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October 17 - 23, 2012


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN DR. LORETTA MOORE

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r. Loretta Moore’s main task as the associate vice president for the Academy of Research and Scholarly Engagement is to nurture the intellectual aspirations and scholarly production of the faculty members at Jackson State University. Moore’s first love was chemistry. That changed quickly when, as a high school student, an experiment went bad—there was a small explosion, and her lab caught on fire. After that, she wrote off chemistry because the mistakes were too consequential. Still interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (commonly called STEM), she chose to pursue computer science. She completed her Ph.D. in computer science at the Illinois Institute of Technology after getting her computer science degree from JSU. Moore had little interest in teaching but, under her adviser’s encouragement, she applied for and landed a faculty position at Auburn University. The Jackson native was the first black female professor to teach in the computer-science department at Auburn. In her first course, she learned that she was the first black teacher that some of her students had ever had. “I don’t think I fully understand what it meant to be the first black faculty member,” she says. This naïveté, as she puts it, was somewhat of a blessing, because it allowed her to block out some of the larger socio-cultural aspects of being a black woman in a field that

CONTENTS

was dominated by males at a predominantly white institution. “As a computer scientist, we build machines. I wasn’t interested in understanding human behavior, that’s just overwhelming to me,” she says. But eventually she had to face it. And once she did, her career transformed. She went from being a well-published researcher whose work was supported by millions in grants to someone who worked to transform the social environment in which she lived. After seven years at Auburn, Moore, now 49, returned to her alma mater to head the computer science department. She got IIT involved a National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE program. “It’s designed to advance the participation of women in STEM and transform the academic environment so that it does not discriminate or have biases based on any target characteristics, towards race, class or gender,” she says. In her current position, Moore’s sights are set much more broadly. Among several other initiatives, she leads JSU’s new Academy for Research and Scholarly Engagement. “The academy will be targeted toward junior faculty members who have yet to establish a strong grantmanship record and people at the associate or full professor level who are trying to re-emerge with a new or different research focus,” Moore explains. —Piko Ewoodzie

Cover photograph by Trip Burns

10 Mississippi vs. Immigration

Gov. Phil Bryant signed Mississippi onto a federal lawsuit against the Obama administration over policy involving undocumented youth.

23 Poetic License

“In poetry, the worst thing a poet can do to me, as a reader, is not invite me into the project, not invite me to be his or her co-conspirator. In strange ways, these ideas show up in my own work. ... I like writers who take huge risks, even if they are unsuccessful. I’d much rather read a book that has ambition than one that plays it safe.” —Steve Kistulentz, “Dark ‘Daydream’”

34 Cultivating Caring

Involving your children around the house and neighborhood, as well as teaching them about giving back both locally and globally, is vital to raising community-minded kids.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ........................PUBLISHER’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 17 ............................ COVER STORY 23 .............................. DIVERSIONS 24 .......................................... FILM 26 ....................................... 8 DAYS 27 ............................... JFP EVENTS 31 ....................................... MUSIC 32 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 33 ..................................... SPORTS 34 .................. LIFE&STYLE FAMILY 35 ......................................... FOOD 39 .................................... HITCHED 40 .............................. BODY/SOUL 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 42 .................................. FLY STYLE

KELLY BRYAN SMITH; JAMES PATTERSON; AMILE WILSON

OCTOBER 17 - 23, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 6

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PUBLISHER’S note

by Todd Stauffer, Publisher

Romney’s Real Record as a ‘Job Creator’

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’m writing this before the second presidential debate, so I can’t tell you now whether you heard a lot or a little about Sensata. It’s an automotive parts company in Illinois whose manufacturing operation is being moved to China by Bain Capital, reportedly going so far as to have its American workers train their Chinese counterparts. Mitt Romney detractors have jumped on the videos and stories coming from Sensata employees, saying it paints Romney and his old firm in a bad light. The American workers have asked Romney to intervene with his Bain buddies; he’s declined. Romney supporters say he isn’t accountable for Bain, because money he makes from the company is held in a blind trust. As a Saints fan, I’m forced to point out that there is no “commissioner” of Wall Street; unlike Sean Payton under BountyGate, it’s my understanding that Mitt Romney is perfectly free to contact the management of Bain and discuss business. He just doesn’t want to. The ethic appears to be that since Romney only profits from what Bain does—instead of deciding how those profits are made—then he’s somehow squeaky clean. This new mention of Bain brings renewed scrutiny to Romney’s claims as a “job creator”—a boast he makes while pointing to his years at Bain Capital and to his record as a one-term governor of Massachusetts. Both, it turns out, offer a shaky support for the “job creator” claim. Two points about Romney as governor. First, he’s made hay recently of the idea that he “worked across the aisle” when he

was governor, conjuring the image of Ronald Reagan and Tip O’Neill rolling up their shirtsleeves in the Oval Office. According to reporters and columnists who witnessed it, though, Romney’s one term in Massachusetts went a little differently. “He put a velvet rope across the door to keep people from walking into the governor’s offices,” wrote Rick Holmes of the MetroWest Daily News, quoting Massachusetts Rep. David Linsky. “He commandeered an elevator for his exclusive use,” in the capitol, so as not to mix with the chattel. Romney vetoed more than 800 bills sent to him by the Democratic Legislature, which overrode them all. By the time he announced he wouldn’t seek a second term, Romney was 16 points down in the polls to his Democratic opponent; he ended his term with a 34-percent approval rating. As for jobs? Remember that Romney was in office from 2003-2007, at a time wedged between two recessions and marked by considerable job growth in the country. Under his leadership, the unemployment rate in Massachusetts did fall—but much slower than in most other states. The state averaged 47th in job creation over his term. That put Massachusetts ahead of three states—rust-belt states Ohio and Michigan, and Louisiana, which Katrina hit in 2005. Unemployment went down by one percentage point while Romney was governor, but it turns out a considerable chunk of that single-digit drop was due to the outmigration of working-aged adults. The Los Angeles Times reported that Massachusetts saw a net loss of 220,000 residents during Romney’s term in office, one of the highest

‘I never actually ran one of our investments. That was left to management.’ — Mitt Romney

population losses in the country. One of the bright spots was health care, where the implementation of “Romneycare” effected a 7.6 percent increase in positions in Massachusetts, the strongest growth in that sector in the country. This is, oddly, something that Romney now opposes replicating at a national level, despite its success. Romney’s other justification for being a “job creator” is his time spent in the private sector as CEO and owner of Bain Capital. Bain Capital specializes in leveraged buyouts (LBOs)—getting a controlling stake in companies by putting up a small percentage of their own money, then taking out massive loans against the company’s own credit line (the “leverage” part). Bain takes fees throughout the process for the “management services” rendered to the acquired company. The debt stays with the company; if it can weather crushing new debt, it’ll continue to function. If not, it goes bankrupt. This all started back in the “Greed is Good” Gordon Gecko 1980s, but, as Matt Taibbi in Rolling Stone pointed out in September, Bain’s approach isn’t a “hostile takeover.” Instead, it generally promises current management lucrative bonuses to sign off on the deal—and get on board the gravy train. Then, the newly procured company pays Bain—typically—millions of dollars a year in fees, plus whatever dividends or stock payouts Bain can “harvest”—literally Romney’s word—from the company. Taibbi notes that this approach to LBOs is compared to a mob tactic called a “bust out”—taking over a legitimate business, buying a bunch of stuff on credit and then bankrupting it (or, in the case of the mob, burning it to the ground for the insurance money). If you select the right target and credit, it’s easy money. It just takes a sell-job to bring Wall Street banks on board and willingness to part-out the company and send its workers packing. (Romney’s phrase

is “creative destruction.”) So now the leveraged company is saddled with loan repayments, and it owes Bain millions a year. Solution? Cut jobs, cut wages, outsource, sell off machines; do whatever it takes to generate a return for the shareholder—Bain. And Mitt Romney. But we’re talking about whether he created jobs, right? Then it’s worth asking what Mitt Romney, himself, said about his job-creating prowess at Bain. According to Taibbi, Romney wrote in his book, “Turnaround,” that “I never actually ran one of our investments. That was left to management.” Real “job creators” run their businesses. They have business plans, they execute strategies, they sell, they hire and fire. But that’s not what companies like Bain Capital do. “(Job creation) was not his or Bain’s or the industry’s primary objective. The objective of the LBO business is maximizing returns for investors,” said Marc Wolpow, a former Bain colleague of Romney’s, in Taibbi’s story. Taibbi writes that Romney has never once taken any responsibility for an acquisition’s failure, despite some big blowouts— Stage Stores (a merger of Bealls Brothers and Palais Royal) ended up bankrupt in 2000, while Bain took $175 million in returns from the investment. Romney bought Ampad in 1992, loaded it with debt, took Ampad public and made $100 million before the company was bankrupt and hundreds lost their jobs. KB Toys went bankrupt by 2004; Bain made $83 million in fees and “dividend recapitalization.” Which is to say this: Comparing Mitt Romney to a businessman who creates jobs is like comparing a junkyard owner to Ford. Sure, they both know a little something about making money from steel and wires. But if both tried to sell you a car, which would you drive? Todd Stauffer is the publisher and coowner of the Jackson Free Press.

October 17 - 23, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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R.L. Nave

Piko Ewoodzie

Ross Cabell

Kathleen M. Mitchell

Alonzo Lewis II

Whitney Menogan

Trip Burns

Korey Harrion

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis and graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri). Call him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12 or email rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. He wrote the cover story.

Editorial intern Piko Ewoodzie is an out-of-towner from a bunch of different places, (New York, Wisconsin, Ohio, Ghana, West Africa) who is thoroughly enjoying his time in Jackson. Piko wrote the Jacksonian.

Ross Cabell is a Mississippi native, and was a feral child until the age of 16. He is teaching himself the English language by writing for the Free Press. Ross wrote a food story and an event blurb.

Kathleen has a bachelor’s degree in English from Millsaps College and a master’s in journalism from Boston University. She is still waiting on her acceptance letter to Hogwarts, however. She wrote the books feature.

Coila native Alonzo Lewis II started cooking at age 5. He is a writer for The Examiner. He also owns Coila’s Crossroads Bistro where the motto is: Food so good that it will make your tongue slap your brains out. Alonzo contributed a recipe.

Editorial intern Whitney Menogan holds bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College. She enjoys reading, writing and mind-blowing conversations. She hopes to be able to travel around the world. She wrote the Hitched feature.

Staff photographer Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He took many of the photos in this issue.

Web Producer Korey Harrion is a saxophonist who runs a small computer-repair business. He enjoys reading, writing and playing music, origami and playing video games. He loves animals, especially dogs.


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TRIP BURNS

WHO IS YOUR LOCAL HERO AND WHY?

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October 17 - 23, 2012

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Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

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Central Mississippi Tea Party President Janis Lane said in “A Mississippi Tea Party Chat� (jfp.ms/teapartychat): “I’m really going to set you back here. Probably the biggest turn we ever made was when the women got the right to vote. Our country might have been better off if it was still just men voting. There is nothing worse than a bunch of mean, hateful women. They are diabolical in how than can skewer a person. I do not see that in men. The whole time I worked, I’d much rather have a male boss than a female boss. Double-minded, you never can trust them.�

YOU Responded: Knolaust: “Please, in the name of all things holy, unholy, and in between, tell me this is satire. Please! Please!� Blackwatch: “Ms. Lane took the cake. I didn’t think that their retrograde, selfloathing thinking would be so blatamly on display, but it is. Sadly, it seems the governor is listed among this ilk. What a shame.� Lhaythri: “In the future, it would be great if you (Lane) could use your platform to share your politics without setting women’s rights back a century. I am speechless.� Akwalker: “Ms. Lane, just with this one interview alone, you are single-handedly tearing down what you are trying to achieve. What an embarrassment.� BethIsadora: “This is absolutely revolting.

And hypocritical, since I’m assuming Lane feels she has the right to vote, just not the ‘mean, hateful women’ whose opinions differ from hers? OY.� Billy_Bob_Neck: “Tell the truth and get mocked for it! God made Eve outta Adam and it was Eve who listened to the snake. Girls are STILL listening to snakes today!� scottmcg: “I take it with her viewpoint on women that she would have no problem reverting back to the days of when she could be sold because women were only considered property. The most frightening thing in the world is ignorance in action and this woman shows she is a master at that skill. If she doesn’t think women should be allowed to vote, then she should be stopped from entering a booth on Nov 6th.�

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Activity Sponsors: Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce, Mississippi State Department of Health, Eat Jackson LLC, & Alcorn State University

7


Thursday, Oct 11 More than 3.5 million tweets are posted during the vice-presidential debate between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan, down dramatically from the over 10 million posted during the first presidential debate. Friday, Oct.12 The Mississippi Attorney General’s office orders Xerox to halt communication with child-care centers using their finger-scanning technology. ‌ The St. Louis Cardinals come back from a 0-6 deficit to defeat the Nationals 97 in game five of the National League division series. Saturday, Oct. 13 Courtney Roxanne Pearson is crowned the first black homecoming queen at Ole Miss, 50 years after the university’s integration. ... Mississippi State University bests Tennessee to remain the only undefeated college football team in the state. Sunday, Oct 14 Austrian Felix Baumgartner successfully skydives from the stratosphere, over 24 miles from the Earth’s surface, reaching Mach 1.24 speed on the way down.

October 17 - 23, 2012

Monday, Oct. 15 Two Americans, Alvin E. Roth of Harvard University and Lloyd S. Shapley of the University of California, Los Angeles, win the Nobel Prize for economics.

8

Tuesday, Oct. 16 The Mississippi State Department of Health reports 12 new human cases of West Nile virus, bringing the total for 2012 to 225 cases, the highest number ever reported in the state. ‌ President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney face off in the second of three debates leading up to Election Day. Get breaking daily news at jfp.ms and jfpdaily.com. Subscribe free.

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Did Lake Money Dry Up? By R.L. Nave

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ankin-Hinds Pearl River Flood and Drainage Control District officials are scratching their heads trying to locate funds set aside to help develop a flood-control plan for the Pearl River. Gary Rhoads, Flowood mayor and the Levee Board’s president, said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had set aside funds for a flood-control study, and was curious how much money was left over. Levee Board officials aren’t sure of how much, but they say Congress originally put the money in the Corps’ budget to study a dual lake that planners scrapped in favor of a more modest one-lake proposal amid cost and complaints from conservationists. The Levee Board and nonprofit Pearl River Vision Foundation are drafting a plan to reduce flooding along the Pearl River. PRVF, started by local oil magnate John McGowan and backed by his business partners, agreed in 2011 to pay for the study. At an Oct. 8 Levee Board meeting, officials said they were seeking clarification on precisely how much the Corps had left over for the development. Board attorney Keith Turner estimates that somewhere around $200,000 left over after the Corps paid legal fees related to drafting several recent agreements for the Levee Board. But Kavanaugh Breazeale, spokesman for the Corps’ Vicksburg office, told the Jackson Free Press Monday afternoon there wasn’t any money left over. “They are strictly on their own. We’ve given them permission, and we’re stepping away,� Breazeale said. Dallas Quinn, spokesman for the Pearl River Vision Foundation, which is organiz-

ing and paying for the study for the Levee Board, said even if PRVF doesn’t have access to the Corps funding, it’s won’t be a substantial hurdle. A previous two-lakes plan was scuttled due to costs, concern over eminent domain TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, Oct. 10 Gov. Phil Bryant joins a lawsuit against the Obama administration over its plan to grant some young illegal immigrants work permits rather than deport them. ‌ Schools in the Swat Valley, Pakistan, close to protest the attack of Malala Yousafzai, a teen activist for girls’ education in her country.

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Levee Board President Gary Rhoads wants to know if there is any U.S. Corps of Engineers money left over from a previous “two lake� to help out with drafting a new flood control plan.

and because environmentalists said building the lakes would wreak environmental havoc on the river’s ecosystem, promising years of lawsuits before the project could come to fruition. Robert Jones, a biologist at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, said in 2006 that the target area also contained endangered species, including the ringed sawback turtle, which is indigenous only to the sections of the Pearl River in Jackson and south of the city. The species does not proliferate in the northern tributaries of the river.

Likewise, the Gulf sturgeon, a 200million-year-old subspecies of the Atlantic sturgeon, also live in the area, and are have been listed as “threatened� under the United States Endangered Species Act since 1991. Dallas Quinn, a spokesman for PRVF, said the price tag for the environmental impact assessment that federal law requires to study one lake and other alternatives would cost around $2 million. PRVF got a boost from the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership in the form of a $200,000 donation toward the group’s efforts, for which Quinn said the group is thankful. The chamber made the one-lake project, which calls for building 1,500-acre lake along the Pearl offering lakefront development opportunities, central to its 10-year strategic economic development plan called “Vision 2022/One Voice.� At the Oct. 8 meeting, Levee Board member Socrates Garrett pressed PRVF officials if the funding was in place to complete the EIS, which could take up to 18 months. In addition to paying for the study itself, the Levee Board also has to cover the Corps’ costs to review PRVF’s work. Quinn added that said PRVF has developed an 18-month schedule that will be posted online for the public to view. Quinn told the Levee Board that going forward one of the group’s largest obstacles will be securing $133 million that Congress authorized but never appropriated to help pay for the lake’s construction. “We’re working expeditiously to resolve that,� Quinn said. Comment at jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

THE JFP DEBATE DRINKING GAME RULES With only one more debate on the books between President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney (Monday, Oct. 22), we’ve perfected our drinking game rules. Cheers! u Drink while doing a bicep curl every time Michelle Obama is mentioned or shown on screen. u Chug if either candidate tells a heartwarming story about someone they met on the campaign trail. u Drink every time a former president is mentioned— twice if it is Reagan, Clinton or Jack Kennedy. u Chug if "Obamacare" or "Romneycare" are mentioned.

u u u

u Drink if they go over time, and continue until they are done or cut off by the moderator. u Drink each time Obama says "middle class." Drink each time Romney says "spending" or "entitlement." Drink every time Romney changes his position. Drink and curse every time Romney says "Mr. President" in a condescending, “What are you doing here?� way.


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FBI ARREST ‘ROGUE OFFICERS’ by Jacob D. Fuller

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by R.L. Nave

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ust as many people crowded into the hallway outside the Hinds County Board of Supervisors chamber as were packed into the meeting room Monday. Among all the workers who showed up to show solidarity against changes to the county employee health plan, there were so many representatives from the Hinds County Public Works Department that one had to wonder if there was anyone out there working on the streets. At the meeting, supervisors voted on a compromise that involved the county picking up a portion of an increase in employee premiums approved at the Oct. 1 board meeting. At that meeting, supervisors voted approved a new plan that lowered deductibles from $5,000 to $1,000

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were drug dealers from another state. Robinson entered the hotel room and took a bag containing about $23,000. On the same day, all four men stole the money and seven iPads that were part of the FBI undercover investigation. The defendants made their initial appearances Oct. 10 before U.S. Magistrate Keith Ball. All four were released on $10,000 bond. Their trial is set for Dec. 3. If convicted, the men face a maximum of 15 years in prison and a $500,000 fine. Assistant United State Attorney Jerry Rushing will be the prosecutor in the case. Donna Ladd contributed to this report.

WARD SCHAEFER

Insurance Smackdown!

“This is not a departmental thing and should not reflect adversely on the Jackson Police Department, the Hinds County Sheriff’s Department or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department. It is essentially rogue officers abusing the public trust,� Dowdy stated in the email. The indictment alleges that the defendants conspired to steal cash from drug dealers traveling to Mississippi from other states between Sept. 6 and Nov. 27, 2011. According to the allegations, on Sept. 30, 2011, Robinson, Daniels and Jackson drove to a hotel in Jackson to steal personal property from individuals they believed

or $500, but raised monthly premiums by about $100. Under the plan District 3 Supervisor Peggy Hobson-Calhoun proposed, the county would cover part of the employees’ premium increases, approximately $44 per month. Employees would pay the remainder, between $34 and $40. Employees, who did not receive a raise when the county approved its budget in September, complained that the increase would District 3 Supervisor Peggy Hobson-Calhoun proposed that the county be too costly after the board voted to lower the cover part of the employees’ premium increases, approximately $44 deductibles during the last meeting. Employee per month.The proposal passed by a vote of 3-2. spokeswoman Sharon Sims, who works for Hinds County Department of Human Capital Development, said some employees dropped their inSims, who spoke on behalf of employees who did wish surance plans because they couldn’t afford to pay more. to speak publicly, said supervisors are forcing parents to Before supervisors took up the health insurance, they choose between working harder hours on the job and spendapproved a $125 per month across-the-board salary in- ing time with their children, which she said could lead to crease, which drew applause. more kids winding up in juvenile-detention centers. “They could keep that,� said one worker, who did not After the meeting, Sims characterized the compromise want to be identified. The employee said that paying high- as bittersweet. “In the end, I think it’ll work out,� she said. er insurance premiums would effectively negate the raise. Comment at jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY JOHN DOWDY

he FBI arrested four men, including cases as a Jackson police officer, including the two former metro police officers and initial Heather Spencer assault case, in which one acting Hinds County Sheriff’s Daniels downgraded George Bell’s charge the deputy, Oct. 2 on charges of conspir- first time he beat her. Bell later killed Spencer. acy to commit an offense against the United “These four subjects were arrested purStates and theft of government property. suant to an indictment returned by a federFBI agents arrested al grand jury in the United former Madison County States District Court for Sheriff’s deputy Watson the Southern District of Lee Jackson, 42, former Mississippi, on October 2, Jackson Police officer Kent 2012,� Daniel McMullen, Daniels, 44, Hinds CounSpecial Agent in Charge of ty Sheriff’s deputy Zack the Federal Bureau of InRobinson, 45, and George vestigation in Mississippi, Hilliard, 43, of Madison stated in a press release. on the charges. Criminal Division Daniels served as one Chief of the U.S. Attorof two bodyguards that ney’s office John Dowdy Hinds County District Attold the Jackson Free Press torney has said that thenin a email that the arrest Criminal Division Chief of Mayor Frank Melton aswas part of an ongoing FBI the U.S. Attorney’s office signed to him soon after investigation that has been John Dowdy expects that the investigation of he became DA—a controin the works for a couple rogue officers will yield versial move the JFP critiof years. He stated that he more arrests. cized at the time. Daniels expects additional arrests also worked on high-profile from the investigation.

9


TALK | state

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October 17 - 23, 2012

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10

Gov. Bryant Leaps Into National Immigration Mess by R.L. Nave

aliens in Mississippi in 2006 was 49,000. This represented a midpoint among various estimates available at the time. Upon information and belief, the State’s current illegal alien population remains that high, if not higher,” the complaint states. However, in a 2011 survey of undocumented immigrants living the United States, the nonpartisan Pew Hispanic Center cited Mississippi as Gov. Phil Bryant joined a lawsuit on the state’s behalf one of 34 states with fewer against the Obama administration’s recent order to than 50 cases of unauthorized halt deportation of young unauthorized immigrants. immigrant households in its sample survey. From 2000 to ov. Phil Bryant signed Mis2010, the number of Hispansissippi onto a federal lawsuit ics jumped by 106 percent, according to against the Department of information from the 2010 U.S. Census. Homeland Security over the Still, just 81,481 Hispanics live in Mispresident’s recent decision to stop de- sissippi, roughly 3 percent of the state’s porting young undocumented immi- population. grants living in the U.S. The Mississippi branch of the AmerMississippi is the first state to sign ican Civil Liberties Union denounced onto the lawsuit filed in August on behalf Bryant’s joining the immigration lawsuit of 10 U.S. Immigration and Customs on the state’s behalf. Enforcement agents, arguing the Obama Nancy Kohsin-Kintigh, the ACLU administration’s policy change could re- of Mississippi’s program director, said sult in receiving disciplinary action for Bryant is “trying to snatch that opportudoing their jobs. nity away from” young people whom the In a press release posted on Bryant’s president’s executive order helps achieve website, he said the federal government the American dream. has ignored the growing problem of ille“If Gov. Bryant is truly concerned gal immigration. about the economic impact of undocu“I believe this action by the Obama mented immigrants, why would he deny administration is unconstitutional and these young people the opportunity to circumvents Congress’s authority. The get work permits and become taxpayers?” fact remains that illegal immigration is Kohsin-Kintigh said. a real issue with real consequences, and The Bryant administration argues ignoring the rule of law is irresponsible. that joining the lawsuit will not cost MisAs governor, I cannot turn a blind eye to sissippi taxpayers as attorneys Michael the problem of illegal immigration and its Jung and Kris Kobach are representing costs to Mississippi,” Bryant said. the state at no cost. Bryant said he joined on the state’s Kobach, who is also representbehalf “based on the significant fiscal ing the ICE agents in their suit against costs that illegal immigration imposes the U.S. Department of Homeland on the state.” In 2006, then-State Audi- Security, ran unsuccessfully for a seat tor Bryant commissioned a report that in Congress in 2004. In 2010, Kansas concluded undocumented immigrants elected Kobach to serve as the state’s top cost state taxpayers $25 million based elections officer. on “significant education, law enforceBryant’s office describes Kobach as ment and health care costs, as well as an “immigration law expert,” but more substantial lost tax revenues and other notably he is Kansas’ Secretary of State economic losses.” and helped draft Arizona’s controversial According to Bryant’s complaint, filed immigration law, SB 1070. in U.S. District Court in Texas, his auditor’s In the past two legislative sessions, Misreport took undocumented immigrants’ tax sissippi has attempted to pass a immigration contributions into consideration. enforcement law modeled on SB 1070. “The OSA Report was based on Comment at jfp.ms. Write R.L. Nave an estimate that the number of illegal at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

AMILE WILSON

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Immigration, Illustrated REGIONS OF BIRTH FOR FOREIGN-BORN POPULATION

WTF is ‘Self-Deportation?’

COUNTRIES OF BIRTH FOR THE FOREIGNBORN POPULATION

(MISSISSIPPI)

(JACKSON)

INDIA - 125 JAPAN - 83 ENGLAND - 62 ITALY - 47 GREECE - 46 CHINA - 33

Latin America 51.9%

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11


TALK | business

A New, Extended Vision for Jackson by Jacob D. Fuller

Saturday,
Nov.
3
at
8am Mayes
Lake,
Jackson
MS $20
Early
Bird $10
Dog
Walk $30
day
of
registration Register
at

www.gallanthearts.org
or www.mstrackclub.com Proceeds
Benefit

October 17 - 23, 2012

Gallant
Hearts
Guide
Dog
Center

12

FILE PHOTO

Walk
With
Your
Dog!!

T

he Greater Jackson Chamber Part- ter “quality of place” for residents. nership, along with the mayors of The plan has taken several different Jackson and Flowood, have an ex- forms, including a recently abandoned and pansive, long-term plan for the metro. The group unveiled Vision 2022/One Voice, a 10-year plan for the greaterJackson area, at the Jackson Convention Complex Oct. 9 in front of an audience of more than 200. The 97-page plan has hundreds of goals in the fields of education, health care, economic development, infrastructure, public transportation, arts and culture, and the aerospace industry. “(The plan) really came Duane O’Neill, president of the Greater Jackson about by us going outside of Chamber Partnership, said he and other leaders our community and taking traveled to several revitalized cities to get ideas for their 10-year plan. a look at a number of other communities that have transformed themselves into a thriving economic controversial plan for two lakes that had decenter,” GJCP president Duane O’Neill said layed a flood-control strategy for many years. at the presentation. “Never, in the 30-plus years of this isGJCP went to cities like Richmond, sue, have all of the key players come together Va., Oklahoma City, Okla., and Nashville to support a common plan, until today,” and Chattanooga, Tenn., to research how Flynn said. those cities managed successful revitaliza“For the first time, the Levee Board, the tion. O’Neill said one thread that connected (U.S. Army) Corps of Engineers, the Pearl all of those cities was they all had a 10-year River Vision Foundation and the leaders of plan. In the past, Jackson has only had five- both sides of the (Pearl) River support a comyear plans. O’Neill said he learned from his mon plan. That has never happened before, travels that the city has bigger issues that folks. It is time for us to get behind that plan leaders cannot tackle in such a short period and make it a reality, because when we do, of time. Therefore, a 10-year plan is vital to we will totally transform this community.” the metro’s growth. While Vision 2022 is a regional plan Mayo Flynn, chairman of GJCP, said for the Jackson metro, GJCP worked with water was the one common theme among the Mississippi Economic Council to assure the revitalized cities they visited. To get Jack- that the plan fit with Blueprint Mississippi, a son in line with that theme, GJCP wants to long-term plan for the entire state. divert the Pearl River to create a 1,500-acre The aggressive plan requires a lot of lake near downtown Jackson, which they work, and GJCP is signing up volunteers believe will help the area with flood control, for each of the 10 categories: health care, economic development and in creating bet- regional infrastructure, aerospace, lake de-

velopment, regional marketing, core city, regional bike and pedestrian trails system, talent attraction and retention, arts and culture and education. “Many times, people are going to be a little hesitant about it, because they are going to say, ‘Are you sure we can do that?’” O’Neill said. “There are too many times that we don’t give ourselves the credit that we should take in this community.” When central Mississippians stop and think about all the positive things that others have done in the area, it brings a stronger optimism about what can be done here in the future, O’Neill said. One of the biggest goals of Vision 2022/One Voice is a vast expansion of the area’s health-care industry. A health-care corridor that could extend from the JacksonMedgar Wiley Evers International Airport to the Hawkins Field Airport in Jackson is in the latter planning stages. More than 100 stakeholders are currently working on the plan they hope will make Jackson a national leader in the health care industry. GJCP seem to be in the earlier stages of planning the other aspects of Vision 2022/ One Voice. In the aerospace portion of the plan, leaders hope to draw major players in the industry to Jackson, including manufacturing and training. As for regional infrastructure, GJCP plans to make the entire metro more pedestrian and bike friendly, while expanding public transportation throughout the metro. A downtown trolley system is also in the plans for Jackson. The development of Jackson is key to the development of the entire area, Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said at the presentation. “The greater Jackson area must acknowledge that trends that are taking place in the core city significantly affect the competitive position of the broader Jackson region,” Johnson said. Comment at jfp.ms. Email Jacob Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.


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Contact IDS NSP for eligibility guidelines.

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jacksonfreepress.com

(ELP7ANTED

13


A Smile, A Smirk

W

eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got less than a month until the election. As usual, during campaign season you can look along the trail and see the collateral damage that political spin has left. There are the carcasses of operatives whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been thrown under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bus,â&#x20AC;? the charred remains of discarded talking points and the parade of pundits analyzing to death a smile, a twitch, a smirk. But an unfortunate by-product of politics is the number of friendships and relationships that I see ended during elections. In social media, I see lots of folks who say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve either unfollowed, unfriended, blocked or deleted someone because of their political beliefs. Some will say they can easily end friendships over politics. They believe that political views give insight into personal traits or beliefs. These beliefs, some would say, may not be acceptable. Understandable. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the first to agree that politics is serious business ... but is it that serious? We are a country made up of different people. Different races. Different views. The nation is filled with folks who may align themselves with different parties voting for different candidates. What we also know is that friendships are special things between two people who have decided to unconditionally deal with the imperfections of the other. Granted, this is America, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re free to be friends, in person or on social media, with whomever you wish. You may like the echo chamber. But methinks it gets quite boring surrounding yourself with folks who will parrot what you believe. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not saying to allow overtly mean, racist, or sexist drivel. But simply be more open to people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think like you. In fact, be more open to folks whose views are very different than yours. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes for healthy, albeit passionate, debate. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d suggest this election season to respect everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s viewpoints ... whether you agree with them or not. They have a right to their position. And in the end if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to end a friendship over politics, dare I say that you guys probably werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;reallyâ&#x20AC;? friends to begin with. Acquaintances, Facebook buddies perhaps, but real friends? Nope. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the truth...sho-nuff.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;lifeâ&#x20AC;? October 17 - 23, 2012

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14

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No Good Can Come of Immigration Suit

W

henever election season draws near, the shenanigans in which politicians will engage to score cheap points are seemingly boundless. Recently, Gov. Mitt Romney said 27 untruths in 38 minutes of talking time in a debate with President Barack Obama and all but promised to put PBSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lovable fluffy puppets on the chopping block should he occupy the White House. Whatever you think of Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tactic, the move worked, and Romney inched up in the polls, even moving past the president in some polls. Obama isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly guiltless. If you think that the proximity to the presidential election and the need to energize the progressive base didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t figure into the calculus of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embrace of same-sex marriage or the decision to stop deporting some unauthorized young people, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got some beachfront property on Sesame Street weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to sell you. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personhood and voter ID amendments, though constitutionally questionable (the courts are still grappling with both), coincided with statewide elections and probably helped turn out social conservative voters. It also likely contributed to Republicans taking back control of the Mississippi from Democrats who ruled the House for more than 100 years. But in Mississippi, where Gov. Romney leads Obama by 18 percentage points and statewide officers arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t due up for re-election for another three years, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having a hard time wrapping our noggins around why Gov. Phil Bryant is wading into a

politically charged lawsuit over immigration. Last week, the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office announced that Mississippi would become the first state to join a federal lawsuit filed by U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents against the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. In June, Obama issued an executive order halting deportations of immigrants who immigrated to the U.S. before age 16 but who are younger than 30, have committed no major crimes, have been in the U.S. for five years, posses a high school diploma or served in the military. Bryant justified the move by saying he could not â&#x20AC;&#x153;turn a blind eye to the problem of illegal immigration and its costs to Mississippiâ&#x20AC;? and assuring taxpayers that Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state who helped draft Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immigration enforcement law, would represent the state at no cost. In the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warped logic, getting rid of immigrants will free up jobs and save taxpayers $25 million per year. We question the veracity of Bryantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s math. When the well-respected nonpartisan Pew Hispanic Center tried to count Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unauthorized immigrants, it found very few. Legally speaking, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to see how Mississippi has any standing in a fight between bureaucrats and their bosses and even harder to how dragging the citizens of Mississippi will improve any of the myriad challenges we face as a state. Gov. Bryant should focus on the job in front of him in Mississippi; we have many tough problems, but illegal immigration isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one of them.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


MELISHIA GRAYSON For My Grandmothers EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Intern Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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remember my grandmother’s first question on my 18th birthday, before she even wished me a happy birthday: “Are you going to register today?” “Yes, Ma’am!” I answered. Since I was a kindergarten student at Galloway Elementary School, I can recall watching my grandmother and greatgrandmother passionately participating in the voting process. Upon arriving to school on Election Day, we would file into the auditorium after breakfast to find the machines situated on the stage. People from my community would be streaming in and out, as teachers and principals ensured complete and utter silence until the beginning of the school day. I did not understand or enjoy the process initially. After all, I had things to talk to my classmates about. I would sit there, hoping to see my grandmothers before being ushered off to class. As I got older (fourth or fifth grade), I became very familiar with the process. As a matter of fact, I knew that they were going to come between 7 and 8 a.m. I looked forward to it because my greatgrandmother would slip me a quarter (which I spent on pickles or chips at lunch). I can remember them being dressed for success, and I often imagined that there were actually people behind those curtains. I later found out that there were not any people, but polls instead. All of this was taboo and mysterious, and it sparked a curiosity inside of me that would ensure that I never stay away from the polls. As the presidential election draws near, many people wonder what is going to happen with the “young vote” such as mine. Many are wondering if young people will once again be the deciding factor of who will become the next president of the United States. Others believe that young people were only following an impulsive fad during the 2008 election, when voting became the cool thing to do. As a young voter, I have found that people in my age group have varying ideas about the voting process. Some have a nonchalant attitude and believe that politics will not benefit them in everyday life. Others vote for the political party that their parents have traditionally supported. And some vote based on issues that are important to them. I vote because of my grandmothers and what they taught me. As a proud voter, I look forward to

election time. I never complain about waiting in a line. I have yet to miss one election, for any reason. And I most certainly have taken someone, anyone, along for the event. Because of the way my grandmothers were diligently a part of the democratic process, I consider voting an event. It is a time to reflect, celebrate and give thanks for the people who came before us. It is a celebration for me, because I understand that there were people who could not vote, would not vote and who died to vote. All of these things motivate me to engage myself in a process that was denied to so many men and women, black and white, for far too long. I know that some people are on the fence about this election. Many are confused about the candidates, their accomplishments and what is in store for our country. But no matter your political affiliation, please know that this process is necessary to maintain balance and order in this country. Even if you are not a “political” person, be a person familiar with the “process.” Visit jfp.ms/voterid to stay abreast on the voter ID debacle in the state of Mississippi. Know your rights, protect your rights and remember that we must vote to maintain our rights. My great-grandmother’s last presidential election was in 2004 (before she succumbed to cancer the next year). George W. Bush versus John Kerry was one of the most controversial elections of our time. She was 86 years old and was fighting cancer, but went to vote. I cannot recall a time that she complained about going to vote. It was just something she had to do. She did not even look into mailing in an absentee ballot, or any of the convenient options we are afforded. She simply went to the polls, exercised her right and returned home. My point is this: There are people right here in Mississippi who still believe that women and minorities are not capable of being a part of the democratic process when it comes to issues of health and voting. Why give them ammunition to fire the argument of oppression? Exercise your right to vote like you exercise your right to breathe. After all, if you don’t, you may lose both. I make an event of it; maybe you won’t. But remember that people died so that we, no matter our race, could continue to be a part of the process that keeps this country free. See you at the polls, people!

Exercise your right to vote like you exercise your right to breathe.

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October 17 - 23, 2012


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the Washington Addition. Talented, energetic and cun- in, steal from you, kill you. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care about me, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ning, the boys possess the necessary qualities to rise above care about you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unspoken war,â&#x20AC;? Robrelle said. their circumstances. With the neighborhood kids in mind, Operation Up- Mess around with that hood ward began six years ago with Wes Murrayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Robrelle, Edward Evans Jr. was a casualty of that war. Slender and spreading a tarp on the ground at Battlefield Park to play medium-height, everything about him evoked the word boygames with the children from the neighborhood where she ish. Until last year, Evans participated in Operation Upward and Wesley have spent most of their lives. on and off for two or three years. Responding to the needs of the 500 to 600 children, The Murrays describe him as respectful and quiet when many of whom come from the neighborhood and partici- he attended the center. Evansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; father, Edward Evans Sr., depate in the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services, Operation Upward has ex- scribed his son a different way. panded manifold in physical size and scope of services even as â&#x20AC;&#x153;He would run his mouth all the timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about what the neighborhood surrounding it struggles to he would buy, money, being a rapper. It stave off the symptoms of urban decay. was all about getting money so he could The Washington Addition is bounded get some girls,â&#x20AC;? said his father, who has by John R. Lynch Street to the north, Terry eight daughters. Road to the east, U.S. Highway 80 to the Evans tried his hand at rapping and south, and Valley Street on the west. In adput out a demo CD using the moniker Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l dition to growing up on Topp Avenue, MurEdward, which was also how people identirayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;known simply as Mr. Wes inside the fy him in the Washington Addition, where centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;asked to be assigned the Washinghis father and paternal grandmother live. A ton Addition as a Jackson police beat officer Clarion-Ledger article about Evans said the and, later, a Hinds County sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deputy. boy wanted to be a hockey player. The Murrays are both graduates of Jim Evans Sr. doubts his son ever had an Hill High School and Jackson State Univerinterest in hockey, but admits the young sity, whose main campus is located inside the man liked to fight and was starting to get Washington Addition. They have had frontinto trouble more often. By the time Evans row seats to the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downward spiral and Jr. was 15, his father said, the boy been to the children who are, often literally, caught Henley-Young Youth Correctional Facility Edward Evans Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life in in the crossfire. and Brentwood Behavioral Healthcare, a the Washington Addition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got all this anger, bitterness built was tragically short. 17 PRUH/,)(VHHSDJH up on the inside of them: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to break jacksonfreepress.com

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n command, two black boys marched into Wesley Murrayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office and slouched against the wood paneled wall. Murray, who played football for Jackson State and spent two decades in law enforcement, began to interrogate the teenage offenders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your name?â&#x20AC;? Murray asked the smaller, peanut-butter-complexioned boy draped in a plain bright white T-shirt and blue basketball shorts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;James,â&#x20AC;? the boy replied, keeping his large almondshaped eyes fixed forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How old are you?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;13.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why are you here?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suspended.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your mama? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Work.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your dad? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jail.â&#x20AC;? Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; older brother, Travis, was also suspendedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;accused,â&#x20AC;? he stresses, of hitting a female schoolmate in the face. Wavy-haired, a half-foot taller, and twice his brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girth, Travisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sly smile suggested he was comparatively unfazed by the levity of the situation. Each has been suspended from school before this year. Fearing that leaving them home alone or with relatives would lead to more mischief making, the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mother arranged for her sons to spend the day at Operation Upward, a community center and youth church located in the Washington Addition neighborhood of west Jackson. James and Travis, whose names were changed for this story, epitomize both the challenges and potential of


Life in Washington Addition

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psychiatric hospital in Jackson. an untapped market for drugs and used longstanding fam- ing through the neighborhood on a given day, the WashIn fact, the last time Evans Sr. saw his son was in ily ties in the South to establish a pipeline of drugs, guns, ington Addition seems to be occupied by grandparents and the back of a police car after a witness implicated Evans money and young gang bangers. grandchildren. Jr. in a house burglary. He was eventually released and Wes Murray recalls the neighborhood in the mid ’80s Early one weekday morning, a group of six or seven never charged. being inundated with young Chicagoans whose families young men, ages ranging from late teens to mid-20s, are “My son wasn’t street, but you mess around with that sent them to live with relatives in Jackson, believing the hanging out on a street corner. Only one of the young men, hood, you’ll become street,” Edward Evans said. children would be safer down in “the country.” a tall spindly 20-year-old, admits to having legal employIn late August, police found the younger Evans’ body Crack and its byproducts—prostitution, violence and ment as a cook at a chain fast-food restaurant. behind a vacant home at 1604 Barrett Ave., just a few hous- hopelessness—surged into the Washington Addition like a However, with only five work hours scheduled for the es away from his grandmother’s home, week and the high cost of gasoline, he admits that he may after neighbors reported the smell of a have to give up the job if his managers don’t schedule him decaying animal. Evans had been shot in for more hours soon. the face. Another young man wearing a black and red Chicago Cedric Ratliff, who lives next door Bulls cap is seated in a folding chair with his legs pressed to to the house where Evans’ body was dishis chest. He said he wants to work. covered, turned himself in to Jackson po“I need a mentor,” he offers as the justification for why lice for the shooting in early August, but he’s not in school or working. soon bonded out. On a different day, a skinny woman in a black T-shirt, At a meeting arranged through an flags down a car driven by a family friend and asks for a intermediary, Evans Sr. said he talked to few dollars so she can go to the store, referring to one of the Ratliff, who believed someone was tryabundant neighborhood drug spots. ing break into his home that night. Evans Royce Smith, whose family has deep roots in the Sr. said Ratliff didn’t know his shot hit Washington Addition and who lived there for a brief time anyone and that Ratliff was like an older as a youngster, recalls an incident when he realized the brother to Edward and other kids in the neighborhood was different from the place where Medgar neighborhood. Evers and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who had “If Edward knew who killed him, been a guest in the home of Smith’s grandfather, R.L.T. The Lewis Dairy Bar & Restaurant at Valley Street and Hill Avenue he wouldn’t even be mad,” said Evans Smith, spent time as civil rights organizers. has been the site of numerous presumably drug-related homicides and Sr., who described his son, as helpless and Smith remembers driving with his uncle, R.L.T. shootings through the years—including involving a number of young tormented. Smith Jr., and encountering a young man who appeared men connected to former Mayor Frank Melton. “Edward needed isolation,” his fato be around 18 standing in the middle street firing a 9mm ther said. “He’s more peaceful up there.” pistol haphazardly into the air. Smith froze at the sight, and crippling wave, Wes Murray recalled: “What we saw was asked his uncle if should turn the car around. No Peace nothing but destruction—death, prison and the grave.” “We don’t run,” the elder Smith told his nephew. The odds facing the Washington Addition are stagSmith, who owns some land and a few buildings in the gering. U.S. Census figures indicate that the community is ‘We don’t run’ Washington Addition, and previously ran a store at Valley located in one of the city’s poorest ZIP codes with 37 perValley Street runs rough and narrow through the and Florence, recounts with disappointment how businesscent of residents earning incomes below the poverty level Washington Addition. Along either side of the street are a es, most of which were black owned, started to disappear in compared to 21.8 percent statewide. Nationally, 15 percent handful of mom-and-pop eateries, a couple of small conve- the 1970s and more rapidly around the time of the crackof people lived in poverty in 2010. nience stores and old frame houses, where entire families sit cocaine onslaught. The average gross income of $21,771 per year is ap- out on their porches, waving at passing cars even the ones Today, the businesses that remain are a hodgepodge proximately $11,000 per year lower than Mississippi’s last- whose passengers are unfamiliar. of widely respected local institutions such as Stamps Superin-the-nation average. And nearly twice as many WashingThe Jackson State-owned Palisades Apartment com- burger and Valley Street Fish House, after-hours lounges ton Addition residents rent their dwellings, compared to plex, which is surrounded by a high black iron fence, takes and other businesses that seem to be magnets for crime. For the 30 percent of Mississippians who rent statewide. up one whole block at the north end of Valley Street. Driv- example, the notorious Lewis Dairy Bar & Restaurant at Crime, the most visible by-product of poverty, is also palpable. Across the city, violent crimes—assaults, armed robberies, car-jackings, rapes and homicides—in Jackson have risen 9.7 percent up to 1,364 instances from 1,243 in 2011, according to police records. Citywide, homicides alone have jumped 54.3 percent so far this year, rising to 54 year-to-date in 2012 from 35 in the same time period last year. West Jackson’s Precinct 2, which includes the Washington Addition, has suffered seven more homicides than last year, up to 21 from 14. Residents of the Washington Addition mark the start of its freefall to shortly after the conclusion of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. With little tangible left to rally around after the passing of several landmark pieces of civilrights legislation, activists fell into a lull. As the iconography of the movement dissipated, so did America’s fascination with Mississippi, its heroes and villains. In the Washington Addition, as was the case in many American cities, the emptiness was satiated with a potent new street drug called crack, which flooded American cities from as far away as Central America. Chicago street gangs, some of which trace their roots to the Black Power Movement of the ’60s, saw Jackson as After getting in trouble for horseplay at Operation Upward’s Monday church service, a young man sulks on the back row.

October 17 - 23, 2012

R.L. NAVE

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Life in Washington Addition

A native of the Washington Addition with 20 years of law enforcement experience in the neighborhood,Wes Murray says young people mimicking the destructive behavior of older relatives is a generational curse.

break down youth disconnection by neighborhoods within cities. The disparities between wealthy and poor communities are striking.â&#x20AC;? Preventing what Wes Murray called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;generational curseâ&#x20AC;? of poverty and crime that afflicts the Washington Addition is one reason the Murrays started opening their center to kids suspended from school. James and Travis, for

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When the buses, all purchased at auction, returned to the center, the children received dinner before Salvation Station, a youth-led church service. Robrelle Murray said the meal program resulted from children coming to the center complaining about not having eaten since school lunch. In addition, the center provides two care packages per week that consist of dry cereal, juice boxes, canned fruit, soup or whatever rations they have on hand. In September, the center started a small vegetable garden by planting mustard and collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower and kale. The meals also settle children and help them focus during church service. At a recent service, Willie Goss, one of approximately a dozen adult volunteers at Monday night church, caught one boy in a gray hooded sweatshirt returning a lick upside the head of a friend who administered the first blow, and banished the young man to the back row. With each offense, rule violators were moved further into the back of the cavernous room with pale yellow walls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Next move, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out the door,â&#x20AC;? Wes Murray joked. Operation Upward exists as a stopgap against tendency to move black youth, especially males, out the door, so to speak. A September report from Social Science Research Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Measure of America project, identified black youth having the highest rate of disconnectedness; that is, most likely to be neither in school or working. The study concluded that young men are more likely than their female counterparts to be disconnected. In addition, the rate of youth disconnection usually mirrors adult disconnection. States the report â&#x20AC;&#x153;Household poverty rates and the employment and educational status of adults in a community are strongly associated with youth disconnection. Where a young person lives is highly predictive of his or her likelihood of disconnection. The findings TRIP BURNS

explanation of how the Southern Strategy was developed. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;You start out in 1954 by saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N*gger, n*gger, n*gger.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; By 1968 you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n*ggerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; -- that hurts you. Backfires,â&#x20AC;? Atwater said in a 1981 interview with a Case Western Reserve political science professor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So you say stuff like forced busing, statesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights and all that stuff. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting so abstract now (that) youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about are totally Robrelle Murray, who grew up in the Washington Addition, started Operation Upward economic things and a for kids in the neighborhood.The program has expanded by purchasing a building, implementing a food program and, recently, planting a garden. byproduct of them is (that) blacks get hurt worse than whites.â&#x20AC;? With President Valley Street and Hill Avenue has been the site of numerous Ronald Reagan leading the charge in his drug war, Conpresumably drug-related homicides and shootings through gress passed laws in the mid â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s that imposed penalties for the yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;involving a number of young men connected to possessing and trafficking crack, a drug more prevalent in former Mayor Frank Melton. black neighborhoods, that were 100 times more severe than Frustrated, Smith wonders aloud why a community powder cocaine, more preferred by whites. that was once so eager to take on Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s white suIn 2001, the chances of going to prison were highpremacist political establishment wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand up to small est among black males, at 32.2 percent and lowest among minority of drug dealers and criminals laying siege to the white males, 5.9 percent for similar offenses. neighborhood today. Before mandatory minimums for crack cocaine ofâ&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more to blame than the white power fenses became effective in the mid 1980s, the average fedstructure,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our grandparents faced harder eral drug offense sentence for African Americans was 11 things. They faced being lynched. ... I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any differ- percent higher than for whites. Following the implemenence between a drug dealer standing on the corner with a tation of harsher drug sentencing laws, the average federal Tec-9 and a Klansman.â&#x20AC;? drug offense sentence was 49 percent higher for blacks. In Mississippi, which imprisons more people than any The Root of the Problem state except neighboring Louisiana, the incarceration rate In the 1940s, Kenneth and Mamie Clark, a husband- for blacks of 1,742 per 100,00 people is more than triple and-wife team of psychologists, began publishing findings the rate for whites of just 503 per 100,000. from their now-famous doll experiments. When presented Speaking at a conference on black male college achievewith two dolls, one black and the other white, researchers ment, Rodney Washington, chairman of the Department found that black children preferred to play with the white of Elementary and Early Childhood Education at Jackson doll. Since, social scientists have recreated the experiment State University, recommended building stronger bridge numerous times usually with the same results. programs to encourage smoother transitions between grade Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Andra Orey, a Jackson native and political science levels, starting in pre-kindergarten and continuing through professor specializing in issues at the nexus of race and poli- the first two years of college, as well as developing mentors tics, points to the doll tests as one of the earliest studies in and active support groups. black self-hatred, which he prefers to think of as internalWashington, a former corrections officer, rejects a ized racism. meme about the lack of role models in the lives of black â&#x20AC;&#x153;Internalized racism and self-hatred are the root of the males. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at the role models in their own problem in the black community,â&#x20AC;? said Orey, who is black. communities,â&#x20AC;? he said. Socialization, particularly with respect to the development â&#x20AC;&#x153;They just may not be positive models.â&#x20AC;? of racial attitudes, begins in school, but Orey argues positive messages about African Americans are noticeably lack- Redeem the Child ing in most school textbooks and on standardized tests. Operation Upwardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four school buses and a miniâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t teach black folks about black folks because van rumbled out of the gates to fan across south and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to be on the test. And if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know west Jackson to gather children for dinner and a weekly who you are, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to believe who someone else says church service. you are,â&#x20AC;? Orey said. Boys and girls piled excitedly onto the buses at Pine In that regard, the success of the Southern Strat- Ridge Gardens, formerly called Rebel Woods Apartments. egy, the Republican Partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appeal to racist white south- In August, a security guard shot and killed a man at the ern Democrats since the 1960s, paralleled the decline of apartment complex. In 2010, the Mississippi State SuAmericaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inner cities and neighborhoods like Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preme Court dismissed a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrongful death suit in the Washington Addition. murder of his childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, arguing that the complexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Orey recites former GOP strategist Lee Atwaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owners failed to provide adequate security.

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Life in Washington Addition, from page 19 RL NAVE

Viva con Sabor (Alive with Flavor) -Mentioned in Boom Jackson Magazine Autumn 2010 Edition-

WEDNESDAY 10/17

Zach Lovett (Acoustic)

Tamales

THURSDAY 10/18

Spirits Of The House (Traditional Irish)

FRIDAY 10/19

Willie Mae Shirley has lived in the same house since her birth in 1927. She admits that the Washington Addition has struggled, but she loves the neighborhood nonetheless.

Bailey Brothers (Blues)

SATURDAY 10/20

Contriwise

Enchiladas & Refried Beans

MONDAY 10/22

• Tortillas Made Fresh To Order • Authentic Not Tex-Mex

(Indie)

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 10/23

Open Mic hosted by Jason Bailey

Try our new wraps while they last.

October 17 - 23, 2012

• Reuben • Summer Veggie •Jerk Chicken and more!

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6610 Old Canton Road Suite J Ridgeland, Ms|Behind Dominoe’s Pizza Wed. - Mon.10am - 9:30pm|Closed Tue. Call for ToGo Order|601-899-8821

example, are promptly put to work moving tires on an unusually warm fall day. Robrelle, who runs the center’s day-today operations, said many of the children who come to the center who grow up in challenging environments need nurturing. “When I committed my life to Christ, the thing that resonated with me was ‘Redeem the Child,’” she said. “They hunger and thirst for love and attention. When they come here, they get love, attention and Jesus.” Forever Home Willie Mae Shirley has lived in the same house since her birth in 1927. Sitting on her front porch in a brightly colored striped shirt, a bracelet around her wrist referred to Scripture, John 14:12-14, Shirley recounted the neighborhood’s rich history. In those days, she said, her father and the other men worked at Sheppard Brickyard, where a park now sits. The women were housewives, but sometimes took in laundry and ironing from white families. The family raised cows, chickens, pigs and planted vegetables on their tiny plot of land, at what is now the Washington Avenue and Shirley Avenue. Anchoring the tiny community was the Delta Cotton Oil Mill. Its president, W.B. Gowdy provided the town its name. Gowdy attracted black professionals from across the state. Richard Wright, the Roxie, Miss.-born author of “Black Boy” and “Native Son,” spent time in Gowdy as an adolescent, experiences that later colored his literary works. The Gowdy Post Office, located in the cottonseed oil building, hired the state’s first black postmistress, Julia Humbles. “Everybody was brother and sister. They loved. There was no such thing as killing somebody,” Shirley said. Today, she doesn’t know who lives two houses down. Peter Stoner came to Jackson in 1961 as a student at the University of Chicago to participate in the Freedom Rides, and settled in Washington Addition.

“You didn’t see the crime. People didn’t buy burglar bars for their houses. The law helped keep the crime down even though they were all white officers,” said Stoner, leaning against his old blue tow truck, a broken hammer and set of pliers at his feet. Echoing others’ stories, Stoner said as soon as the Civil Rights Movement drew to a close, “the people uptown and the police ignored this neighborhood.” For a brief time, during a city election Stoner can’t recall, the Jackson Police Department set up a satellite precinct office in a trailer on Valley. Stoner describes the Washington Addition as a hardscrabble neighborhood where families of modest means could afford to buy homes, but had to work long hours to afford the mortgages. Unsupervised and with few entertainment options, neighborhood kids joined or formed gangs and started breaking in peoples’ homes. Born in the rural Pennsylvania town of Berlin, the septuagenarian sees American history repeating itself in the Washington Addition. Stoner, who earned a PhD in chemistry from the University of Southern Mississippi, said the illegal drug trade now mirrors the whiskey bootlegging business, which whites controlled and remained prevalent in Mississippi through the 1950s. In his memoir, “Writing the Wrong,” Stoner points out how white settlers took land from indigenous people in his native Pennsylvania and across America. “They’re doing the same things,” Stoner said. “If they can just take something without paying for it, they do.” Despite having the means and opportunity to leave at any time, neither Stoner nor Shirley have ever considered moving out of the Washington Addition. Years ago, Shirley’s brother invited her to live with him in California and pay all her expenses. She declined. “I love it,” she said defiantly when asked why she remained in the Washington Addition. “This is forever home to me.”


p py a H

25th Ann iver sary Free Tea For The Entire Month Of October

Family Fun Night! Every Saturday • 6:00pm - 8:30pm

jacksonfreepress.com

1149 Old Fannin Road • Brandon, MS 39047 • 601-992-6686 • Open 7 Days A Week 5647 Highway 80 East • Pearl, MS 39208 • 601-932-8728 • Open 7 Days A Week

21


Watch. Drink. Eat. Come watch your favorite teams play and enjoy 99¢ beer & $6 dollar oysters

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm • Mon - Fri Other Special Offers: Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland • 601-956-5040 Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 • Sat & Sun 11 - 10

presents

Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:00 pm -10:00 pm Colonial Mart Shopping Center 5046 Parkway Drive

October 17 - 23, 2012

off Old Canton Road (in the parking lot)

22

For more information call 601-957-1975 Don’t forget to wear your costume!


FILM p 24 | 8 DAYS p 26 | MUSIC p 31 | SPORTS p 33

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

Name: Steve Kistulentz Age: 45 Job: Poet and professor at Millsaps College

who takes pictures of the industrial decay of Detroit. And so there will be pictures of the interior boardroom at the old Packard automobile office building, which is this sort of beautiful deco, walnut-veneered, paneled boardroom that’s now overgrown with moths and leaves and vines. Those pictures to me became a big part of the unconscious layer of this book. I think the other thing I was thinking about was, we talk so rarely as a culture about ideas of atonement and regret. I think the end of that middle-class lifestyle comes with a concordant side order of regret.

When did you begin writing poetry?

I think the first poem I can recall writing and keeping happened in graduate school. I was doing a masters in fiction writing at John Hopkins and I took a class with a wonderful poet named Natasha Sajé. We read a number of essays by poets about their process and how they saw the world. I found I had an affinity for the some of their worldviews. I started writing these things almost as marginalia in notebooks and didn’t dare show them to anybody for quite a while. One of the poems I wrote as part of that process, a very different version of it is in my new book. What is your process as a writer?

Tell me about your most recent book of poems.

It’s not until you’ve written a large stack of poems that you see some sort of connective tissue between what you’ve been thinking about and how it manifests itself on paper. For me, this book was about the intersection of a couple ideas. The first was that there is an entire way of life within the American middle class that has disappeared, and I don’t mean that in the political sense, but I mean literally that the collectively bargained, union job, 40-hour a week, middle-class auto worker in Detroit … that life is gone. Then, I was traveling two summers ago and saw an exhibition of photographs by a guy named Andrew Moore

When I was a kid, there was a poster store close to my house that had a lithograph that was basically an altered photograph of the Washington, D.C., cityscape as you look across the 14th Street bridge. And it looked like any other tourist postcard with the exception that there was a mushroom cloud rising up over the center of downtown. Probably about the same time, I took the subway to see my father in his office for lunch, and I noticed on the map of the Washington Metro system that there was a series of red concentric circles, and they weren’t labeled. I asked my father, who worked for the Department of Defense, what they were, and he said they were civildefense markers—they were the number of miles away from a theoretical ground zero in the event of a nuclear attack. … When I took that sense of anxiety and that sense of powerful dread that I grew up with and grafted it onto this idea of the Rust Belt decay, I came up with a very strange and dreamlike landscape. So instead of visions they were dreams, and they weren’t quite nightmares. So the phrase, “little black daydream,” comes from a line in one of the poems. I think of that phrase itself as sort of admitting to ourselves what we really think about. What kind of poets and writers inspire you?

Most often, the writers that appeal to me are writers who have a wholly realized worldview and aren’t afraid of expressing large opinions. As a culture, we’re so afraid of opinions, and we try to work to-

JAMES PATTERSON

I think people ask about process far more than writers think about process. ... One of the things that I think is dangerous about talking about process is that it gives the impression to people that there is an easier, softer way that shortcircuits preparation and hard work. We have a lot of mythology that surrounds the idea of inspiration, whether it be divine or whether it comes from some other place, but as Picasso said, “Inspiration exists, but it must find us working.” And so I try to think much more in terms of that I’m always doing something to prepare to work, whether it’s reading other poets, or I read a lot of narrative nonfiction about music, creativity, the arts. But mainly my process is one of preparation. My new book was written in about a six-month flurry, but I had been reading and thinking about the ideas that are in that book for probably four or five years. So you could argue that my process is either very short or very extended.

Why the title, “Little Black Daydream”?

wards building these sort of false concensuses, and I find that somewhat disingenuous. … I like poets who do more than look out the window and report what they see. I find most 20th-century lyric poetry excruciatingly boring. I’m much more invested in people who have a way of taking their personal experience and grafting it onto larger things. Those are the writers I teach, those are the writers I read, those are the writers I bring to Millsaps and part of the visiting writers series. In poetry, the worst thing a poet can do to me, as a reader, is not invite me in to the project, not invite me to be his or her co-conspirator. In strange ways, these ideas show up in my own work. ... I like writers who take huge risks, even if they are unsuccessful. I’d much rather read a book that has ambition than one that plays it safe.

Steve Kistulentz will sign and read from his latest book of poems, “Little Black Daydream,” at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202, 601-366-7619) Oct. 23 at 5 p.m.

jacksonfreepress.com

Dark ‘Daydream’

23


DIVERSIONS | film

Eclectic Espionage COURTESY WARNER BROS.

by Anita Modak-Truran

October 17 - 23, 2012

B

24

en Affleck’s “Argo” is a deeply satisfying picture with an emotional current that sizzles your senses into shock and awe. For some, it may be “aw shucks, did that really happen?” Admittedly, the Canadian government probably did have a bigger role in the return of the six U.S. diplomats from Tehran than this American-centric film lets on. But this is a movie, not a history lesson. As a piece of entertainment loosely based on fact, Affleck deftly weaves ’70s culture, an international incident, an espionage thriller, character introspection and Hollywood mystique into an eclectic cinematic masterpiece. On Nov. 4, 1979, an angry mob of young Islamic revolutionaries stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, taking more than 60 Americans hostages. Six diplomats evaded capture and hid at the home of the Canadian ambassador. What the public did not know until the information was declassified in 1997 was that CIA agent Tony Mendez (Affleck) rescued the six Americans under cover of a fake movie production. It was the best bad idea in a bunch of bad ideas and only a hair better then getting the escapees bikes to ride 300 miles through treacherous mountains to get to the border. This fake movie cover required the escapees to go through three levels of security at the airport, where a blown cover meant torture and most likely a public execution. Hollywood makeup artist John Chambers (John Goodman), who created Spock’s pointy ears and won an Oscar for the makeup in “Planet of the Apes,” helps Mendez in creating a faux film project. Chambers brings in movie producer Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin). Arkin and Goodman play off of each other like ping-pong pros. Arkin is older, crustier and gets the final slams. His character tells Chambers: “If I’m going to make a fake movie, I’m going to make a fake hit.” Chambers and Siegel advise Mendez that they need a script to legitimize the cover story. Mendez finds the script buried in a large heap of dead scripts. It’s called “Argo,” a “Star Wars” rip off requiring sandy ter-

Ben Affleck (center) directed and stars in “Argo,” which weaves together espionage, Hollywood mystique and ’70s flair.

rains and action heroes and space creatures with Middle Eastern features. Chris Terrio wrote the screenplay for this movie based on an article written by Joshuah Bearman called “How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans from Tehran.” The dialogue is fastpaced, witty and pointed. The story moves briskly, but takes time to breathe and to reflect on Mendez’s torn life and how confinement affects the six escapees. Affleck portrays Mendez with somber intelligence. He’s an honest, hard working guy. He’s scared, but man enough to admit it. I found Affleck’s bushy beard a character in and of itself. It appears he took notes from producer George Clooney, who had a similarly shaggy visage in “Syriana.” Canadian Ambassador Ken Taylor (Victor Garber) tells Mendez that he was expecting someone a bit more “G-man.” (I was thinking someone more Hispanic.) Affleck’s directorial accomplishment in “Argo” is somewhat reminiscent of what Orson Welles did in “Citizen Kane.” Welles told the back story of the rise of Charles Foster Kane through news reels, newspaper headline and montages. Likewise, in “Argo,” Affleck effectively sets up the prologue through news reels. A narrator recounts the development of Iran from the Persian Empire, the U.S. role in the 1953 Iranian coup that led to our buddy, the Shah, heading the country, the human-rights abuses that ensued, and the Shiite revolution that led to the rise of Ayatollah Khomeini. The antiAmerican sentiment in Tehran dramatically escalates after the Shah takes refuge in the United States. The CIA analysts miss the revolution in the making, so it comes as a complete surprise when a loud mob infiltrates the embassy. “Argo” is great pop art, kind of like Campbell soup cans on a canvas, but with more gravitas. You feel good when you leave the movie theater, and when’s the last time you went to a non-kiddy film where real people endangered their own life to save others? (“The Avengers” doesn’t count.)


25

jacksonfreepress.com


THURSDAY 10/18

FRIDAY 10/19

WEDNESDAY 10/24

Jesse Robinson performs at Blues by Starlight at Highland Village.

Head to Jacktoberfest for bands, brats and beer in downtown Jackson.

The folk/rock band Frontier Ruckus performs at Hal & Mal’s.

BEST BETS OCT. 17-24, 2012

Pumpkin Adventure is from 9 a.m.-noon at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive); runs through Oct. 26. $6, children under 2 free; call 601-432-4500. … Enjoy music during Live at Lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … The preview of “Present Meets Past: Voices from Mississippi History” during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The play “Henry V” is at 7:30 p.m. at the Belhaven University Center for the Arts; runs through Oct. 20. $10; $5 students and seniors; call 601-965-7026.

THURSDAY 10/18

COURTESY DOTTIE SERIO

The artist reception for Alice Hammell and Obie Clark is at 5 p.m. at Southern Breeze Gallery (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5005, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-607-4147. … Enjoy live music at the High Note Jam is at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … Activist and civil-rights figure James Meredith discusses and signs his book “A Mission From God” at 6 p.m. at The Coffee Roastery (Electric Building, 308 E. Pearl St.). JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd moderates. RSVP. Free, $25 book; call 601-355-3889. … The “I Am a Craftsman: 40 at 40” book reveal party is at 6 p.m. at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). $40,

October 17 - 23, 2012

26

$100; call 601-969-7088, ext. 25. … Micky and the Motorcars play at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $12 advance, $15 at door; call 800-745-3000. … The “Taste of Chicago” Soul-Cial is at 10 p.m. at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.). $10.

FRIDAY 10/19

The Scarecrow Cruise and Car Show is from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Madison Square Center for the Arts (2103 Main St., Madison); continues Oct. 20. Proceeds benefit Hope Hollow Ministries. Free, $20 car registration; call 601853-0291. … Jacktoberfest, a JFPBY LATASHA WILLIS sponsored event, is from 11 a.m.11 p.m. on Congress Street. Free admission; jacktoberfest.com. … JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Boo at the Zoo kicks off at 6 p.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol FAX: 601-510-9019 St.) ; continues Oct. 20. $10, $6.75 DAILY UPDATES AT children 2-12, children under 2 free; JFPEVENTS.COM call 601-352-2580. … “Ragtime: The Musical” is at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) at 7 p.m. at Aven Fine Arts Building; runs through Oct. 21. $10-$15; call 601-925-3440. … Food for the Soul: Spoken Word Edition at 8 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe includes a soul food buffet, music and poetry. $10 before 11 p.m., $15 after. … The “Dubbed for Your Pleasure” Burlesque to Dubstep Show is at 11 p.m. at The Joint. $10-$15.

EVENTS@

SATURDAY 10/20

Kayla Fuentes, Jonathan Parker and Kylie Dowd star in “Ragtime” Oct. 19-21 at Mississippi College.

$25 book; call 601-856-7546. … United Way’s spellBOUND SPELLdown Challenge is at 6 p.m. at Duling Hall. Donations welcome; call 601-441-1889 or 601-965-1349. … The Town of Livingston Fall Concert with Steel Magnolia, South of 20 and Samantha Landrum is at 6 p.m. at Highway 463 and Highway 22, Madison. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; call 601-898-0212. … Masquerade Ball: An Evening in New Orleans is from 6:30-10 p.m. at The South (627 E Silas Brown St.). Proceeds benefit Community Place’s relocation campaign. For ages 21 and up. $75; call 601-3550617, ext. 313. … Blues by Starlight is from 7-10 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Benefits the Boys and Girls Clubs.

COURTESY KELLIS MOORE

WEDNESDAY 10/17

The Sun King 5K is at 8 a.m. at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Benefits Habitat for Humanity. $25 5K, $20 fun run, $60 family; call 601-954-2038 or 601-260-7648. … JSU Homecoming Week culminates with a parade at 9 a.m. in downtown Jackson and a football game against Mississippi Valley State at 3 p.m. at JSU Stadium (2531 N. State St.). $25-$45 football game; jsums.edu/homecoming. … The Fat Tire Festival is at 9 a.m. at Ridgeland Trails (521 Giles Lane, Madison); includes the Run For Heather 5K. Oct. 21, the McGee Lungbuster Mountain Bike Race is at 9 a.m. Benefits Heather’s T.R.E.E. Free, $25 5K (active.com), $35 bike race (usacycling.com). … Broadmeadow’s BlocktoberFeast is from 3-7 p.m. on Montbrook Street. Free admission; $10-$15 plates; topoffondren.com. … Todd Snider headlines Guactoberfest at 4 p.m. at Duling Green (Duling Avenue and Old Canton Road). $10 advance, $15 at gate; call 800-745-3000. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $20 and up; call 601960-1565. … Roo$ta’s mixtape listening party is at 8 p.m. at Safari Video Lounge (GMR Enterprises, 357 N. Mart Plaza). Free; call 510-772-7394. … The Pre-Halloween Costume Contest and Bash

Steel Magnolia is at the Town of Livingston Fall Concert Oct. 18 at Highway 463 and Highway 22 in Madison.

is at 9 p.m. at Sam’s Lounge. $5. … Nameless Open-mic featuring Kiki Gayden is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5, $3 to perform.

SUNDAY 10/21

St. Richard Catholic Church (1242 Lynwood Drive) holds a Fun Fest at 11 a.m. Food and games tickets sold; call 601-366-1157. … The Mostly Monthly Ceili is at 2 p.m. at Fenian’s. Free.

MONDAY 10/22

The Whitehall Lane Wine Dinner is at 6 p.m. at BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N.). $99; call 601-982-8111. … The Presidential Debate Watch Party is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Free.

TUESDAY 10/23

Power APAC’s An Evening of the Arts is at 5:30 p.m. at The Commons. $2, children 10 and under free, $5 food; call 601954-7798. … The play “The Great Gatsby” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $22-28; call 601-948-3533.

WEDNESDAY 10/24

The National Food Day Tailgate and 5K Fun Run kicks off at 6 p.m. at Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity (2548 Livingston Road). $1 fun run; call 601-987-6783. … Frontier Ruckus performs at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $8-$10; call 800-745-3000. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Events at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Free. â&#x20AC;˘ Visiting Writers Series: Jake Adam York Oct. 17, 7 p.m. York is the author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Murder Ballads,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Murmuration of Starlingsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Persons Unknown.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-974-1305. â&#x20AC;˘ Millsaps Friday Forum Oct. 19, 12:30 p.m. David Yates, assistant professor of classical studies, talks about Alexander the Great and the Persian city of Persepolis. Free; call 601974-1305. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Romans at Dinner: A View from Archaeology and Artâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 20, 5:30 p.m. Katherine Dunbabin, professor emerita at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, speaks as part of National Archaeology Day. Free; call 601-974-1299. â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. Younus Mirza Lecture Oct. 22, 7 p.m., in room 215. Mirza, an expert on Islam and a faculty teaching fellow in the Religious Studies Department, talks about Al Qaeda and its role in current global issues. Free; call 974-1000; email mirzayy@millsaps.edu.

G

Listings 10/19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Paranormal Activity 4

Management for a Small Business Oct. 18, 1-3 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Learn how to manage personnel, time and cash flow. Registration required; seating limited. Free; call 601-979-2795; mssbdc.org. Yazoo County CVB Honors Oct. 18, 5:307:30 p.m., at Triangle Cultural Center (332 N. Main St., Yazoo). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Tourism.â&#x20AC;? The Yazoo County CVB honors those who contributed in categories such as dining, lodging attractions. Free; call 800-381-0662.

R

Alex Cross PG13 Argo

R

Here Comes The Boom PG

Vicksburg Campaign Sesquicentennial Civil War Battle Reenactment Oct. 18-21, in Raymond. Locations include original battleground sites on Highway 18, the Raymond Courthouse and Raymond Confederate Cemetery. The Friends of Raymond and the Blue-Gray Alliance reenact three Civil War battles. Adults must accompany children. $15 per day, $25 twoday pass, children 12 and under free; call 601-201-1632; friendsofraymond.org. Computer Class for Adults Oct. 18, 10-11 a.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Learn to use Microsoft Word. Free; call 601-932-2562.

for Thur.

Sinister

R

Seven Psychopaths

R

Atlas Shrugged Part II PG13 The Perks Of Being A Wallflower PG13

5th Annual

Taken 2

Fri. 10/25 PG13

Frankenweenie (non 3-D) PG Pitch Perfect PG13 Looper

R

Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG End Of Watch R House At The End Of The Street PG13

Halloween Bash

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

Church Keys

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

with the

Saturday, October 27, 2012 9:00pm | Cover $8

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

Precinct 3 COPS Meeting Oct. 18, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve commore EVENTS, page 28

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

Guac It to Me

ALL STADIUM SEATING

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jacksonfreepress.com

#/--5.)49 Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Besieging the Bowl Oct. 17, 1 p.m. Millsaps students will march in ancient military formations armed with PVC spears to demonstrate Greek hoplite tactics under the leadership of David Yates, professor of classical studies at Millsaps College. Free; call 601-974-1294. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have a Beer, Bible Readerâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 18, 6-8 p.m. James Bowley, professor of religious studies at Millsaps, will explore the â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer cultureâ&#x20AC;? of the ancient Eastern Mediterranean and Fertile Crescent. Free; call 601-974-1299. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chemistry of Brewingâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 18, 7 p.m., in Leggett Center. Tracy Hamilton, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, describes the brewing process. Proceeds benefit Raise You Pints. For ages 21 and up. $5; call 601-974-1089.

South of Walmart in Madison

Events at Tulane University, Madison Campus (2115 Main St., Madison). Pre-registration required. $10; call 601-605-0007. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inside the 2012 Electionâ&#x20AC;? Workshop Oct. 19, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Discuss current political trends and forecast policy shifts that may occur after the presidential election. â&#x20AC;˘ Business Etiquette and Dining Skills: How to Outclass the Competition Oct. 19, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Topics include shaking hands, making introductions, what to wear and handling silverware.

27


)5203$*(

munity issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0003.

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAYS

10/17

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM

GIVEAWAYS FROM THE W BY AZWELL THURSDAYS

10/18

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL & COLLEGE NIGHT 8PM - UNTIL • 9 FLAT SCREENS

$2.25 LONGNECKS • $3.25 WELL DRINKS Friday

10/19

Cedric Burnside Project SATURDAY

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

October 18

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE

Friday

October 19

Swampfoot Saturday

October 20

Still Stanley

w/ Liver Mousse

10/20

Flowtribe MONDAY

10/21

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

2-for-1 Drafts

$2.25 longnecks $3.25 well drinks

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

10/22

SHRIMP BROIL 5 - 10 PM MATT’S LATE NITE

KARAOKE

October 17 - 23, 2012

October 22

GUYS NIGHT COLLEGE NIGHT 7pm - until|

28

Monday

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm SEE OUR NEW MENU WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Tuesday

October 23

Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday October 24 KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

New Vibrations Network Gathering Oct. 18, 6:30-8 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The mixer is held every second Thursday. Bring business cards and brochures to share. Free, donations welcome; email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. Brothers and Sisters-to-be Class Oct. 20, 10 a.m., at St. Dominic Hospital (969 Lakeland Drive). In the Veritas/St. Theresa Classroom. For children ages 3-8 who are expecting a new baby in their family. Refreshments included. Free; call 601-200-6934. Be Bold Beer Run Oct. 20, 4 p.m., in downtown Jackson. Lucky Town Brewing Company and the Home Brewers Association of Middle Mississippi are the sponsors. Registration is at 4 p.m., and the run/walk is at 4:30 p.m. The race includes stops at designated restaurants for drinks. Drink prices vary; call 262-391-9265. Yazoo County Fair through Oct. 20, at Yazoo County Fairgrounds (203 Hugh McGraw Drive, Yazoo). Enjoy amusement rides and canning, art and craft exhibits. Free parking. $10; call 662-746-1815 or 800-381-0662.

ist Church (517 N. Farish St.). The event includes a run/walk (more at active.com), a health fair, a concert and children’s activities. $30, $60 family (3-5 members) for race, other events free; email cumcflcdirector@ yahoo.com. Senior Health and Wellness Fair Oct. 23, 9 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Includes screenings, information booths, and flu and pneumonia shots. Free; call 601-960-0335. FAQs About High Blood Pressure Oct. 23, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in the Baptist for Women Conference Center. Topics include prevention, early detection and dietary changes. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262. Art in Mind Art Program Oct. 24, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi offers the program on fourth Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for people with early-stage dementia and their caregivers. Participants tour the galleries and make art in the studio classroom. Registration required. Free; call 601-987-0020; alz.org/ms.

Tougaloo College’s 143rd Founders’ Week through Oct. 21, at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). The annual celebration includes lectures, luncheons and signature events such as the Mr. and Miss Tougaloo Coronation Oct. 18 at 7 p.m., and the Founders’ Convocation featuring attorney Shirletha Franklin Oct. 21 at 10 a.m. Most events free - see schedule for details; call 601-977-7871; tougaloo.edu.

First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children every first Friday of the month. Appointment required. Free; call 601-707-7355.

Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 22, 6 p.m., at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). Former NFL quarterback Brodie Croyle is the speaker. $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186.

Teen Movie Saturday Oct. 20, 1-3:30 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Enjoy a movie and snacks. Call the library for the movie title. Free; call 601932-2562.

“WILD about Bats” Teacher Workshop Registration through Oct. 22, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Learn how facts about bats can be incorporated into a curriculum. Register by Oct. 22. Workshop held Oct. 27; bring lunch. 0.6 CEUs from Mississippi College included. $15; call 601-576-6000.

Crossroads Film Festival Call for Film Submissions through Nov. 30. Filmmakers may submit through Nov. 30 for the annual festival, which takes place April 12-14, 2013. Discounts apply for entries submitted by Nov. 15. Special pricing for students and youth. $25-40 through Sept. 30, $30-$45 through Oct. 31, $35-50 through Nov. 15, $45-$65 through Nov. 30; withoutabox.com.

Ridgeland Mayor’s Fun Walk Oct. 23, 9 a.m., at Ridgeland Recreational Center (Old Trace Park, Post Road, Ridgeland). The annual walk includes refreshments, entertainment and door prizes. Pre-register by Oct. 19 to receive a T-shirt (first 300 registrants). Free; call 601-856-6876. Paint the Mall Pink Celebration through Oct. 31, at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Retailers decorate their display windows for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and shoppers vote for the best display. Free; call 601-956-3438.

7%,,.%33 JPS Wellness Walk Oct. 18, 4-6 p.m., at Hughes Field (545 Ellis Ave.). The Food Services Department is the host. Registration is at 3 p.m. The first 200 to register receive a prize. Health screenings, refreshments and resources included. The JPS school or facility with the most participants receives a prize. Free; call 601-960-8911. Shalom: A Day of Health and Wellness Oct. 20, 8 a.m., at Central United Method-

34!'%!.$3#2%%.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings include readings. Call 601-366-7619. • “Stray Decorum” Oct. 17, 5 p.m. George Singleton sign books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $15.95 book. • “Death in the Delta: Uncovering a Mississippi Family Secret” Oct. 18, 5 p.m. Molly Walling signs books. $28 book. • Dr. Seuss’ Sleep Book Snoozapalooza Slumber Party Story Time Oct. 19, 6 p.m., at LemuriaBooks.com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). Children enjoy bedtime stories, sleepover activities and treats. Wear pajamas and bring a pillow or stuffed animal. Free. • “Kiss & Make Up” Oct. 22, 4 p.m. Katie Anderson signs books. $16.99 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and crafts. Free. more EVENTS, page 30


It’s Crazy

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly

jacksonfreepress.com

Good Wine!

29


)5203$*(

Thomas R. Ruffin Book Signing Oct. 18, 8 p.m.-10 p.m., at ToMaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (9347 Highway 18 W., Raymond). The author signs copies of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Empty.â&#x20AC;? Books sold at 7 p.m. $17.99 book; call 601-502-8580. Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Contest. High school students at participating schools may compete, and regional finalists compete March 7. The winner advances to the national contest in Washington, D.C. April 29-30. Schools must register by Nov. 2. Free; call 601-327-1294.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Registration required. Call 601-898-8345. â&#x20AC;˘ Turkey Workshop Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Topics include food safety, tips for preparing turkey and recipes for side dishes. For ages 16 and up. $115. â&#x20AC;˘ Spooky Halloween Feast Class Oct. 21, 1-3 p.m. For ages 7-12. Recipes include spider web soup, chocolate mice and green ghoul punch. $59. â&#x20AC;˘ Tailgating Party Class Oct. 24, 6-9 p.m. Topics include food safety and storage, setting an outdoor table, making a supply list and grilling tips. For ages 16 and up. $89. Discover Series - Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Night Craft Class Oct. 18, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Choose from wire jewelry, hammered jewelry or pottery. $25-$25; call 601-856-7546. Mississippi Music Foundation and Bilingual Family Cultural Exchange Oct. 19, 5:30 p.m., at Horn Lake Library (2885 Goodman Road W., Horn Lake). Mississippi Music Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CEO Peter Whitham leads a workshop on music technology, composition and synthesizing. Also enjoy performances from MMF members. Free; call 662-429-2939. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Photography Retreat Oct. 19-21, at Sandy Toes (8004 Belle Fontaine Drive, Ocean Springs). Mary Fitzgerald is the instructor. The retreat includes photography classes, guided walks and meals. All skill levels welcome. $300; email msamba@comcast.net; fitzgeraldphotographyretreats.net. Cityscapes and Landscapes with Wyatt Waters Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Participants learn to paint on site at two designated locations. Registration required; boxed lunch included. $75; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

October 17 - 23, 2012

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paint Your Punkinsâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 20, 10 a.m.noon, at Easely Amused (Trace Harbor Village, 7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Bring up to three pumpkins to paint. Space limited; reservations required. $15; call 601-707-5854.

30

Basic Photoshop Class Oct. 20, 10 a.m.1 p.m., at Lisetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Photography and Gallery (1800 N. State St.). Laptop with Adobe Photoshop required. Light refreshments and snacks included. Registration required. $55 (cash or credit card); email info@lisette.co. Oil Painting Workshop Oct. 22-26, at Pat Walker Gallery (133 W. Peace St., Canton). Stapleton Kearns teaches the class with a focus on plein air painting. $595; call 601855-0107. A Visual Exploration of Tuscany Through Drawing And Painting. The one-week

program with instructor Jerrod Partridge takes place in Tenuta Di Spannocchia in Italy July 12-19, 2013. Limit of 11 students. $2,700 (includes accommodations); email psholmes@me.com.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Foundersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Week Art Talk Oct. 18, 1 p.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). In the Bennie G. Thompson Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lecture hall. Art professor Katrina Arrington speaks on the topic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recycled Narratives: Christian Art in a Postmodern Culture.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-977-7871. Look and Learn with Hoot Oct. 19, 10:30 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). This educational opportunity for 4-5 year olds and their parents features a hands-on art activity and story time. Please dress for mess. Free; call 601-960-1515. Millsaps Faculty Art Show through Oct. 24, at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), at Lewis Art Gallery and The Emerging Space. Exhibitors include Sandra Murchison and Molly Morin. Open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. The gallery talk and reception is Oct. 19 at 2 p.m. in Lewis Art Gallery. Free; call 601-974-1762 or 601-497-7454.

"%4(%#(!.'% fund for the girls Fundraisers. The nonprofit funds breast cancer screenings for low-income women. Drawings held Oct. 25. $100; fundforthegirls.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Putting on the Ritz Raffle. Buy tickets for a chance to win a trip to three Ritz Carlton properties near Atlanta. Limit of 250 tickets. â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Made for Fun Raffle. Buy tickets for a chance to win a custom suit from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and a wardrobe-consulting package. Limit of 100 tickets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pink the Runwayâ&#x20AC;? Call for Slideshow Submissions. Friends of Survivors will honor those who have lost their lives to breast cancer during their Oct. 28 benefit fashion show at Rain Event Hall. Submit names with pictures, and the birth and death dates by Oct. 23 at 5 p.m. Free; call 601-665-5645; email 2pinktherunway@gmail.com. Pucker Up for a Cure. The fundraiser benefits Rebirth Alliance, a nonprofit that helps breast cancer patients. Help the organization raise $25,000 before Oct. 31, and Baptist Medical Center physician Dr. Phillip Ley will kiss a piglet Oct. 31 at noon at the Colonnades. Donations welcome; call 601-966-7252; email rebirthalliance2008@aol.com. Mississippi Run to Remember Oct. 20, 12:30 p.m., at Renaissance at Colony Park (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). The race includes a run/walk, a one-mile fun run and a balloon release ceremony. Proceeds benefit the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. $30, $15 fun run, $1 balloon; call 601-519-0900; msruntoremember.com. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS | music

OCTOBER ALBUM RELEASES (SO FAR)

Supercrush COURTESY SUPERCRUSH

by Elyane Alexander

Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new punk band, Supercrush, performs at Morningbell Records Oct. 26.

H

aving only been together for seven months, Supercrush is making a name in Jackson. The band consists of Jacksonians vocalist Murph Caicedo, 33, bassist Curt Thomas, 40, guitarist Brad Walker, 35, drummer Kelly Powell, 40, and guitarist Adam Bloodbird Herrington, 31. Supercrushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound is fast punk rock that is to the point. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our longest song is two minutes and 30 seconds, and our shortest song is 10 seconds,â&#x20AC;? Caicedo says. Life has been the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest inspiration and

Caicedo says the band members strive to make their lyrics very personal. The band recently released its first album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;1MinutetoNothin,â&#x20AC;? which it recorded in one day in August at Morningbell Records & Studios. The album is about being in a transitional period and how each individual rebuilds his or her life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody in the band at the same time lost someone like a significant other whether it be a divorce or whatever,â&#x20AC;? Caicedo says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because this happened, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of pouring of the heart into songs â&#x20AC;Ś Everyone is emotionally involved.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten real positive support,â&#x20AC;? Caicedo says about Supercrushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debut album. The band has become an outlet for all members to just get things off their chests. A fan favorite on their album is the break-up song, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Headache.â&#x20AC;? The band members love what they do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do this for money,â&#x20AC;? Caicedo says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play in the biggest venue or your living room if you let us.â&#x20AC;? The band plays at local venues around Jackson and performed at Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Den in New Orleans this past August. Supercrush will perform at Morningbell Records & Studios (622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, 769-233-7468) Oct. 26 with Oxford-based band The Cooters for $5. Get Supercrushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debut album for free at Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St., 601-487-6349), Morningbell Records or at supercrush1.bandcamp.com.

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by Garrard Lee

N

tive, eventually worked with the Narcotics Task Force. After a stint with the FBI in Newark, N.J., he returned to CPD where he headed up the Special OperaTRIP BURNS

ightclubs and bars are usually the places where bands and other musical acts go to celebrate the release of a new project, not authors. Clinton writer Thomas R. Ruffin, who recently released his fourth volume of poetry and prose, sees it a bit differently. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tend to sell more books at bars,â&#x20AC;? Ruffin tells me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my kind of people. The folks who go to get a beer after work.â&#x20AC;? As such, Ruffin will celebrate the release of his new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Empty,â&#x20AC;? at ToMaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Highway 18 in Raymond Oct. 18 at 8 p.m. There is, of course, a full bar, pool tables and, interestingly enough, karaoke on that night as well. While the â&#x20AC;&#x153;release a book at a barâ&#x20AC;? model may seem strange at first, a readthrough of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;? proves otherwise. This is blue-collar poetry and prose, written by a man who has worked hard and seen disturbing things in his days. Ruffin, 49, is a retired cop. He started his career at Fort Hood, Texas, in the military police. He worked his first undercover job in Germany before coming to Mississippi to join the Clinton Police Department as a detec-

Thomas Ruffin will release his latest book of poetry this week at ToMaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bar.

tions Group (which operates the SWAT team and so forth) before retiring as a lieutenant in 2007. As you can imagine, Ruffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words quite often reflect some of the things he saw while on the job; his experiences resonate even in the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The

Emptyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a place in your mind that cops and others can go after seeing and living through tragic events,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a void, a nothing. A place where you can go to not feel anything.â&#x20AC;? In the introduction, Ruffin lays out the major theme, recounting an experience in 1998 when he was called to the scene to investigate the death of an infant found in a wooded area. While it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the first time he sent his mind to the empty, it was the deepest he had gone up to that point. He writes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the safest place for me. I could survive there. I could function there. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; does not allow one to feel â&#x20AC;Ś it does not permit emotion.â&#x20AC;? Many of the pieces in the book, whether based fully on actual events or stories pieced together from his experiences and those of others, deal with life as a cop and the subtlety of reaction and emotion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jumperâ&#x20AC;? tells the story of a young Midwestern lady who leaps to her demise off of a water tower and the townspeopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s search for who is to blame. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Persistent Return of Michi Pfauâ&#x20AC;? gives the reader a peak inside the mind of an undercover cop. And â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face Down on a Gravel Roadâ&#x20AC;? is the first

person account of someone who has just been shot in the head. This is intense stuff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for children,â&#x20AC;? illustrator Joshua Rushing says. Rushing, who has teamed up with Ruffin for the second time in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Empty,â&#x20AC;? produces pencil drawings to give the reader a visual of Ruffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words. For â&#x20AC;&#x153;Karma Goat,â&#x20AC;? Rushing drew a simple goat head with just enough self-awareness to match the vernacular of the characters in Ruffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poem. The two artists collaborate heavily and Ruffin refers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;? as â&#x20AC;&#x153;our book.â&#x20AC;? To be sure, not everything in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;? is so dark. Ruffin made an effort with this book, he says, to examine the full range of human emotions, â&#x20AC;&#x153;happy, sad, everything.â&#x20AC;? Ruffin writes in the introduction that what he wants is for his readers to feel something, anything, when they read his work, because â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Emptyâ&#x20AC;? allows us to get back in touch with our emotions at their basest level. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone should be happy that we have â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the empty,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? he says. Thomas R. Ruffin signs copies of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;? at ToMaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar (9347 Highway 18 W., Raymond, 601-502-8580) at 8 p.m. Buy copies of the book at 7 p.m.

jacksonfreepress.com

Traversing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Emptyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

31


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/#4 7%$.%3$!9

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/17 Baby Jan & All That Chaz (Dining Room)

THURSDAY 10/18

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Micky & The Motorcars with Mark Mann (Red Room)

Wednesday, October 17th

FRIDAY 10/19

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover, Wine Specials All Night

Bill & Temperance (Dining Room)

SATURDAY 10/20

LISA MILLS

(Americana/Blues) 7-10, No Cover

MONDAY 10/22

Friday, October 19th

TUESDAY 10/23 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Dining Room) Jesse Robinson & Friends Blues Night (Red Room)

Coming Soon

10/24: Frontier Ruckas w Shovels & Rope & Water Liars - Red Room 10/25: Robert Earl Keen - Red Room 10/27: International Vintage Guitars in NOLA presents their 20th anniversary show: Leroy Troy w The Avon Suspects & The Kenny Vaughn Trio - Red Room 10/30-31-Rocky Horror Picture Show Big Room 7:30 10/31-Rumprollers & Otis Lotus Halloween Show - Red Room

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

October 17 - 23, 2012

Thursday, October 18th

Rump Rollers (Dining Room) MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

32

JOSH TAYLOR

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St.

DAVIS ROGAN

(New Orleans Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 20th

LIAM CATCHINGS & THE JOLLY RACKET

(Rock & Roll) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday,October 23rd

CHALMERS DAVIS

(Piano) 7-10, NoCover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

COMING SOON OCTOBER 25 & 26 2012

Grady Champion HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG!

TILL 7 EVERY OTHER NIGHT!

2-FOR-1 â&#x20AC;¢ DRAFT BEER â&#x20AC;¢ WELL DRINKS â&#x20AC;¢ APPETIZERS!

HIGH GRAVITY

BOMBERS on sale

$5.50 ea.

WHILE THEY LAST! 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

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MUSIC | live

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DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

Solid Weekend for Four-Year Schools

The Mississippi State Bulldogs are 12th in the initial BCS standings and bowl eligible after their win over Tennessee.

by Bryan Flynn

three SWAC teams. Not only did all three overs and had none of their own. get wins, but all three got right into the thick Mississippi Valley (2-4) State took winof the East division race. less Grambling State behind the woodshed Jackson State (3-4), in their 45-21 victory. The down 20-13 at halftime, Delta Devils jumped out rallied twice in the second to a 17-0 halftime lead half against Alabama State. and never looked back Ryan Deising gave the Tiagainst the Tigers. gers the win as time expired MVSU quarterback on his 39-yard field goal. Garrick Jones rushed for Clayton Moore led 100 yards on four carJSU with 269 yards passries and two touchdowns ing and 131 yard rushas the Delta Devils other ing. Moore threw for two quarterback Marcus Rantouchdowns and ran in dle threw for 167 yards three more scores in the Tiand three scores. gers 37-34 victory. Delta State (3-3) got Alcorn State (3-4) their first home win of the might have pulled off the Ole Miss ended its 16-game season. The Statesmen shocker of the day with SEC losing streak with its rallied for 20 points in 41-20 victory over Auburn their victory over previously the fourth quarter to beat undefeated Alabama A&M. West Georgia 33-24. The Braves raced out to a 21-14 lead in the Millsaps (5-1) got right back to winthird quarter and then held off a late rally by ning after suffering their first loss of the seathe Bulldogs for the win. son. The Majors rolled Sewanee 42-28 for In a total-team win, ASU got a 66- their fifth victory of the season. yard interception return for a touchdown by Belhaven (3-4) had no trouble with Devon Francois to put the Braves up 14-10 Bluefield College (Va.) at home. The Blazhalftime lead. Alcorn State forced three turn- ers laid the smack down in their 66-10 win against the overmatched Rams. Southern Miss (0-6) played Central Florida all the way to overtime, but the Golden Eagles still werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to get their 3TILLA#HANCEFORA3AINTS3UPERBOWL first win of the season. USM kicker Corey Acosta made a 37KHUHZDVQÂśWHYHQHQRXJKWLPHWREDVNLQWKH ÂżUVWKDOIDQGVRPHWLPHVWKHVHFRQGKDOI WKUHHTXDU ZLQDJDLQVW6DQ'LHJREHIRUHWKRXJKWVWXUQHG WHUVEXWQRWDIXOOJDPHXQWLOEHDWLQJWKH&KDUJHUV yard field goal to send the game into overWRWKH1HZ2UOHDQV6DLQWVÂśSOD\RIIKRSHV  7KDWZDVDIXOOPLQXWHVRIHIIRUWE\WKH6DLQWV time. The Golden Eagles defense was unable  &DQ WKH  6DLQWV FRPSOHWH WKH WXUQ 1HZ2UOHDQVSOD\HGWKHHQWLUHJDPHDQGZDVUHZDUG to stop the Knights offense from scoring on DURXQGDQGPDNHWKHSOD\RIIV" HGZLWKDYLFWRU\ both their possessions in overtime. USM  7KHVKRUWDQVZHULV\HV7KHUHZHUHVRPHJRRG  7KLV ZHHN WKH 6DLQWV JHW -RH9LWW EDFN DV KHDG WKLQJVLQWKDWZLQDJDLQVWWKH&KDUJHUV FRDFKDQGWKHWHDPVKRXOGIHHOHYHQPRUHFRPIRUW freshman quarterback Anthony Alford ran  7KH6DLQWVÂżQDOO\IRXQGDSDVVUXVKDJDLQVW6DQ DEOHZLWKWKHFRDFKLQJVLWXDWLRQ for a touchdown in the first overtime, but 'LHJRDQGLWZDVQÂśWMXVWDWWKHHQGRIWKHJDPH1HZ  7KHERXQW\LVVXHKDVFRPHXSDJDLQEXWWKHSOD\ threw an interception to give UCF the 382UOHDQVZDVDEOHWRJHWSUHVVXUHRQ&KDUJHUVTXDUWHU HUVWKDWDUHDIIHFWHGZLOONHHSSOD\LQJXQWLODQ\PDW EDFN3KLOOLS5LYHUVIURPWKHRSHQLQJNLFNRII WHUVLQWKHFRXUWVDUHUHVROYHG1HZ2UOHDQVPXVWSXW 31 win over USM in the second overtime.  $JDLQVW6DQ'LHJRWKH6DLQWVKDGVL[TXDUWHUEDFN WKLVGLVWUDFWLRQRXWRIWKHLUPLQGVDQGIRFXVRQJHWWLQJ Mississippi College (1-5) couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t KLWVÂżYHVDFNVDQGQXPHURXVTXDUWHUEDFNSUHVVXUHV EDFNWRIRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHWKLVVHDVRQ overcome seven turnoversâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;four fumbles <HVLWZDVMXVWRQHJDPHEXWWKHGHIHQVHPLJKWEH  1HZ2UOHDQVLVJHWWLQJDORWRIKHOSIURPWKHLU1)& and three interceptionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in a 27-24 loss to JHWWLQJ FRPIRUWDEOH LQ 6WHYH 6SDJQXRORÂśV GHIHQVLYH FRXQWHUSDUWV7KHXSVDQGGRZQVRIWKHVHDVRQPHDQV V\VWHP 6SDJQXROR QRZ NQRZV WKH VWUHQJWKV DQG RQO\ VHYHQ WHDPV FXUUHQWO\ KDYH D ZLQQLQJ UHFRUG the previously winless Howard Payne. ZHDNQHVVHVRIKLVGHIHQVLYHSOD\HUVDQGFDQVFKHPH  2QHWKLQJWKDWVFDUHVPHLV6DLQWVOHDGLQJUXVKHU Hinds Community College (3-4) was WRZDUGWKRVHVWUHQJWKVDQGKLGHWKHZHDNVSRWV:H 3LHUUH7KRPDVZLWKUXVKLQJ\DUGVRQWKHVHDVRQ no match for Jones Community College in a ZLOOÂżQGRXWWKLVZHHNDJDLQVW7DPSD%D\LIWKH6DQ ,WKLQN1HZ2UOHDQVQHHGVWRUXQWKHEDOOPRUHIRUWKH 'LHJRJDPHZDVIRUUHDORUMXVWDQDEHUUDWLRQ UHVWRIWKHVHDVRQ 50-15 loss. Holmes Community College (3 1HZ 2UOHDQV DOVR ÂżQDOO\ SOD\HG D IXOO IRRWEDOO  7KLVZHHNDJDLQVW7DPSD%D\LVVWLOODPXVWZLQIRU 4) fell 32-20 to Northeast Mississippi ComJDPH7KH6DLQWVKDGSOD\HGDKDOI VRPHWLPHVWKH 12/$EXWWXUQLQJWKLVVHDVRQDURXQGLVSRVVLEOH munity College. COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

THURSDAY, OCT. 18 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NFL Network) first place in the NFC West is on the line as the 4-2 San Francisco 49ers meet the 42 Seattle Seahawks. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (8-11 p.m. ESPN) undefeated Oregon gets a major test against surprising Arizona State in a big PAC-12 Clash. FRIDAY, OCT. 19 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN) Big East showdowns between Connecticut and Syracuse in a game both need a win to keep their bowl hopes going strong. SATURDAY, OCT. 20 College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN 2) Mississippi State puts their undefeated season on the line against a good Middle Tennessee football team. â&#x20AC;Ś (6-9 p.m. CBS Sports Network) Southern Miss looks to avoid their first losing season in 18 years against Marshall. SUNDAY, OCT. 21 NFL (12-3 p.m. Fox) New Orleans tries to make it two wins in a row coming off their bye week against NFC South rival Tampa Bay Buccaneers. MONDAY, OCT. 22 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN) One of the oldest rivalries in the NFL is featured on Monday Night Football as the Chicago Bears host the Detroit Lions.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

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JFP Top 25: Week 8

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23 Documentary (7-8:30 p.m. ESPN) 30 for 30: Benji, the story of Ben Wilson a Chicago basketball star who was killed a day before the start of his senior high school basketball season. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 MLB (TBA Fox) Game one of the 2012 World Series is set to feature the American League Champion against the National League Champion. MSU needs to focus on Middle Tennessee and not look ahead to their game against Alabama. The Blue Raiders are no pushover, just ask Georgia Tech. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports

      

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   15   15

jacksonfreepress.com

I

t wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a perfect weekend for four-year college-football programs in Mississippi, but it was darn close. Every four-year college or university in Mississippi with a football team won this weekend but two. Mississippi State (6-0) led the way with a 41-31 victory over Tennessee to stay undefeated. The Bulldogs jumped out to a 27-14 halftime lead before the Volunteers fought back into the game in the third quarter. Quarterback Tyler Russell had one of the best games of his collegiate career in the win. Russell completed 23 of 37 passes for 291 yards with a touchdown. The play of the night for the Bulldogs might have come on their final touchdown. Malcolm Johnson made a remarkable catch and tapped his toes in the back of the end zone on his 9-yard catch. Ole Miss (4-3) kept their bowl hopes alive and well with a 41-20 win over Auburn. This was a game of streaks as the Rebels raced out to a quick 14-0 lead only to see the Tigers make a 17-0 run to take a 17-14 lead. After that, Ole Miss outscored Auburn 27-3 for the rest of the game. The Rebels doubled up the Tigers in total yards at 451 to 213 as they moved above .500 again. This weekend was huge for the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

by Bryan Flynn

33


FOOD & DRINK p 35 HITCHED p 39 BODY/SOUL p 40 FLY STYLE p 42

Raising Kids Who Care

#ARING"OOKSFOR+IDS

KELLY BRYAN SMITH

So far, we have helped dozens of people with a small investment of $25. We helped a group of women start a general store in Uganda, and another group of women start a used clothing store in Uganda. We provided money for a man expanding his milk business in Azerbaijan, a group of women establishing a shoe store in the Dominican Republic, a man starting a general store in Kenya and a woman expanding her family farm in Samoa. We also helped a woman starting a weaving business in Cambodia, another to expand her poultry business in Kenya, a man to start a taxi business in Bolivia and another to expand his cafĂŠ in Iraq. My son loves to look at the pictures of the people and their businesses and imagine what their lives are like around the world from where we are. When my 3-yearold is a little older, we can make our giving an even bigger project by finding all the countries on a map and learning more about them from library books. Some other kid-friendly charities we love include Heifer International (heifer.org; livestock), Pennies for Peace (penniesforpeace.org; schools), the Green Belt Movement (greenbeltmovement.org; conservation and tree planting), and the Make-a-Wish Foundation (wish. org; for sick children).

#LEAN/UTTHE#RAP

The authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son helps around the house with small chores such as bringing the trash can in from the street.

October 17 - 23, 2012

book, without stopping to help others in need or even picking up the trash that spilled by your curb. Yet, in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interconnected world, with the big problems we face, it is more essential than ever to find connections with others and help our kids care about others and their environment. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen overnight, but by trying on a few of these easy ideas, you and your kids can make a big difference.

34

'IVE4O/THERS Through a charity called Kiva (kiva.org), my son and I have been able to make several micro loans to help change lives around the world. As recipients repay each loan, we sit down and choose someone else to re-loan the money toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; someone who is seeking to raise their family out of poverty through their own ingenuity.

Get your kids involved in cleaning out the house and cutting down on clutter. I am preparing to put my house on the market sometime this spring. I am excited about downsizing with my son and living in a smaller space together. And I am astounded by the amount of stuff we have, most of which we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even use. We just buy more containers to hold more stuff! Now that it is time to lighten our load, my son is helping to choose the books and toys and clothes and shoes we can trade at a consignment store or give to other children who have less than we do. Get your kids involved in clearing out too-small clothes and too-babyish toys to give away. Ask for help cleaning out the cupboards during canned-food drives. Brainstorm about ways to lighten your load and share with others.

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n todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world of fast food, video games and social media, it can be harder than ever before to cultivate kindness and caring in our children. Between school and our endless scurrying back and forth to activities, taking the time to sit together as a family, eating a home-cooked meal and talking about how things are going can get lost. It is all too easy to race through your days without getting to know your neighbors, without turning off the television to read a

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#ULTIVATE'RATITUDE Create a family ritual to share what you are thankful for each evening around the dinner table. As you feel more and more thankful for your own gifts, think about how your family can help others and share with those who are less fortunate in our community and around the world. Consider feeding the homeless through church, hosting a yard sale and donating the proceeds to your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite charity, organizing a school supply drive for a needy school, picking up the trash along your neighborhood creek bed or mowing the lawn for a sick neighbor.

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LIFE&STYLE | food & drink

Get Ready to Fill Your Pints by Ross Cabell ROY ADKINS

would have it, the couple overheard the group of “Last year, we had a dozen brewers and about 25 to 30 friends talking at the bar, and approached the guys, beers entered in the competition. Now we have 35 brewers telling them they couldn’t have an Oktoberfest and 65 to 70 beers entered in the competition,” he says. without German beer. There are five categories in this year’s competition, “I think the hot button was Todd and Katie with medals awarded to the winners. Two additional medParkman saying, ‘We’ll buy the keg for it.’ It was als will be awarded Best Overall Beer and The People’s the first step in making it happen. Todd and Katie Choice. Participation is limited only to amateur brewers, bought a keg of German beer, and it was kind of a no commercial brewers allowed. domino effect,” Barnette says. Accompanying the craft-brew competition will be a The fest is Friday, Oct. 19, on Congress Street craft-beer garden, where anyone over 21 years old who pays between Amite and Capitol streets, It is free and the $15 admission fee will be able to try the beer entered open to all ages. In fact, bringing the whole fam- in the competition and talk with the brewers themselves. ily is encouraged. Jacktoberfest kicks off early at 11 Once in the garden, participants will receive a souvenir pint a.m. and goes on until 11 p.m. Live music will be glass and a sampling glass to taste beer entries and a ballot Katie Parkman, one of the founders of Raise Your Pints, pours a playing throughout the day with bands like Rosco to vote for the People’s Choice winner. craft beer at last year’s Jacktoberfest. Bandana from Gulfport, Sister Sparrow and the Barnette says the craft-beer garden has become an inDirty Birds, and more. tegral part of the festival atmosphere. This year, the compeIt wouldn’t be much of an Oktoberfest with- tition will achieve a level of legitimacy it didn’t necessarily ands. Brats. Beer. No, this isn’t exactly a word-asso- out bratwurst, and there will be plenty of the German sausage have last year. Several judges are certified and will judge in ciation game. This is the mantra of Jackson’s answer and sauerkraut to wash down the beer. But make no mistake, accordance to the Beer Judge Certification Program, the nato Oktoberfest: Jacktoberfest, and it was a bar bet it’s the beer that is the kaizer of this festival. This year Jackto- tional standard for craft-brew competitions. that almost went nowhere. berfest will have 12 taps, but that won’t necessarily limit it to The festival is a hyper-local event, Barnette says. The Seven years ago, at a bar during happy hour, someone 12 beers, Barnette says. Raise Your Pints will have volunteers ownership falls on all who help out and contribute to makasked, “Why doesn’t Jackson celebrate Oktoberfest?” A group pouring the drinks, and while it may not cost anything to get ing the festival happen every year. The food? All thanks to of locals who shared an interest in beer decided they would in the festival, they will be working for tips. McDade’s. Power? That’s Entergy. throw something together. Craig Hendry, president of For Jacktoberfest, It’s all about It’s been an annual event ever since, always on the third Raise Your Pints, has attended local businesses working together. Friday of October. The festival skipped one year back in 2009 Jacktoberfest for the past couple “We are doing everything because most members were burnt out, but when the coordi- years and looks forward to seeing locally, like the beer is distributed nators realized the impact it had on in the city, they brought it grow. locally. The food comes locally, it back in full force. “I would love to see it get not like going to Sam’s Club, this JFP co-founder Stephen Barnette has been co-coordina- bigger, so that people from way national chain. It’s this idea that tor since the beginning, and remembers the first year fondly. outside of Jackson will get a hotel we are all in this together,” Bar“It started very organic, as a group of friends. It was also room, go have beers around town nette says. “All of it is in-kind.” In the craft-beer garden, festivalgoers can bitterly cold from what I remember, the attendance was really afterwards or the next day and eat Jacktoberfest is from 11 a.m. sample beer and chat with brewers. light, and we had a few hundred people. It was a haphazard at some restaurants,” he says. to 11 p.m. Oct. 19 downtown. ‘Hey, let’s do this’ kind of thing,” he says. The big draw that will bring Admission is free, but prices on Without the help of Todd and Katie Parkman, who in people from out of town? That would be the 2012 Craft food and beer vary. Cash only. The craft beer garden costs $15 would eventually be instrumental in the founding of Raise Brew Competition. In only its second year, the participation to enter and runs from 5-7 p.m. Visit jacktoberfest.com for Your Pints, the festival may have not even happened. As luck has more than doubled, Barnette says. more information. ROY ADKINS

B

by Alonzo Lewis

O

nce upon a time in the county of Carroll, my brother and I went out early one morning to gather the cows. We had our “knives,” made by splitting a pair of old hedging shears. As we tracked the cows, we saw an old tree that had been blown down by the previous night’s storm. In the trunk of the tree, we saw some honey. We proceeded to crawl underneath the barbed-wire fence and cut out the honey with our homemade knives. We were so excited. This excitement quickly turned into panic when the owners of that honey returned to claim their proper-

Tea and Honey Brined Pork Chops Ingredients

ty. Although they were smaller than we were, there were so many of them that we had to fight or flight. A fight ensued and the owners won the fight. So, we decided to switch to flight—but not without injuries. Those little bees were hard pressed to protect what belonged to them. My father used to get completely naked (and I would not recommend this procedure to anyone), wade through thousands of bees and not get stung once. He would always come home with buckets of honey. I didn’t acquire a taste for honey until in the middle of adulthood, but now, it’s like I can’t live without having some at least once a day.

1-1/2 cups strong brewed tea, chilled 3/4 cup kosher salt 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar 4 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 cup ice cubes 4 bone-in-center pork chops 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt 8 teaspoons pepper–garlic spice rub Cooking spray

Combine the first six ingredients in a large bowl, stirring until salt and sugar dissolve. Pour the mixture into a large zip-top plastic bag. Add ice and pork, seal. Refrigerate for three hours, turning the bag occasionally.

Remove pork from bag; discard brine. Pat pork dry with paper towels. Sprinkle 1/8 teaspoon salt over pork. Rub 8 teaspoons pepper-garlic spice evenly over both sides of pork. Spray your skillet or grill racks using the cooking spray. Cook or grill both sides evenly for about 2 minutes on each side. Cook in oven or grill until tender and done. Serves four with one chop per serving. Note: This brine is also excellent with chicken thighs and drumsticks, and pork or beef ribs. I tend to grill, using hardwood chips—hickory is my preference, but any type will work.

jacksonfreepress.com

Cooking Healthy with Honey

35


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music october 17 - 23

wed | october 17 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | october 18 Starving Artists 5:30-9:30p

October 25

5:00 Check In 6:00 Run $30 Singles $100 Teams of 4

Info: 601-326-3714

Purple Dress Run 601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

fri | october 19 Jason Turner Band 6:30-10:30p sat | october 20 Jon Clark Band 6:30-10:30p

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

R and R’s Eatery (3618 Rainey Road, 601-346-6111) Southern delicacies include fried catfish, fried chicken and chicken and waffles. Healthy options include grilled chicken salads and turkey burgers. Mon. Thru Thur. 11-9:30. Fri. And Sat. 11 to 11. Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street District offering a savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

sun | october 21 Hollywood & Clark 4:00 - 8:00p mon | october 22 Karaoke tue | october 23 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

PIZZA

Naked Eskimos Friday, October 19 & Saturday, October 20

Wednesday - October 17 KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - October 18

LADIES NIGHT with Snazz

Friday - October 19

Trademark

Saturday - October 20

Trademark Sunday - October 21

October 17 - 23, 2012

9 Ball Tournament 7pm

36

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night

Monday - October 22

with DJ Reign

Monday Night Football

-Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

$1.50 Mugs & 2-for-1 Domestics During the Game

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowfin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.


DINEJackson

5A44 FX5X

Paid advertising section.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes!

CRAB CAKES No Filler

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

ASIAN AND INDIAN

Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and much more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and buildyour-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made spring rolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

Summer Vacation is year round at the Islander!

Now Open on Saturdays • 11-2 during JSU home games

&IEGL:MFIˆ.MQQ]&YJJIX8YRIW

,ETT],SYV

Go Tigers!

ˆ6E[3]WXIVW ˆ'LEVKVMPPIH3]WXIVW ˆ4IIP )EX7LVMQT ˆ*VMIH&YVKIVW ˆ+EQFMRS4S&S]W ˆ*VIWL*MWL ˆ+VIEX0YRGL&PYI4PEXIW

- also acceppting JSU Supercards-

1*TQ

In Town & in the USA

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-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

jacksonfreepress.com

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

37


OVER

Sweet & Spooky

100,000 Were you one of them? Come Come see see the the

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Phone: 601-706-4605

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County Line Road at I-55 in North Jackson 888-263-0524 â&#x20AC;˘ www.jackson.hilton.com


LIFE&STYLE | hitched

Love in Faith by Whitney Menogan

â&#x20AC;&#x153;W

ERIC GRACE

Everyone in Allisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family loved CJ and knew that one day the two would get married; they just werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure when. The couple discussed marriage and knew it was a lifetime commitment, something to take seriously. While watching television one day, Allison made a comment about a yellow diamond ring that she just saw and how she wanted one similar to it. CJ did not respond, but he paid close attention and made a mental note. When it came time to find a ring, he knew exactly what to look for. The couple planned a visit to the New Orleans Aquarium, where CJ planned to propose. Unfortunately, Allison was called into work and had to cancel the trip, leaving CJ to find another opportunity. While getting ready for church, CJ had a spiritual feeling that came over him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a Godly moment,â&#x20AC;? he explains. He knew that day would be the day that he proposed to Allison. After the closing prayer, CJ called Allison to the front and proposed before the entire congregation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even have a cute outfit on,â&#x20AC;? she says, laughing. They Allison pulled her veil across CJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face for their first kiss as husband and wife, a memorable moment for all in attendance. met in church, so he proposed in church, as a reminder that be in a relationship, they built a deep friend- God brought them together. ship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around that time, I was working on During the proposal, her friend recordmyself as a Christian. He became that friend ed it on her phone and placed it on Facebook I could always go to, never judgmental, and to share the good news of her friend. UnforI saw his true colors on the first day we met,â&#x20AC;? tunately, due to the recording, word of the Allison says. proposal got back to her mother before the Three months into the friendship, they couple had a chance to tell her themselves. made it official and began dating. Rememâ&#x20AC;&#x153;She was livid,â&#x20AC;? Allison laughs. But the bering the outcome of previous relation- joy of her youngest daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s engagement ships, CJ became a bit concerned, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was quickly dismissed that feeling, and they beso pretty, I had to make sure she was beyond gan to set a date for the wedding. just looks,â&#x20AC;? he says. Just nine months later, The couple knew from the beginning CJ knew Allison was the one. that Allisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother would be the wedding

STERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

ho is that young man in the pulpit?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the pastor,â&#x20AC;? Allisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom, Gerilynn Thomas, responded. CJ Rhodes is the youngest pastor to serve at Mount Helm Baptist Church, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest African American church. After first spotting each other at a funeral for Allisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cousin almost three years ago, CJ, now 30, and Allison, now 27, were formally introduced by Naomi Sams, the minister of music at Mount Helm, at the repast. They were both fairly shy and did not exchange numbers. But after that meeting CJ could not get Allison out of his head, so he hunted around for her number and worked up the courage to call. Although they were not looking to

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planner. Her mother took their ideas and executed them exactly how they wanted. The colors were yellow and sky blue, the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two favorite colors, as well as the colors of the church, Galloway Memorial United Methodist Church. Sabrina Mallard, a close friend of the family, created a crest, as well as shower invitations and programs for the approximately 900 guests invited. Allison found her beautiful white dress at Imaginations in Brookhaven, and CJ his tuxedo at Tuxedo Junction in Northpark Mall. Accompanying Allison were 12 bridesmaids, including her sister as the matron of honor. CJ had six groomsmen, with his brother as his best man. CJ and Allison knew that a typical wedding was not what they wanted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew we wanted the spirit to move

throughout the wedding,â&#x20AC;? they explain. They wanted the guests to see what God has truly blessed them with, something that a wedding planner could not do. The 11 a.m. wedding on June 23 consisted of 850 guests, and immediately following was a reception at the Old Capitol Inn. The menu covered everything from sushi to fried chicken, topped by a four-tier yellow and blue lemon wedding cake that Allison designed herself. For their picture-perfect day, Sterling Photography captured the wedding and reception. Their wedding was a true celebration of Allison and CJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love and a faithful testimony of how God brought two people together within his word and love. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is why a man leaves his father and mother and is united to his wife, and they become one 39 fleshâ&#x20AC;? Genesis 2:24.

jacksonfreepress.com

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CJ and Allison Rhodes wed this summer in front of 850 of their family and friends.


LIFE&STYLE | body/soul

The Power of Choice FLICKR/BOETTER

by Jasmin S. Searcy

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Once you view decision-making as a positive force, you will see the effect in your life.

S

pend your last bit of cash, or save it for a rainy day? Eat healthier to stay away from the doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, or splurge on a decadent dessert? Vote for the 2012 election, or remain uninvolved? Every day, we face the big three Cs in life: challenges, choices and, most of all, consequences. Because I am a clinical psychology trainee, a lot of people ask me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you do?â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does your title mean?â&#x20AC;? I tell them I am being trained to one day assist individuals with issues such as grief, depression, anxiety, adjusting to life circumstances and so on. I believe that this is the purpose my creator bestowed upon me: to become a clinical psychologist to help others. Helping individuals make a difference, find their purpose and make changes in their personal life is my

vital goal. So now I want you to ask yourselves the same thing. Ask yourself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is my purpose here on this earth, and how will I make a difference to others around me?â&#x20AC;? Now, what about the three Cs in life and how they relate to this article? In life we are going to have challenges. Because of these, we make choices, good or bad, and must deal with the consequences of our decisions. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consider a quick example when thinking about the three vital Cs. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say Joe, who is 28, has just been promoted as the CEO of his firm, something he has been working toward since age 21. However, some challenges have come into his life the same week he received his promotion. He proposed to his long-term girlfriend and now has a wedding to plan, learned that his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer, and just

This Month in Health October 17 - 23, 2012

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

40

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found out he owes the IRS $10,000. What does Joe do? In Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s situation he has to analyze the challenges that have arisen, what choices he will make in response and the consequences that follow his actions. Anyone can be faced with adversity, but by making well-thoughtout choices, taking responsibility for the consequences, and learning from your mistakes, you can overcome. You have the power of choice in your own life. But it is important to remember that you do and should not have that power in othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; livesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can only make decisions for yourself and must allow others the same. We can try to influence, educate and inform someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision, but we have no control over their end choice. Choice can be a very powerful tool to have when you know and embrace that power.

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TRIP BURNS

Lily and Laura bracelet

Pure Barre Studio, Jackson

(4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 235-A, 769-251-0486, also sold at stores around the metro, lilyandlaura.com)

Street Style:

Effortless Chic by Kathleen M. Mitchell

E

verybody has that one friend who, no matter the season or situation, is dressed perfectly and (seemingly, at least) effortlessly. For me, that person is Jordan Willett, a friend and sorority sister from college. She has a knack for mixing classic pieces with fun accessories, isn’t afraid of color and always manages to perfectly toe the line between youthful and ladylike. I caught up with Jordan in Highland Village this week, and she gave me the sartorial scoop on her fall look.

Infinity scarf

Blouse and jeans

Hemline

Taylor Collection

(140 Township Ave., Suite 102, Ridgeland, 601-898-3456)

(2082 Main St., Madison, 601-605-0236, facebook. com/TaylorCollection)

Boots

Arco Avenue

(1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601-790-9662, arcoavenue.com)

SHOPPING SPECIALS Rooster’s

Fresh Ink

(4500 Interstate 55 N., 601-9820235) All John Hart products, such as this customizable shaving bag, are on sale until the end of October. It’s a great time to shop ahead for Christmas.

Age: 26 Job: Recruiting coordinator at Horne LLP and instructor at Pure Barre Favorite color to wear: Red Heels or flats: Heels to work; Flats pretty much everywhere else Best style trick: Always wear at least one statement item, whether it be a bold color or fun accessory. Could wear every day without getting sick of it: Skinny jeans Favorite item of clothing or jewelry: Kate Spade watch—perfect for work-casual wear

Do you know someone with great style? Nominate them for our FLY Street Style feature! Email kathleen@jacksonfreepress. com.

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com. Babalu Tacos and Tapas

(622 Duling Ave., 601-3665757) Babalu is celebrating “tacos for ta-tas.” For every taco purchased in October, the restaurant will donate $1 to the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

Swell-O-Phonic

(2906 N. State St., 601-9813547) Get ready to stock up on Jackson swag. Swell-O-Phonic is having a crazy sale all this month on the outside tee rack. Grab five tees for $20 or 10 tees for $30.

Material Girls

(182 Promenade Blvd., Flowood, 601-992-4533) Each Wednesday from 4-7 p.m. is Greek Night at Material Girls. Bring something to show your sorority and receive 20 percent off your purchase.

October 17 - 23, 2012

(2906 N. State St., 601-9822001) Every Wednesday in October is ’80s night. From 5 to 9 p.m., prices on burgers, sides and more will be lowered to what they were in 1984.

Name: Jordan Willett

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Check out flyjfp.com or @FlyJFP on Twitter and Instagram for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


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jacksonfreepress.com

5440 Executive Place STE B2 | Jackson MS 601.364.2869 | naturalusalon.webs.com

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Get All Of Your JSU Homecoming Gear Here! 579 Hwy 51 North â&#x20AC;¢ Ridgeland Village 601.856.8886 â&#x20AC;¢ 601.260.1904

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In Historic Fondren | 622 Duling Ave, Ste. 206 Tue - Fri:10:00 am - 7:00 pm | Sat: 10:00 am - 3:00 pm find us on facebook

4325 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ Flowood, MS 39232 â&#x20AC;¢ 601.936.7000 (Behind Parkway Theatre)

$5.00 OFF 2 Hibachi Dinners

with purchase of 2 drinks

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v11n06 - Facing The Odds in the Washington Addition