Page 1


2

October 31 - November 6, 2012


TRIP BURNS

I

JACKSONIAN FRANK FIGGERS

n the NAACP office on Lynch Street, Frank Figgers sits in the lobby, wearing Clubmaster Readers glasses. He is a thirdgeneration Jacksonian, and the third generation of his family to live in the same neighborhood, near the intersection of Pocahontas Avenue and Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. “My grandmother and grandfather, on my father’s side, and my wife’s grandmother and grandfather, on her father’s side, resided in the same neighborhood,” he says. “My grandfather had a good year sharecropping, and he invested his good year in land and settled there. In turn, he divided his land among his children. My father didn’t use his portion, so when my wife and I married, he gave it to us.” Figgers and his wife, Laura, met when they were 9 years old, and were “on and off with each other” until they married in August 1975. Growing up, Figgers went to Holy Ghost Catholic School, and his wife attended local public schools, graduating from Lanier High School. “We were always comparing notes and lessons, between public and private school,” Figgers, 62, says. “When we went to college, she went to Jackson State and I, Tougaloo. We both majored in sociology. So we were again comparing notes.” They graduated from their respective colleges in 1972. At Tougaloo, Figgers worked part-time for the Jackson Human Rights Project. One of the projects “arms,” as Figgers calls it, was

CONTENTS

the Georgetown Liberation School, which later changed its name to the Georgetown Black and Proud School and, ultimately, the Black and Proud Elementary School. The school originated as an after-school program and, over the course of several years, developed into a state-accredited elementary school. “[It] was started by a group of parents that was concerned about the education of their children when everybody knew that the schools were going to be integrated. So one year, they (the opponents of integration) were fighting for the schools not to be integrated, not to allow black children to attend white schools. … The parents were concerned, you know, if you’re fighting against me this year, when my child comes there, what kind of education are they going to receive?” Former civil-rights workers and teachers staffed the school, which had a standard elementary school curriculum, with the addition of a black studies program. “There wasn’t a lot of money in that kind of work,” Figgers says. “So I also worked at an office and school supply company called Southern Supply and Sales, and I worked there until 1980.” Figgers worked several other positions throughout the years, before retiring as an architectural product specialist. He also served as election commissioner of District 3 from 1996 to 2004, responsible for hiring, selecting and training poll workers. —Dylan Watson

Cover illustration by Mike Day

8 Lauderdale’s Disdain for Children The U.S. Department of Justice has sued Lauderdale County and various people and departments within for injustices against youth.

27 Collecting Moments

“I was really looking for, initially, things that artists had already done. Things that were tucked away, sketches, incidentals. My thought was that these are moments between artists, colleagues, friends that are very non-self-conscious. There’s no pressure of commission or exhibit or exhibition of these pieces. So I was really thrilled to find a lot of works that were done over the past 20 years.” —David Lambert, curator of “Artists by Artists” exhibit

32 Everything We Hoped For

7evenThirty’s recently released “Heaven’s Computer,” a concept album that follows the exploits of a space traveler, reasserts the rapper’s raw talent.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 17 ............................ COVER STORY 27 .............................. DIVERSIONS 28 ....................................... 8 DAYS 30 ............................... JFP EVENTS 31 .......................................... FILM 32 ....................................... MUSIC 33 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 34 ..................................... SPORTS 35 ...... BEST OF JACKSON BALLOT 37 .............................. BODY/SOUL 39 ......................................... FOOD 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 42 ............................ ELECTION FLY

KEN PATTERSON; TRIP BURNS; MELISSA WEBSTER

OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 8

3


EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

The Deal With a Racist Devil

M

any of us have been there. We’re having a political debate over rising national debt or the merits of “Obamacare,” and suddenly we hurl over a bizarre cliff: We hear that President Obama used ACORN to steal the election, that he’s making it easier for freeloaders to get welfare or the zinger: “He is not a Christian. He was born in Kenya.” Before we know it, we are whiplashed into the middle of an alternative birther universe, where easily verifiable facts are ignored. For me, these moments blind me with memories of growing up in Mississippi, listening to racial slurs and innuendo about “them” that made no moral or Christian sense from extended family and their friends (not my immediate family, thank God). I would always get up and leave. I walked out of my Mississippi State boyfriend’s family living room in North Jackson because his uncle greeted the news that I’m from Neshoba County with approval: “Well, y’all know what to do with your n*ggers that act up, don’t ya? You just bury them under a dam!” Blinded with shock, I got up and left. His mother never forgave me. That slur, of course, was arguably more obvious than today’s birther myth. Or is it? I mean, who gets to spread rumors that a long-time Christian church-goer (who cares a ton about the needy) isn’t actually a Christian—as if they could possibly know? But now we seem to be going backward, not forward, on race and other bigotry issues. Ten years ago, maybe even four years ago, I thought the nation was farther along than we are on the road to racial understanding and acceptance. I remember going to a so-called Klan rally over in Neshoba County, my home county known for our violent race past, not long after moving back here. It was absurd, with a handful of KKKers in a muscle truck with a woman in a rebel flag tank top as their spokeswoman.

They marched around the court square and about everyone there had shown up to shout them down: “Go home!” “Idiots!” I was really proud of my hometown that day. Now we have reports—such as recent one by ABC News—of angry Klansmen growing in popularity in Mississippi and around the nation. I get disgusting emails from the John Birch Society, still yammering about the U.N. And there is no much open racism on conservative blogs right here in Jackson that it makes my toes curl (by, inevitably, men too cowardly to use their real names, but racists often hide under hoods, masks and pseudonyms, after all.) Then last week, the co-chairman of the Mitt Romney presidential campaign, John Sununu, made a horribly bigoted statement about Colin Powell, and he wasn’t fired the next day. It’s worse than it was when we started the paper 10 years ago. The reason is obvious if we pay attention. Many people spreading baseless rumors they see on nasty blogs aren’t trying to be mean or hateful; they think they’re right because people they agree with on other issues or go to church with believe it, too. There’s no need to check it out; besides, any source that says something else is obviously “biased.” People are passing along hateful lies and bigotry because they are very purposely being lied to. I’ve written often about the Republican “southern strategy” that Richard Nixon and then Ronald Reagan and even the first George Bush adopted to get people they perceived to be white racists to go along with policies that helped the rich, if not most of the presumed racists. Their strategists—including the late Lee Atwater and his sidekick, our own Haley Barbour—convinced them to court the old Dixiecrat voters who fled the Democratic Party in the 1960s after it supported civilrights legislation to end legal segregation and Jim Crow policies. In essence, the GOP

made a deal with the racist devil to get support for government shrinkage—meaning of the kinds of laws and regulations that could have kept more manufacturing and jobs in the U.S. and Americans working—as well as tax breaks and loopholes for the wealthy. They also went after these voters with wedge issues like being against abortion and gay rights—at least in public. To get it done, the new not-Lincolnesque GOP rejected the more blatant racism of the Dixiecrats in favor of wink-wink racism—such as attacking “welfare mothers” (falsely presumed to be overwhelmingly black and single); food stamps (same wrong assumption); “entitlements” (ditto); and crime hysteria (the “super-predator” myth spread by Reagan drug czar Bill Bennett and the first George Bush’s “Willie Horton” ad). (These days, politicos refer to winkwink racism as “dog whistling.”) The Republican Party, which used to be the preferred party of black Americans before the 1960s, has nearly cracked under the weight of this burden. It has become an exclusive club with a weird mix of corporate barons (and those who’d love to be), abject racists and “values voters.” It has seen a sad descent with its potential membership shrinking as younger voters and just about every non-white rejects the party. South Carolina Sen. Lindsay Graham said it well at this year’s Republican National Convention when he warned that there just aren’t that many more “angry white guys” to lure into the party, so they’d better change their ways. Former RNC chairman Ken Mehlman even apologized to the NAACP in 2005 for using the southern race strategy, saying, “it’s not healthy for our country.” If anything, now it’s worse—and the kinds of false ideas about the “other” is empowering fringe groups like the new Klan in Mississippi to believe they can attract enough membership to raise real hell again against

non-whites. (Remember: The Klan always emerged out of more mainstream bigotry; not the other way around.) And dangerous agitators like neo-con Dinesh D’Souza write books like “The End of Racism” (1996) to convince us that talking about racism is actually racist. Then he does a film in 2012 (“2016: Obama’s America”) to convince the gullible that Barack Obama is actually acting on behalf of the Muslim father he met once. Then there are men like Mitt Romney and John Sununu. Are they racist? Clearly. Racism is always about what you do and the “system” you support and whether it systemically hurts an ethnic group that already lacks real equality and equal access to opportunity. The legacy of our nation’s racism has not yet been reversed—precisely because white men like these do not want to risk losing some of their own power and wealth, regardless of how they got it or who suffered as a result. This campaign has pulled out the race stops and turned the U.S. backward in a way that even George W. Bush wouldn’t do. Both Romney and Rep. Paul Ryan lied repeatedly, for instance, about Obama changing the work rules for welfare (he didn’t), and Sununu has gone out repeatedly and made race-charged statements. The latest—that Gen. Powell endorsed Obama because he’s black—appeals to the worst instincts of some white Americans, whom these men assume are majority racist. Why else would Powell have endorsed Obama!?! Sigh. Sununu could not know what is in Powell’s mind any more than our own family or friends (or D’Souza) could know if Obama secretly pines to be Muslim. But leaders from a shrinking lily-white party do know that some people want to believe that black people are as race-obsessed as they are. It is up to white Americans to end this ugly ruse right here. Please stop voting against your best interests because some Republicans assume you’re racist. Prove them wrong.

October 31 - November 6, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Jacob Fuller

Ronni Mott

Mike Day

Dylan Watson

Garrad Lee

Kathleen M. Mitchell

Tom Speed

Terrence Jones

Reporter Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He covers the city for the JFP. He wrote the cover story.

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. She’s an awardwinning writer and the JFP’s news editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She helped coordinate the cover package.

At the “Hindsonian” at Hinds Community College, Mike Day won top cartoonist awards from the Mississippi Press Association and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association in New York. Mike drew the cover graphic.

Editorial Intern Dylan Watson is from Indianola. He is a senior at Millsaps College, where he studies political science. Dylan wrote the Jacksonian and contributed to the cover package.

Garrad Lee is a graduate of Jackson State University and currently teaches history at a community college. He grew up in south Jackson, but now lives in Fondren with his wife, dog and cat.

Features Editor Kathleen Mitchell is a Millsaps College graduate. She is hoping for four more years, and possibly four more beers as well, this election season. She wrote the arts feature and shopped for FLY.

Tom Speed is a writer, amateur kazooist and peanut butter enthusiast. He co-founded the music magazine Honest Tune and has written for Paste, Blurt and Living Blues magazines, among others. Tom wrote a music feature.

Design intern Terrence Jones is a recent graduate of Hinds Community College. When he isn’t interning at the JFP, he freelances design work. Call him at 601-667-8090 or email terrence.jones42606@ go.hindscc.edu.


ACLU of MS Voter Information! There is no PHOTO VOTER ID REQUIREMENT!

You do not have to show photo identification to vote unless it is your first time voting and you registered by mail. Persons with disabilities may ask for assistance to vote. Some felony convictions do not impede your right to vote. Be cautious of rumors overheard while standing in line, as they may be designed to intimidate you. Locate your polling location and the hours before you go to vote. Review the sample ballot before you cast your vote. If you experience problems exercising your right to vote, call 1-888-354-ACLU immediately.

In Mississippi, the ACLU has been on the forefront of protecting the right to vote, especially for the poor and for people of color whose right to vote historically has been the most vulnerable to suppression. www.aclu-ms.org | 601-354-3408

jacksonfreepress.com

A strong, healthy democracy must include the voices of all its citizens. In a democracy, voting is a right, not a privilege. Yet, in our democracy, more than 5 million Americans are unable to participate in this most basic, fundamental right of citizenship. Know your rights before you go to the polls on Nov. 6!

5


Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

COURTESY BRYAN DOYLE

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

[YOU & JFP]

WHAT IS THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE AT STAKE IN THE NOVEMBER ELECTION? (Be serious, please. No conspiracy theories, birther crap or anything thrown around by Dinesh D’Souza.) Melissa Kelly: Using economic policies which have been shown to work for recovery, even if not as quickly as we would wish; or going back to Voodoo trickledown mythology and ramrodding our economy into oblivion.

will also affect me in a very direct way. So, I’m scared, not just for me, but for others in the same boat. Elaanie Stormbender: National security ... without it, everything else is just chatter.

Bilal Hashim: The economy. Toi Thomas: The economy. Jill Butler: Not allowing the 1% to continue to milk the country dry.

Bryan Doyle is reading the JFP election issue from 2008.

.!-%%U\DQ'R\OH ,/#!4)/.&DSLWRO+LOO:DVKLQJWRQ'& !'%

/##50!4)/.-RXUQDOLVW32/,7,&2 ,)6%$).*!#+3/.LQ

*&02%!$%23).#%GXULQJWKHEHJLQQLQJRI)UDQN0HOWRQVDJD6HUYHGDVPXVLFHGLWRULQ IRUWKH-)3*UDWHIXOWKDW'RQQDDOVROHWPHZULWHDERXWSROLWLFVRQRFFDVLRQ

&!6/2)4%*!#+3/.-/-%.4Âł,KDYHWZR)LUVW,ÂśGGHÂżQLWHO\KDYHWRVD\WKHHOHFWLRQSDUW\DW+DO DQG0DOÂśVLQ1RYHPEHU)RUP\VHFRQG,ZLVKWRLQFOXGHDFRPSRVLWHRIPHPRULHVIURPP\ WLPHLQ)RQGUHQ)ULGD\VLQ)RQGUHQKDSS\KRXUVDW6DO 0RRNLHÂśVZDONLQJWRZRUNRQ6WDWH6WUHHW ,WÂśVMXVWDQDPD]LQJSODFHWROLYHDVDFUHDWLYHSHUVRQDQG,ÂśPJUDWHIXOIRUDOOWKHIULHQGV,PDGHZKLOH ,ZDVWKHUH´ ,!34"//+2%!$Âł2WLV7KH2WLV5HGGLQJ6WRU\´E\6FRWW)UHHPDQ)RUIDQVRIWKHVLQJHULWÂśVD PXVWUHDG &!6/2)4%3!9).'Âł<RXFDQÂśWXVHXSFUHDWLYLW\7KHPRUH\RXXVHWKHPRUH\RXKDYH´        ²0D\D$QJHORX "%340!24/&4(%%,%#4)/.3%!3/.Âł,ZRXOGVD\WKHSROLWLFDOFRQYHQWLRQVLQ7DPSDDQG&KDU ORWWH3XUHSROLWLFDOWKHDWHUOLNHZKDWZHVHHZLWKWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUVSHHFKHVFDQEHYHU\HQWHUWDLQLQJLIQRW LQVSLULQJ$QG\HVLWÂśVFDQDOVREHIXQWRZDWFKDGLVDVWHURUWZR´ 7/2340!24/&4(%%,%#4)/.3%!3/.Âł7KLQNLQJDERXWH[DFWO\KRZPXFKPRQH\LVEHLQJVSHQW E\RXWVLGHJURXSVWKLVHOHFWLRQF\FOH'DYH/HYLQWKDODQG.HQ9RJHODW32/,7,&2DORQJZLWKWKHFUHZ DW3UR3XEOLFDKDYHGRQHVRPHDPD]LQJZRUNUHSRUWLQJRQ6XSHU3$&6DQGWKHLULPSDFWLQWKLVHOHF WLRQ3HRSOHQHHGWREHHGXFDWHGDERXWWKHLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIWKHVHW\SHVRIRUJDQL]DWLRQVEHFDXVHWKH\ÂśUH DOVRJURZLQJDWWKHVWDWHDQGORFDOOHYHOV´

-OST6IRAL3TORIES,AST7EEK FROMJFPMS -OST VIEWED%VENTSLISTINGS

October 31 - November 6, 2012

³5RPQH\WR(QG+RVSLWDO9LVLWDWLRQ5LJKWV´UHDGHU EORJSRVWE\1DWKDQ:LOVRQ ³&KULVWLDQ5HGQHFNVDQG3DWULRWV$7HD3DUW\&KDW´ E\5/1DYH ³6HSDUDWLRQ6DWXUGD\DQG:HHN&ROOHJH)RRWEDOO 3LFV´EORJSRVWE\%U\DQ)O\QQ ³:KR,V.ULV.REDFK"´E\5/1DYH ³%HZDUHWKH*23œV 8Q 6FLHQWL¿F6H[LVP´HGLWRUœV QRWHE\'RQQD/DGG

6

.LGVÂś1LJKW2XWDW/LEHUW\3DUN)ORZRRG2FW  %ORFNWREHU+DOORZHHQ3DUW\'RZQWRZQ2FW  7UXVWPDUN5HG%HDQV 5LFH&HOHEUDWLRQ2FW  $OO2FWOLVWLQJV

Stephanie Burks: Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive rights. Shane Crowe: National debt. Georgia Casey Purvis: The economy is my biggest concern. This year, I have lost income at a time when cost of living is skyrocketing. I am truly afraid and disheartened. I have cut out nearly everything, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still having a rough time. Anything affecting health-care funding

Lesly Michals: Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights. Davy Frazee: Having an election where third parties are fairly treated and not just pushed to the side by democrats and republicans. Vote Jill Stein. Linda Albin McMurtrey: A fair and balanced economic policy. ... Laurie Ross: Marriage rights for LGBT and reproductive rights for women. Lindsey Lee: Education!!

&)2340%23/.

I

went to my OBGYN yesterday and asked when I might need a new IUD. Too much information? Truly, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree more, until NOW. My doctor kindly but firmly suggested that I make sure and get a new one as soon as possible, and certainly before the end of this year. The clear implication: Laws may change early next year, because we may have a new president, and the IUD could no longer be covered by my insurance. Furthermore, a personhood amendment would outlaw it altogether. I live in Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a personhood

amendment vote here is inevitable. This is not a slippery slope. This is a vortex. Why anyone in their right mind is taking these positions, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. But I know this: WE CANNOT STAND FOR IT. My vote from here on out goes to those who promise they will do everything in their power to allow my daughter to live in a humane society. Enough of this madness! â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Caroline Herring, via Facebook. Herring, a Canton native and Ole Miss grad, is an Atlanta-based singer-songwriter.


jacksonfreepress.com

www.hiltonjackson.com

7


¹) SEE A #ONGRESS THAT HAS COMPLETELY ABANDONED MIDDLE CLASS AND WORKING FAMILIES² ²'HPRFUDWLFVW'LVWULFWFDQ GLGDWH %UDG 0RUULV FULWLFL]LQJ WKH ERG\ LQ ZKLFK RSSRQHQW 5HS$ODQ1XQQHOHHVHUYHV

Thursday, Oct. 25 Hinds County Chancery Judge Denise Owens ruled that the Department of Human Services must delay the start of a finger scanning system for some parents to sign youngsters in and out of child care. â&#x20AC;Ś President Barack Obama called out Republican rival Mitt Romney over his backing of Richard Mourdock, the Indiana Senate candidate drawing fire for saying that pregnancies that result from rape are â&#x20AC;&#x153;something God intended.â&#x20AC;? Friday, Oct. 26 Blueprint Mississippi released a report showing that Mississippi has trouble competing for biotech research and development jobs because too few residents are highly skilled in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Saturday, Oct. 27 Gov. Phil Bryant called for a statefinanced expansion of the University of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical school.

October 31- November 6 , 2012

Sunday, Oct. 28 The Army Corps of Engineers started work to raise 4.7 miles of the Mississippi River levee near Vicksburg. â&#x20AC;Ś A magnitude 7.7 earthquake struck off the west coast of Canada, the biggest one in the country since the earthquake that registered 8.1 in 1949.

8

Monday, Oct. 29 Officials of the Southern Poverty Law Center inspected the Pike County Juvenile Detention Center after expressing concerns about possible abuse and unsanitary conditions. â&#x20AC;Ś The threat of an 11-foot wall of water approaching New York City, caused by Hurricane Sandy, prompted officials to close the mass transit system. Tuesday, Oct. 30 Bahrain imposed emergency-style rules banning all protest gatherings and threatening legal action against groups considered backing escalating demonstrations and clashes in the country. Get daily breaking news at jfpdaily.ms.

²6RXWKHUQ 3RYHUW\ /DZ &HQWHU 0LVVLVVLSSL'LUHFWRU-RG\2ZHQVRQ VFKRROVDQGMXYHQLOHMXVWLFH

*RY3KLO%U\DQWZDQWV WRFUHDWHD³G\QDPLF HFRQRP\´ZLWKWKH KHDOWKFDUHLQGXVWU\ &DQLWZRUN" S

Protecting the Kids by Ronni Mott

A

young student left her class to use the bathroom. She didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have her teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permission, even though she had asked for it. The girl had a bladder problem, and was afraid she would have an accident and soil herself. The teacher refused to let her go, but she went anyway. As a result, police arrested her and put her in a detention center because she disobeyed the teacher. If such a scene happened only once, you might dismiss it as an anomaly, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way the youth-justice system in Lauderdale County has been working for years, said Jody Owens of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which sued the county over abusive practices at its detention center in 2009. On Oct. 24, after an eightmonth investigation and two months of unsuccessfully trying to negotiate with the defendants, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the county, the city of Meridian, two county youth court judges, the state Department of Human Services and the Division of Youth Services, accusing â&#x20AC;&#x153;unlawful conduct through which they routinely and systematically arrest and incarcerate children.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lawsuit makes clear that children have constitutional rights and that the Department of Justice will do all in its

power to protect these rights,â&#x20AC;? said U.S. Deputy Assistant Attorney General Roy L. Austin Jr. during a press conference announcing the lawsuit. The DOJ alleges that the defendants operate a school-to-prison pipeline. They regularly violate childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitutional rights by arresting them without probable cause, denying them effective counseling or hearings, and then â&#x20AC;&#x153;imposing disproportionate and severe consequences, including incarceration.â&#x20AC;? The offensesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some as minor as wearing the wrong color socks or being late for classâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;result in police automatically handcuffing and arresting the kids at school â&#x20AC;&#x153;regardless of whether information is conveyed regarding the allegation,â&#x20AC;? or whether the â&#x20AC;&#x153;crimeâ&#x20AC;? warrants arresting the child. The suit states that the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s violations â&#x20AC;&#x153;are particularly grievous and pronounced for black children and children with disabilities in the Meridian Public School District.â&#x20AC;? The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall African American population stands at 62 percent, according to the DOJ, yet the school districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrollment is 86 percent black. From the 2006-2007 school year through the first semester of the 2009-2010 year, every one

DVDQLQVXOWLVDORWOLNHFDOOLQJVRPHRQHWKHQZRUG SHRSOHZKRKDYHPDWXUHGLQWRDFWXDODGXOWVMXVWGRQÂśW GRLW:HFDQÂśWLPSURYHRQWKHJUDFLRXVUHVSRQVHRI -RKQ)UDQNOLQ6WHSKHQVD6SHFLDO2O\PSLFVDWKOHWH +HUHÂśVZKDWKHZURWHLQDQRSHQOHWWHURQWKH6SHFLDO 2O\PSLFVEORJ VSHFLDORO\PSLFVEORJZRUGSUHVVFRP 

 ³)LQDOO\,ZRQGHUHGLI\RXPHDQWWRGHJUDGHKLP DVVRPHRQHZKRLVOLNHO\WRUHFHLYHEDGKHDOWKFDUH OLYHLQORZJUDGHKRXVLQJZLWKYHU\OLWWOHLQFRPHDQG VWLOOPDQDJHVWRVHHOLIHDVDZRQGHUIXOJLIW  ³%HFDXVH0V&RXOWHUWKDWLVZKRZHDUH²DQG PXFKPXFKPRUH  ³$IWHU,VDZ\RXUWZHHW,UHDOL]HG\RXMXVWZDQWHG WREHOLWWOHWKHSUHVLGHQWE\OLQNLQJKLPWRSHRSOHOLNH PH<RXDVVXPHGWKDWSHRSOHZRXOGXQGHUVWDQGDQG DFFHSWWKDWEHLQJOLQNHGWRVRPHRQHOLNHPHLVDQ LQVXOWDQG\RXDVVXPHG\RXFRXOGJHWDZD\ZLWKLWDQG VWLOODSSHDURQ79  ³,KDYHWRZRQGHULI\RXFRQVLGHUHGRWKHUKDWHIXO ZRUGVEXWUHFRLOHGIURPWKHEDFNODVK  ³:HOO0V&RXOWHU\RXDQGVRFLHW\QHHGWROHDUQ WKDWEHLQJFRPSDUHGWRSHRSOHOLNHPHVKRXOGEH FRQVLGHUHGDEDGJHRIKRQRU  ³1RRQHRYHUFRPHVPRUHWKDQZHGRDQGVWLOO ORYHVOLIHVRPXFK  ³&RPHMRLQXVVRPHGD\DW6SHFLDO2O\PSLFV6HH LI\RXFDQZDONDZD\ZLWK\RXUKHDUWXQFKDQJHG

MELISSA WEBSTER

Wednesday, Oct. 24 Jason Brookins resigned from his position as Executive Director of the Jackson Redevelopment Authority. â&#x20AC;Ś Militant groups in Syria rejected a proposal for a four-day cease-fire during the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha.

¹/NCETHEKIDHADBEENLABELEDAS ATROUBLESOMEKID ¨SCHOOLAU THORITIES CHOOSETOPUSHTHEMOUT OFTHECLASSROOMDIRECTLYINTOTHE DETENTIONCENTERS.OSTOPS²

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Retardâ&#x20AC;? Âł,KLJKO\DSSURYHRI5RPQH\ÂśVGHFLVLRQWREHNLQGDQG JHQWOHWRWKHUHWDUG´ °!NN#OULTERTWEETDURINGTHE THIRDPRESIDENTIALDEBATE /CT Âł2EDPDÂľ6WDJH5RPQH\VLDœ²EHFDXVHFDQFHUUHIHU HQFHVDUH+,/$5,286,IKHÂśVÂľWKHVPDUWHVWJX\LQWKH URRPÂśLWPXVWEHRQHUHWDUGHGURRP´ °!NN#OULTERTWEET /CT REGARDING0RESIDENT "ARACK/BAMA´SDUBBING'OV-ITT2OMNEY´STALENT FORCHANGINGHISPOSITIONSASÂą2OMNESIA² 7HYITSTINKS:KDWLVVKH"/LNHKHUPDOHFRXQ WHUSDUW5XVK/LPEDXJKULJKWZLQJSXQGLW$QQ&RXOWHU LVQRVWUDQJHUWRVOLQJLQJFKLOGLVKVOXUVZKHQVKHFDQÂśW FRPHXSZLWKDQ\WKLQJDFWXDOO\XVHIXORULQWHOOLJHQWWR VD\+DWHUVJRQQDKDWH%XWXVLQJWKHZRUGÂłUHWDUG´

Âł&RPHRQ0V&RXOWHU\RXDUHQÂśWGXPEDQG\RX DUHQÂśWVKDOORZ6RZK\DUH\RXFRQWLQXDOO\XVLQJD ZRUGOLNHWKH5ZRUGDVDQLQVXOW,ÂśPD\HDUROG PDQZLWK'RZQV\QGURPHZKRKDVVWUXJJOHGZLWK WKHSXEOLFÂśVSHUFHSWLRQWKDWDQLQWHOOHFWXDOGLVDELOLW\ PHDQVWKDW,DPGXPEDQGVKDOORZ,DPQRWHLWKHU RIWKRVHWKLQJVEXW,GRSURFHVVLQIRUPDWLRQPRUH VORZO\WKDQWKHUHVWRI\RX,QIDFWLWKDVWDNHQPHDOO GD\WRÂżJXUHRXWKRZWRUHVSRQGWR\RXUXVHRIWKH 5ZRUGODVWQLJKW  Âł,WKRXJKWÂżUVWRIDVNLQJZKHWKHU\RXPHDQWWR GHVFULEHWKHSUHVLGHQWDVVRPHRQHZKRZDVEXOOLHG DVDFKLOGE\SHRSOHOLNH\RXEXWURVHDERYHLWWRÂżQG DZD\WRVXFFHHGLQOLIHDVPDQ\RIP\IHOORZ6SHFLDO 2O\PSLDQVKDYH  Âł7KHQ,ZRQGHUHGLI\RXPHDQWWRGHVFULEHKLPDV VRPHRQHZKRKDVWRVWUXJJOHWREHWKRXJKWIXODERXW HYHU\WKLQJKHVD\VDVHYHU\RQHHOVHUDFHVIURPRQH VQDUN\VRXQGELWHWRWKHQH[W

³$IULHQG\RXKDYHQœWPDGH\HW -RKQ)UDQNOLQ6WHSKHQV *OREDO0HVVHQJHU 6SHFLDO2O\PSLFV9LUJLQLD´


¹7E´REALREADYNEEDINGMOREINTHEWAYOFFEDERALMONEYTHANWE´VEGOTTEN INTHEPAST9OUBEGINCUTTINGNOWWITHAMEATAX ANDTHEFEDERALPROGRAMS THAT -ISSISSIPPI WAS A HEAVY PARTICIPANT IN°WHETHER IT´S EDUCATION 0ELL GRANTS STUDENTLOANS WHATEVERAREA°-ISSISSIPPIWILLFEELITMORE BECAUSE WEDEPENDMOREONFEDERALDOLLARSTHANOTHERSTATES² ²6WHQQLV,QVWLWXWH'LUHFWRU0DUW\:LVHPDQRQIHGHUDODLG0LVVLVVLSSLUHFHLYHV

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf

gps!uif!npouit!pg!Pdupcfs!'!Opwfncfs

.%7315): +RZORQJDJRGLG+DELWDWIRU+XPDQLW\ 0HWUR-DFNVRQEHJLQZRUNLQJRQWKH(QJOH ZRRG*DUGHQVQHLJKERUKRRG" +RZPDQ\SHRSOHZRXOGORVHWKHLUMREVLI ZHUDLVHGWD[HVRQMREFUHDWRUV" :KDWLVWKHSHUFHQWDJHRI$IULFDQ $PHULFDQVLQWKHFLW\RI0HULGLDQ":KDWLV WKHVFKRROGLVWULFWÂśVHQUROOPHQWRI$IULFDQ $PHULFDQV" D$ERXWWKUHH\HDUVDJR E7KUHHTXDUWHUVRIDPLOOLRQ FSHUFHQWDQGSHUFHQW

of the students â&#x20AC;&#x153;referred to law enforcementâ&#x20AC;? and all students expelled from school in Meridian were black. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids of color were being disciplined more harshly for doing the same school violations that kids not of color would do,â&#x20AC;? Owens said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And those kids would ultimately find themselves in the detention center more and more often.â&#x20AC;? Disabled kids were punished for their disabilities, he said. If a child was hyperactive, for example, that behavior could result in incarceration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real sad component of this whole ordeal,â&#x20AC;? Owens said. Owens characterized some of the actions of the youngsters that resulted in arrest as â&#x20AC;&#x153;normal, kid-like behavior.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;They knew these kids were not committing criminal acts,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once the kid had been labeled as a troublesome kid, as a kid that acted up in class, â&#x20AC;Ś (school authorities) choose to push them out of the classroom directly into the detention centers. No stops.â&#x20AC;? As a result, he said, many kids would fall behind in school and ultimately drop out. The system continues its illegal actions during the intake process, the DOJ suit states, when the officer orders temporary custody of the child to the county without a hearing, without advising the child or his or her rights, and without a defense attorney. The county uses, â&#x20AC;&#x153;almost exclusively,â&#x20AC;? a single public defender, who gives â&#x20AC;&#x153;only minutesâ&#x20AC;? for a consultation and refuses to meet any time other than just prior to a hearing in the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth courtâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which could be several days after the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrest. In February, Lauderdale shut down its youth detention facility citing its legal battles with the SPLC. At the time of the investigation, Federal Judge Carlton

Reeves wrote that the facility â&#x20AC;&#x153;has allowed a cesspool of unconstitutional and inhuman acts and conditions to germinate, the sum of which places the offenders at substantial ongoing risk.â&#x20AC;? The county now ferries its youthful offenders to Rankin County, 80 miles from Meridian, where they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have access to their attorneys, counselors or, frequently, their families. The systemic practices of Lauderdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth justice system hurt kids, said the DOJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Austin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we are trying to do is to fix the problem and not the blame,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, the defendants do not feel the same way.â&#x20AC;? Owens says the entire systemâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from the schools to law enforcement to judgesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;share blame for the state of Lauderdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth justice system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every safeguard in place failed these kids,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most disappointing in this, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most shocking, is that the kids thought this was normal.â&#x20AC;? Comment and read the DOJ suit at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Npoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-7 pm Level 2&3 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:15-8:30 pm Level 1 (through October) â&#x20AC;˘ 7:15-7:45 pm Yoga for Runners (November)

Uvftebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Level 1

Xfeoftebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm The Practice â&#x20AC;˘ 1-1:15 pm Meditation â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

Uivstebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 11:30-12:30 pm Pilates (Oct 19-Nov 16, $60) â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 9-10:15 am Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

6DQG\ SIGNER 2 A P E &%-! 6 X U J H +LS+RS $JHQGD

jacksonfreepress.com

%ORRPEHUJÂśV

&KU\VOHU 6XQXQX 3 C A R Y

.REDFK

&ROLQ 3RZHOO 0HWURFHQWHU

Harvey Johnson, Jr. - Mayor

9


TALK | city

Habitat Rebuilds Englewood Gardens by Jacob D. Fuller

they began building brand new homes in the neighborhood, with a one-of-a-kind construction project in Jackson. The unique

because they meet each other (and) they become friends before they even become neighbors because they’ve been working on each others’ homes.” Along with helping build each other’s homes, homeowners in Englewood Gardens also attended a six-week financial counseling class called Financial Peace University. Now, 22 of the 27 homes in the neighborhood are complete. HFH/ MJ held an unveiling celebration in the neighborhood Oct. 24 with the help of Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., State Sen. Hillman Frazier and the Adult Gospel Choir of Nissan. Habitat For Humanity/Metro Jackson recently completed 22 new homes in the formerly derelict “It amounts to a subdivision, quite Englewood Gardens neighborhood, with help from frankly—a Habitat subdivision,” the new home owners. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. told the Jackson Free Press. “It’s a new concept; it’s a great concept. Habitat factor was one that Griffin said helps create does a great job in revitalizing areas througha community before anyone moves into out the city. This is one they’ve obviously put their homes. a great deal of resources into. “(The new home owners) worked on Griffin told the crowd at the celebratheir homes,” Griffin told the Jackson Free tion that it was wonderful to look around Press. “That’s what is a really nice compo- Englewood Gardens and not see abandoned nent of doing a neighborhood like this, homes and piles of trash. Now, she envisions

TRIP BURNS

H

abitat for Humanity unveiled 22 new homes in a celebration of teamwork that created a new and close-knit neighborhood from what was once an illegal dump. It is a big change from just a couple of years ago, Englewood Gardens served as a dumping ground and the notorious home of illegal and nefarious activities. Located off Woodrow Wilson near Hawkins Field, Englewood Gardens originally served as military barracks for the Hawkins Military Airfield beginning in the late 1940s. Once the military moved out, though, the neighborhood began to decay as absent landowners neglected the site. “This is truly an extraordinary day,” Habitat for Humanity/Metro Jackson Cindy Griffin said to the crowd at the opening celebration of the new neighborhood. “When I think about what was here before, and what we’re surrounded with now, it’s apparent that Englewood Gardens truly is a neighborhood that is rising out of the ashes of a dump heap.” About three years ago, Habitat for Humanity/Metro Jackson began working on cleaning up the property. In January 2012,

a thriving neighborhood with children playing, parents working and neighbors watching out for one another. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provided a Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant though the Mississippi Development Authority that funded 18 of the homes. HOME funds through the city of Jackson financed five more homes, and the Junior League of Jackson, Entergy, the Mississippi College School of Law, Women Build with Lowe’s, Nissan and hundred of volunteers also pitched in to help complete the homes. HUD provided funding through its Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program through Habitat for Humanity International to put in new water and sewer lines in Englewood Gardens. Altogether, the neighborhood is a $3.4 million investment into the city, that Griffin said will generate $5.7 million in local economic impact. Where there was once a tax vacuum, soon, 27 homeowners will contribute $15,000 annually in property taxes, as well as utility income for the city. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Factcheck: Morris, Nunnelee Debate in Oxford by R.L. Nave

October 31 - November 6, 2012

10

Rep. Alan Nunnelee Claim: “The accounting firm Ernst and Young has said if we raise taxes on job creators—which, incidentally we already have the highest tax of any country in the industrialized world on those that create jobs—that means three-quarters of a million people are going to lose their jobs.” Verdict: Partly right. While Ernst and Young did issue a widely cited report earlier this year that stated 750,000 jobs would be lost if the Bush-era tax cuts expire, Nunnelee’s facts about the U.S. tax rate are murkier. In March, the U.S. surpassed Japan to become the nation’s highest corporate tax rate, 36.8 percent. It is also true, however, that corporate tax receipts as a share of profits remain at the lowest level in the past four decades. Total corporate federal taxes paid stand at

around 12.1 percent. Claim: “For two years, the president had the ability to do whatever he wanted unchecked.” Verdict: Wrong. It’s a common GOP response to charges from Democrats that blame the Republican-led Congress for stifling the president’s agenda. Republicans like to say that Obama had Democratic majorities during his first two years in office, but failed to take actions that would lift the U.S. out of recession. But that’s not really the whole story. Although Democrats held control of both congressional chambers, they never had a filibuster-proof 60 votes in the Senate. After the death of Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy, Democrats temporarily had 60 seats (for about four months), but late West Virginia Sen. Robert Byrd was reportedly in poor health and too sick to cast votes. In 2010, Republicans took over in the House. Brad Morris Claim: “Let’s look at history and see what changed between the year 2000, when we were running trillion-dollar surpluses when Bill Clinton left office and today, when we’re running trillion-dollar deficits…” Verdict: Right. The Congressional

Budget Office issued a report in January 2001, when President George W. Bush took COURTESY BRAD MORRIS CAMPAIGN

O

n Oct. 25, incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Alan Nunnelee (1st District) met Democratic challenger Brad Morris, an Oxford attorney, at the University of Mississippi for a halfhour face-off. Despite the brief time allotted, the men jammed in a lot of information to try to distinguish themselves along ideological lines. The Jackson Free Press fact-checked the candidates’ statements.

Democrat Brad Morris hopes to replace incumbent Republican Rep. Alan Nunnelee in the U.S. House of Representatives.

office and projected budget surpluses of $5.6 trillion until 2011. When Bush left office, in 2008, the CBO found total debt was $10.6 trillion. Claim: “We fought a two-front war in Iraq and Afghanistan … and we largely paid for both of those wars on credit. Congress did not provide a dime to pay for them until

after 2006/2007.” Verdict: Right. Here’s what the Brown University-based Cost of War Project had to say about the wars: “Iraq war costs have topped $1 trillion, said Scott Lilly, former staff director for the House Appropriations Committee and now a research fellow at the left-leaning Center for American Progress. Neither Bush’s war effort in Afghanistan nor Obama’s escalation there has been paid for, both analysts noted.” Claim: “The Violence Against Women Act is sitting there unpassed amid partisan squabbles.” Verdict: Partly right. Morris is referring to the VAWA reauthorization bill, which the Senate passed in May. However, the House passed its own version that did not include protections contained in the Senate bill for gay, immigrant, American Indian and student victims. Critics of the House plan also said the bill rolled back rights of immigrant women, including for unauthorized immigrants. Lawmakers have not reconciled the differences between the two versions. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. Read the JFP’s full factcheck of the Morris-Nunnelee debate and comment online at www.jfp.ms.


jacksonfreepress.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

11


TALK | business

Health-Care Industry Needs Healthy Workers by Ronni Mott

I Marketing and Sales Support Ninja Do you live and breathe customer service?

The JFP/BOOM Jackson advertising department needs your help keeping our advertisers and partners happy and prosperous! Your key duties include social media management for clients, plus planning and supporting marketing events, so some evening and weekend flexibility is recommend. Other duties include ad copy updates, Web updates, creating reports, taking photos and helping with logistics. Parttime and hourly to start, but the right person can expand this position.

October 31 - November 6, 2012

Send cover letter and resume to kimberly@jacksonfreepress.com.

12

the University of Mississippi Medical Center, providing the infrastructure needed to expand its teaching facilities. “I believe the Legislature’s going to join us next year and help us with a bond bill to RL NAVE

NEEDED

t’s no secret that when it comes to the health of Mississippians, we rank at or near the bottom of nearly every well-being marker, from obesity to infant mortality. It’s logical to think that those statistics would put the state in an ideal position to take advantage of the booming health-care industry, but an Oct. 26 report makes the opposite argument “When businesses are making investment decisions, the health of the workforce is a factor,” states the report, commissioned by the Mississippi Economic Council. “The population must be healthier and have better access to care in order to be competitive in capturing private-sector investment.” Last week, the MEC unveiled “Blueprint Mississippi Health Care: An Economic Driver,” which New York City-based consulting firm Newmark Grubb Knight Frank completed for about $340,000. With MEC’s focus as the state’s chamber of commerce, the presentation zoomed in on health care as an industry. “(The report) is a real good look at how we seize this opportunity, how we seize the opportunity to hook in to what is the fastestgrowing segment of the American economy … bringing in more pharmaceutical operations, more distribution, more shared services, more support for existing health-care entities and a broadening of our health-care footprint,” said Blake Wilson, MEC president, in his opening remarks. The gathering, part of a one-day, threecity tour, featured Gov. Phil Bryant who called on the MEC to conduct the study during his inaugural address in January. “This will be an effort unlike anything in the nation; a comprehensive action plan to provide health care as an industry of necessity,” Bryant said then. Repeating the “industry of necessity” meme Friday, Bryant said that the state should build health care like any industry. Bryant also announced a $10 million community-development block grant for

Gov. Phil Bryant would like to commoditize health care in the state.

finish that off,” Bryant said. The grant represents about 16 percent of the $62.6 million UMMC officials say it will cost to construct a new medical-school building, the Associated Press reported Friday. The goal of the study was create a roadmap to the “dynamic economy” Bryant referenced, which benefits to Mississippians would include healthy, productive citizens, a better quality of life, and sustainable business and economic wealth. In the Magnolia State, however, the barriers to that prosperity are substantial, beginning with the health of her people and the lack of health-care access to many, especially in the state’s rural areas. The report’s authors repeat that poor health of Mississippians—with high rates of childhood and

adult obesity, diabetes, heart-disease mortality and cancer—as a weakness several times. The authors take a cautious approach to achieving improvements. “Mississippi needs more and better-paying jobs that provide insurance coverage,” they write. “The population needs to be educated on lifestyle changes to improve health.” Caution is warranted given the state’s political atmosphere. Bryant, a Republican, has stated that he will not accept federal funds to expand Medicaid, and the state Legislature has only fully funded the Mississippi Adequate Education Program (which provides additional, leveling funds for poorer school systems) for two of the last 10 years, and the Legislature is considering dropping it altogether. In a state where nearly a quarter of its citizens have incomes below the federal poverty level, Medicaid represents the only access to health care for nearly 600,000 people, including more than 350,000 children. The ACA, dubbed Obamacare, would raise the eligible income-levels for the program to 133 percent of FPL, providing coverage for an up to 400,000 additional low-income Mississippians. The federal government would pick up 100 percent of the expansion costs for three years and decrease to 90 percent thereafter when implemented fully. The authors of the MEC Blueprint report agree with experts on health policy: Access to care would go a long way to improving health outcomes in the state. Ed Sivak, director of the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, told the Associated Press Friday that expanding Medicaid would allow low-income Mississippians to get regular medical care and support thousands of additional health-care jobs. “We think there’s no quicker way to realize the goals of that report than expanding Medicaid,” Sivak said. Comment and read the MEC blueprint report at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.


7EARELOOKINGFORINDIVIDUALS

ZKRQHHGDSDUWWLPHMREVHOOLQJQDPHEUDQG LWHPV/LQJHULHDOOW\SHVRIEDJVERG\RLOEODFN VRDSVKHDEXWWHUDOOW\SHVRIZLJVHWF (DUQLQJDJUHDWSD\ZLWKFRPPLVVLRQ,I LQWHUHVWHGSOHDVHFDOO3DXODW

(ELP7ANTED

0DNHDZHHNPDLOLQJEURFKXUHVIURPKRPH )5((6XSSOLHV+HOSLQJ+RPH:RUNHUVVLQFH *HQXLQH2SSRUWXQLW\1RH[SHULHQFHUHTXLUHG 6WDUW,PPHGLDWHO\ZZZPDLOLQJXVDFRP

,//+).'4/()2%

jacksonfreepress.com

-DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVVRIIHUVLQH[SHQVLYHFODVVL¿HGV WKDWDSSHDURQOLQHDQGLQSULQWUHDFKLQJRXU ZHHNO\DXGLHQFHRIRYHUUHDGHUV0RVWDUH ZHOOHGXFDWHGDQGPRELOH9LVLW ZZZMISFODVVL¿HGVFRPWRJHWVWDUWHGQRZ

13


JFP Endorsement: Barack Obama and Joe Biden

I

t’s been a harrowing four years for the country as we’ve ridden out the Great Recession. The country appears to be on the upswing—monthly job growth now exceeds monthly averages under the George W. Bush administration, with more than 5 million private-sector jobs created since the economy bottomed out. From 2000-2009, the country experienced a “lost decade” of job creation, even given the apparent boom of the mid-2000s. In 2008 alone, 3.6 million jobs were lost; in the January prior to Obama taking office, another 800,000 jobs were lost. Ultimately, the Great Recession wiped out every job gained during the Bush administration. Barack Obama immediately enacted a historic stimulus plan: a mix of tax cuts, aid to the states and infrastructure projects. The stimulus started to turn the tide of the economy. Obama passed landmark legislation including “Obamacare,” Wall Street reform, the Lilly Ledbetter act; overturned “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell”; ended the war in Iraq; and began withdrawing from Afghanistan. Obama has also come down on the right side of women’s choice and health care, gay marriage rights and the chance for some immigrants to stay in a country they’ve always called home. The president had a huge mess to clean up. But there’s much more work to be done. The country has run large deficits over the past four years, in part because of the burden of interest payments from previous administrations’ debt (roughly $400 billion a year) and previous administrations’ warmaking decisions ($400 billion to $500 billion in military and security spending per year over 2001 levels) along with new programs including Medicare Part D in 2006. We’ve also seen the lowest percentage of revenues since 1950 (thanks to the Great

Recession and Bush tax rates) despite higher outlays for entitlements and jobless benefits. Notwithstanding the hair-on-fire proclamations of Republicans, President Obama has grown federal spending modestly compared to his predecessor (who ran $300 billion to $400 billion deficits during good times), and has seen his budget deficit shrink every year since Bush’s final-year $1.4 trillion deficit. Obama has reached across the aisle to an intransigent GOP House to work on a “grand bargain” for raising revenues and cutting expenses, but the GOP’s primary focus hasn’t been governing the country, it’s been thwarting Obama’s re-election. With that off the table in a second term, the Bush tax cuts should finally be allowed to expire, and we’ll hopefully see a jump in the capital-gains tax rate, which should, for instance, bring Gov. Romney’s effective tax rate up from 13 to 14 percent to something appropriately higher on his millions from passively gained investment income. It’s a huge step in the right direction. (Reagan raised capital gains midway through his administration, for instance, and Simpson-Bowles recommended doing away with the lower rate completely.) In contrast, Romney has laid out perhaps the least transparent plan for a presidential campaign in the modern era. Romney’s famous “Etch-a-Sketch” political persona has him on both side of issues from Romneycare to contraception and abortion rights to Afghanistan timelines to the auto industry bailout. His plan to overturn Roe v. Wade would give states the ability to outlaw abortion in all instances, as well as limit birth control and fertilization procedures—the kind of law Mississippi voters rejected last fall. During the GOP primary, Romney asserted that FEMA should “absolutely” be shut down—a problematic position with

FEMA now in full emergency mode with Hurricane Sandy. Romney’s most concrete policy—a 20 percent “across-the-board” federal incometax cut—will not only fail to help the tens of millions who already don’t make enough money to pay income taxes, but is also likely to require the middle class to give up tax breaks for home mortgage interest or childcare. (In three debates, Romney has yet to offer a specific loophole he’ll close.) And his assertion that military spending should be increased in future budgets undercuts the notion that he’s the solution to ideologically driven spending sprees in Washington. Perhaps Romney’s most telling moment was a behind-closed-doors campaign fundraiser at which he told his well-heeled

donors that he equated the “47 percent” of people on the lower end of the income spectrum to people whom he can’t convince to “take personal responsibility and care for their lives.” It was a shameful performance by a man hoping to be president. A note on Obama’s vice president, Joe Biden. Biden is a close adviser to the president, involved in security and foreign policy decisions, and fully capable of taking over the White House should tragedy strike. We can’t offer the same assurances for Romney’s choice, Paul Ryan, a young congressman known mostly for his draconian budget proposals that don’t add up. This year, the choice could not be more clear. Re-elect Barack Obama and Joe Biden on Nov. 6.

it troubles me that a sitting president chose to tell me why I shouldn’t vote for the other guy instead of impressing upon me reasons I should give him a second term. It bothers me that I only have two choices every four years. And it worries me that after three presidential debates and one vice presidential debate, neither side outlined a substantive plan as to what they would do the next four years—at least not to my satisfaction. Mitt Romney was a weak candidate from the start. Republicans did everything short of giving the guy the wrong directions to Tampa. It was an “anybody but this guy” philosophy from the outset. Even Herman Cain of the Georgia Tea Party grabbed a brief stop at the top of the polls. They knew Romney was a rich, ambitious flip-flopper

who had been basically running for president for eight years. But, alas, he was the best the GOP had to offer. Contrast that with what many have described as the “Obama campaign machine” and the killing of Osama Bin Laden, and there was no way that this race would be close ... on paper. Even with the economy still anemic, even with gas prices rising, Republicans were still putting their feet squarely in their mouths making bonehead comments about race, abortion and rape. One would think they were doing everything possible to lose by one of the largest margins in history. But then, with his foot firmly pressing down on Romney’s neck, Obama gave one of the most lethargic debate showings of modern time. A performance that, in

my opinion, will be the reason he loses if he is defeated. Suddenly, the challenger was back in business and he began closing in. And now here we are: just a few days out from the election, and I honestly don’t know who will win. I’m not impressed with Obama but much more afraid of a candidate that insults foreign countries on their turf, doesn’t care about 47 percent of us and appears to want the position to pad his resume. What was a sure thing has become a toss up. So if you want four more years of President Obama instead of Romney, please make sure you cast a ballot on Nov. 6. It’s just that serious. And that’s the truth … shonuff.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.

Now It’s Serious

October 31 - November 6, 2012

T 14

hings just got serious. We have less than a week until the election, and I hope everyone understands how close this race is. Further, I hope you fully embrace the importance of your and everyone else’s vote on Nov. 6. It’s no secret that I won’t be voting for Mitt Romney. I outlined those reasons clearly in a previous column. I will be voting for the incumbent, but unfortunately, not because Obama has proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that he is the better candidate but because the other candidate has shown himself to be the worse of two evils. I’ve heard a lot of information thrown at me over the past year. I’ve seen lots of facts, lots of figures, lots of mistruths and lots of outright lies from both sides. Quite frankly,


CJ RHODES On Values and Votes EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Terrence Jones, Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

letters@jacksonfreepress.com editor@jacksonfreepress.com editor@jacksonfreepress.com events@jacksonfreepress.com ads@jacksonfreepress.com todd@jacksonfreepress.com news@jacksonfreepress.com style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

by The Rev. CJ Rhodes

W

e sat together, inches apart, confident Jesus would hear our prayers. Others prayed with bowed heads and hearts in their groups of three, also seated in the opulent room at the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mansion. Their voices competed for my attention as I attempted to hear every word my prayer partners lifted successively to Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ears. As they prayed, I searched for moments where my soul could say Amen. Those moments came, but there were times when my soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s silence was a kind of protest. Though we shared our precious faith, we did not altogether share the same politics. With the presidential election approaching, I knew that it would somehow be part of our supplications. I prayed for all elected and appointed officialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from President Barack Obama to Gov. Phil Bryant and Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., and our City Council. I asked God to grant them wisdom to govern with compassion and justice. It was a bipartisan prayer, one that did not reveal my concerns over all electoral politics or my hope that Obama wins four more years. Others were more courageous. As they prayed for God to raise up political leaders who loved him, I recalled the Mississippi Southern Baptist Conventionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial that implicitly endorsed Mitt Romney. It was clear that he was the candidate many in the room believed shared our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christianâ&#x20AC;? values. Their lamentations about infanticide and gay marriage, the decadent and immoral drift of our nation, the cold war against â&#x20AC;&#x153;successâ&#x20AC;? resounded in many of their hearts if not out loud. I was relieved when the prayer-team leader invited us to our closing prayer. We huddled around the governor, laying hands on each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulders. Dolphus Weary closed with holy and humble words. His offering was a reminder that Mission Mississippi was on an evangelistic mission to cultivate spiritual friendship across racial, denominational and political lines so that the church can proclaim the gospel to a lost world without reservation. It is insufficient, yet indispensable, work reconciling folks who should already be unified through our baptisms. Old idols die hard. Mission Mississippi is ecumenical but appeals largely to the pan-evangelical world. Sadly the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;evangelicalâ&#x20AC;? has become synonymous with white conservatism and the GOP. The reality is that evangelicalism is not monolithic, though the media think otherwise. Much of my formation as a

Christian has been in predominantly black Baptist, Methodist and Pentecostal churches born in the fires of evangelical revival. Despite different doctrinal accents, most of these churches share a common religious lexicon and inventory of religious experiences. I get it when politicians talk about being born again (Carter and Bush II), or speak in a rhythmic cadence of southern preachers (Obama). Like most of the believers during that morningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prayer breakfast, I embody and promote many â&#x20AC;&#x153;traditionalâ&#x20AC;? family and community values. I, too, am a values voter. The problem is my values go beyond two issues. My political vision is comprehensive, too wide to fit easily in a two-party system like ours. Neither Republicans nor Democrats fully represent my values. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect them to. Some on the Christian right are no longer complaining that Mormonism is a cult, instead throwing their support behind Mitt Romney. They are praying that he wins to restore Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s status as a Christian nation. My Anabaptist sensibilities revolt against this nationalistic heresy. To me, there is, and has always been, only one Christian nation. It is called the church, the people of God called from the world to live in the world as citizens of another kingdomâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kingdom. When Christians put their entire faith in government, politicians and policies, they have confused the nation-state with the kingdom Jesus said is not of this world. To confess by the Holy Spirit that Jesus is Lord is the beginning of a nonviolent revolution against the empires of this world, even our beloved America. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m theologically pro-life from the womb to the tomb: The sacred lives we cherish in the womb are lives that deserve equity and fairness out of the womb. I believe, like Marvin Gaye, that war is never the answer because only love can conquer hate. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in the death penalty because vengeance belongs to God; the Lord will repay. I believe that being pro-life is to love justice for all, especially the least of these. Sadly, both parties deal in cultures of death. Neither party is the kingdom. Evangelicals will vote for values Nov. 6. When I vote for Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for a second timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I will be doing so as a values voter. Rev. CJ Rhodes, a Hazelhurst native, attended Ole Miss and Duke Divinity School in North Carolina, where he earned his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of divinity. Installed in July 2010, Rhodes is the pastor at Mount Helm Baptist Church,.

#/22%#4)/.3,Q³6HHNLQJ7KH7UXWK´ 9RO,VVXH ZHLQFRUUHFWO\VSHOOHGZULWHU/X$QQ0DUUV¶¿UVWQDPHª ,Q³>7KH6ODWH@7KH%HVW,Q6SRUWV,Q'D\V´ 9RO,VVXH ZHLQDGYHUWHQWO\SULQWHGWKHGDWHVIURPWKHSUHYLRXV LVVXH7KHHQWULHVIRUWKHVSRUWVHYHQWVOLVWHGRFFXUUHGIURP7KXUVGD\2FWWR:HGQHVGD\2FWª,Q³7UD YHUVLQJµ7KH(PSW\¶´ 9RO,VVXH ZHLQFRUUHFWO\VSHOOHGZULWHU*DUUDG/HH¶V¿UVWQDPHDV*DUUDUG7KH-DFNVRQ )UHH3UHVVDSRORJL]HVIRUHUURUV

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


16

October 31 - November 6, 2012


â&#x20AC;˘ Election 2012 â&#x20AC;˘

More at jfp.ms/election2012 â&#x20AC;˘

The Candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Plans: How Will They Affect You? by Jacob D. Fuller MIKE DAY

MONTHLY PRIVATE SECTOR JOB CREATION/LOSS         

0REVIOUS!DMINISTRATION

 

/BAMA!DMINISTRATION

     -AR 

3EPT  -AR  3EPT  -AR 

3EPT  -AR 

3EPT  -AR  3EPT 

SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, CURRENT EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS SURVEY

vate sector, on traditional Medicare. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason you get higher rates is because with health insurance, the way you bring down costs is when you have a nice mix of people in a group plan and group insurance,â&#x20AC;? Wiggins told the Jackson Free Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You think about Medicare as group insurance. If you have that group, and you end up with people who couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get insurance in the private market, and they buy back into

Medicare, then you more likely will have people termed as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;high utilizers.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They are sicker, they are going to use the health insurance more. When you have that, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to increase the premium rates, just because the system itself is paying more money out.â&#x20AC;? Marty Wiseman, director of the John C. Stennis Institute of Government and Commore CANDIDATES, page 18

jacksonfreepress.com

enrollees. Under the proposal, seniors who become eligible for Medicare after the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s implementation in 2023 would have the option to receive vouchers from the government, which they could spend on private health insurance. Seniors who prefer traditional Medicare would also have the option of the current public insurance plan as well. While Romney has not come out in total support of Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan, he says it is a step in the right direction. Opponents of the plan say it could raise the price of traditional Medicare so high that it would effectively dismantle the program. A study by the Kaiser Family Foundation showed that in Mississippi, as many as 16 percent of those who chose to stay on traditional Medicare would see their premiums rise as much as $100 per month. Using 2010 as a model, the study applied Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed voucher plan to seniors on Medicare and private insurance plans. On a national average, annual premiums for those on traditional Medicare would have gone up $720 under Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan. For those on private insurance, 88 percent would have paid higher premiums if they stayed on the same plan. Corey Wiggins, program manager at the Mississippi Health Advocacy Program, said the voucher program would likely leave only the most unhealthy seniors, who were unable to find affordable coverage in the pri-

*OBS#REATED,OST

W

ith less than a week before the presidential election, polls show the two frontrunners neckand-neck in a campaign focused largely on health care and economic issues. While the candidates are quick to tell us what their policy could mean for the entire country, the effects will vary from state to state and income to income. That leaves many Mississippians wondering just how the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposed policies will affect them. On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law, most of which the U.S. Supreme Court upheld June 28, 2012. Despite the actâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close relation to the state health-care law Republican candidate Mitt Romney passed in Massachusetts, the former governor has made repealing and replacing PPACA one of the biggest focuses of his campaign. He says his Massachusetts law should be a model for other states, but that the federal government should not force states to adopt it. One major change Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running mate Paul Ryan proposes is turning Medicare, federal health insurance for senior citizens, into a voucher program for future

17


THE CANDIDATES, from page 17 of the health-care industry to the states, including whether states will allow insurance providers to deny coverage to people with pre-existing conditions. During the first presidential debate, Romney said, “pre-existing conditions are covered under my plan.” However, his advisers admitted after the debate that they are, in fact, not covered under Romney’s plan. It would be up to the states.

WISEMAN COURTESY STENNIS INSTITUTE

munity Development, said Ryan’s voucher program is scary for future generations of Medicare recipients. “For example, I am a diabetic who takes five shots a day,” Wiseman told the JFP. “I would hate to have been self-employed or a farmer or whatever, and reach the age of 65 and be handed a voucher for X amount of dollars and no more, and have to go out on the insurance marketplace at the age of 65 and negotiate for an insurance contract. I fear for what the results of that would be. I’m sure it would not be something I could afford, if I could find insurance.” Ryan has proposed putting the voucher system into effect in 2023. The point of that, Wiseman said, is to not upset those who are currently on Medicare or will be eligible in the next decade. “The assumption is: ‘We will protect the folks age 55 and older. They are the ones that would raise the greatest hue and cry about it. Those under 55 are not close enough to worry about it, yet, and by the time we get it all in place, then they will be reaching that point,’” Wiseman said. “‘If we could just set

Marty WIseman, director of the John. C. Stennis Institute Government and Community Development at Mississippi State University, said the Republican voucher program for Medicare scares him to death.

it up and get it in place, then we’ll let that take care of itself.’ That is not satisfactory to me. The voucher scares me to death.” Romney has vowed to return control

Taxing the Rich Another key issue that will hit the pocketbooks and pantries of Mississippians is the candidates’ proposals for the Bush-era tax cuts. Neither candidate has proposed allowing the national debt to continue growing on its current path. So the question is how they plan to get the nation’s income moving in the other direction. Romney is refusing to use tax increases on the wealthy to create more federal income, or lower the debt, while Obama wants to see the wealthiest pay more on income over $250,000. President Obama wants to see the taxes

on the wealthiest Americans go back to levels before the George W. Bush-era tax cuts. In 2008, one-third of the nation’s 400 highestincome taxpayers paid 15 percent or less in federal taxes. Obama proposed the Paying a Fair Share Act this year, which would impose a 30 percent tax rate on those earning $1 million or more annually, the top 0.3 percent of the nation’s taxpayers. Romney strongly opposes raising the taxes on the wealthy, and proposes across-theboard tax cuts, including a 20-percent cut in marginal rates for everyone. According to 2008 U.S. Census Bureau numbers, 39,270 Mississippians qualified as millionaires. That’s 21.5 millionaires per 1,000 households in the state, the lowest rate in the country. He also wants to keep the current tax rates on interest, dividends and capital gains, all of which are forms of income that come from investments. Because wealthy stockholders receive the majority of investment income, a rise in those tax rates would affect only a small percentage of Mississippians. The Republican candidate says the Bush-era tax cuts help create jobs in the pri-

Congressional Contest Roundup—Mississippi U.S. Senate

Four candidates are vying for the Senate seat that Republican Roger Wicker now occupies. Wicker, a former state lawmaker who took over for retiring Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott in 2007, faces Albert N. Gore Jr., a Democrat, and Thomas Cramer and Shawn O’Hara of the Constitution Party and Reform Party, respectively. With Wicker sitting on $2.6 million in campaign cash, mostly donated by congressional leadership PACs, unseating him represents a yeoman’s challenge for any of the four contenders. Of his opponents, only Cramer, of the conservative Constitution Party, has reported raising any money. As of Sept. 20, Cramer had raised $1,730 and was $1 in debt. Until Congress put a implemented a ban on earmarks, Wicker once held the dubious distinction of “King of Pork.” In the 2008 fiscal year, then-Rep. Wicker sponsored 42 earmarks totaling $159 million, ranking him among the top spenders in the U.S. House.

October 31 - November 6, 2012

1st Congressional District

18

Democrats’ best hope of wresting away one seat might lie with Brad Morris, Rep. Travis Childers former chief of staff. Morris, an Oxford attorney, criticizes the current GOP-led Congress as a “complete failure.” “I see a Congress that has completely abandoned middle-class and working families,” Morris said in an October interview with the Jackson Free Press. He added, of Nunnelee: “I do not see a willingness out of our current congressman to work in a bipartisan fashion.” Nunnelee proudly defends and promotes conservative ideals, including advocating repeal of the federal healthcare overhaul and railing against what he characterizes the “trillion-dollar welfare state.” The Morris-Nunnelee matchup appears to be the Democratic Party’s only hope for winning back a seat in

the House, and Morris isn’t exactly going down without a fight. Despite Nunnelee’s $1.4 million fundraising advantage, the challenger has been able to raise—and spend— close to $200,000 during the cycle through Sept. 30.

2nd Congressional District

Mississippi’s only majority-black congressional district features an interesting race between a deeply entrenched powerful incumbent in Rep. Bennie Thompson, conservative Republican Bill Marcy and the upstart Independent Cobby Mondale Williams. Williams is ready to jump in headfirst, eager to work on issues as varied as agriculture, levees and ports, education and health care. He counts his experience working on Capitol Hill and his youth as key assets. “I figured it was time for somebody young who understands this generation, who understands the youth, and who’ll be able to provide those resources for the youth, for the youth of today,” Williams, a Canton resident, told the Jackson Free Press in May. Thompson points to his years almost 20 years experience in Congress, part of which he spent chairing the House Homeland Security Committee as the reason voters should send him back for another term. A former mayor and Hinds County supervisor, Thompson sees his main role in Congress as hooking local governments up with federal resources, but is disappointed that too few take advantage. As he told the JFP in March, before the Democratic primary: “A member of Congress can suggest, urge, and highly recommend that communities take advantage but at the end of the day, the decision rests with the leaders of those communities.” A Reform Party candidate, LaJena Williams, is also on the ballot.

3rd Congressional District

It’s easy to forget that Republican Rep. Gregg Harper rep resents part of Jackson. Mississippi’s District 3 captures the affluent corner of northeast Jackson and cuts a diagonal path across the state’s midsection, extending from the southwest corner of the state northeastward to Oktibbeha and Noxubee counties. A first-term incumbent, Harper has played the role of a fairly vanilla conservative in championing rolling back regulations on automobile dealers and manufacturers, lower taxes, immigration reform and being against anything Barack Obama stands for. He has a wide-open path to re-election. He has raised $647,340 and spent $452,683, leaving him with $235,788 cash on hand at the end of September, but faces just one opponent, John “Luke” Pannell of the Reform Party.

4th Congressional District

Republican Steven Palazzo is such a team player that he has the Romney/Ryan logo posted on his own campaign website, right above a statement endorsing the budget crafted by Rep. Ryan, the GOP veep pick. Palazzo, a first-term congressman and former representative in the Mississippi House, trails other incumbent members of Congress with $891,523 during the cycle. Democratic opponent Matthew Moore says he supports the federal Affordable Care Act, a woman’s right to make her own health care decisions, increasing education funding, ensuring veterans’ health care, backing labor unions, environmental stewardship and policies in support of “all committed loving couples.” As of press time this week, the FEC did not have campaign-finance information for Moore or other 4th CD hopefuls Robert W. Claunch of the Reform Party or Libertarian Ron Williams.


FEDERAL MEDICARE AND MEDICAID SPENDING UNDER REPUBLICAN AND DEMOCRATIC PROPOSALS

3PENDINGASAPRECENTOF'$0



0HGLFDUH2EDPD 0HGLFDUH5RPQH\ 0HGLFDLG2EDPD 0HGLFDLG5RPQH\ 3ULYDWH2EDPD



On the Ballot - The Candidates *&0ENDORSEMENTSAREINBOLD 0RESIDENT6ICE0RESIDENT

%DUDFN2EDPD-RH%LGHQ 'HPRFUDWLF

0LWW5RPQH\3DXO5\DQ 5HSXEOLFDQ

9LUJLO*RRGH-LP&O\PHU &RQVWLWXWLRQ

*DU\-RKQVRQ-DPHV3*UD\ /LEHUWDULDQ

-LOO6WHLQ&KHUL+RQNDOD *UHHQ

%DUEDUD'DOH:DVKHU&DWK\/7RROH 5HIRUP

 

533ENATE

$OEHUW1*RUH-U 'HPRFUDWLF

5RJHU):LFNHU 5HSXEOLFDQ

7KRPDV&UDPHU &RQVWLWXWLRQ

6KDZQ2Âś+DUD 5HIRUP

 

53(OUSEOF2EPRESENTATIVES

 

                            

9EAR

VW&RQJUHVVLRQDO'LVWULFW %UDG0RUULV 'HPRFUDW

$ODQ1XQQHOHH 5HSXEOLFDQ

'DQQ\%HGZHOO /LEHUWDULDQ

-LP5%RXUODQG &RQVWLWXWLRQ

&KULV3RWWV 5HIRUP

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 6DQWRUH'%UDFH\ 'HPRFUDW  -HUPDO&ODUN 'HPRFUDW

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW &RQQLH&RFKUDQ 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW /HOLD*DVWRQ5KRGHV 'HPRFUDW

.DWK\6\NHV 'HPRFUDW

+LQGV&RXQW\6FKRRO%RDUG /LQGD./DZV 1RQSDUWLVDQ

/NTHEBALLOTIN-ADISON #OUNTY (OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 7LPRWK\1-HQNLQV 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW -XOLD+RGJHV 5HSXEOLFDQ

SOURCE: SOURCE: AARON CARROLL AT THE INCIDENTAL ECONOMIST

of cuts to public programs more so than their pocketbooks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already needing more in the way of federal money than weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten in the past,â&#x20AC;? Wiseman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You begin cutting now with a meat ax, and the federal programs that Mississippi was a heavy participant inâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education, Pell grants, student loans, whatever areaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mississippi will feel it more, because we depend more on federal dollars than other states. What does that mean? It means Mississippi is going to have to look at its own budget and its own revenues and resources and decide which programs that we want to take over from the federal government and which we want to simply go out of existence and do without.â&#x20AC;? Education Romney has approached education in much the same way as the rest of his campaign: with more rhetoric than specific, defined policy. One talking point he has pushed for children, especially those from low-income families and those with disabilities, is to have the option to attend schools outside their geographical district. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed that the government provide funding for those children to attend another school. While the concept of choice looks good on paper, opponents say many qualified children in Mississippi wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to afford to go to another school. Carolyn Jolivette, executive director of Parents for Public Schools of Jackson, said one of the biggest obstacles, especially for children from low-income families, would be reliable transportation to and from a school outside their district. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we have to look at: Is it really â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;choiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;?â&#x20AC;? Jolivette asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What happens if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t meet the demands? If every parent decided that they wanted their child to go to another school, what does that mean if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t meet those demands? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure how realistic that is, given where we are today in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy.â&#x20AC;?

UG&RQJUHVVLRQDO'LVWULFW *UHJJ+DUSHU 5HSXEOLFDQ

-RKQÂľ/XNHÂś3DQQHOO 5HIRUP

WK&RQJUHVVLRQDO'LVWULFW 0DWW0RRUH 'HPRFUDW

6WHYHQ03DOD]]R 5HSXEOLFDQ

5REHUW:&ODXQFK 5HIRUP

5RQ:LOOLDPV /LEHUWDULDQ

0LVVLVVLSSL&RXUWRI$SSHDOV-XGJH 1RQSDU WLVDQ

'LVWULFW3RVLWLRQ &HROD-DPHV (UPHD(-5XVVHOO 0LVVLVVLSSL6WDWH6XSUHPH&RXUW 1RQSDUWLVDQ

'LVWULFW &HQWUDO 3RVLWLRQ (DUOH6%DQNV :LOOLDP6³%LOO´:DOOHU-U 'LVWULFW3RVLWLRQ /HVOLH'.LQJ XQRSSRVHG

'LVWULFW 6RXWKHUQ 3RVLWLRQ 7DOPDGJH%UDGGRFN 0LNH5DQGROSK 'LVWULFW 1RUWKHUQ 3RVLWLRQ -RVLDK'HQQLV&ROHPDQ 5LFKDUG )OLS 3KLOOLSV

/NTHEBALLOTIN(INDS#OUNTY (OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 0DULO\Q$YHU\ 5HSXEOLFDQ

-DPHV$5HHG 'HPRFUDW

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW -RVHSKLQH$QGHUVRQ 'HPRFUDW

Maria Ferguson, executive director of the Center on Education Policy in Washington, D.C., said though Romney hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t used the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;voucher,â&#x20AC;? that is essentially how he is proposing to fund students crossing district lines. Very few areas of the country have attempted similar voucher programs in education, she said, and none have produced any data that shows it is a viable concept. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fairly unrealistic proposal just be-

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 3DW7UXHVGDOH 5HSXEOLFDQ  (OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW $]]LH/-DFNVRQ$GDPV 'HPRFUDW

%DUEDUD%URZQ (OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW /HUR\/DF\ 'HPRFUDW

6FKRRO%RDUG'LVWULFW 6DP.HOO\1RQSDUWLVDQ -DQHW'6KHDUHU1RQSDUWLVDQ 6FKRRO%RDUG'LVWULFW 3KLOLS+XVNH\1RQSDUWLVDQ

/NTHEBALLOTIN2ANKIN#OUNTY (OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 1\FROH/HZLV .HQQHWK³.HQQ´0XQQ 5HSXEOLFDQ

.HOO\*RII:HGJHZRUWK 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 6KDURQ%HUU\ 5HSXEOLFDQ

/HVOLH)RVKHH/HZLV 5HSXEOLFDQ

7KRPDV(<DWHV,,, 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 6DQGUD$QQ0DUWLQ 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW (ULF%DOGZLQ 5HSXEOLFDQ

6KHOWRQ(0F.D\ 5HSXEOLFDQ

(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHU'LVWULFW 0LOWRQ6%URZQ &/³&KDUOLH´3LWWPDQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6FKRRO%RDUG'LVWULFW 5XWK0HDFKDP%XUJHVV1RQSDUWLVDQ +XJK&DUU1RQSDUWLVDQ 6FKRRO%RDUG'LVWULFW -HIIUH\3D\QH1RQSDUWLVDQ -DPHV5REHUWV1RQSDUWLVDQ $QQ06WXUGLYDQW1RQSDUWLVDQ

cause of the way the current system is set up, and (Romney) has put no detail to it to help us understand how he would overcome the fact that the current system is in no way set up to handle that,â&#x20AC;? Ferguson said. Higher education presents another big divide between Obama and Romney. As a part of the Affordable Care Act, Obama more CANDIDATES, page 21

jacksonfreepress.com

vate sector. His logic is that more money in wealthy taxpayersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pockets means they will use that money to create new jobs. His opponents want to know where the evidence of that is. The evidence seems to show more that more money in the pockets of the rich does not result in a trickle down to the unemployed. In the era of the Bush tax cuts, unemployment rose from less than 6 percent in 2002 to more than 8 percent for most of the last four years. Meanwhile, the average income of CEOs at major corporations was $9.6 million in 2011, up 6 percent from the previous year and the highest since the Associated Press began tracking the numbers in 2006. CEO income doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to only rise with the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bottom line, either. Executives earned 6 percent more than in 2010, despite corporate profits rising just 7.9 percent in 2011, compared to a 32.2 percent increase in 2010. So while the wealthiest individuals at the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major corporations are getting richer, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to be creating more jobs for Americans. While an end to tax cuts for the wealthiest taxpayers would only directly affect about 2 percent of Mississippi households, the cut to federal government programs would affect far more. Only West Virginia and New Mexico compare to Mississippi in amount of federal funding received versus federal taxes paid compared to the state GDP. According to numbers collected by the U.S. Census Bureau and the IRS, from 1990 through 2009, Mississippians paid $164.7 billion in federal taxes. The state took in $404.6 billion in federal funding, or $239.9 billion more than the state put in. That is 254 percent of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GDP of $94.4 billion over that period. Of all 50 states, only New Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 261 percent of state GDP ranked higher than Mississippi. Undoubtedly, most in the state would see the effects of federal tax cuts in the form

QG&RQJUHVVLRQDO'LVWULFW %LOO0DUF\ 5HSXEOLFDQ

%HQQLH*7KRPSVRQ 'HPRFUDWLF

&REE\0RQGDOH:LOOLDPV ,QGHSHQGHQW

/DMHQD:LOOLDPV 5HIRUP

19


Obamacare vs. Romneycare

I

f elected, Gov. Mitt Romney has block grant with capped federal funding vowed to repeal or replace much of to states. The block grant would start in the Patient Protection and Afford- 2013 and grow annually with populaable Care Act, commonly called tion growth and inflation,â&#x20AC;? the paper Obamacare. What he will replace it with states. is open to speculation; however, the budRepealing Obamacare would cut get plan the U.S. House of Representa- federal spending by $932 billion from tives passed in 2011 and 2012 provides 2013, when the Medicaid expansion in a credible point of reference. Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the states is scheduled to begin, through running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul 2022. Block grants to the states repreRyan, was chairsent another $810 man of the House billion in cuts. TOTAL MISSISSIPPI POPULATION Budget CommitCombined, the tee. cuts would elimiIt is with that nate 38 percent of IN 2022 (AGES 0 - 64) in mind that the federal spending Kaiser Commison the program. 8QLQVXUHG sion on Medicaid For Mississippi, and the Uninsured the cuts would be "ASELINE   analyzed the imdeeper: Under the pact of the House House budget, the Republican budstate would get 40 !FFORDABLE#ARE!CT   get on Medicaid percent less money at the national and from the federal state levels, releasgovernment than 2OMNEY0LAN   ing an issue paper it would under the on the subject in Affordable Care /RZHUQXPEHUVDUHEHWWHU October. Act (see figure 1, SOURCE: COMMONWEALTHFUND.ORG Beyond rebelow). In 2022, pealing the PPAfederal funds to CA, the House Mississippi drops budget proposes converting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medicaidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another 8 percent, to 48 percent less. structure from an entitlement with guar- Under the ACA, Mississippi stands to reanteed federal matching payments to a ceive $8.2 billion in 2022; under the Re-

publican plan, $4.2 billion (see figure 2). Medicaid enrollment would also be affected. Obamacare promises to provide health insurance for an estimated 32.9 million Americans by 2022, still leaving about 27 million uninsured, The Commonwealth Fund estimates. Under the Republican budget, the number of uninsured Americans climbs by 12 million almost immediately, resulting in 72 million uninsured in 2022. For Mississippi, the numbers are more dramatic. Under the Democratic plan, the number of uninsured drops to 10.6 percent; under the Republican plan, the uninsured rise to nearly one-third of the population. Kaiser estimates that Mississippi would have to increase its Medicaid spending by $2.1 billion in 2022 to insure the same number of low-income citizens as the PPACA would do, an increase of 131 percent. (see figure 3) â&#x20AC;&#x153;States could avoid some of the enrollment cuts generated by the block grant by increasing spending from their own resources, but completely avoiding enrollment cuts would require very large increases in spending to offset the reduction in federal funds,â&#x20AC;? the Kaiser paper states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś The proposed changes and reductions in federal financing for Medicaid under the House Budget Plan would almost certainly worsen the problem of the uninsured and strain the

-ISSISSIPPI-EDICAID3PENDING 5NDER#URRENT,AWAND4HE (OUSE"UDGET0LAN  

%STIMATED)NCREASEIN-ISSISSIPPI 3PENDINGINTO/FFSET -EDICAID%NROLLMENT2EDUCTIONS UNDERTHE(OUSE"UDGET0LAN

UNINSURED

B B   5HGXFWLRQLQ  BILLION 6SHQGLQJ BILLION 6SHQGLQJ8QGHU &XUUHQW/DZ ,QFOXGLQJ$&$

&XWGXHWR $&$UHSHDO &XWGXHWR %ORFN*UDQW

6SHQGLQJ8QGHUWKH +RXVH%XGJHW3ODQ

October 31 - November 6, 2012

SOURCE: KAISER COMMISSION

20

-ISSISSIPPI-EDICAID3PENDING 5NDER#URRENT,AWAND4HE (OUSE"UDGET0LAN  B B   BILLION 5HGXFWLRQLQ  6SHQGLQJ BILLION 6SHQGLQJ8QGHU &XUUHQW/DZ ,QFOXGLQJ$&$

&XWGXHWR $&$UHSHDO &XWGXHWR %ORFN*UDQW

6SHQGLQJ8QGHUWKH +RXVH%XGJHW3ODQ SOURCE: KAISER COMMISSION

 BILLION  BILLION

 LQFUHDVH LQVWDWH VSHQGLQJ

$VVXPLQJ&XUUHQW 3HU(QUROOHH 6SHQGLQJ*URZWK

 BILLION  BILLION

 LQFUHDVH LQVWDWH VSHQGLQJ

$VVXPLQJ5HGXFWLRQ LQ3HU(QUROOHH 6SHQGLQJ*URZWK SOURCE: KAISER COMMISSION

nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety net. Medicaidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to (provide care to many low-income individuals) would be significantly compromised under this proposal, with no obvious alternative to take its place.â&#x20AC;?

INDICATORS OF NEED

FOR HEALTH SERVICES IN

MISSISSIPPI

(EALTH)NSURANCE#OVERAGE 0RIVATE  -EDICAID 

-EDICARE 

5NINSURED  !GE2ANGEOF-ISSISSIPPIANS

 



  

 

-ISSISSIPPIANSWITH (EALTH)SSUES $'8/76:,7+ ',6$%,/,7,(6

 

&+,/'2%(6,7< 5$7(6 $'8/72%(6,7< 5$7(6 &+521,& ',$%(7(6 &$1&(5

  PER 

32250(17$/  +($/7+          SOURCE: KAISER COMMISSION


AFFORDING EDUCATION

THE CANDIDATES, from page 19

%DQNUXSWF\FDQHOLPLQDWHDZLGHUDQJHRIGHEWEXWSTUDENTLOANSDUHH[FOXGHG

signed a law that gave the federal government direct control over student loans for higher education. In Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words, that will essentially â&#x20AC;&#x153;cut out the middle man,â&#x20AC;? bypassing the banks. Under the Obama administration, student-loan debt repayment requirements dropped to 10 percent of discretionary income, and the government forgives the debts after 20 years. Obama has spoken about further changing the debt forgiveness laws, including allowing student-loan debt to be forgiven when individuals file bankruptcy, which now does not affect student loans. Romney, who has run on a platform of pro-private business, has said that he will bring private lenders back into the studentloan process, which he claims will drive down interest rates and costs to students. With 54 percent of Mississippians who graduate college having student-loan debt, policy on repaying those loans is affecting a growing number of citizens every year. Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income-based repayment plan has lowered payments for nearly 1 million graduates, but progress adoption has been slower than initially hoped.

-EDICAID%XPANSION7ILL2AISE 3TATE-EDICAID3PENDINGBY /NLY0ERCENT BILLION

TRILLION  

TRILLION   6WDWHVÂś6SHQGLQJRQ0HGLFDLGDQG&+,3 :LWKRXW+HDOWK5HIRUP $GGLWLRQDO6SHQGLQJRQ0HGLFDLG ([SDQVLRQDQG&+,3 SOURCE: CENTER ON BUDGET AND POLICY PRIORITIES ANALYSIS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE

One issue that may proportionately affect Mississippi more than any other state is the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stance on community colleges. With 15 community and junior colleges in the state, a large number of Mississippians depend on adequate funding at the two-year schools to keep tuition low and quality of education high. In 2010, Obama signed the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act into law, which provided $2 billion over four years to community colleges and career training programs. The goals of the law were to help colleges create relationships with businesses and colleges, teach basic skills and develop better online courses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always refer to (community colleges) as the workhorses of the American higher-ed system,â&#x20AC;? Ferguson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This (funding) is long overdue. These community colleges are ground zero for a lot of low-income students. So a lot of people who lost their jobs during the recession and now need to go back and get new skills, usually the community colleges are the first place they go.â&#x20AC;? Romney has not addressed community colleges much, if any, on the campaign trail. Ferguson believes that further shows his disconnect to the people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think what some people are put off by are some of Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound bites about higher ed are the ideas that if students need more money, they should just ask their parents or they should shop around for more affordable schools,â&#x20AC;? Ferguson said. With more than half of Mississippi college students using student loans to pay for school, it seems not everyone can afford to pay for their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college out of pocket. Boosting Business, Creating Jobs Both candidates in this election talk big when it comes to small business. Before voters can understand how potential policy may affect small business, though, they first need to define just how big these â&#x20AC;&#x153;smallâ&#x20AC;? businesses are. The candidates use the Small Businessmore CANDIDATES, page 22

$PHULFDQVRZHPRUHWKDQBILLIONINPRIVATESTUDENTLOANDEBT 6WXGHQWVDUHFDOOLQJIRUFKDQJHEXWZLOOWKHFDQGLGDWHVOLVWHQ"

MITT ROMNEY Âł,W LV YHU\ WHPSWLQJ DV D SROLWLFLDQ WR VD\ Âľ<RX NQRZ ZKDW , ZLOO MXVW JLYH \RX VRPH PRQH\ 7KH JRYHUQPHQW LV MXVW JRLQJ WR JLYH \RX VRPH PRQH\ DQG SD\ EDFN \RXU ORDQV IRU \RX , DP QRW JRLQJ WR WHOO \RX VRPHWKLQJ WKDW LV QRW WKH WUXWK EHFDXVH \RX NQRZ

WKDW LV MXVW WDNLQJ PRQH\ IURP \RXU RWKHU SRFNHW DQG JLYLQJ LW WR WKH RWKHU SRFNHWÂľ

BARACK OBAMA 5HFRPPHQGVDSRWHQWLDOFKDQJHWRWKH WUHDWPHQW RI SULYDWH VWXGHQW ORDQV LQ EDQNUXSWF\SURFHHGLQJV$OUHDG\SDVVHG LQFRPHEDVHG UHSD\PHQW DQG D GLUHFW JRYHUQPHQWORDQSURJUDP

:DQWV ´&RQJUHVV WR WDNH D VHFRQG ORRN DW KRZ ERUURZHUVPLJKWEHDEOHWR UHVWUXFWXUHWKHLUGHEWLQWKH EDQNUXSWF\SURFHVV¾

POLICY SNAPSHOTS

5201(<:DQWVWRPDNHWKHÂżQDQFLDO 2%$0$ 'RXEOHG IXQGLQJ IRU 3HOO DLGV\VWHPVWURQJHUDQGVLPSOHU *UDQWV :HOFRPHV SDUWLFLSDWLRQ IURP WKH &DSSHG IHGHUDO VWXGHQWORDQ SD\ SULYDWHVHFWRU PHQWVDWGLVFUHWLRQDU\LQFRPH SOURCE:: HUFFINGTONPOST.COM

#OMBINED.ATIONAL3TUDENT,OAN$EBT

-ORETHANTRILLION

THELARGESTSUMOFANYDEBTINTHE53

$26,600

DYHUDJHVWXGHQWORDQGHEWDWJUDGXDWLRQ (SOURCE: INSTITUTE FOR COLLEGE ACCESS AND SUCCESS)

50th

0LVVÂśVKLJKVFKRROHUVÂśQDWLRQDOUDQNLQJ LQSK\VLFVDQGFDOFXOXVSURÂżFLHQF\

(SOURCE: STATISTICAL RESEARCH CENTER AT THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS)

54%

RI0LVVLVVLSSLDQV JUDGXDWHZLWKVWXGHQWORDQGHEW SOURCE: INSTITUTE FOR COLLEGE ACCESS AND SUCCESS

19.6%

0LVVLVVLSSLDQVZLWKDEDFKHORUÂśVGHJUHH RUKLJKHU7KLUGORZHVWEHKLQGRQO\ $UNDQVDV  DQG:HVW9LUJLQLD  SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

â&#x20AC;˘ Plate Lunches â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Home-Made Desserts â&#x20AC;˘ Cosmo Burger On Fridays â&#x20AC;˘ Take-Home Casseroles 2947 Old Canton Rd Suite G â&#x20AC;˘ Fondren Village Jackson, MS 39216 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.983.4450

Now Serving Lunch Tuesday-Fridayâ&#x20AC;˘11:00am-2:00pm

Madison Cellars | 1038 Hwy 51 Madison, MS | 601.856.0931

jacksonfreepress.com

Lots of Ways to Unwind

21


THE CANDIDATES, from page 21 FLICKR/FOTOS_GOV/BA

Opx!Pqfo Gps!Tvoebz!Mvodi Wpufe!Pof!pg!KbdltpoĂ&#x2013;t Cftu!Ofx!Sftubvsbout .Cftu!pg!Kbdltpo!3123.

Mjwf!Nvtjd Uivstebz-!Opwfncfs!2

Tpokb!Tubnqt

Gsjebz-!Opwfncfs!3

Mbssz!Njmupo

Tbuvsebz-!Opwfncfs!4

Mbssz!Njmupo

Possibly more than ever before, voters are making a decision about their future health care when they go to the polls to vote for president.

Fwfsz!Gsjebz!evsjoh!Mvodi!22!.4

Tbypqipojtu-!Bnpt!Csfxfs 2211!Kpio!S/!Mzodi!Tusffu!}!Tvjuf!B Kbdltpo-!NT!}!87:/362/6333 uifqfohvjont/dpn

SOURCES OF COVERAGE IN THE UNITED STATES: Before and After Full Implementiation of Health Reformation

#URRENT,AW

.EW,AW

)NDIVIDUAL0RIVATE  %XCHANGE 

Viva con Sabor (Alive with Flavor) -Mentioned in Boom Jackson Magazine Autumn 2010 Edition-

-EDICAID #()0  /THER 5NINSURED 

5NINSURED /THER   %XCHANGE 

%MPLOYER 

-EDICAID #()0

%MPLOYER 

)NDIVIDUAL0RIVATE  SOURCE: ESTIMATED BY THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE

October 31 - November 6, 2012

Tamales

22

Enchiladas & Refried Beans â&#x20AC;˘ Tortillas Made Fresh To Order â&#x20AC;˘ Authentic Not Tex-Mex 6610 Old Canton Road Suite J Ridgeland, Ms|Behind Dominoeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza Wed. - Mon.10am - 9:30pm|Closed Tue. Call for ToGo Order|601-899-8821

Lunch Buffet â&#x20AC;˘ 11-2 Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10pm

862 Avery Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 â&#x20AC;˘ ruchiindia.com

Administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definition of small business, which defines it as a company with 500 or fewer employees. Under that definition, 99.7 percent of the approximately 6 million businesses nationwide are small businesses. More than half those businesses, 3.7 million of them, employ four or fewer employees, and 4.7 million employ 10 or fewer. Mississippi ranks No. 17 nationally with 16.2 percent of the labor force owning a micro-enterprise, a company which requires $35,000 or less in start-up funds and employ five or less people. Eighty percent of those businesses employ a single owner/operator, and they make up the majority of Mississippi small-business owners. Only 1.39 percent of the Mississippi workforce owns a business that employs between six and 100 workers. That puts Mississippi No. 36 out of 50 states in that category. It seems in every ad or debate claim made by these two candidates, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit of truth and bit of not-quite-truth. For every â&#x20AC;&#x153;yes,â&#x20AC;? thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a â&#x20AC;&#x153;but,â&#x20AC;? especially when it comes to the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; track records on small business and job creation. For example, some Romney ads claim that as governor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Romney reduced unemployment to just 4.7 percent.â&#x20AC;? While the unemployment rate did drop under Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watch, it went from slightly below the national average when he took office to about the same as the national average when he left. In the final presidential debate, President Obama said that when Romney was governor, Massachusetts ranked 48 out of 50 states in small business development. Those numbers came from comparing Bureau of Labor statistics between 2002, the last year before Romney took office, and 2006, the last year he was in office. Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign compared privatesector startups and closings from the two years. While the national average rose 7.4 percent from 2002 to 2006, Massachusetts business startups fell 9.6 percent. The Romney campaign responded


4OTAL*OB#HANGEFOR0RIVATE 3ECTOR7ORKERS3INCE THE3TARTOF%ACHOF,AST4HREE2ECOVERIES









 

2ECESSION

   

2ECESSION

 

2ECESSION



                            

,ENGTHOF2ECESSION-ONTHS

-ONTHSSINCE2ECESSION´S%ND

1RWHV3XEOLFGDWDH[FOXGHWHPSRUDU\&HQVXVZRUNHUV7LPHOLQHIRUHDFKUHFHVVLRQEHJLQVDWWKH RIÂżFLDOVWDUWRIWKHUHFHVVLRQVRWKHOHQJWKRIWKHOLQHWRWKHOHIWRI]HURLQGLFDWHVWKHOHQJWKRIHDFK UHFHVVLRQ

3HAREOFTOTALJOBS STATEOFRECOVERY

3HAREOFTOTALJOBS STATEOFRECOVERY

4OTALJOBCHANGEFORPUBLIC SECTORWORKERSSINCETHE STARTOF%ACHOFTHE,AST4HREE2ECOVERIES



 2ECESSION

  

 2ECESSION

 

 2ECESSION

  

                            

,ENGTHOF2ECESSION-ONTHS

-ONTHSSINCE2ECESSION´S%ND

1RWHV7LPHOLQHIRUHDFKUHFHVVLRQEHJLQVDWWKHRIÂżFLDOVWDUWRIWKHUHFHVVLRQVRWKHOHQJWKRIWKH WLPHOLQHWRWKHOHIWRI]HURLQGLFDWHVWKHOHQJWKRIHDFKUHFHVVLRQ SOURCE: AUTHORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANALYSIS OF BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CURRENT EMPLOYMENT STATISTCS PUBLIC DATA SERIES

SOURCE: AUTHORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANALYSIS OF BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CURRENT EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS PUBLIC DATA SERIES

with numbers from a Kauffman Foundation study that compared entrepreneurial startup from 1996-1998 with those from 2005-2007. That study, which unlike Bureau of Labor statistics included self-employed people starting businesses and unincorporated businesses, ranked Massachusetts as the fourth-highest state in entrepreneurial activity over that time period. When you directly compare the two candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; policies, it seems that their plans might work best together, with Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan

creating jobs in the short term, and Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aiming to help employment in the future. Obama signed the American Jobs Act in 2010, which immediately put Americans back to work. The act cut the payroll tax in half for a companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first $5 million in payroll, a number that 98 percent of businesses do not reach annually. It also eliminated payroll tax on increased payroll up $50 million for companies that hired new workers or gave raises to current employees. The bill also provided $5,600 to $9,600

Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

in tax credits for companies that hired unemployed military veterans and invested large sums in infrastructure projects, such as rebuilding interstate highways, which has created thousands of jobs. Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed policy focuses more on the long term, with talking points such as ramping up domestic energy production, cracking down on China, cutting corporate tax rates and creating better trade agreements with Latin America. None of these points are quick fixes.

Increased domestic oil production, trade negotiations with China, new trade deals in Central and South America and rewriting tax codes all take time. Obama, however, has already begun to make some of changes in his first term that Romney proposes. While Romney would point out that the increase is on private land, not public, U.S. domestic oil production is up more than 700,000 barrels a day since more CANDIDATES, page 24

Best Pizza 2009-2012 -Best Of Jackson-

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Mon - Fri Other Special Offers: Come watch your favorite teams play and enjoy 99¢ beer & $6 dollar oysters 6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland â&#x20AC;˘ 601-956-5040 Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat & Sun 11 - 10

BELHAVEN LOCATION OPEN DURING CONSTRUCTION Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com NORTH JACKSON LOCATION Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-10pm | Sun: 11am - 8pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

jacksonfreepress.com

HAPPY HOUR SEVEN DAYS A WEEK â&#x20AC;˘ 4pm - 6pm

23


ELECTION DAY IS NOV. 6 POLLING PLACES WILL BE OPEN FROM 7 A.M. TO 7 P.M. 9OUDO./4NEEDVOTER)$TOVOTEIN-ISSISSIPPI

October 31 - November 6, 2012

0OLL0ROBLEMSTO2EPORT $Q\YRWHULQWLPLGDWLRQLQFOXGLQJYLGHRWDS LQJ 3DUW\ZRUNHUVVLWWLQJDWYRWLQJWDEOHVRU KDUDVVLQJYRWHUVLQDQ\ZD\ ,'FKHFNV RWKHUWKDQ¿UVWWLPHYRWHUVZKR UHJLVWHUHGE\PDLO  $OFRKROFRQVXPSWLRQRQVLWH &DPSDLJQPDWHULDOVZLWKIHHWRISROOV $Q\RQHQRWEHLQJDOORZHGWRFDVWDSURYL VLRQDOEDOORW 3ROOZRUNHUVZKRUHIXVHWRDVVLVWYRWHUV 2EVHUYLQJVRPHRQHEHLQJWXUQHGDZD\ IURPWKHSROOV 3ROOZRUNHUVRUSDUW\UHSVDSSURDFKLQJ YRWLQJPDFKLQHV 9RWLQJPDFKLQHVWKDWGRQRWZRUN  )FYOUHAVEPROBLEMSATTHEPOLLS DO NOTWAITUNTILYOUHAVE½NISHEDVOTING 5HSRUW\RXUSUREOHPLPPHGLDWHO\WRDSROO ZRUNHURUPDQDJHU,IWKDWSHUVRQFDQ¶WRU ZRQ¶WKHOSFDOORUDOORIWKHIROORZLQJ  7KH86-XVWLFH'HSDUWPHQW   7KH1$$&3¶V9RWHU3URWHFWLRQKRWOLQH 927(  7KH0LVVLVVLSSL6HFUHWDU\RI6WDWH¶V2I ¿FH(OHFWLRQ+RWOLQH  0LVVLVVLSSL3URWHFWLRQDQG$GYRFDF\ 6\VWHP IRUGLVDEOHGYRWHUV 

24

6OTE 0<927( 

285927( 

9(<927$ HQ(VSDxRO

$OVRFDOOWKH-DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVVQHZVURRP H[WRU  7RYRWH\RXPXVWEHUHJLVWHUHGDWOHDVW GD\VSULRUWRDQHOHFWLRQ$OWKRXJKLW¶V QRWUHTXLUHGLW¶VDJRRGLGHDWRKDYHDSKRWR ,'ZLWK\RXDWWKHSROOVMXVWLQFDVHWKHUHLV DSUREOHP5HPHPEHUWRWDNHRIIDQ\FDP SDLJQSDUDSKHUQDOLDEHIRUHHQWHULQJIDLOLQJ WRGRVRFDQUHVXOWLQEHLQJWXUQHGDZD\ 7HERETO6OTE  <RXUYRWHUUHJLVWUDWLRQFDUGVKRZV\RXU SUHFLQFWQXPEHUDQGDQDGGUHVVIRUYRWLQJ ,I\RXPLVSODFHG\RXUFDUGDVNDQHLJKERU JRWR9RWH YRWHRUJ DQGHQWHU\RXU DGGUHVVRUWRWKH0LVVLVVLSSL6HFUHWDU\RI 6WDWH¶VZHEVLWHSROOLQJSODFHORRNXSSDJH  &DOOWKHVWDWH¶V(OHFWLRQV+HOS/LQHWR ¿QG\RXUSROOLQJSODFH²<RX FDQDOVRFDOOWKHFOHUN¶VRI¿FHLQ\RXUFLW\RU FRXQW\LQWKHFLW\RI-DFNVRQFDOO LQ+LQGV&RXQW\LQ 0DGLVRQ&RXQW\LQ5DQNLQ &RXQW\ 

THE CANDIDATES, from page 23 Obama took office in January 2009. As for China, President Obama brought a trade case against China to the World Trade Organization over Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practices creating cheap exports in the auto part manufacturing industry that threaten U.S. jobs among other cases. WTO cases often take more than a year to complete, so the case is not likely to make a difference prior to 2013, but it shows that Obama has taken action to back his words about cracking down on Chinese trade practices. Furthermore, Obama has proposed ending tax breaks for company which ship jobs to other countries, like China, and replace them with tax credits for company which create manufacturing jobs here in the U.S. While Romney talks tough on China, his former company Bain Capital often took advantage of tax incentives and the workforce that came with shipping U.S. jobs to countries with like China, which has little labor regulation. (Bain, which Romney started, continues to close plants in the U.S. and move jobs offshore.) Another major difference in the plans coming from the right and left is how the candidates plan to pay for their plans. Obama has made it clear that he wants to end tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans to

help pay for his plan. Romney, on the other hand, strongly opposes raising taxes on the rich. He has said that once in office, he will evaluate every federal program to decide what is and is not necessary. Anything he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find necessary, he proposes cutting and handing to the states to fund or drop. Just what he plans to cut and whether that will pay for his policies is still a mystery. In Mississippi, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already seen Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure investments creating jobs to repave and construct new interstate highways. If Romney becomes president, he will likely push for more offshore drilling in the Gulf, which could mean more jobs for Mississippians in the oil business, at least in the short term. However, the risk of oil spills and accidents concerns many residents. In Mississippi, the numbers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lie. We are at or near the bottom of the nation in almost every sector, from health care and education, to personal income to employment. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll soon know which presidential candidate we will have to put our hope in for the next four years to improve our state and put us in a position to rise from the bottom of the barrel. Comment on this story at jfp.ms. Read full election coverage at jfp.ms/election2012. You can reach Jacob Fuller at 601-362-6121 ext. 22 or email jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. Watch jfp.ms for election updates.


No Matter Which Way You Fall

FX]VBc^_ on State Street

CdTbSPh=XVWc

control Release and

Selected works by Jacob Rowan and Bryan Fulton Thursday, November 8th at 7 pm at Lisetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Photography & Gallery 1800 North State Street in Jackson 601.497.2899 for more info

â&#x20AC;˘ 19 Beers On Tap â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music â&#x20AC;˘ 50¢ Boneless Wings â&#x20AC;˘ $10 Pitcher Abita â&#x20AC;˘ $2 Pint Abita

WEDNESDAY 10/31

Classic T.V. Halloween Costume Contest

FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

CWdabSPh=XVWc

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no

With Larry Waters Duo

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Here To Catch You

Finvarraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wren (Traditional Irish)

FRIDAY 11/2

John Whelan (Irish Accordian)

SATURDAY 11/3

sharing, no carry out

Zach Lovett

$2 Pints

% (%(%# ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^]<B

THURSDAY 11/1

(Indie/Folk)

4949 Old Canton Road | 601-956-5108

www.briarwoodwineandspirits.com NATHAN S. M C HARDY & LESLEY M C HARDY OWNERS & SOMMELIERS

MONDAY 11/5

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 11/6

Open Mic hosted by Jason Bailey MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

$INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

6ISITALADDININJACKSONCOM

7%$%,)6%2

)RQGUHQ%HOKDYHQ80&DUHD

,AKELAND$R *ACKSON -3 7HORU )D[

6ISIT OUR'R OCE 3TOREN RY EXT DOOR

2IDGE7AY 3TE% &LOWOOD -3 7HO )D[

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

$7.98

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia

Free Tea For The Entire Month Of November

Specials & Rewards text 71441

1149 Old Fannin Road â&#x20AC;˘ Brandon, MS 39047 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-992-6686 5647 Highway 80 East â&#x20AC;˘ Pearl, MS 39208 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-932-8728 Both Locations Open 7 Days A Week

Thursday : Chicken Diane or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or

Chicken & Dumplings

jacksonfreepress.com

Happy 25th Anniversary

or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef

25


Energy, Illustrated NORTH AMERICAN OIL PRODUCTION SCENARIOS    

U.S. ONSHORE

(OW-UCH/ILISTHERE

   ,OW#ASE    "ASE#ASE    (IGH#ASE   

3ROLWLFLDQV OLNH WR WDON DERXW IUHH LQJ WKH 86 IURP GHSHQGHQF\ RQ IRUHLJQRLO7KHWUXWKLVWKH86LP SRUWVIDUOHVVRLOIURPWKH0LGHDVW WKDQHOHFWHGRI¿FLDOVOLNHWRDGPLW ,QSHUFHQWRIWKHRLOFRQ VXPHG E\ WKH 86 ZDV LPSRUWHG WKH ORZHVW OHYHO VLQFH  7KH VDPH \HDU 86 FRQVXPHG  PLOOLRQ EDUUHOV SHU GD\ PDNLQJ XV WKH ZRUOG¶V ODUJHVW SHWUROHXP FRQVXPHU/HW¶VVD\IRUWKHVDNHRI DUJXPHQW WKDW UDWH KROGV XS DF FRUGLQJWRWKHVHSURMHFWLRQVLQWKH EHVW FDVH VFHQDULR WKH 86 ZLOO RQO\ EH DEOH WR SURGXFH MXVW  PLOOLRQEDUUHOVDGD\E\KDOI RIWKHQDWLRQ¶VFXUUHQWXVDJH

U.S. GULF OF MEXICO    ,OW#ASE    "ASE#ASE    (IGH#ASE   

OIL SANDS    

   ,OW#ASE    "ASE#ASE    (IGH#ASE   

CANADIAN CONVENTIONAL/TIGHT OIL    ,OW#ASE    "ASE#ASE    (IGH#ASE   

TOTAL NORTH AMERICAN OIL 

   ,OW#ASE    "ASE#ASE    (IGH#ASE   



-ISSISSIPPI%NERGY#ONSUMPTION%STIMATES  #OAL .ATURAL'AS -OTOR'ASOLINEEXCLUDING%THANOL $ISTILLATE&UEL/IL *ET&UEL ,0' 2ESIDUAL&UEL /THER0ETROLEUM .UCLEAN%LECTRIC0OWER (YDROELECTRIC0OWER "IOMASS /THER2ENEWABLES .ET)NTERSTATE&LOWOF%LECTRICITY 

0LVVLVVLSSLGRHVQ¶WKDYHDORWRIHQHUJ\EXW XVHVDORWRIHQHUJ\$FFRUGLQJWRWKH(,$ 0LVVLVVLSSLSURGXFHV7ULOOLRQ%WXVRU SHUFHQWRIWKHQDWLRQ¶VHQHUJ\VXSSO\+RZHYHU 0LVVLVVLSSLUDQNHGQGLQDUHDDQGSRSXODWLRQ GHQVLW\LVQDWLRQ¶VWKKLJKHVWHQHUJ\FRQ VXPHUDSSUR[LPDWHO\PLOOLRQ%WXVSHU\HDU 

#OAL .ATURAL'AS -ARKETED #RUDE/IL .UCLEAR%LECTRIC0OWER "IOFUELS /THER2ENEWABLE%NERGY 





3HUFHQWDJHRI2LO1HW,PSRUWV

          

     

  4RILLION"45





SOURCE: ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, STATE ENERGY DATA SYSTEM

-ISSISSIPPI %NERGY2ANKINGS

#LEAN%NERGY      



-ISSISSIPPI%NERGY0RODUCTION%STIMATES 

SOURCE: ALBERTA OIL MAGAZINE, SEPT. 2012





SOURCE: ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, STATE ENERGY DATA SYSTEM

$OOSURGXFWLRQQXPEHUVDUHH[SUHVVHGLQEDUUHOVSHUGD\

2ELIANCEON&OREIGN/IL

  4RILLION"45

,QWKHSDVWIRXU\HDUV86GHSHQGHQFHRQ IRUHLJQRLOKDVGHFUHDVHGZKLOHUHOLDQFHRQ FOHDQHQHUJ\VRXUFHV,QIDFWWKHSRUWLRQ RI86HOHFWULFLW\SURGXFHGE\QRQK\GUR UHQHZDEOHHQHUJ\VRXUFHVZLOOJRXSIURP SHUFHQWLQWRSHUFHQWE\ DFFRUGLQJWRWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI(QHUJ\¶V (QHUJ\,QIRUPDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ (,$ 

Total energy consumed per Capita (15), Total energy consumed (32), Crude oil (12), Natural Gas (21), Coal (17). Electricity (26), CO2 Emissions (32)

SOURCE: JOBS PLAN BOOKLET

LGBT Illustrated THE CANDIDATES ON LGBT ISSUES MARRIAGE 2OMNEY,DJUHHZLWK\HDUV RIUHFRUGHGKLVWRU\,GLVDJUHHZLWK WKH6XSUHPH-XGLFLDO&RXUWRI0DV VDFKXVHWWV0DUULDJHLVDQLQVWLWXWLRQ EHWZHHQDPDQDQGDZRPDQ

/BAMA³,KDGKHVLWDWHGRQJD\ PDUULDJHLQSDUWEHFDXVH,WKRXJKW WKDWFLYLOXQLRQVZRXOGEHVXI¿FLHQW ,ZDVVHQVLWLYHWRWKHIDFWWKDWIRUD ORWRISHRSOHWKHZRUGPDUULDJHZDV VRPHWKLQJWKDWLQYRNHVYHU\SRZHUIXO WUDGLWLRQVDQGUHOLJLRXVEHOLHI%XW,KDYH WRWHOO\RXWKDWª,¶YHMXVWFRQFOXGHGWKDWIRUPH SHUVRQDOO\LWLVLPSRUWDQWIRUPHWRJRDKHDG DQGDI¿UPWKDW,WKLQNVDPHVH[FRXSOHVVKRXOG EHDEOHWRJHWPDUULHG

October 31 - November 6, 2012

MILITARY SERVICE

26

2OMNEY³,ZDVQRWFRPIRUWDEOHPDNLQJWKHFKDQJH /BAMA³%\HQGLQJ³'RQ¶W$VN'RQ¶W7HOO´QR GXULQJDSHULRGRIFRQÀLFWE\YLUWXHRIWKHFRPSOL ORQJHUZLOORXUQDWLRQEHGHQLHGWKHVHUYLFHRI FDWLQJWKHIHDWXUHVRIDQHZSURJUDPLQWKHPLGGOH WKRXVDQGVRISDWULRWLF$PHULFDQVIRUFHGWROHDYHWKH RIWZRZDUVJRLQJRQEXWWKRVHZDUVDUHZLQGLQJ PLOLWDU\GHVSLWH\HDUVRIH[HPSODU\SHUIRUPDQFH GRZQDQGPRYLQJWRWKDWGLUHFWLRQDWWKLVVWDJHQR EHFDXVHWKH\KDSSHQWREHJD\$QGQRORQJHUZLOO ORQJHUSUHVHQWVWKDWSUREOHP´ PDQ\WKRXVDQGVPRUHEHDVNHGWROLYHDOLHLQRUGHU WRVHUYHWKHFRXQWU\WKH\ORYH´

DOMA 2OMNEY³&HUWDLQO\,ZRXOGGHIHQGWKH'HIHQVH RI0DUULDJH$FWZKLFKWKHFXUUHQWSUHVLGHQWKDV UHIXVHGWRGHIHQG,EHOLHYHWKDWWKH'HIHQVHRI 0DUULDJH$FWZDVZHOOFRQVWUXFWHGDQGVKRXOGEH PDLQWDLQHG´

/BAMAEHOLHYHVWKDWWKH'R0$LVXQFRQVWLWXWLRQDO DQGKDVGLUHFWHGKLVDGPLQLVWUDWLRQWRVWRSGHIHQG LQJWKH$FWLQFRXUWDOWKRXJKWKH\ZLOOFRQWLQXHWR HQIRUFHLWXQWLO&RQJUHVVUHSHDOVWKHDFW COMPILED FROM INTERNET SOURCES

DOMA: INDEFENSIBLE?

$SSURYHGDQGVLJQHGE\3UHVLGHQW%LOO&OLQWRQLQ WKH'HIHQVHRI0DUULDJH$FWGH¿QHV³PDUULDJH´DV RQO\DOHJDOXQLRQEHWZHHQRQHPDQDQGRQHZRPDQ VDPHVH[FRXSOHVHYHQLIOHJDOO\PDUULHGLQWKHLU VWDWHZLOOQRWEHFRQVLGHUHGVSRXVHVIRUSXUSRVHV RIIHGHUDOODZ´)HGHUDOODZSURYLGHVPRUHWKDQ EHQH¿WVULJKWVDQGSURWHFWLRQVSURYLGHGRQWKHEDVLV RIPDULWDOVWDWXV

SOCIAL SECURITY

6XUYLYLQJVSRXVHVDUHHOLJLEOHWRUHFHLYH6RFLDO6HFX ULW\SD\PHQWV+RZHYHUVXUYLYLQJVSRXVHDQGVXUYLY LQJSDUHQWEHQH¿WVDUHGHQLHGWRJD\VDQGOHVELDQV

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE

7KH)DPLO\DQG0HGLFDO/HDYH$FW )0/$ JXDUDQWHHV IDPLO\DQGPHGLFDOOHDYHWRHPSOR\HHVWRFDUHIRU SDUHQWVFKLOGUHQDQGVSRXVHV+RZHYHUWKLVODZGRHV QRWSURYLGHOHDYHWRFDUHIRUDGRPHVWLFSDUWQHURUWKH GRPHVWLFSDUWQHU¶VIDPLO\PHPEHU

IMMIGRATION RIGHTS

&XUUHQW86LPPLJUDWLRQODZGRHVQRWDOORZ/*%7 FLWL]HQVRUUHVLGHQWVWRSHWLWLRQIRUWKHLUVDPHVH[ SDUWQHUVWRLPPLJUDWHIRUFLQJOHVELDQDQGJD\ FRXSOHVWRVHSDUDWHRUIHDURIGHSRUWDWLRQ

FEDERAL WORKER BENEFITS

'RPHVWLFSDUWQHUVRIIHGHUDOHPSOR\HHVDUHH[FOXGHG IURPWKH)HGHUDO(PSOR\HHV+HDOWK%HQH¿WV3URJUDP )(+%3 :KLOHPDUULHGFRXSOHVDUHHOLJLEOHIRUUHLP EXUVHPHQWH[SHQVHVLQFXUUHGE\DGRPHVWLFSDUWQHU DUHQRWUHLPEXUVDEOH

CONTINUED HEALTH COVERAGE (COBRA)

)HGHUDO&2%5$ODZGRHVQRWPDQGDWHWKDWHPSOR\HUV SURYLGHGRPHVWLFSDUWQHUVWKHVDPHFRQWLQXHGFRYHU DJHJXDUDQWHHGWRPDUULHGFRXSOHV

SOURCE: HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL

“Governor Romney also believes, consistent with the 10th Amendment, that it should be left to states to decide whether to grant same-sex couples certain benefits, such as hospital visitation rights and the ability to adopt children.” — Mitt Romney advisor Bay Buchanan


8 DAYS p 28 | FILM p 31 | MUSIC p 32 | SPORTS p 34

TRIP BURNS

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

A

or exhibition of these pieces. So I was really thrilled to find a lot of works that were done over the past 20 years.” As Lambert began traveling the state, meeting artists and requesting works, he also found many artists eager to create something specifically for the show, as he got to know various art microcosms throughout Mississippi. “This show can show you how the artist community really is connected, not just of people painting each other on their own, but the anecdotes revealing a little more flavor and texture about how they really are connected,” Lambert says. The works submitted by P. Sanders McNeal are a good example of that sense of community. In the ’80s, she and several other artists in Jackson regularly got together once a month to do live figure drawings. “We actually put an ad in the paper: Live drawing models needed. We had some 30, 40 people show up. Some of them didn’t know what live drawing meant,” McNeal says with a laugh. “All they saw was $10 an hour. … But when the models would not show up, we would draw each other. So I had some wonderful drawings of all my friends, and then I’d just throw them in the drawer, which is what (Lambert) saw. They’ve got coffee stains on them and stuff like that. I didn’t even remember I had them.” “What was nice with those drawings was to see the artists 15 years younger, 20 years younger … We wanted the

TRIP BURNS

tiny, Sharpie-drawn sketch on a white matchbook, no bigger than a shot glass, sits on a shelf. On another wall, a vivid jester-like face grins from atop a harlequin diamond backdrop on a larger-than-life canvas. Across the gallery hangs an oil painting so realistic it could almost be a photograph. This is “Artists by Artists,” and what ties these disparate pieces of art together is that they are all portraits of Mississippi artists, painted or drawn or, in a few cases, sculpted by fellow artists. The show opened at the Mississippi Museum of Art in September and continues through mid-January. David Lambert, curator of the show, has been working on “Artists by Artists” for almost two years. He says the idea struck when he was working in his studio and caught himself looking at two paintings of fellow artists. “I thought, ‘You know, this means something to me.’ I know these people, and I respect their work, and I bet other artists around the state have similar things in their collections that people don’t see,” Lambert says. He began making some calls. “I was really looking for, initially, things that artists had already done. Things that were tucked away, sketches, incidentals,” Lambert says. “My thought was that these are moments between artists, colleagues, friends that are very nonself-conscious. There’s no pressure of commission or exhibit

exhibit to be sort of a small portrait of the art community over a period of time, so it was really a nice addition,” Lambert adds. William Goodman, one of the younger artists participating in the show, says the show gave his generation of local artists a similar chance to reflect on and celebrate the influence they’ve had on one another. “It was roughly 2003 or so when I moved into the Fondren Corner building. Around that time, Ginger Williams moved in there and Josh Hailey. Jason Lott was there all the time,” Goodman says. “We had this special moment, this bond, a time where we saw each other’s creativity, and we really felt each other. And we’d stay up all night long and do photoshoots. It was just kind of a magical time. We’re still very good friends, but we all kind of do our own thing now. But it was one of those moments like you are talking about where, looking back on it, I think we all kind of grew from that time as a community.” For the show, Goodman and Baxter Knowlton painted each other’s portraits. Ginger Williams Cook and Jason “Twiggy” Lott also painted portraits of each other for the show. The exhibit features close to 75 pieces of art from 50 artists, mostly paintings with a few drawings and sculptures. There are no photographs, simply because Lambert says he had to set some arbitrary guidelines to keep the show from growing far too large. When the exhibit leaves the museum, it will continue on via its website, artistsbyartsists.com.

Paintings of Fletcher Cox, Baxter Knowlton and Ginger Williams Cook share a wall in the exhibit.

“Artists by Artists” hangs at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515) through Jan. 13. As a special exhibit, the cost is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and $3 for students. Visit msmuseumart.org or artistsbyartists.com for more information.

jacksonfreepress.com

Artists by Artists

“Artists by Artists” includes portraits of Mississippians Jere Allen (two paintings left of center), Charles Gross and Marty Vinograd.

27


WEDNESDAY 10/31

SATURDAY 11/3

New Horizon Church’s Harvest Festival is from 5-7 p.m.

The Hot Diggity Dog 5K at Mayes Lake includes a dogs’ fun run.

WEDNESDAY 11/7 Sun and Sand: The Mississippi Film and Music Festival is on the Gulf Coast.

BEST BETS OCT. 31NOV. 7, 2012

COURTESY DARBY KELLUM

Archaeologist Patty Miller Beech speaks during “History Is Lunch” at noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The Belhaven Halloween Block Party is from 5:30-8 p.m. at Belvoir Place. $3, under 12 months free; greaterbelhaven. com. … “The Color Purple” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in Rose E. McCoy Auditorium; runs through Nov. 4. $20, $10 students and seniors, $5 school children (Nov. 2), JSU students free Oct. 31 and Nov 2; call 601-979-5956 or 601-979-4309. … The Ragbirds’ Halloween Show is at 7 p.m. at Duling Hall; includes a costume contest. $8 advance, $10 at door, children under 12 free; call 800-745-3000. … Fondren Theatre Workshop’s “The Rocky Horror Show,” a JFP-sponsored event, is from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s; encore Nov. 1. For mature audiences. Benefits Mississippi HeARTS Against AIDS. $20; call 601-301-2281.

EVENTS@

FRIDAY 11/2

Richard Heard and Dr. Theresa Sanchez perform at the Guest Artist Recital at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts in the concert hall. Doors open at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-974-6494. … Howie Mandel performs at 8 p.m. at IP Casino Resort and Spa (850 Bayview Ave., Biloxi). For ages 21 and up. $40-$55; call 800-745-3000. The Ragbirds perform Oct. 31 at 7 p.m. at Duling Hall.

THURSDAY 11/1

Fondren After 5 is from 5-8 p.m. Stops to make include the “Show of Devotion” Art Show at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101; call 601-291-9115) and the opening reception for the “Color of Water” Winter Art Show at The Cedars (4145 Old Canton Road; call 601981-9606). Free. … liveRIGHTnow’s fondRUN is at 6 p.m. in Fondren. The run ends with drinks at Sneaky Beans. Visit liverightnowonline.com. … The Community Reinvestment Awards Program at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) is at 7 p.m. $35; call 601982-8467. … Tailgating with the Tigers is from 6-9 p.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Wear a college football jersey or T-shirt. For ages 18 and up; must be 21 to drink. $15 advance, $20 day of event, $30 VIP (pre-purchase); call 28 601-352-2500. … Thick and Proud Sisters’ Fashion and Full October 31 - November 6, 2012

Frames Model Showcase is at 7:30 p.m. at Lakeover Center (6531 Dogwood Parkway); trunk show follows. Curves and Cocktails VIP Lounge at 6:30 p.m. $10 advance, $15 at door, $25 VIP; call 769-233-1936. … The play “The Great Gatsby” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage BY LATASHA WILLIS Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.); ends Nov 4. $28, $22 seniors and JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM students; call 601-948-3533. … Alejandro Escovedo and FAX: 601-510-9019 The Sensitive Boys perform at DAILY UPDATES AT 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. $15 JFPEVENTS.COM advance, $20 at door; call 800745-3000. … The High Note Jam with Under Discussion is at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … Harpsichordists Shawn Leopard and John Paul perform at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). $20, $5 students; call 601-594-5584.

STERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

WEDNESDAY 10/31

SATURDAY 11/3

The Biggest Loser Run/Walk is at 7:30 a.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. Country singer Dan Evans performs. Space limited. $50 5K, $70 10K (by Nov. 2); visit biggestloserrunwalk.com. … The JFP-sponsored Hot Diggity Dog 5K is from 8 a.m.-noon at Mayes Lake at LeFleur’s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace); dogs welcome. Proceeds benefit Gallant Hearts Guide Dog Center. $20 advance, $30 day of race, $10 fun walk; call 601-853-6996. … Intersect Dance Collective’s Dance, Dessert and Donations is at 7 p.m. at The Church at Northshore (498 Northshore Parkway, Brandon). $10, $7 students, children under 12 free; call 903-316-0692. … The screening of J. Lee Productions’ film “The Murderer” is at 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium. Bring ID to redeem tickets bought online. $12; jleeplays. com.… Nameless Open-mic featuring Talibah Smith is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). $5, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents “Pops I: Simply Swingin’” at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $15 and up; call 601-960-1565.

J. Lee Productions’ debuts the film “The Murderer” Nov. 3 at Russell C. Davis Planetarium at 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Jimmie Lee is pictured.

SUNDAY 11/4

The improvisational duo Billy Martin and Wil Blades performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 800-745-3000.

MONDAY 11/5

Texas A&M’s Jason Cook speaks at the Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting at 6 p.m. at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186.

TUESDAY 11/6

Music in the City with Stephen Sachs is at 5:45 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … The Stardust Duo performs at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. $10; $5 seniors; students free; call 601-974-6494.

WEDNESDAY 11/7

Mistletoe Marketplace kicks off at 11 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.); runs through Nov. 10. Benefits the Junior League. $10-$20, $5 ages 6-12 and seniors; call 888-324-0027. The JFP sponsors. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


SAIL AWAY WITH

RUSH

REWARDS

:;<<=<<<((

!" #!$%&'(%!)*

>?@A?B**CDB(

ACDBEFEG !"#$%& *%+,"$%'() #-(./01 &'( 45267 231" #$-#89+

Better “safe” than sorry!

One winner every hour will choose an envelope containing a code. At Midnight, each winner will try to Crack the Code for $5,000 Cash! All winners are guaranteed $500 Cash. If no one wins the $5,000, the prize will rollover to the next drawing day until it’s won! Earn entries now. 10X entries Wednesdays-Saturdays, 20X entries Sundays,

W24%S0PPQL +,-.%/01123453%"506%7%89:;<=>1?@%AB%CD+E,%7%+FE..F.+GFD+HG%7%19I21J0K;I9:;<=>1?L:5M

facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

"NB'%"2J016<%<>=O2:4%45%M939M>M%PK0Q%12R>912M234<L%&S2<2%32J%12J016<%012%<5%P5J21T>K@%Q5>UKK%T22K%K9;2%0%32J%P21<53L%% V54%4S04%4S212U<%03Q4S93?%J153?%J94S%4S2%J0Q%Q5>%012%35JL%A><4%=2%H+%51%5K621%45%23421%:0<935L%A030?2M234%12<21I2<% 0KK%19?S4<%45%0K421%51%:03:2K%P15M54953%04%03Q%49M2%J94S5>4%3549:2L%W0M=K93?%P15=K2MX%!0KK%+FEEEFYYYFD.D.L%% ZH,+H%"9I21J0K;%!0<935%7%'542KL%#KK%19?S4<%12<21I26L

jacksonfreepress.com

Mondays and Tuesdays.

29


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Dialogue Circles Program. The program includes six two-hour sessions of dialogue and problem-solving to encourage racial harmony and community involvement. Six-week commitment required. Free; email nikalea@gmail.com.

(/,)$!9 Events in Yazoo City. Free; call 662-746-7676. â&#x20AC;˘ Trick-or-Treat Yazoo Oct. 31, 4-6 p.m. Participating merchants give treats to visitors; call for locations. â&#x20AC;˘ Christmas Open House Nov. 4, 1-5 p.m. Participating merchants open their doors for a preview of their holiday offerings.

#/--5.)49 Events at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Call 601-576-6000. â&#x20AC;˘ Conservation Celebration Nov. 3-4. The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks celebrates its 80th anniversary Nov. 3 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; activities include archery, laser shooting, and face painting. Free admission to all MDWFP sites Nov. 4. Free. â&#x20AC;˘ Water Is Life, No Water, No Life: Adopt-AStream Nov. 6, noon-1 p.m. Dwebra Veeder; Adopt-A-Stream Coordinator at the Mississippi Wildlife Federation, shares the importance of water conservation. $4-$6.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings 11/2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Flight

R

Argo

Fri. 11/8 R

Here Comes The Boom PG

3-D Wreck It Ralph PG

Sinister

R

Wreck It Ralph (non 3-D) PG

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower PG13

Cloud Atlas

Taken 2

R

PG13

3-D Silent Hill: Revelation R

Frankenweenie (non 3-D) PG

Chasing Mavericks

Pitch Perfect PG13

Paranormal Activity 4

PG PG13 R

Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG

Alex Cross PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

30 Movieline: 355-9311

Precinct 1 COPS Meeting Nov. 1, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 1 (810 Cooper Road). The monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0001. Institute of Interfaith Dialog Dinner and Awards Ceremony Nov. 1, 7-9 p.m., at Hilton

AKC All-breed Dog Show Nov. 2-4, at Scott County Forest Coliseum (151 Erle Johnston Drive, Forest). The obedience fun match is Nov. 2 at 2 p.m., and the breed competition and judging is Nov. 3-4 from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Free; email pugnit60@yahoo.com; brandonkc.com. Free Spanish Demo Classes Nov. 2, at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy free classes at 6:30 p.m. and free ethnic food at 7:30 p.m. Music included. Guests may bring food, beer and wine. RSVP. Free; call 601-500-7700. Mississippi Music Teachers Association Fall Conference Nov. 2-3, at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Includes lectures, master classes and recitals. Registration required. $20, free for students; call 601-974-6494; email vtate@belhaven.edu. Fall Native Plant Sale Nov. 3, 8 a.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). More than 60 species of native trees and shrubs are for sale in the parking lot of the Clinton Community Nature Center. Free; call 601-926-1104. Hearts of Compassion Family 5K and Fun Run Nov. 3, 8 a.m., at Colonial Heights Baptist Church (444 Northpark Drive, Ridgeland). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Run to Share Hope with the Hopeless.â&#x20AC;? $25 in advance, $30 day of race, $10 fun run (ages 12 and under), family: $70 in advance, $75 day of race; call 601-956-6000; mstrackclub.com. Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk Nov. 3, 8 a.m., at Mayes Lake at LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Adults must accompany children under 15. Free, $3 car entrance fee; call 601-956-7444. Rankin County Democrats Monthly Breakfast Nov. 3, 8:30 a.m., at Corner Bakery (108 Market St., Flowood). Jackson-area Democrats meet for breakfast and discuss current political activities. Free with food for sale; rankindemocrats.net.

Rampage Rocks and Rolls

J

WIKICOMMONS

Man With The Iron Fists R

Fun Size October 31 - November 6, 2012

for Thur.

Starting a Business: First Steps Nov. 1, 6-8 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Topics include regulations, legal forms of ownership, marketing concepts and creating a business plan. RSVP; seating limited. Free; call 601-979-2795; mssbdc.org.

Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Role of Media in Fostering Global Understanding.â&#x20AC;? Investigative reporter Jerry Mitchell is the keynote speaker. RSVP. $30, $250 table of 10; email mgok@interfaithdialog.org.

DFNVRQÂśVRQO\VNDWHSDUNZLOOEHEXVWOLQJRQFHPRUHDIWHUVWDQG LQJHPSW\VL[PRQWKV%L]DDQG-RKQ-HQQLDUHUHRSHQLQJWKH SDUN IRUPHUO\ FDOOHG 6SOLQWHU 6NDWHSDUN 1RY  DV 5DPSDJH ([WUHPH3DUN  7KHUHLVDUHDOQHHGIRUDSODFHOLNHWKLVLQ-DFNVRQ%L]D-HQQL VD\VÂł7KHUHLVGHÂżQLWHO\DQHQWLUHVNDWHFRPPXQLW\WKDWKDVEHHQ ZDQWLQJVRPHWKLQJOLNHWKLV´VKHVD\VÂł,WÂśVLVDKXJHFRPPXQLW\LQ -DFNVRQWKDWKDVQRSODFHWRVNDWHOHJDOO\7KH\JRWRDSDUNLQJORWRU ZKDWHYHUDQGWKHQJHWNLFNHGRXWDQGWKHQJRVRPHZKHUHHOVHDQG JHWNLFNHGRXWWKHUH´  -HQQLDOVRHPSKDVL]HVWKHSDUNDVDVDIHSODFHIRU\RXWKWRKDQJ RXWDQGEHDFWLYHÂł,WÂśVDJRRGZD\WRJHWWKHNLGVRIIWKHFRXFKDQG RIIWKHVWUHHWVDQGEULQJWKHPLQWRDVDIHFRPPXQLW\´VKHVD\VÂł:H GRQÂśWDOORZGUXJVRUDOFRKRORUSURIDQLW\DQGVH[XDOUHIHUHQFHV´  7KHSDUNLVFORVHWR%L]D-HQQLÂśVKHDUWÂł0\GDGKDVDVKRSLQWKH VDPHIDFLOLW\DQGP\EURWKHUVXVHGWRVNDWHWKHUH´-HQQLVD\VÂł-RKQ Skaters in Jackson will have a DQG,DFWXDOO\KDGDGDWHWKHUHZKHQLWZDV6SOLQWHU6NDWHSDUN´6KH skate park to frequent once more when Rampage opens. KRSHVDQHZJHQHUDWLRQFDQFRPHWRDSSUHFLDWHLWDVZHOO  Âł,WKLQNLWÂśVDGLDPRQGLQWKHURXJK´-HQQLFRQWLQXHVÂł:KDWZH IHHOLVWKDWWKLVFRXOGJURZWKHDUHDDQGFRXOGRSHQLWXSIRURWKHUGLDPRQGV´  7KHSDUNZLOOEHRSHQ)ULGD\VSP6DWXUGD\VSPDQG6XQGD\VSP$GPLVVLRQZLOOEH IRUDGD\SDVVIRUDZHHNHQGSDVV )ULGD\WKURXJK6XQGD\ DQGFRYHUIRUPXVLF)RRGDQGGULQNDUHDOVR DYDLODEOHIRUSXUFKDVH  5DPSDJH([WUHPH3DUN 86+LJKZD\ RSHQV1RY7KHJUDQGRSHQLQJZHHNHQGZLOOIHDWXUHPXVLF DWSPHDFKQLJKW1DXWLOXVDQG'DJJHUVSHUIRUP1RYDQG6RPHWKLQJ3RVLWLYHDQG$UJLĂ&#x20AC;H[SHUIRUP1RY (PDLOUDPSDJHH[WUHPHSDUN#JPDLOFRPIRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ ².DWKOHHQ00LWFKHOO


DIVERSIONS | film

Women’s Council Luncheon Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m., at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse (Renaissance at Colony Park, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Includes a panel discussion with local women leaders. RSVP. $30; call 601-853-2734. Dr. Younus Mirza Lecture Nov. 5, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), room 215. Mirza, an expert on Islam and a faculty teaching fellow, talks about Al Qaeda and its role in current global issues. Free; call 601-974-1000. ENCOUNTER Teen Empowerment Corps Nov. 6, 5:30 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Youth Solutions hosts a rally for teens in the Community Room. Activities include mentoring, motivational talks, IGNITE Vocal Talent rehearsal, teen dramas and character development. Free; call 601-829-0323. Writing a Grant Proposal: The Essentials Nov. 7-8, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The workshop covers essentials such as budgeting, researching and managing awards. One day: $179, $89 members; both days: $359, $179 members; call 601-968-0061. Basic Computer Fundamentals: Level 2 Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, at Tulane University, Madison Campus (2115 Main St., Madison). Learn the basics of Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Pre-registration required. $10; call 601-605-0007.

7%,,.%33 Hope for Hurting Hips Nov. 2, 11:45 a.m., at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. Dr. Jason Craft explains the benefits of hip arthroscopy. RSVP. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children. Appointment required. Free; call 601-707-7355.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Mississippi JUCO: The Toughest Football League in America” Nov. 1, 6:30 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Cain-Cochran Hall. See the documentary featuring six Mississippi community college football teams. $5; call 800-HINDS-CC. “Destination 2012” Nov. 2-3, 7-10 p.m., at Morton Church of God (431 Old Highway 13 S., Morton). The play is about three teenagers who face serious hardships. Free; call 601-732-7008. “Nefarious” Documentary Screening Nov. 4, 5 p.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). The film is about the sex slave trade and ways to combat it. A Q&A session with the producers follows. Free; call 601-371-5070; newhmi.org.

“Santa’s Wish” Book Signing Nov. 3, 1-3 p.m., at Cabot Lodge Jackson North (120 Dyess Road, Ridgeland). Author Santa Claus and illustrator Marshall Ramsey sign books. $12.99 book; call 601-957-0757.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). • Party Portrayals Nov. 1, 5:30 p.m. The drawing workshop includes on-site sketching during the High Note Jam. $10; call 601-960-1515. • Figure Drawing Class Nov. 2, 6-8:30 p.m. Supplies not included. To register, send an email with “Figure Drawing Class” in the subject line. $10; email gcook@msmuseumart.org. Dips, Lifts and Tricks Class Nov. 5-26, at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Mondays at 7:30 p.m. Dance partner required. $10 per person; call 601-213-6355; salsams.com.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Firefly Cottage at Willow Pond Touring through Nov. 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Firefly Cottage at Willow Pond (104 Chestnut Hill Road, Flora). The tour features designs from local craftsmen. Benefits the educational programs at the Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi. $10; call 601-856-7546.

"%4(%#(!.'% Customer Appreciation Party Oct. 31, noon10 p.m., at Ink Injection Tattoo (1405 Old Highway 49 S., Richland). Enjoy tattoo specials, refreshments, more than $500 in prizes and a Halloween art show. Proceeds from tattoo sales ($31) benefit the American Cancer Society. Free admission; find Ink Injection Tattoo on Facebook. Charity Garage Sale Nov. 3, 6 a.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Proceeds benefit Mountain Child, a nonprofit for Himalayan children. Call 601-213-6355. Christmas in November Nov. 3, 10 a.m.-noon, at Holy City International Empowerment Ministries (251 Kearney Park Road, Flora). Needy families receive food, toys and clothes. Call 601-366-6201. Protect the Vote Call for Volunteers, at Mississippi State Conference NAACP (1072 W. Lynch St., Suite 10). The Mississippi NAACP seeks volunteers to serve as poll watchers and work at the election call center during the Nov. 6 election. Registration required. Free; call 601-353-6906 Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Cosmic Imagination by Anita Modak-Truran

“C

loud Atlas” has oracular power on a cosmic scale. Seemingly impossible, a triumvirate force of directors—Lana Wachowski (formerly Larry before gender reassignment), her brother Andy Wachowski and their friend the German director Tom Tykwer of “Run Lola Run” fame—shift time, people and cultures from a kaleidoscopic abstraction of flight and fancy into a gripping morality play. Somni 451 (Doona Bae), a servant clone from a glittering futurist city called Neo-Seoul circa 2144, delivers the unifying message that binds each of the plots: “From

Further back in time, a young American (Jim Sturgess) on a voyage through cannibal societies in the Pacific Islands protects a stowaway slave (David Gyasi). In the present, an unscrupulous London publisher (Broadbent) markets a lowbrow book titled “Knuckle Sandwich” without paying royalties to the writer (Hanks), who is in prison for killing a critic. When the thug writer’s friends demand the money, the publisher seeks help from his brother (Hugh Grant), but finds himself locked up in an old folks home that looks a lot like mansion where a crotchety composer of the same visage attempted to steal a young man’s composition called “Cloud Atlas.” Luisa Ray (Berry), the California reporter, later buys the record. The chosen people in this film—those who create change—hear the same melody. The filmmakers whisk us into the age to come, where civilization has been destroyed and small tribes of people kill each for no apparent reason. A higher life form (Berry) visits the tribe and, Like the other talented actors in “Cloud Atlas,” Doona Bae portrays multiple characters, including thankfully, she knows the lanSomni 451 from the year 2144. guage of no-verbs. Hugo Weaving portrays the womb to tomb, we are bound by others, bad guy in nearly every time zone. He’s an past and present, by each crime and every assassin, a slave owner and the devil. Weavkindness, we determine our future.” ing is magnificent, as are the other members Adapted from a novel by David Mitch- of this incredible cast, who cross genders, ell, “Cloud Atlas” uses six different stories, set cultures and racial barriers. Detractors of in time periods that span from the mid-19th the film take potshots at Anglo-types playcentury to “106 winters after the Fall,” to ing Asians, but I think they miss the point, tease and entertain our senses and emotions, which is that skin color and eye shape are irand illustrate Somni 451’s oral missive. For relevant in the bigger scheme. “Matrix” fans, Somni is this film’s Neo. All six stories assume there always will The movie opens on a gnarled-up old be natural and societal laws that favor one man (Tom Hanks) with a shrunken eye star- group over another; however, one can traning at the night sky in front of a fire. You can scend convention or bend natural order if almost imagine him tossing a bone in the one can conceive of doing it. If you think air in homage to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: a single drop of water has no meaning in a A Space Odyssey.” He could be Prometheus limitless ocean, then ask yourself: “But what of a new age. The man’s leathered face bears is an ocean, but a multitude of drops?” witness to a long life. This movie is a fusion of Wachowski The film cuts to a dashing English- philosophy and politics; you could plaster man (Ben Whishaw) inserting a revolver in your refrigerator with its pithy quotes. But his mouth. “Suicide takes courage,” he says. the cryptic verbal cues seem more right than We later learn this young man worked as an wrong. Without them, we would be lost in amanuensis for the leading British composer space and time. Audiences must have felt (played by Jim Broadbent) of the 1930s. this way when they first saw “2001: A Space The movie speeds off to Neo-Seoul, Odyssey” in 1968. In “2001,” the computer, where female fabricants are anonymous Hal, guides viewers. Here, the breadcrumb slaves to the food industry. “Honor the con- trail warping us through time zones is twitsumer” is the first principle of their ordered ter-long phrases of human experience. society. The filmmakers zip us to San FranThis film is a polarizing experience, but cisco in 1973, where an investigative jour- I absolutely loved it and can’t wait to see it nalist for Spyglass magazine (Halle Berry) again to relish the details, find more congets stuck in an elevator with an elderly sci- nections between the stories and understand entist who later tips her off to an imminent the mystery. This film has no peers and is a nuclear-power plant disaster. triumph of imagination over convention. 31 jacksonfreepress.com

Question It? Discover It! Saturdays Nov. 3, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Learn ways to be fit during the fall season. $8, children under 12 months free; call 601-981-5469.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. • “The Unfailing Light” Oct. 31, 5 p.m. Robin Bridges signs books. $17.99 book. • “My First Bird Book and Bird Feeder” Nov. 1, 9:30 a.m. Sharon Lovejoy signs books. $21.95 book. • Lemuria Story Time. Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free.

COURTESY WARNER BROTHERS

Real Food Radish Festival Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., at Harper McCaughan Town Green (301 Jeff Davis Avenue, Long Beach). Celebrate local food producers and chefs through tasting heirloom vegetables, fruits, honey, artisan cheeses and more. Free; call 228-234-8732.


TODD WOLFSON/COURTESY CONCORD MUSIC GROUP

DIVERSIONS | music

Not Done Yet by Tom Speed

A

fter more than 35 years and a dozen albums, Alejandro Escovedo is a musician’s musician and a critics’ darling—the kind of artist whom other songwriters speak of in reverent tones. He is a constant denizen of those “best of” lists at the end of each year and is consistently heralded for his storytelling chops as much as his way with an electric guitar. Escovedo sings with literary flair while harnessing the wild abandon of his punk roots. Escovedo’s most recent album, “Big Station,” which has received rave reviews from the likes of Paste Magazine, continues this tradition with deeply drawn tales and pinpoint observations, all cloaked in sounds both sublime and strident. Escovedo wrote “Big Station” in collaboration with songwriter pal Chuck Prophet. The album completes a trilogy of sorts. “I think that when I look back at the albums I’ve made, I’ve made trilogies,” Escovedo says. “The first three work together thematically. There were the Bloodshot (Records) years: ‘More Miles than Money,’ ‘Bourbonitis Blues’ and ‘A Man Under The Influence,’ which is probably one of the most important records I’ve ever put out. ... Then I started this phase with “Real Animal,’ ‘Streets Songs

of Love’ and now ‘Big Station.’” Like on the previous two albums, the story uses richly drawn characters of the southwest in and around Escovedo’s adopted hometown of Austin, Texas. “Sally Was A Cop” recounts the realities of the ongoing drug war in Mexico—the song’s protagonist having become more of a soldier than a cop during the continuing cartel conflicts. Escovedo uses ripped-fromthe-headlines scenes about “35 bodies lying in the highway/children forced to dig the graves of their fathers.” As is now customary for Escovedo, he juxtaposes these grim tableaus with a gorgeous melody, acoustic guitars, swaying saxophone and backup singers over a bedrock of electronic beats. Elsewhere, he rhapsodizes about his hometown of San Antonio and laments the changes that have befallen Austin. Like much of his work, some of the album is autobiographical. At 61, Escovedo has already enjoyed a long and sometimes illustrious career on the rock circuit, from his early days as a punk rocker with The Nuns to his ’90s reinvention as an alt-country icon. He’s got the battle scars to prove it, having narrowly survived his battle with the wellworn rock demons of the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle

of drugs and alcohol. But these days, clean and sober, he plunges forward with vigor and resolve. On the album’s opening track, the bombastic garage-rock shredder “Man of the World,” he defiantly states, “You know I’m frustrated, hot, overrated, feel like dissipating.” But he still yearns for the road and insists that he’s “duct-taped together for one last ride!” Mississippi holds a special connection for Escovedo. Alternative rock singer/songwriter Alejandro Escovedo The way he approaches his will perform with his band,The Sensitive Boys, Nov. 1. songwriting reveals Escovedo’s longstanding friendship with Mississippi novelist Larry Brown, his canon is riddled with the same type of who passed away in 2004. twisted characters. His rock ‘n’ roll heart “The books I read definitely influence and his compulsion to bring these stories me as a songwriter,” Escovedo says. to life keep him moving forward. As he “Especially Larry, because his charac- emphatically states on “Man of the World”: ters were so real and conversational. They “I’m not done yet!” had weird little twisted outlooks on life. I Alejandro Escovedo and The Sensitive always felt with Larry I found a kindred Boys perform at Duling Hall (622 Duling spirit, like a lost brother. He has such a love Ave., 601-292-7121) Nov. 1 at 9 p.m. Tickfor music, too.” ets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For Escovedo, songs are stories, and Visit ardenland.net or alejandroescovedo.com.

key of g

by Garrard Lee

Nobody as Good: 7evenThirty

October 31 - November 6, 2012

32

for “Grey Skies.” Dean and 7even made a few songs together, and Dean presented “Heaven’s Computer,” which had been KEN PATTERSON

I

know a lot of really good rappers. Jackson is loaded with them; my friends in places like Baton Rouge and Denver rank among some of the best nationally. But, I have always said, I don’t know anybody who is as good as 7evenThirty. 7evenThirty, aka Marques Phillips, is a Jackson native who relocated with his wife, Tori, to Dallas a few years ago after the death of their baby daughter, Jada. On Oct. 14, Phillips made a triumphant return to the city to perform at Morningbell Records to celebrate the release of his newest album, “Heaven’s Computer.” “Heaven’s Computer” is 7even’s second full-length release, and his first on Dallasbased label Mello Music Group, an emerging indie hip-hop label that is putting out some of the most creative hip-hop music in the country. We have all known for a while that Phillips was destined for something bigger, and signing a two-album deal with an influential independent is that next step. 7even took the long path to Mello Music Group. In Dallas, he befriended a producer and former Jacksonian named Gensu Dean. Any Crooked Lettaz fans should recognize that name, as he provided some beats

7evenThirty released his newest album at Morningbell Records two weeks ago.

awaiting release for over a year, to the guys at Mello. The rest is history. Serendipitous is the word that comes to mind.

“Heaven’s Computer” is a concept album that follows the exploits of a space traveler named Max Redrum goes to planets to prep them for destruction. With the help of his on-board computer Alfie, Max lands on earth and immediately begins crushing wack MC’s on the standout tracks “TwentyTwelve” and “Get Up!!!” Plans go awry when Max meets a young lady on “Earth Gurl” and after they experience “Chocolate Bliss” (a song with more similes and metaphors than an AP English exam), Max’s mission is totally altered. The shining track of the album is “God,” a song dedicated to the late Jada. “If you knew Jada, this song is more special,” Phillips says. “God” is a heart-wrenching song that drives the concept of the record home while giving Phillips an opportunity for some kind of catharsis. I don’t want to give away too much about the rest of the album or the ending, but I would be remiss to not mention my favorite track, “Space Gangsta,” which features a standout verse from Jackson’s Coke Bumaye. This song is everything I hoped it would be when they told me about it over a year ago. That’s all I am going to say.

At Morningbell for the release show, which according to many in attendance, including the owners, was the best show yet at the young venue, Phillips looked tired, having just gotten into town from Atlanta where he performed a raucous set at the A3C Hip Hop festival, which was headlined by Raekwon, Big Boi and Devin the Dude. He had a little bit different look in his eyes than the last time I saw him, which probably comes from having a nationally well-received album, performing shows with hip-hop legends, and well over 5,000 YouTube views for “Get Up!!!” in less than a week. “Y’all know me as Marques. We hang out; we’re friends. Y’all know me on a personal level. Now, it is happening more that people only know me as 7evenThirty. That is weird,” he tells me. 7even loves being home in Jackson, though, where he can be Marques Phillips. “I love Jackson more than I ever loved Jackson before,” he says. “It’s a bizarre place.” If you know Marques, you know he means that in the best way possible. “Heaven’s Computer” is at Morningbell Records and online at iTunes, Amazon, and mellomusicgroup.com. 7evenThirty performs at the Red Room at Hal & Mal’s Nov. 9 .


0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQSULQW DQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP

060XVHXPRI$UW,IVEAT,UNCH 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH &OXE0DJRR¶V+ARAOKESP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT +DO 0DO¶V-ISSISSIPPI*OHN $OUDEREST 2UMPROLLERS /TIS,OTUS(ALLOWEEN3HOW 22 2OCKY(ORROR0ICTURE3HOW BIG 'XOLQJ+DOO(ALLOWEEN0ARTYW 4HE2AGBIRDSAND3OUNDWAGON ALLAGESSHOW DUGHQODQGQHW +LOWRQ-DFNVRQ!COUSTIC#ROSSROADS 0RUQLQJEHOO5HFRUGV'OULS´ 'ALLERY!RT3HOWPLUS4HE &EATHER3TRINGS 4HE2AT+INGS $2+-T2SP )HQLDQ¶V#LASSIC46(ALLOWEEN 0ARTYW,ARRY7ATERS$UO 2OJD¶V*OSEPH,A3ALLASP &DSLWRO*ULOO+ARAOKE.IGHT SP 3LH:RUNV0DGLVRQ(ALLOWEEN #OSTUME0ARTY 8QGHUJURXQG*ESSE2OBINSON SPIUHH

+DO 0DO¶V4HOMAS*ACKSON UHVW

./6 &2)$!9 0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\&IRST &RIDAYSW$*4,EWISSP DPIUHHEHIRUHSP  +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 7KH%RDUGZDON+ARAOKE 7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTONSP 7DEOH$AVID0IGOTT 'HER¶V/RXQJH±+ARAOKE

Jarekus Singleton

6RXO:LUHG&DIH,IVE"AND +ARAOKEWITH$*3MOOTHSP DPFRYHUDIWHUSP &KHURNHH,QQ,UCKENBACHSP  )HQLDQ¶V*OHN7HALEN .DWKU\Q¶V,ARRY"REWER(UNTER 'IBSONSP &OXE0DJRR¶V"IG2ICHARD 8QGHUJURXQG#UCHO,OS 0APIS %RWWRPV8S$*$ANCINGW 3PECIAL%VENTSSP )LW]JHUDOG¶V'ENA3TRINGER ./6 4(523$!9 2OJD¶V*OHNNY#ROCKERSP %XUJHUV %OXHV"LUESINATOR &KHURNHH,QQ$´LO4RIO SP 2OH7DYHUQ,ADIES.IGHT 0DUWLQ¶V3OUTHERN+OMFORT"RASS 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT "ANDSPDP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 2OH7DYHUQ!MY,A6ERE &OXE0DJRR¶V+ARAOKEJAZZBAR 6RXOVKLQH7RZQVKLS$AIN%DWARDS ,ADIES.IGHTW$6$*2EIGN SP %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE 6RXOVKLQH/DNHODQG-C"EAN)NC 'UHDP]-;14HROWBACK4HURSDAYS SP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH/FF#AMPUS 7KH3HQJXLQ!MOS"REWER 4HURSDAYSHIP HOP ROCK SOUL  SAXOPHONIST  OXQFK DP SPFRYHUIHPDOHFROOHJH SP,ARRY-ILTON VWXGHQWVIUHH ,6+%DU *ULOO&IRST&RIDAYW 'XOLQJ+DOO!LEJANDRO%SCOVEDO +AREN"ROWN $*3HANOMAK 4HE3ENSITIVE"OYSSP SP DUGHQODQGQHW +LOWRQ+RWHO(&RXQW\/LQH5RDG /RFDO4HE(USTLERSSP 2ENEGADE 060XVHXPRI$UW(IGH.OTE*AM +DO 0DO¶V!DAM"ARKLEY 55  FEAT5NDER$ISCUSSIONSP 3WINGDE0ARIS UHVW

-DFNVRQ6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\)'+DOO 8QGHUJURXQG,OS0APISSP 0XVLF&HQWHU*35#HAMBER DP /RCHESTRASPIUHH 0RUQLQJEHOO5HFRUGV%L#ANTADOR 6W$QGUHZ¶V(SLVFRSDO&KXUFK*OHN SPIUHH 0AUL3HAWN,EOPARD"ACHON HARPSICHORD SP ./6 3!452$!9 VWXGHQWV )HQLDQ¶V&INVARRA´S7REN &OXE0DJRR¶V"IG2ICHARD )LW]JHUDOG¶V'ENA3TRINGER +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 2OJD¶V*OHN0OWELLJAZZ SP 6KXFNHUV$OUBLE3HOTZ -DFNVRQ=RR4AILGATINGWITHTHE &KHURNHH,QQ'EORGE-C#ONNELL 4IGERSFEAT$*'EORGE#HUCK 4HE.ONCHALANTSSP SP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH3IMPLYTHE"EST MDFNVRQ]RRRUJ 2EGGAE.IGHTW$*# ,ECTA &DSLWRO*ULOO+ENNY$AVISOF IUHHIRUODGLHVXQWLOSP $IESEL SP 6XLWH.AMELESS/PEN-ICFEAT %XUJHUV %OXHV%VANS'ENO 4ALIBAH3MITHSP SP %RWWRPV8S$*$ANCINGAND3HOW 3RS¶V3NAZZSP SPDPFRYHU 6RXOVKLQH/DNHODQG*ON#LARK %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSIE3MITH"AND SP SP 7KH3HQJXLQ3ONJA3TAMPS 2OH7DYHUQ!DAM$OLEAC"AND +LOWRQ+RWHO(&RXQW\/LQH5RDG 3RS¶V3NAZZSP 2ENEGADE 7KH3HQJXLQ,ARRY-ILTON 3DQ$VLD,ARRY"REWER )HQLDQ¶V:ACH,OVETTINDIE 8QGHUJURXQG'RIEVOUS!NGELS 0DUWLQ¶V3PACEWOLFW"ANTAM "RAD#ROUCHERSP &OXES

+DO 0DO¶V$AVID%CHEVARRIAOF$R %ANDTHE6OODOO+INGS  UHVW

8QGHUJURXQG*AREKUS3INGLETON SPDP

./6 35.$!9 'XOLQJ+DOO"ILLY-ARTIN7IL "LADESSPDGY GRRUDUGHQODQGQHW +RW6KRWV%\UDP-IKEAND -ARTY´S*AM3ESSION 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ+NIGHT "RUCEDP EUXQFK

)LW]JHUDOG¶V!NDY(ARDWICK EUXQFK DP 7DEOH2APHAEL3EMMESJAZZ BRUNCH DPSP 6RPEUD0H[LFDQ.LWFKHQ*OHN -ORADPSP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH3POKEN7ORD 0OETRY.ITEW$*3PRESP FRYHU %XUJHUV %OXHV!DEEBS!COUSTIC $UOSP

./6 -/.$!9 +DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3"LUES 3OCIETY*AM UHVW SP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE 2OH7DYHUQ0UB1UIZ %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE 6RXO:LUHG&DIH#HILL#ONVERSE -ONDAYSSPDPQRFRYHU 0LVVLVVLSSL&ROOHJH$YHQ+DOO "RICK3TREET4RIOJAZZ +RISTEN *OHNSONSPIUHH

./6 45%3$!9 +DO 0DO¶V%LECTION.IGHT0ARTY AND6IEWING UHVWDQGEUHZSXE

2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQ¶V/PEN-IC 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT 0DUJDULWDV*OHN-ORASP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH-).$GASM%ROTIC 0OETRYFRYHU 8QGHUJURXQG#AROLINE #RAWFORDPIANO SPIUHH %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH )LW]JHUDOG¶V*OHNNY#ROCKER .DWKU\Q¶V,ARRY"REWER 0DUWLQ¶V-ATT´S,ATE.IGHT +ARAOKESPPLGQLJKW

./6 7%$.%3$!9 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH &OXE0DJRR¶V+ARAOKESP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE +XQWLQJWRQ¶V*OHNNY"ARRANCO )LW]JHUDOG¶V2ICK-OREIRA 3LH:RUNV0DGLVRQ/PEN2OAD 0XVLFOLVWLQJVPXVWEHUHFHLYHGE\ WKH)ULGD\EHIRUHWKHQHZLVVXHWR EHFRQVLGHUHGIRU(LJKW'D\VSLFNV )RUPXVLFYHQXHDGGUHVVHVDQG SKRQHQXPEHUVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

10/31

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM

GIVEAWAYS FROM THE W BY AZWELL THURSDAY

11/01

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL & COLLEGE NIGHT

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

November 1

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday November 2

Amy LaVere

7PM - UNTIL • 9 FLAT SCREENS

$2.25 LONGNECKS • $3.25 WELL DRINKS Friday

11/02

FIRE UP THE GRILL RIBEYE STEAKS, BAKED POTATO, SALAD & FRENCH BREAD!

Southern Komfort Brass Band SATURDAY

11/03

SPACEWOLF -with Bantam Foxes-

Sunday

Saturday

November 3

Adam Doleac Band

11/02

Food Service Industry Night 5 P.M. UNTIL! 30% OFF ALL DRINKS! “YOU TAKE CARE OF US, NOW LET US TAKE CARE OF YOU!” COME WATCH THE GAMES WITH US! SUNDAY TICKET, NFL NETWORK. MONDAY

11/05

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

GUYS NIGHT COLLEGE NIGHT 7pm - until| $2.25 longnecks $3.25 well drinks

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

11/06

SHRIMP BROIL 5 - 10 PM MATT’S LATE NITE

KARAOKE

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm SEE OUR NEW MENU WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Monday

November 5

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

November 6

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday November 7 KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

COURTESY DARNELL JACKSON

MUSIC | live

33


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

Few Wins; Some Bad Losses

Baseball is over, but the NBA returns this week. Everyone will be looking to catch the Miami Heat in the spring.

by Bryan Flynn

I

victory of the season with its 35-0 win on the MSU is a better team than when Dan road over Faulkner University. The Blazers Mullen arrived in Starkville, but the Bulldogs have won three straight games and are now still have work to do to reach Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tal4-1 in Mid-South ent level. The CrimConference. son Tide rolled to a With just two 38-7 win. games left in the seaThe dumpster son, Belhaven still has fire that is Southern a chance to win its Miss football contindivision in their conued to burn against ference and reach the Rice on Saturday. playoffs. The Blazers USM was down 21should be proud of 10 at halftime and how they bounced never got close in the back after starting second half. the season with three USM (0-8) has straight losses. gone from a team Quarterback Bo Wallace led Ole Miss Mississippi State to one of only a handful of wins for that won 12 games (7-1) had a social-me- Mississippi teams this week. and a C-USA chamdia frenzy going before pionship to a team its game against Alathat canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even combama. The Bulldog faithful believed in an 8- pete against the lower-end teams of C-USA. 0 start for MSU, and posted all over Twitter Golden Eagles fans are just praying the end and Facebook. of the season comes quickly. The only problem: Alabama didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get Mississippi Valley State (2-6) has a the memo. The Crimson Tide ran away with championship defense, but its offense is just this game with a 24-0 lead at halftime and not matching up. The Delta Devils fell this never looked back. week 10-0 to Arkansas-Pine Bluff as the stout Valley defense kept the sluggish MVSU offense in the game until the end. Millsaps (6-2) dropped its final road game of the year 35-24 against Trinity (Tex&OOTBALL´S7ACKINESS&ORECAST as) in a nonconference game. The Trinity Tigers used a 21-point third quarter burst ROOHJHIRRWEDOOQRZEHFRPHVDIRXUZHHNVSULQW  7KHFUD]LQHVVUHDOO\EHJLQVLIDOOWKHVHWRSWHDPV to pull away from Millsaps. The Majors finWRWKHÂżQLVKOLQHRIWKHUHJXODUVHDVRQ1RYHPEHU VWXPEOH7KDWZRXOGRSHQWKHGRRUIRU/RXLVYLOOHRXWRI ZLOOFODULI\WKHQDWLRQDOFKDPSLRQVKLSSLFWXUH WKH%LJ(DVW7KH&DUGLQDOVPXVWÂżQLVKXQGHIHDWHGWR ish the season with two home games and a  &XUUHQWO\DQ\RQHRIÂżYHXQGHIHDWHGWHDPVFDQZLQ KDYHDQ\VKRWIRUDVSRWLQWKHWLWOHJDPH chance to finish undefeated in conference in WKHFKDPSLRQVKLS2KLR6WDWHLVDOVRXQGHIHDWHGEXW  ,IDOOWKHXQGHIHDWHGWHDPVORVHRUDOOEXWRQHVWXP their final game. LQHOLJLEOHIRUSRVWVHDVRQSOD\ EOHVDWVRPHSRLQWLQWKHÂżQDOIRXUJDPHVLWZLOORSHQ  $ODEDPDLVWKHHDUO\OHDGHUIRURQHVSRWLQWKHQD WKHGRRUWRDĂ&#x20AC;RRGRIRQHORVVWHDPV)ORULGD*HRUJLD Mississippi College (2-6) lost its WLRQDOWLWOHJDPHV7KH&ULPVRQ7LGHVKRXOGKDYHDQ /68DQG)ORULGD6WDWHDUHZDLWLQJLQWKHZLQJV homecoming game 34-24 to East Texas BapHDV\SDWKLIWKH\GHIHDW/68WKLVZHHNHQG  /68ZLOOEHRXWRIWKHWLWOHUDFHLIWKH\IDOOWR$OD tist. MC was doomed after getting outscored  7KHIURQWUXQQHUVWRIDFH$ODEDPDDUH.DQVDV6WDWH EDPDWKLVZHHNHQG*HRUJLDFDQÂśWDIIRUGDORVVDWWKH 27-16 in the second and third quarter. The 2UHJRQDQG1RWUH'DPH HQGRIWKHUHJXODUVHDVRQRUDWWKH6(&WLWOHJDPH  +HLVPDQFDQGLGDWH&ROOLQ.OHLQDWTXDUWHUEDFNDQG  )ORULGDMXVWKDVWRVLWEDFNDQGOHW$ODEDPDEHDW Choctaws are guaranteed a losing season afDVWRXWGHIHQVHOHDG.DQVDV6WDWH7KH:LOGFDWVPLJKW /68DQGWKHQ*HRUJLD7KH*DWRUVZLOOWKHQKDYHWR ter this defeat. KDYHWKHPRVWXQGHUUDWHGFRDFKLQWKHFRXQW\LQ%LOO KRSHVRPHRQHEHDWV.DQVDV6WDWHDQG1RWUH'DPHWR Hinds Community College (4-5) fin6Q\GHULQKLVVHFRQGJRDURXQGDW.68 RSHQWKHGRRUWRWKHWLWOHJDPH  2UHJRQIHDWXUHVLWVIDPLOLDUKLJKSRZHUHGRIIHQVH  )ORULGD6WDWHQHHGVHYHU\WHDPLQIURQWRIWKHPWR ished its season with a 26-16 win over Pearl DQGDQLPSURYHGGHIHQVH7KH'XFNVKDYHZDVWHGOLWWOH ORVHDWOHDVWRQFH7KH6HPLQROHVDOVRKDYHWRGHIHDW River Community College, and Holmes WLPHEORZLQJWHDPVRXWWKLVVHDVRQDQGKDYH\HWWR WKH*DWRUVDWWKHHQGRIWKHVHDVRQ Community College (5-4) rolled CoahoUHDOO\EHFKDOOHQJHGIRUIRXUTXDUWHUV  &ROOHJHIRRWEDOOSOD\RIIVDUHFRPLQJEXWWKDWZLOO ma Community College 49-3 to finish the  1RWUH 'DPH LQ WKH FKDPSLRQVKLS UDFH LV OLNH WKH QRW VWRS WKH SRWHQWLDO %&6 PDGQHVV WKLV VHDVRQ $ 1HZ<RUN<DQNHHV LQ WKH:RUOG 6HULHV7KH )LJKWLQJ IHZXSVHWVLQWKHÂżQDOIRXUZHHNVRIWKHVHDVRQFRXOG season. The Bulldogs outperformed many ,ULVKLQYRNHVWURQJHPRWLRQ7KH\ÂśUHWKH'DOODV&RZ FUHDWHFKDRV:DFNLQHVVZLOOHQVXHZLWKXSVHWVLQWKH expectations this season. ER\VRIFROOHJHIRRWEDOODQGWKHPRUHWKH\ZLQWKH 3$&RU6(&FKDPSLRQVKLSJDPHV Jackson State and Alcorn State picked PRUHWKHPHGLDZLOOVLQJWKHSUDLVHVRIWKHÂł*ROGHQ  ,KDYHWKHIHHOLQJWKDWFRQWURYHUV\ZLOOVWULNHEHIRUH 'RPHUV´DQGÂł7RXFKGRZQ-HVXV´ WKHVHDVRQHQGV6LWEDFNDQGZDWFKLWDOOXQIROG the right weekend to have their off weeksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be back in action this week. COURTESY OLE MISS

t was a tough football weekend for most Mississippi colleges. The only two fouryear schools to win on the last Saturday of October were Ole Miss and Belhaven. Everyone else lost, and most lost badly. Ole Miss needed to defeat Arkansas to keep its bowl hopes alive. The Razorbacks righted their ship after a disastrous start by winning two straight and are trying to stay alive for the postseason. Arkansas started fast with a 10-0 lead in the first quarter. Ole Miss answered by outscoring the Razorbacks 21-7 in the second quarter to take a 24-17 halftime lead. The Rebels led most of the second half, but Arkansas rallied one last time. Arkansas scored 10 points in the fourth quarter to tie the game up at 27-27 with just over two minutes to go. Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace took the Rebels down the field on a great drive to set up a 31-yard field goal. Bryson Rose, who also hit 27- and 53-yard field goals, banged home the winning kick as time expired. The win moves Ole Miss to 5-3 on the season. The Rebels only need one more win to reach Bowl eligibility. Belhaven (5-4) earned its first shutout

THURSDAY, NOV. 1 College football (6:30-9:30 p.m. ESPN): Virginia Tech heads to Miami in a game featuring two teams that have fallen short of expectations this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but could have major implications on the ACC Coastal division. FRIDAY, NOV. 2 NBA (7-10:30 p.m. ESPN): Exciting NBA double header with the Miami Heat at the New York Knicks followed by the battle for L.A. as the Clippers face the Lakers. SATURDAY, NOV. 3 College football (11 a.m.-2 p.m. ESPN): Mississippi State welcomes SEC newcomer Texas A&M to Starkville in a big conference tilt. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (2:30-6 p.m. CBS): Ole Miss will try to upset the Georgia Bulldogs between the hedges in Athens. SUNDAY, NOV. 4 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NBC): The Dallas Cowboys will try to avoid Tony Romo interceptions to be the first team to defeat the Atlanta Falcons.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

MONDAY, NOV. 5 NFL (7:30-10:30 p.m. ESPN): Playoff hopes hang in the balance when the New Orleans Saints play the Philadelphia Eagles at home. Both teams need a win to keep their postseason dreams alive.

October 31 - November 6, 2012

C

34

JFP Top 25: Week 10

T

KHODVW6DWXUGD\LQ2FWREHUVDZ*HRUJLD.DQVDV 6WDWH$ODEDPDDQG1RWUH'DPHPDNHPDMRU VWDWHPHQWVWRWKHUHVWRIWKHFROOHJHIRRWEDOO ZRUOG0HDQZKLOH2NODKRPDDQG86&VDZWKHLU FKDPSLRQVKLSKRSHVIDOOE\WKHZD\VLGH  8QGHIHDWHGWHDPVZHQWGRZQDWDIXULRXVSDFH )ORULGD2KLR2UHJRQ6WDWH5XWJHUVDQG0LVVLVVLSSL 6WDWHDOOVDZWKHLUELGIRU³SHUIHFW´HQG

 7KH\KDYHIRXUZHHNVOHIWLQWKHUHJXODUVHDVRQWR VRUWHYHU\WKLQJRXW 3UHYLRXV 5DQN 7HDP 5HFRUG 5DQN  $ODEDPD&ULPVRQ7LGH    2UHJRQ'XFNV    .DQVDV6WDWH:LOGFDWV    1RWUH'DPH)LJKWLQJ,ULVK    /687LJHUV    *HRUJLD%XOOGRJV  

          

/RXLVYLOOH&DUGLQDOV )ORULGD*DWRUV )ORULGD6WDWH6HPLQROHV 6RXWK&DUROLQD*DPHFRFNV %RLVH6WDWH%URQFRV 86&7URMDQV 0LVVLVVLSSL6WDWH%XOOGRJV 6WDQIRUG&DUGLQDO &OHPVRQ7LJHUV 7H[DV$ 0$JJLHV 2NODKRPD6RRQHUV

          

          

by Bryan Flynn

TUESDAY, NOV. 6 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN 2): MAC football on a Tuesday night features the Toledo Rockets against the Ball State Cardinals. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN 2): The first week of the year with football on every night continues with more MAC football, featuring the Bowling Green Falcons against the Ohio Bobcats. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports        

2UHJRQ6WDWH%HDYHUV 7ROHGR5RFNHWV :HVW9LUJLQLD0RXQWDLQHHUV 5XWJHUV6FDUOHW.QLJKWV 8&/$%UXLQV 1RUWKZHVWHUQ:LOGFDWV 1HEUDVND&RUQKXVNHUV 2KLR%REFDWV

       

    15 15 15 

$ROPPEDOUT7&8+RUQHG)URJV'XNH%OXH'HYLOVDQG :LVFRQVLQ%DGJHUV


,

W¶VWLPHWRFDVW\RXUYRWHIRU%HVWRI-DFNVRQ:HPXVWUHFHLYH\RXUEDOORWE\PLGQLJKW'HFHLWKHUDWEHVWRIMDFNVRQFRP RUDQHZVSULQWYHUVLRQ OLNHWKLVRQH ULSSHGIURP\RXU-)3 QRSKRWRFRSLHVDOORZHG :HZLOODQQRXQFHWKHZLQQHUVLQWKH %HVWRI-DFNVRQLVVXH-DQDQGKRQRUWKHPDWDQLQYLWDWLRQRQO\FHOHEUDWLRQRQ-DQ5HPHPEHUWKDWWKHVH UHDGHU¶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½RSTANDLASTNAME

ZLWKLOCALPHONENUMBERDQGEMAILADDRESSIRU YHULÃ&#x20AC;FDWLRQLIQHHGHG'RQRWDVNIULHQGVDQGIDPLO\ IURPRXWVLGHWKH-DFNVRQPHWURWRYRWHIRU\RX %ACHVOTERMUSTCHOOSEEVERYVOTECASTONHISHER BALLOTVLPLODUDQGLGHQWLFDOEDOORWVZLOOEHLQYHVWLJDWHG DQGSRVVLEO\GLVFDUGHG 9OUAREWELCOMETOCAMPAIGNE\DVNLQJSHRSOHWR YRWHIRU\RXEXWPXVWQRWRIIHUÃ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOLQFHQWLYHVRU GLVFRXQWVVHWXSFRPSXWHUVRUVFULSWVZLWKDQ\YRWHV SUHFKRVHQRUDVNWRVHHVRPHRQH·VEDOORW ,WLVLPSRUWDQWWRSPELLNAMESCORRECTLYIRUYRWHVWR

FRXQWWDNHWLPHWRORRNWKHPXSRUDVNSOHDVH )UDXGXOHQWEDOORWV XVLQJRWKHUSHRSOH·VQDPHVDQG FRQWDFWLQIRUPDWLRQ ZLOOEHGLVFDUGHG$ONOT½LLOUTA BALLOTFORANYONEELSEORSUGGESTASLATEOFVOTES .OEMPLOYEES FULL ORPART TIME OF*ACKSON&REE 0RESS)NCAREQUALI½EDTOWINORPLACEIN"EST OF*ACKSONCATEGORIESDQGPXVWQRWFDPSDLJQRQ DQ\RQH·VEHKDOI 9LRODWLRQRIDQ\RIWKHVHUXOHVFDXVHVIMMEDIATE DISQUALI½CATIONIURPZLQQLQJ%HVWRI-DFNVRQDZDUGV 927(DQGVHHPRUHUXOHH[SODQDWLRQDWEHVWRIMDFNVRQFRP

<RXFDQDOVRJRWR"ESTOF*ACKSONCOMWRYRWHRQOLQH +LSKRSDUWLVW -D]]DUWLVW -XNHER[ /LYHPXVLFYHQXH 0DUJDULWD 1HZEDU RSHQHGLQ

2SHQPLFQLJKW 2ULJLQDOEDQG 3ODFHIRUFRFNWDLOV 3ODFHWRGDQFH 3ODFHWRGULQNFKHDS 3ODFHWRVKRRWSRRO 3ODFHWRZDWFKWKHJDPH 5 %DUWLVW 5RFNDUWLVW    1RWH,QIRRGFDWHJRULHVOLVWRQO\ORFDOO\RZQHGUHVWDXUDQW QDPHVQRWLQGLYLGXDOGLVKHVRUQDWLRQDOFKDLQV $VLDQ5HVWDXUDQW %DNHU\ %DUEHFXH %HHUVHOHFWLRQ %UHDNIDVW %UXQFK &KLQHVHUHVWDXUDQW 'RXJKQXWV (WKQLFUHVWDXUDQW (WKQLFRUVSHFLDOW\JURFHU *UHHNUHVWDXUDQW *XPER +DQJRYHUIRRG ,QQRYDWLYHPHQX ,WDOLDQUHVWDXUDQW .LGV·PHQX /RFDOEXUJHU /RFDO)UHQFKIULHV /RFDOIULHGFKLFNHQ /XQFKEXIIHW 0HDOXQGHU 0HGLWHUUDQHDQ0LGGOH(DVWHUQ 0H[LFDQ/DWLQ 1HZUHVWDXUDQW RSHQHGLQ

2XWGRRUGLQLQJ 3L]]D 3ODFHIRUGHVVHUW 3ODFHIRUKHDOWK\IRRG 3ODFHIRULFHFUHDP 3ODFHIRUULEV 3ODFHWREX\FDNHV 3ODFHWRHDWZKHQVRPHRQHHOVHSD\V 3ODFHWRJHWFRIIHH 3ODWHOXQFK 5HVWDXUDQW 6DQGZLFKSODFH 6HDIRRG 6RXOIRRG 6WHDN 6XVKL-DSDQHVH 7DNHRXW 7DTXHULD 9HJHWDULDQRSWLRQV

9HJJLHEXUJHU :LQHOLVWZLQHVHOHFWLRQ :LQJV    1RWH9RWHRQO\IRUORFDOO\RZQHGEXVLQHVVHVQRELJER[ RXWOHWVRUQDWLRQDOFKDLQVSOHDVH $QQXDOHYHQW $UWJDOOHU\ %DUEHUVKRS %HDXW\VKRSRUVDORQ %RXWLTXH %ULGDOIRUPDOZHDUVWRUH &DWHJRU\ZHOHIWRII &DWHUHU &RPLFVWRUH 'DQFHVWXGLR 'D\VSD )LWQHVVFHQWHUJ\P )ORZHUVKRS *DUGHQVXSSO\QXUVHU\ .LGVHYHQW /LTXRUZLQHVWRUH /RFDOO\RZQHGEXVLQHVV /RFDOFOHDQLQJVHUYLFH 0DUWLDODUWVVWXGLR 0HFKDQLF 0HQ·VFORWKHV 0XVHXP 3ODFHIRUDÃ&#x20AC;UVWGDWH 3ODFHWREX\DQWLTXHV 3ODFHWREX\ERRNV 3ODFHWREX\NLG·VFORWKHVWR\V 3ODFHWRERRNDSDUW\RUVKRZHU 3ODFHWRJHWPDUULHG 7DLORU 7DQQLQJVDORQ 7DWWRRSLHUFLQJSDUORU 7KULIWFRQVLJQPHQWVKRS 7RXULVWDWWUDFWLRQ 8QLTXHJLIWV 9HWHULQDULDQRUYHWFOLQLF :RPHQ·VVKRHV <RJDVWXGLR   &DVLQRIRUJDPLQJ &DVLQRIRUVKRZV &DVLQRKRWHO

<RXPXVWLQFOXGH\RXUQDPH DQGDYDOLGSKRQHQXPEHU ZLWKDUHDFRGHIRU\RXUEDOORW WRFRXQW&DXWLRQ :HFDOOPDQ\YRWHUVWRFKHFN EDOORWDXWKHQWLFLW\1RIDNH SKRQHQXPEHUV

1DPH 3KRQH (0DLO 5HWXUQEDOORWWRWKHDGGUHVV EHORZE\'HF -DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVV 32%R[ -DFNVRQ06

´%HVWRI-DFNVRQµLVDUHJLVWHUHGVHUYLFHPDUNLQWKHVWDWHRI0LVVLVVLSSL

jacksonfreepress.com

 ,QWKLVFDWHJRU\YRWHIRURQHSHUVRQZKROLYHVDQGZRUNVLQ WKH-DFNVRQPHWURÃ&#x20AC;UVWDQGODVWQDPHVSHOOFRUUHFWO\ $UFKLWHFW %DULVWD %DUWHQGHU %XVLQHVVRZQHU &DPSDLJQHUIRU%HVWRI-DFNVRQ$ZDUG &KHI 1RRQH´5RFN,W2XWµ%HVW1HZ&KHI$ZDUG &OXE''HQWLVW 'RFWRU -DFNVRQYLVXDODUWLVW OLYLQJ

-HZHOU\GHVLJQHU )DFLDOLVWHVWKHWLFLDQ )LOPPDNHU *RVSHODUWLVW +DLUVW\OLVW .DUDRNH'0DVVDJHWKHUDSLVW 0HDQHVWEDUWHQGHU 0XVLFLDQ 3UHDFKHU 3URIHVVRU 3XEOLFÃ&#x20AC;JXUH 5HDOHVWDWHDJHQW 5LVLQJHQWUHSUHQHXU 6HUYHUZDLWSHUVRQ 6H[LHVWEDUWHQGHU IHPDOH

6H[LHVWEDUWHQGHU PDOH

6LQJHU 6LQJHUVRQJZULWHU 79SHUVRQDOLW\ 8UEDQZDUULRU 9LVLRQDU\    $UWVRUJDQL]DWLRQ &KXUFKFKRLU 3URMHFWXQGHUFRQVWUXFWLRQ &RPPXQLW\JDUGHQQDWXUHDWWUDFWLRQ /RFDOOLYHWKHDWHUWKHDWULFDOJURXS 1RQSURÃ&#x20AC;WRUJDQL]DWLRQ 3ODFHWRFKLOO 5DGLRSHUVRQDOLW\RUWHDP 5DGLRVWDWLRQ FDOOOHWWHUVRQO\

5HDVRQWROLYHLQ-DFNVRQ 6WDJHSOD\    %DU %DUZKHUHHYHU\RQHNQRZV\RXUQDPH %OXHVDUWLVW &ROOHJHVWXGHQWKDQJRXW &RXQWU\DUWLVW &RYHUEDQG 'LYHEDU */%7KDQJRXW +DSS\KRXU

35


THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/31 Rocky Horror Picture Show (Big Room • 10/30 - 11/01 •7:30pm)

THURSDAY 11/01 Thomas Jackson (Dining Room)

FRIDAY 11/02 Adam Barkley (Red Room) Swing de Paris (Dining Room)

SATURDAY 11/03 David Echevarria (Dr. E and the Voodoo Kings) (Dining Room) MONDAY 11/05 MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 11/06

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover, Wine Specials All Night

Thursday, November 1st

GRIEVOUS ANGELS & BRANT CROUCHER (Americana) 7-10, $5 Cover

Friday, November 2nd

LOS PAPIS

(Latin Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, November 3rd

JAREKUS SINGLETON (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday, November 6th

Coming Soon

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT!

11/9: The “Recognize The Real” Tour - Red Room 11/17: England in 1819 w Ice for Eagles - Patio 11/23: Molly Ringwalds - Big Room 11/28: The Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show - Red Room 11/30: Jarekus Singleton - Red Room

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

October 31 - November 6, 2012

Wednesday, October 31st

NO PUB Quiz Election Night Party and Viewing (Dining Room & Brew Pub)

11/9: Crooked Creek - Dining Room

36

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

CAROLINE CRAWFORD (Piano) 7-10, No Cover

-Tuesdays Only-

COMING SOON NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Gold

Magnolias COMING SOON NOVEMBER 10, 2012

Eden Brent HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG!

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

TILL 7 EVERY OTHER NIGHT!

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

• WELL DRINKS • APPETIZERS!

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

2-FOR-1 • DRAFT BEER

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com


FOOD & DRINK p 39 ASTRO p 41 FLY STYLE p 42

What’s in Your Food? by Jim PathFinder Ewing

0RWKHU(DUWK1HZVMISPV0RWKHU(DUWK*02 *020\WKV 7UXWKVHDUWKRSHQVRXUFHRUJ

employed by the corporations that produce the GMO seeds say they are safe.

GMOs presumed ‘safe’—like DDT So it is with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The giant multinational corporations that produce them say they are safe and, due to lax U.S. laws, regulatory agencies are obliged to take them at their word. There is no U.S. government mandate to check safety regarding GMOs in food or the environment. Corporations like Monsanto, Bayer, Syngenta and Dupont—and the scientists they employ—say they are safe. So, as far as the federal government is concerned, they are safe—without independent testing to prove the validity of their statements (see Los Angeles Times: jfp.ms/latimesGMOs).

Taking over Billionaire Bill Gates wants to plant GMO crops across Africa to prevent hunger and mass starvation, saying this science will feed the world (see jfp.ms/GMOAfrica). But

Farmers report own ‘Silent Springs’ Meanwhile, people are reporting their own silent springs regarding GMOs. Farmers in Illinois say the GMO corn that was supposed to kill the western corn rootworm has instead caused mutated rootworms that thrive, making them even harder to kill. In fact, an Iowa State University researcher published a study confirming the observation, saying the corn was creating “superbugs” in Iowa fields (see jfp.ms/superbugs). Some farmers say their chickens refuse to eat GMO corn or, if they do, the yolks don’t have their usual bright orange color. Farm workers report allergic responses to working with GMO plants. In Canada, 80 percent of pregnant women and their offspring tested were found to have Bt toxin (a poison used to kill insects that’s genetically part of GMO corn) in their blood, despite industry assurances that it wouldn’t linger in the human body (see jfp.ms/GMOtoxins). Some scientists worry that if the GMO Bt genes are colonizing the bacteria living in the digestive tract of North Americans, we might see an increase in gastrointestinal problems, autoimmune diseases, food allergies and childhood learning disorders. French scientists analyzed the raw data from three rat studies in 2009 and found that three GMO corn varieties caused liver and kidney toxicity and other organ damage. Yet, all three corn varieties are in the human food chain in the U.S. (see jfp.ms/GMOcorn). Yet, as before “Silent Spring” was published, government agencies and scientists

What’s that dark cloud?! If we thought “Silent Spring” was a wake-up call about the indiscriminate use of pesticides, wait until whole ecosystems are failing because these man-made invasives have taken over the landscape. Or when food prices skyrocket because crops are being overwhelmed by superbugs and superweeds FLICKR/MUFFET

&ORMORE SEE

jobs as promoting industry profits rather than looking out for the public’s safety.

Genetically modified organisms in crops such as corn can have a negative effect on both the environment and the consumer.

what happens when these living biological pollutants overwhelm the natural safeguards against them? That’s not a future concern, but one that’s occurring right now. Farmers are noticing that the GMO crops of some of their neighbors have escaped their fields. GMOs are genetically designed to be aggressive pollinators, and they are infecting the crops of organic farmers and taking over the landscape. Enough so that, Environmental Health News reports, “about 80 percent of canola growing along roadsides in North Dakota contains genes that have been modified to make the plants resistant to common weedkillers” (see jfp.ms/80percent). Read that again: 80 percent! In Oregon and in Manitoba, Canada, researchers are finding similar outbreaks. And these quasi-designer plants are evolving into new plants that combine natural and unnatural genes. These plants are becoming “superweeds” that cannot be killed by the poisons they were scientifically engineered to withstand and are taking over other crops.

created by GMO varieties. Or when certified organic prices rise even more—or “organic” itself collapses—because heirloom seeds not tainted by GMO are virtually extinct (see jfp. ms/seedmonopoly). Food security? When GMO strains wipe out the biodiversity of corn in Mexico (which has already started, see jfp.ms/ Mexicocorn), the corn-based agricultural economy of the world will be standing on a slim reed indeed. Bill and Melinda Gates may find they have funded agricultural “science” so that the world starves, a famine that would dwarf the Irish potato famine. What is that we see on the horizon? A dark cloud? No, it’s genetic biological pollution—a black swan of global proportions. Jim PathFinder Ewing is the author of five books on energy medicine and eco-spirituality (Findhorn Press). Look for his new book “Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating” in a bookstore near you. Find Jim on Facebook, on Twitter @edibleprayers or visit 37 blueskywaters.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

A

black swan event is generally defined as an unforeseen catastrophe that only in hindsight seems obvious or inevitable. It stems from the fact that for centuries Europeans believed with certainty that a black swan was genetically impossible until flocks of them were found in Australia. One could see the publication of “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson in 1962 as signaling a black swan event. Her book brought public attention to the decimation of plant and animal species due to DDT and other poisons thought “safe” for agricultural use by science and government. As the woman who came to be known as the mother of the environmental movement wrote in her book: “Over increasingly large areas of the United States, spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song.” It was, for millions of Americans, a black swan moment that would change the way the corporations, government and scientists would be viewed. All human beings are fallible, and even prominent scientists, leaders in government, federal agencies and giant corporations can be terribly wrong. After “Silent Spring,” Americans began to notice where toxic pollution was having a devastating effect. The government responded by creating the Environmental Protection Agency, charged specifically to protect the nation’s ecology. Of course, since then, American consumers have also been deluged with ways in which the government—charged with protecting the public from unsafe agricultural and food industry practices—has fallen far short in its duty. Just Google salmonella, E. coli and other food-borne illness outbreaks for a reminder of the more widespread, scarier instances—usually from lax inspections at giant industrial agriculture operations. Indeed, one could make a case that somewhere along the line, government officials and agencies changed hats to see their


50;;8=C>58C=4BB 1 free personal training session from Ibex Wellness for all new members.

901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 | Flowood, MS in front of Walmart flowood@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-992-3488 2155 Highway 18, Suite E | Brandon, MS across from Home Depot brandon@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-706-4605 4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 | Jackson, MS in front of Kroger jacksonms@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

October 31 - November 6, 2012

Phone: 601-321-9465 Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

38


LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

Delight by Alonzo Lewis

W

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music oct 31 - nov 6

wed | october 31 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | november 1 Evans Geno 5:30-9:30p fri | november 2 Bluesinator 6:30-10:30p sat | november 3 Jesse “Guitar” Smith Band 6:30-10:30p sun | november 4 Adeebs Acoustic 4:00 - 8:00p mon | november 5 Karaoke tue | november 6 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

Ingredients:

3-4 medium to small yams 1 stick margarine or butter 3 cups sugar (more if not sweet enough for your taste) 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup milk (optional) 1 tablespoon nutmeg 1 teaspoon vanilla flavor 1-1/2 teaspoon lemon flavor

Wash, peel, and slice the potatoes (thin or thick, up to you). Place them in a non-stick or cast iron skillet on

I also appreciate when the server knows me and attends to all my requests for service. Oh, yes, and by the way, they also need to know that a big tip is always coming their way from a satisfied customer. I ate well and I tipped well and I got excellent personal service. The waitress knew exactly how I wanted my yams—hot, toward the end of my meal and accompanied by a thick slice of warm, buttered cornbread. The personal attention, and those yams, kept me coming back for more.

Big

Richard

the stove on medium heat. Pour in the water and margarine. Heat until the margarine is melted. Add the sugar and milk. Cover and turn on low heat. When the potatoes are soft and done (approximately 30-45 minutes), sprinkle in the other ingredients. Cover and let simmer for five minutes. Serve hot with biscuits, cornbread, or just plain eat them alone. Good any way you slice them. Serves 1 or 2

Candied yams are the perfect pairing with biscuits or cornbread this time of year.

Lagar/Hybrid Sandy Brasfield Stout Porter Nathan Harms Wheat Jeremy Wickham Miscellaneous Brad Justice

For a full list of winners (first through fourth place) and their beers, visit jfp.ms/2012craftbeerwinners.

Wednesday - October 31 KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - November 1

LADIES NIGHT with Snazz

Friday - November 2

SouthBound Saturday - November 3

Snazz

Sunday - November 4

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night

Monday - November 5

with DJ Reign

Monday Night Football

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

IPA/American Ale Jonas Outlaw

People’s Choice Award Fred Ezelle and Charles “Bo” McEuen

Friday, November 2 & Saturday, November 3

-Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat)

Local brewers brought their best to Jacktoberfest’s craft-beer competition this year. Here’s who placed first in each category:

FLICKR/CAT

hen I was working in the city of Mobile, Ala., back in the early ’90s, I found the most down-home restaurant ever. It was a place in the center of old Mobile that served some real homemade, slapyour-mama type food. This restaurant was a throwback to the plantation days when mama used to cook with soul. Of course, I befriended the cook and the one server. (I am no fool.) I learned while in the military that there are certain people that you need to stay on their good side: the cook, paymaster, medic and barber. These people take care of your personal needs, so you really need to be wise in dealing with them. When something is going into my stomach, I need to know that the person who is cooking has my best interest at heart.

Candied Yams

9 Ball Tournament 7pm

$1.50 Mugs & 2-for-1 Domestics During the Game

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

jacksonfreepress.com

Down-home

TOP BREWS

39


5A44 FX5X

DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

CRAB CAKES No Filler

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

10:00pm | Cover $10

D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, V’burg 601-634-0100) 24/7 in Riverwalk Casino.

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes!

NEW MENU Happy Hour

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more.

Wed - Fri 4 - 6pm

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

“Best Barbecue in Jackson”

2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011

October 31 - November 6, 2012

- Jackson Free Press

40

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads. PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. offering local brews and more!

George McConnell and The Nonchalants Saturday, November 3, 2012

Yo u H a n dl the Unif e orm!

Game Day Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2lbs of Pork, Beef or Chicken, 2 Pints of Beans, 2 Pints of Slaw, 5 Slices of Texas Toast Or 10 Buns)

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN/BAKERY Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

le Hand We ’ l l o o d ! the F

1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson,MS | 601.956.7079

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles). Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and lunch specials. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. ASIAN, INDIAN & VEGETARIAN Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and much more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513)Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian restaurant.


3#/20)//CT .OV 

7KLVLVDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHWRH[SORUHWKHIURQWLHUVRIZLVHIRROLVKQHVV,¶PKRSLQJ\RXZLOO WDNHIXOODGYDQWDJHRIOHDUQLQJRSSRUWXQLWLHVWKDWPLJKWUHTXLUH\RXWRVKHG\RXUH[FHVV GLJQLW\DQGDFNQRZOHGJHKRZPXFK\RXGRQ¶WNQRZ$UH\RXEUDYHHQRXJKWRGLVDYRZ F\QLFDOWKRXJKWVDQGMDGHGDWWLWXGHVWKDWPXIÃ&#x20AC;H\RXUOXVWIRUOLIH"$UH\RXVPDUW HQRXJKWRXQGHUVWDQGKRZKHDOWK\LWZRXOGEHWRJRRXWDQGSOD\OLNHDQLQQRFHQWZLOG FKLOG"0DNH\RXUVHOIDYDLODEOHIRUGHOLJKWIXOVXUSULVHV

3!')44!2)53.OV $EC 

=RPELHVXVHGWREHWHUULI\LQJ%XWWKHQWKH\EHFDPHD IHDWXUHGPRWLILQSRSFXOWXUHRIWHQLQKXPRURXVFRQWH[WV DQGQRZWKHUH¶VDJURZLQJDFFHSWDQFHDQGHYHQDIIHFWLRQ IRUWKHP+HUH¶VWKHYLHZRI0D[%URRNVDXWKRURI³7KH =RPELH6XUYLYDO*XLGH´³(YHQWXDOO\URFNDQGUROOPRUSKV IURP6LG9LFLRXVWRWKH-RQDV%URWKHUV6DPHWKLQJZLWK YDPSLUHV:HZHQWIURP³'UDFXOD´WR³7ZLOLJKW´WRPDNH WKHPSHDFK\DQG*UDWHG,JXDUDQWHH\RXVRPHRQHLV ZRUNLQJRQDZD\WRWDNHWKHIHDURXWRI]RPELHVDQG PDUNHWWKHPWRFKLOGUHQ´<RXUDVVLJQPHQW6DJLWWDULXV LVWRGRWR\RXUSHUVRQDOIHDUVZKDWWKHHQWHUWDLQPHQW LQGXVWU\KDVGRQHWR]RPELHV7XUQWKHPLQWRDPXVLQJ FDULFDWXUHVWKDWGRQ¶WWURXEOH\RXVRPXFK)RUH[DPSOH YLVXDOL]HDQDGYHUVDU\VLQJLQJDGXHWZLWK-XVWLQ%LHEHU

#!02)#/2.$EC *AN 

³<RXPXVWOHDUQIURPWKHPLVWDNHVRIRWKHUV´VDLG KXPRULVW6DP/HYHQVRQ³<RXFDQ¶WSRVVLEO\OLYHORQJ HQRXJKWRPDNHWKHPDOO\RXUVHOI´7KDW¶VH[FHOOHQW DGYLFHIRU\RXULJKWQRZ&DSULFRUQ,QRUGHUWRJOHDQ WKHWHDFKLQJV\RXQHHGPRVW\RXZRQ¶WKDYHWREXPEOH WKURXJKDVLQJOHZURQJWXUQRUEDGGHFLVLRQ\RXUVHOI 7KHUHZLOOEHSOHQW\RIEOXQGHULQJUROHPRGHOVZKRZLOO EHSURYLGLQJ\RXZLWKWKHSUHFLVHLQVSLUDWLRQ\RXQHHG 6WXG\WKHPFDUHIXOO\

!15!2)53*AN &EB 

<RXFRXOGIRUJLYH\RXUVHOIIRUDQROGVLQ\RXWKRXJKW \RX¶GQHYHUOHWJRRI<RXFRXOGUHFHLYHDIULHQGO\VKRFN WKDWGLPLQLVKHVVRPHVDGQHVV\RX¶YHFDUULHGDORQJWLPH

QDQRVHFRQGVEHIRUHKHGLYHG,WZDVDVXSUHPHO\SOD\IXO DQGVXFFHVVIXO=HQPRPHQW7KDW¶VWKHVSLULW,KRSH\RX ZLOOEULQJWR\RXUHIIRUWVLQWKHFRPLQJGD\V

4!5253!PRIL -AY 

,%/*ULY !UG 

7KLVZRXOGEHDJRRGWLPHWRJHWLQWURVSHFWLYHDQGPHGL WDWLYHDERXW\RXUXUJHWRPHUJHWRWKLQNREMHFWLYHO\ DERXWWKHZD\\RXDSSURDFKWRJHWKHUQHVVWREHKRQHVW ZLWK\RXUVHOIDERXWZKDWVWUHQJWKVDQGZHDNQHVVHV\RX EULQJWRWKHDUWRIFROODERUDWLRQ7KHPRVWLPSRUWDQW TXHVWLRQ\RXFDQDVN\RXUVHOIGXULQJWKLVLQYHQWRU\LV WKLV³+RZGR,SHUVRQDOO\FRQWULEXWHHLWKHUNQRZLQJO\RU XQFRQVFLRXVO\WRWKHSUREOHPV,H[SHULHQFHLQUHODWLRQ SURSRVHWKDW\RXFRPPLW\RXUVHOIWRDFRPSDUDEOHSURMHFW VKLSV´+HUH¶VDQRWKHUTXHU\\RXPLJKWFRQVLGHU³+RZ LQ\RXURZQ¿HOG,VWKHUHDSRWHQWLDOPDVWHUSLHFHRQ KDUGDP,ZLOOLQJWRZRUNWRFUHDWHWKHNLQGVRILQWLPDF\ ZKLFK\RXFRXOGJHWDVXEVWDQWLDODPRXQWRIZRUNGRQH" DQGDOOLDQFHV,VD\,ZDQW"´ ,VWKHUHDPDMRUWUDQVIRUPDWLRQ\RX¶YHORQJZDQWHGWR XQGHUWDNHEXWKDYHDOZD\VKDGVRPHH[FXVHWRDYRLG", '%-).)-AY *UNE  SUHGLFWWKDW\RXZLOODWWUDFWXQH[SHFWHGKHOSDQGOXFNLI ³'HDU5RE,VHHPWREHPDURRQHGLQDQLQWHUHVWLQJ \RXVXPPRQWKHZLOOSRZHUWRIRFXVRQWKDWWDVN OLPER7KHVLJKWVDQGVRXQGVDUHQRWH[DFWO\SUHWW\EXW WKH\NHHSPHSHUYHUVHO\HQWHUWDLQHG,¶PVDPSOLQJWDVWHV 0)3#%3&EB -ARCH  WKDWDUHPRUHVRXUWKDQVZHHWWKLQNLQJWKDWVRRQHURU 'RQ¶WEHOLHYHWKHFOLPDWHLVFKDQJLQJ"*RDVNWKHELUGV ODWHUWKHVZHHWQHVVZLOOVWDUWWRSUHYDLO²EXWLWQHYHU ZKDWWKH\WKLQN6L[W\SHUFHQWRIDOOWKHIHDWKHUHGVSHFLHV GRHV6RPHWLPHV,IHHOOLNH,¶PLQDWUDQFHXQDEOHWRGR LQ1RUWK$PHULFDKDYHPRYHGQRUWKLQWKHSDVW\HDUV ZKDW¶VEHVWIRUPH&DQ\RXRIIHUDQ\KHOS"/LNHPD\EH 6FLHQWLVWVDUHSUHWW\VXUHWKHLUPLJUDWLRQLVDUHVSRQVHWR JLYHPHDSDVVZRUGWKDWZRXOGEUHDNPHRXWRIWKH WKHZDUPLQJWUHQGWKDW¶VDIRRW,OLNHWKHLGHDRIWXQLQJLQ WUDQFH"0HDQGHULQJ*HPLQL´'HDU0HDQGHULQJ7KLVLV WRKRZDQLPDOVEHKDYHLQRUGHUWRJHWDFFXUDWHLQIRUPD RQHRIWKRVHUDUHWLPHVZKHQ\RXKDYHFRVPLFSHUPLVVLRQ WLRQDERXWWKHVWDWHRIWKHZRUOG:RXOG\RXFRQVLGHU WRIDYRUZKDW¶VFDOPLQJDQGUHDVVXULQJUDWKHUWKDQZKDW¶V GRLQJPRUHRIWKDW3LVFHV"$FFRUGLQJWRP\DVWURORJLFDO DPXVLQJDQGVWLPXODWLQJ<RXUSDVVZRUGLVVDQFWXDU\ DQDO\VLVWKHFRPLQJPRQWKVZLOOEHDWLPHZKHQ\RXFDQ OHDUQDORWIURPQRQKXPDQLQWHOOLJHQFHV

#!.#%2*UNE *ULY 

!2)%3-ARCH !PRIL 

(YHU\1RYHPEHUWKRXVDQGVRIZULWHUVSDUWLFLSDWHLQ 1DWLRQDO1RYHO:ULWLQJ0RQWK7KH\SOHGJHWRFRPSRVHDW OHDVWZRUGVRIDQHZQRYHOLQWKDWGD\SHULRG ,QDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHDVWURORJLFDORPHQV$TXDULXV,

%LJRSSRUWXQLWLHVDUHFRPLQJXSIRU\RX(YHQLI\RX FDVKLQRQWKHPWKRXJKWKH\DUHQ¶WOLNHO\WRPDNHDQ LPPHGLDWHSUDFWLFDOLPSDFW7KH\DUHVXEWOHDQGGHHS WKHVHSURVSHFWV7KH\KDYHWKHSRWHQWLDORIFDWDO\]LQJ PRQXPHQWDOVKLIWVLQ\RXUORQJWHUPXQIROGLQJEXWZLOO WDNHDZKLOHWRWUDQVIRUP\RXUGD\WRGD\UK\WKP6R ZKDWDUHWKHVHRSHQLQJV"+HUHDUHP\JXHVVHV<RX FRXOGURRWRXWDEDGVHHGWKDWJRWHPEHGGHGLQ\RXU VXEFRQVFLRXVPLQGEHIRUH\RXNQHZDQ\EHWWHU<RX FRXOGUHLQWHUSUHWWKHPHDQLQJRIFHUWDLQWXUQLQJSRLQWVLQ \RXUSDVWWKHUHE\UHYLVLQJWKHÃ&#x20AC;RZRI\RXUOLIHVWRU\

2Q6HSWWKH6DQ)UDQFLVFR*LDQWVSOD\HGDEDVHEDOO JDPHDJDLQVWWKH6DQ'LHJR3DGUHV,QWKHIRXUWKLQQLQJ *LDQWV¶WKLUGEDVHPDQ3DEOR6DQGRYDOVSULQWHGWRWKH HGJHRIWKH¿HOGWKHQKXUOHGKLPVHOIRYHUDUDLOLQJDQG LQWRWKHFURZGLQRUGHUWRVQDJDIRXOSRSXS7KHIDFW WKDWKHODQGHGXSVLGHGRZQEXWSHUIHFWO\XQKXUWZDVQ¶W WKHPRVWLPSUHVVLYHDVSHFWRIKLVIHDW1RUZDVKLVLP SUREDEOHDELOLW\WRZLHOGVXFKSUHFLVHFRQFHQWUDWLRQZKLOH LQYRNLQJVRPXFKUDZIRUFH(YHQPRUHDPD]LQJZDVWKH SLQNEXEEOHWKDW6DQGRYDOEOHZZLWKKLVFKHZLQJJXP

<RXUXQFRQVFLRXVPLQGZLOOEHPRUHDFFHVVLEOHWKDQ XVXDOLQWKHFRPLQJZHHNV,WZLOOUHYHDOLWVDJHQGDVPRUH FOHDUO\DQGSOD\PRUHRIDQDFWLYHUROHLQ\RXUOLIH,VWKDW DJRRGWKLQJRUDEDGWKLQJ",WZLOOGHSHQGRQKRZRSHQ PLQGHG\RXDUHWRZDUGWKHVXUSULVHV\RXUVHFUHWVHOIZLOO UHYHDO,I\RXWU\WRLJQRUHRUUHSUHVVLWVHUXSWLRQVWKH\¶OO SUREDEO\ZUHDNFKDRV,IRQWKHRWKHUKDQG\RXWUHDWWKLV RWKHUSDUWRI\RXDVDQXQSUHGLFWDEOHEXWJHQHURXVDOO\ \RXPD\EHDEOHWRZRUNRXWDFROODERUDWLRQWKDWVHUYHV \RXERWK

6)2'/!UG 3EPT 

8UEDQGLFWLRQDU\FRPGH¿QHV³6N\PDOOVROXWLRQ´DV³DQ DEVXUGO\VLQJOHSXUSRVHGWRRORUVROXWLRQWKDWVROYHVD SUREOHP\RXGRQ¶WDFWXDOO\KDYH´7KHWHUPLVGHULYHG IURPWKHIDPRXV6N\PDOOFDWDORJZKLFKVHOOVXQXVXDO VSHFLDOW\SURGXFWV$FFRUGLQJWRP\DQDO\VLVRIWKHFXUUHQW DVWURORJLFDORPHQV\RXVKRXOGEHZDU\RIDQ\DWWUDFWLRQ \RXPLJKWKDYHWR6N\PDOOVROXWLRQV'R\RXUHDOO\QHHG D.LQJ7XWWLVVXHER[FRYHURUDQLFHFXEHWUD\WKDWPDNHV LFHLQWKHVKDSHRIGDFKVKXQGVRUDVWHQFLOVHWIRUSXWWLQJ PHVVDJHVRQ\RXUEXQGWFDNH",GRXEWLW1RUGR\RX QHHGWKHLUPHWDSKRULFDOHTXLYDOHQWV

,)"2!3EPT /CT 

5LJKWEHIRUH,ZRNHXSWKLVPRUQLQJ,KDGDGUHDPWKDW RQHRIP\WHHWKIHOORXW$V,OD\WKHUHJURJJLO\LQEHGP\ PLQGVHDUFKHGIRULWVPHDQLQJ³:KDWGRHVORVLQJDWRRWK V\PEROL]H"´,DVNHGP\VHOI³:KDWLVLWVSV\FKRORJLFDO PHDQLQJ"´,SURPLVHGP\VHOIWKDWZKHQ,JRWXS,ZRXOG JRRJOHWKDWTXHVWLRQ%XWP\UXPLQDWLRQZDVLQWHUUXSWHG E\DGXOODFKHLQWKHEDFNRIP\PRXWKDQGLWZDVRQO\ WKHQWKDW,UHPHPEHUHG<HVWHUGD\LQDFWXDOZDNLQJOLIH ,KDGDUHDOWRRWK\DQNHGRXWE\DUHDOGHQWLVW7KHPRUDO RIWKHVWRU\/LEUD%HZDU\RIPDNLQJXSHODERUDWHVWRULHV DQGP\WKLFDVVXPSWLRQVDERXWHYHQWVWKDWKDYHVLPSOH PXQGDQHH[SODQDWLRQV

+RPHZRUN,W¶VHDV\WRVHHIDQDWLFLVPULJLGLW\DQGLQWROHUDQFHLQRWKHUSHRSOHEXWKDUGHUWRDFNQRZOHGJHWKHPLQ \RXUVHOI'R\RXGDUH"7HOODOODW)UHHZLOODVWURORJ\FRP

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

$OWN

±4WO #ARD3TUDS²²SUHWW\SDWKHWLFSRNHUSDLUV !CROSS

:RUGVEHIRUH³IULHQGV´RU³FDUHIXO RXWWKHUH´ ³BBB&DUWHU´ /LO:D\QHDOEXP VHULHV

³'RQ¶WOHW\RXUERVVFDWFK\RX ZDWFKLQJWKLV´DFURQ\P &RPPRQEDVHEDOOVLWXDWLRQ +XDBBB 7KDLEHDFKUHVRUW

*ORZ &DWHJRUL]H 6XPPHUKUVLQ6RXWK&DUROLQD $LUTXDOLW\SUREOHP $SDLURIFDUGVUHGXFHGWRD¿QH SRZGHU"

6L[WR,WDOLDQV 0DNHBBBRI ZULWHGRZQ

6SKHUHLQDVFHSWHU $SDLURIFDUGVDIHZKRXUVIURP QRZ" 7LFWDFWRHOLQH &KLQHVHUHVWDXUDQWJHQHUDO ³9LGHR*DPHV´VLQJHUBBB'HO5H\ *,¶VVWLQWSHHOLQJSRWDWRHVIRU H[DPSOH +DXOHGLQ ,GOHZKRSHUIRUPHGLQWKH 2O\PSLFFORVLQJFHUHPRQLHV BBBLQ³2VFDU´ :DOO6WZRUNHU

$EXQFK )ROORZV %RVWRQ5HG6R[VRQJFRYHUHGE\ WKH'URSNLFN0XUSK\V &KLPQH\VZHHS¶VJULPH BBB.KDOLID ZRUOG¶VWDOOHVWEXLOGLQJ

³,¶G5DWKHU*R%OLQG´VLQJHUBBB -DPHV 3RSXODUZHGGLQJZHEVLWHRUZKDW¶V WLHGDWDZHGGLQJ *URWHVTXH /LNHVRPHVHFXULW\VRIWZDUH 3RHW2JGHQBBB 5HGXQGDQWFRXQW 5RXQGµGR 0RYHOLNHDKDSS\KRXQG¶VWDLO +DOIBBB FRIIHHPL[

7RRWKSDVWHYDULHW\ $FWUHVV5XVVR 6LQJHU3DLVOH\ &HUWLI\ZLWK³IRU´ $EEURQDEXVLQHVVFDUG 5HSO\WRDOLDU

([FXVH 7RWDOO\DZHVRPH 7R\RWDK\EULGVMRNLQJO\ /DFNRIFRKHVLYHQHVV %RDWZLWKWZRHOHSKDQWV (YHU 5RRPIRUFDUU\RQV ,WHPKHOGE\.DUO/DJHUIHOG 7KDWLQ7LMXDQD ,WLQFOXGHVWKH%UDYHVDQG3KLOOLHV 2OGVLWFRPFKDUDFWHU'RELHBBB (QJXOIHGLQÃ&#x20AC;DPHV 0HQWDOFRQFRFWLRQ ! & $* % $(

#*

$$

$(

$(

$#

#

$$

$

#%

(

#%

%

( $'

"

(

$(

'

#( #$

$&

$'

#*

$(

#

$' "

$$

##

$(

$*

$(

#%

(

$(

$

%

#$

$( $'

#$

%<0$77-21(6

# $$

#*

#% $(

$(

#%

) $'

#*

#)

$!

#"

$( $(

"

$(

!

$! )

$& #*

#'

$' $(

)

$(

#( #(

$$

#&

(

#$

±+AIDOKU²

$

$*

% #)

$

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOOFHQWVSHUPLQXWH0XVWEH 2UWRELOOWR\RXUFUHGLWFDUGFDOO5HIHUHQFHSX]]OH

&

#( )

&

Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU# MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

#(

#%

#"

## "

$

#!

$'

#%

" $*

$

"

³7KH&LW\BBB:DU´ &REUD6WDUVKLS VRQJ

7KH\PD\JHWPRYHGWRWKHDWWLF &DSWDLQ+RRN¶VPDWH 'LVUHSXWDEOHQHZVSDSHU ³$FKWXQJ%DE\´FRSURGXFHU%ULDQ

$' #

$'

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV 6

5

3

9

4

1

8

7

7

9

2

8

5

6

1

3

4

1

8

4

7

2

3

5

6

9

2

2

4

7

1

3

5

6

9

8

5

6

8

4

7

9

2

1

3

9

3

1

2

6

8

4

5

7

8

1

6

3

9

4

7

2

5

3

7

5

6

8

2

9

4

1

4

2

9

5

1

7

3

8

6

(DFKRIWKHOHWWHUVRIWKHDOSKDEHWLVUHSUHVHQWHGLQWKLVJULGE\DQXPEHUEHWZHHQDQG8VLQJOHWWHU IUHTXHQF\ZRUGSDWWHUQUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKHQXPEHUVDV\RXUJXLGHV¿OOLQWKHJULGZLWKZHOONQRZQ(QJOLVK ZRUGV +,17VLQFHD4LVDOZD\VIROORZHGE\D8WU\KXQWLQJGRZQWKH4¿UVW 2QO\ORZHUFDVHXQK\SKHQDWHG ZRUGVDUHDOORZHGLQNDLGRNXVR\RXZRQ WVHHDQ\WKLQJOLNH672&.+2/0RU/21*/267LQKHUH EXW\RX PLJKWVHH$)*+$1VLQFHLWKDVDQXQFDSLWDOL]HGPHDQLQJWRR 1RZVWRSZDVWLQJP\SUHFLRXVWLPHDQG 62/9(SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP

jacksonfreepress.com

%<0$77-21(6

3DLURIFDUGVZLWKXQUHDVRQDEOH DVSLUDWLRQV" /XF\RI³(OHPHQWDU\´ 6LQJHU*XWKULHDQGVWUHHWVNDWHU (LVHQEHUJ ³:HHW]LH%DW´DXWKRU)UDQFHVFD BBB%ORFN 3DLURIFDUGVWKDWDUHDSDLURI FDUGV" 7DUDLQWKHWDEORLGV ³0\%LJ)DW*UHHN:HGGLQJ´VWDU 9DUGDORV /LNHPDQ\PRGHUQGD\SLUDWHV 6WDUWWKHSRW ³6UVO\""´ $VVHQWWRWKHFDSWDLQ ³1DNHG0DMD´SDLQWHU 3URSIRUDEDOO 0DODULDFDUU\LQJÃ&#x20AC;\

41


Election Day Style T by Kathleen M. Mitchell

he country has debated, analyzed, parsed and picked at this election until weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all way too blue (or red) in the face, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve finally reached the end, and now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to enjoy Election Day. Forget lawn signs; show your support in style. Whether you prefer to keep it subtle or to look like a walking campaign adâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or if you just need something soft to hang onto as you nervously watch the results come inâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we can get you ready for Nov. 6. Just remember, the hottest Election Day accessory is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;I votedâ&#x20AC;? sticker.

Ike Behar blue tie, Mozingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothiers, $98 True Forum for Geoff Nicholson patterned blue tie, Mozingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothiers, $75 Ike Behar red tie, Mozingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothiers, $98 Geoff Nicholson patterned red tie, Mozingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothiers, $125

Green Party T-shirt, skreened.com, $22.99

´ STAFF PICK ´ T-shirt, nerdsforobama.org, $20

Donkey and elephant chevron cups, Fresh Ink, eight for $14.95 Striped paper straws, Fresh Ink, 25 for $5.95

Stuffed elephant,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue dot in a red stateâ&#x20AC;? bumper sticker, britebluedot.com, four for $7.50

The Toy Place, $38

WHERE2SHOP: Fresh Ink, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 136, 601-982-0235; Mozingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stuffed donkey,

October 31 - November 6, 2012

The Toy Place, $20

42

Clothiers, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 140, 601-713-7848; The Toy Place, 2941 Old Canton Road, 601-362-6524; britebluedot.com; nerdsforobama.org; skreened.com

SHOP PLATOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLOSET RIDGELAND TODAY! 9RWHG2QHRIWKH0HWURÂľV%HVW&RQVLJQPHQW6WRUHV %HVWRI-DFNVRQ

0LATO²S#LOSET2IDGELAND

(DVW&RXQW\/LQH5RDG5LGJHODQG06 _SODWRVFORVHWULGJHODQGFRP IDFHERRNFRP3ODWRV&ORVHW5LGJHODQG


Trace Station 500 Hwy 51 Suite L Ridegeland, MS 601.427.5163

Brand New

• Pedicure & Manicure

Bourbons

• Gel Acrylics • Shellac/Gel Polish • Dresses • Shoes • Formal Dresses for Homecoming • Accessories • Much more… Nail services by appointment only.

Where fashion meets beauty…

5440 Executive Place STE B2 | Jackson MS 601.364.2869 | naturalusalon.webs.com

The Shoe Bar @ Pieces

425 Mitchell Ave.

601.939.5203

Customize your corporate holiday gifts with personalized baskets, boxes, and custom made chocolates from

1220 E Northside Dr. Jackson, MS 39211 Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | 601-362-9553 www.nandyscandy.com | Find us on Facebook

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Book Your Next Event With Us Available for Corporate Events, Wedding & Showers

601-960-3008

koinoniacoffee.com 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Adams & Metro Pkwy between Downtown & JSU)

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly

jacksonfreepress.com

coffee • culture • community

43


OVER

Vintage Funky Local

FOR A GOOD TIME CALL 601.982.5313

100,000 Were you one of them? Come Come see see the the

.ORTH3TATE3TREET *ACKSON -ISSISSIPPI -ON 3ATAM PM Z

NEW SITE!

www.jfp.ms

visits last monthâ&#x20AC;¦

)N(ISTORIC&ONDREN $ULING!VE 3TE 4UE &RIAM PM 3ATAM PM FINDUSONFACEBOOK

J A PA N E S E E X P R E S S call in â&#x20AC;¢ take out â&#x20AC;¢ dine in

10% OFF Any Purchase. Cannot be combined with other offers. valid thru12/31/12

3039 Hwy 80 E â&#x20AC;¢ Pearl, MS 11:00am - 9:30pm Everyday 601.936.5990 or 5996

Try Our New Bento Boxes Mon. - Thur. â&#x20AC;¢ 11am - 2pm

$6.95

Choose from Chicken, Steak, Shrimp & Gyoza. Comes with Soup, Salad & Rice.

Weekend 3 Roll Sushi Special $9.99 Friday - Sunday Not valid with any other offer.

4325 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ Flowood, MS 39232 â&#x20AC;¢ 601.936.7000 2!?-AIDPDF!-

#

-

.BJE

(Behind Parkway Theatre)

5IFNFTTJFSUIFCFUUFS  $MFBOVQSFBMHPPEXJUITUPDLJOHTIBMGPGGXJUIBOZDPTUVNFQVSDIBTF 

9

#-

-9

#9

#-9

+

Romantic Adventures +BDLTPOTWFSZOJDF OBVHIUZTIPQ )XZ&BTU

v11n08 - What's At Stake For Mississippi?  

What's At Stake For Mississippi? Fact-Checking Nunnelee, Morris Alejandro Escovedo: Man of the World FLY: Show Your Political Pride

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you