com. 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens Workshop March 23, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., at Hearts of Madison Events Center (123 Jones St., Madison). Certified Franklin Covey facilitator Lynn Ward covers topics such as being proactive, establishing goals and being a good listener. $55-$65; call 769798-1702. Celebrate Women’s Month Workshop March 23 and March 30, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Breaking Free Ministries shares a presentation and leads group discussions. Free; call 601-214-6140 or 601-960-3008. Mississippi Federation of Democratic Women Convention March 25, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). The keynote speaker is Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood. Lunch included. RSVP. $10; call 601-503-6469 or 601-969-2913.

Jackson Mayoral Candidates Forum March 25, 6-8:30 p.m., at Greater Mt. Bethel Church of Christ (Holiness), U.S.A. (4125 Robinson Road). The Hinds County Democratic Executive Committee is the host. Free; call 601-969-2913. Wine Dinner March 26, 6:30 p.m., at Anjou Restaurant (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). Enjoy a six-course meal paired with wines. Reservations required. $75 per person; call 601-707-0587.

7%,,.%33 Be Fit for Life 5K Run/Walk March 23, 8 a.m., at First Baptist Church of Clinton (100 E. College St., Clinton). Check-in is at 7 a.m. Includes a one-mile fun run. Awards given. $25, $80 family of four, $20 Boy Scouts, $15 fun run; call 601948-6111. Fit Fest Week March 25-30, at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). Includes a health fair March 27 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and the “Sweetness” Fight Against Obesity 5K March 30 at 8 a.m. (pre-register by March 22). Fees vary for race, other events free; call 601-979-1368.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “The Importance of Being Earnest” March 21-23, 7 p.m., March 22, noon and March 24, 2:30 p.m., at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in Aven Little Theater. The Mississippi College Tribal Players present the Oscar Wilde comedy. $8, $5 seniors, students and MC employees; call 601-925-3935.


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why I Live at the P. O.â&#x20AC;? March 26, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Courtney Walsh of Stanford University performs in the recital hall. Free; email marrss@millsaps.edu. Mississippi Puppetry Guildâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Arts Festival and Puppetry Jam March 27-28, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Presenters include Puppet Arts Theatre, Sherman Lee Dillon, Inky the Clown and Rosia Crisler. $8, $7 per child in a group; call 601-977-9840.

-53)# Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in the concert hall. Free; call 601-974-6494. â&#x20AC;˘ Belhaven Strings and Chamber Orchestras March 22, 7:30 p.m.. Enjoy string solo and group performances from students. â&#x20AC;˘ Belhaven University and Jackson Community Symphonic Band, Jazz and Percussion Ensemble Concert March 23, 7:30 p.m. Dr. Paxton Girtmon and Owen Rockwell conduct. Joshua James and David Ramirez March 21, 7:30 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). Isaac Russell also performs. Cocktails at 6 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissanceâ&#x20AC;? March 20, 5 p.m. Thomas McNamee signs books. $16 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing Gold Can Stay: Storiesâ&#x20AC;? March 22, 5 p.m. Ron Rash signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $24.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can a Pig Swim?â&#x20AC;? March 23, 1 p.m. Thomas W. Rush signs books. $19.99 book. Campus Reading Community: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Native Sonâ&#x20AC;? March 21, 11:30 a.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the Liberal Arts Lecture Room. Free; call 601-979-1328.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Spring Figure Drawing Session March 26, 6-9 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Jerrod Partridge is the instructor. Classes are Mondays for 10 weeks. Registration required. $275; call 601-668-5408. Day of Dance March 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Children learn about dance styles. $8, under 12 months free; call 601-981-5469.

Jackson Irish Dancers %8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Masters to Monetâ&#x20AC;? Opening Family Day March 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). See the new exhibit and enjoy family-friendly activities. Free with exhibit ($12, $10 seniors, $6 students), call 601-960-1515. Kara Dunne Art Exhibit through April 10, at Lewis Art Gallery (Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex, 1701 N. State St.). Reception and gallery talk March 21 at 7 p.m. in room 137; Tyler Tadlock performs. Performance workshop March 22 at 2 p.m. Free; call 601-974-1762.

perform 5:30 pm Thursday, March 21st Belhaven Park on Poplar

FREE! Irish fare for sale by Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub www.greaterbelhaven.com Sponsored by

"%4(%#(!.'% Little Feet Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Consignment Sale March 22-23, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., at First Baptist Church of Jackson (431 N. State St.). Proceeds from sales benefit the nonprofit Mission First. Free admission; littlefeetconsignment.org. Cookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for Mental Health March 23, 9 a.m.3 p.m., at Central Mississippi Residential Center (701 Northside Drive, Newton). Includes a barbecue contest, a raffle, games and music. Meet the GrabUOne Outfitters. Free admission, food and game prices vary, fees apply for contest and vendor space; call 601-683-4310 or 601-683-4247. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Fresh, Bustling Market

I

jacksonfreepress.com

FILE PHOTO

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39


FX]VBc^_ on State Street

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WEDNESDAY 3/20

Pub Quiz with Andrew

THURSDAY 3/21

Spirits Of The House FRIDAY 3/22

Blind Dog Otis SATURDAY 3/23

Cassie Taylor & Shook Stace MONDAY 3/25

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 3/26

â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

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All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no sharing, no carry out

$2 Pints

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Open Mic with Jason Bailey

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

$7.98

March 20 -26, 2013

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40

Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 4 - 7pm â&#x20AC;˘ Drink Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Special Food Menu

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DIVERSIONS | music

Waxing Fantastic with a Night Full of Classics

O

ne thing we can all agree on is that Rick James, Prince and Michael Jackson are undeniable icons of pop and soul music. Their beats and melodies have become part of the fabric of pop culture and are nothing to be messed with—unless you’re one of the three talented DJs spinning hits at the upcoming RPM Party. As DJ Phingaprint says, “Bring your dancing shoes, ’cause it’s gonna be a stone groove, baby!” Ardenland presents the RPM Party at Duling Hall. DJ Young Venom, DJ Phingaprint and DJ Stephen Urquel will mix classic hit tracks from the three title artists, with some additional surprise tracks in store, by artists who have unique relationships to each of the superstars they’re representing. DJ Young Venom, a 28-year-old local DJ on the rise and the brainchild of the RPM Party, has carried the concept for the show around in his mind for many years. “I was first introduced to soul music by my godfather and (to) pop funk music by my aunt when I was growing up throughout the 1980s,” he says. “After seeing the movie ‘Juice’ in 1993, that’s when my interest in turn-tablism really began.” Hot 97.7 took Young Venom on as an

COURTESY DJ YOUNG VENOM

by JP Lawless

DJ Young Venom has carried the idea for the RPM Party for years, and finally gets to execute it this weekend with DJ Phingaprint and DJ Stephen Urquel.

intern from 2004 to 2006. As his interest continued to grow, he approached DJ Phingaprint, hoping that the more experienced DJ could help him hone his skills. Phingaprint told him he’d need his own equipment before he would take become an apprentice. Venom set out to do just that. It wasn’t long before Young Venom was not only working with DJ Phingaprint,

but had also landed a gig performing each Sunday at Seven Studioz for Poetry Night. By 2009, he was a member of the Violator Allstar DJs and went on to have a popular syndicated show called Violator Radio on Sirius/XM. DJ Young Venom will be working with Michael Jackson’s hits at the party. DJ Phingaprint, a local DJ in his 30s, has 20 years of experience spinning wax, 10

music in theory

of which he’s done on a professional level. David Banner hired him on as his exclusive DJ before Phingaprint got involved with the Prague festival, “HipHop Kemp,” for three consecutive years. The first two years he included special guest performers—Skipp Coon one year and Kamikaze the next— choosing to go solo that third year. Shortly thereafter, he toured Ghana, Africa, in 2009 in a series of conferences representing the Rhyme & Reason Foundation, whose mission is educating children through hip hop. “Turn-tablism is not just a way of life for me,” DJ Phingprint says. “It is my life.” Rick James is DJ Phingaprint’s chosen artist for the evening. The third DJ, performing Prince’s hits, is DJ Stephen Urquel. As an artist, he is as secretive and mysterious as Prince—Urquel chooses to remain anonymous, so you’ll have to come on out and find out why. The 18-and-up RPM Party is at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601-362-8440) March 23 at 9 p.m. with cocktails at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 in advance or $8 at the door, and are available at Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757), Morning Bell (622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, 769-233-7468), the Coliseum Box Office (1207 Mississippi St., 601353-0603), ardenland.net or ticketmaster.com.

by Micah Smith

Weeknight Warriors COURTESY CARDINAL SONS

enough circumstance, as I listened to the guitarist whistle in between lyrics about politics and television, realized that I could walk into just about every coffee shop or bar or restaurant in Jackson on a typical Thursday night and still consume local music culture. My dad worked as a youth minister all through my childhood and high school years, and we moved three times just inside of Mississippi. I lived in Brandon for much of that time, and despite the proximity, travelling into Jackson was discussed as if it was an Antarctic expedition, long and tedious. But nights like I had on that Thursday, where I could walk up to a coffeehouse by happenstance and have an experience instead of an espresso, I realize how many times I sat perennially bored at friends’ houses on school nights, assuming weeknights would always look this way. Unfortunately, I know myself too well to believe that this reminder will fundamentally change my life Monday through Thursday. I’m sure many of you have been in similar situations and swore to dust off the mind-numbing workday and get out to those marginalized shows. But while it’s likely I’ll slip back into the mindset that the week is one long wait for Friday night, maybe this will be a prompt for someone else to walk into whatever concert you happen across and just enjoy the benefits of being in a city that breeds great music. 41 Email Micah Smith at micah@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he immediacy of music is one of the things that I Set unassertively to the side of the wooden patio out find captivating about living in a city instead of the front was a single guitarist, clanging the coiled strings of an countryside or, say, a deserted island where the clos- acoustic and singing sweetly over the conversations of patrons est thing to a dance beat and dog walkers who shuffled back is a coconut thumping against a and forth to make a path for each rock. While shows and concerts are other on the asphalt. My initial viewed as weekend-only events for thought was that this singer-songsome, the trained eye of a Jacksowriter must be someone I should nian knows where to find premium know, or at least related to someone entertainment every night of the I should know. Perhaps a shortweek. That is to say, Jackson’s muhaired cousin of Sam Beam from sic scene has plenty going for it. (A Iron & Wine or, based on his whissmaller number of coconuts and tling abilities, a long lost brother of rocks, for one.) Andrew Bird. If all of those people A few weeks ago, my girlwere willing to play “awkward friend, Jeana, and I made plans to sidewalk Twister” just to stay near join a friend to meet for drinks and the sound, I thought, he must Sometimes a coffeeshop concert can catch up at Sneaky Beans on your be somebody. have as much power as a packed venue. basic, listless Thursday night. As I I remember overhearing a said, an adept denizen of Jackson is conversation that got me thinking aware of the day-to-day events that differently about the singer (who slip through the fingers of so many others. Sadly, I think that honestly was excellent regardless of my thought process). Two Thursday I fit comfortably into the “many others” category, college students were talking about a house show the same as the sheer quantity of concert-going coffee drinkers left me night, discussing whether they would have time to make it decidedly surprised. an appearance at both. And even though that’s a common


MUSIC | live

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-!2#( 7%$.%3$!9

WEDNESDAYS

03/20

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL â&#x20AC;¢ MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM THURSDAYS

03/21

$4 APPETIZERS â&#x20AC;¢5 -9PM 2 for 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

03/22

Dinner with live music by

Gravity A 10:00 P.M.

SATURDAY

03/23

THE LAST WALTZ ENSEMBLE w/ Members of Dirty Dozen Brass Band 10:00 P.M.

MONDAY

03/25

2 for 1 DRAFT ALL DAY

Lazy Magnolia, Magic Hat, Lucky Town, Laughing Skull, Blue Moon, Andy Gator, and all of your favorites.

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

03/26

SHRIMP BOIL â&#x20AC;¢ 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NITE

KARAOKE

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS â&#x20AC;¢ 10 - 12pm

Howl at the Moon w/ Hunter Gibson 6 - 10pm UPCOMING SHOWS

March 20 -26, 2013

3.29: Furrows 3.30: Static Ensemble 3.30: Naive Melody (Talking Heads Tribute Band) 4.3: Minnesota, Protohype, & DCarls (18 & up) 4.4: Rolling in the Hay 4.6: Elliot Lipp 4.14: Meat Puppets

42

SCAN

ME! 214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/20:

Cassie Taylor (Dining Room) Desert Noises, Hollis Brown & The Giving Tree (Red Room)

THURSDAY 3/21:

Erin Callie (Dining Room) Joshua James w/ David Ramirez (Red Room)

FRIDAY 3/22:

Howard Jones Trio (Dining Room)

SATURDAY 3/23:

BRICE MEDIA

WEEKLY EVENT CALENDAR

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Luckenbach (Dining Room)

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MONDAY 3/25:

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Central MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 3/26:

Pub Quiz w Erin and Friends (Dining Room)

Coming Soon 3/28: Howlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bros (Red Room) 3/28: Swing de Paris (Dining Room) 3/29: Crossin Dixon (Red Room) 3/30: Miles Flat (Red Room) 4/5: North MS Allstars (Big Room)

NOW AT HAL & MALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

-!2#( &2)$!9

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

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$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2& bottled for 1domestic house wine beer

starting at •

pm

Thursday

March 21

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday

Air Review March 22

(with Special Guest) Saturday March 23

Candybone (with Slack Jawed) Tuesday

March 26

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner & DVDJ Reign

Wednesday

March 27

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, March 20th

SWING DE PARIS

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover,

Thursday, March 21st

KELLY MCRAE

PART OF 50 CONCERTS IN 50 STATES FOR EPILEPSY AWARENESS

Wednesday, May 15th Thalia Mara Hall Reserved Seats on Sale 10am Monday at:

(Acoustic) 8-11, No Cover,

Friday, March 22nd

VASTI JACKSON

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

ardenland.net ticketmaster coliseum box office 800.745.3000

Saturday, March 23rd

BAILEY BROTHERS

(Blues/Rock) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday, March 26th

JIMMY JARRATT

*A portion of the proceeds will benefit Heather’s T.R.E.E.

(Piano) 6:30 -9:30, No Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

ardenland_JFP1_4BLOCK_LyleL_bw.indd 1

3/18/13 7:30 PM

COMING

SOON March 29, 2013

Southern Komfort Brass Band

HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG! Till 7 Wednesday -Friday

2-FOR-1 • DRAFT BEER • WELL DRINKS • WINE

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

9.99

and his acoustic group

Weekly Lunch Specials

43


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

Rebels Going Dancing by Bryan Flynn

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant Debate

March 20 - 26, 2013

I

44

he is dropping big shots on your team. Ole Miss second leading scorer (14.6 points per game) Murphy Holloway is also COURTESY OLE MISS ATHLETICS

O

le Miss finally broke through under head coach Andy Kennedy. The Rebels earned a berth into the NCAA Tournament after winning the SEC Tournament for the first time since 1981. This is the second time the Rebels have won the SEC Tournamentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the last when they defeated Georgia 66-62. This year, Ole Miss defeated the Florida Gators 6663 to earn the SECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s automatic bid into the NCAA Tournament. When the NCAA Tournament brackets were announced, the Rebels were placed in the West Region and given a 12th seed. Ole Miss will face fifth-seeded Wisconsin Badgers in their opening round game. Wisconsin barely missed upsetting Ohio State for the Big Ten Championship on the same afternoon the Rebels won their conference title. The Badgers fell 50-43 to the Buckeyes in a grind-it-out game typical of the ones Wisconsin plays under head coach Bo Ryan. Ole Miss (26-8) will try to impose their up tempo style against the slow plodding style of Wisconsin (23-11). Both teams are very good defensively and force their opponents into bad shots and turnovers. On average, Wisconsin scores 66 points per game and gives up 56 points to their opponents. Ole Miss scores 65 points per game and allows slightly more points than the Badgers at 59 points per game. Leading the Rebels will be one of the most colorful personalities in the tournament, guard Marshall Henderson, who averages 20 points a game and leads Ole Miss and the SEC in scoring. The Howell Trophy winner always has his emotions on display. If you are a fan of Ole Miss or a neutral party, Henderson antics are fun to watch. If your team is playing against Henderson, he his act will get on your nerves quickly when

Coach Andy Kennedy is taking Ole Miss to the NCAA Tournament after all.

the top rebounder (9.6 rebounds per game) on the squad will be needed against the physical Badgers. Reginald Buckner will also be needed to help protect the basket against Wisconsin. The wildcard for Ole Miss might be freshman guard Derrick Millinghaus who hit several big shots in the SEC Tournament. Millinghaus ended up filling in for sophomore guard Jarvis Summers who missed games in the conference tournament because of concussion symptoms. Ole Miss faces a tough test against a Wisconsin team that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any major stars but played in the toughest basketball tournament this season, the Big Ten. The Badgers are going to play a physi-

cal, slow and deliberate style. The Rebels face the Badgers on Friday at 11:40 a.m. on Tru TV. If Ole Miss defeats Wisconsin, they will face the winner of the Kansas State/play in winner between Boise State/La Salle winner. Wisconsin played in a tougher conference and played a tougher nonconference schedule than Ole Miss, facing four teams that made the NCAA Tournament. The Rebels faced only one team in their nonconference schedule and lost, going down 65-62 to Middle Tennessee on the road. Ole Miss will have to get a monster game from Henderson and play defense like they did during the SEC Tournament. Recent tournament history says that 45 seeds can do very well against five seeds, but the Rebels havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to the tournament since 2002. Wisconsin, on the other hand, has made the NCAA Tournament 15 straight years. Last season the Badgers reached the regional semifinals after winning their first two tournament games. Ole Miss and Wisconsin have never met in the NCAA Tournament. The Badgers are 6-0 in the first round of the tournament under current coach Bo Ryan when they are a fifth seed or higher. Prediction: Ole Miss will give Wisconsin all they want and then some, but the Rebels lack NCAA Tournament experience while the Badgers are full of experience. I have a feeling that Wisconsin will find a way to win a close game. The Rebels are coming in hot so a major first round upset shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a surprise. If the Badgers canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contain Henderson, then all bets are off that Wisconsin advances. Wisconsin 68 Ole Miss 65

in a Fighting World

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by Bryan Flynn

One of the best sporting events starts Thursday with the opening round (now the second round after the play-in games) of the NCAA Tournament. Chances of a perfect bracket are nine-quintillion to one. THURSDAY, MAR 21 College basketball (11 a.m.-12 a.m., various networks): Watch the opening-round games of the NCAA Tournament on four different networks of CBS: Tru TV, TNT and TBS all day. FRIDAY, MAR 22 College basketball (11:40 a.m-2 p.m., Tru TV): Ole Miss opens their NCAA Tournament run against the fifth-seeded Wisconsin Badgers out of the Big Ten. SATURDAY, MAR 23 College baseball (7:30-10:30 p.m., ESPN U): Ole Miss Rebels have started SEC play and continue this week against SEC newcomer Texas A&M Aggies. SUNDAY, MAR 24 NASCAR (2-5 p.m., Fox): the stars of NASCAR, led by points leader Brad Keselowski, invade the California for the Auto Club 400 at the Auto Club Speedway. MONDAY, MAR 25 NHL (7-10 p.m., NBC Sports Network): Get your weekly hockey fix as defending Stanley Cup champions the L.A. Kings hit the road to face the hottest team in the NHL, the Chicago Blackhawks. TUESDAY, MAR 26 NBA (6-8:30 p.m., TNT): One of the NBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest rivalries is on display when the New York Knicks face their longtime foes the Boston Celtics. WEDNESDAY, MAR 27 NBA (7-9:30 p.m., ESPN): The major question of the NBA season has become, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can anyone defeat the Miami Heat?â&#x20AC;? The Chicago Bulls get their chance at home. The NCAA Tournament continues throughout the weekend on various networks, but the schedule is not available to add games to The Slate this week. The networks are waiting to see who wins before scheduling which stations carry which games. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music march 20 -26

wed | march 20 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | march 21 Brian Jones 5:30-9:30p

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat)

Soul Haven Friday March 22

+LEDFKL /XQFK6SHFLDOV VWDUWLQJDW

 OXQFKKRXUV

fri | march 22 Doug & Deeb 6:30-10:30p sat | march 23 Jesse “Guitar” Smith Band 6:00-10:00p sun | march 24 Aaron Coker 4:00 - 8:00p mon | march 25 Karaoke tue | march 26 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

Dylan Moss Saturday March 23

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

jacksonfreepress.com

1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

601.664.7588

45 JCV7210-42 Event Week March 18 JFPress 9.25x5.875.indd 1

3/15/13 3:25 PM


HOME FOR SALE Located at 736 Dorgan Street Jackson, MS 3BR/1BA Single Family 1563 sqft, Fixer Upper Lease Option or Cash $250 Down, $173/mo

Project-Coordinator (Part-Time) Jackson 2000, located in Jackson, Mississippi, is looking for an individual who can oversee Dialogue Circles—a project of Jackson 2000. Dialogue Circles advance Jackson 2000’s mission to pursue racial harmony through dialogue and understanding. You can assist us with this important work. Duties may include: • Developing systems through which the public can sign up for and receive info about Dialogue Circles. • Publicize Dialogue Circles through, among other means, presenting the program to groups and community based organizations of various sizes. • Developing materials that can be used for the implementation and marketing of the program, as well as for grant-seeking. • Assisting with administrative tasks. Candidate will report to subcommittee on a regular basis through written reports and in-person supervision. This is a part-time position for now, with the potential to move to full-time based on funding and need. A strong applicant will be reliable, have administrative experience and basic computer skills. A strong applicant will also be personable and enjoy working in collaboration with others.

Call 803-978-1541

To apply, send résumé and cover letter to Bevelyn Branch, bevelyn_branch@att.net

March 13- 19, 2013

 

46



Laptop & iPads screen replacement  



Data backup, DC Jack repair  



Small business service calls 

7048 Old Canton Rd Ridgeland, MS  M‐F 9 am to 7 pm  Sat. 9 am to 5 pm 



Same day service 

 



We sell and buy used computers 

601‐977‐1008 

“Work was completed as promised  and price was lower that other  stores. This is the second 5me I  have used them and am very sa5s‐ fied”  Ernest V. 


A True Taste of Italy Best Of Jackson • 2008 -2013

What is an “Old” Catholic? Don’t let the name fool you . . . Learn more about this inclusive and progressive Independent Catholic Church and its origin . . . The Old Catholic Community of

St. Mary Magdalene - the Apostle

WEEKLY MASS 1 P.M. Sunday

COME JOIN US. ALL ARE WELCOME AT OUR LORD’S TABLE. St. Alexis Episcopal Church’s Building 650 East South Street, Jackson, Ms

www.occms.org

601-871-0601

It’s A Preservation Celebration Celebrates its National Natural Landmark

50th Anniversary April 6th & 7th, 2013 Saturday & Sunday 9 A.M. - 6 P.M.

See the NEW Madison County

Mastodon Exhibit.

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora www.MSPetrifiedForest.com Check Out Our Events!

www.facebook.com/MSpetrifiedforest

Nature Trail / Museum Ticket Prices rolled back to 1963!!

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jacksonfreepress.com

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland, MS 601-956-2929 Mon • 5 - 9pm Tue - Sat • 5 - 9:30pm

47


$130,000

CASH MADNESS

GIVEAWAY !"#$%&'() *%+,"$%&'(( #-(.%"/0(

1234.#$-#5

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$25,000 FOUR-LEAF

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March 20 -26, 2013

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TRIP BURNS

Gig: Floral Fashioner by Kathleen M. Mitchell

As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

door. I was very interested in learning to make a happy presentation on the front door.

I wanted to be an airline stewardess because I loved seeing new places. I was a teacher for 20-something years.

What’s the strangest aspect of your job?

Describe your workday in three words. Energizing, fulfilling and fun.

What tools could you not work without, and why? We design and work on floral arrangements, door baskets, all sorts of things, so wire cutters and clippers, scissors, moss, ribbon, oasis foam (to anchor plants and flowers in arrangements)…

NAME: VARNER STEWART AGE: 66 JOB: SALES ASSOCIATE

AT THE EVERYDAY GARDENER

Knowing how to get into somebody else’s mind. Their expectations of you and what they perceive of you—what they want you to create versus what you are thinking—can be totally different.

What’s the best thing about your job? People! The people we work with. And, for me, learning a new skill. I was a first-grade teacher, so to learn something new is wonderful.

What steps in the past brought you to this position? I’ve always been interested in having something floral in the middle of my table. I would always go pick flowers out of my yard or someone else’s yard and liven up the table. I think it was the fact that I love centerpieces—and also door décor. I think its very inviting in having something on your front

Gig is a new spotlight on interesting jobs around the Jackson metro area. If you have a great job, or know someone who does, suggest it for a future profile. Email kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.

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March 20 - 26, 2013

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50

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Neat Used Things for Sale

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

The only place in Fondren to get your  O-fficial Sweet Potato Queen &  Zippity Doo DahŽ Parade Merchandise! Thurs, March 21st - Sat, March 23rd

a different kind of resale store

NUTS Fondren

Specializing in upscale clothing and home decor

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STOP BY OUR TABLE ON SATURDAY!

Extended Hours for the  Zippity Doo DahŽ  Parade Weekend!

APPETIZER HAPPY HOUR

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During Zippity Doo DahTM! (in front Salsa Mississippi)

Appetizers 1/2 OFF! 2:00 - 4:00

NUTS is a fundraiser for The Good Samaritan Center, helping families in crisis for 40 years!

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ www.villagebeads.com

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51


Authorized Dealer

Mac Rusling, Owner

601-362-0201

Tuesday - Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ 10am-6pm mac@brewhahasupply.com Also On Facebook

XFinity TV, Xfinity Internet, & Xfinity Voice

Market Cafe

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bargain Hunting Makes You Hungryâ&#x20AC;? Offering Breakfast & Lunch

Call To Get Great Price

Over 36,000 sq ft of antiques, architectural salvage, collectibles and furniture. located inside of

LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gallery

4800 I-55 N Suite 17A â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

No Money Down W/ Approved Credit Se Habla Espanol

1325 Flowood Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ www.fleamarketms.com Sat: 9am-5pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 12pm-5pm â&#x20AC;˘ $1 Admission Mention This Ad For Free Admission!

1-877-536-9990

136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

10% OFF

Easter

Sunday Includes Meal & Beverage

4PVM

lunch & dinner â&#x20AC;˘ with this ad

Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10pm

Brunch

March 31st 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

7FHBO 7FHFUBSJBO $BSJCCFBO $PNGPSU

862 Avery Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 â&#x20AC;˘ ruchiindia.com

*O)JTUPSJD(FPSHFUPXO #8PPESPX8JMTPO%SÂ&#x2026;+BDLTPO Â&#x2026; .PO'SJBNQNQNNJEOJHIU 4BU4VOBNNJEOJHIU

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2012 Best of Jackson -

GKHair Keratin Treatment TM Starting at $125 (Depends on Length of Hair)

$15 For Adults $10 Children 12 and Under

LACEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S S

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Hair & Accessories

601.906.2253 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

Cropâ&#x20AC;Ś

Not just for farmers. (And way more exciting than watching corn grow!)

Romantic Adventures Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very nice, naughty store. 175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p www.shopromanticadventures.com


v11n28 - Color Me Fondren: Here Come The Queens, Zippity Doo Dah & All The Details