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JACKSONIAN A. SHAE WILLIAMS

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t the restless age of 19, Adrenace “Shae” Williams enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps, beginning a journey of service that led her across the country until family and career brought her back to serve the community where she grew up. Born and reared in Jackson, Williams’ travels began with boot camp on Paris Island, S.C., followed by two years as a communication-center operator and computer technician at Camp Pendleton, Calif. Williams left the Marine Corps in 1995 and returned to Mississippi for a short stint at Jackson State University. Several semesters later, she transferred to Oklahoma University. That year, while on a school break, she met her future husband, fellow Jackson native Fredreca Williams. “Fredreca was in the Navy at the time, so I went right back into military life,” the 38-yearold says with a bemused smile. “I gave birth to our first son, Jairen, while stationed in Hawaii.” Two more children (daughters Jenesis and Jeniah) and multiple moves later, the Williamses returned to Jackson in 2009, when she was pregnant with their fourth child. “We came to Jackson for a baby shower because I’d never had a shower with my family— I’d always been away—(and) I was persuaded to stay,” she says, laughing. “My mother in-law, whom I dearly love, told me she didn’t want me traveling when I was so close to having the baby. So we stayed.” With newborn son Jaxcen in tow, the fam-

CONTENTS

ily moved to south Jackson and enrolled their school-aged kids in Jackson Academy. In July 2011, Williams began working for Mississippi Faith-Based Coalition for Community Renewal at New Horizon Church on Ellis Street. The Coalition”s primary mission is to provide counseling on home, health and auto insurance to low- and moderate-income families in Jackson and across the state. With services from financial literacy and foreclosureprevention counseling to volunteer income-tax preparation, the organization is vital to some Mississippi families and neighborhoods. “I started out as a volunteer,” Williams says. “(New Horizon) Bishop (Rev. Ronnie Crudup) wanted to utilize my talents in the best way possible, so I worked on the website.” Her skill set and devotion to the coalition’s mission led Williams to take over as executive director last year. She says she has touched more than 500 people by helping them qualify for mortgages or save their home from foreclosure. “I’ve always been a servant,” she says. “All the places I’ve been, the knowledge and skills I’ve gathered, when I came back, I knew what my job was.” In addition to her work at the coalition, Williams participates in the Leadership Jackson program. She likes seeing and being a part of Jackson’s evolution. “I’m happy to see the diversity of people here,” she says. “Jackson is becoming its own little melting pot.” —Genevieve Legacy

Cover photograph by Trip Burns.

10 Politics and Potholes

“My first priority is if I have to buy the asphalt myself, I’m going to fix some of the potholes on Hanging Moss (Road). I don’t mean that to be flippant. The mayor indicated that he is trying to do a new bond issue to get some of the streets repaved. This winter has been particularly bad for potholes. It’s something that very adversely impacts, in a very concrete way, a lot of people’s lives. A lot of people are getting their cars messed up because of these potholes. I would particularly like to see that this bond issue moves forward as indicated. I would like to make sure that we put in a very transparent and accountable measure for ranking which potholes get fixed first and which roads get fixed first.” —Melvin Priester Jr., “A Political Family”

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4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 16 .............................. COVER STORY 24 ...................................... HITCHED 26 .............................. DIVERSIONS 27 ....................................... 8 DAYS 28 .......................................... FILM 28 ............................... JFP EVENTS 30 ....................................... MUSIC 31 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 32 ..................................... SPORTS 33 ................................. ORGANICS 34 ......................................... FOOD 35 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 37 .............................. ASTROLOGY

COURTESY DARRIAN DOUGLAS; CHUCK JETT;

FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 23

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Between Man and His God

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very day throughout my Neshoba Central stint, until I graduated in 1979, some young person would come on the loud speaker and say a prayer. Put more accurately, a student would clear his or her throat through the crackly speakers and start reading “The Lord’s Prayer.” Inevitably, the kid sounded bored, and it seemed that few of us paid very close attention to the daily prayer that the teachers and administration pushed on us. We weren’t exactly inspired by this canned, forced prayer. And some of us, at least by the time we were in high school, knew that it was unconstitutional—because the government (which a public school is part of, like it or not) is not supposed to force students to listen to a prayer. Not a Muslim one. Not a Jewish one. Not a Christian one. Some really smart people knew that when they wrote the First Amendment, which includes two intertwining clauses to ensure that no one abridges our freedom of religion by trying to establish their own. Put simply, the government doesn’t get to pick or establish or force any particular faith or its prayers and practices, because that obviously endangers freedom of religion for all of us. This is an integral part of what it means to be American. So many of our ancestors became immigrants to the new world in the first place due to religious persecution back home. And much of that persecution was coming from someone claiming to be Christian of one flavor or another. They came here, in part, to worship free from government interference. And when they got here and got settled, they set up a U.S. Constitution to prevent that kind of religious dogma from happening again. But that’s not what the school-prayer warriors tell us. Instead, they twist and scheme and lie about basic American history and civics to get an official government-sanctioned prayer on public-school loud speakers or at

assemblies or even at the start of each class. That way, they tell us, God will be in the classroom. What most of them are really trying to do is to get votes from voters who don’t understand this basic American principle of religious freedom. In other words, they want votes from people who want the government to help them push their own particular religious beliefs on others. I hate to tell them, but the God many of us believe in does not need a canned prayer

We weren’t exactly inspired by the canned, forced prayer. on the loud speakers in order to be in school, a classroom or anywhere else. And what kind of message does it send to children to act like He (or She, if you prefer) does? It also teaches an uneducated lesson to stand up and scream that children need to be able to pray in schools—when anyone with half a brain knows that anyone can pray anytime they want. I do, and I know many of you do, too. You know, lying in bed, driving the car, climbing the front stairs to the office, climbing a steep rollercoaster hill, right before I get on a jet ski, when we go to the post office for checks. The right lesson is that we don’t need a piped-in, government-approved prayer to be faithful and spiritual. What is remarkable is that so many of

the people who demand school prayer in public schools are actually anti-government types, or say they are. They don’t want the government to give “entitlements” or protect the rights of people who do not believe, or love, the same way. Often they don’t want the government to regulate business safety or require a minimum wage. But they are willing to entrust this government that they hate with the power to choose one American’s preferred prayer over another and one religion over another in our schools and other public spaces. How does this make a lick of sense? Of course, these folks assume that the government will, of course, lean their direction and pick their prayer (forgetting how vehemently Christians fought each other back in the days when America was founded). But consider this: Why should a free government that we all pay into support the beliefs of some over others? Even if a majority of Christians could even agree, those who understand the Constitution know that it is never about the majority—it is about one person’s rights to believe, worship, speak, publish and exercise this remarkable freedom we Americans enjoy. Not just collectively, but as individuals with our own ideas and opinions. The U.S. Constitution is brilliant, and we must guard it at all cost. Likewise, if we believe in what America stands for, we must up for that one single child who is not Christian and who does not want to hear The Lord’s Prayer or any other prayer on the loudspeaker every day. Her family paid for that speaker, too, and the walls around her and the desk she sits at. The government, on behalf of a momentary majority, cannot be allowed to push a religion or a prayer on her. Sadly, tyranny is often pushed by the “majority” and even, too often, in the name of one religion or another, including Christianity. Remember the socalled Christian soldiers, the Ku Klux Klan, who quoted the Bible and prayed to God at

rallies where they planned violence against African Americans. Yes, that happened right here in a Mississippi where the majority voted to close the public schools rather than follow federal law to integrate them. Folks, the “majority” isn’t always right. My intense respect for the U.S. Constitution, including my belief in freedom of each of us to worship as we please, is exactly why I will stand against any establishment of religion by the government. Yes, that includes putting a crèche in front of City Hall. Yes, that includes school-sanctioned religion activities. Yes, that includes public schools and universities saying an organized collective prayer before classes and meetings. If we want America to continue to be great and free, we must respect and fight to maintain every single person’s constitutional rights. And that means each of us needs to stand firm against anyone trying to push their own personal theocratic dream on our schools and our government institutions. It’s wrong, and it’s un-American. I recently visited the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C., and watched a group of young people freely bowing their heads and praying near the statue, even as his engraved words about religious freedom circled them above, showing the great American juxtaposition at its finest. I’ll leave you with Jefferson’s words from a letter he wrote in 1802 to the Baptists of Danbury, Conn.: “Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should ‘make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,’ thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.” Amen, brother.

February 13 - 19, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Ronni Mott

Genevieve Legacy

R.L. Nave

Jacob Fuller

Mo Wilson

Mark Braboy

Anita Modak-Truran

Kimberly Griffin

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-winning writer and the JFP’s news editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. Ronni wrote the cover story.

Genevieve Legacy is an artist and writer who relocated from New York last August. She lives in Brandon with her husband, and son and one of Mississippi’s laziest dogs, a piebald hound named Dawa. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-3626121 ext. 12 or email rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Reporter Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He covers the city for the JFP. Email him at jacob@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Editorial intern Mo Wilson is a Millsaps College student. He enjoys pizza, the Internet, dancing alone is his bedroom, social-justice politics and giggling. He wrote an event blurb.

Mark Braboy is an English major at Jackson State University from Chicago, Ill. He is a staff writer for JSU’s Blue & White Flash newspaper and runs a blog (allredmusic. wordpress.com). He wrote a music feature.

Film reviewer Anita ModakTruran is a southern convert, having moved here from Chicago more than a decade ago with her husband and son. She loves the culture, cuisine and arts in these parts.

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.


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Your Turn: On Education

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February 13 - 19, 2013

eople have to care about it. You can lead the horse, but you can’t make it drink, remember? This state cultivates a culture that looks down on intellect as “elite� and prefers stupidity in protection of faith? As a defense against the outside world? I don’t know why but it is actively cultivated here. People have to make education a priority. Because it’s not just money we need, it’s political willpower and parental tolerance. Change is hard, and what we are doing isn’t working, but no one has the power and will to fix anything. Everyone just wants their department funded or themselves re-elected or whatever. Above all else, we need as close to a one-to-one ratio of students to teachers as we can get. If there is one thing above all else that we know helps students it’s having attention small group or one on one instruction. You can just work on it until that student gets it. This is the one universal thing that will always pay off. I’d like to see classes of maybe 10 kids average. ... In addition, I think we shouldn’t have a mandatory brick and mortar school system. Alternatives should be encouraged. I think we can go high tech in some places, online. I think we can put education in the hands of the people by supporting charters and homeschooling and co-ops the same as any public school. I think the old system of apprentices was a good one. There’s no reason for young adults to be in school until 18 unless they want to be. I think we can easily pay for excellent schools with tech for everyone by doing things like state lotteries, taxing casinos and yes, even decriminalizing and taxing marijuana. Colorado is on its way; yet Mississippi has long led the way in agriculture. Hell, we have the only legal place that grows it and studies it up in Oxford. Why are we letting them beat us to those millions?! ... I think there is no will to do what has to be done because there is too much to be made off the low wage uneducated and often incarcerated work force by corporations who have “invested� heavily in Mississippi’s Republican leadership. —Jenni Watson

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“THE CIRCUS ARRIVES WITHOUT WARNING …” On the last Sunday in January under a full moon, Center Court at Metrocenter Mall was magically transformed into a night circus. More than 1,500 rêveurs, dressed in black, red and white, and many wild circus and steampunk costumes, marveled at magicians, jugglers, mime artists, whimsical art, lighted hula hoops and a burlesque geisha. Masked Servitude bartenders served wine from Kats and craft beers from Capital City Beverage. In the old Victoria’s Secret, revelers sampled blackberry cocktails by Cathead Vodka and chose sparkly outfits from the N.U.T.S. pop-up shop. They wobbled to D.J. Phingaprint, with sound by Nat Duncan, under huge red balloons and lighted palm trees as a big-mama disco ball twirled. The guests sampled food from two dozen local restaurants and cheered the winners of the 154 Best of Jackson awards before disappearing back into the night.

A VERY SPECIAL THANK YOU TO: Restaurants and Caterers: Aladdin, Amerigo, Anjou, Babalu, BRAVO!, Broadstreet, Cake Pop Cuties, Campbell’s Bakery, Cerami’s, Char, Chico’s Tacos, Cool Al’s, Hickory Pit, Jaco’s Tacos, Lulu’s Sweet Shop, Mac’s Pizzeria, Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge, Pan-Asia, Pizza Shack, Sal and Mookies, Signa’s Grill, Sombra, State Street Barbeque, Two Sisters, Underground 119 and Walker’s Drive-In Performers & Pop-Ups: Artist Aemi Baggett, Artist Clay Hardwick, Artist Daniel Johnson, Artist Drew Landon, Artist Mallory Kay, Artist Melvin Priester Jr., Artist Sarah Baggett, DJ Phingaprint, Figment, Fortune Teller Peyton Wofford of Intuitive Starseed Readings, Greg Gandy of subSIPPI, Inky the Clown, Jezabelle von Jane and Magick City Sirens, Josh Hailey and Fridge Foto, Juggling by Micah Whitehead and Alan Orlicek, Laurel Isbister and Lazy Jane band, LED Hula Hooping by Tara Blumenthal and Daniel Irby, Magician Robert Day, Makeup by Emily Goode, Mime Artist, Miriam Lamar and Sarah Link, N.U.T.S.’ Traveling Circus Shop, PULPcon and The Southern Komfort Brass Band

Party Coordinators: Ariss King, David Sewell of Metrocenter, Erica Crunkilton, Kimberly Griffin, Samantha Towers and Tamika Smith Party Angels: Allie Jordan, Andrea “Smart Chick” Thomas, Angela Norris, Becky Morgan with Brown Bottling Company, Billie Harmony of the Magick City Sirens, Briana Robinson, Chris and Sarah Scarborough, Demetrice Sherman, Duane Smith, Stephen Barnette, Edward Cole II, Envy Jade of the Magick City Sirens, Fondren Art Gallery, Hinds County Sheriff ’s Deputies, Hope Mallard, Jackson Police Department, Jessica Gordon, Jessica Spears, Kathleen Mitchell, Kristin Brenemen, Latasha Willis, Lea Gunter, Lisa Rodenis, Loraine Steele, Mario Nevarez, Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., Metrocenter Security, Michele Smith Michael Raff and Greg Riley with the City of Jackson, Molly Lehmuller, Monique Martin, R.L. Nave, Ronni Mott, Sarah Baggett, Tiffany Paige, Tina Brooks, Trip Burns, Ursula Thompson, Nat Duncan Sound and Willie McClendon If you were left off, please email erica@jacksonfreepress.com.

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Thursday, Feb. 7 The University of Southern Mississippi announces Rodney Bennett, vice president of student affairs at the University of Georgia, as the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10th president. â&#x20AC;Ś U.S. senators debate whether Indian authorities should be able to prosecute non-Indians in domestic-abuse cases. Friday, Feb. 8 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Defense Fund founder and Director Marian Wright Edelman unveils a set of recommendations to end zero-tolerance school-discipline policies. â&#x20AC;Ś Syrian rebels bring their fight within a mile of Damascus. Saturday, Feb. 9 A shooting on Bourbon Street in New Orleans leaves four people wounded. â&#x20AC;Ś Former Vice President Dick Cheney accuses President Barack Obama of jeopardizing national security with substandard Cabinet-post candidates and degrading the military. Sunday, Feb. 10 A tornado causes widespread property damage and leaves at least 10 people injured in Hattiesburg and surrounding Forrest and Marion counties. â&#x20AC;Ś Flights resume at major airports in the northeast after a massive blizzard brought up to 3 feet of snow, killing at least 15 people.

February 13 - 19, 2013

Monday, Feb. 11 The state Legislature passes SB 2806, which adds the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural retailâ&#x20AC;? to the tourism project definition to qualify an outlet mall for funds from the tourism project sales-tax incentive. â&#x20AC;Ś Pope Benedict VXI announces his resignation during a routine morning meeting of Vatican cardinals.

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Tuesday, Feb. 12 The Mississippi House and Senate pass separate bills to allow the state to hire private companies to collect overdue child support. â&#x20AC;Ś North Korea conducts its third nuclear test in defiance of United Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warnings. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Home Brewing Comes to a Head by R.L. Nave

I

f Kevin Kowalewski knew what he knows now about Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home-brewing laws, he might not have moved here from the St. Louis area in August 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was kind of shocked. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize there were any states where home brewing is illegal,â&#x20AC;? Kowalewski said. Mississippi and Alabama are the last two states where the legality of making homemade beer is in question. Hopefully, for hobbyists like Kowalewski, an effort to clarify the law and make home brewing legal in Mississippi will succeed this year. Raise Your Pints, the beer connoisseurs who helped raised the alcohol-content limit of beer last year, is once again in the forefront of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (alcohol-by-weight) bill is really helping craft brew culture,â&#x20AC;? said Craig Hendry, president of Raise Your Pints. Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson, sponsored the legislation, which passed the Senate last week. Rep. David Baria, D-Bay St. Louis, has a companion bill in the Mississippi House. To legally brew beer in the state, a person has to have a $1,000 permit from the Mississippi Department of Revenue. The law, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow such permits for home brewers, which leaves home brewers facing possible fines if caught. Horhnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill would differentiate between commercial sellers and hobbyists by exempting individuals who make less than 100 gallons and households making less than 200 gallons of suds per year from the state beer regulations. Hobbyists could not sell their home brews, and the law would not apply to â&#x20AC;&#x153;dryâ&#x20AC;? counties, where any sale of alcohol is illegal.

R.L. NAVE

Wednesday, Feb. 6 The Coast Guard completes cleanup of the oil spill on the Mississippi River near Vicksburg caused when two barges hit a bridge Jan. 27. â&#x20AC;Ś President Barack Obama nominates businesswoman and former engineer Sally Jewell as secretary of the interior.

¹)T´SAGREASEDPIGALREADY 3OMEBODY UP ON HIGH AL READY KNOWS WHO´S GOING TOGETTHISCONTRACT²

Mac Rusling, owner of Brewhaha Homebrew Supply Co. at Lefleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gallery Shopping Center in Jackson, said his customers are proof that the beer culture in Mississippi is improving.

About 750,000 people home brew in the United States, according to the Boulder, Colo.-based American Homebrewers Association. Novices can purchase a starter kit for about $80 and spend as much as $45 on one 5-gallon batch of beer. Jackson native Mac Rusling never made his own beer until 1973 when he bumped into a buddy carrying a sack full of beer-making ingredients and asked for the recipe. In December, he took his love of home brewing to the next level and opened Brewhaha, a home-brewing supply store in Jackson. Given the ambiguity in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home brewing law, Rusling said he was nervous about opening the shop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt like it was time,â&#x20AC;? Rusling said. Rusling considers himself a traditionalist,

preferring to make dark-hued Vienna lagers, while other hobbyists such as Kowalewski like to experiment with ingredients not ordinarily associated with beer, such as bananas, pecans and orange peels. Kowalewski, who says he makes a decent American-style lager thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweet and slightly hoppier than macro-brewed lagers, also wants to experiment with ingredients that are unique to Mississippi and the American South, such as persimmon and Satsuma peel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a science to it and an art to it,â&#x20AC;? Kowalewski said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have total control over what goes into your final product. You can make something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than what you can get commercially.â&#x20AC;? Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.

doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need Keep M ississippi any more bad publicity. Lately, national media comour Legislature to irate Mississippi pared marsupials and a lawmakfacial hair to copulating Out of the erâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sshrimp. Media again took aim again last Friday when groundHeadlines skeepers inadvertently hoisted a Rebel flag at the Mississippi State Supreme Court. Here are a few suggestions to keep Mississippi out of the national spotlight:

â&#x20AC;˘ Require the Legislature to convene Thursday evenings during broadcasts of ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dramatic series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scandal.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;˘ Have Gov. Phil Bryant talk about anything other than his disdain for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obamacare.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Pass a law to exempt Mississippi from Google News searches. â&#x20AC;˘ Actually do something to improve the quality of health care and public education in the state. â&#x20AC;˘ Officially change the name of Hattiesburg to Johannesburg, install Nelson Mandela as mayor, and bring peace and prosperity to the nation and the world.


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by Ronni Mott

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ith Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abor- nold, R-Booneville, introduced the muchtion facility facing permanent maligned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Protection of the Human Person closure due to a law passed Act,â&#x20AC;? which would have made it illegal to during the 2012 legislative create a human-animal hybrid by outlawing session, other womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive rights the introduction of any non-human cells to a may be fairly safe during this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s session. human egg during in-vitro fertilization. Unlike last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s barrage of bills seeking to The bill also sought to â&#x20AC;&#x153;provide proteclimit those rights, this year, only a handful of tion for the inalienable right to life of every the usual suspects introduced the usual pro- human being at every stage of development.â&#x20AC;? life legislation. Most of the bills never made The bill would have made abortion doctors it out of committee. felons, redefined zygotes and embryos as One measure that is still kicking is â&#x20AC;&#x153;pre-bornâ&#x20AC;? children, severely restricted inSenate Bill 2795, which seeks to put restric- vitro fertilization procedures and outlawed tions on drugs used to induce first-trimes- human cloning. It also sought to preclude ter abortions. Doctors prescribe the drugs, abortions from any health-insurance plan mifepristone (formerly known as RU-486) sold in the state and outlawed using state and misoprostol, as late as nine weeks after a funds for abortions. missed menstrual period; however, SB 2795 This sessionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartbeatâ&#x20AC;? bill also bit would shorten that window to seven weeks. the legislative dust, as did its 2012 predecesIn addition, the bill would force women tak- sor. HB 6 would have outlawed abortion of ing the drugs to see a fetus with a detecttheir doctors at least able heartbeat and four times, which opwould have made ponents say will make it mandatory to detheir use prohibitively termine whether a expensive, especially heartbeat exists prior for uninsured women. to an abortion. DocIt bars women from tors can detect a fetal taking misoprostol at heartbeat as early home, which is the as six weeks into a current practice. womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pregnancy Several pieces of pro-life legislation The bill also never made it out of committee in the (often before the prevents doctors from Mississippi Legislature this year. woman knows she is prescribing the two pregnant) with invamedications for any use not approved by the sive procedures such as a transvaginal ultraU.S. Food and Drug Administration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Off- sound. The timing contradicts the landmark labelâ&#x20AC;? prescribing is common and legal; the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court Roe v. Wade deciFDA has estimated doctors write up as many sion, which guarantees a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to an as one in five prescriptions for uses other abortion until the point of viability, about 23 than those officially approved. or 24 weeks of pregnancy. The Mississippi chapter of the AmeriRep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, who can Congress of Obstetricians and Gyne- sponsored the heartbeat bill, also made cologists strongly objects to the bill. another stab at personhood legislation â&#x20AC;&#x153;SB 2795 is a flagrant interference in this year, despite the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voters having the physician-patient relationship and in the soundly rejected the concept in a ballot refpractice of good medicine, which should erendum. In November 2011, 58 percent alone be sufficient grounds for defeat of the of Mississippi voters said no to personhood, bill,â&#x20AC;? the organization stated in a release, add- which seeks to amend the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constituing that SB 2795 â&#x20AC;&#x153;confuses â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;FDA approvedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tion to define human eggs as people from with accepted medical standard of care. The the moment of fertilization. release lists several conditions for which docDespite the votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rejection, Sen. Joey tors prescribe the drugs, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;postpar- Fillingane, R-Sumrall, (who introduced SB tum hemorrhage, still a primary cause of 2795 this year) filed a bill to reintroduce death for women following childbirth.â&#x20AC;? personhood in the 2012 session, and Gipson HB 819 was among the pro-life bills sponsored a similar action this year. Neither that did not survive the Feb. 5 deadline for bill made it to the chamber floor for a vote. the Legislature to act on bills in the chambers Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni where they originated. Rep. William Ar- Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

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DISH | Candidate

A Political Family: Melvin Priester Jr. by Jacob D. Fuller

What did you learn while living in San Francisco that you think could work in Jackson? I think I’ve learned in San Francisco

February 13 - 19, 2013

Melvin Priester Jr.

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Running for: Ward 2 City Council Age: 34 Political experience: Helped coordinate his father’s judicial campaign in 2010 Education: Murrah High School 1997; Harvard University 2001, bachelor’s in social studies; Stanford Law School 2004 Profession: Lawyer at Priester Law Firm Family: Single; Father is Hinds County Judge Melvin Priester Sr.

how better to appreciate what we have in be mined effectively. If we can make certain I also would, on Election Day, make it Jackson. The process of me moving back to online resources of Jackson more dynamic, a real priority to work with either whoever Jackson, it wasn’t like I picked up one day I think it would help people do a lot. will become the new mayor, or assuming and moved back to Jackson. My grandMayor (Harvey) Johnson (Jr.) wins, workmother was 99, and she ing with his office to make was bed-ridden. So I sure that we roll back the started to come back in lack of civility that I think extended streaks: a couple has taken root at City Hall. of weeks here and there, I think one of the reato help take care of her. sons we have situations like When I came back, we had with Sam’s (Club I’d go to things like the announcing it is moving North Midtown Arts out of the city) is that Center, or Seven Studios. people either aren’t talking Being in a place like San to each other enough, or Francisco, where you do they’re not talking to each literally have some of the other enough in a civil best artists or musicians manner. People on city and cultural things in council right now often the world, you get an eye complain that the mayor where you can go, “Oh doesn’t let them have acmy God, the things that cess to department heads. are going on here are just He wants city council as world-class.” people to go through the Jackson, for a city mayor’s office. We need of 175,000 people, has to be able to talk to each an absolutely world-class other. We need to be able arts and culture scene. It’s to be a team. an amazingly collaborative group of people who Why is this a problem work very hard to not be for the Council? bound by genre or racial Because we have background. It’s a real a strong-mayor, weakMelvin Priester Jr. is a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School, and the son of a Hinds County district judge.This May, Priester example of when people council form of governhopes to add Ward 2 City Councilmen to his resume. work together. ment, that often causes Being in San Fransome tension between cisco gave me the conpeople. I think what we, fidence to (say), “I want to be associated If you are elected, day one, what as city councilmen, have to do is recogwith these people, because what they are is your first priority? nize our role. We are a legislative body, doing here is just as good as what they are My first priority is if I have to buy the but we are also ambassadors for this city. doing in the Bay Area.” Now, there are asphalt myself, I’m going to fix some of the I’ve talked to members of the Missisfewer people doing it, so you may not get potholes on Hanging Moss (Road). I don’t sippi Delegation to the state Legislature, to have the volume of activity, but you have mean that to be flippant. and they often talked about how we somethe parts there. Learning how to appreciThe mayor indicated that he is trying times shoot ourselves in the foot, in terms ate that is one of the main things I learned to do a new bond issue to get some of the of getting things from the state, because in San Francisco. streets repaved. This winter has been partic- we’re not able to present our city leadership The other things that I’d say I learned ularly bad for potholes. It’s something that as organized, as a team, as a competent in San Francisco, in terms of politics and very adversely impacts, in a very concrete body. That has to stop. governance, specifically, is the extent to way, a lot of people’s lives. A lot of people We have for too long fought old fights. which it is possible now to make govern- are getting their cars messed up because of We see ourselves in battle with Madison or ment very user-friendly for people. It goes these potholes. Clinton or the rest of Hinds County. We see from a variety of things: from just simply I would particularly like to see that ourselves in battle with the state Legislature, turning parking meters to devices that this bond issue moves forward as indicated. because of current acts and because of hiscan take credit cards so people are willing I would like to make sure that we put in a toric acts. At the end of the day, the way you to pay to park instead of just walking off very transparent and accountable measure get out of hole is: You’ve got to stop digging. because they don’t have change; to making for ranking which potholes get fixed first You’ve got to start saying: “I’m going to keep sure that any city service that needs to be and which roads get fixed first. in mind how we got here, so I don’t make accessed can be accessed online, and (that There’s a perception, rightly or wrong- the same mistakes over again, but we’re goit has) a well-done Web page. ly, that certain parts of town gets more at- ing to turn a new page. We’re going to be I think one of the things that really tention that other parts of town. I think it’s on the same page, and not sort of have these frustrates a lot of people that are trying important for us to develop and have pro- public squabbles that we have had before.” to do things in Jackson, is that they often cedures in place so that we make sure that Read more of this interview and com(say), “I would do it legally if I just knew Ward 2 is getting as much attention on the ment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller how to do it right.” That is an area that can road front as Ward 1 and Ward 7, etcetera. at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. TRIP BURNS

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ttorney Melvin Priester Jr. first dove into politics when he helped manage his father’s campaign for Hinds County Court judge in 2010. Melvin Priester Sr. won that election. Now, Junior is following with a bid for the Jackson City Council seat for Ward 2. Priester spent four years after graduating from Stanford Law School working at a San Francisco firm before moving back to Jackson. Since deciding to run for city council, Priester said he has turned his attention to neighborhood associations. He said he has visited with one to two community groups every day for weeks, gauging what people want to see from local government. Priester said he sees a need for the city to make the process of taking over abandoned properties easier and to allow community organizations to get involved in the process. The Jackson Free Press caught up with Priester at his family’s law firm, where he works. Priester wants to focus on making the most of what Jackson has. He said he’d like to see the city’s 3-1-1 system allow citizens more access to tracking other people’s complaints and issues. He also said he wants to see the city open Lake Hico to the public. The lake, located off Northside Drive, was closed to the public in 1968, shortly after black people began to use it. Jackson Public Schools own the land, and currently lease Lake Hico to Entergy Mississippi as a cooling pond. Priester believes it is time to reopen the lake to bring Jacksonians together. It’s that type of connectedness and openness that Priester says he wants to help bring to the city.


LEGISLATURE: Week 5

The Wrong Roads? by R.L. Nave

Most Gun Bills Shot Down An Outlet for Tax Dollars wage of $13 per hour for sales associates. The smoke has cleared on the blaze of What some people consider a retail Sen. Hob Bryan, D-Amory, praised more than 30 gun-related bills introduced oasis now under construction received a the project as a potential economic since the start of the legislative session. boost courtesy of Mississippi taxpayers. boon, but questioned whether giving tax Now, just only a handful of gun bills Last week, the Mississippi Sen- incentives to a company that has already remain. Most notably, HB 485, would ex- ate passed a bill to give $24 million in begun work is a good investment. empt conceal-carry permits from the state’s tax credits to the developers of Outlets “If we’re going to give $24 million public-records laws. at Bloomfield, a 325,000-square-foot to this development, how do we say no “Simply because the document is in shopping center near where interstates to the next company that comes along possession of the government does not, in 55 and 20 meet in Pearl. and wants help with their shopping cenmy mind, make it a public document,” Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl and spon- ter?” Bryan asked. the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Mark Baker, R- sor of the bill said the project would Bryan said the new shopping center Brandon, told the would simply reAssociated Press shuffle retail activin January. Baker’s ity in the Jackson bill is now before metro rather than the Senate, where create new derapid passage is mand for services. expected. He added that the Other gun state “gave away bills include HB the country store 958, sponsored and the back 40 by Rep. Bubba and everything Carpenter, which else” to attract carwould permit makers Nissan and two staff memToyota and their bers per school to automobile plants have a concealed into Mississippi. firearm on school Kirby regrounds. sponded by preRep. Mark dicted that the Formby, R-Picashopping center yune, sponsored would generate one of the last re- Some Mississippi lawmakers want to expand prayer in public schools. more money in maining bills dieconomic activity recting Mississippi to ignore federal law. generate between 1,500 and 1,600 jobs, that what the state is investing. HB 625 nullifies federal laws seek- plus another 300 temporary jobs for Yates also built the Nissan plant in ing to regulate guns, ammo and accesso- construction workers. Canton and the Beau Rivage casino in ries and provides penalties for violating Kirby added that the 80-plus shops, less than one year. the act. Finally, a bill from Rep. Andy located next to Bass Pro Shops and the “If we pass this bill, you can be shopGipson, R-Braxton, would exempt sales Mississippi Braves stadium, would in- ping there in November,” Kirby told his tax on firearms and ammunition during clude Saks Fifth Avenue, Banana Repub- fellow senators. Mississippi Second Amendment Week- lic and Coach, among other high-end reComment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. end in September tailers, and the jobs would pay an average Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. FLICKR/CADDY CORNER

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ontrary to the popular belief held in some corners of Mississippi, kids who say a prayer before class won’t become the targets of Obama administration drone attacks. Still, some Mississippi legislators want to make sure prayer has a legal place in public schools. The Constitution already permits students to pray at school, but SB 2633 would extend the right in Mississippi to student-led prayer to “limited public forums” such as athletic events, commencement ceremonies and morning announcements. Sponsored by Sen. Chris McDaniel, R-Ellisville, the bill would also prohibit schools from punishing kids who pray or express religious viewpoints in class work. Bear Atwood, legal director of the Mississippi ACLU, said that the law could be an end-run around the prohibition on school-led religious expression. Not only does she believe schools would eventually encourage students to participate, but also that broadcasting over loud speakers would be an unconstitutional use of school time and resources. “Every child in the school, regardless of their religion, is going to hear it,” Atwood said. It’s a road Mississippi has been down before. In 1996, a federal court ruled that Pontotoc County School District could not broadcast prayers over its schools’ public-address systems. U.S. District Court Judge Neal Biggers Jr. ruled that the practices of the Pontotoc County schools were an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment’s separation of church and state provisions. Besides, Atwood adds: “Parents have a right to direct who gives their children religious education.”

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TALK | business

Farish on Thin Ice, Fondren Getting Pub by Jacob D. Fuller

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Pub Coming to Fondren Fondren will soon get the craft-beer-centered pub some local businesspeople have believed that the neighborhood has needed for a long time. Marty Clapton, owner of Clapton Realty, and Wilson Hood, leasing manager at the Mattiace Company, have joined forces to open the pub. They are keeping some information, including the pub’s name, from the public for the next few weeks, though, Hood said. “We don’t want to put out too much information regarding timing and that kind of stuff until we get a little further along,” Hood told the Jackson Free Press Feb. 11. Farish Street developers may be on thin ice with their The pub, located landlord, the Jackson Redevelopment Authority, but JRA board members aren’t talking. in the Fondren shopping center at the intersection of Lakeland Mott returned a call to the Jackson Free Drive and Old Canton Road, on the corner Press Feb. 1. When asked about Farish Street, between Rainbow Co-op and Cups, will Mott again said that all media calls needed focus on selling craft beers on tap for locals to go through Mims. When told that Mims looking for a good drink, Clapton said. said he did not handle JRA interviews, Mott He added that the bar will offer pubsaid, “(Mims) told me something different style appetizers like pimento fritters and last week.” boiled peanuts, and small entrees like a Mott then said that he needed to speak blackened chicken sandwich, but it won’t to Mims again, and asked for a list of ques- attempt to compete with the multitude of tions so that he could make sure he answered restaurants located in Fondren. them correctly. This reporter informed Mott “We just want to be known as the bar that providing questions to a source prior place, focused more toward young profesto an interview is against JFP policy. Mott sionals,” Clapton said. “We want to have said that he would speak to Mims and call that aspect where you can go somewhere afback Feb. 4. ter work, sit down, have some good beer and The JFP has not heard back from Mott, have that food option.” and he has not returned messages left at the Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob JRA office since Feb. 4. D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. that his office does not handle media relations for the JRA. Mims said he would let Mott know that. JRA board member Beneta Burt told this reporter during a phone interview that she needed to defer any questions to Mott or Chairman Ronnie Crudup. Attempts to contact Crudup have been unsuccessful.

TRIP BURNS

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he Jackson Redevelopment Authority had some big questions for the Farish Street Group at the monthly JRA meeting in January. JRA board members haven’t divulged where the quasi-governmental agency stands in regard to its contract with the developers since that Jan. 23 meeting, though. JRA owns the land and holds the Farish Streets Group’s lease on the historic property. At the meeting, board members and board attorney Zach Taylor said that the Farish Street Group failed to meet certain deadlines that were in their contract. As a result, the JRA could declare the Farish Street Group, headed by principal investor David Watkins, in breach of contract if the board chooses to do so. “There are obligations under the lease that (the Farish Street Group) have with the authority that have not been performed,” Taylor said at the meeting. “There was a schedule for completing renovation of buildings. That schedule has not been met and is way behind.” Members also mentioned reading a story in the Jackson Free Press revealing that The Farish Street Group’s engineers had discovered there is no foundation in the building the developers planned to renovate for the B.B. King’s Blues Club. Newly reappointed JRA Executive Director Willie Mott said that the JRA, which owns the building, had heard this news from The Farish Street Group, but the board needed to see the proof of the findings from the engineers. This reporter spoke to Mott after the meeting and requested an opportunity to interview him later that week. Mott said that all media requests to speak with him needed to go through City of Jackson Communications Director Chris Mims’ office. When this reporter called Mims to request an interview, Mims laughed and said

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Creamy Black History

C

ream-O-Wheat Man: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Greetings, black history enthusiasts. This is my favorite time of the year because I get to become a spokesperson for black history in America. Allow me to be your trusted guide as I share with you a Creamy Black History Moment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The story of Crispus Attucks (a black man who was one of the first martyrs of the American revolution) was passed on to me by my grandpa Cream-O-Wheat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My great, great granddaddy Cream-O-Wheat and Crispus Attucks worked as kitchen servants at a pub somewhere in colonial Boston. While serving hungry customers bowls of hot and creamy CreamO-Wheat, they heard some commotion in the heart of the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;According to great, great granddaddy Cream-O-Wheat, the ruckus started after a crowd of American colonists confronted a sentry who fussed at a boy about his complaints that a British officer did not pay a barberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The colonists threw snowballs at the soldiers, and a riot started like a hot pot of bubbling Cream-O-Wheat. Crispus Attucks wanted to join a group of armed colonists and fight the British soldiers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great, great granddaddy Cream-O-Wheat warned Attucks that the conflict between the Americans and British was an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; conversation, and that black slave servants need to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122; their way out of this hoo-ha foolishness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyway, Attucks got involved with the angry colonists, and a British soldier shot him down. Thus, he became the first American casualty in the Boston Massacre of March 5, 1770. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the rest is Creamy Black History.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Politicalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ³œ+HDUWEURNHQÂś0LFKHOOH2EDPDDWWHQGLQJIXQHUDORI+DGL\D 3HQGOHWRQ,JXHVVWKHRWKHUPXUGHUYLFWLPVGLGQÂśWEUHDNKHU KHDUW0RVWRIWKH&KLFDJRPXUGHUYLFWLPVLQ  ZHUH\RXQJEODFNPDOHV,VVKHDWWHQGLQJWKLVIXQHUDOWRPDNHD SROLWLFDOSRLQW"´

February 13 - 19, 2013

°&ORMER2EPUBLICANCONGRESSMANAND4EA0ARTYFAVORITE*OE7ALSHOF )LLINOISREGARDINGTHE½RSTLADY´SPLANSTOATTEND0ENDLETON´SFUNERAL

14

Why it stinks: Hadiya Pendleton, 15, was fatally shot in the back in a Chicago playground Jan. 28 in a neighborhood close to where the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family once lived. Just a week before, the high-school sophomore had performed at the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inauguration with her dance troop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despite the heavy security because of the attendance of first lady Michelle Obama and other dignitaries, Hadiyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral at the Greater Harvest Baptist Church only occasionally touched on politics and the gun violence that ended Hadiyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, instead focusing on a 15-year-old girl whose smile lit up the room,â&#x20AC;? The Chicago Tribune reported. As Pendletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father reportedly said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t political. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal.â&#x20AC;?

If He Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Serve, Anderson Should Retire

O

n Monday, Pope Benedict XVI shocked Roman Catholics around the world by announcing his retirement at the end of February. In making the announcement to a group of cardinals, Benedict, who became pope eight years ago, said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to govern ... both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me.â&#x20AC;? It was a shocking announcement not only its suddenness or even in its rarenessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Benedictâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is the first voluntary papal resignation in nearly 600 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but in its courageousness. We could use some of that courageousness here in Jackson. District 2 Supervisor Doug Anderson infrequently attends the bi-monthly meetings of the Hinds County Board of Supervisors. When he does attend, he rarely speaks. When he speaks, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never above a whisper. So when Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or, more precisely, when his daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;announced Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resignation in early December after nearly two decades on the board, the news seemed welcome. After all, Anderson has been sick for a long time now, having suffered at least two strokes. In recognizing Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 36-year-long tenure as a public servant, which includes the last 19 on the

Hinds County board, fellow Supervisor Peggy Hobson-Calhoun said she hoped Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retirement from the rigors of public service would have a positive effect on his physical health. Then, abruptly, Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;again, through his daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;changed his mind about stepping down in early January. One might assume that upon reflection, Anderson was reinvigorated by his sense of duty to serve out his term and would return to the board rejuvenated and ready to work. But since rescinding his resignation, Anderson has continued being a non-contributing member of the board, often missing meetings and hardly ever making a meaningful contribution to the proceedings. Stubbornly remaining on the board is not only likely deleterious to Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own health, but is also a disservice to his District 2 constituents, some of whom have given up on trying to access county services through the office of their elected representative. If Anderson is able to complete the responsibilities he swore to carry upon earning re-election 2011, we applaud him for dutifully serving out his term. But if he cannot, Anderson should step aside and allow the citizens of District 2 the opportunity once again have active representation on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


JOE ATKINS

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc.

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A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Organizing in the South

South of Walmart in Madison

T

Listings 2/14 –

OUGALOO – I’m a Catholic now, but I grew up in the Pentecostal Holiness Church. My grandfather was a Holiness preacher. I know about revivals. Preachers exhort, and people respond. They sing, they shout, they come to the altar and they pray. Everything seems possible at a revival. People can conquer the world at a revival. They feel they’re not alone. They look around and see the spirit flowing through the congregation. When it’s over, they file out into the night like so many Christian soldiers “marching as to war.” That revival spirit invigorated civilrights activists in the 1960s. Think of all the reverends who led that movement: Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph Abernathy, Hosea Williams. The march on Selma in 1965 began in a church. Think of all the churches the racists burned hoping to kill the movement. Any social movement in the South needs religion as part of its DNA if it’s going to succeed. What was true for the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s is true for the labor movement today. Labor organizing in the South must be a “civil rights crusade,” Congress of Industrial Organizations leader Philip Murray said many years ago. The spirit of revival certainly was in the air at Tougaloo College’s Holmes Hall Jan. 29, where a crowd of 200 or more gathered to show support for Nissan workers seeking a union election at the giant plant in Canton. Preachers, workers and activists talked of labor rights as civil rights. A men’s choir fired things up with “Look, Oh Happy Day” and other songs. “I pastor people who work at Nissan,” Bishop Ronnie Crudup of the New Horizon International Church told the crowd. “I’m outraged that in 2013—this is not 1930—intimidation and threats could be used on citizens in the state of Mississippi. We say to Nissan, `This is unbecoming (of) you. Allow the union to give their side, and allow workers to hear both sides.’” The rally at Tougaloo College—a place rich in civil-rights history—was the latest community response to the United Auto Workers’ years-long organizing effort. The Nissan plant in Canton is ground zero in its struggle to break through the wall of nonunionized, foreign-owned auto plants in the South. Success or failure could be pivotal not only to the UAW’s future but also the future of the labor movement in this country. Nissan’s worldwide workforce is largely unionized, but CEO Carlos Ghosn has strongly resisted union efforts here in Mississippi and Tennessee. Workers in Canton say they’re subjected to endless anti-union meetings with management, though Nissan has denied these allegations. “Plant closings and layoffs are things they talk about,” Nissan worker James

Brown said. “If Nissan has an anti-union video, we’re asking the UAW to show a prounion video. It’s not just about money. It’s about retirement, health care.” It’s also about respect and human dignity, workers said at the rally. They told of arbitrary decisions by management to reduce pension benefits, change work hours, delay or eliminate pay raises, and expand the plant’s temporary workforce. Nissan officials insist that direct relations between management and employees are best, not “third party” representation by a union. Ironically, Mississippi’s anti-union governor, Republican Phil Bryant, has actually encouraged outside (also known as “third”) parties to help prevent unions from coming to Mississippi auto plants, reported the Memphis Commercial Appeal. When the Freedom Riders arrived in Mississippi a half-century ago, their task to integrate what historian James Silver called the “closed society” must have seemed impossible to most. Nowhere was the resistance to racial integration stiffer. To succeed they had to appeal to the nation’s conscience, its sense of right and wrong. Theirs had to be a broad social movement that involved more than integrating a water fountain or theater. To succeed, the labor movement must be about more than paychecks. “Human rights are worker rights, and worker rights are human rights,” Mississippi’s pro-labor, fighting priest, Rev. Jeremy Tobin, told the crowd Jan. 29. Workers have a legal and a human right to organize, to speak as one voice across the table from management on issues that affect their lives. They should not be intimidated and threatened for exercising that right. Back in the 1930s, the lowest-paid workers in the southern economy—sharecroppers and tenant farmers—organized together as the biracial Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union, and they won key battles in getting plantation owners in the Mississippi and Arkansas Delta to recognize their rights. They did this despite gun-toting vigilantes who tried to stop them. A STFU rally was like “a southern evangelical revival,” Mississippi-bred historian Elizabeth Anne Payne has written. “Fiery sermons, passionate exhortations, and emotional hymns … gave testimony about the power of the STFU in Holiness style, witnessing that the Holy Spirit could instantly transform lives through the union.” I saw some of that spirit at Tougaloo College Jan. 29. A veteran journalist who teaches at the University of Mississippi, Joe Atkins is author of “Covering for the Bosses: Labor and the Southern Press” and winner of the Mississippi Association for Justice’s 2011 Consumer Advocate Award. His blog is laborsouth.blogspot.com. He can be reached at jbatkins@olemiss.edu.

ALL STADIUM SEATING for Thur.

Beautiful Creatures PG13 opens 2/14

Thur. 2/21

Warm Bodies PG13 3-D Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters R

A Good Day To Die Hard R opens 2/14

Mama

Safe Haven PG13 opens 2/14 3-D Escape From Planet Earth PG opens 2/15 Escape From Planet Earth (non 3-D) PG opens 2/15 Identity Thief

R

Side Effects

R

PG13

Zero Dark Thirty R Les Miserables PG13 Django Unchained

R

Parental Guidance

PG

Lincoln

PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

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Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

6A0=3E84F

15


TRIP BURNS

From Punishment to Healing Moving Mental-Health Care Home

by Ronni Mott

Critics of the state’s mental-health care system say the state relies too much on big institutions such as the Mississippi State Hospital at Whitfield, pictured.

J

February 13 - 19, 2013

ennifer Michaels* traces her mental-health problems back to Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, when she was 12 years old. “We had 9 feet of water, and we had a one-story house,”

she said. Michaels was living with her grandmother at the time, but during the storm they went to her mother’s second-floor apartment on the east side of New Orleans, near Lake Pontchartrain. There, they watched the water rise. She remembers doing homework a day after the storm, because she didn’t want to make her teacher mad. Even when she saw cars disappearing under the murky water, she thought that the school bus would pick her up the next day. A week later, a boat rescue moved them to a bridge to wait all day in the broiling August sun. Then a military truck picked them up and offloaded them on the causeway with hundreds of others to wait some more in the dark. Mud was everywhere. “I remember my grandma falling,” she said. “That was scary.” Michaels’ grandmother has diabetes, and her mother has high blood pressure. Because both needed medication, the small family got picked up quicker than some others. The next conveyance was a yellow school bus filled with mostly older people, some of whom had urinated on themselves. Michaels still remembers the smell. Hours later, the trio found themselves

16

*Not her real name

in Texas at the Houston Astrodome. The space was filled with cots, with barely room enough to walk between them. They got out as fast as they could and found a motel room, where they stayed for another week. Other than clothes and medicines they received in the Astrodome, they had almost nothing, not even the family dog, which they had left behind in New Orleans. “We got her back maybe a month after,” Michaels said. The Humane Society had rescued the dog. “That was fun.” The family ended up in Jackson, where other family members lived, and Michaels’ mother took a job with a local nonprofit. Michaels remembers seeing a counselor there, “just in case” she might be experiencing some post-traumatic stress disorder— PTSD—from the ordeal. For a few months, Michaels attended a Jackson public school, which she said was “very different” from what she was used to. It was the first time she was in a public school, the first time in a classroom with more than 20 students. In New Orleans, she had been in private school. “It’s not like the race thing was different,” she said. Her old school was majority African American, as she is. But, she said: “They talked different from me; they talked about different things. They didn’t listen to the same popular music.” Michaels was enrolled in advanced placement classes, which deepened her isolation from most of the students. Her mother soon transferred her to a private school where blacks were in the minority—another first for Michaels. From an

academic standpoint, it was closer to what she was used to. But she didn’t talk about Katrina, or what she had been through. At her mother’s prompting, she had a few arttherapy sessions along with another displaced student from New Orleans. The school proved to be traumatic in a different way. Early on, Michaels made friends with a lesbian. Michaels is not homosexual, and she didn’t think it was a big deal, either way. But it mattered to others, and she lost the few friends she had made. At the same time, the brutal truth of her situation—that the family wasn’t going back to the city of Michaels’ birth—hit her. “I started realizing, ‘Man, there are people I’m never going to see again, and people I didn’t get to say goodbye to,’” she said. She began to dream about the storm and the people she left behind. “I wanted to go home. … I never thought that I would end up staying in Jackson.” “It was there that I started cutting myself,” she said. Dancing and Superman On March 10, 2010, the Montgomery, Ala.-based Southern Poverty Law Center sued then Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour along with a handful of state mental-health administrators on behalf of several teenagers whom the state was holding in mental institutions. All of the children’s problems stemmed from trauma. Court documents describe 17-yearold J.B., who had been in foster care most

of his life, initially because of his mother’s neglect and abuse. His behavioral and emotional problems caused the state to shuffle him between hospitals, homes, shelters and detention facilities. The state committed him to the Specialized Treatment Facility in May 2009. While there he wrote an autobiography, which he hopes to publish one day. During his STF intake, he shared these wishes: “To rewind time; to show my mama that I can be a better child; to be independent and on my own.” L.P., also 17 at the time of the suit, was sexually abused from a “young age.” She began displaying emotional and behavioral issues at age 8, and ended up in a hospital at age 10. Her wishes are simple: “For my family to be back to normal; a place for me to live so it can be like the loving family that I have always wanted.” The suit describes L.M., 16, as a “lively, outgoing child who enjoys dancing and Superman.” He had been molested at age 7, and discovered his grandmother’s dead body at 13, among other traumas. The list goes on. None of the children received the community-based mental health proscribed under the law. “We have been one of the last states to heed the warnings of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ (a 1962 novel and 1975 film) and some of the advances that were taking

more HEALING, see page 18


The Hal & Mal’s Herald JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FEBRUARY, 13, 2013

Alabama Shakes To Headline Street Dance

Tickets are on sale now at Ticketmaster.com, and fans 18+ are encouraged to make their purchase soon! Visit www.malsstpaddysdparade.com on the Web or search “Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade” on Facebook for more info!

all new

jacksonfreepress.com

[Jackson, Miss.] New this year, Hal and Mal’s will feature the Grammynominated Alabama Shakes at the Street Dance after the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade. Also on the bill are Michael Kiwanuka, Riley Downing, Sam Doores and Houndmouth.

17


HEALING, from page 16 place decades ago,” said Brandon Jones, executive director of the Mississippi Democratic Trust and a former state representative. Jones has been deeply involved in issues of mental health and domestic violence, and recently organized a forum on mental health at the state capitol. Mississippi has come around to understanding that the current model needs to be revamped, Jones said. Community-based mental health just works better than institutionalization. It’s also the law. Vanessa Carroll, senior staff attorney with Southern Poverty Law Center and lead attorney on L.P. v Barbour, points to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, Olmstead v. L. C., as a basis for the suit. “(Olmstead) reverses the unfortunate trend that was the status quo that in the country for many, many years that it was OK to segregate individuals with disabilities in hospitals and institutions and remove them from general society in order to provide them with care,” Carroll said. “We know very well that that approach isn’t necessary. It’s actually possible to serve people with a range of disabilities in integrated settings in the community—and it’s actually cheaper to do that.” The Olmstead case, decided in 1999, has been coined the equivalent of Brown v. Board of Education for people with mental disabilities. In the 1954 Brown case, the U.S. Supreme Court held that separate schools for white and black children was inherently unequal treatment under the law, and ruled the practice unconstitutional. It was a landmark ruling that ended legal school segregation. Enforcement of the law for some states, including Mississippi, came only after years of struggle and bloodshed—and frequently, at the hands of federal troops. The Magnolia State finally grudgingly complied with Brown in 1970. In the 1999 Olmstead v. L. C., case, the Supreme Court affirmed the Americans With Disabilities Act, which states, in part that “the isolation and segregation of indi-

viduals with disabilities as a serious and pervasive form of discrimination.” Olmstead involved two mentally retarded women, L.C. and E.W., who were voluntarily admitted to Georgia Regional Hospital at Atlanta, where they were confined for treatment in a psychiatric unit, according to legal documents. L.C. suffered from schizo-

settings rather than in institutions when the state’s treatment professionals have determined that community placement is appropriate.” It also said that lack of funds is not an excuse to discriminate. “Unjustified placement or retention of persons in institutions severely limits their exposure to the outside community, and therefore constitutes a form

MENTAL HEALTH GRADE MAP OVERALL U.S. GRADE: D

STATES’ GRADES

B

C

D

F

NOTE: NO STATE RECIEVED AN ‘A’ GRADE The National Alliance on Mental Health gives Mississippi’s mental-health care an F. The state has taken preliminary steps toward providing more care to people in the community; however, it cut 10 percent from its general fund mental-health budget from 2009 to 2012, and its psychiatric hospitals are filled to capacity. “Services are not available until people reach a point of severe crisis,” NAMI stated. “Then, individuals either become the responsibility of the state hospital system or state correctional system.” SOURCE: THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL HEALTH

phrenia, and E. W., with a personality disorder. “Although their treatment professionals eventually concluded that each of the women could be cared for appropriately in a community-based program, the women remained institutionalized at GRH,” Olmstead states. The decision upheld a lower court’s ruling that “states are required to place persons with mental disabilities in community

of discrimination based on disability.” The case fueled a nationwide campaign to move patients out of mental institutions and into the community, where they could live, go to school and work within a framework of home and family. But, as with so many of its health-care policies, Mississippi is behind the curve. A few days before Christmas in 2011,

Barbour received a 40-page letter from Thomas E. Perez, U.S. Assistant Attorney General. The letter, dated Dec. 22, 2011, was a report of findings subsequent to an investigation of Mississippi’s system “for delivering services and supports to thousands of persons with mental illness and/or developmental disabilities (DD).” “Our review reveals that the State of Mississippi has failed to meet its obligations … by unnecessarily institutionalizing persons with mental illness or DD in public and private facilities and failing to ensure that they are offered a meaningful opportunity to live in integrated community settings consistent with their needs,” the letter continued. The federal government framed its investigation under Olmstead as a civil-rights issue, “focusing on potential issues related to the unnecessary segregation of people with disabilities,” Perez wrote. Mississippi, the letter continues, “is the most institution-reliant system in the United States,” a system that not only deprives patients of their civil rights, but costs the state’s taxpayers a fortune. More than half the state’s mental-health budget goes to institutional care, where the annual per-patient cost is $150,000. For adults, such care is not eligible for federal Medicaid matching, which means it comes completely out of the patients’ or taxpayers’ pockets. “Serving a person with mental illness in the community costs as little as $44,500 per year and enables the State to pay for the majority of those services with federal Medicaid dollars,” the letter s. The matching rate is 74 percent. “Mississippi could serve ... four persons with mental illness in the community for every one it serves in its institutions.” ‘I’m Going to Kill Myself Today’ When Michaels was in the 10th grade, counselors put her on antidepressants, and Michaels’ mother put her in yet another new school. She said her relationship with her mother is close; they talk every day. Still, Michaels’ depression and self-harm is taboo.

February 13 - 19, 2013

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18

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to speak to any of her friends, only family, though once, her mother gave a friend the phone so the two could talk. Her mom came for once-a-week visits.

‘The State of Mississippi has failed to meet its obligations.’ Everything at Pine Grove was highly regimented. The girls could not spend time in their rooms except at night, and privacy was limited to a nightly shower, the only place that didn’t have cameras—that she knows of—and other people. First thing in the morning for a few minutes, the patients saw a psychiatrist who did little more than prescribe medications. They attended group sessions with counselors several times a week, and Michaels remembers a handful of 30-minute one-on-one counseling sessions. The facility offered precious few activities for the teens other than eating and watching TV, she said. Once a week, they went to an outside courtyard where the kids could play basketball. They received worksheets to complete for “school.” “They would bring in games, sometimes, like cards or monopoly or something like that,” Michaels said. “They didn’t have any books there. Eventually, I got my mom to bring me a book. One other person had a book. Everyone else would just sit there—all day.” Michaels remembered one early group session: “(The counselor asked), ‘What have you learned?’ And I was like, ‘What kind of

a question is that to ask?’ … So I said, ‘I’ve learned that if I want to kill myself, I should not take Tylenol.’ That was the wrong answer. … I don’t think anyone had a good answer for that question.” She learned that medications were easy to manipulate: When she wanted more, she would tell the psychiatrist how bad things were the day before. “I could’ve been on the strongest stuff in there if I had wanted to, because that’s how much they didn’t pay attention.” As it was, she received Lithium, Prozac and another drug she can’t remember. Most of the kids at Pine Grove while Michaels was there had behavioral issues; others had attempted suicide. “School” was chaotic, and there was no teacher. If someone acted out, nurses isolated them in a small room. Michaels could hear kids screaming sometimes. At night, she heard them crying, sometimes for their mothers. ‘Maybe It’s Normal’ John Damon is the CEO of Mississippi Children’s Home Services, a 100-yearold organization that began as an adoption agency. MCHS holds the statewide contract for family preservation and reunification. Community-based mental-health services make up about 60 percent of what the organization does. “Every child wants to be home, even if they’ve had a horrific family situation,” Damon said. To fulfill its mission of preserving the family, Children’s Home goes directly into a child’s home to provide support to both the child and the family. Often, that support takes the form of an intervention. The voice of the children and families always comes first. “We want the family to help guide the treatment,” Damon said. He singled out one of the programs, MYPAC, or Mississippi Youth Programs Around the Clock, as a particular success. The federal government awarded $50 million grants to nine states to develop communitybased programs to bring mental-health care

out of institutions and into the community. “Mississippi led the country, both statistically and in outcomes,” he said. The Division of Medicaid oversees the state’s program, which Damon said serves as a national model. “We’ve been the cutting edge of how to deliver community-based services,” he said. The children and their families participating in MYPAC receive intensive case management, individualized services that focus on the strengths and needs of the child and family, and respite services, which provide caregivers much-needed breaks. The children, the parents or guardians and the MYPAC providers develop the service plans together. Those providers are expected to be available to participants and their families around the clock. “We’re not in the business of raising children,” Damon said. “We’re not interested in raising children. We believe children should be raised by their families.” With all the work Children’s Home is doing to advance community mental health care, the MYPAC program served only 600 people in 2011. That means a lot of Mississippi’s children—the University of Southern Mississippi School of Social Work Research put the number at 1,025 in 2011—are still placed into psychiatric institutions. Worse, others are fed into the juvenile-justice system where they may never find their way to being productive members of society. “If children don’t get the kind of services and support they need in the community, where they end up is in jail or in longterm psychiatric treatment facilities,” said Joy Hogge (pronounced “hoag”), executive director of Mississippi Families as Allies for Children’s Mental Health in Jackson. “Acute psychiatric care gets over-utilized because there is no place else to go and no other help available.” Families as Allies maintains a laser focus more HEALING, see page 20

jacksonfreepress.com

Then Michaels stopped taking the antidepressants. “I felt like they didn’t work. I was so sad when I was taking them, and I still wanted to hurt myself,” she said. “One day I woke up, and I was like, ‘I’m going to kill myself today.’” She counted out 24 extra-strength Tylenol and took them all. She called a friend to tell her what she had done when she didn’t feel any different. “I don’t know if it’s going to work,” Michaels told her. “All these times when I was hurting myself, my mom was in her room, which is right next to my room,” she said. “Sometimes she would hear me screaming or crying, and she would try to come to my door and try to come in. But I would lock it. Sometimes she would force her way in—or not. But we would never have a conversation about my being upset or depressed.” At the urging of her friend, Michaels went to her mother and told her what she had done. “I don’t think it’s going to kill me, but I think I might need to go to the doctor,” she remembers saying. Her mother immediately took her to St. Dominic’s Hospital, where doctors gave Michaels drugs to make her throw up the pills. “Then, they wouldn’t let me leave,” she said. Doctors can hold patients who need care for up to 72 hours without a court order. St. Dom’s gave Michaels, who lacked health insurance, only a couple of options of where they would send her for treatment: Pine Grove in Hattiesburg or another facility even farther from Jackson. They strapped her to a gurney in an ambulance and transported her three hours away to Pine Grove. One of her roommates there had attempted to jump from a moving car on the interstate, Michaels said. The other had run away from her foster home, “because she was bored, basically.” The second girl had been at Pine Grove twice before. Michaels was in the facility for a month. She could talk to her mother by telephone twice a week at set times. She wasn’t allowed

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HEALING, from page 19 partner to ask the right questions and get clear answers. The goal, Manning said, is to be “advocates, but not adversarial.” Much of what family partners do is to remove the shame of mental illness—for the children and families they represent and for the professionals who are in positions

never heard of any of this,” she said of the alphabet soup of ailments. Despite her sons now receiving diagnoses, counseling and numerous prescriptions, Manning is on call day and night to respond to her sons’ many issues. The constant calls from school took their toll. Manning lost a

‘Walking the Walk’ Tara Manning and Coreaner Price work as family partners with Families as Allies. They each have about 20 families on their case load. Both also have two sons with multiple mental-health problems. Between them, the four boys exhibit a nightmare list of mental illness: obsessive compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiance disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, Tourette’s syndrome, a suicide attempt. Manning and Price use their experiences to assist other families, doing everything from research into their children’s maladies to accompanying them to meetings with teachers, school administrators, and to psychiatric and doctor appointments. Their presence ensures that the children and families have strong representation and an unemotional

Joy Hogge, executive director of Mississippi Families as Allies for Children’s Mental Health and a psychologist with more than 25 years experience, said the state provides too much acute psychiatric care and not enough community-based care.

TRIP BURNS

on ensuring families are involved in the care and treatment of their children, focusing on support, education and advocacy. Caseworkers, called “family partners,” all have children with mental or emotional problems, and they each work with about 20 families, helping them navigate the state’s often-daunting school and health-care systems to ensure the best outcome for their children. It takes a discerning person to understand what is normal behavior and what is a problem. For teens especially, the brain is still developing the areas responsible for executive planning, reasoning and judgment. “All the places adolescents flub it,” Damon said. “Sometimes we misconstrue an adolescent pushing back as oppositional defiant disorder. Well, maybe it’s absolutely normal.” “Once you really have an understanding of what is happening inside your child’s brain, you have more empathy for them,” he said. “Changing how you think about them changes how you act toward them.” Education—of parents, guardians, teachers, counselors and even people in law enforcement and in the judiciary—is critical to shift attitudes toward care and away from punishment.

of authority. The misconceptions are something Manning and Price are intimately familiar with. “I had to deal with the constant stigma of teachers telling (my son) he could control his behavior,” Manning said of her youngest boy. Teachers wanted him to sit down, be still and stop his obsessive talking. They would put him in time-outs, send him out of their classes, or make him sit by himself during lunch. She started keeping a journal for her pediatrician. In retrospect, some of the issues her youngest was dealing with had also occurred with her older son. “(The behaviors) had been there for a while, but I had

job as a clerk in a law office because of frequent, almost daily absences from work. She understands why the firm had to let her go; she was always behind. “At first I was angry,” she said, but then she realized that it was God’s way of letting her know that her children needed her more. Manning spent the next year becoming an expert about her sons’ ailments. She found the scarce local resources to help—a Tourette’s support group, for example, and Families as Allies. Still, she struggles to keep an open mind and has to remind herself that her sons’ issues don’t define the totality of who they are. “I accept it for what it is (and ask myself), ‘Now, Tara: What are you

going to do to help your kids,’” she said. “I have to believe in their abilities, not their disabilities,” she continued. “I focus on their needs rather than being understood; there’s a difference. The biggest thing of all is that I have educated myself about their mental-health diagnoses.” Her experiences help others to understand that they’re not alone. “I can talk the talk because I’m actually walking the walk on a daily basis,” Manning said. Manning’s colleague Price takes responsibility for her two boys’ shutting themselves off from her. She was in an abusive marriage, and like many women, she had a tough time getting out of the relationship. She also has three other children to care for. By the time she realized she had to get help for her two sons with disabilities, gangs and drugs had entered into the picture. Her upbringing taught her that “What goes on in your house stays in your house,” she said, and her husband preached that if a man shows emotion or cries, he’s weak. “I was always pointing out the bad things,” she said. After both boys ended up in alternative schools because of their behavior, Price knew she had to get help. She hesitantly enrolled in a CommUNITY Cares program where she lives. The program emphasizes the importance of family, school and community, and promotes the full potential of every child by addressing physical, emotional, intellectual, cultural and social needs, the program website states. “They didn’t judge me,” Price said. “Everything I was saying, they were listening to me. Everything I was going through, they understood.” Price’s case manager talked to everyone in the family individually and asked them to each write down what they wanted. “When we all came together, our family vision was the same,” Price said. “We all

more HEALING, see page 22

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Faking It To this day, no one other than her mother, grandmother and a mere handful of friends know about Michaels’ depression or cutting. She believes two of her cousins have mental-health issues, but the family doesn’t talk about it. Her grandmother, she said, is ashamed. “She doesn’t understand mental disabilities,” Michaels said. When she’s having problems, the rest of her family just thinks she’s being “weird.” She can’t be open with most of her family, and that hurts. “They can’t offer me

support if they don’t know they need to be there to support me,” she said. Michaels told her story unemotionally, except when she talked about her breakup with a boyfriend, which she said is because of her disability. She speaks deliberately. In social situations, she said, she has to force herself to laugh at things she knows should be funny, even though they don’t feel funny to her. The drugs keep her from getting too “high,” but she can’t watch emotionally COURTESY COREANER PRICE

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wanted to see the same thing happen. … For all of us to be able to sit in a room and laugh and talk and get along.” Even with the support of the program, though, Price’s sons had difficulties in school, especially because they’ve been in alternative schools. Zero-tolerance policies push kids out of school, she said. Teachers and administrators targeted and scapegoated her sons. When there’s a problem, they rarely got the benefit of the doubt. Instead, they were the ones hauled off in handcuffs. Eventually, her oldest dropped out, convinced he couldn’t get fair treatment. School officials even tend to punish Price’s daughter, an honor-roll student, because of her brothers’ reputations. Manning and Price are both dealing with children aging out of Medicaid. The boys’ options for health-care assistance under the program become severely limited in Mississippi as they become adults at age 18. Both mothers have serious concerns about their sons’ futures, between limited job and educational opportunities and inadequate access to medications. But both moms make sure their sons know their mothers will always be in their corners. “They can never say, ‘Mama didn’t help me,’” Price said. “It gets hard sometimes—most of the time—but I still stand strong,” Manning said. “I’m taking control of the situation; I’m not going to let the situation take control of me.” The two mothers said that families can find help, but emphasize that an educated parent is the best defense. Parents know their children’s needs better than anyone else, they said. Both rely on their own mothers and families for support and respite. Manning’s mother cares for her youngsters on weekends, she said, and Price’s other children are the first to advocate for their disabled brothers. “Don’t be ashamed to go out and get help,” Price said. On the other hand, “don’t let anyone tell you what your child needs.” Manning said that as much as she loves her job helping other families, she would leave her job tomorrow, if necessary, to take care of her sons full time. “Those are my kids,” Manning said. “I had them. They didn’t ask to be here; they didn’t ask to have what they have.”

Coreaner Price works as a family partner with Families as Allies. She uses her personal experiences to assist other families with mentally disabled children.

charged movies, either, because they affect her too much. Michaels said she’s tried to kill herself again by taking an overdose of Lithium, but she threw up the pills. She get prescriptions through the state’s Region 8 Mental Health Center in Canton, but she no longer takes Lithium. Michaels is not receiving any counseling in Canton, just refills for her drugs. Though Michaels said she has never received a diagnosis, she regularly takes four drugs (two for depression, one for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder—ADHD—and one for anxiety) and has a fifth, Klonopin, for when things get really bad—though she’s not clear what that might be. (Doctors prescribe Klonopin for seizures and for panic disorder.) She’s supposed to take the Klonopin every day, but it makes her speech slow and slurry and her mind fuzzy. She is unaware of any additional help available through the state Department of Mental Health. Michaels functions remarkably well with her disability. She’s a college junior, and she has two part-time jobs. “If you want to function in society, you have to hide your problems,” she said. “It’s

more HEALING, see page 24


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HEALING, from page 22 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just luck of the draw which system a child ends up presenting to, whether thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s juvenile justice or child welfare or to the emergency room,â&#x20AC;? Carroll said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trauma and unaddressed emotional needs often drive similar behavior. â&#x20AC;Ś The approach should be seen as a public-health issue, and the right kind of intervention should be Luck of the Draw provided.â&#x20AC;? Neither form Attorney Vanessa of segregation is useful, she Carroll said Mississipsaid, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prison or piâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mentally ill children a hospital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be and their families need looking at what the child a much stronger system needs and wrapping the to ensure the well-being services around them.â&#x20AC;? of the children. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s significant to note Damon, CEO of Mississippi Institutions arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t John that Mississippi has the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Services, said good for kids. They can the organization has a strong second highest rate of inbe abused and neglect- focus on community-based care. carceration in the nation, ed in badly run facili- About 60 percent of its services Carroll said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That says ties; removing children fit that description. something really profound from their homes and about where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re putting schools can be traumatic, exacerbating exist- our taxpayer dollars and how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re approaching problems; when a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peers are only ing public-health issues.â&#x20AC;? those who are struggling, they have a lack Few working on the ground in mental of positive role models. Often, children get health believe lack of funds is the root of the worse instead of better. problem. Budgeting is about values, Jones

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(We) havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had the concerted concern about mental health,â&#x20AC;? in Mississippi. But community-based mental-health care is making huge inroads, even in the Deep South. Since 16 months ago, Alabama has closed all of its large institutions for people with intellectual disabilities. The last one, the W.D. Partlow Developmental Center in Tuscaloosa, Ala., shut down at the end of September 2011. The state transitioned its 151 residents to community-based care. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[A]pproximately 6,000 people with intellectual disabilities receive services through a network of more than 100 certified community providers across the state,â&#x20AC;? Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Mental Health said in statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś Satisfaction surveys following the transition (of residents in other closed institutions) gave substantial evidence that clients and family members were very happy about the move to community life. Along with community life opportunities for Partlow residents, the department anticipates that by closing the facility it will be able to provide community services to additional consumers who are now on a waiting list. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Alabama can do it, we can,â&#x20AC;? Carroll said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

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February 13 - 19, 2013

CORUTESY JOHN DAMON

kind of like that expression: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fake it â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til you make it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re faking to feel happy, and some of us might think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be happy one day. A lot think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re never going to feel happy, but we can at least put a smile on our face when we need to.â&#x20AC;? Michaels hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut herself in about four months.

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Culture Convention by Kathleen M. Mitchell

26

feel like the state has adopted it as Mississippi’s con, not just Jackson’s.” The first Pulp Con, held four years ago, attracted around 60 people. Jett hopes to see 400 or more at the third-annual convention this year. Mississippi Pulp Con is Saturday, Feb. 16, from 11 a.m. to midnight at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201

E. Pascagoula St.). Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Visit mspulpcon.com or facebook.com/MSPulpCon. Advance tickets are available at Comic Commander (579 Highway 51, Suite D, Ridgeland, 601-856-1789) and Heroes and Dreams (5352 Highway 25, Suite 1700, Flowood, 601-992-3100). CHUCK JETT

February 13 - 19, 2013

M

ississippi Pulp Con is a place where steampunk zombies can rub elbows with Wookiees. Roller-derby girls can exchange numbers with comic fanboys. Vampirellas, paranormal investigators and pop artists can dance the night away. It’s a melting pot of pop culture and nerd culture, inclusive of everyone. The con (short for convention) is the brainchild of Chuck Jett, a local illustrator and graphic designer. He founded the event to fill a niche between fine-arts events and on-the-street pop-art demonstrations. “Pulp, the word, is based on the pulp dime books on the newsstands in the first half of the 20th century,” Jett says. “The detective stories, westerns, sci-fi and superhero comic books and fantasy. It was kind of trash as far as how it was looked upon at the time, cheap trash novels—but those are the ones we remember: the fun, interesting, new fantastical things you had to hide from your mom.” Jett stresses the multifaceted nature of the event, which includes visual arts, film, literature, music and dance. “It’s definitely a whole-family event,” he says. More than 30 artists and authors will be on hand to discuss their works, do Q&As, exhibit their art and do live demonstrations. Jett is particularly excited about this year’s guests of honor, including comic artists Mitch Byrd, who has illustrated for Green Lantern, among dozens of other titles; Steve Scott, known for work on X-Men and Batman; and Geoffrey Gwin. Author guests of honor will be Allen Brown and James Bell, who will discuss his recently released novel, “Vampire Defense.” Costume contests and a pop-art contest will continue throughout the day, Jett says. As the afternoon fades into evening, The Consortium of Genius, a band out of New Orleans, will play for the first time in Jackson. Another first follows with the premiere of “Dead Weight,” an independent horror film making its Mississippi debut. The night ends with the MissiHIPPY Black Hearts Ball, which Jett calls “Jackson’s original anti-Valentine’s Day party,” this year taking on the theme “zombie apocalypse.” The MissiHIPPY belly dancers have four choreographed dances planned. Jett is pleased with the way the whole state has embraced the convention. “We have comic stores from Biloxi and Tupelo coming in for it,” he says. “It makes me

Pulp Con attracts fans from many corners of pop culture, such as sisters Rachel, Christine and Diane Ward, shown here at last year’s convention. Inset: Artists, such as Nikki Campbell Costilow, will be on hand to discuss their work.


THURSDAY 2/14

SATURDAY 2/16

SATURDAY 2/16

Couples receive two-for-one admission at the Jackson Zoo.

The Rotary Club’s pancake breakfast is at St. James Episcopal Church.

Cirque de la Symphonie performs at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall.

BEST BETS

The Jackson 2000 Discussion Luncheon about the Affordable Care Act is at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). RSVP. $12; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org. … Filmmaker Jeanne Luckett presents her documentary on Medgar Evers during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The Valentine’s Matchmaker Run is at 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Free; call 601899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com. … Brownout performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. Buddy and the Squids also performs. For ages 18 and up. $5 advance, $10 at door; call 601292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

THURSDAY 2/14

GRAYSONCAPPS.COM

Couples receive two-for-one admission during Sweetheart Day at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). $7, $6 seniors, $4.50 ages 2-12, children under 2 and members free; call 601-352-2580. … The February Art Show for Wayne Packer, Bebe Wolfe and Vidal Blankenstein is from 5-7 p.m.

Grayson Capps performs during Southern Songwriters Night at Duling Hall Feb. 15 at 8 p.m.

at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). Free; call 601-291-9115. … Friends to Elect June Hardwick hosts Love for Jackson: An Intimate Night of Music and Spoken Word at 7 p.m. at Yellow Scarf. BYOB. $25; call 601987-4023. … Enjoy the one-act operas “Cabildo” and “The Old Maid and the Thief” at 7 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in the Aven Fine Arts Building, JPW Recital Hall; shows through Feb. 17. Student tickets sold at the door. $15, $10 students with ID and children; call 601-925-3440. … The Mississippi Opera Valentine’s Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Christ United Methodist Church (6000 Old Canton Road) Tickets sold at the door. $20, $15

seniors, $5 students with ID; call 601-960-2300. … Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

FRIDAY 2/15

The Royal Bleau Semi-Annual Fashion Show is at 7 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at Rose E. McCoy Auditorium and features Tahiry from VH1’s “Love and Hip Hop.” Benefits Girl Power Unlimited. $10, $20 VIP (after-party access at Dreamz Jxn); call 601-750-2872. … The Metro Male Chorus performs at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). Proceeds benefit DiverseCity Diner, an initiative of Working Together Jackson. $20, $5 students with ID; call 601-354-1535. … Southern Songwriters Night with Lisa Mills, Grayson Capps and Cary Hudson is at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

SATURDAY 2/16

The Have-A-Heart Pancake Breakfast and Blood Drive is from 8-11 a.m. at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Benefits local charities; donate blood to receive a free breakfast. $10, $5 ages 12 and under; find Rotary Club of North Jackson on Facebook. … The Make A Difference 5K is at 8:30 a.m. at Woodlands Office Park (800 Woodlands Parkway, Ridgeland). Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. $20 in advance, $25 race day; BY LATASHA WILLIS fun run: $10 in advance, $15 race day; call 601-984-5273. JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM … The Cupid Shuffle 5K is at 9 a.m. at Belhaven UniverFAX: 601-510-9019 sity (1500 Peachtree St.). Registration required. $25, $15 BelDAILY UPDATES AT haven employees, $10 Belhaven JFPEVENTS.COM students; belhaven.edu. … The Malaco Artist Retreat Showcase at Stronger Hope Baptist Church (223 Beasley Road) includes a seminar from 9 a.m.-noon and performances at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-982-4522, ext. 206; malacoshowcase. com. … The Mississippi Pulp Con kicks off at 11 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.); includes workshops, a costume contest and the MissiHIPPY Black Hearts Ball at 9 p.m. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; mspulpcon.com. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra and Cirque de la Symphonie perform at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia

EVENTS@

Tawanna Shaunte performs during Love for Jackson at Yellow Scarf Feb. 14 at 7 p.m.

Mara Hall. $15 and up; call 601-960-1565. … AJC and the Envelope Pushers perform at 9 p.m. at Mediterranean Fish and Grill. $8. … Alcorn and JSU compete at the SWAC Spoken Word Championship at 10 p.m. at Suite 106. $5; call 601-720-4640.

SUNDAY 2/17

The Jackson Irish Dancers’ Mostly Monthly Ceili is from 2-5 p.m. at Fenian’s. Free, donations welcome; call 601592-9914; email maggie@jacksonirishdancers.org. Sean Nós Dancing Workshop from 4-5:30 p.m. ($15, $10 members; call 601-720-5034).

MONDAY 2/18

The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents “A Decent Proposal” at 6 p.m. at Anjou (361 Township Ave. Ridgeland). Seating limited; RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752; more shows at thedetectives.biz.

TUESDAY 2/19

The Faculty Voice Recital with Gena Everitt and Colman Pierce is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494.

WEDNESDAY 2/20

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 2/13

COURTESY TAWANNA SHAUNTE

FEB. 13-20, 2013

Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. 27 More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


DIVERSIONS | film

Cinematic Wedgie by Anita Modak-Truran

“S

COURTESY DI BONAVENTURA PICTURES

ide Effects” is a decent story. Despite the try eventually takes a back seat to clever obfuscation. dry title, which suggests secondary ailWistful music with the quality of a soft breeze draws us ments associated with but not necessar- into a Manhattan apartment. A wooden sailboat and a small ily caused by prescription drugs, the film envelope lay on a chair. A trail of blood mars the floor. twists issues of mental health, depression, suicidal ideation, The movie rewinds to three months earlier. Emily Taytherapeutic pharmacological agents and business pressures lor (Rooney Mara), a thin, nervous woman, waits for her faced by prescribing doctors into a mind-riddling thriller. husband Martin’s release from prison. Her mother-in-law The different pieces of the puzzle fit snuggly together (Ann Dowd) sits by her side. Martin (Channing Tatum) by the end—perhaps too snuggly, like a cinematic wedgie crushing out the avant-garde for a predictable tale of greed, jealously and lust. The film, directed by Steven Soderbergh and written by Scott Z. Burns, captures the feeling of a cloudy day. As opening credits roll, the camera languishes on an austere building, forewarning us that this ain’t going to be one of them pretty pictures. The glossiest film Soderbergh made was “Ocean’s Eleven.” The “Ocean’s” trilogy had visual snap, complementing cool wit and an outrageously handsome cast. “Magic Mike,” also under Soderbergh’s direction, had cabaret charms and a biting sense of humor. Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law) searches for answers for his patient’s When serious issues drive the story, such as ailments with a controversial drug in “Side Effects.” in “Traffic,” “Erin Brockovich” and “Contagion,” Soderbergh focuses on ugly realism. But that realism cracks served four years for insider trading, and he’s ready to jump apart in “Side Effects.” The mental twists distort our perspec- start their lives and recapture his fortune. tive from understanding what’s real and what isn’t. And the But Emily can’t stop crying. She’s an emotional wreck, interesting social commentary on the pharmaceutical indus- living in a fog of hopelessness. She guns her car into a con-

*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Discussion Luncheon Feb. 13, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The topic is the health care debate. RSVP. $12; email bevelyn_branch@ att.net; jackson2000.org. Crossroads Film Society Membership Drive and Friend-raiser Feb. 28, 6 p.m., at Yellow Scarf (741 Harris St., Suite E). Enjoy movies and music, and learn more about joining the organization. The event includes a DVD swap. Free admission; email info@crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

(/,)$!9 President’s Day Celebration Feb. 16, 10 a.m.2 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Learn what it is like to be president of the United States, and about former and current presidents. Attendees also write a letter to the president. $8, children 12 months and under free; call 601-981-5469.

February 13 - 19, 2013

#/--5.)49

28

Feb. 20 Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building, room 166/266. • Medgar Evers 50th Anniversary Program, 10 a.m. The program is a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the civil-rights leader’s assassination. The keynote speaker is author Dr. Michael V. Williams. Free; call 601979-1562; email hamer.institute@jsums.edu.

• Black History Makers Forum, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Also at the COFO Center. Attendees recognize the accomplishments of prominent black Mississippians with an emphasis on the life of Medgar Evers. Free; call 601-979-4348; email cofo.center@jsums.edu; sites.jsums.edu/cofo. Necessary Tension: An Honest Conversation on Race, Art and Identity with Kiese Laymon. The Jackson native is an associate professor of English and co-director of Africana Studies at Vassar College, and a contributing editor at Gawker. Free; call 601-979-3935. • Part 1: Feb. 19, 7-9 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in the recital hall. • Part 2: Feb. 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building, room 166/266. American Board Teaching Information Session Feb. 13, 3:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., at Canton Public Library (102 Priestley St., Canton). Learn how to earn a professional teaching license. Bachelor’s degree required. Online registration available. Free; call 877-669-2228; abcte.org. Broadmeadow Neighborhood Association Annual Meeting Feb. 16, 10 a.m., at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Neighbors are encouraged to attend and learn about upcoming events, meet the leaders and learn ways to get involved. Bagel breakfast included. Free; email broadmeadowneighbor hoodassoc@gmail.com. Teen/Parent Dating Violence Workshop Feb. 16, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County

crete wall, and the suicide attempt gets the attention of Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law). Banks wears an air of Sundaysuit formality: He’s proper, not the type to be involved in a scandal. After consulting with Emily’s previous therapist (Catherine Zeta-Jones), Banks prescribes Ablixa. “This drug makes it easier for you to be who you are,” he explains. But the medication has side effects, which may or may not be a central concern. As Banks searches for answers to Emily’s problems, his clinical investigation transitions into a forensic whodunit. Soderbergh casts actors with the ability to bring characters up and out of themselves, and then encourages them to trust themselves and each other. Each character here is an original. Rooney Mara’s Emily wanders off in her head and loses track of what’s going on around her. She needs a keeper, and she finds one in Jude Law’s steady and optimistic Banks. As Banks unravels the threads, his professional and personal life disintegrates into a tumultuous nightmare. Catherine Zeta-Jones provides an intense foil to Banks; through thick glasses, her penetrating glare notes his every misstep. “Side Effects” sustains the tension for a good chunk of the film. The shortcoming is that the clichés of the psychological thriller genre crack open by the end. The solution provides too much coherence. The movie doesn’t quite pay off the way we expect a thriller to do–in thrills. Instead, it pays off in atmosphere and the greedy ordinariness of evil at play. Soderbergh works imaginatively in the detail; what he lacks here is a low cunning.

Line Road). The purpose of the conference is to empower youth and adults to prevent violence. Topics include teen dating, bullying, suicide and social networking. Refreshments and lunch included. Free; call 601-953-5747 or 601-2595254; email evajustice5@hotmail.com; butterfliesbygracedefinedbyfaith.com.

Parents & Kids Magazine’s Camp and Education Connection Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Representatives from camps, schools and other organizations share what activities are available for children this summer. Free with museum admission ($4-$6); call 601-366-0901.

Rankin Democrats: Extra Shot of Blue Feb. 16, 2:30-3:30 p.m., at Dunkin’ Donuts (403 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Party members fellowship and network in the private dining room. Free admission, food for sale; email rankincountydemocrats@ gmail.com; rankindemocrats.net.

Lunch and Learn Series Feb. 17, noon-1 p.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The topic is “Grant Research Tools.” Lunch included; registration required. $15, members free; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org.

Mississippi Child Welfare Institute Conference Feb. 13-15, at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Attendees hold workshops and present papers on ethics, diversity, foster care, justice issues and other related topics. Registration required. $190, $45 students; call 601-432-6816. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting Feb. 14, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol Street). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0002. Coffee and Conversation Feb. 15, 7-8:30 a.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Interact with business professionals, leaders, and other community members, and learn about upcoming city projects. Free; call 601-576-6920. Professional Development Workshop for Teachers: Amazing Adaptation Feb. 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.) Educators learn about adaptation, competition and selection in order to teach the concepts in the classroom. Registration required; 0.5 CEU credits available. $25; call 601-352-2580, ext. 240; jacksonzoo.org.

Chancellor’s Luncheon Feb. 20, 11:30 a.m.1 p.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The Central Mississippi Ole Miss Rebel Club is the host. $20; call 601-949-4621 or 601-506-3186; email centralmsolemissalumniclub@gmail.com. Women’s Council Luncheon Feb. 20, 11:30 a.m.1 p.m., at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse (Renaissance, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). The Madison County Chamber of Commerce event includes a panel discussion with local women leaders. RSVP. $35, $30 members; call 601-853-2734; email jodi@madisoncountychamber.com. SBA Loans and Start-up “First Steps” Clinic Feb. 20, 1-3 p.m., at Small Business Administration District Office (210 E. Capitol St., 10th floor), in the conference room. Topics include financing, registration and legal issues. Registration req. Free; call 601-965-4378, ext. 18; sba.gov/ms. “Back in the Day” Black History Celebrations Thursdays, 6 p.m. through Feb. 28, at New Hope Baptist Church (5202 Watkins Drive). Enjoy listening to a different guest speaker each Thursday in the Family Life Center Chapel, sec-


7%,,.%33 Events at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. Registration required. Free; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262; mbhs.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Feeling Faint? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Brush It Off! Feb. 13, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Dr. Jimmy Lott explains how the condition could be a sign of an underlying problem. $5 optional lunch. â&#x20AC;˘ Chest Pain and Fainting in Children and Teens Feb. 19, 6-7 p.m. Dr. David Braden explains when an examination is necessary. â&#x20AC;˘ High Blood Pressure: Old Myths and New Treatments Feb. 20, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Dr. Alfredo Figueroa talks about myths, causes, medications and treatments. $5 optional lunch.

&!2-%23-!2+%43 Mississippi Farmers Market through Dec. 21, at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573; mdac.state.ms.us.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Books to Film Movie Club Feb. 16, 11:30 a.m.2 p.m., at Flowood Library (103 Winners Circle, Flowood). This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s selection is Michael Lewisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Blind Side.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-919-1911. JSU Campus Reading Community Book Discussion and Signing Feb. 19, 6 p.m., at COFO Civil Rights Education Complex (1013 John R. Lynch St.). Dr. Michael Vinson Williams discusses and reads from his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-979-1563.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). Call 601631-2997; southernculture.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Ballroom Dance Lessons Feb. 17, 5-6 p.m. James Frechette, owner of Applause Dance Factory, teaches the nightclub two-step in the Academy Building. $10. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;More than a Paintingâ&#x20AC;? Art Workshop for Couples Feb. 13, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Nancy Mitch-

ell teaches the class. Topics include composition and color mixing. Supplies included. $80 per couple, $70 members. Events at The Emporium Canton (3344 N. Liberty St., Canton). Seating limited; RSVP. $45; call 601-667-3670; lisette.co. â&#x20AC;˘ Point and Shoot Class Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Learn the basics of taking great photos. â&#x20AC;˘ Intro to Digital DSLR Feb. 16, 2-5 p.m. Learn how to use camera settings. Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). For ages 16 and up; registration required. Call 601-898-8345. â&#x20AC;˘ Classic Cakes Feb. 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Topics include making frosting, assembling a layer cake and making cupcakes. $115. â&#x20AC;˘ Pasta Workshop Feb. 18, 6-9 p.m. Topics include making dough, rolling, cutting, shaping, filling and assembling. $79. Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Couplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pottery Feb. 14, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Materials included; registration required. $35 per person; call 601-856-7546.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). $4-$6; call 601576-6000; msnaturalscience.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Giant National Geographic Map of North America through Feb. 15 and Feb. 18-23, 9 a.m.-noon. The interactive exhibit allows children to use their bodies to represent terrain, track population growth and more. â&#x20AC;˘ Rainforest Adventure Exhibit through May 12. The interactive exhibit introduces children to rainforests around the world.

"%4(%#(!.'% Clothing Giveaway Feb. 16, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., at Sheppard Brothers Park (1355 Hattiesburg St.). Clothing of all sizes available. Volunteers and donations welcome. Free; call 769-257-8494. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

A â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Drunkardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at Belhaven

C

WEEKLY EVENT CALENDAR WEDNESDAYS

02/13

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL â&#x20AC;˘ MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM THURSDAYS

02/14

WEDNESDAY 2/13:

New Bourbon St. Jazz Band (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 2/14:

$4 APPETIZERS â&#x20AC;˘5 -9PM

Taylor & Valley Hildebrand (Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Specials)

with Renegade 6-10pm

Graham Wilkinson (Restaurant) Duwayne Burnside (Red Room)

Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinner Special for 2

FRIDAY 02/15 Ribeye Steaks & Baked Potatoes

with live music by

Dax Riggs with Special Guest 10pm - close SATURDAY

02/16

MONDAY

02/18

Otis Lotus

2 for 1 DRAFT ALL DAY

Lazy Magnolia, Magic Hat, Lucky Town, Laughing Skull, Blue Moon, Andy Gator, and all of your favorites.

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

02/19

SHRIMP BOIL â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NITE

KARAOKE

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS â&#x20AC;˘ 10 - 12pm

Howling at the Moon w/ Hunter Gibson 6 - 10pm

FLICKR/PAUL STEVENSON

RPPXQLW\PHPEHUVPLJKWEHVXUSULVHGWKDWWKH  Âł,WÂśVDVWRU\DERXWUHGHPSWLRQ´+DOH\VD\VRI FRQVHUYDWLYH%HOKDYHQ8QLYHUVLW\LVSXWWLQJRQD WKHSOD\7KHGLUHFWRUWKRXJKWWKHSOD\ÂśVVWRU\ZRXOG SOD\ FDOOHG Âł7KH 'UXQN EHZHOOVXLWHGIRU%HOKDYHQDQG DUG´%XWGHVSLWHWKHSURYRFD JLYH KLV VWXGHQWV WKH FKDQFH WLYH WLWOH WKLV IDPLO\IULHQGO\ WR VWXG\ PXVLFDOV DQG ROGHU SOD\  ÂżWV LQ ZLWK WKH VFKRROÂśV SOD\V 7KH RULJLQDO VFULSW IRU &KULVWLDQ EDFNJURXQG ZLWK D  Âł7KH 'UXQNDUG´ FDPH RXW SORW H[SORULQJ WKH KD]DUGV RI LQ  GXULQJ WKH WHPSHUDQFH DOFRKRO PRYHPHQW 3UHIDPH %DUU\ 0D  7KHSOD\WDNHVSODFHLQD QLORZDGGHGWKHPXVLFDQGO\ULFV VLPSOHU WLPH ZLWK WKH ZLFNHG LQ WKH ÂśV WR FUHDWH WKH FXU 0U &ULEV KDWFKLQJ D SORW WR UHQW LQFDUQDWLRQ 3HUIRUPDQFHV GULYHUHVSHFWDEOH(GZDUGLQWRD DUH DW WKH %ODFNER[ 7KHDWHU GUXQNHQVWXSRU&DQKLVIDPLO\ DW %HOKDYHQ 8QLYHUVLW\  Belhaven is mounting a VDYH(GZDUGIURPWKHGHPRQV play from the 1840s, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 3HDFKWUHH 6W  7KXUVGD\ )HE RIWKHERWWOH" WKURXJK6XQGD\0DUFKDW Drunkard.â&#x20AC;? SP6DWXUGD\DQG6XQGD\  Âł7KH'UXQNDUG´LV6WHZDUW +DOH\ÂśVGLUHFWRULDOGHEXWDW%HOKDYHQDVZHOODVWKH DOVRIHDWXUHSPPDWLQHHV7LFNHWVDUHIRUWKH ÂżUVWWLPHWKHVFKRROÂśVWKHDWHUGHSDUWPHQWKDVVWDJHG JHQHUDO SXEOLF DQG  IRU VHQLRUV DQG VWXGHQWV )RU DPXVLFDOLQUHFHQWPHPRU\ PRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO ²0R:LOVRQ

THIS WEEK

UPCOMING SHOWS 2.23: Southern Komfort Brass Band 3.8: Greenhouse Lounge 3.15: St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blowout

SCAN

ME! 214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

FRIDAY 2/15:

SATURDAY 2/16:

Thomas Jackson (Restaurant)

MONDAY 2/18:

MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 2/19:

Pub Quiz w Erin and Friends (Dining Room & Brew Pub)

Coming Soon

2/20: Daryl Shawn 2/21: Baby Jan & All That Chazz 2/22: The Good Fables 2/22: Flint Eastwood 2/23: Brian Jones 03/23: Kamikaze Showcase

MONDAY - FRIDAY Blue Plate Lunch

$8

with corn bread and tea or coffee

25

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

March 16, 2013

Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feat. Grammy Nominated Headliner

Alabama Shakes http://www.ticketmaster.com/ event/1B004984C1667E2E

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St.

jacksonfreepress.com

ond floor. Free; call 601-366-7002; email jadams@newhope-baptist.org.

29


DIVERSIONS | music

The Session: Mad Skills, Chill Jazz by Genevieve Legacy

of the band’s collaborative spirit, but each member gets his chance to shine. It features nine original songs and a cover of trumpeter Stephen Land’s fresh arrangement of

anced talent housed in such youthful forms. The longest cut, “Of Two Minds,” starts out smooth and elegant, then takes the listener on a journey that showcases each musician and each instrument. The journey culminates in a barely managed breakout where sound and instruments push and pull, clash and collide, but ultimately converge, returning to the familiarity of the beginning theme with a few taut embellishments. “The album isn’t ‘mad jazz.’ It’s chill. It’s accessible,” Douglas says. “We try not to forget that we’re entertainment, but we also want to express ourselves and not be limited.” This month, The Session kicks off a short regional tour beginning with a CD release party for “This Is Who We Are” in The Session, including (from left) James Partridge, Stephen Lands, Darrian Douglas, Jason Weaver and Andrew McGowan, plays this weekend at the Yellow Jackson. Then the band plays in Scarf Listening Room. Hattiesburg and gives a master’s class at the University of Southern Mississippi. Also, look for the 1944 jazz standard, “Moonlight in Vermont.” The Session at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Fes“We try to work together as much as possible,” tival in April. Douglas says. “Everyone has at least one song that they Darrian Douglas and The Session will perform at Yelwrote on the album.” low Scarf Listening Room (741 Harris St., Suite E, 347Listening to “This Is Who We Are” is an expansive 754-0668) Feb. 15 and 16 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 advance, experience, one of those moments when reincarnation $25 at the door, $5 with student ID. For tickets and more seems like the only explanation for such mature and nu- information, visit yellowscarf.ojahmediagroup.com.

COURTESY DARRIAN DOUGLAS

P

ercussionist and Jackson native Darrian Douglas is a brilliant example of arts education in action. Since his high-school years at the Academic and Performing Arts Complex and study under Dr. Perry Combs at APAC, Douglas has turned his youthful aspirations and talent into a promising profession. At age 28, his creds include four years with the Ellis Marsalis Quartet, three years at the Jazz Ascona Festival in Switzerland with the ReGeneration Brass Band and, most recently, recording with his equally talented band mates in their New Orleans-based jazz quintet, The Session. “I’ve been lucky,” he says, “and my mom prays a lot.” He’s not shy about conveying respect for the band mates he has been playing with for about two years in The Session. “Sometimes, we’re billed as Darrian Douglas and The Session, but it’s not really like that,” Douglas says. “It’s a group effort—we all write the songs.” The Session includes: Berklee School of Music graduate James Partridge on tenor sax; New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts and SUNY Stony Brook graduate Andrew McGowan on piano; New Orleans University graduate Jason Weaver on stand-up bass; and Delfaeyo Marsalis Uptown Jazz Orchestra member Stephen Lands on trumpet. Like many industrious artists and musicians these days, The Session’s band members often use the Internet and social media to connect with fans. They used kickstarter.com, a funding platform for creative projects, to raise $5,000 to record the group’s debut album. The band made the most of its fundraising effort. The album, “This is Who We Are,” is representative

natalie’s notes

by Natalie Long

COURTESY TERRY FILISETTI YOSHINAGA

February 13 - 19, 2013

30

Vampire Weekend

Going to SXSW is a dream come true for Natalie Long.

the application to cover the festival for the JFP, but didn’t meet the press guidelines in time. I was disappointed, but vowed that by the time the 2013 festival rolled around, I would have my ducks in a row and get things in order to have my application complete and ready for send-off to the SXSW staff. You can’t imagine my excitement when that confirmation email landed in my inbox. SXSW is a music-lover’s Mecca, and

I’m beyond excited to see bands such as Dawes, Glossary, ZZ Ward, Vampire Weekend, Paul Oakenfold, The Polyphonic Spree, Cherub, Moon Taxi, Freedy Johnson and many more. Plus, I can’t wait to come back with new favorites that I hadn’t heard of before the festival. Besides just hearing music, SXSW is an amazing place to learn about music and connect with others as a musician. Each day, festival-goers can sit in on sessions such as “The Power of Lyrics in the Digital Age” or “Getting Your Music Startup Funded: Whale, Dolphin and Minnows” or even “Jingle is Not a Four Letter Word.” Legendary record producer Clive Davis will be in attendance to speak during one of the many music seminars, as will former Vice President Al Gore and many other heavy hitters in music, film and other industries. I’ll also be attending workshops for media and journalists—the festival is always a big event for

social media and new, interactive media, so it should be really cool to learn about what’s next in those fields. Thanks to Kathleen, Donna and the staff at JFP for allowing me to fulfill a COURTESY MOON TAXI

I

’ve wanted to go to the SXSW (South by Southwest) Festival in Austin, Texas, for years. Some of my friends go annually and report daily how much fun they are having and about all the concerts they attended. Whenever I wanted to go, however, I was teaching school and had not accrued enough sick or personal days to take off for such an adventure (the festival is held in mid-March). So, last year I decided I that I was going, come hell or high water. I filled out

COURTESY SXSW

Hello, Texas!

Moon Taxi

dream to cover SXSW this year. I promise I will try not to disappoint, will do my best to represent us well and will work as hard as I can to cover as many shows as possible. Thanks for your support, Jackson. Hello, Texas!


DIVERSIONS | music

MUSIC | live

Taking the State by Storm

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Although they live in different cities across the state, members of The Weekend Kids (left to right: Cody Bass, Salar Almakky,Travis Bass, Hayden Boyd and Micah Boyd) unite in Jackson to make music.

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spiring to make real music and a lasting impact in Jackson, indiemeets-alternative-rock band The Weekend Kids dares to be creative rather than conforming to mainstream standards. The band aims to deliver quality music in the indie-rock scene with songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eastside Rivalsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;? from its latest release, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animal.â&#x20AC;? The Weekend Kids are singer and guitarist Hayden Boyd, guitarist and background vocalist Micah Boyd; guitarist Travis Bass; drummer Cody Bass; and bassist and background vocalist Salar Almakky. (Bradley Presson is temporarily substituting for Micah Boyd on guitar, because Boyd has an internship at Disney World. He will return to the band this August.) The band members are scattered in three different colleges across Mississippi now, but they have known each other since their days at Northwest Rankin Middle School. They unite to play at Jackson venues such as Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Morningbell Records & Studios, and the Capri Theatre. Formed in April 2012, The Weekend Kids began with brothers Hayden and Micah. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It started out with (me) writing songs in my room for about two or three weeks, and my brother (Micah) was there, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d write together,â&#x20AC;? Hayden Boyd says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We kept bugging some friends of mine to join the band, and I sent them about two or three songs. And the third oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I guessed they liked it and decided to join, and we started writing music.â&#x20AC;? Boyd says the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name came from an inside joke: Whenever the guys got together and practiced on the weekends, someone would say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You guys ready for the weekend, kids?â&#x20AC;? The Weekend Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fun and fresh sound comes from many influential periods in rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Our influences span) anywhere from 1950s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s rock like the whole rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll stage and a little bit

of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,â&#x20AC;? Hayden Boyd says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I listen to a lot of Flaming Lips. Phantom Planet is a real big one. Just bands that are kind off-the-wall stuff that you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect to hear, just to get a new creative feel.â&#x20AC;? The Doors and The Beach Boys are also influential for the band. Recreating a raw sound similar to 1950s music is what The Weekend Kids strive for in some songs. Songs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surf Warrior,â&#x20AC;? the opening track for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animals,â&#x20AC;? exemplify The Weekend Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to mesh together the opposite ends of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s influences. The song opens with a distinct surf-rock drum beat. The vocals have that slightly distorted feel to them to bring the listener to a past decade while still being somewhat reminiscent of pre-â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idiotâ&#x20AC;? Green Day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fish Tacosâ&#x20AC;? offers another â&#x20AC;&#x153;surfrockesqueâ&#x20AC;? bit, this time starring the guitar with a vocalist singing a fast and playful â&#x20AC;&#x153;doo wop.â&#x20AC;? It ends, however, on a lighter, slower note with the guitars working together with the drums to create a new melody which carries over (slightly faster and embellished) into the next track, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Rosa.â&#x20AC;? For Boyd, songwriting is a craft that takes time. Often, the process starts with Almakky sending him a short riff. From there, Boyd will add to it and send it to the rest of the band mates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like we just sit around and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh these four chords will work,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Boyd says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We actually put thought into it and work hard at it, and I feel like a lot of bands donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that. They just kind of (use) whatever sounds good. ... A lot of modern rock songs are written toward what people want to hear instead of what they feel. We write about what we feel and experiences weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had, not crowd pleasers.â&#x20AC;? See The Weekend Kids at Morningbell Records & Studios (622 Duling Ave., Suite 205A, 769-233-7468) Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. Visit theweekendkidsms.bandcamp.com to keep up with the band, or find it on Facebook.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY TIME TO MOVE BAND

COURTESY THE WEEKEND KIDS

by Mark Braboy

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DIVERSIONS | jfp sports bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

9.99

Healthy Skepticism

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2& bottled for 1domestic house wine beer

starting at â&#x20AC;˘

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Thursday

February 14

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache â&#x20AC;˘ Ladies Drink Free

Friday

February 15

Mississippi Shakedown Saturday February 16

Stiff Necked Fools

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, February 13th

BABY JAN & CHALMERS (Jazz) 7-10, No Cover,

Thursday, February 14th

BRET MOSLEY

SPECIAL â&#x20AC;&#x153;SWEETHEARTâ&#x20AC;? DINNER MENU Reservations Strongly Recommended (Americana) 7-10, No Cover,

Friday, February 15th

BIG AL & THE HEAVYWEIGHTS

(Rock/Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, February 16th

BOOKER WALKER

(Jazz/Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday, February 19th

CAROLINE CRAWFORD

(Piano) 6:30 -9:30, No Cover

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HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

COMING

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February 21, 2013

Tuesday

February 19

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Open Mic with Jason Turner & DVDJ Reign

Wednesday

February 20

KARAOKE

February 13 - 19, 2013

with DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

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416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

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the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 NBA double header (7 p.m.-midnight, TNT): A rematch of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NBA finals featuring the Miami Heat at the Oklahoma City Thunder, followed by a battle for L.A. with the Clippers battling the Lakers. FRIDAY, FEB. 15 College basketball (8-10 p.m., ESPN): Cincinnati faces Georgetown in a Big East clash that could have implications for both teams when the calendar turns to March. SATURDAY, FEB. 16 College basketball (7-9 p.m., ESPN 2): Ole Miss tries to keep their drive to the NCAA Tournament on track at home against Georgia. SUNDAY, FEB. 17 NBA (7-10 p.m., TNT): The best players from the Western Conference host the best players from the Eastern Conference in the 2013 NBA All-Star Game.

If February is any indication, this will be a wild March when the madness begins. College basketball has no dominate teams and upsets seem to come nightly. MONDAY, FEB. 18 College basketball (6-9 p.m., ESPN): The Notre Dame Fighting Irish hit the road to meet the Pittsburgh Panthers in a top-25 matchup. TUESDAY, FEB. 19 NHL (7-10 p.m., NBC Sports Network): The San Jose Sharks take on western-conference foe the St. Louis Blues as both teams battle for playoff positioning in a short hockey season. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 College basketball (6-8 p.m., CSS): Ole Miss should get another win, this time on the road against South Carolina, as SEC play slowly begins to come to a close. It has been a rough couple of weeks for the Ole Miss basketball team as the Rebels failed to beat any of the top teams in the SEC. Ole Miss lost to Kentucky, Florida and Missouri in three of their last four games. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


FOOD p 34 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 35 ASTRO p 37

Great Gardens Start with a Plan

PEAT MOSS

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For more on the use of peat moss, see this post on Natural Life Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Does Peat Moss Have a Place in the Ecological Garden?â&#x20AC;? by Wendy Priesnitz: jfp.ms/peatmoss

COMPOST ADVICE

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The Rodale Institute provides great tips on composting, including answers to common questions about antibiotics and heavy metals. Visit jfp.ms/compostingtips. Or, you can look back in my previous articles and blogs by searching: ShooFlyFarmBlog.

to access food and water. Make sure you have plenty of vegetative matter worked into the soil to provide â&#x20AC;&#x153;tilth,â&#x20AC;? a mix of soil and matter that holds nutrients and water even in prolonged dry spells. This matter is especially good for the earth if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recycled: Try plowing under your cover crops for â&#x20AC;&#x153;green manure,â&#x20AC;? or using last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lawn clippings or last fallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crumbledup leaves, mixed with kitchen compost that you have been saving. Too many people just buy inputsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as bags of sphagnum peat mossâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and dump it in their gardens. Although peat is

ANALYZE YOUR SOIL

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COURTESY JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SELECTED SEEDS

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rganic gardeners may be eager to get out and garden, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still too early to plant summer crops. We can start planning, though, savoring the bounteous crop of garden seed catalogs arriving daily in the mail. Planning should include deciding on the plants we want to put out (and where), and preparing the soil to plant. Plowing or tilling a time or two before planting time can make the soil good and crumbly, if done when the soil is suitably dry. Wet soil creates clumps that lock up nutrients. Well-tilled soil makes it easier for roots

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he Mississippi State University Extension Service Soil Testing Laboratory analyzes soil. It only costs $6 for a routine analysis. For more information, see msucares.com/crops/ soils/testing.html, or visit your local extension office or write: Soil Testing Laboratory, Box 9610, Mississippi State; or call 662-325-3313.

the hay they had bought for mulching had herbicide residue that was killing their plants. The moral: Be careful about your inputs. Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eatingâ&#x20AC;? (Findhorn Press), is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook or follow him @edibleprayers or @organicwriter or visit blueskywaters.com.

WATCH YOUR SEEDS

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SEED COMPANIES TO TRY

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jacksonfreepress.com

Now is the time to plan the placement and diversity of your summer crops.

widely sold, if consumers knew how critical and rare the material was, they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t treat it so cavalierly. Some scientists say that the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peat bogs are as vital and endangered as the rainforests. Not only do they hold moisture in their indigenous habitats as a protection against local droughts, they provide habitat for wildlife, and they also hold prodigious amounts of carbonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which protects the planet from climate change. Using peat moss in the garden releases that stored carbon into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Many people who routinely used peat are now turning to renewable organic matter, such as cocoa shells. While you are planning your garden, make sure you have fertile soil by taking a sample down to the extension service to be tested. That will tell you precisely what you need to add to your soil to grow good crops and what elements are in abundance so that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t over fertilize. We want healthy soil in organic gardening, without artificial inputs or runoff that will harm the environment. One issue that came up during the Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association workshops last November was the experience of some organic farmers in north Mississippi who were baffled by their plants failing to grow. They discovered, to their horror, that

COURTESY JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SELECTED SEEDS

COURTESY JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SELECTED SEEDS

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

33


LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

All-You Can- Drink

Scott Albert Johnson

%ORRG\0DU\ 0LPRVD%DU

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

6RXWK6WDWH6WUHHW_-DFNVRQ06 _ZZZMDFRVWDFRVFRP

Thank You! for voting us

Come Try Our Dinner Specials 2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

February 13 - 19, 2013

34

How much do you know about this seasonal delight?

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

If you simply canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait a year to eat another king cake, try making your own. This recipe makes three cakesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;plenty to share with friends.

by Michele Breaux

CRABCAKES now on the menu

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

601-919-2829

What do the three colors of icing stand for? What does the circular shape represent? What is Mardi Gras actually leading up to (hint: weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in it now)? What small trinket is often hidden in the cake or included with it? What does the recipient of said trinket have to do? Where does the name â&#x20AC;&#x153;king cakeâ&#x20AC;? come from? Find the answers at jfp.ms/kingcake

Easy King Cakes

Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2012

1 2 3 4 5 6

-JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Of Jackson 2013-

ALL CRAB, NO FILLER

Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to say farewell to fresh king cakes once again. As the scent of flaky dough and sweet icing fades from local bakeries and we polish off the last slices, many of us are already looking forward to next year, when the seasonal treat comes back again. Now is as good a time as any to consider: How well do you really know the green, purple and gold treat? Test your king cake knowledge so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ready when Carnival season 2014 rolls around.

Best Fried Chicken!

5A44 FX5X

Join us for Happy Hour

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

FLICKR/SYVWLCH

IRUZLWK /XQFK(YHU\6DWXUGD\

Saturday, February 16, 2013 9:00pm | Cover $5

A King Cake Quiz

Cake:

1 tablespoon sugar 4-1/2 teaspoons yeast 1/2 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees) 2 cups milk 10 tablespoons butter or shortening 2 teaspoons salt 2 egg yolksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;save whites for egg wash 1/2 cup sugar 6-1/4 to 7 cups flour Cinnamon, as desired 3 12-1/2 ounce cans cake filling (can be found on the baking aisle in several flavorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;note: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the same thing as pie filling!)

Topping:

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 â&#x20AC;˘ 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079

3 cups powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 to 4 tablespoons water colored sugars: green, purple and yellow

Place yeast in a medium bowl and sprinkle with one tablespoon sugar. Stir in 1/2 cup warm water (if water is hotter than 115 degrees it will kill the yeast) to dissolve sugar and mix yeast in well. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a thermometer, water should feel warm but not hot on your wrist. Place bowl in a warm place and let the yeast mixture double in size; it should take about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, heat two cups of milk. Melt the butter in warm (not hotâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;remember the 115-degree limit) milk. When milk has cooled, whisk in two egg

yolks, half cup sugar and two teaspoons salt, and add to yeast mixture. If you are using a mixer, attach a dough hook. While mixing, add flour slowly to yeast mixture until dough is glossy but not sticky. This can be as much as seven cups of flour. Move dough into an oiled or buttered bowl, turning to oil all sides. Cover with a damp cloth and put in a warm place to rise until doubled, 45 minutes to one hour. After dough has doubled, punch down and divide into three. Roll or pat out each section on a floured surface into a 16-inch by 10-inch rectangle. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Spread one can of filling onto each rectangle. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go all the way to the edges, or it will squeeze out. Roll it up jelly-roll style into a long snake shape. Gently twist this roll into a wreath shape and pinch ends together. Repeat with all three sections of dough. Place seam-side down on baking sheets and let rise in a warm place for 45 more minutes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Make an egg wash by adding two tablespoons water to the saved egg whites. Whisk until smooth and brush over tops of cakes. Bake cakes for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Let cakes cool. To decorate, make a glaze from three cups powdered sugar, a half teaspoon vanilla extract, and enough water to achieve desired consistency. Decorate cakes with colored sugars.


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

Lifelong Learning Wednesday - February 13

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

Karaoke • $3 Pitchers

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat)

Thursday - February 14

Naked Eskimos

Valentine’s Ball

feat. Snazz Friday - February 15

Rodea Dance with On The Edge

Friday, February 15 & Saturday, February 16

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

Saturday - February 16

Rodea Dance with On The Edge Sunday - February 17 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

jacksonfreepress.com

M

y friend Brooks and I have a restaurant world, culinary history and inbit of a running joke involving novation. Chatting him up while you sip our alma mater, Millsaps Col- means you are guaranteed not only a good lege. I love Millsaps dearly and cocktail, but some intellectual stimulation am grateful every day for the education it as well. He’s even planning lectures on gave me. That education included making topics like classic cocktails and scheduled me and my friend—and no doubt count- regular wine tastings on Monday nights at less other alumni—into lifelong learners. 6 p.m. (Calendar of events available at the We tend to laugh about it: Will we ever Fairview Inn.) figure out what we want to be when we While visiting the Library has become grow up? a bit of a Monday night tradition, a girl can’t For some, it means a lifetime (or live on booze alone. Thanks to Brooks, I renear-lifetime) of formal education via one cently discovered another literarily minded graduate school program after another. Personally, I tapped out after just one graduate degree (a J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School), though I did go back and complete the Else School of Management’s Business Advantage Program (a certificate program for professionals) at Millsaps two years ago. I don’t care to amass any more education-related debt, and my short attention span means I lack the patience required to pursue, say, a doctorate. My lifelong thirst for knowledge takes a form more akin to curiosity than a desire to accumuMillsaps College inspired in Julie Skipper a journey of lasting late multiple diplomas. learning that continues throughout Jackson. Luckily, plenty of opportunities around town can quench that thirst without the pressure of way to get some learning. The Eudora Weltests, grades and papers. ty Visiting Writer Series at Millsaps brings The perfect place to learn is a library, noted authors to campus to give talks that so it’s fitting that one of my favorite new are free and open to the public. Each event bars is the Library Lounge at the Fairview features a guest writer followed by a reading Inn (734 Fairview St., 601-948-3429, and a question-and-answer session. Most fairviewinn.com). This small (four seats at recently, Ann Patchett’s lecture about why the bar, 25 seats total), cozy spot is quickly she wanted to become a writer, the process gaining ground as the place for Belhaven- of writing, and the surprises she’s encounarea residents to stop for a classic cocktail tered in her career left me feeling creative, and nibble on a small plate. The bar is inspired and eager to attend the next lecliterally in the home’s library, inviting you ture. (For more information, contact Dr. to grab a book from the shelf as you sit by Steve Kistulentz, 601-974-1305, writers@ the fire. In keeping with the literary theme, millsaps.edu.) the cocktail menu features drinks named Given that Jackson is a college town for Mississippi authors. And it doesn’t and our state’s capital, full of museums and stop there. culture, we have plenty of opportunities to Bartender John Swanson keeps a stack keep learning. Next on my list is an upcomof books on classic and prohibition-era ing event featuring free lectures at Jackson cocktails on the bar, but rather than perus- State University’s Margaret Walker Alexaning them myself, I prefer gleaning from his der Center called “Necessary Tension: An wisdom on the subject. It’s not just cock- Honest Conversation on Race, Art and tails he knows. As a proponent of sustain- Identity,” with Kiese Laymon (jsums.edu/ able farming and a graduate of the Culinary margaretwalkeralexander). Institute of America with impressive restauLifelong learning: In this college town, rant experience, Swamson knows well the why not embark on some yourself?

35


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Fridays & Saturdays in February 7pm-11pm Veh icle cou rtes

y of

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Thursdays 5pm-10pm

down your gullet.

Fridays Saturday&s

February 13 - 19, 2013

5pm-11pm

36

Get happy. !"#$%&'(()*+,*%-,'.%/%0123456(78%9:%;<!=" !>=$$>$!?><!@?%/%(1A)(B'C3A123456(7D2,E

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Valentine ’s Day

www.nandyscandy.com

• Pedicure & Manicure • Gel Acrylics • Shellac/Gel Polish • Dresses • Shoes • Formal Dresses for Homecoming • Accessories • Much more… Nail services by appointment only.

Where fashion meets beauty…

OVER 100,000 visits last month…

Were you one of them? Come Come see see the the

NEW SITE!

Planting Season is Here! Martinson’s is stocked and ready with of bushels of bushes! 650 Hwy 51 | Ridgeland 601.856.3078 facebook.com/martinsonsms www.martinsonsms.com mon - sat 8:30am - 5:30pm sunday CLOSED

Who needs flowers when you can have a bouquet of blowout styles!

Mississippi’s First Blow Dry & Keratin Bar!

Shampoo/Style one flat price.. $25! No cuts. No color. No appointment necessary. Now how cool is that! Give Us A Call! 5352
Lakeland
Dr
suite
600
|
Flowood 601.992.7980
|
601.992.4911
|
www.lacrusalon.com Tues:
9‐7
•
Wed
9‐5
•
Thu:
9‐7
•
Fri:
9‐6
•
Sat:
9‐3

jacksonfreepress.com

Trace Station 500 Hwy 51 Suite L Ridegeland, MS 601.427.5163

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

www.jfp.ms

Mon-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 601-362-9553 Find Us On Facebook zz

39


HAIR STYLIST

GREEK & MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE

Natural Hair • Extenstion • Cut & Color 4920 Watkins Dr. • Hair & Things Salon 601.868.2040 • tstylezdesignz@gmail. com

Lunch Buffet • 11-2 Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri • 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun • 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun • 5 - 10pm

862 Avery Blvd • Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 • ruchiindia.com

2741 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 601.366.0161 w w w . P e t r a C a f e . n e t

Great Valentine’s Day Gift Idea! To: Metro Jackson Area Residents Value: $30.00 (1 free hour, Reformer class) From: Vivian Taylor (by appointment)

136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway)

601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

Koinonia Presents…

During the entire month of February Every Fri & Sat 5:30pm - 9:30pm Poetry, Reading and Spirituals Full Course Dinner

$18

pilatesvworks@gmail.com • pilatesvstudioworks.com • 601.665.4530

getting it daily?

news as it occurs + • events • sports • music

Valentines…

jfpdaily.com

A month long celebration embracing the rich culture of the African American Community.

Just because it’s named for a Saint doesn’t mean be one! (Toys, lingerie and DVD’s will certainly help with that!)

Romantic Adventures Jackson’s very nice, naughty store. 175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p www.shopromanticadventures.com

v11n23 - From Straitjackets to Service  

From Straitjackets to Service: Rethinking Mental Health in Mondern Times Legalizing the Homebrew Hobby? Ole Miss' Big Haul King Cake: Make i...