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Celebrate St.
Patrick’s Day with

Saturday, March 16,
 2013



Pre-Parade Brunch

Block Party!!!

9 am-12 noon

$5 Admission

12 noon ‘til your shamrocks fall off!

March 13- 19, 2013

Music, Food, Fun, Friends…


2

Don’t miss the St. Paddy’s Day celebration
 at 
the only Irish Pub in Jackson!
 BLOCK PARTY LINEUP 10:00am: St. Brigid’s 2:00pm: Spirits of the House 5:00pm: Otis Lotus 8:00pm: Pratty Sponsored By


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN V.A. PATTERSON

E

ach year, in March, V.A. Patterson becomes something else. One year, she became a gypsy. Another year, a streetwalker. One year, she even transformed into an emu. Though her personas can get a little silly, even racy, that’s all part of the fun of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade. “I tell people that I love being in the parade because it’s the only day that I make a fool of myself on Capitol Street, and my mother would not be upset by that, and my daughter wouldn’t be embarrassed,” 74-year-old Patterson says. As one of the founding members of the Krewe of Kazoo, Patterson has been involved with the parade since the beginning. “I watched the first one,” she says. “And then the second one, we were all down around George Street having a good time, and Gay Reynolds drove up in her Moonbeam’s Jungle (florist shop truck) and said, ‘Come ride on the truck!’ And from then, it was the only way, to be in the parade.” These days, the ladies of the Krewe of Kazoo march at the front of the parade, just behind Malcolm White’s krewe, the O’Tuxes. The Kazoo women are known for their decorated, bright pink umbrellas they carry, themed costumes and green-and-pink color scheme. Patterson says the krewe is inspired by the main theme of the parade, but puts a quirky word-play spin on it—such as 2000’s theme, “A New Moo-llenium,” where they dressed as

CONTENTS

cows. The group’s theme and costumes remains a surprise until parade day. Patterson is excited to unveil the krewe’s riff on the “Waters, Waters Everywhere” theme this year. “Our krewe is such a creative bunch of people, and I just love sitting around with everybody, throwing ideas out,” Patterson says. “I can’t say I’ve ever had a favorite (theme) because each year seems to get better than the last.” Although not an artist herself, Patterson surrounds herself with creative people. A Jackson native, she graduated from Murrah High School its first year and then earned a degree at Millsaps College. She worked for many years in the museum field, specializing in historic house museums and was the first curator at the Manship House. “I’ve mostly worked in the arts,” she says. “I’m an administrator. I’m a paper-pusher. I love creativity in people because I can pretend I’m part of that creative process.” Patterson also served as the director of the Mississippi Craftsmen’s Guild and worked for VSA before retiring last February. Although she has a grown daughter and two grandchildren who live in Austin, Texas, Patterson can’t imagine leaving Jackson. “It’s home, that’s the first thing,” she says. “It’s been wonderful to be involved in the arts in Jackson and in the parade all these years— and it’s a great group of women, the Krewe of Kazoo. … It makes me stay young.” —Kathleen M. Mitchell

Cover painting of Malcolm White by Sarah Baggett

11 Back on the Ballot

“We’ve got to get the kids more motivated. Getting them more motivated, you can improve those test scores. Elementary is a whole different game from middle school and high school. They look like when they reach middle school, the focus in their education kind of falls short. Going in there and getting them motivated where they can pass the subject-area tests and increase the school’s (rating).” —Charles Alexander, “Alexander: Third Time a Charm?”

30 St. Paddy’s Party Food

Plan ahead to be the host everyone wants to celebrate with on the greenest day of the year.

38 Cardinal Band

The three Shirley brothers bring their psychedelic sound to Hal & Mal’s for parade day eve.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 9 ............................................ TALKS 12 .....................................BUSINESS 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 14 .................................... STIGGERS 15 .................................... OPINION 16 .............................. COVER STORY 25 ................ LIFE & STYLE - TRAVEL 28 ................................. ORGANICS 30 ......................................... FOOD 33 ...............................DIVERSIONS 34 .......................................... FILM 35 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 36 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ........................................ MUSIC 39 ........................MUSIC LISTINGS 40 ...................................... SPORTS 43 ............................... ASTROLOGY 45 ............................. CLASSIFIEDS 45 .................................... PUZZLES

COURTESY CARDINAL SONS; FLICKR/CHARLES HAYNES ; JACOB D FULER

MARCH 13 - 19, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 27

3


EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Take It to the Streets

A

couple weeks ago, Todd Stauffer and I went to Michigan to speak to the KnightWallace journalism fellows in Ann Arbor about how we’ve managed to grow the Jackson Free Press (and BOOM Jackson) over the last decade, during a tough economy and a time when so many newspapers have shrunk. While we were there, we did an extended tour of Detroit, a city that at once manages to capture the American imagination and bring out the most negative comments a city could possibly provoke. And I’ll be honest, we saw a lot of sadness and need in that once-grand city. It’s a large city in area—similar to the size of Jackson. But its population has shrunk by 25 percent in a decade, while our shrinkage has started to reverse again in the same period, a reversal after years of flight. Because Detroit was so populous at one point, though, its shrinkage is so much more dramatic appearing than Jackson’s. Motown has very little density, and a lot of houses have been burned or torn down over the years. We saw entire city blocks with one or two houses left on them—and clearly houses that were once surrounded by lovely homes. I also saw nothing in Detroit that scared me. Sure, the city has high crime, which is highly associated with the illegal drug trade (as here in Jackson). What I saw and felt most were sadness and hopelessness. Even though I heard stories about efforts to revitalize Detroit, the narrative was much more like the ones we used to hear a decade ago in Jackson (and which some shortsighted people still try to hawk): The city is hopeless, crime-filled; the leaders are miserable; it’s all “their” fault. I couldn’t help but think, over and over again: “Detroit needs an urban warrior class.” “Urban warriors” is what I’ve dubbed

the growing group of people of all ages in Jackson who are determined to reverse the narrative here. These are people who know that crime is a symptom of much larger problems, and who don’t try to use the problem as a way to get cheap votes or attention. These people know that each of us plays a role in making our city into what we want it to be, and that we must continually challenge and motivate others around us to get on board. They are also people who are willing to challenge the status quo, but who also know that demanding “change” in elected officials is a tiny part of the equation (and

Jackson has long had a strong base of urban warriors. can be devastating; think Frank Melton). Jackson has long had a strong base of urban warriors. Years before I moved back to Mississippi and co-founded this newspaper, for instance, Malcolm White and his brother, Hal, dug their heels into downtown Jackson and wouldn’t uproot them for anything. They weren’t “wait until” thinkers; they just got out there and opened Hal & Mal’s. And 31 years ago this week, they started a parade that would become one of the largest St. Paddy’s parades in the country (and one that is possibly the most diverse at this point). The White brothers seem to know a few things that can escape other less creative people. First, that every person has power if we’ll use it. Second, people in a city need to

have fun together in order to then be willing to stick their collective noses to the grindstone and reverse a history of decay and neglect in a city. They seem to get that crime is a symptom of deeper problems—and one great way to counteract it is to get more people in our communities, our downtown and on the streets. Does knowing this mean they don’t care about crime? Of course not. It means the White brothers are willing to do their part to liven up the community, its economic base and its spirits. This is urban warriordom at its finest. The best thing about the White brothers, perhaps, are the huge masses of family members, friends and complete strangers they’ve motivated to join the pro-Jackson movement—even if all those folks didn’t know they were joining a movement. That’s the best kind, in fact. We’ve watched the St. Paddy’s parade, and about every other event worth going to, get more diverse over the years, both in the participants and the folks lining the streets to watch and scramble for beads. (The same spirit of inclusiveness has also spilled into the Sweet Potato Queens’ Zippity Doo Dah parade a week later in Fondren, another excellent event that spun off from the Whites’ parade.) I go to these events, and I’m ever so proud of Jackson and what we’re accomplishing together as a citizenry. In Detroit, I heard so much that I used to hear just about every day in Jackson, from the (false) meme that you have to “cure” all the crime before redeveloping the city, to suburban dwellers talking about how it’s not safe to even drive into the city. I also heard a lot of whining about Detroit’s leaders—including from people who don’t live in the city with the ability to run for office or vote for our elected officials. Sound familiar? I’m not naïve enough to believe that

Detroit’s problems are easy to repair or that a new parade is the answer: Just as Jackson does, the city suffers from intense poverty (worse than ours, in fact) resulting from a very difficult history that has left deep wounds and immense anger, not to mention distrust between the races. And just as in Jackson a decade ago, its locally owned media tend to display either nearly all black faces or all white faces (an archaic media approach that is about as dated as land lines and black-and-white TVs as this point). But from being involved with Jackson’s effort to reinvent itself into a more inclusive, prosperous city, I know that it takes people willing to take chances, get to know people unlike them, be uncomfortable, and just get out and do cool stuff to convince others that it’s worth their time to live in and invest in a city that other people love to put down. When smart people talk about the danger of negative “perceptions” in a city— whether about the hopelessness of crime or any other issue—they are warning about a real threat that kills a community’s spirit. Hopelessness is the exact opposite of hope (duh). When we have hope, we are inspired to take action and join together with others to rebuild neighborhoods, bring creativity to empty storefronts and hold cool parades. When we’re mired in hopelessness, which is often pushed by politicians, we whine and point to other people who aren’t doing what we don’t bother to do ourselves. The moral of the story? Come up with an idea and make it happen. Just be sure to tell the JFP about it so we can help get people there to support you and be inspired to help or do something cool themselves. Send events info to jfpevents.com. Free, of course. P.S. All you Jackson urban warriors, send Detroit some good vibes and a prayer or two. And go for a visit and spend some money there the next chance you get.

March 13 -19, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Kathleen Mitchell

Julie Skipper

R.L. Nave

Larry Morrisey

Briana Robinson

Spencer Nessel

Kelly Bryan Smith

Kimberly Griffin

Features Editor Kathleen Mitchell loves all things green, Irish or related to Ireland. Her greatest secret is that she’s not a natural redhead. She coordinated and wrote for the cover package.

Julie Skipper lives, works, and plays downtown. Ask her about it if you want an earful. She hopes to learn to cook one day, but mostly thinks of the kitchen as additional closet space. She wrote for the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote talks.

Larry Morrisey is the director of grants programs for the Mississippi Arts Commission. He is a host for “Mississippi Arts Hour,” the agency’s arts interview radio show on Mississippi Public Broadcasting. He wrote a music feature.

Music Editor Briana Robinson’s hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a junior at Millsaps College. Briana wrote music features.

Spencer Nessel is a born and raised Jacksonian. A recent Millsaps graduate, he majored in English and spends his free time eating, lounging and leading a life of gluttony. He wrote a food feature.

Kelly Bryan Smith is a busy mom, brain tumor survivor, and nursing student living with her son in Fondren. She enjoys cooking, swimming, reading and collecting pastel blue eggs from her backyard chickens. She wrote a travel story.

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.


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Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

WHAT IS YOUR BEST ST. PADDY’S PARADE MEMORY?

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Home Of The

Comeback Sauce

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

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Melissa Burks Dearman Last year when I had all of my grandchildren with me!

Colleen Keith Turnage Hands down best parade year was when my best friend Camie and I made our best T-shirts ever, with our team name and logo for CamCo on the front with the back reading: Whiskey shooting Beer drinking Back roads riding Southern girls! I would like to note that we rocked our southern pride in parade ’08 before it was cool! Thank you Hal & Mal’s for supporting Mississippi and giving us THE best holiday celebration in Jackson year after year!

Emily Braden Knight The Rude Boyz had a float titled, “I wanna be a Sweet Potato Queen when monkeys fly out my butt� the year the theme was Wizard of Oz. I think they were dressed as flying monkeys. Shellie Erin Manor It will be this year! We are getting married on St. Patrick’s day! A whole weekend of partying! Jason Roberson Hahaha! Remember St. Patty’s day? If it was a good St. Patty’s day, you shouldn’t be able to remember ... Ashley Runnels Hmm ... The best memories are pretty fuzzy! Many years I had TOO much fun to recall, lol!

-OST6IRAL3TORIESATJFPMS

Niki Lee Dunbar Two years ago, I met my future husband at the parade!

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March 13 -19, 2013

Coldwater Flannel Hahaha, not being able to remember my best St. Pat’s memory! Lol.

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6

James Rice What is it they say about the Jackson St. Paddy’s Parade? If you remember it, you weren’t really there.

Andrew Spencer Can’t remember the best ones, but I know we had a good time! Kathleen Conner Strickland Joining the parade at the last minute—we were in the back of a friend’s classic green pickup truck. 1982? ’83? You could get away with that back then. Afterward, we had an Inez burger. Good times.

LATASHA WILLIS

cherokeedrivein.com

Clay Thornton Don’t remember— have I ever gone? Lisa Alexander Kermit the Frog in the parade! Janet Mobley Just remember having fun every year with friends!


         

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Friday, March 8 The state Senate gives final approval a bill eliminating the requirement that lawmakers periodically renew authorization for payday loans. ‌ Charlotte DuprÊ, CEO of the Central Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, states that the hospital would benefit with Medicaid expansion. Saturday, March 9 The People’s Assembly Task Force hosts eight of Jackson’s mayoral candidates in the first public forum of the 2013 elections. ‌ Former Hinds Emergency Operations Director Larry Fisher, 76, dies of natural causes at his home. Sunday, March 10 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel meets with Afghan President Hamid Karzai as part of a three-day visit to the Afghanistan warzone. ‌ Republican lawmakers welcome President Barack Obama’s efforts to work with them to find budget solutions. Monday, March 11 Interim State Superintendent Lynn House denies accusations that Mississippi education officials are considering dropping American history from high-school requirements. ‌ New York State Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling strikes down New York City’s ban on big sugary drinks hours before it was to take effect. Tuesday, March 12 Cardinals at the Vatican begin the conclave to elect the next pope. ‌ The Senate Judiciary Committee debates a bill to extend background checks to nearly all firearms purchasers. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

by R.L. Nave

G

ov. Phil Bryant’s education-reform package is on track to become law. Called Education Works, the plan includes provisions to adopt merit pay scales for teachers and ending so-called social promotion by retaining students who cannot read by third grade. Once passed, it would represent a huge victory for Bryant, who borrowed the ideas from Florida and has said he wants education reform to be the hallmark of the legislative session. Education Works enjoys near-universal support in the Republican-controlled Legislature with even education-minded Democrats supporting parts of the program. “I like it very much, I just want thoughtful consideration of the costs. I want to do it right and fund it,� said Rep. Linda Whittington, D-Schlater, of the third-grade reading bill. Money has emerged as the crucial question at the center of the third-grade reading bill and other proposals, both in terms of the funds to pay for the various education initiatives lawmakers are considering as well as cash that special-interest groups pushing the proposals are spreading around Jackson. Gov. Phil Bryant has proposed spending $15 million to hire literacy coaches in kindergarten through third grades. Mary Laura Bragg, who implemented Florida’s third-grade reading bill under Bush in 2003 and now serves as FEE’s director of national policy, said the Florida Legislature allocated about $10 million for the program. Bragg added that although state officials repurposed another $18 million in teacher professional-development funds to serve more of Florida’s approximately 12,000

retained fourth graders, the program’s success was not primarily the result of the extra funding. Instead, Bragg said Florida saw positive outcome because of what she terms a “sea change of behaviorâ€? from local school officials, who scrambled to reorganize curricula around more robust literacy programs put in place shortly after the law passed. “It’s a shame that the threat of retention is the thing that spurred the school district to do what it was supposed to do in the first place, which is teach kids how to read,â€? Bragg told the Jackson Free Press on Feb. 15. Whittington, who directs an education nonprofit organization, also served on the House Education Committee until this year, when Speaker of House Philip Gunn, R-Clinton, removed her, all but ensuring passage of Republican-de- Many of Mississippi’s education initiatives are based on programs former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush implemented sired bills such as charter-school during his eight years in office. expansion. While serving on the committee, Whittington said she was disturbed The Money Trail by the overtures for-profit educational firms Over the past two years, money has made toward her and other influential law- poured into the Mississippi Capitol from nonmakers. and for-profit education organizations, some “One of the things we have to do is fol- of which have ties to the Tallahassee, Fla.-based low the money. ‌ If you believe in privati- Foundation for Excellence in Education. zation, it may not trouble you. I, however, In January, Mississippi Public Radio don’t like corporations making money off reported that three virtual-education providour children in public education,â€? WhitPRUH)/25,'$VHHSDJH tington said.

CELTIC KNOT MAZE

Find your way through the celtic maze to the pot of gold on the other side!

jacksonfreepress.com

Thursday, March 7 Mississippi House members amend a bill to allow for a 75 mph speed limit on some highways. ‌ President Barack Obama has lunch with GOP Rep. Paul Ryan, and the committee’s top Democrat, Chris Van Hollen, to find common ground with lawmakers.

The Florida Connection FLICKR/WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA

Wednesday, March 6 A bill to give Jackson’s mayor the right to name the majority of a commission to oversee spending from a 1-percent local-option sales tax dies. ‌ Arkansas’ GOP-controlled Legislature overrides Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe’s veto of a bill banning abortions beginning in the 12th week of pregnancy.

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THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/13

MONDAY 3/18

New Bourbon St. Jazz (Restaurant)

Central MS Blues Society’s Blue Monday

THURSDAY 3/14 Mark Roemer & Cody Cox (Restaurant) Jesta James (Red Room)

TUESDAY3/19 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (restaurant)

Mal’s St. Paddy’s Celebration!

FRI 3.15: Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp Gather at the King Edward on Capitol Street at 5:00pm, enjoy the sounds of the Southern Komfort Brass Band and then march up Capitol St. to Hal and Mal’s for libations and good vibrations.

Monday - Friday Blue Plate Lunch March 13 - 19, 2013

with corn bread and tea or coffee

10

$8

25

SAT 3.16: St. Paddy’s Parade St. Paddy’s events will be happening all day. Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade Race (5K Run, 5K Walk, 1 Mile Fun Run), Trustmark Children’s Festival, Pet Parade, and the Children’s Parade. Then at 1pm Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade Starts! After the parade a Street Dance will be held in the parking lot of Hal & Mals. This after party will feature Alabama Shakes, Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores, Riley Downing, Houndmouth. Gates open at 4pm. Ages 18 and up, please. Tickets available from Ticketmaster.com. As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. | Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

ers—K12 Inc., Connections Education LLC and Education2020 (now Edgenuity), all of which are among FEE’s funders—spent a combined $250,000 on lobbying in 2011 and 2012. Headquartered in Herndon, Va., K12 is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange and is the subject of a class-action lawsuit that charges the company misled investors about student performance on standardized tests. Nonprofits have not missed out on the legislative action. For example, the Washington, D.C.-based National Alliance for Charter Schools also spent $36,000 on lobbyist salaries and $969.81 on meals for lawmakers and their staffs at Jackson-area restaurants. Lobbying reports for 2013 are not due until the end of the calendar year. Donald Cohen, chairman of a government privatization watchdog group called In the Public Trust said for-profit and virtual-education companies, a roughly $24 billion industry, see schools as potentially profitable. In January, Cohen’s group launched a web portal containing emails that the nonprofit claims “conclusively reveal that FEE staff acted to promote their corporate funders’ priorities and demonstrate the dangerous role that corporate money plays in shaping our education policy.� As a 501(c)(3) organization, FEE is not required to disclose its donors and no longer lists its donor roster on its website. A list of FEE donors the Jackson Free Press obtained, however, includes several for-profit education firms that are heavily lobbying Mississippi lawmakers, including K12, Education2020 and Amplify Education. In 2012, Amplify Education Inc. joined other for-profit educational firms already lobbying Mississippi by hiring three lobbyists, records from the Mississippi secretary of state’s office show. Part of international media conglomerate and Fox News Channel parent company News Corporation’s education division, Amplify rolled out a partnership with multinational telecommunications corporation AT&T last summer. AT&T is also a heavy player in Mississippi politics. Between 2007 and 2009, the company made more than $460,000 in campaign donations to Democratic and Republican legislators and statewide officers.

The role of virtual education became a sticking point during recent debates on charter schools, and lawmakers stripped provisions to allow virtual charter schools in the state out of both the House and Senate versions of the charter school bill. Either bill could be amended at any time to reinstate the provision to allow virtual charter schools, however. In the Public Trust’s Cohen said there’s nothing wrong with companies lobbying state legislatures, but he questions why the companies and FEE have been so secretive about the nature of their relationship. “I’m sure there are people of good will who are conservatives and have different ideas on education,� Cohen said. “But it’s clear that this online stuff is the new incarceration of vouchers.� Worth the Results? During an interview about Florida’s reading initiatives, FEE declined to comment about criticism of the foundation’s relationship with its corporate donors, except to say its programs are widely sought out by state officials looking to replicate Florida’s successes. Bragg, FEE’s national policy director, said the programs work. As evidence of the Florida program’s success, Bragg offers two studies showing that two years after schools retained students due to poor performance, they went on to outperform their peers in reading and math, and that minorities benefitted the most. Another study Bragg points to shows that by seventh grade, the retained students were still doing better in math and reading and on science standardized tests than their peers who were not retained, while fewer students in earlier grades were referred to special education, Bragg said. Under Florida’s model, Bragg added that resources went into kindergarten through third grade to provide a foundation for students to achieve reading goals so that retention at the third grade was the last resort. With proper funding and state support, Whittington also believes that a renewed emphasize on reading instruction would benefit Mississippi students in the long run. “I think that would do many good things for the state,� Whittington told the Jackson Free Press. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

“I want to do it right and fund it.� – Rep. Linda Whittington


DISH | Ward 5 Candidate

Alexander: Third Time a Charm? by Jacob D. Fuller

My plan, day one, is trying to find different businesses to bring in and relocate. Then, trying to get the infrastructure rebuilt along the Highway 80 corridor. That’s a state highway. Go to the state (and) let them know: “You’re going to have to come in and help the city bring money in to redo water

That’s something the city has been trying for a long time.The city took over highway maintenance from the state in the ‘80s because they had the money. Now they don’t. Do you have a plan of how you could get the state to actually take back the highways?

On a broader scale, the city is facing hundred of millions of dollars in infrastructure improvements over the next couple of decades, including water, sewer and streets. What would

County, maybe once a month take $2 or $5 out of their paycheck. As a substitute teacher, you’re aware JPS faced possibly losing its accreditation last summer. As a councilman, how would you work with JPS to turn that district around?

We’ve got to get the kids more motivated. Getting them more motivated, you can imThat’s a hard thing to do. prove those test scores. The one thing about it, if you Elementary is a whole keep bugging somebody about different game from middle it long enough, they’re going to school and high school. They eventually do it. You just can’t look like when they reach midgo down there one time and dle school, the focus in their say, “We need this done.” You’ve education kind of falls short. got to keep lobbying and letting Going in there and getting Security guard Charles Alexander is making a third run for the them know we need this stuff. them motivated where they can Ward 5 Jackson City Council seat. There are a lot of senators pass the subject-area tests and and representatives in Ward increase the school’s (rating). 5 that are down there at the state Capitol. be your top infrastructure priority, and You also need to find money where kids Those are some of the people that should how would you look to fund the work? can have textbooks, have more paper (and) want to bring something within the city of One: Try to get money from the state. make copies of worksheets and stuff. That’s Jackson. Also, you’ve got to look for other sources. One one of the things that you need to do to go To me, it’s like they’re not doing any- source is a commuter tax. I know when you in there and improve the school system. thing, either. You’ve just got to keep pushing. say “taxes,” a lot of folks scare away from that. Read more of this interview and comI was reading earlier about (Jackson Rep.) This is the capital city. If you look at ment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at Cecil Brown saying, “You’ve just got to keep other capital cities, the state takes care of jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. fighting for it. You can’t stop.” If they say no them. A commuter tax is one of the things (and) reject it this time, you’ve got to just that would improve (the city). If you just get keep fighting for it. maybe 10 cents for a vehicle coming into the That’s one of the ways to bring the in- city of Jackson, that’s a lot of money when Charles Alexander frastructure back in the Highway 80 corri- you add up all the cars that come in within Age: 37 dor: keep fighting for it. the day to and from work. Other than improved infrastructure, what kind of incentives would you try to offer to businesses to get them to Highway 80?

One thing is, you’ve got to give them a tax break. Let’s say a 30-year tax break to bring their business within the city of Jackson.

How do you enforce that?

(You could) set up a toll, maybe along Highway 80, entering from Rankin County into Hinds County. Set up, maybe, a 10cent toll. Or you could set a tax where people working inside of the city of Jackson, that are living in Madison, Rankin (or) Warren

Born: Jackson Education: Jim Hill, 1995; bachelor’s in Business Administration fromTougaloo College, 2000 Political Experience: Ran and lost Ward 5 races in 2005 and 2009 Family: Wife, Carla

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jacksonfreepress.com

You said your top focus is the Highway 80 corridor. If you are elected, what is your plan, day one, focusing on that?

lines, and to redo infrastructure along the Highway 80 corridor.” That’s the main thing.

JACOB D. FULLER

W

hen Charles Alexander first ran for the Jackson City Council Ward 5 seat in 2005, he was just 29 years old. Two defeats later, Alexander is back on the ballot and hoping the third time will be the charm in his attempt to unseat incumbent Councilman Charles Tillman. Alexander is a security guard at The Quisenberry Library in Clinton and a substitute teacher in the Jackson Public Schools district. Like Tillman, a long-time school administrator, Alexander has witnessed the struggles and triumphs of JPS first-hand. The Jackson Free Press met Alexander March 6 at the library where he works to talk about his candidacy. Before this reporter could even begin the Q&A, Alexander made it clear what his top priority is. “Let’s bring Highway 80 back like it was in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s,” Alexander said. Highway 80 has the potential to become a tourist attraction like Gatlinburg Parkway in Gatlinburg, Tenn., or areas of Branson, Mo., he added. Helping make that happen with business and museum incentives would be Alexander’s first goal in office. “It’s going to take a person that’s going to go out there and talk to these different businesses to bring them into the city,” Alexander said. Despite losing the last two elections for city council, Alexander said there’s no rivalry between him and the incumbent.

601-871-0601 11


LEGISLATURE: Week 9

All Over Again

I

March 13 -19, 2013

t won’t be Christmas in March for Mississippi cities looking to raise cash for infrastructure projects. Until last week, two legislative vehicles would have allowed Jackson to use proceeds from a 1-percent sales tax to pay for infrastructure and construction projects. Under a 2009 state law, Jackson has the authority to impose the tax with the approval of three-fifths of voters and with oversight from a legislative oversight board. One bill known as the Community Economic Development Act, or CEDA, would have allowed cities statewide to impose a similar temporary tax if approved through a referendum. The other, HB 546, would have given Jackson majority control over the oversight commission. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, said that even though a bill similar to HB 546 passed the Senate last year, he killed it this time around after he started getting requests from mayors around the state wanting to be included. “It became a Christmas tree. It just collapsed under its own weight,” Fillingane said. In the other chamber, CEDA apparently had the converse problem. Rep. Edward Blackmon, a Canton Democrat who chairs the House Municipalities Committee, told the Jackson Free Press Feb. 28 that he held the CEDA bill because he didn’t believe it had enough votes. “I think the more the local officials get involved in pushing it, the more likely it is to (pass),” he said at the time. Quincy Mukoro, government affairs director for the Mississippi Municipal League, believes CEDA did have enough support in the House. Before it died, CEDA cleared the Senate as well as the House Ways and Means Committee.

12

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

by R.L. Nave

Senate Finance Chairman Joey Fillingane said he killed a bill that would have helped Jackson raise money through a 1-percent sales tax because it became too unwieldy.

Mukoro added that 76 local governments passed resolutions supporting CEDA. In the meantime, the city of Jackson will have to devise other strategies to pay for millions of dollars worth of needed infrastructure projects that are in the works. “Ultimately, if we can’t get a local-option sales tax enacted, then (increased service) rates would be something we would have to consider,” City Hall Communication Director Chris Mims said last week. Bryant Buckling on Medicaid? Gov. Phil Bryant is still against Medicaid expansion, but says he’s now willing to talk about a deal. Specifically, Bryant, who met with hospital executives last week, wants to sit down with hospitals about other ways to cushion the blow from massive funding cuts when certain

provisions of the Affordable Care Act go into effect. In a statement issued jointly with the Mississippi Hospital Association, Bryant said he and hospitals “have come together in good faith to work out a possible solution to our funding issues.” Under the ACA, certain hospital funding mechanisms would sunset and be replaced by other revenue streams, primarily state Medicaid expansion. However, Bryant hates Obamacare so much he’s refused to talk about covering an extra 300,000 low-income Mississippians with an expanded Medicaid plan. Chris Anderson, CEO of Singing River Health Systems in Gulfport, said the Medicaid expansion question is “dead end” with Bryant so hospitals will have to work with the governor’s administration to find alternate funding sources.

Bryant’s newfound religion on at least having a discussion with hospitals came as a bit of a surprise, and might have been the result of political blowback. After Bryant said last week that he does not “see expansion of Medicaid in Mississippi as it exists today, with all its waste, fraud and abuse,” legislative Democrats pounced. “Apparently, in the last few days, it has come to the governor’s attention that a program he has been managing for more than 14 months is now fraught with waste, fraud and abuse. If that is the case, it has happened on his watch,” stated House Minority Leader Bobby Moak, DBogue Chitto, in a news release. “If this current administration has allowed fraud to occur, the people of Mississippi deserve to know the details. If not, the governor owes all of the hard-working doctors, hospital employees, nursing home staff and other health-care providers an apology.” Almost There Several little-talked-about bills are headed to Gov. Phil Bryant’s desk. Even though students can already pray until kingdom come, SB 2633 would extend the right in Mississippi to student-led prayer to “limited public forums” such as athletic events, commencement ceremonies and morning announcements, and would prohibit schools from punishing kids who pray or express religious viewpoints in class work. It passed the House with no debate 109-6. Also, a bill concerning controversial loan products is close to becoming law. HB 559, which has passed the both chambers, makes the Check Cashers Act permanent. Until now, the Legislature was required to periodically renew the act. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.


TALK | business

by Jacob D. Fuller

I

n 1950, Willard and Lillian McMurry created the first record label in Mississippi to gain national exposure through distribution and radio airplay. They managed the label, Trumpet Records, out of their retail store, Record Mart, at 309 N. Farish St. in downtown Jackson. More than 60 years later, local musician Sherman Lee Dillon is trying to rebuild the former Trumpet Records’ home into a museum and recording studio that will honor the McMurry’s work along with that of great musicians like Sonny Boy Williamson II, Elmore James and Willie Love, all of whom

TRIP BURNS

To raise the funds, Dillon has started a campaign on indiegogo.com. There, he has until 1:59 a.m., March 30, to raise the entire $48,000. If the campaign fails to reach the goal by the deadline, contributors will receive a full refund of their donation. If Dillon can raise the money, he hopes to get the building back in business-worthy condition. Once repairs are complete, he wants to open a museum in the front of the building, recognizing the contributions Trumpet Records and its artists made to the area’s music scene, including recording blues, country and gospel music. “If there were a little Trumpet Records museum there that would have access to those songs, that would be very cool,� Dillon said. In the back of the building, Dillon wants to open a recording studio. He isn’t trying to revive Trumpet Records, Dillon said, only to honor its legacy. He plans to call it Studio 309. There, Dillon hopes to help Mississippi musicians get Local musician Sherman Lee Dillon is trying to raise international exposure and the money to turn the former home of Trumpet Records chance to play in the studio with into a museum and recording studio. world-renowned artists. “These folks don’t have the released records on the label. identification and passports to go around “There were a lot lesser artists who the world, or the bankroll to do it,� Dillon (also) did really good things, but Trumpet said. “Folks could come here and record and Records just did not have the power to push have access to hire those musicians.� them nationwide,� Dillon told the Jackson Hayes and Daniel Dillon may give Free Press. “That’s what ultimately got them. Sherman leeway if he can’t raise the money The big companies would threaten distribu- by March 30, but not much, Sherman said. tors: ‘If you sell (Trumpet Records’) stuff, If he can’t revive the building, the owners will we’re not going to sell to you.’� likely sell the land to real-estate developers. That didn’t keep Trumpet Records Dillon got a scare early Saturday mornfrom making its mark on music history, ing when his son arrived at work and found though, with records such as Elmore James’ the Mississippi Blues Marker recognizing “Dust My Broom,� which made the na- Trumpet Records was missing. Contrary tional rhythm and blues charts in Billboard to his initial fear, the marker wasn’t stolen. magazine in April 1952. A crew from the Jackson Public Works DeIn March 2009, Dillon’s son, Daniel, partment removed it to repair damage from and his partner, Adam Hayes, purchased vandalism. Upon further inspection, the the several adjoining Farish Street proper- damage was greater than workers originally ties. Daniel Dillon and Adam Hayes now thought, so the department decided to manrun Frank Jones Corner, a late-night bar ufacture a new marker. and music venue, in the building at 303 FarThe Jackson Redevelopment Authorish St. The white building that spans 305 ity owns most of the land along a two-block through 309 Farish still sits in disrepair. stretch of Farish Street where 309 is located. The elder Dillon is trying to raise The Farish Street Group, led by Watkins De$48,000 to pay his son and Hayes for two velopment, holds a lease on most of the land years’ rent on the former home of Trumpet and has been attempting to secure funding Records at 309 Farish St. Dillon said he had to complete an ambitious entertainmentthe building repairs estimated, and $48,000 district makeover. would be the minimum cost to get the Dillon said he would explore the possibuilding back in workable condition. bility of getting support from those groups if “The arrangement is: They get paid the online campaign does not raise the funds two years in advance. With that money, they he needs to move forward. will fix up the building,� Dillon said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Resurrecting 309 Farish

Have you or a loved one suffered a

13


Shop Until You Survive

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iss Doodle Mae: “Jojo and members of the Ghetto Science Economic Survival Commission want to help financially challenged customers deal with the sequestration budget cuts. The plan is to transform isle 7-1/2 of Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store into a consumer-education and empowerment center. Chief Crazy Brother, creative display coordinator and alternate customer service representative, is very excited about this plan. He has already booked some notable economic and lifestyle experts to participate as special guest speakers. “Ladies and gentlemen of the Ghetto Science Community, Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store’s Consumer-Education and Empowerment Center presents the ‘Shop Until You Survive the Sequestration’ guest-speaker series. “The guest-speaker series begins with words of economic and spiritual encouragement from Congressman Smokey ‘Robinson’ McBride and Sister Encouragement of the Rev. Cletus Car Sales Church radio show. Brother Hustle will conduct a special Compensatory Investment Request Town-Hall Meeting. Chef Fat Meat, co-author of the ‘Poor People’s Dietary Manual’, will hold a ‘Sequestration Hunger Prevention Seminar.’ Nurse ‘Tootie’ McBride and CNAs for a Brighter Day will provide free health-care advice and blood-pressure screenings. And Pookie Peterz, Ghetto Science Team economist and consumer advocate, will develop every shopper’s critical thinking skills with his ‘Don’t Let the Politicians and Corporations Keep You Down Sequestration Survival Seminar.’ “Become an empowered and critically thinking shopper at Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store, where sequestration will not result in a consumer’s economic castration. “Get ready for the ‘Shop Until You Survive the Sequestration’ guestspeaker series.�

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March 13-19, 2013

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14

Why it stinks: A 2009 CBS News/New York Times poll showed that President George W. Bush left office with an approval rating of 22 percent, the lowest approval since Gallup began asking the question 70 years earlier. Only Millard Fillmore, Warren Harding, William Henry Harrison, Franklin Pierce, Andrew Johnson and James Buchanan rank lower. President Bush squandered the budget surplus he inherited from Bill Clinton—a surplus of $1.9 billion in fiscal 1999 and $86.4 billion in fiscal 2000—and plunged the nation into a recession from which it has yet to recover. Two weeks before Barack Obama took office, the Congressional Budget Office projected the deficit to be $1.2 trillion; the estimated 10-year projection was about $3.1 trillion. “[I]n fact, the Bush tax cuts and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will account for almost half of the $20 trillion in debt that, under current policies, the nation will owe by 2019,� states The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Beyond the economics are the human costs of the wars George W. Bush began. In addition to more than 50,000 U.S. soldiers wounded, more than 6,630 U.S. soldiers have died. The Afghanistan War started Oct. 7, 2001, and will be the longest war in American history when it ends in 2014.

Voters Were Not Confused

I

n November 2011, 58 percent of Mississippi voters made their voices unequivocally heard when they said “No� to Initiative 26. Pushed by Personhood Mississippi (which was cochaired by then-gubernatorial candidate and now governor Phil Bryant), the initiative proposed to change the state constitution to provide citizenship rights to fertilized human eggs. Opponents of the initiative pointed out— rightly—that women had too much at stake with such a change. Setting aside the morality-based arguments for or against abortion, the language of Initiative 26 was so broad that nearly every aspect of women’s reproductive health could have been negatively affected. Passage of such an initiative could mean the end of many forms of hormonal or barrier birth control. It could unnecessarily complicate, delay or eliminate medical treatment for infertility and for life-threatening pregnancies. Depending on lawmaker’s interpretations, such a measure could even criminalize spontaneous abortions—miscarriages—that occur naturally in as many as 75 percent of all pregnancies, often before a woman knows she is pregnant. Mississippians were not confused when they voted against the measure. Right on schedule, Mississippi Personhood is back with a new, revised version of the initiative and a new ally in the game: the American Family Association. If you’re not familiar with the AFA, we urge you to read what the Southern Poverty Law Cen-

ter says about this group. Read the hate-filled statements of Bryan Fischer, the group’s director of issues analysis. In 2010, the SPLC named the American Family Association to its growing list of anti-gay hate groups, although sexual identity is far from the only issue Fischer rants about. In between prayers to Jesus, Fischer has denigrated African American people and Muslims, among others, and even blamed the separation of church and state for the Newtown, Conn., massacre. Ann Reed, the “sponsor� of the new personhood initiative in Mississippi, is married to Jeff Reed, producer of Bryan Fischer’s radio talk show. Odds are that backers of this new initiative will gather the required 107,216 signatures (12 percent of the number of votes for governor in the last race) to put the issue on the ballot again in 2015. They have changed the words, but the intent is exactly the same. Why change the wording? Reed and Personhood Mississippi’s Les Riley believe Mississippians are too stupid to understand big ole’ words like “fertilization� and “cloning.� That’s why, they say, voters said no to 26. They will understand “conception,� which appears in the new initiative. Despite changing the language, the new initiative amounts to exactly the same ends: limiting women’s rights and endangering women’s health. Mississippians were not stupid or confused in 2011. They won’t be in 2015, either. For more, visit jfp.ms/personhoodlanguage.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


DAVID JOSEPH

Times Have Changed EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Editor Briana Robinson Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Editorial Assistant Leigh Horn Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Angelica Allen, Nneka Ayozie, Bethany Bridges, Susan Hogan, David Joseph, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Kira Cummings, Ariss King, Melvin Thigpen ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers David Rahaim, Brad Young Sales Assistant Samantha Towers Marketing Intern Tamika Smith BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Robert Majors, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

letters@jacksonfreepress.com editor@jacksonfreepress.com editor@jacksonfreepress.com events@jacksonfreepress.com ads@jacksonfreepress.com todd@jacksonfreepress.com news@jacksonfreepress.com style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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s we followed the bumpy, dark road around the perimeter of the sleeping giant called Metrocenter Mall, it led to the food-court entrance where we found a great parking space exceedingly far away. The cop car was just behind us and moving slowly, its blue lights in the middle of this gloomy parking lot seemed incredibly beautiful. With my top hat in place and my circus-master cape flowing, I am sure we looked quite strange to the dedicated policemen. But this night, the distinctive blue lights that usually cause panic provided security. The Jackson police were out in force for the JFP’s annual Best of Jackson celebration on the last Sunday in January. My beautiful daughter, who was five months pregnant, was at my side. Her graceful black cocktail dress looked just perfect with her two softlooking cat ears perched prominently on the top of her head. She looked lovely, and she smiled. I could see in her eyes that her vision of Metrocenter was much different from mine. When her loving Jackson-bred, Mississippi hunter husband found out the party was at the Metrocenter, his first reaction was, “Are you taking a pistol?” His protective instinct kicked in. My capturing his wife and taking her to the Metrocenter was a curious quandary for him to ponder. I saw it differently. In 1978, I had left Texas Tech and came to Jackson to live with my parents during the summer. I landed a great job at Metrocenter at the J. Riggins men’s clothing store. The mall was fascinating to me. The big, new, beautiful mall was the largest shopping venue in the state. I was proud to be part of it. The next year, I attended Hinds Community College on the Raymond campus because it was the school’s only campus at the time. My father opened the El Chico restaurant located on the north side of the one-mile perimeter of the mighty mall. I’m a fourth-generation former restaurateur; my great grandmother and uncles founded this Mexican restaurant chain that grew to 75-plus locations in the southwest, and now Jackson landed my family’s chain to put in this whopping center. It was my destiny to be part of this opening. Wearing ugly mustard-colored vests with gold buttons, black slacks and the El Chico nametag made with red “la-

bel maker” tape, we were sporty looking for this time period. Fresh-made sopapillas with soft honey butter was our signature “free surprise” that people always remember. My family’s black-and-white photos hanging in the foyer were a conversation piece. I was proud to be a waiter, not a bus boy like Fernando Gomez, yet Fernando became a proud restaurateur who soon created his own line of Mexican restaurants in the area. Some great restaurant stories came out of the mall-area’s food scene. The grand, easy-flowing restaurant called Widow Watson’s was an experience; you felt like you were eating in the widow’s home. To up the game, there was Ruth’s Chris Steak House, the top of the line. Tico’s was located on Bound Street off Interstate 55 at the time and, of course, Crechale’s and the Green Derby were down the road on Highway 80. But none was at the Metrocenter Mall. Poets, an eatery and bar, opened a second location. With liquor by the glass available in the state just a few years, this popular hot spot made it big in the state’s most popular shopping destination. Other chain restaurants were around: Ruby Tuesday, Shoney’s, Piccadilly and more. This south Jackson part of town was thriving. As my daughter and I walked to the entrance, I worried about my costume. I had freshly painted big black sideburns, and my salt-and-pepper facial hair was painted black with mascara. My hair was slicked back with styling gel my daughter gave me. My top hat was lined with red ribbon, and my silk black cape had matching red ribbon as the tie strings. Was I was over-dressed? The invitation said black, red or white, mask optional or dress as a circus-like animal. As we came closer to the entrance, we saw all the smokers outside taking drags off cigarettes. Everyone was laughing and having a good time. I soon saw I was going to fit right in with the kitty-cat costumes, made-up faces and all kinds of hats. The stage was set for a festive atmosphere. As I opened the door to let my daughter enter, she looked at me with a big smile and said, “Dad, I feel safe.” As she moved past me, I looked back at all the blue lights and felt sad. What happened to this beautiful giant of a mall where I grew up? My daughter might not ever know its true glory. Long-time Jackson restaurateur David Joseph is an intern at the Jackson Free Press.

The mall was the largest shopping venue in the state. I was proud to be part of it.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


St. Paddy’s 2013 Paint
 the
 Town
 
Green

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hat is it about green beer, fiddle ditties and catching things that come flying off floats that makes people just so happy? How can dressing in costumes and marching around downtown instill such pride in a place? Whatever it is, it’s all here this weekend: the beads, the floats, the tunes and more. Centered around Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade, this year St. Paddy’s is bigger than ever, with Grammy-nominated musicians, world-class artists and the quirky southern soul only Jacksonians can provide.

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March 13 - 19, 2013

WYATT WATERS

COURTESY WYATT WATERS

nyone who lives or plays in Jackson long enough will eventually be driving down a road and pass a quiet, slender man with a paintbrush. Wyatt Waters, with his long, gray hair tied back and glasses perched on the bridge of his nose, is known for setting up in neighborhoods and downtown to create in his calm, peaceful way. Jacksonians will get to see a new side of their favorite watercolorist this weekend, though—a green-haired, swashbuckling side. Each year, a local celebrity or wellknown Jacksonian takes on the role of Grand Marshal of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade. This year, Waters joins the ranks of those chosen to lead the biggest, greenest party in the state. The theme, inspired by a Coleridge poem, is “Waters, Waters Everywhere.” “(The line in the poem) is actually ‘water, water, everywhere,’ but Malcolm has adjusted this to accommodate me,” Waters says. “And so I will be dressed as a sailor, an 1800s sailor, which is not really the period that Coleridge was talking about, but again, it’s poetic license or artistic license—I call it artistic learner’s permit.” Waters describes his costume’s jacket as a mix between Jack Sparrow and Michael Jackson—rendered in shades of green, of course. Even Waters’ signature ponytail will take on the hue of the day. “My hair will be green,” he says with a chuckle. “I will be very green.” For Waters, taking on the role of Grand Marshal is a chance to stretch his limits and his naturally introverted personality. “This is a very public event, there are 78,000 people supposed to be there,” he says. “When you do books or something, and you have shows, you get to Waters painted this year’s official artwork, which he calls be public. But the part of me that’s me “Leprechauns on the Levee.” ain’t that way. … You know, (my work is) solitary stuff. It’s hard to take the solitary thing and be in public with it.” Waters says painting on location, plein air, was how meet homeless people, or you meet governors who are he got used to being around people in the first place. interested in your paintings. You meet them all—mostly “I don’t think I could look people in the eyes until I everything in between.” was pretty well into adulthood,” he says wryly. “But I Working on location allows Waters to see the city had to, because when you’re painting on the street, you change from the street level. “There’s a lot of good stuff

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Wyatt Waters leads Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade as Grand Marshal this year.

happening, particularly in this area,” he says of the stretch from downtown to Fondren. “… There’s a lot of hope for what things can be. I know what things are, but you have to see what things can be. That’s kind of the job of an artist, anyway—or of anybody. I don’t know why they put that exclusively on artists; it’s everybody’s job.” Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is a good example of seeing what Jackson can be, Waters says. “It’s the hopeful part of what Jackson can be. And it’s just a good cause, and it’s a good excuse to get people together. I think (people coming in) will see Mississippi at its funnest. I know that’s not the correct word (grammatically), but sometimes it’s the right one.” Although Waters has always enjoyed watching the parade, he really got involved last year, when Malcolm White asked him to paint an image to be used on the posters and T-shirts for the 30th anniversary of the parade. White also invited Waters to march in the O’Tux krewe. “So I was led into this gently,” he says. This year, Waters created another custom watercolor for the event, featuring local Jennifer Breaux,


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 5 p.m., Third Annual Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp to Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The second line stomp starts at the historic King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St., 601-353-5464). The Southern Komfort Brass Band leads the way, followed by Hal and Malcolm White, the O’Tux Society, the Green Ladies, the Krewe of Kazoo, the Bucketheads and any other Jacksonians willing to wear funky costumes and join the fun. No fee to march in the parade, no motorized vehicles. “Libations and good vibrations” follow at Hal & Mal’s, featuring Hunter Gibson, The Rumprollers, Southern Komfort Brass Band and Cardinal Sons.

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 7 a.m., Float lineup begins.

dressed in her annual leprechaun garb, standing atop a barrel and hoisting a larger-than-life mug of frosty green beer. Waters named the painting “Leprechauns on the Levee.” Breaux came to Waters’ studio in costume to pose for the painting. “I don’t work from photographs. I mean, I can work from photographs, but there is something about being there that’s very, very important in the time that we live,” Waters says. “Because I love my little

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he theme of the parade is a slightly adjusted line from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s longest poem. It was published in 1798 and tells the story of a mariner who stops at a wedding and begins to narrate his story—a tale of an Albatross, bad seas, meeting Death and the curse Death puts on the mariner. The famous passage containing the line Malcolm White and company were inspired by comes near the beginning of the poem: Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean. Water, water, everywhere, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.

iPad and this little doohickey here (my iPhone), but the truth is, they are only valuable if they point you to the real experience.” That sense of in-personness is what Waters likes about the parade, too. “I will say this about the parade: It gets people out of their cubbies,” he says. “And momentarily, even though there is going to be a lot of iPhone photos, it will get them into the real experience of being there together. I like that.”

9 a.m., Trustmark Children’s Festival begins on Lamar Street in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art. 9 a.m., Pet Parade registration begins. Cost is $5 per pet, and proceeds benefit the Mississippi Animal Rescue League. 9:30 a.m., Children’s Parade registration begins. 10 a.m., Pet Parade begins. 11 a.m. Children’s Parade begins. Both the pet parade and children’s parade will be on Lamar Street in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art, between Pascagoula and Court Streets (rain site: Jackson Convention Complex). Trophies for Trustmark St. Paddy’s Children’s Parade and Pet Parade will be awarded for creativity, originality and performance.

1 p.m., the parade starts at the corner of State Street and Court Street. After the parade, a Street Dance follows in Hal & Mal’s parking lot on South Commerce Street. Alabama Shakes headlines. Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores, Riley Downing and Houndmouth also perform. Gates open at 4 p.m., music begins at 5 p.m. Ages 18 and up, please. No coolers or pets. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com for $20 plus fees. Visit malsstpaddysparade.com for more information. Visit jfpevents.com for more events throughout the city all weekend.

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GUSTAV DORÉ_PUBLIC DOMAIN

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8 a.m., Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade Race (5K Run, 5K Walk, 1 Mile Fun Run). The race starts and finishes on Pascagoula Street at the Jackson Convention Complex. You must be preregistered—there will be no registration on race day. You can register online at stpaddys5k.com or in person at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51, Suite Z, Ridgeland, 601-899-9696) from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. March 13 or 14, or from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. March 15. Registration is $25, and the event benefits the Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Visit stpaddys5k.com or email info@stpaddys5k.com for more information.

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St. Paddy 2013

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Playing the Boot

March 13 - 19, 2013

Traditional Irish music is a collaborative art form that welcomes audience participation, so the next time you attend a céilí or listen to Irish performers, feel free to join in by “playing the boot,” or tapping and stomping your feet along with the music.

Enter the Irish Dance Master. In the 1800s, towns and provinces had someone to teach céilí dances to the young and the old alike. The point was to teach new people how to dance in a way that could refine the skills of the seasoned dancers. That way, everyone could dance t o g e t h e r. Thus, a “gathering” became a “gathering with dancing and music.” The masters were an important way to teach the dances—the Haymaker’s Jig, the Rinnce Fada and the Trenchmore— to a new generation of people. The traditional céilí dance has many forms—maybe you’ve been to CelticFest at the Mississippi Agriculture & Forestry Museum and seen one version of the céilí. Those dances are simple compared to the difficult solo dances (such as those in “Riverdance”). Set dances involve partners, and some even have music where you change partners—from which line dancing evolved. The Jackson Irish Dancers, which Cupples and others formed in 1998, teach classes and perform at events throughout the metro area. “We’re not a competitive group,” she says. “It’s an old-fashioned good time.” As part of Jackson’s big St. Patrick’s weekend, this Sunday at Fenian’s Irish Pub, the dancers will hold a céilí with a special surprise. Emerald Accent, an Irish band from Laurel,

will perform music for the event. “The dancing and the music are designed to go together,” Cupples says. “That’s what makes it unique.” People all over the world can know the same dances set to the same type of upbeat, energetic music. Cupples says the Jackson Irish Dancers once hosted a man from southwestern Ireland. He knew a particular dance that his family had been dancing for years and years in his small town. It turns out that the Jackson Irish Dancers knew the dance, the Ballyvourney Reel Set. They were in New Orleans years ago and learned it from a nun. As fate would have it, she just happened to be from the same small town in Ireland. Cupples says the man cried joyfully because he had come all the way to Mississippi from a small town in Ireland and the people here knew his family’s dance. The Jackson Irish Irish Ceili Dancers hold free “mostly dancing has a monthly” céilís at Fenian’s rich history as a dance form that Pub, usually the third Sunconnects people day of the month. Cupples across the globe. says it’s a “great place to meet new people. You can dance or you can sit and watch. It’s a family event.” There’s an Irish proverb that goes something like this: “Your feet will bring you where your heart is.” Bring your feet to Fenian’s Pub on Sunday and dance. The Jackson Irish Dancers will hold the next céilí at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St., 601-948-0055) Sunday, March 17, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. The group teaches classes by appointment, $10 each, plus $25 for a family or $15 for an individual registering for the year. Visit jacksonirishdancers.org for more information. FLICKR/ALPHATANGOBRAVO

ou’ve mostly likely seen Irish dancing in movies and TV, if not in real life. Remember when Jack takes Rose down to the third-class deck to have a good time in the movie “Titanic?” They leave the stuffy atmosphere of the upper class and go below deck to hear robust, lively music and to dance a jig. Or, think of the celebration at the beginning “The Fellowship of the Ring.” (Hobbits have a strikingly similar culture to the Irish). And, of course, let’s not forget Michael Flatley, the Irish American dancer and choreographer of “Riverdance” and “Lord of the Dance.” When it comes to Irish dance, Margaret Cupples, president and co-founder of the Jackson Irish Dancers. likes to say, “It’s the only aerobic exercise you can do while drinking a beer.” Dancing and beer often go hand-in-hand at the Irish céilí (pronounced KAY-lee), which is Gaelic for “gathering,” although Cupples says over the years the word has transformed to mean a “gathering with dancing and music.” Irish céilí dancing has a rich history with no clear origins, but it’s a traditional dance that has survived the ages. Few accounts of it exist in early literature, but the dancing was popular enough that it spread to England from Ireland in the 1500s. In a 1569 letter to Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Henry Sydney describes dancers he saw in Galway: “They are very beautiful, magnificently dressed and firstclass dancers.” But then, a major bummer: The English introduced the Penal Laws, which made dancing an activity to repress—for more than 100 years. Céilí dancing survived, practiced in secret until those laws were no longer recognized.

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Fun facts about Guinness

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hen I, an admittedly scrawny white woman, walk up to the bar and order a pint of Draught Guinness, I tend to get a strange look or two. It’s true, most of my peer group would rather down a vodka-diet than a black brew that’s been compared to drinking a loaf of bread. But, to me, a glass of Guinness tastes like putting on a warm, comforting sweater. I wasn’t always a fan of Guinness. My dad drank it on occasion, and I had tried it several times, but could never quite adjust to the dry, somewhat bitter, roasted coffee aftertaste. Then, the fall of my senior year at Millsaps College, I spent the semester abroad in Dublin and became a convert. Confession time: I didn’t start drinking Guinness because I suddenly developed more mature taste buds and a subtle palette. I drank it because it was the cheapest drink at most pubs in Dublin (although, at around four euro a pint—equivalent to $6 and up at the time—it wasn’t even that cheap). I also had the mentality that as an Irishwoman (or, at least, a direct descendent of Irishwomen), I needed to drink Guinness while in Ireland, and I needed to like it, or I wasn’t legit. Then, before I knew it, I was ordering the thick brew because I truly enjoyed it, not just because I wanted to save a euro or two. In fact, if I had to pick my last meal right now, I would, without hesitation, order a steaming bowl of beef and Guinness stew, a side of brown bread and butter, and a freshly poured pint of Guinness. Ideally, I would also be at Gus O’Connor’s pub in the tiny town of Doolin, Ireland, wearing a wool sweater that still smelled like a sheep and listening to a gaggle of Irish musicians play traditional tunes from the Emerald Isle. Guinness is for Ireland what Budweiser wishes it could be for America—a truly national beverage. It is impossible to imagine an Ireland with no Guinness. The company sponsors events country-

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

(the man and the beer):

Guinness is more than a drink to Ireland—it is part of the country’s legacy.

wide, from the Cork Jazz Festival to various rugby tournaments. Little old men drink Guinness with their lunches in pubs dotting the countryside and tucked into buildings off the cobbled streets of Dublin and Galway and Limerick. The iconic ads and billboards are a part of the skin of the cities. Tourists visit the brewery at St. James Gate, often to try Guinness for the first time, and discover that there’s nothing like enjoying a beer that was kegged only an hour ago, in a room with wall-to-wall windows, 10 stories above Dublin.

natalie’s notes - parade edition

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by Natalie Long

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COURTESY OTIS LOTUS

he time is finally here: the annual Mal’s St. Paddy’s from a muddy yard on New Year’s Day). Elsewhere, Dreamz Parade week. I and so many others start anticipat- JXN has Throwdown Thursdays, local rock band Triple Shot ing and preparing for the next year’s parade the day performs on Que Sera, Sera’s patio (it’s one of my favorite after the parade is over. Parade day and the week places to be, especially when they have live music), Burgaround it is a homecoming for many ers & Blues has Cassie & Stace, and Jacksonians. I love seeing our aweF. Jones Corner has the Amazin Lazy some city come out dressed in wild, Boi Band at midnight (congratulations creative costumes, and I cherish the to Amazin’ Lazy Boi, aka Andrew Dilchance to catch up with friends from lon, on getting engaged recently!). Or, all over the globe who come here to to get in the mood for some Emerald partake in all the frivolities. Isle fun, head over to Fenian’s to hear Our parade-week festivities betraditional Irish music from the band gin early in the week, so be sure to Dead Irish Blues. take a break from building floats, On parade day eve (Friday, working on your costumes, or cleanMarch 15), I would suggest going to ing for all the company you’ll be havbed early, since the next day is going to ing this weekend to enjoy some prebe filled with activities from sunrise to parade fun. On Wednesday, March Grateful Dead tribute band Otis Lotus sundown—but if you’re like me, sleep 13, music man Hunter Gibson plays performs at Fenian’s Saturday. is something you’ll worry about after at Olga’s. It’s also karaoke night for all all the fun is over. Hard rockers Shineof you wannabe singers at Philip’s on down and Three Days Grace take the the Rez, Club Magoo’s and Last Call—pick out your favor- stage at the Mississippi Coliseum—go to ticketmaster.com ite Irish ditties or party tunes and serenade the crowd. for more information on ticket prices. On Thursday, March 14, my favorite bluegrass buddies If you’re ready to practice your marching strut for the The D’lo Trio perform at The Cherokee Drive Inn (ask next day’s parade, join the MALfunction Street March PreSteve Chester and Hal Jeanes about how they got me unstuck Parade Party at Hal & Mal’s. The crowd will meet up at

5 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel. At 7 p.m., follow Hal and Malcolm White, the Krewe of Kazoo, the Bucketheads, the Green Ladies, the O’Tux Society and other krewes as they march up Capitol Street to Hal & Mal’s, led by the Southern Komfort Brass Band. Once at Hal & Mal’s, The Archtops and Southern Komfort will perform. You can also head over to Underground 119 that night to see one of my favorite bands, The Fearless Four, or to Ole Tavern on George Street to see Amy LaVere. On parade day, Jackson will be hopping with live music after the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade—headlined by national music darlings Alabama Shakes performing at the Hal & Mal’s Street Party after the parade. Club Magoo’s also hosts its Second Annual Rock & Roll BBQ and Downtown Throwdown with Dylan Moss Project, South of 20, Jason Miller Band, U.S. and Spank the Monkey. Meanwhile, Ole Tavern on George Street hosts its annual party with killer bands and food, and Fenian’s hosts its annual St. Patrick’s Block Party featuring St. Brigid’s, Spirits of the House, Otis Lotus and Pratty, starting at 9 a.m. Time Out Sports CafÊ is also having a St. Paddy’s party after the parade that I’m sure will be packed with great music and even better libations. I hope all of you have a wonderful parade experience like I do every year. Be careful, drink lots of water, don’t drink and drive, and have fun! Venue info at jfp.ms/musicvenues.

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Fun, Fun Everywhere

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FLICKR/BIBLIOARCHIVES/LIBRARYARCHIVES

St. Paddy 2013

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ne of the most interesting things about Irish culture is the unique names—and pronunciation of those names—that have resulted from the linguistic shift from old Irish to modern English. While traveling in Ireland, I got to meet a lot of my distant Irish relatives, and I loved trying to guess the spelling of my great-aunts’ and third-cousins’ names based on the way they were pronounced. For example, would you ever think a name pronounced “Neev” would be spelled “Niamh”? Irish names also have some really cool meanings, often stemming from ancient folklore. Here are a few of my favorites.

FEMALES Maeve

March 13 - 19, 2013

Pronunciation: mave (may + v) Maeve is probably my favorite Irish name, meaning “the cause of great joy” or “she who intoxicates”—or, in racier translations, “she who makes men drunk.” It comes from the old Irish name Madb, the great warrior queen of Connacht.

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Aoife

Niamh

Pronunciation: ee + fah Coming from another female warrior, a daughter of a king of Connacht whose marriage St. Patrick himself arranged. Aoife means “beautiful, radiant, joyful.”

Pronunciation: neev or nee + iv The legend of Niamh and Oisin tells the story of “Niamh of the Golden Hair,” the daughter of the sea god, who fell in love with Oisin. They lived in Tir-na-nOg, where, in what seemed like three weeks, 300 years passed. Niamh means “radiance, luster, brightness.”

Ciara Pronunciation: kee + rah This name comes from the Irish word “ciar,” which means “dark.” It is the feminine form of Ciaran—both names imply dark hair and eyes.

Grainne Pronunciation: gran + ya or grawn + ya Grainne comes from “gran,” which means “grain” or “corn,” and Grainne was the patron of the harvest in ancient Ireland. Legends also exist of a Grainne who was daughter to an Irish high king. She jilted a fiancé to run away with a lover named Diarmuid—but, due to the fiancé’s pursuit, the couple could not spend two consecutive nights in the same place.

Aoife is one of several female Irish warriors whose names are popular today.

Kathleen Pronunciation: kath + leen Now isn’t that a beautiful name? Kathleen is the Irish form of Katherine (or Cathleen from Catherine), which means “pure.” It became such a popular name that poet W.B. Yeats chose it for his heroine in his 1899 play “The Countess Cathleen.”

MALES Liam Pronunciation: lee + am Liam is a popular name across the world, but it began as the Irish form of

William—which came from “will” + “helm,” (helm meaning helmet), suggesting “strong protector.”

Oisin Pronunciation: o + shee + in or osh + een In folklore, Oisin was the lover of “Niamh of the Golden Hair.” But before he met Niamh, Oisin lived in the forest until he was 7 years old, raised by his mother, whom a Dark Druid had turned into a PRUH1$0(6!


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deer. Oisin’s father found him and gave him his name, which means “little deer.” Pronunciation: eng + iss Aengus was the god of love and youth, with a name deriving from “aon” (“excellent”) and “gus” (“strength, vigor”). The god Aengus fell in love with a woman in a dream and worked to win her love by passing trials, including transforming into a swan. William Butler Yeats wrote of his quest in the poem, “The Song of Wandering Aengus.” Other variations are spelled Aonghus or Oengus. Pronunciation: cloon + ee Although most associated with everyone’s favorite perennial bachelor, George, in Ireland, Clooney is a first name as well. It comes from the Irish word “cluain,” which means “a green plain or pasture,” but also connotes “an intriguing rogue.”

Connor Pronunciation: con + er or con + or Another name that has gained popularity outside Ireland, Connor means “lover of hounds.”

Niall Pronunciation: nye + al In legends, Niall of the Nine Hostages became a king by passing a test. He and his brothers were sent to a forest to find shelter, food and drink. After growing thirsty, they found a well that a “hideously ugly” woman guarded. She asked for a kiss before giving them water. Niall was the only of the brothers to agree—when he kissed her, she turned into “the most beautiful woman on earth” and gave him the throne. The name Niall means “passionate, vehement.”

Brian Pronunciation: bree + an Brian is one of the most widespread Irish names, although its American counterpart is usually pronounced “bry + an.” It comes from the Irish word “brigh,” meaning “high, noble, strong.” It gained popularity after the most revered high king of Ireland, Brian Boru, died of battle wounds after defeating an invading Viking army in 1014. SOURCE: BABYNAMESOFIRELAND.COM

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Clooney

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hree decades ago, it was just folks in and march, too, as will other family members: costumes inspired by Tennessee Wil- Zita White’s mom, Vivian (an original Sweet liams novels and Queens in pickup Potato Queen), will be marching this year for trucks throwing produce at people the first time in 12 years. during rush hour on a Friday. Now, the Rather than calling themselves a krewe, Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is an annual celebra- “league” connotes a team, and in a subtle nod tion of springtime and one of the things that to what may be the ultimate female buddy makes Jackson unique, attracting a crowd of movie, “A League of Their Own,” the league’s 60,000 revelers. outfits for the Second Line Stomp on Friday A great deal of the fun comes from dress- night will be baseball jerseys. ing in crazy outfits, consuming adult beverThe league’s colors, blue and green, comages during the daytime and dancing in the bine St. Patrick’s blue with the traditional green streets—but it’s also about doing so with friends, family and community. Perhaps none are better aware of the revelry’s deep ties to family and community than the family of parade founders Malcolm White and his brother, Hal. Malcolm’s daughter, Zita White, participated in her first parade wearing a onesie, carried by her mom. She has only missed one in her 28 years on the planet. A true daughter of the parade, she fondly thinks of Hal & Mal’s and the St. Paddy’s Parade “like my older sisters—my dad’s brain children.” Her cousin Brandi White Lee— Hal’s daughter—agrees: “If you saw our family on parade day, you’d think we’re crazy, but we’re always a part of it.” Lee even got engaged the night beBrandi White Lee (left) and Zita White have fore the parade in 2006. formed a new St. Paddy’s Parade krewe, following But here’s the rub: Daughters of in their fathers’ footsteps. the parade though they may be, they are still daughters. Malcolm and Hal’s marching krewe, the O’Tux Society, is male, of his holiday. Accessories are a cape—like a so while Lee and White participated in vari- league of superheroes—and a tiara, which ous ways through the years—riding on floats, really needs no explanation because, well, it’s selling T-shirts, carrying banners—they never a group of girls. “Mayhem” keeps with the had a permanent parade home. whole parade spirit, though there’s also a seOne day soon after last year’s parade, in the cret meaning to the moniker that only krewe office at Hal & Mal’s, 34-year-old Lee looked at members know. Zita White and said, “We need to start our own League founders wanted to have a unikrewe!” And thus began the Nugget League fied look with their colors and capes, but of Mayhem. highlight the individuality of the girls, so each “There were a lot of great girls and fam- member will decorate her own cape and tiara ily members of ours who weren’t in a krewe,” as an expression of herself. White says. “We thought it would be fun to “My inner craft master has come out,” pull a group of them together so that we have White says with a laugh, explaining that it’s not just a group that marches on Parade Day, been fun to come up with ideas and then but a network of women on whom we can figure out how to make them happen. For rely for support for things year-round. It’s instance, what kind of nugget can you throw about family and friendship.” without injuring someone? “People will know White and Lee invited friends, who in- us for our throws, our tiaras and capes … and vited friends, and this year’s initial 20 mem- our awesome crafts, she adds.” bers came together—I am lucky enough to be “I’m so glad that my uncle and family one, and couldn’t be more thrilled. got together on a day 31 years ago and started The girls swung into research mode to this tradition that Mississippi can be proud of. help define their krewe’s identity. “Nugget” re- And I’m excited to be a part of and carry on fers to the luck of the Irish and the pot of gold the tradition,” Lee says. at the end of the rainbow, as well as referencLook for the Nugget League of Maying Lee’s daughter Rivers, whom the family hem near the start of the parade behind the called “Nugget” when she was a baby. League Green Ladies. Hold your hands high to catch a members’ “nuggets” (children) will dress up golden nugget.

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SCAN

ME!

UPCOMING EVENT CALENDAR

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WEDNESDAYS

03/13

LADIES NIGHT 1/2 off drinks for ladies 5PM - UNTIL • MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM THURSDAYS

03/14

$4 APPETIZERS •5 -9PM

Live Music • 2 for 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

03/15

Playing Of The Pipes 5 pm - 8 pm (Bag Pipe Player) Renegade 6 pm - 9 pm The Quickening 6 pm - 10 pm (Members of Flow Tribe)

SATURDAY

03/16

St Paddy’s Blowout (After Alabama Shakes) (After Alabama Shakes)

DJ Venom 4 pm Cassie & Stace 1 pm

2 for 1

03/18

DRAFT ALL DAY

Lazy Magnolia, Magic Hat, Lucky Town, Laughing Skull, Blue Moon, Andy Gator, and all of your favorites.

OPEN MIC 10pm

TUESDAY

03/19

SHRIMP BOIL • 5 - 10 PM

MATT’S LATE NITE KARAOKE

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE • $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

with LIVE MUSIC & ENTERTAINMENT All Day

Lord T & Eloise Space Capone

MONDAY

Howl at the Moon w/ Hunter Gibson Request Night 6 - 10pm

UPCOMING SHOWS 4.3: Minnesota, Protohype, & DCarls 18 & up 4.6: Eliot Lipp 4.13: The Meat Puppets w/ The Tomatoes Advance Tickets @ Ticketmaster 5.4: Black Francis

Baptist Cancer Services presents the 10th Annual Run From The Sun® 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Run, benefitting The Leonard E. Warren Melanoma Foundation.

Saturday, April 6, 2013 Race begins and ends at Baptist Madison Campus, 401 Baptist Drive, Madison, Mississippi. All ages can participate on race day! Race day activities, including a free skin screening at Baptist Medical Clinic | Family Medicine - Madison, begin at 3:30 PM. The race gets underway at 5:30 PM. Pre-registration is $20 by April 1, 2013, and the race-day fee is $25. Family maximum is $50 (pre-registration only) and applies to immediate family only (parents and children).

March 13 -19, 2013

Learn more about the race and download a registration form at www.runfromthesun.com.

22 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 03/2013. 9.5” x 6.167”. Commissioned by Robby Channell.


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C3: Creativity. Conversation. Community.

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THE FUTURE IS ON THE TABLE #4 GET INVOLVED!

Participate in

this community art project through March 20. Visit

www.msmuseumart.org

for information and schedule. Contact the artists,

Gwylène Gallimard and Jean-Marie Mauclet,

jacksonfreepress.com

This year’s project is made possible by funding from Alternate ROOTS and the Ford Foundation through the ROOTS Tour & Residency Program. Additional support is provided by a Challenge America Fast-Track Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

to be a part of the process at JEMAGWGA@gmail.com. Follow the progress on the C3 blog at www.c3mma.blogspot.com.

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MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART n 380 SOUTH LAMAR n 601.960.1515 n 1.866.VIEWART

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2/12/13 11:47 AM


ORGANICS p 28 FOOD p 30

WILD IRISH ADVENTURES

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he bare tree branches twisted against the darkening wintry sky. Deep into the wooded path in the wilds of Ireland’s County Wicklow, the rich green moss hummed with the promise of ancient magic, while tiny waterfalls fell from secret caves, throbbing with the pulse of the blood of our ancestors. When I decided to hop on an international flight with just my 3-year-old and a few suitcases for company, much to the thinly veiled scorn and genuine bewilderment of many less adventurous souls, I knew we would have a great time together. I just had no idea what joy and wonder

were waiting for us across the pond. We arrived in Dublin shortly after lunchtime on Christmas Eve. We felt tired, hungry, jet-lagged, dirty. And because of an unanticipated computer glitch, it seemed for a few harried moments that we might just be homeless, since the lodging I had booked in advance was locked and dark. A cozy lunch of sandwiches and juice in a pub down the cobbled street revived us, and I set out with purpose—a boy on my back, suitcases on one arm and my Lonely Planet guidebook in the other hand. We found a lovely, afford-

tured by an up-close-and-personal encounter with wild seals in the Irish Sea. From ancient churches to cozy tea houses, Ireland has something to offer anyone, and it is a trip that can really be tailored for different tastes and budgets. We walked almost everywhere, stayed in an inexpensive guesthouse, and ate simple picnic meals from the grocery store. We people watched, played in parks, explored free museums and splurged on an amazing night at an incredible Italian restaurant. I know, I know, we were in Ireland, but my 3-year-old is not a big fan of the more traditional Irish fare of seafood or stews, and I have to admit that it was truly some of the best pasta I have ever eaten.

4RAVEL!BROAD 4IPS7ITH#HILDREN KELLY BRYAN SMITH

Ireland is a place for educational exploration. Here, the writer’s son explores an ancient monastery in the valley of Glendalough with a Wild Wicklow Tours guide.

able, family-friendly guesthouse nearby, and a friendly local even helped carry our luggage most of the way. I have traveled extensively, but I have never been anywhere as friendly and welcoming as Ireland. It was easy to navigate public transportation and everyone spoke English. Plus, everyone we ran into was so excited to help out by recommending places to eat, pointing us in the right direction, giving us discount fares, insisting we take an extra book free of charge at the used bookstore, offering their help, or asking us about our lives. Even though Dublin is a vibrant modern city of more than a million people, it is full of historic buildings, cobbled streets and a vibrant community of friendly faces. We felt right at home. We could have stayed in Dublin for weeks without running out of things to do. There are fabulous museums—many free—to explore. The Natural History branch of the National Museum of Ireland appeals to natural-science enthusiasts of all ages, with an incredible collection, including different breeds of octopi that have been preserved in jars since 1837 and many other extremely odd specimens dating back to Victorian times. The Archaeology branch of the museum around the corner houses everything from ornate religious relics to human remains that were preserved in boglands for centuries and only recently discovered. St. Stephen’s Green is a beautiful park in the middle of the city, a short walk from the celebrated Book of Kells at Trinity College and the high-end shopping of pedestrian-friendly Grafton Street. We spent a lot of time at the St. Stephen’s Green playground making friends with Irish families in between our more touristy forays. It is also worth wandering outside the city. We hopped on an amazing bus tour of County Wicklow and were able to see and experience countryside and wilderness that would have been difficult to navigate on our own. We rode the train up to the little seaside village of Howth for a day, where we were enrap-

A spontaneous trip to Ireland turned out to be a friendly, cozy Christmas to remember for the writer and her son. +EEP SOME HEALTHY MUNCHIES IN THE ROOM EHFDXVH OLWWOH NLGV ZLOO OLNHO\ ZDNH XSKXQJU\LQWKHPLGGOHRIWKHQLJKWFRQ IXVHG E\ MHW ODJ DQG GLVFRPEREXODWHG E\ WKHQHZWLPH]RQH0\OLWWOHJX\DQG,ZHUH DZDNHIURPPLGQLJKWWRDPHYHU\QLJKW WKDWZHHNHDWLQJKXPPXVDQGFDUURWVDQG DSSOHVWRJHWKHU 0ACKAFEWFAMILIARTOYSANDBOOKS EXW WKHUH DUH HQRXJK H[FLWLQJ NLGIULHQGO\ SODFHVWRJRWKDWLWLVQRWZRUWKOXJJLQJD EXQFK RI VWXII DURXQG IRU HQWHUWDLQPHQW 3OXV\RXUNLGZLOOZDQWWKDWFRROGRXEOH GHFNHUEXVWR\$QG\RXZLOOSUREDEO\ZDQW WRVD\\HV "EžEXIBLE:HVKRZHGXSLQ'XEOLQZLWKD JXLGHERRNDQGQRSODQVH[FHSWWRKDYHIXQ WRJHWKHU7UDYHOZLWKD\RXQJFKLOGLVPXFK PRUHMR\IXOZLWKRXWUXVKLQJWRPHHWSUHGH WHUPLQHGDJHQGDVDQGH[SHFWDWLRQV

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KELLY BRYAN SMITH

by Kelly Bryan Smith

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Celebrating outstanding contributions to the humanities in Mississippi. Friday, March 22, 2013 Jackson Marriott Hotel

Humanities Awards Luncheon 12:00-2:00 p.m.

Followed by programs exploring how to use the humanities to understand our cultural heritage and become more thoughtful participants in our world.

Featuring: Humanities at the Crossroads

Starring Dru Hill, KC & Jojo AND the Soulful Silk

2:15-4:00 p.m.

Public Reception 4:00-5:30 p.m.

www.mshumanities.org

March 13-19, 2013

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jacksonfreepress.com


LIFE&STYLE | organics

Urban Homesteading: Probiotics a Yummy Alternative

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odern homesteaders, that is, urban and rural folks who are into self-sufficiency, could do little better in regard to their food choices than delving into probiotics. Simply put, probiotics are the tiny organisms that help maintain the natural balance (microflora) in the intestines. That may sound yucky, but it can be tastier than it might sound. If you visit Rainbow Natural Grocery Co-Op in Fondren, for example, you’ll see row after row of “natural� sauerkrauts in a remarkable variety of flavors. That’s probiotics. If you dine at a fine Asian restaurant and sample the spicy and wonderfully complex flavors of kimchi, that’s probiotics. Finally, if you grew annoyed at the Jamie Lee Curtis TV ads touting how her body is in such great intestinal balance, that’s (yes, you guessed it) probiotics. Probiotics is a form of homesteading because it’s all about taking leftover or common materials and recycling them into healthful, edible food. The “sauerkrauts� at Rainbow are carefully fermented unsold produce; Kimchi, basically, is fermented cabbage that was too tough or bitter to eat straight from the fields; Curtis’ product is yogurt with a trademarked probiotic culture added. It all boils to lacto-fermentation: a long word for homegrown food. As my beautiful wife Annette has blogged (blueskywaters. com/articles.html): Dr. Andrew Weil makes

CREDIT: TRIP BURNS

by Jim PathFinder Ewing



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Locally, Rainbow is a great source for sauerkrauts (and other sauer-foods) rich in probiotics.

his own sauerkraut, not because it’s a way to preserve summer crops and eat them all year, or a cheap way to recycle old, tough, bugeaten or leftover garden crops (which it is) but because it’s a healthier way to eat. “Fermenting does some of the digestive work for you, so it makes a lot of foods more digestible and the nutrients in them more bioavailable,� Weil says. Unlike other methods of preserving foods, lacto-fermentation actually increases nutritional value. There are a couple of methods for doing this. Weil uses a Harsch crock, as does

Rainbow Grocery, but that takes weeks to produce, and they are rather pricey. Annette uses a cheaper method that’s also quicker. Read about it at store.therawdiet.com/ pisaandkimch.html. She writes: “I use the sea salt proportion Weil recommends (jfp.ms/DrWeil), then add any veggie combination that appeals to me. I always add fresh grated ginger and fresh grated turmeric if available. I go easy on garlic, as the process makes its flavor stronger. You don’t have to use a starter, but I do. Yogurt whey, miso, kraut juice or a capsule or

two of a probiotic culture is fine.� Read about more fermentation methods and recipes in the book “Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods� by Sandor Ellix Katz (Chelsea Green, 2003, $25). Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book, “Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating� (Findhorn Press), is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook or follow him @edibleprayers or @organicwriter or visit blueskywaters.com.

fertilized and able to fend off pests and bear fruit. One way to do that is through regular spraying of compost tea (liquid compost) to the drip line every six weeks during the growing season. Stay at least 12 inches away from the trunk. Naturally, here in the South, pests are

as Trichogramma wasps to control the pecan casebearer; you can purchase them at organic garden centers, feed stores and ordered by mail—check Amazon. To kill unwanted pests, look into natural treatments, such as the widely sold organic bacterial insecticide known as Spinosad, derived naturally from a soil-dwelling bacterium. A lot of trouble for nothing? Hardly. In fact, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Texas found that pecan trees transitioned to organic outperformed conventional varieties. For more information, visit jfp.ms/ organicpecantrees. You might also peruse the Arbico organics catalog (arbico-organics.com), for a variety of OMRI-approved pest-control solutions for nut and fruit bearing trees.

In Search of Better Pecans

March 13 - 19, 2013

CREDIT: FLICKR/CORY_LEOPOLD

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Using organic methods can help ensure your pecan trees continue to bear nuts.

requently, people ask me why their pecan trees no longer bear. A major reason (among other possibilities) is that the trees don’t get enough food. The first step is to take a soil sample from beneath the tree(s) to the local extension service; and if that doesn’t reveal a deficiency, take a leaf sample for plant tissue analysis. Traditionally, if you have pecan trees, this time of year (February and March) is the time to fertilize them for fall harvest. Most of the guides for fertilizing pecan trees follow conventional methods with synthetic chemicals. The USDA has a paper on it: jfp. ms/USDApecans. If you plan to go organic, avoid synthetics. As with an organic garden, the secret is in the soil: Assure that the trees are well

3EVEN 2EASONS 7HY 0ECAN 4REES$ON´T"EAR From the Alabama Extension Service: jfp.ms/7reasons. in great abundance. As with other organically grown crops, you can use beneficial insects to fight the ones you don’t want, such


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You can go green at Rainbow any day of the year,

        

WHOLE NEW 

DELTA HEALTH ALLIANCE

Indianola Promise Community ANNOUNCES REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR

IPC Summer Camps 2013 Funding Opportunity RFP Technical Assistance Workshop Monday, March 18 8:00 a.m. to Noon IPC office, 135 Front Avenue Indianola • (662) 686-3930 RFP application is available at http://www.deltahealthalliance.org/ wp-content/uploads/ 2013/02/ IPC-Summer-Camp-2013-RFP1.pdf

Celebrate this weekend by shopping at the greenest store in town!

www.deltahealthalliance.org

POST OFFICE BOX 277, STONEVILLE, MS 38776 • 662-686-7004 Current funding for this Request for Proposals is made possible through a grant from the Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhood Program (Award # U215N120032) TM

facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

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PURPOSE: to establish innovative opportunities that support youth vocabulary and reading comprehension enhancement over the summer months, while school is not in session. The goals of the program are to foster vocabulary development, an appreciation for literature, improve reading comprehension skills, reduce dropout rates, and minimize loss of knowledge over the summer. This RFP is specifically looking for programs which utilize innovative, fun, and creative approaches to developing vocabulary and reading comprehension skills.

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LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

Feeding the Masses by Spencer Nessel

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lemon to the hummus will help sustain its life on the party table longer. Lemon and parsley This particular hummus also benefits from sitting overnight as the lemon and parsley flavors will become much more pronounced after 24 hours. Both flavors lend themselves well to a spring dish. A proper hummus incorporates tahini, a sesame paste or sauce; however, tahini is not in the arsenal of the average home chef, so we’ll leave it out for this recipe. A succulent pork butt is perfect for a party because it doesn’t require much attention once it’s in the oven, and your boozed-up friends will flock to the smell. For this recipe, I recommend serving the pork over warm polenta or mashed potatoes, or in a warm tortilla Braised pork cooks long and slow, so it’s a great dish to with black beans. You want make during a party. something that will be able to soak up all of the jous at the Hummus is an easy, cheap and ver- bottom of the pan. satile little appetizer to make. Dips and For dessert, go with a base that can spreads are standards for feeding groups of be made the night before. The density of people, but they become increasingly less pound cake allows it to sit overnight withappetizing when they sit out too long. This out drying out. Paired with the fresh and problem can usually be fixed with a good bright flavors from macerated berries, it’s a squeeze of lemon or lime juice on top of fairly light dessert and a great way to top off whatever it is you’re serving. Adding more any springtime party.

FLICKR/CHARLES HAYNES

ooking for friends and family on St. Paddy’s weekend may seem daunting, but it doesn’t have to be a total schlep. When I cook for events where I don’t want to be stuck in the kitchen missing the party, I cook things that can be made a day in advance or that take a long time in the oven so I don’t miss the fun.

Lemon-Parsley Hummus

March 13 - 19, 2013

2 cans chickpeas 2 lemons—both juiced, one zested 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup of parsley (I use flat leaf.) 1/4 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon water pinch of chili flakes or Sriracha Salt and pepper to taste

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Drain, rinse and dry the chickpeas. Put all the ingredients except the olive oil in a blender or food processor. Blend while drizzling in the olive oil. If you want a creamier texture, add a little more olive oil or even sour cream. Garnish with a parsley leaf and a slice of lemon and serve with warm pita.

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra, Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

Simple Braised Butt 4 pounds pork butt (shoulder, bone-in) 5 garlic cloves, mashed 2 onions, quartered 1 cup fresh oregano 4 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 dark beer 2 cups chicken or beef stock

Take the pork out of the wrapping and let it come to room temperature (for safe consumption, cook meat immediately after it has thawed). Make small incisions in the pork and stuff the cloves of garlic. Make sure they are in there tight, but don’t tear the meat apart. Chop the oregano and rub the meat down with olive oil and oregano. Salt and pepper

generously—this is a four-pound piece of meat so don’t be afraid to load it on. Brown the meat on all sides (a Dutch oven is best if you have one, but if not, use your biggest roasting pan with a lid.) Deglaze the pan with the beer, Worcestershire, stock and Dijon. Then throw the meat back in (fat side up) with the onions, making sure they are in contact with the braising liquid. Cover with a lid or tin foil and place in the oven at 325 degrees for 3-1/2 hours. Uncover the meat and crank up the heat for the last 30 minutes to 425. This will help develop a crisp crust on the outside of the meat. When you take the meat out of the oven, let it rest for about 10 minutes before shredding it or cutting into it.

Buttermilk Pound Cake with Macerated Berries For Cake

For Berries

Make sure your butter is at room temperature, then cream it with the sugar in a standing mixer. Dissolve the baking soda into the hot water and add it to the butter and sugar. Add one egg yolk at a time while the mixer is going, making sure each egg yolk is fully mixed before adding the next. Slowly add the flour, then the vanilla. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until they have stiff peaks. Carefully fold the whites into the batter. Bake it in a 10-inch tube pan, making sure the pan is properly greased before adding the batter. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Let the cake sit in the pan for at least a half hour before taking it out.

You can prepare the berries a few hours in advance, but I would advise not letting them sit overnight as you want them a bit fresher. If you are using strawberries, make sure to slice them into smaller bits. Put the berries in a shallow dish and spread them out. Add the orange juice, zest, liquor, sugar and honey. Use a fork to gently mash everything. You want the berries to maintain a little form, so don’t mash them too much. You can even add a little fresh mint or basil to perk it up. Wrap the berries in plastic wrap and let them sit in the fridge until you are ready to serve them on top of the pound cake.

3 cups flour (sifted twice) 5 eggs, separated 2 sticks butter 3 cups sugar 1 cup buttermilk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon hot water 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

St. Paddy’s Day

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3 cups fresh berries (I use strawberries, blackberries and blueberries. Just use what looks good.) 1 orange, juiced and zested 3 tablespoons orange liqueur (Cointreau or Grand Marnier—or go cheap and use triple sec) 1/4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons honey

Happy St. Paddy’s Day In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm


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Double Shotz Band Drink Specials, Shots and a Costume Contest! 2801 North State Street • Fondren District 601-981-2520 • www.QueSeraMS.com

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DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

Looking for authenticity? How about trying a quality import from Ireland or the British Isles? (We’ve got all your other favorites, too!)

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STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes! Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Hwy 80 E in Pearl, 601-932-8728 and 149 Old Fannin Rd in Brandon, 601-992-6686) A culinary treat traditional Mexican. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town� features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,� Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

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March 13 - 19, 2013

Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-8486

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Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren 601-366-5273 English Village 904 E. Fortification St. 601-355-9668 Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089 Yazoo City 734 E Fifteenth St. 662-746-6005

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,â€? has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. ASIAN AND INDIAN Mr. Chen’s (5465 I 55 North, 601-978-1865) Fresh authentic Chinese Food, located within an actual grocery store with many unique produce offerings. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made springrolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry. VEGETARIAN High Noon CafĂŠ (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-veganfriendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.


FILM p 34 | 8 DAYS p 35 | MUSIC p 38 | SPORTS p 40

Rock ‘n’ Roll and Retro-Soul by Briana Robinson

there, but you’re not. You feel like you’re disconnected I guess. … I mean you can see all the people out there, but you don’t know where it ends.” Alabama Shakes became so popular within the year and a half after releasing “Boys & Girls” that, along with receiving many concert requests, the group was nomi-

Grammy-nominated band Alabama Shakes headlines the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Street Dance.

it’s fun to be on the road playing their music and meeting new people, the members miss the things they once took for granted. “You eat when you can because you don’t know when you’ll get to again,” Johnson says. “You shower when you can because you don’t know if at the next stop you’re going to have a hotel room or if you’ll be sleeping on the bus and bathing at the venue. And not all venue showers are nice.” The transformation from playing small Alabama bars to playing larger shows and festivals hasn’t been too bad, though. “They gradually escalated so that it felt comfortable,” Johnson says. “Festivals are still a little shocking. They’re not as personal as a small club or theater venue. You feel like you’re

nated for three Grammy awards: Best New Artist, Best Rock Performance (for the song “Hold On”) and Best Recording Package (for the album “Boys & Girls”). While the band didn’t win, lead singer and guitarist Howard had the opportunity to perform with Elton John, Mavis Staples, Zac Brown, T Bone Burnett and the band Mumford & Sons in a tribute to the late Levon Helm of The Band. Howard’s voice is one of the defining elements of her band’s music. Sources such as Newsweek and The New York Times likened Howard to Janis Joplin. They share the same throaty, gritty style, singing deeply in a way that weakens the vocal chords after one night of singing. Howard’s voice isn’t just gritty and raspy, though; her singing evokes

raw, emotional power. Listeners can feel that passion coming through in songs such as “You Ain’t Alone.” “Even the album’s slower moments sizzle in Howard’s hands, her vocal delivery conjuring old-soul emotions and effortlessly reaching back through the decades to solder together heartbroken blues, righteous soul and irreverent rock ‘n’ roll,” wrote NPR in its “NPR Music’s 25 Favorite Albums of 2012 (So Far).” “Boys & Girls” made the list. Howard’s old-school raspy delivery combined with Motown-esque guitar melodies has earned Alabama Shakes the labels of soul-revival and retro-soul; however, this isn’t the band’s goal. “We definitely have a soul influence, and there’s a bunch of songs of ours that I guess give off that vibe of being a soul band,” Johnson says. “But I don’t think it was ever our intention to be retro-soul.” Alabama Shakes’ style is the result of a mixing of influences from the different members. Cockrell is really into Motown and old session players, while Howard and Johnson like to play hard rock. Lately, Johnson has been listening to an assortment of music including Steel Johnson, Michael Kiwanuka, The Fugees and Pantera. “Put all four of us together, and that’s just what came out,” Johnson says. “We’ve got some songs that have a groove to them and are kind of soulful, and by the end of the song they’re just amped up rock ‘n’ roll songs.” Johnson strongly believes that rock ‘n’ roll is probably the best way to describe Alabama Shakes’ music. “If you’ve been to one of our live shows, if you’ve seen us, then you would classify us more as a rock ‘n’ roll band because there’s a lot of energy that we bring in a live setting that is not captured on the album,” he says. Alabama Shakes performs in Jackson as part of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Street Dance March 16. Doors open at 4 p.m., and tickets cost $20 plus fees for the 18-and-up event. Visit ticketmaster.com to purchase tickets or alabamashakes.com for more info on the band. 33 jacksonfreepress.com

jobs so it wasn’t like we could get out and tour or anything.” Now, Alabama Shakes tours all the time across the country, and in Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, South America and Europe, and plays at big and small venues alike. The band has had a love/hate relationship with touring, Johnson says. While PIETER M.VAN HATTEM/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

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teve Johnson was delivering a FedEx package to the animal clinic where his friend Zac Cockrell worked in 2008 when Cockrell asked if he wanted to play some music together after work. Cockrell and friend Brittany Howard were already working on a couple of songs, so Johnson, a drummer, asked if they wanted to create a band. “That’s pretty much how it started,” Johnson says of the unassuming beginning of Alabama Shakes. In April 2009, they got their first gig through Heath Fogg, who offered them a 45 to 60-minute gig opening for his band. The problem, however, was that Cockrell and Howard had little-to-nil experience performing. Plus, Howard had never played the songs on guitar while singing, so Fogg stepped in to help. After a week or two of preparation, the four played the set. “We were extremely well-received, so we kept doing it,” Johnson says. Whenever Fogg’s other band had a show, he’d do double duty and have the Shakes open. “Finally we caught a break. We just happened to be in the right place at the right time,” Johnson says. “Somebody heard us and kind of passed it on to a friend who had a blog and blogged about us.” The blogger happened to be Justin Gage, whose influential Los Angeles-based Aquarium Drunkard blog has gained honorable mention from the likes of Rolling Stone and Paste magazines. Before they knew it, Patterson Hood was at a Shakes show and hooked them up with his management. In April 2012, two years after that first gig in their hometown of Athens, Ala., Alabama Shakes released its debut album, “Boys & Girls,” through ATO Records. The road wasn’t easy, though. The group had to travel to nearby cities to perform on weekends when possible. “All of the places around here wanted cover bands to play for like four hours—bar bands and stuff,” Johnson says. “We were trying to work on originals, and we all had


DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

No Love for the Wizard

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings 3/15 –

R

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone PG13 3-D Oz: The Great And Powerful PG Oz: The Great And Powerful (non 3-D) PG Dead Man Down R 21 And Over R 3-D Jack The Giant Slayer PG13

Fri. 3/21

Jack The Giant Slayer (non 3-D) PG13 The Last Exorcism Part II PG13 Snitch

PG13

Beautiful Creatures

PG13

A Good Day To Die Hard R Safe Haven PG13 Escape From Planet Earth (non 3-D) PG Identity Thief

R

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

March 13 - 19, 2013

Movieline: 355-9311

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824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

by Anita Modak-Truran

COURTESY DISNEY

The Call

for Thur.

2nd Annual

Rock N Roll BBQ & Downtown Throwdown

BBQ, Crawfish • Cold Drinks • live entertainment

SATURDAY MARCH 16th Open 11 AM Featuring: (Outside Parking Lot)

Chad Wesley Band The Dylan Moss Project South of 20 Jason Miller Band U.S. (Inside Club Magoo’s)

Special Guest Kid Vicious Spank the Monkey

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat)

James Franco is on his way to the magical kingdom in “Oz the Great and Powerful.”

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ho is the man behind the curtain, pulling the strings and reprimanding Dorothy and her buddies? The voice belonged to the so-called “great” and “powerful” Wizard of Oz. In movie circles, the wizard is a charlatan, fake, fraud and liar. Without spoiling the ending of a 74-year-old classic, a few clicks of ruby slippers and Dorothy would have been back in tornado-torn Kansas. But thanks to the sumabitch wizard, she had to risk life and limb to death-melt the wicked witch. So I ask the elephant-in-the-room question. Why make a movie about a not great and not powerful man? I think some MBA types must have hatched a plan to adapt the George Lucas prequel playbook to one of the most beloved movies of all time. Strip out Dorothy singing, dump a bunch of money into a super-sized, jumbo-normous green screen, snag a great director like Sam Raimi and throw in a lot of good-looking actors with misfit toys, and you have created “Oz the Great and Powerful.” Somehow, someone—maybe a lot of somebodies—believed that the wizard of fabrication had enough oomph to compete with a somewhere-over-the-rainbow farm girl and her little feisty dog. Screenwriters Mitchell Kapner and David Lindsay-Abaire front load the story with the life of Oscar Diggs (James Franco) before Oz. Oscar—shortened to Oz because twosyllable names are so hard to pronounce— leaches the innocence from pretty country girls. He treats his beleaguered assistant with disdain, and he generally messes things up with his pride and selfishness. When the muscle man smashes down his door, he escapes in a hot air balloon. And then things spin out of control. Oz gets twisted, hurled and cleaned up in the eye of a tornado. He lands on the shores of Oz, where the beautiful witch Theodora (Mila Kunis) welcomes him, and little creatures nip at his heels. Theodora’s sisters—Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and banished Glinda (Michelle Williams)—have their own quality time with Oz. He’s quite the witch’s man with his awe-shucks-I’m-in-Oz grin. But like Dorothy after him, Oz has a quest. He must free

the people of the pestilent Wicked Witch of the West. But which of three witches is the wicked one? I won’t tell. If—and that’s a big if—a prequel should have been made about the “The Wizard of Oz,” then the story should have focused on the witches, who have lots of anger, builtin drama and reality-show hair-grabbing potential. Somewhere before the acres of sleep-forever poppies, the seeds of a witches’ prequel were sown in the “Wizard of Oz.” When Glinda first meets Dorothy, she asks, “Are you a good witch, or a bad witch?” You see, everything in Oz is based on what kind of witch you are. No one give a flying pig’s curly tail about the wizard. The witches sell the story. In the book “Wicked: the Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West,” Gregory Maguire tells a phenomenal tale of the much-aligned, green-skinned, pointychinned, broom-flying witch in a prequelian story to the “Wizard of Oz.” But in this film, the three witches are far too bland. They should have stolen the show, but they don’t bedazzle us with their wickedness, and they barely daze us with their treachery. The talking monkey (voiced by Zach Braff) and a chipped china doll (voiced by Joey King) have more pizzazz than the three witches combined. Some critics have complained about James Franco. But he’s perfect in the role— Snidley Whiplash sinister with a smile that cracks his face apart. You can’t fake that; that’s honest-to-goodness method acting. The real issue is that Franco plays the man behind the curtain, and we don’t really care about the non-great wizard after the “Wizard of Oz.” This film says nothing beyond confectionary beauty. And it almost gets a pass. Some scenes are so wildly imaginative and eye-poppingly colorful that you can almost forgive the movie’s fun-ride emptiness. But then it starts to grate on the nerves, like the music for “It’s a Small World.” But let’s think rainbows, not rides. “Somewhere over the rainbow, skies are blue. And the dreams that you dare to dream, really do come true.” Don’t go looking for your dreams to come true in “Oz the Great and Powerful.” They won’t.


FRIDAY 3/15

SATURDAY 3/16

The Lady’s Night Out Tour is at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex.

The Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is at 1 p.m. in downtown Jackson.

TUESDAY 3/19 The Metal Show is at 6:30 p.m. at Rampage Extreme Park.

BEST BETS MARCH 13 - 20, 2013

THURSDAY 3/14 PAUL FAYARD

The Mississippi Artists’ Guild Fine Arts Exhibition hangs through April 28 at the Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). Free; call 601-960-1582.

See Paul Fayard’s painting “Hill of the King” at the “From These Hills” Art Show March 15 at 7 p.m. at Attic Gallery.

FRIDAY 3/15

The Marching MALfunction and Second Line Stomp starts at 5 p.m. at King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.) and ends at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The annual parade and street dance includes music from the Southern Komfort Brass Band, Hunter Gibson, the Rumprollers and Cardinal Sons. Costumes welcome. Free; call 601-948-0888. … The Youth Gospel Explosion and Talent Show is at 6 p.m. at the Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) at center stage. Free; call 601-941-7519. … The open-

ing reception for the “From These Hills” Art Show is from 7-9 p.m. at Attic Gallery (1101 Washington St., Vicksburg). Show hangs through April 15. Free; call 601-638-9221. … Shinedown, Three Days Grace and P.O.D. perform at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum. $37.50; call 800-745-3000. … BY LATASHA WILLIS The Tallis Scholars perform at 7:30 p.m. at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Road). $30, $5 students; call FAX: 601-510-9019 601-594-5584; ancientmusic. org. … The Lady’s Night Out DAILY UPDATES AT Tour with Dru Hill, K-Ci and JFPEVENTS.COM JoJo, and Silk is at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $30-$40; call 601-960-2321 or 800-745-3000.

EVENTS@

SATURDAY 3/16

The Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade festivities in downtown Jackson include a 5K race at 8 a.m., the Trustmark Children’s Festival at 9 a.m., the Pet Parade at 10 a.m., the Children’s Parade at 11 a.m., the St. Paddy’s Parade at 1 p.m. starting at State and Court streets, and the after-parade street dance at 4 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s; performances from Alabama Shakes, Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores, Riley Downing and Houndmouth start at 5 p.m. Free, $20 concert (ages 18 and up); malsstpaddysparade.com. … The St. Patrick’s Day Block Party at Fenian’s includes brunch at 9 a.m. (food prices vary), and the party is at noon ($5). Performers include St. Brigid’s at 10 a.m., Spirits of the House at 2 p.m., Otis Lotus at 5 p.m. and Pratty at 8 p.m. … The St. Paddy’s Blowout begins at 1 p.m. at Martin’s. Performers include Cassie and Stace, DJ Venom, Lord T and Eloise, and Space Capone. … Ole Tavern’s St. Paddy’s Downtown Throwdown is at 2 p.m. Performers include the Michael Jackson tribute band Who’s Bad, the Bluz Boys, Furrows, Rooster Blues, JAG, Jason Bailey and Company, and DJ Stache. Lawn chairs welcome; no coolers. $10 cover. … Nameless Open Mic is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640.

SUNDAY 3/17

The Oxford Music Festival at Plein Air in Taylor (8 County Road 3065, Oxford) includes watching the Ole Miss baseball game on an LCD screen at 1 p.m. and a concert at 4 p.m. Performers include Hinge Dance Company, Damien Wash, The Red Thangs, Adrian Dickey and the Family Band, and Shannon McNally. Free; call 662234-3151; oxfordmusicfest.com.

British singer-songwriter Michael Kiwanuka performs at the Mal’s St. Paddy Parade street dance at Hal & Mal’s March 16 at 5 p.m.

MONDAY 3/18

The Wine Tasting Fundraiser is from 6-8 p.m. at Olga’s. Includes heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, a silent auction and door prizes. Hunter Gibson performs. Proceeds benefit Community Animal Rescue and Adoption. For ages 21 and up. Tickets sold at Olga’s and The Rug Place. $45 in advance, $55 at the door; call 601-842-4404. … Cellist Bryan Hayslett performs at 8 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) at the Aven Fine Arts Building in the recital hall. Free; call 601-925-3440.

TUESDAY 3/19

The four-course California Wine Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. at Char. Seating limited; RSVP. $50 per person; call 601956-9562. … The Metal Show is at 6:30 p.m. at Rampage Extreme Park (931 Highway 80 W.). Performers include Iron Lung, Sun Ballet and In the Clear. $7; rampagextremepark.com.

WEDNESDAY 3/20

jacksonfreepress.com

The Jackson 2000 Discussion Luncheon is at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The topic is creating a successful small business. RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000. org. … Spring Break Day is from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at Adams Street Park (115 Adams St., Flowood). Includes games, prizes and a special guest speaker. Free; call 601992-4440. … MDAH Historic Preservation Division director Jim Woodrick talks about Jackson during the Civil War during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998.

BIGHASSLE.COM

WEDNESDAY 3/13

Forrest Lamar Cooper shows his collection of postcards of Jackson during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The Artist and Jewelry Artisans Exhibit at the Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive) hangs through April 30. Free; call 601-432-4056 or 800-647-7542. 35 More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Discussion Luncheon March 13, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The topic is creating a successful small business. RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org. St. Patrick’s Day Block Party March 16, 9 a.m., at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St.). The pre-parade brunch is at 9 a.m., and the party is at noon. Performers include St. Brigid’s at 10 a.m., Spirits of the House at 2 p.m., Otis Lotus at 5 p.m. and Pratty at 8 p.m. $5 admission, food for sale; call 601-948-0055; fenianspub.com.

(/,)$!9 St. Patrick’s Day Art March 16, 10 a.m.2 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Wear green and make crafts in the Inspirations Studios. $8, children 12 months and under free; call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. St. Paddy’s Day CÊilí March 17, 2-4 p.m., at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St.). Jackson Irish Dancers teaches traditional dances; beginners welcome. Emerald Accent performs. Food for sale. Free, donations welcome; call 601-592-9914; email maggie@jacksonirishdancers.org.

March 13 - 19, 2013

The Bunny Photo Experience through March 30, at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Children may visit and take a picture with the Easter Bunny Monday-Saturday from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sundays from noon-6 p.m. The Easter Egg Hunt is March 16 from 2-3 p.m., pet

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photography available March 17 from 4-6 p.m., and the Caring Bunny photo session for specialneeds children is March 24 from 10 a.m.-noon. Photo packages start at $19.95, $5 online credit available for additional items; call 601-956-3438.

#/--5.)49 Events at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). • Minority Business Network Meeting March 14, 6 p.m. The guest speaker is Jim Griffith of Griffith Financial Services. Refreshments served. Bring business cards and other marketing materials. RSVP recommended. Free; call 601-750-236 or 601-316-5092. • Tax Workshop March 15, 4-5:30 p.m. Topics include free tax preparations, claiming dependents and tax credits. Get a free tax consultation. The program is part of the Mississippi Taxpayer Assistance Project. Free; call 601-968-5809 or 601-968-5803. Events at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). • Jackson Garden and Patio Show March 15, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., March 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and March 17, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy shopping, gardening seminars, children’s activities and door prizes. Special guests include gardening experts Nellie Neal, Catherine Strange and Dr. Gary Bachman. $6, children 12 and under free; call 601-919-8111; email info@msnla.org. • All 4 Children Consignment Spring/Summer Sale March 20, 5-8 p.m., March 21, 10 a.m.7 p.m., March 22, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., and

March 23, 8 a.m.-noon. Purchase or sell gentlyused children’s clothing and accessories. The VIP pre-sale is March 20 (4-8 p.m. for new moms). Consignors and volunteers get additional opportunities to shop early. Free admission, $10 presale; call 601-566-7046; email cbpampa@yahoo. com; all4childrenconsignment.com. Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). • “The Costs of Unintentional Racial Biasâ€? Lecture March 18, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215. Tamar Gendler, professor of philosophy at Yale University, is the speaker. Free; call 974-1000; email goldekb@millsaps.edu. • Spring Community Enrichment Series. Most classes begin the week of April 1 and fall into the categories of art, music, fitness, design, business and technology. Call to request a brochure. Fees vary; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. Events at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6920. • Coffee and Conversation March 15, 7 a.m.8:30 a.m. Interact with business professionals, leaders and other community members to learn about upcoming city projects. • Metropolis Makers Program through March 29. School groups of students in grades 4 and up participate on town planning exercises. Reservations required. Spring into Science Camp March 12-15, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The four-day camp is for children in grades 1-5. Topics include food science, physics, chemistry and the body systems. Registration required. $15 discount for each additional

child. Price increases after March 7. $175; call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. Spring Break Day March 13, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Adams Street Park (115 Adams St., Flowood). The event includes games, prizes and a special guest speaker. Free; call 601-992-4440. Teen Time (7th-12th Graders) March 14, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). The program includes activities related to pop culture and current events. Free; call 601-856-4536. Jackson Mayoral Candidates Forum March 14, 6-9 p.m., at Masonic Temple (1072 W. John R. Lynch St.). The Jackson City NAACP Branch is the host. Meet the candidates, ask questions and share concerns. Free; call 601-906-1717 or 601331-0274. New Vibrations Network Gathering March 14, 6:30-8 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The mixer is held on second Thursdays. Bring business cards and brochures to share. Free, donations welcome; email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. Jeet Kune Do Fight Clinic 3 March 16-17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). The martial-arts clinic emphasizes techniques that legendary martial artist Bruce Lee used. Additional specialty classes available. Early registration: $75 one day, $100 both days; additional $25 for walk-ins; call 262-994-3174; email jeremy@ boxersrebellion.com. Meridian Bridal Expo March 17, noon-4 p.m., at Northeast Conference Center (111 Highway 11, PRUH(9(176VHHSDJH


IURPSDJH

Meridian). Consult with wedding professionals and enjoy a fashion show, food samples and door prizes. No strollers permitted. $5; call 601-650-9288. Jackson Zoo Math Days March 18-22 and March 25-29, at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Teachers may bring their classes for self-guided, math-based activities. Registration required. Free with paid admission; call 601-352-2580, ext. 240; jacksonzoo.org.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557. • Ask for More Arts Student Exhibit through March 24, in the upper and lower atriums. Parents for Public Schools is the sponsor. • Goodwill Art Show through March 28, in the main galleries. The show features works from artists with disabilities.

Veterans of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement Conference March 20-24, at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). The theme is “Looking Back to Move Forward: Sacrificing for Human Dignity, Securing Human Rights.” The conference includes workshops, lectures, book signings, film screenings, luncheons and tributes. Speakers include Elsie Dahmer and Owen Brooks. $100, $40 one day, $25 college students, $10 high school students, banquet: $30, $10 students; call 601-977-7914.

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • “C3: Creativity. Conversation. Community.” through March 20. Participants create 3D interpretations of Jackson landmarks and creeks. Completed artwork will be displayed at the Art Garden’s BankPlus Green. • Look and Learn with Hoot March 15, 10:30 a.m. This educational opportunity for 45 year olds and their parents features a hands-on art activity and story time. Please dress for mess.

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Events at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6920. • “Pieces of the Past: Civil Rights in Jackson” through April 7. The rotating artifact exhibit provides insight into the causes, violence and resistance that occurred during the movement. • “Jackson: A Photographic History” through July 7. The photography exhibit showcases the capitol city’s history and development.

Poker Run March 13, 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Participants receive five playing cards during the three-mile run/walk, and the people with the best hand and worst hand win prizes. After-party at Cazadores (500 Highway 51, Suite R, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-899-9696. Living with Alzheimer’s: Early Stages March 19, 10:30 a.m.-noon, at Baptist Healthplex, Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton). The Alzheimer’s Association-Mississippi Chapter presents the education program. Topics include diagnosis, planning and resources. Free; call 601-987-0020; email info@msalz.org.

Thomas “Tom” Cochran Art Exhibit through March 29, at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). See the late artist’s paintings, sculptures and woodcarvings in the Academy Building. Free; call 601-631-2997.

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Zippity Doo Dah Events Through March 22. • Patty Peck Honda Doo Dah Day Blue Car Giveaway through March 22, at Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children (2500 N. State St.). Purchase a raffle ticket for a chance to win a new 2012 Honda Civic EX-L. Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. Winner announced March 23 during the Color Me Rad 5K. $25; call 601-984-5273; foch.org. • Budweiser Clydesdale Wagon Ride Raffle through March 22. The winner gets a chance to ride in the wagon during the Zippity Doo Dah Parade March 23. Drawing held March 22 during Arts, Eats and Beats. Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. For ages 21 and up. $5; zddparade.com.

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Teen Book Club (9th-12th Graders) March 18, 4-5 p.m., at Canton Public Library (102 Priestley St., Canton). This month’s book is Angela Johnson’s “First Part Last.” The book discussion includes a pizza party. Registration required; space limited. Free; call 601-859-3202. History Is Lunch March 19, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Author Vladimir Alexandrov discusses and signs copies of his book, “The Black Russian.” Free; call 601-576-6998. Chris Meister Lecture and Book Signing March 19, 5:30 p.m., at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). In the Convert Chapel. Meister is the author of “James Riely Gordon: His Courthouses and Other Public Architecture.” Free admission, $49.95 book; call 601-631-2997; email info@southernculture.org.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Discover Classes March 19, 6-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Take Jenny Thomas’ fused glass class or Anne Campbell’s recycled jewelry class. Registration required. $35; call 601-856-7546; mscrafts.org.

Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition’s Queer Youth Advisory Board Call for Applicants. MSSC seeks people ages 14-30 to work with LGBTQ youth. Includes travel opportunities. Apply by March 15. Visit mssafeschools.org. Mississippi Youth Hip-Hop Summit and Parent/Advocate Conference Call for Volunteers through July 20. Volunteers ages 19 and up with youth that are not participating in the summit are welcome. The conferences are July 20-21 at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Call 601354-3408, ext. 104; email ddenney@aclu-ms.org; tinyurl.com/2013MSYouthHHSVolunteerReg. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; lemuriabooks.com. • “The Black Russian” March 19, 5 p.m. Vladimir Alexandrov signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25 book. • Lemuria Story Time. Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free.

37


DIVERSIONS | music

The Tallis Scholars: Perfection in Polyphon by Larry Morrisey

M

COURTESY ERIC RICHMOND

usical superstars often skip playing in Jack- by Tallis Scholars director Peter Phillips, the label has released had a long-running relationship with The Tallis Scholars, son, but this weekend the city will host more than 50 recordings by the group. The releases include bringing the group to Jackson five times. The group’s initial early music’s equivalent of The Roll- music by well-known master composers like Palestrina, as Jackson performance in 1988 came about due to a sudden ing Stones. The Tallis Scholars, a British well as more obscure Renaissance composers. open date in its schedule during one of its early Ameria cappella group that specializes in Renaissance music, will The Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music—a long- can tours. MAAM made sure that the group would want perform this Friday at St. Philip’s Episto come back again. Don Lacy, a copal Church. The group’s distinctive MAAM supporter, hosted a barbecue sound, along with a carefully researched for the group at his home after the repertoire and non-stop international concert, which they believe helped touring, has made it the top group in get The Tallis Scholars back for the their genre. subsequent concerts. The Tallis Scholars are named for “I think it was strictly a matter the English composer Thomas Tallis, of southern hospitality,” Lacy explains. one of several Renaissance-era compos“They said at that time, ours was the ers that the group has helped to introfirst private home that they had ever duce to contemporary audiences. Tallis been in while touring America. I think and his contemporaries primarily com- The Tallis Scholars, one of the world’s top Renaissance music groups, returns to Jackson this Friday. they appreciated that MAAM and St. posed church music with Latin texts. Philip’s went the extra mile to make The music is polyphonic, with multhem comfortable.” tiple voices singing different melodic lines that twist and turn running organization focusing on music of the Renaissance St. Philip’s Episcopal Church has been the site of all of across each other, creating a complex and intense sound. and earlier eras—presents the Tallis Scholars in Jackson. Rich The Tallis Scholars’ performances in Jackson. Max Garriott Max Garriott, co-founder of the Mississippi Academy McGinnis and Max Garriott were regular attendees of the believes that the church is perfectly suited for the group’s of Ancient Music, says The Tallis Scholars have a finely Boston Early Music Festival during the 1980s. They co- sound, another factor in helping to get them to return. tuned performance style that makes their concerts espe- founded MAAM in 1982 to bring some of the groups they “The acoustics are superb for their kind of choral cially memorable. had seen in Boston to Mississippi. sound,” Garriott says. “They appreciated that we put them “The purity of their voices and the way that they blend “We decided we’d rather make our record collection in such an acoustically appropriate place for their sound.” together is so intense that it’s hard to imagine anything finer come alive by bringing the music to us (rather) than traveling The Tallis Scholars perform at St. Philip’s (5400 Old Canor more appealing,” Garriott says. to it,” Garriott says. ton Road) this Friday, March 15, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $30. In addition to regular tours around the world, the Tallis MAAM has brought some of the top early music per- In addition to Renaissance music, the group will also perform Scholars have also helped to increase awareness in Renaissance formers to Jackson over the past 30 years, including Musica works by contemporary composers Arvo Pärt and Eric Whitacre. music through Gimell, the group’s recording label. Founded Antiqua of Cologne and The Boston Camerata. They have For more information, visit ancientmusic.org.

A New Psychedelic by Briana Robinson

March 13 - 19, 2013

38

trying to fully describe his band’s music. “We’re indie-rock music with pop hooks.

After graduation, they just ended up settling in the city, which has naturally become part of the band’s sound. “We’re influenced by New Orleans,” Shirley says. “I don’t think our sound takes too much from it, but we’re inspired by it in that we’re trying to be less player-centric and be more song-centric. … Rather than the sound of New Orleans being our greatest influence, I think it’s really the attitude and culture of the place that’s more influential than anything.” The band Cardinal Sons, a trio of brothers, has created During the band’s an indie-rock aesthetic while being influenced mainly by first months of existence, psychedelic ’60s music. the brothers did things a bit backward. The first goal they We try to layer in a lot of synths and a lot tackled was releasing a four-song EP, called of organs. It’s pop music, but we play it very Cardinal Sons “Make an EP,” in November loudly,” he says. 2012. Later that month at Martin’s Lounge, Based in New Orleans currently, the they had their debut performance. The three brothers all grew up in Jackson, at- band has also shot and released two music tended St. Joseph Catholic School, and videos, for “Underdressed” and “October then went to college at Loyola University. Rolls.” The guys are working on a video for

COURTESY CARDINAL SONS

L

ast summer, the band e.company, which featured brothers Joe and David Shirley, went on an infinite hiatus. Their older brother, John, decided that it seemed like the perfect opportunity for them to make a brothers’ trio. “I didn’t want to see them continue on with gigs that they didn’t really care about. So I thought we could make something and make some music together,” John says. Cardinal Sons is made up of drummer David, 23; organist and synth player Joe, 25; and guitarist John, 28. Joe and John, who are the main songwriters for the band, cite the Beatles as a major and obvious influence. That general music era of the 1960s, especially psychedelic rock, has acted as a guide for the band’s musical direction. “We’re not as psychedelic as we want to be, but we’re definitely influenced by the melodies and instrumentation of the era for sure,” John Shirley says, although psychedelic is one of the very first words that he mentions when describing the music he loves to listen to and play. “The whole aim is to get weirder,” he says, with a laugh. Personally, however, he finds trouble

“Young Guns,” set for an April release. “One description of the EP is that it’s kind of like the base level of what we can do,” Shirley says. “Pretty much everything was recorded live, so it’s really basic. I think where we want to go next is a little bit out there, I suppose, where we have a little bit (of) different instrumentation rather than just the three instruments each of us play.” A listen to the (approximately) 17-minute long demo does not hint at the fact that it was recorded in less than two days with minimal rehearsal beforehand. While the songs aren’t particularly intricate, they nevertheless evoke polish. Still, Shirley insists that Cardinal Sons did not reach its full potential on the EP. Partly to make up for this, the band hopes to produce a full-length album this year. “Not only do we have enough material for it, but we want to make a true statement,” Shirley says. Cardinal Sons performs at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888) on March 15 at 9:30 p.m. Admission is $5 at the door. Visit cardinalsons.com to name your price and download “Make an EP.”


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9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2& bottled for 1domestic house wine beer

starting at •

•

•

•

pm

Thursday

March 14

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday

March 15

Dead Soliders (Americana, Alternative Country)

Saturday March 16

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, March 13th

PATRICK HARKINS

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover,

Thursday, March 14th

LISA MILLS

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover,

Friday, March 15th

FEARLESS FOUR

(Jazz/Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, March 16th

LUCKY TOWN ST. PADDY’S AFTER-PARTY

BILLY IUSO

(Rock/Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

2-for-1 Lucky Town Beer Tuesday, March 19th

CHARLES SCOTT

(Piano) 6:30 -9:30, No Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

St Paddys Blowout featuring Who’s Bad? (michael jackson tribute band)

with JAG, Rooster Blues, Furrows, Bluz Boys, DJ Stache, and the Larry Waters Duo

Tuesday

March 19

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner & DVDJ Reign

Wednesday

March 20

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE FREE WiFi 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

COMING

SOON March 29, 2013

Southern Komfort Brass Band

HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG! Till 7 Wednesday -Friday

2-FOR-1 • DRAFT BEER • WELL DRINKS • APPETIZERS!

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

-!2#( 7%$.%3$!9

COURTESY HAL JEANES

MUSIC | live

39


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

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bryan’s rant

Rick Ray 3rd Annual

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LIVE MUSIC SCHEDULE Thursday 3.14

Amazing Lazy Boi Band

Backlot Blowout

St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Party Saturday | March 16

Lizz Strowd 2:00-6:00p

TJ Burnham 6:30-10:30p

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friday 3.15

Sonny Rydell With Sorrento Ussury saturday 3.16

After Paddy featuring

Dexter Allen 10pm-Until

the best in sports over the next seven days

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music march 13 -19

wed | march 13 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | march 14 Casey & Stace 5:30-9:30p fri | march 15 Acoustic Crossroads 6:30-10:30p sat | march 16 Liz Strowd 2:00-6:00p T.J. Burnham 6:30-10:30p

March 13 - 19, 2013

sun | march 17 Evans Geno 4:00 - 8:00p

40

303 N. Farish Jackson, MS 601-983-1148

mon | march 18 Karaoke tue | march 19 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060â&#x20AC;ŠEâ&#x20AC;ŠCountyâ&#x20AC;ŠLineâ&#x20AC;ŠRd.â&#x20AC;Šinâ&#x20AC;ŠRidgeland Openâ&#x20AC;ŠSunâ&#x20AC;?Thursâ&#x20AC;Š11amâ&#x20AC;?10pm Friâ&#x20AC;?Satâ&#x20AC;Š11amâ&#x20AC;?Midnightâ&#x20AC;Š|â&#x20AC;Š601â&#x20AC;?899â&#x20AC;?0038

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

Looking for perhaps the biggest underdog to root for in the NCAA Tournament? Take a look at the Big South tournament champs Liberty Flames who have a 15-20 record.

THURSDAY, MAR 14 NBA (7-9:30 p.m. TNT): The Dallas Mavericks try to make a playoff push for the eighth spot in the Western Conference against the current top seed San Antonio Spurs.

MONDAY, MAR 18 NBA (7-9:30 p.m. ESPN): Featuring one of the best current NBA rivalries, this game has Paul Pierce and the Boston Celtics hosting LeBron James and the Miami Heat.

FRIDAY, MAR 15 College basketball (9-11 p.m. CBS): The University of Mississippi closes out day three of the SEC tournament against the winner of the Missouri versus Texas A&M/Auburn game.

TUESDAY, MAR 19 NHL (6:30-9:30 p.m. NBC Sports Network): Two faces of the league are on display as Alex Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals face off against Sydney Crosby and the Pittsburgh Penguins to try to get into the playoff hunt.

SATURDAY, MAR 16 College basketball (2:30-5 p.m. ABC): If Ole Miss advances Friday, their bubble hopes could hinge on winning their next game against Kentucky or the Arkansas/ Vanderbilt winner. SUNDAY, MAR 17 Documentary (8-10 p.m. ESPN): Another film in ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30 for 30 series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Survive and Advance,â&#x20AC;? features the 1982-83 North Carolina State basketball team that shocked the world by defeating a heavily favored Houston team for the NCAA Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball Tournament title.

WEDNESDAY, MAR 20 NHL (6:30-9:30 p.m. NBCSN): Your weekly hockey fix will be complete when the Minnesota Wild make the trip to Hockey Town USA to take on the Detroit Redwings. Someone should jump on this thought. In honor of March Madness, make up a bracket of 64 of the best things about Jackson, as voted on by the people, to crown the best thing about the metro. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


WEDNESDAY 3/13

Pub Quiz with Andrew

THURSDAY 3/14

Dead Irish Blues FRIDAY 3/15

Doug Frank’s Triple Threat

SATURDAY 3/16

St. Patrick’s Day Block Party SUNDAY 3/17

St. Paddy’s Ceili with Emerald Accent MONDAY 3/18

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 3/19

Open Mic with A Guy Named George

Intro100_JacksonFreePress_38P4C_v01.indd 1

2/13/13 12:40 PM

Project: Tarantula 100 Intro Ad - Jackson Free Press - March 2013 - 3/8P4C

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Size: Live: 7.083” x 6.167” Version: v01 Date: 02/13/13 Color: 4C Contact: Patrick Fee, Creative & Design Manager - pfee@mccormickdistilling.com Notes:

10 am - St. Brigid’s 2 pm - Spirits of the House 5 pm - Otis Lotus 8 pm - Pratty

March 17, 2013 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

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7IRHVIWYQIWXSNSFW$NEGOWSRJVIITVIWWGSQ

44

8LI.EGOWSR*VII4VIWW-RGMWER)UYEP3TTSVXYRMX])QTPS]IV-XMWXLITSPMG]SJXLIGSQTER]XSTVSZMHIIUYEP STTSVXYRMX]JSVEPPIQTPS]IIWERHETTPMGERXWJSVIQTPS]QIRX[MXLSYXVIKEVHXSVEGIGSPSVGVIIHVIPMKMSRKIRHIV WI\YEPSVMIRXEXMSRREXMSREPSVMKMREKIQEVMXEPWXEXYWQIRXEPSVTL]WMGEPHMWEFMPMX]TVIKRERG]QMPMXEV]SVZIXIVERWXEXYW SVER]SXLIVFEWMWTVSLMFMXIHF]WXEXISVJIHIVEPPE[8LMWTSPMG]EPWSTVSLMFMXWIQTPS]IIWJVSQLEVEWWMRKER]SXLIV IQTPS]IIWJSVER]VIEWSRMRGPYHMRKFYXRSXPMQMXIHXSVEGIVIPMKMSRWI\REXMSREPSVMKMREKISVHMWEFPIHWXEXYW



Laptop & iPads screen replacement  



Data backup, DC Jack repair  



Small business service calls 

7048 Old Canton Rd Ridgeland, MS  M‐F 9 am to 7 pm  Sat. 9 am to 5 pm 



Same day service 



We sell and buy used computers 

601‐977‐1008

“Work was completed as promised  and price was lower that other  stores. This is the second 5me I  have used them and am very sa5s‐ fied”  Ernest V. 


JOBS

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TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: Post an ad at jfpclassifieds.com, call 601-362-6121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-510-9019. Deadline: Mondays at noon. ,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

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jacksonfreepress.com

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45


xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf Npoebz

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 2 • 7:00-8:00 pm Yoga for Runners/Athletes

Uvftebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) • 6-7:15 pm Level 1

• 12-1 pm Level 1 • 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas • 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

• 9-10:15 am Classical Hatha Yoga • 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

March 13- 19, 2013

Xfeoftebz

Uivstebz

• 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Classical Hatha Yoga • 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

46

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

• 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing


Every Bunny Shops Atâ&#x20AC;Ś 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

601.960.3008 Food

10% OFF lunch & dinner â&#x20AC;˘ with this ad

Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10pm

Friday Forum

862 Avery Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 â&#x20AC;˘ ruchiindia.com

www.nandyscandy.com 1220 E. Northside Dr. Mon-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

601.362.9553

Find Us On Facebook

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY

Fellowship

730 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

Xf!Bsf!Qpqqjoh!Vq

Wine Wednesday - 10% OFF!

FX]VBc^_ on State Street

CdTbSPh=XVWc

Cftu!pg!Kbdltpo!Xjoofs!3123.3124!

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â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

Sizuin!'!Cmvft

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc

Uivstebz-!Nbsdi!25

gu/!Ifbwz!Esfbet boe!Mbssz!Kpiotpo Gsjebz-!!Nbsdi!26

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Tbuvsebz-!!Nbsdi!27

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Remember to visit our store for a larger selection of clothing and home items. We carry everything from womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trendy tops and cocktail dresses to maternity wear and business attire. Voted One of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Consignment Stores.

Fwfsz!Gsjebz!evsjoh!Mvodi!22!.4

COLONIAL MART SHOPPING CENTER 5070 Parkway Drive, Jackson

2211!Kpio!S/!Mzodi!Tusffu!}!Tvjuf!B Kbdltpo-!NT!}!87:/362/6333 uifqfohvjont/dpn

Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sat 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

Tbypqipojtu-!Bnpt!Csfxfs

601.991.0500

Appetizers 1/2 OFF! 2:00 - 4:00

wine & spirits

1 DAY ONLY

Fri. March 22 â&#x20AC;˘ 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR fondren cellars

bu!uif!Nfuspdfoufs!Nbmm

â&#x20AC;˘

APPETIZER

This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Highlights 360 Vodka (All Flavors) $14.99 (reg. $17.99) Eagle Rare Single Barrel Bourbon $24.99 (reg. $29.99)

Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

CWdabSPh=XVWc

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no

jacksonfreepress.com

koinoniacoffee.net

sharing, no carry out

$2 Pints

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B

633 Duling Avenueă&#x192;ťNext to Brentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 769ă&#x192;ť216ă&#x192;ť2323 ă&#x192;ť fondrencellars.com

47


Open All Of Spring Break

1/2 Off

Drop In Child Care

Authorized Dealer

$8.50 an Hour

XFinity TV, Xfinity Internet, & Xfinity Voice

Paint Your Own Mug!

Limit 1 Per Group

After School Care $55 a week

Call To Get Great Price

5352 Lakeland Suite 300 Flowood, MS

• Open Late • Ages 1-5 • State Licensed

No Money Down W/ Approved Credit

601.992.6553 FatCatCeramics.com

Se Habla Espanol

Mon - Sat • 11am - 8pm

1-877-536-9990

1155 Jackson Blvd Jackson, MS 39204 601.352.2662

HAIR STYLIST

Natural Hair • Extenstion • Cut & Color CEO of T Stylez Virgin Hair

Mac Rusling, Owner

601-362-0201

JEET KUNE DO FIGHT CLINIC 3 426 Tombigbee St. • 601.973.2400

ST. PADDY’S DAY BREAK IN BASH Saturday, March 16th

All ages are welcome.

Strategy : Theory and Application March 16-17, 2012 Jackson, MS

4920 Watkins Dr. • Hair & Things Salon 601.868.2040 • tstylezdesignz@gmail. com

Tuesday - Saturday • 10am-6pm mac@brewhahasupply.com Also On Facebook

(No One is Required to Spar: By Choice Only)

For more info contact Jeremy Gordon.

Jeremy@BoxersRebellion.com 262.994.3174

www.boxersrebellion.com

located inside of

LeFleur’s Gallery

4800 I-55 N Suite 17A • Jackson

(wrist bands for minors)

$5 Advance before 6:30 (all day/night access & pee pass) $10 At The Door after 6:30 Featuring:

Fearless Four (Starts at 6:30)

Huge Beer Selection ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC.FOOD.DRINK.PEOPLE!

NOW HIRING!

.543ISLOOKINGFORENERGETIC HARDWORKING CUSTOMERSERVICE ORIENTEDFOLKSWITHAFLAIRFOR THECREATIVE For application please visit www.goodsamaritancenter.org/jobs

MidTown
Location

114
Millsaps
Ave.
•
Jackson,
MS
39202
•
(601)
355-7458
 Wednesday
-
Friday
9:30
-
5:30
&
Saturday
10:00
-
4:00

Fondren
Location

3011
N.
State
St.
•
Jackson,
MS
39216
•
(601)
366-9633
 Monday
-
Friday
10am
-
6pm
Saturday
10am
-
5:30pm

Charm…

Not the only thing useful for getting lucky. (Feather boas, corsets and lingerie will have you shamrockin’!)

Romantic Adventures Jackson’s very nice, naughty store. 175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p www.shopromanticadventures.com

v11n27 - Paint the Town Green: All the St. Paddy's Music & Mayhem  

Paint the Town Green: All the St. Paddy's Music & Mayhem New Life for Trumpet Records?Exploring Éire: Traveling Ireland SpontaneouslyGet Sho...

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