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vol. 11 no. 05

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WHEN THE SUN SETS THE MUSIC AND NIGHTLIFE ISSUE

ARTISTS TO WATCH

JACKSON’S MUSICAL FAMILY TREE pp 16-26

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Chasing Edom

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October 10 - 16, 2012


TRIP BURNS

I

JACKSONIAN SKYLER BREADY

f you go to Sneaky Beans today, you will probably find a tall, shaggy-haired young man sitting in a corner drinking a steaming hot mug of medium coffee. A large stack of composition books, or “the bricks” as he calls them, will be carefully placed on the table with his guitar leaning against the wall behind him. His name is Skyler Bready. At 22 years old, this Belhaven University senior, who is majoring in composition, calls his passion for music an addiction. “It all started when I was 10 years old,” Bready says. “My dad’s guitar was sitting around the house, and I told him that it was time for him to teach me how to play it.” His dad taught him three chords, and Bready has been playing every day since. Now, he plays seven instruments—the electric guitar, acoustic guitar, bass, banjo, mandolin, piano and drums. He also teaches others how to play those same instruments at Fondren Guitars and composes his own music. Music runs deep in this Jackson native’s family roots. His dad, John, played in a rock band, traveling loops around the country for years, and his mother, Shellie’s, side of the family has a rich stylistic tradition of singing thick, harmonic southern gospel. The talented musician has always had a knack for writing his own pieces. He compares it to playing with Legos. “When you get Legos, you get a big box of them, and you all have all these shapes to work with,” Bready

CONTENTS

says. “That’s how composing music works, too; you just put the pieces together.” When he graduates from college, Bready says, “I am going to be writing like a madman.” Bready already practices a daily composition pattern, typically writing at least one piece of music each day, but he wants to increase his output and quality, and he hopes to get published as quickly as possible. He also sees performance as a tool of improvement, where he is able to “sit back and view people’s reactions while (my set) is going on, and especially having conversations afterward.” Hearing Bready talk about his involvement in his current band, Poly Cannon, you can get the sense of how much music means to him, “I enjoy playing music from the standpoint that this is creating an experience that is authentically fun,” Bready says. “It addresses the human spirit in a way that a lot of things don’t.” Bready calls Poly Cannon’s sound classically-minded, experimental rock. Bready’s life is about to change in a big way, when in January he marries his best friend, Erin Hoover, a ballerina from Indiana. No matter what the future holds, Jackson will always be a part of this talented musician. “I realize to what extent I am a part of Jackson; it is not just some playground I am running around on; it is an integral part of myself,” Bready says. —Matthew Bolian

Cover photograph courtesy of Tawanna Shaunté More covers: jfp.ms/covers

9 Building Baptist

Baptist Health Systems Hospital is well into its planned expansion into the Belhaven neighborhood.

28 Political Witness

“No, I’m not a journalist. I just tell you what I see and how I feel about it. That’s it. I’m just a witness. It’s not for me to speculate or have a crystal ball. I think a lot of this stuff is real simple to understand. Any political issue, you can go to the street and get your understanding. The street never lies.” —Henry Rollins, “Can I Get a Witness?”

36 (Black and) Gold-Star Cuisine From appetizers to dessert, we’re cooking up a truly Southern tailgate, New Orleans Saints-style.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 27 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 28 .............................. DIVERSIONS 30 .......................................... FILM 31 ....................................... 8 DAYS 32 ............................... JFP EVENTS 34 ..................................... SPORTS 35 ................................. ORGANICS 36 ......................................... FOOD 40 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 42 ...................................... FLY DIY

JANE FLOOD; HEIDI MAY; TRIP BURNS

OCTOBER 10 - 16, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 5

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Fire and Brimstone

F

or a minute, we toyed with having debates back at Neshoba Central High School in the 1970s. My homeroom teacher, either in 11th or 12th grade (I forget), also taught American history—but did pretty much anything except teach us much actual U.S. history. He kept a Bible on his desk, though, and used it to proselytize every chance he got. But he wasn’t preaching about all the love-and-help-the-needy stuff that the Bible implores us to do; he was using his Bible to push a certain amount of hatred and fear of “the other.” And he really loved to wave it around to prove his point that (a) women weren’t supposed to speak up in church and (b) that meant we shouldn’t really speak up anywhere else, either. This wasn’t a new experience for me. At the country church where I chose to be baptized, we had a preacher for a while who used cherry-picked parts of his Bible to rail from the pulpit against his wife and punish her for not submitting to his wishes enough. One day, she ran out of the church crying, her hand covering her mouth. I, on the other hand, liked to speak up and out, and I was a big fan of equality for women, people of color and pretty much any marginalized group, just as I am now. What can I say? I believe that is my calling; I didn’t choose that path; it chose me. I was so radical that I even wore pants to prayer meeting one Wednesday night, and they made me stay in the fellowship hall. As a result of my sass, I annoyed this teacher mightily (my embrace of the Equal Rights Amendment, which was on the national agenda then, didn’t help any). So one day, the teacher decided that we were going to have a “debate.” He would pit me against a guy in the class who would argue against the ERA. I would argue in favor of it. I started reading and studying. Mean-

time, it leaked out that the teacher was prepping my opponent with Bible verses to prove me wrong. And the teacher would be one of the judges, along with another teacher who liked to yell at me to “come back in 20 years, you’ll change your mind about all that garbage!” (I haven’t, of course.) So, I realized, the debate was a setup. It didn’t matter how many actual facts I had at my disposal, or good arguments that women deserve equal rights under U.S. law, or that families would benefit, my teacher was setting me up to lose. He planned for me to face a lot of selective Bible waving proving that my gender was inferior (obviously not including Galatians 3:28, the passage that bigots and chauvinists have long loved to treat as a biblical outlier). It didn’t matter how calmly or powerfully I presented my case. I knew I would “lose” that debate. So I withdrew. The fix was in. It was experiences like that one—often revolving around race and gender, respect and equality—that drove me to leave my state the day after I graduated from Mississippi State University in 1983. I didn’t reject Mississippi back then; it rejected me. I thought of my demoralizing “debate” experience for the first time in many years last week after watching the first presidential debate—and after listening to the mainstream media declare Mitt Romney the “winner” immediately afterward because, apparently, Romney was more aggressive than President Obama. And a roller-coaster political narrative helps ratings. It was as if substance was the last thing on the pundits’ minds, much like my teacher back in high school. He was bent on teaching us that debates are won by any means necessary, including abject bigotry or even lies. And last week, Romney “won” a debate with confounding statements that were both shocking and, in many cases, untrue. He

even disputed his own earlier promises—in primary debates and in TV interviews—that he would lower taxes by 20 percent (which analysts projected would lead to the $5 trillion shortfall that he took such offense at in the debate). Now, he says, he won’t lower taxes on the wealthy or raise them—which brings another level of unanswered questions of how he could lower the deficit while not reversing job gains or devastating the poor. It seems Romney wants to create confusion about his plan more than anything— and that won the debate. Remarkable. The most heartbreaking untruth, at least to me, was when Romney looked sick Americans in the eye and promised that his health-care plan would cover pre-existing conditions: a blatant lie designed to make worried voters feel better about his promise to repeal Obamacare on day one. Immediately after the debate, Romney’s adviser walked back the promise. Romney actually meant, he said, that the states would have to work out a way to cover pre-existing conditions because that job would be passed down to them under a Romney administration. In fact, if you listened (or read the transcript), Romney’s remarks were soaked in promises to pass the burdens to the states—from education to health care. Like Massachusetts, the states can pass their own health-care plans, he said, and they can manage their education policy better. Really? Sitting in one of the poorest states whose leadership won’t “adequately” fund public education when it can afford to; opposes the birth-control pill or comprehensive sex education; wants a “personhood” amendment; and tries to gut Medicaid, I’m not buying it. And I’m amazed that close to half of America believes it—including those in extremely poor “red states” like Mississippi that would be hit the hardest by Romney’s the-states-can-handle-it strategy.

We need to listen to what Romney says instead of obsessing over how he says it. He is offering very few specifics about how he would shrink federal government (which President Obama has actually done) other than put costs and burdens back on the states. Meantime, even though U.S. private-sector jobs have grown steadily in the last 40 or so months, we’ve seen big losses in government jobs. This may be great news for those who want to drown government in a bathtub, but what it means in states like Mississippi is immediate unemployment. We’ve already suffered the loss of manufacturing and other jobs to other nations; now we’re losing the government jobs that help sustain us. And if the U.S. Chamber hadn’t forced Congress to block the president’s jobs bill last fall, American companies would be getting tax benefits for creating more jobs in the U.S. now. Romney isn’t even offering up a smart transition plan to steadily replace all those government jobs with private-sector jobs— or support for government stimulus to make it happen. He wanted to “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt,” as he famously wrote in November 2088, but stimulus money ensured that it wouldn’t, saving many jobs and state economies. Just this week, GM announced that it is hiring up to 10,000 computer professionals in four cities, including Detroit. That is government (and business) at its more honorable: Figuring out how to invest wisely in our future success and stimulate the economy. That kind of government-business partnership is exactly how America was built and grew to its current strength: by supporting states’ efforts to grow and overcome challenges, not by dumping on them. Romney’s cheeky recipe for abdicating federal responsibility may play well on some pundits’ scorecards, but it is not going to continue America’s recovery. No amount of fire and brimstone—or lies—will change that.

October 10 - 16, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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Briana Robinson

Dylan Watson

Bryan Flynn

Greg Pigott

Darnell Jackson

Elyane Alexander

Deputy Editor Briana Robinson’s hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a junior at Millsaps College. Briana coordinated and wrote for the cover package.

Editorial intern Dylan Watson is from Indianola. He is a senior at Millsaps College, where he studies political science. He wrote the business story.

Sportswriter Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippi native who lives in north Jackson with his wife and their four cats. He also writes a national blog, playtowinthegame.com. Follow him @jfpsports. Bryan wrote sports stories.

Greg Pigott is truly an avid fan of every kind of music. He’s also the guy who takes karaoke seriously. He wrote a music story.

Darnell “Chris” Jackson is a freelance writer, photographer, graphic designer and entrepreneur. He is a Jackson native and Jackson State graduate. He owns J.Carter Studios. Darnell wrote a music story.

Former editorial intern Elyane Alexander is a native of Madison. She is a fourth-grade teacher. Her hobbies include reading, writing and shopping. She wrote a music story.

Anita Modak-Truran Stephanie Bowering Anita Modak-Truran is a southern convert, having moved here from Chicago more than a decade ago with her husband and son. She loves the culture, cuisine and arts in these parts. Anita wrote a film review.

Account Executive Stephanie Bowering is from Mendenhall. She is mommy to Jameson, the cutest 3-year-old boy, and Duke, a 4-year-old boxer. She loves good food, red wine and music, and wants to travel the world.


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Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

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YOUR TAKE from jfp.ms

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Brjohn9 (Brian Johnson): “Scrappy, there is no need to make up lies to oppose the president. He did not ‘swear to stand with Muslims.’ He did not say that the ‘First Amendment should be restricted when referring to Islam’s prophet.’ If you want to blame him for deaths in Afghanistan, or oppose him for immigration policy, that is one thing. But you’re already traipsing through D’Souza territory with this other hogwash.�

October 10 - 16, 2012

Tim Dukes I’m a lead singer (Daggers), and we played a show the other night at The Joint. We promoted it for weeks and honestly we were kinda nervous no one would show. But when we set up, there was a full room of people. It was one of the best hometown shows we played, and kids went crazy. The whole room was moving. It meant the world to me and my friends! Natalie Brooke Long 1. Meeting Pat Sansone from Wilco. 2. Clinton Kirby and I always said, “Alright, here we go!� before a performance, and without talking about it, would always have matching clothes. SCOTT PENNER

Scrappy1: “(Obama) swore to stand with Muslims and that he has used our tax/ debt dollars to support turning over many parts of the Middle East to Sharia compliant governments. Even announcing with his UN speech that our first amendment should be restricted when referring to Islam’s Prophet.�

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6

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE JACKSON MUSIC MOMENT?

paragons of freedom and self-determination they believe themselves to be, and seem more like the conspirators they fear.�

COURTESY OBAMA’S AMERICA FOUNDATION

Gwilly under “The Delusion and Paranoia of ‘Obama’s America 2016’� (jfp.ms/obama2016) “What amazes me about the stance of the film and the filmmaker is the premise that being anti-colonial is something to be feared. It seems so ironic, considering India was colonized and throwing off the British rule was a long and arduous task, that an Indian-American would make this film and this argument. It is also ironic that Americans would eat up the anti-colonial rhetoric as equal to anti-American, as if our founding principles were those of powerful country with the destiny to rule the world rather than those of a idealistic and struggling young nation yearning to free itself from a colonizing power. Meanwhile, the Republican Party is becoming increasingly intolerant, closed and paranoid to the point that they see a conspiracy behind anyone who disagrees with them. They no longer resemble the

Edward Peter Cole II When PRINCE played at The DOCK! LaRue Owen I have three: 1. George Beverly Shea singing at the Billy Graham Crusade at Memorial Stadium in 1952. 2. Bill Ellison, Temperance Babcock, and Jeff Perkins playing her arrangement of All Of Me at Hal & Mal’s. 3. My singing in the shower this morning. Britini Breazeale This year: Jimmy Herring!!! James Hester Bob Dylan at the 2003 Jubilee!JAM. Melissa Fowler Darling Chris Robinson at Duling Hall NEXT WEEK’S QUESTION: WHO IS YOUR JACKSON HERO, AND WHY? Answer @jxnfreepress on Twitter (hashtag #jxnhero), on the Jackson Free Press Facebook page or to letters@jacksonfreepress.com.


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Thursday, Oct. 4 All traffic is stopped on a section of Lake Harbour Drive in Ridgeland for three hours when construction crews hit a gas line Thursday afternoon. ... Former Charles Manson follower Bruce Davis, sentenced to life in prison in 1972, receives a recommendation of parole from the parole board of the California Men’s Colony at San Luis Obispo. Friday, Oct. 5 Congressman Bennie Thompson sends a request to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to block Mississippi’s Voter ID law. Saturday, Oct. 6 MDOT announces that major renovations on the I-55 Split Diamond Project in Madison County will begin on Sunday and last 10 to 12 months. ... The pope’s butler, Paolo Gabriele, is convicted of stealing the pope’s private documents and leaking them to journalist Gianluigi Nuzzi. Sunday, Oct. 7 Gas prices reach an all-time high in California, with prices set at $4.65 per gallon.

October 10 - 16, 2012

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Tuesday, Oct. 9 The Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership releases its Vision 2022/ One Voice 10-year plan, more than a year in the making, to provide an economic roadmap for the capital city area. ... Jerry Sandusky is sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison for 45 counts of child sexual abuse. Get breaking daily news at jfp.ms and jfpdaily.com. Subscribe free.

by Jacob D. Fuller

A

fter years of supporting a city cur- at a Oct. 4 Planning Committee meeting. A few for minors, but having no fa- curfew would be a new condition, he said. cility in which to hold them, the That leaves the city with the question: Jackson City Council’s discourse If we reinstate the curfew, where do we take appears to be changing on the subject of the kids? what to do with young people after dark. Planning Committee Chairwoman Most of the LaRita Coopercouncil’s planning Stokes of Ward 3 committee agreed brought the curfew with local ACLU back into discusleaders that a city sion at the commitcurfew that sends tee meeting. Her youth violators to husband, Kenneth jail is not only a bad Stokes, has long idea, but one that been a youth-curcould land the city few proponent and in serious trouble proposed re-adoptwith the state. ing the city’s former Und er the curfew, which excity’s former curfew, pired in 2009, when no one under 18 he was the Ward 3 was allowed to be councilman. The orin any public place dinance has been in in the city between the Planning ComLaRita Cooper-Stokes wants the city to the hours of 10 mittee since 2010. a curfew for minors, but she has p.m. and 6 a.m. on reenact Ward 4 Counneither the law nor fellow council members weekdays, and mid- on her side. cilman Frank Bluntnight and 6 a.m. on son, a former proFridays and Saturdays. If police picked up ponent of the city curfew and former direcviolators, they took the minors to Henley- tor of the local youth detention center, even Young Youth Detention Center. seemed to change his tone on the subject. State law now prohibits municipalities He indicated that he is open to listening to from holding status offenders, such as cur- other council members’ proposals to create few violators, in the same facility as crimi- places such as youth centers for children to nals, such as burglars or murderers. A con- go at night. sent decree from the state also prevents the Council President Tony Yarber of Ward city from creating any new conditions which 6 said he has seen no data that show city curwould send juveniles to Henley-Young, fews work. Little to no conclusive data shows Deputy City Attorney James Anderson said a positive affect of curfews on juvenile crime,

despite 78 of the 92 cities nationwide with a population of 180,000 or more currently having youth curfews. In fact, a 1999 study by the Justice Policy Institute of the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice found that when data showed a discernible difference: the cities that most strictly enforced a curfew also had the highest juvenile crime rates. Yarber said he was glad Cooper-Stokes brought the discussion to the table and was excited to hear that the current city council is interested in entertaining new ideas. He wants to see the city find alternative solutions to youth being on the street with nothing to do at night. The city needs to redirect some funds to address the problem, he said. He and Ward 5 Councilman Charles Tillman have been researching the city opening an activity center to take children instead of jail. An even more proactive approach, Yarber said, would be opening activity centers to give all children a fun, safe place to go at night. Mississippi ACLU Legal Director Bear Atwood and Program Director Nancy Kohsin-Kintigh both spoke at the Planning Committee Oct 4. Kohsin-Kintigh said minors have the right to be out anytime of night, just like adults do. “I understand parents are frustrated, but so are young people. There’s nothing to do. There’s no places for them to go,� Kohsin-Kintigh said. “If we created that space, we will see some very positive things coming out of that.� Cooper-Stokes’ only reaction to Kohsin-Kintigh’s comments was to ask KohsinKintigh if she has any children, to which

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CREATIVEFEED WEBSITE

Monday, Oct. 8 The city of Jackson agrees to spend $400 million to make sewer improvements and to pay fines to the Environmental Protection Agency for releasing more than 2.8 billion gallons of minimally treated sewage into the Pearl River system over the last four years.

Council Turns Against Curfews

JACOB FULLER

Wednesday, Oct. 3 The U.S. Justice Department issues a statement saying it needs more data from Mississippi that House Bill 921 will not have discriminatory purpose or effect, preventing Voter ID from going into effect before the November election. ... The first presidential debate is held in Denver, Colo., on domestic policy.

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she answered, “No.� “We send a little over $1.2 million (to the county) every year to fuel the juvenilejustice piece that we have,� Yarber said, adding that some of that money should go into athletic, arts and other programs for children. That would be true pro-activity on the part of the city in preventing youth crime, Yarber said. Atwood wants to see the city include parent support services and discussions with youth and parents to the solution process. She said the answer isn’t just getting children off the streets, because then they’ll just act up at home. “(Parents) are in a tough situation,� Atwood said. “I really hope that we’ll bring parents into the conversation.�

There are also problems with creating another facility to house juveniles who violate a curfew, Anderson said. Youth Court Judge William Skinner would have to approve a new facility to house curfew violators and the city would have to worry with many levels of state and federal requirements for the facility. In previous years, the council has proposed taking the children to a church, but legal counsel has advised them that is illegal to bring a third party, such as a church, in to house the children. The Planning Committee will discuss the curfew at a public meeting at City Hall Oct. 25 at 6 p.m. The next Planning Committee meeting is scheduled for Oct. 29 at 3 p.m. Comment at jacksonfreepress.com.

Baptist Rebuilds Belhaven

A

nyone who has driven by Baptist Health Systems Hospital on North State Street recently has noticed the construction workers building the metal-and-brick structure just across the street. BHS bought the land where the building is now under construction from the owners of Keifer’s restaurant last year with plans for a healthcare-centered mixed-use development. Now much of the five-story, 180,000 square-foot building is complete, and BHS hopes to see the building, as well as an 800-spot parking garage, open on the land by mid-April 2013. BHS began a long-term strategy prior to the 2008 economic collapse that included expanding further into the Belhaven neighborhood. After the recession hit, though, BHS scaled the plans down to focus on building more office space on the land formerly housed Keifer’s. “We needed physician office space to get more physicians down here. We were out of space for them to lease,� BHS Communications Director Robby Channell told the Jackson Free Press. “This was just the first phase of our devel-

will lease out the space inside it. Several tenants have already signed on, including medical providers like Premier Medical Group (which will take up 45 percent of the building, or about 70,000 square feet), Jackson Eye Associates, Retina Associates, BHS’s neurosciences services and home healthcare. There will also be retail space in the building, including an Einstein’s Bagels, a full-service restaurant called The Manship, a yogurt shop and Trustmark Bank. “Part of that retail component of the first floor was to really create some space for the Belhaven residents and neighborhood, some place for them to go to be able to get something to eat,â€? Lampasona said. When BHS purchased the land, Keifer’s owner Rick Olson owned the land just across Poplar Boulevard, but he wanted help in building a new restaurant there. So as part of the land purchase, Olson paid money to BHS for them to give to LHF to construct the new restaurant. Lampasona said LHF is used to only building medical facilities, so Keifer’s got a structure far more stable than the average restaurant. He said the new Keifer’s structure could realistically last up to 8,000 years. .%7315): +RZPXFKPRQH\ZDVLQYHVWHGLQ%DSWLVW+HDOWK6\VWHPÂśVQHZ EXLOGLQJVSDUNLQJJDUDJHDQGWRZQKRXVHVWKDWDUHFXUUHQWO\XQGHU FRQVWUXFWLRQRQ1RUWK6WDWH6WUHHW" 2IWKHFLWLHVQDWLRQZLGHWKDWKDYHSRSXODWLRQVRIRYHU RIWKHPKDYH\RXWKFXUIHZV'LGDVWXG\ SHUIRUPHGE\WKH-XVWLFH3ROLF\,QVWLWXWHVKRZWKDWFLWLHVZLWK VWULFWO\HQIRUFHGFXUIHZVJHQHUDOO\KDYHKLJKHURUORZHUMXYHQLOH FULPHUDWHV" :KDWGRHVWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI-XVWLFHUHTXLUHWKDW0LVVLVVLSSL SURYHLQRUGHUIRUWKH6WDWHWRSURFHHGZLWKLWV9RWHU,'ODZV"

jacksonfreepress.com

Baptist Health Systems has hired Landmark Healthcare Facilities to build a new, mixed-use development.

opment efforts in a long-term plan.� For the project, BHS hired Milwaukee, Wis.-based Landmark Healthcare Facilities to finance, build and manage the facility, while BHS holds ownership of the land. Building medical facilities is the only thing LHF does. President Anthony Lampasona said LHF builds three or four projects similar to the one on State Street every year throughout the country. The company recently finished projects in Florida and one in Lafayette, La. The total investment for the building, parking garage, an addition to Baptist Hospital and 11 townhouses that will also be located on the land across from the hospital, is about $75 million. LHF invested about $8.8 million of its own money into the $35 million office building. The other $26 million came from a bank loan that LHF took out for construction. Lampasona said that hospitals often find companies to build and own new projects like this one, because the hospitals money is better spent elsewhere. “In their overall mission, owning brick-and-mortar buildings is not as important to them as developing more service lines to serve the community, how to better the patient experience, capital required to recruit more physicians to the area, improve core facilities within the hospital,� Lampasona said. “All of that takes a tremendous amount of money.� BHS will provide the funding for the other pieces of the construction, including parking garage and a sky bridge connector that will provide pedestrians a safe walkway above State Street. “I’ve crossed that street many, many times. Sometimes, it’s not the safest street to cross. There’s a lot of fast driving going on there,� Lampasona said. Another part of the project is a streetscape makeover. LHF and BHS will both invest money into creating more well-defined crosswalks and redesigned sidewalks at intersections that will make travel safer and easier on pedestrians. Once LHF finishes construction on the building, it

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by Jacob D. Fuller

9


TALK | election 2012

APPLY FOR ABSENTEE BALLOT BY NOV. 3

Hosemann’s Voter ID Subterfuge by R.L. Nave and Dylan Watson

I

Department officials have up to 60 days to respond. Therefore, Hood stated in a news release, “You will not be required to show ID at the poll until DOJ interposes no objections or pre-clears Mississippi’s voter ID bill.” The secretary of state’s official website seems to suggest otherwise, however. In addition to the lack of assurance that voters won’t need voter ID after all, the purportedly helpful web portal is not very informative. Several calls placed to the toll-free number on Tuesday led to a recording from Hosemann asking voters to leave a message “if you need assistance obtaining a free voter identification card, once the requirement is implemented.” Incidentally, a call placed Tuesday to Hosemann’s spokeswoman Pamela Weaver about problems with the site was not immediately returned. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann (standing, front) is congratulated by State. Rep. Alex Monsour, R-Vicksburg, (rear) as Gov. Phil Bryant signs the state’s voter ID law.

October 10 - 16, 2012

DEBATE FACTCHECK

10

Q: President Obama accused Mitt Romney in the first debate of supporting a $5 trillion tax cut, including on the wealthy. Romney denied it. True? A: Not at the moment. Romney hasn’t used those words, but he promised during the primaries and in many interviews that he would cut 20 percent of everyone’s taxes, including the very rich. Independent budget analysts said that would result in a $5 trillion tax cut. During the first debate, Romney surprised many, including Obama, in saying he’s

by Dylan Watson

B R.L. NAVE

n anticipation of the Nov. 6 general election, Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann’s office has prominently displayed an icon on their state website that asks: “Need a photo ID? Click here for more information.” When the link is clicked, users are directed to another site, www.MsVoterID.ms.gov that advises voters: “When approved, Mississippi’s new Voter ID law will require voters to show identification at the polls. If you do NOT have an ID, tell us how best to contact you so we can assist you.” Also included is a toll-free telephone hotline for citizens to get their questions answered as well as snail- and email addresses where one can presumably send off for additional helpful info. There are a few problems with the site, however. Most glaringly, nowhere does the secretary of state’s website make it clear that the Mississippi’s voter-identification law, which the Legislature and governor approved in May, will not be in effect for the November election. The U.S. Department of Justice has not signed off on it, yet. At a Sept. 19 legislative budget hearing at the Capitol, Hosemann said that because the DOJ was unlikely to approve the voter-ID law that voters approved through ballot initiative in 2011, he wanted to keep $500,000 in his budget to fight for the law in court. Voter ID’s death knell, at least for 2012, came a couple weeks later, when the DOJ asked the Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood for more proof that the law requiring voters to prove their identities at the polls was designed with “neither a discriminatory purpose nor will have a discriminatory effect.” Despite the public concessions from Hosemann and Hood that voters do not need photo ID for this election, the Secretary of State’s office has failed to post any official statement that the law will not be in effect this November. Additionally, flyers posted around the state also advertise the SOS’ voter ID website despite the fact that IDs will not be required in this election. The very same day, a judge in Pennsylvania issued a partial injunction for that state’s voter ID law as well, signaling victory for civil-rights groups who have argued that the recent spate of votersuppression efforts are throwbacks to Jim Crow-era black codes engineered to keep black away from the polls. Mississippi is one of a handful of states where voter discrimination was once so widespread that the federal government must approve any changes to voting law, from the state to the local level. After Mississippi responds to the DOJ’s request for data proving voter ID “will not have a retrogressive effect on minority citizens in the effective exercise of their electoral franchise,” Justice

not going to cut taxes on the wealthy or raise a dollar of taxes on them, regardless of the debt levels.

increased costs. The change sets limits for hospitals and providers if they fail to meet benchmarks for patient care.

Q: Romney says Obama cut $716 in Medicare benefits. Did he? A: No. “Obamacare” cuts that amount from costs paid to private insurance companies and providers, in an effort to reduce expenses. It largely cuts Medicare Advantage programs, started under George W. Bush, designed to add competition but that has resulted in

Q: Romney accused Obama of established Medicare panels (Sarah Palin called them “death panels”) to decide what care patients could get. True? A: False. The law prohibits the advisory panel from deciding care patients can get; it is designed to explore and suggest ways to reduce costs in the program. Sources: factcheck.org, politifact.com

efore you can cast an absentee ballot, you first need to call your county registrar’s office to verify your registration. In order to vote absentee, you must meet one of the following criteria: you will be outside the county on Election Day, you’re disabled, you’re required to be at work on Election Day, you’re over the age of 65, you’re an enlisted member of the military or you’re married to an enlisted member of the military. You need to request the ballot from the registrar’s office. You can request this through a phone call or in person. If you are disabled, over 65, or the spouse or dependent of a person hospitalized 50 miles away from his residence, the circuit clerk will mail you a ballot. Otherwise, you must go to the circuit clerk’s office in person to pick up your ballot. The deadline for applying for an absentee ballot is the Saturday before Election Day (this year Nov. 3), and you must submit the ballot by 5 p.m. the day before the election. This year, you must turn it in by the close of business on Monday, Nov. 5. Bear in mind that if you mail your ballot, it must arrive by that time. Unless you are disabled, you must have your absentee ballot notarized. Mississippi law allows any notary public, United States postmaster, assistant United States postmaster, United States postal supervisor, clerk in charge of a contract postal station or any officer having authority to administer an oath to serve as the witness for the marking of an absentee ballot. If you are disabled, you may have any person 18 years or older witness you marking your ballot. If you are not disabled, not over 65, and not residing outside your county of residence, you must have the Circuit Clerk witness you marking your absentee ballot. See jfp.ms/absentee for more information.


election 2012, illustrated TAX CUTS, WARS PROJECTED TO ACCOUNT FOR NEARLY HALF OF PUBLIC DEBT BY 2019

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jacksonfreepress.com



11


TALK | business

Proud Geek by Dylan Watson

Saturday,
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MS $20
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Bird $10
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Walk $30
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www.gallanthearts.org
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erry native Sheena Allen, 23, started making iPhone apps almost a year ago after graduating from the University of Southern Mississippi. Allen makes apps that can be downloaded to the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Allen decided to start making apps after making a purchase at a local store. She was walking out of the store with her receipt and thought to herself, “It would be so cool to have an app to keep up with my checkbook.” And so she created her first app, PAMO (picture and money organizer). It’s a simple finance app that acts as a digital checkbook. Since then, she’s released three other apps. Allen released her most popular app, Dubblen, last June. Dubblen is a camera app that creates a split-screen in the user’s camera. The user takes a picture using the left side of the screen and then takes a picture using the right side of the screen. Dubblen then combines the two images into one seamless photograph. “So you could be shaking your own hand or high-fiving yourself (in the photo),” she explains. “You can take a double picture of yourself.” At its highest ranking on August 15, Dubblen was the 115th most popular download in the photo and video category in the App store, which only ranks 6,900 apps out of the total of 700,000 that are available for download. “So you pretty much have a 1 percent chance of having your app ranked,” Allen says. Allen released her second most popular app, Words on Pics, in November of last year. Words on Pics allows the user to enhance iPhone photos with text. “You can add photo captions, thought bubbles, speech bubbles, pretty much just have fun with your photos,” she says. Allen released her most recent app, TwtBooth, last July. TwtBooth takes the

Sheena Allen created her first app because she needed it to keep up with her checkbook. Now, she doesn’t know how to stop.

pictures that you’ve tweeted from various photo-sharing programs and consolidates them into one program. “I pretty much made an app where instead of having to scroll through people’s timelines to see photos they’ve tweeted, or go to TwitPic here, go to Instagram there. TwtBooth just shows all the photos that are tweeted no matter what service you (originally) used to tweet them,” Allen says. Allen has introduced both free and for-a-fee versions of her apps. The latter are available for download for 99 cents, with the exception of Dubblen+, at $1.99. Allen turns a profit mainly through downloads of these apps, although she also makes money through advertisements that pop up on her free apps. Through each download of her for-a-fee apps, she receives 70 percent of the payment, and Apple receives 30 percent. To date, Allen’s apps have garnered about 75,000 downloads, and she received more than 21,000 in the month of September alone. But she’s not done yet. “I’m going to do a Words on Pics II,” she says. “Then the next app I’m going to do is going to be called Pic Subject, but I can’t talk too much about that one. It’s a photo/social networking type thing.”

October 10 - 16, 2012

The Jackson Free Press and BOOM Jackson magazine seek TOP PERFORMERS for advertising sales positions.

12

We need client-driven candidates ready to hit the streets to prospect new accounts, listen to client needs and follow up every week with world-class customer service. Bring your love of local business and your willingness to wake up every morning to improve your customers’ bottom line. Young or old, if you have the stuff, we’ll know!

Contact Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton at erica@jacksonfreepress.com to make your pitch!

Allen has a couple websites as well. Her most popular is called PartyTell.com, a website that allows users to post events that are going on in their area and make these posts visible to other users. PartyTell is a free site. “Say if someone from Atlanta is coming to Jackson this weekend, they can actually go to PartyTell, and they can find out about things that are going on in the city,” she explains. The entrepreneur is also working on three website startups. One is a howto website called Step Station. Another is Allen Ad, which steers advertisers in the right direction in terms of where they should advertise. “A lot of people just advertise because they feel like you’re supposed to advertise, but sometimes they spend money and get no results when they’re advertising. It’s a matchmaker between the perfect place to advertise and what you’re trying to advertise,” she says. When asked about her interests, she says, “I’m a proud geek. I’m usually that person you call on a Friday night and say, ‘What are you doing? Are you going out?’ And I’m in the office, on the computer. My best friend’s my computer, I guess.”


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13


Debate Cheers and Boos

M

iss Doodle Mae: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now that fall and the presidential election are here, Jojo is ready to make things happen for his loyal customers and faithful staff. As an enthusiastic member of the Ghetto Science Teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Political Action Committee, he is on a mission to organize motivational sales and voter-drive activities at Jojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discount Dollar Store for residents of the Ghetto Science Community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jojo got things started with the After Hours Presidential Debate Viewing Party and Sale, where customers had the opportunity to shop in the store and view the debate at aisle 7-1/3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Special thanks goes to Aunt Tee Tee Hustleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mobile Ghetto Geek Squad for setting up the high-definition video projector and big screen. Brother Hustle, our part-time cashier, graciously provided refreshing Juicy Juice on ice and light snacks to boost customer satisfaction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, Jojo, the staff and I were pleasantly entertained while customers cheered and booed during the debate. Senior citizens watched intently when the presidential candidates expressed their views about Medicare and Social Security. And the unemployed deejays, emcees and young people focused in on the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plans to improve the economy and create more jobs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jojo canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to have an After Hours Vice-Presidential Debate Viewing Party and Sale. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;you-know-whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; deal, because he is a fan of the vice presidential candidate from Scranton, Pa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Therefore, you are cordially invited to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;shop til you voteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, during two more debate-viewing parties and sales events at Jojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discount Dollar Store.â&#x20AC;?

GOOD NEWS!

Jobs Report=Consumer Confidence The Rasmussen Consumer Index reported this week that the Oct. 5 jobs reportâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;reporting unemployment at a nearly four-year lowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; raised consumer confidence to one of its highest points this year. As we go to press, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up 11 points since Oct. 5, nine points from a month ago and three points since three months ago. 6285&(5$60866(15(32576&20

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Numbersâ&#x20AC;? October 10 - 16, 2012

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14

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Hosemann: Give Voter ID Facts Straight

S

ince last fallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successful referendum requiring Mississippi citizens to show a government-issued photo-identification card, mass confusion has ensued about when and if the law would ever go into effect. For the past year, efforts to explain that no changes to Mississippi election laws can take effect until the U.S. Justice Department says so, which has not happened, have mostly come from the media and civil liberties groups. One voice that has been curiously silent on explaining the facts to voters, however, has been Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, where the buck should stop. As a conservative Republican and one of the chief backers of voter ID, Hosemann can take a certain amount of political satisfaction in helping get the issue on the ballot, through the Legislature and onto Gov. Phil Bryantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desk. Hosemann can even boast to his conservative political cronies of his quietly securing $500,000 in his officeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget appropriation to fight the inevitable legal challenges by the Obama White House. From the perch of a political spectator, one could argue that Hosemann has been victorious (although from a fiscal responsibility point-of-view, he and his pro-ID brethren should be called out for wasting so much taxpayer money on a plan that was sure to meet legal resistance and has scant evidence to back

its need). But with the DOJ now demanding more evidence that the architects of voter ID did not intend to discriminate against black voters, the feds can basically run out the clock. As a result, even Hosemann himself has admitted voter ID wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be effect for the Nov. 6 general election. Hosemann testified to that effect recently at a legislative hearing at the Capitol. What Hosemann has irresponsibly failed to do is explicitly tell Mississippi votersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and potential poll workersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that voter ID is not required this election. There is no statement that we can find on the SOSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; website nor have we seen a press release alerting people that photo ID is unnecessary this time around. Instead, what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen are misleading posters offering help in securing ID, which falsely implies one is needed. We understand that Hosemann holds a partisan position and believes he needs to tow the party line, but the people of Mississippi elected him to run elections, not perpetually run for office. If he or any other public official believes in his heart of hearts that rampant voter fraud needs to be quelled, then produce the evidence, prosecute the offenders and send them to prison. Otherwise, Secretary Hosemann should stop playing politics and tell Mississippians the truth: You do not need photo ID to vote on Nov. 6.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


JOE ATKINS Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Intern Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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XFORD–On the evening of March 18, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. addressed striking sanitation workers in Memphis, and this is what he told them: “All labor has worth. … Don’t despair. Nothing worthwhile is gained without sacrifice. The thing for you to do is stay together. … Let it be known everywhere that along with wages and all of the other securities that you are struggling for, you’re also struggling for the right to be organized and be recognized.” Seventeen days later, King was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel in downtown Memphis. The next year, a great leader of both the civil rights and labor movements, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters founder A. Philip Randolph, had this to say: “The labor movement has been the home of the working man, and traditionally, it has been the only haven for the dispossessed; and therefore, I have tried to build an alliance between the Negro and the American labor movement.” Josh Dedmond, Monica Atkins and Tyson Jackson want to build on the alliance King, Randolph and others envisioned four decades ago. They believe workers’ rights can be the civil rights movement of today. That’s why they and other Jackson-area members of the newly formed Mississippi Student Justice Alliance are planning an “I Am” labor-and-civil rights conference in Jackson in late November. The conference is named after the “I Am A Man” sign sanitation workers carried in Memphis and will feature veterans of that 1968 strike. “This is in the same vein as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee,” said Dedmond, 25, a recent Tougaloo College graduate in African American and religious studies. SNCC played a key role in the civil rights movement. “There is an enormous power in students regarding social justice issues. The two movements are inextricable from one another.” The Mississippi Student Justice Alliance’s target: helping workers at the giant Nissan plant in Canton realize their goal of joining the United Auto Workers despite management’s disdain for that idea. Dedmond, Atkins and Tyson are also now working with the UAW and its Global Organizing Institute, helping recruit and educate young people from around the world about labor issues. “We started figuring out about the workers at Nissan and how they wanted a fair election process,” said Atkins, 23, a Chicago native who graduated from Jackson State University in April. She said she decided to stay in Mississippi because “here, there is a lot more opportunity to make a difference.” Making a difference in Mississippi can be an uphill fight. King and Randolph would be the first to tell them.

At the Nissan plant, pro-UAW workers not only face an anti-union CEO in Carlos Ghosn but also a conservative state with a union-hostile “right-to-work” law embedded in its constitution, a Republican-led legislature and a Republican governor who has publicly expressed support for outside groups that would help fight a union at Nissan or Toyota in Mississippi. The striking workers in Memphis sought in 1968 “exactly what the Nissan workers are asking for,” said Jackson, 31, who studies political science at Tougaloo. “Respect.” The UAW has laid the foundation for an all-out organization effort at the 3,300worker plant. A network that includes U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., area ministers and civil rights-era veterans and activists has pledged to assist in the union’s call for an election free of intimidation. Mississippi’s rich civil rights history was a factor in the UAW’s decision to take a stand in Canton. In the early 1960s, state NAACP leader and civil rights martyr Medgar Evers worked hand-in-hand with state AFL-CIO leaders Claude Ramsay, Thomas Knight and Ray Smithhart. Like other labor leaders in the South, they endured many defections of white members from their ranks as a result of their stand for civil rights. Most of the workforce at the Nissan plant in Canton is African American. They make some of the best wages in a state that perennially ranks at the nation’s bottom in wage earnings. However, workers complain that they haven’t had a pay raise in years, have little or no say-so regarding working conditions, and face a constant barrage of antiunion propaganda. Federal law guarantees workers have the right to organize and join a union without harassment. The truth is, however, workers across America now face the kind of hostility that Mississippians have known since segregationist Gov. Ross Barnett secured “right to work” as state law. They get little or no backing from Congress or the U.S. “Corporate” Supreme Court, and even some major Democrats seem antagonistic to unions. If there’s to be a resurrection of the labor movement, the UAW seems poised to play the kind of pivotal role it played both in past labor and civil rights history. Its sit-down strikes in the 1930s helped establish modernday labor. In the 1960s, UAW leader Walter Reuther marched alongside Martin Luther King Jr. “When (police commissioner) Bull Connor is destroying freedom in Birmingham, he is destroying my freedom in Detroit,” Reuther said during the famous March on Washington in August 1963. That’s the spirit—along with those of King and Randolph—that Redmond, Atkins and Jackson are hoping to rekindle in Mississippi.

jacksonfreepress.com

All Labor Has Worth

15


A Family Affair

F

Hunter Gibson & The Gators The Caspers

Questions in Dialect

Storage 24

rom indie rock to hip-hop, musicians in Jackson connect with each other in various ways. Here are just a few collaborations going on around town. Add your own at jfp.ms/musiccollaborations.

(Daniel Guaqueta)

Slimm Pusha

Mr. Fluid Smurf

Kamikaze

Doe Hicks

5th Child

7even: Thirty Ulogy PyInfamous

Hollywood Luck Crooked Lettaz â&#x20AC;Ą

Skipp Coon

Akami Graham Kerry Thomas

David Banner

October 10 - 16, 2012

16

Judson Wright

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Roosevelt Noise

Supercrush

The Bachelorettes â&#x20AC;Ą

Jonezetta â&#x20AC;Ą

Hank Overkill Dent May

Redneck Trucker

Bass Drum of Death Fletcher â&#x20AC;Ą

â&#x20AC;Ą

Champagne Heights â&#x20AC;Ą

The Red Hots

Guillermo

A Bullet Well Spent

King Elementary

â&#x20AC;Ą

â&#x20AC;Ą - Defunct band Connection between bands Overlapping Members

Lizzie Wright Super Space Ship

â&#x20AC;Ą

â&#x20AC;Ą

That Scoundrel

Quills

Johnny Bertram & the Golden Bicycles

Passenger Jones Eunuchs

Tuff Luvs

Spacewolf

Mr. Kidd & The Bros. Fox

James Crow

Sharing the Love

L

Furrows

Coke Bumaye

Swamp Babies

Goodman County â&#x20AC;Ą

Liver Mousse

Lil Miss So & So

Taylor Hildebrand

Wooden Finger

Circus of Souls

Amazin Lazy Boi

Victoria Cross

Strange Pilgrims

Horse Trailer

Discover America

TTOCCS REKARP

Tawanna ShauntĂŠ

Tommy Bryan Ledford

Taylor Grocery Band

El Obo

Captain & Co.

Dead Gaze The Rockwells â&#x20AC;Ą

Colour Revolt

City Lights â&#x20AC;Ą

by Briana Robinson

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Alive at Night by Jacob D. Fuller

I

& Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made its name as one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best live music venues and eventually became the premier live music venue downtown and even in the state, bringing in acts from a variety of genres from all over the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We opened on a shoestring budget, and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to borrow,â&#x20AC;? Malcolm White told the Jackson Free Press. Malcolm lived in an apartment at the restaurant/bar

TATE K. NATIONS

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the weekend in Jackson, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for something to do. Unlike many southeastern metropolises, our capital city doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a nightlife center like the French Quarter in New Orleans or Beale Street in Memphis. Throughout the city, however, there are entertainment options for all ages, tastes and styles. From an Irish pub to live rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll venues, from jazz clubs and the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got in the brewery business 10 years too early and got out five years too soon,â&#x20AC;? White said. Today, Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still hosts live music three to five nights a week in one the venueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four spaces â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the big room, the red room, the dining room and the courtyard. It also serves some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most beloved food and any drink a patron can imagine. As for the Farish Street district, Malcolm White is not worried about it taking customers from Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I live in reality. I live in the present,â&#x20AC;? White said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Farish Street) is never going to be a Beale Street. At very best, it can be an entertainment cluster of 10 to 15 similar businesses. It canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put (us) out of business.â&#x20AC;?

TATE K. NATIONS

New ISH finds empty niche Michael Johnson is a hairstylist by training and trade. The Jackson native has operated Work of Art Salon at 333 North Mart Plaza for 17 years. Now he is applying his trained hand and high-end taste in the nightlife business. Johnson created ISH, an upscale restaurant, bar and lounge on the floor above the salon on North Mart Plaza. Still in its infancy, Johnson hopes to have ISH open Tuesday through Friday for lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., dinner from 5 to 10 p.m., and as a bar and lounge from 10 p.m. until closing Wednesdays through Fridays. It will also be open for private parties and events on Saturdays. ISH will feature a variety of music with a single unifying factor: its acts will cater to its crowd. From live jazz, blues, R&B and soul acts to DJs and the occasional ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playlist coming through the speakers, Johnson said patrons will always find something different to listen to at the second-story lounge. when it first opened. At the time, the only people living in The leather love seats, dark wooden tables and elegant downtown Jackson were he and the governor and their fami- lighting give a ISH a cool, calm atmosphere. That is exactly lies, White said. what Johnson said he is hoping for. Then, in 1988, the federal government hit Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I saw the need of mature and professional people wanthard by passing the national Indian Gaming Regulatory ing somewhere to go that was upscale,â&#x20AC;? Johnson told the JFP. Act, which allowed casinos on Indian reservations across â&#x20AC;&#x153;Normally, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nowhere for adult people to go and really the country. The state of Mississippi followed by passing the for people to, what I say is, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;keep it on the level.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Mississippi Gaming Control Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to do right now, is Act, allowing casinos in counset the bar kind of high.â&#x20AC;? ties along the Mississippi River ISH will enforce the upand the Gulf Coast. scale atmosphere with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;dressy Suddenly, Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s casualâ&#x20AC;? dress code. Johnson was no longer the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow ball caps, t-shirts, venue for traveling bands. The athletic shorts or tennis or bascasinos could offer bands three ketball shoes inside. times what the White brothers At night, the food will be could, and Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s began high-end as well. Tony Cole to find it much more diffiand Chef Damien will run the cult to book the more wellkitchen and offer dishes like known acts. steaks and shrimp and grits. The White brothers nevJohnson is hoping that er closed their doors, though. his salon clientele will spread â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a plan. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fam- An upscale restaurant, bar and lounge, ISH is the the word that his sophisticated ily business,â&#x20AC;? Malcolm White newest nighttime hotspot in town. salon now has a restaurant and said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve maintained a lounge to match. quality product. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always served good food. We were able to adapt.â&#x20AC;? Frank Jones Corner: So late, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early In the 1990s, Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tried a new venture, opening The entertainment district on Farish Street may still be its own brewery at the restaurant. White said the fad of mi- just a dream, but there is one blues club at the corner of Farcrobreweries was a long way from catching on in Mississippi ish and Griffith Streets that becomes a reality every weekend, at the time. After several years of brewing, and little success 1,*+7/,)(9(18(6VHHSDJH 17 from it, Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closed its brewery.

open-till-breakfast blues joint to a hot new upscale lounge, Jacksonians need only search the Jackson Free Press event listings to find just the place to relax, party, head bang, dance or just sip on their favorite beverage without leaving the city limits. Look for more venue spotlights in the music pages in the coming weeks, and email kathleen@jacksonfreepress. com to suggest your venue.

TRIP BURNS

Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breathes life into downtown In the late 1970s, when Malcolm White moved to Jackson, there was little do downtown, and no one living there to do it. White, now the executive director of the Mississippi Arts Commission, managed and booked acts for some restaurant/bars in the city in the early 1980s, including George Street Grocery (now Ole Tavern). White opened a nightlife spot in the former GM&O Freight Depot building off State Street, under the name The Lamar, after the old Lamar Theater, which the Jackson Redevelopment authority bought and demolished in the 1980s to make way for the One Jackson Place building. The Lamar was a college bar, open on Wednesday and Saturday evenings. It quickly became popular, but the federal government soon rained on the parade. In 1986, under pressure from the U.S. government, the state raised the legal drinking age from 18 to 21. White said the change killed The Lamar, because most college students couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy alcohol legally anymore. White still held the lease for the building, though, and soon after his brother Harold â&#x20AC;&#x153;Halâ&#x20AC;? White returned to Jackson to open Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with him. In its early years, Hal

jacksonfreepress.com

Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has been pouring drinks, serving food and rocking to live music for almost 30 years.


1,*+7/,)(9(18(6IURPSDJH TRIP BURNS

just as soon as the rest of the city closes. F. Jones Corner is currently Farish Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only live blues bar. The street was once the center of African American music and nightlife in the city, and F. Jones Corner was a big part of it as far back as the 1950s. Like almost everything on the street, though, it closed and was left to disrepair. In 2009, Daniel Dillon and Adam Hayes teamed up to bring back F. Jones Corner and nightlife on Farish Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted there to be a place that was historically accurate to the blues bar in Mississippi and what that means,â&#x20AC;? Dillon told the JFP. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of stuff to be proud of in Mississippi, and one of them is our blues scene.â&#x20AC;? In 2004, the City Council awarded Farish Street resort status. That designation allows F. Jones Corner to stay open and serve alcohol 24 hours a day, which has made F. Jones Corner the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s go-to spot when all the other bars have to close shop at 2 a.m. Dillon and Hayes originally opened the venue with hopes of having it open for lunch and dinner, but the lack of traffic on the street forced them to narrow down their hours and find their time slot in Jacksonianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nightlife. Now, they are open Thursdays through Saturdays from 10 p.m. until 5 a.m. Dillon said F. Jones Corner is trying to get patrons in before the other bars close, though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a $10 cover after midnight, but no cover before

Open until 5 a.m., F. Jones Corner is the place to head once other bars around town close for the night.

midnight,â&#x20AC;? Dillon said. F. Jones Cornerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busy hours will likely change drastically if the Farish Street district finally comes to fruition around it. If that happens, Dillon said F. Jones Corner will stand out from the rest of the street.

natalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notes

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We plan on being the truth,â&#x20AC;? Dillon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We could be surrounded by outsourced management and outsourced bars and things that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t indicative of Jackson and Mississippi, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to maintain the truth. We consider ourself the truth on Farish Street.â&#x20AC;?

by Natalie Long

Girls Behaving Badly

18

TRIP BURNS

October 10 - 16, 2012

I

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the fortunate opportunity to see some great concerts this summer, including Wilco, Kevin Costner, Duran Duran and, most recently, Elton John. I had an absolute blast at these shows, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad such great acts visited the Magnolia State. However, I did notice how the female fans at these shows misbehaved and acted. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been bothering me awhile, and I just cannot hold my silence any longer. Years ago (meaning when I was 33 and younger), I was the rowdy girl at the concerts, literally fighting my way to the front row, getting thrown out for disorderly and Big-name concerts such as Kevin Costner or Elton John seem to be totally unladylike behaviorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you get the bringing out the worst in female fans these days. point. And oh, how my friends and I would just about knock your teeth out over a guitar pick or a (usually too-small) t-shirt someone of her, when really my friend was there for mere seconds to from the band threw out to the crowd. Yes, we acted poorly show me the picture. at rock concertsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of expected, right?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and pretty I turned around to get a better look at this rudester, much any other concert that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t playing classical music. thinking it was someone younger and a tad bit intoxicated. But now that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten older and been lucky to see a But this woman was way older than what I had expected plethora of live shows here in the capital city and throughout and way more than a tad bit drunkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;she was lit. I saw other the state, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve noticed that it is not so much the younger girls women that night exchange words in the bathroom over getting catty, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ones in their forties and up, who know something petty as well. (I think one woman thought the better yet choose to not act like it. other was going to get the stall she was waiting for, and it just Case in point: Lots of women were at the Kevin Costner took off from there.) concert. And when I say lots, I mean it. Females of all ages While at Duran Duran at the Hard Rock Hotel and packed out Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big room to see â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cos.â&#x20AC;? While Casino in Biloxi, my friend and I had balcony seats. And my friend came up to me to show me a picture she had just though security told all of us we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand up, several of taken of him, this other girl lights into her for butting in front us did once the music startedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I mean, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t not dance

when Duran Duran is playing live. Some chicks behind us were yelling at everyone for standing up; yet they were standing up telling everyone to sit down. Once we said to hell with it and went down to the floor where the band was playing, things were much better, yet we still witnessed women catching attitudes and smartmouthing folks. The same thing happened when I attended the Elton John concert a few weeks ago. I was lucky enough to get floor seats, and you know if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on the floor, no one actually sits down. So, while everyone was up dancing and singing away, I felt a tug on my shirt. An elderly lady told me to â&#x20AC;&#x153;sit (my) ass downâ&#x20AC;? because she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see. Why she chose me and not the other people on my row to do the same thing is beyond me, but believe it or not, the older, wiser Natalie ignored her. That rarely happens, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting better at guarding my tongue. Women: there is no need to act like a total b*tch at concerts. Yes, people are going to stand in front of you. Yes, people are going to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;excuse meâ&#x20AC;? a trillion times going to either get a drink or go to the restroom. Yes, you are going to encounter other chicks who have been drinking excessively and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t handle their alcohol, and they are rude. Momsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Mawmawsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Nights Out are going to be a part of any big show you see, especially when someone as good-looking as Kevin Costner or as talented as Elton John is playing, and you can bet they are going to let loose after being stuck at home, or the retirement home, all day. Just remember, ladies, that when two people get into a fight in public, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to tell who the fool is. Now, go out there and have some funâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not fightsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at live local music shows!


Artists to Watch

the music issue

Darius Brown

Benjamin Cone III and Worship

by Elyane Alexander

by Genevieve Legacy

inging background with renowned gospel artists such as Kim Burrell, Tye Tribbett, Brian Courtney Wilson and Marvin Sapp, Darius Brown is no stranger to hard work and determination. While growing up, one thing that made Brown stand out was that while all the other kids wanted to play a Sega Genesis, he wanted to go to choir rehearsal. He ended up singing with the Mississippi Mass Children’s Choir for six years. Brown is a true believer of the phrase “every opportunity is preparing you for the next opportunity.” While attending Jackson State University, he was a part of the Chorale, Jazz Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Bubbling Brown Sugar Musical and the Interfaith Gospel Choir. In each group, he was section leader, and he was director of the Interfaith Gospel Choir. “This was a tremendous experience for me. It helped me establish my brand and opened so many doors,” he says. Only 27 years old, Brown has toured the country and worked with many different choirs and groups locally and nationally. “My biggest moment has been singing overseas,” he says. Brown has traveled to Spain, Italy, Rome and Australia. “I don’t sometimes realize how blessed I am, because so many people that are up-and-coming and don’t get the same type of respect,” he says. Brown was inspired to create his group, FreshWind last year. “I got the idea in church when my pastor talked about the spirit coming like a mighty wind,” he says. “My music is a combination of funk and jazz and contemporary music.” He plans to release a mixtape with FreshWind next summer. Brown has worked with numerous choirs in the Jackson area such as Brandon Mitchell and S.W.A.P.; Dathan Thigpen & Holy Nation; and Vernon Moore & the Urgency Project. He dreams of opening a performing arts school in the Jackson area and combining various church choirs to have a production. The singer credits Marquise Ezelle, Dr. Bobby Cooper, Dr. Resia Thompson, Albert Tate, Kevin Lemon, Lannie Spann McBride, his vocal instructor Phyllis Lewis-Hale and his father, the late Charles E. Brown, for his success as an artist and vocal coach and making him into the person he is today. Visit Darius Brown’s Facebook page, D. Brown and FreshWind, or check out his YouTube page, Darius Brown and FreshWind.

orn in Jackson in 1974 to renowned Malaco recording artist, the Rev. Benjamin Cone Jr. and his wife, Louise Dixon-Cone, Benjamin Cone III is the gifted and rightful heir to their gospel and music ministry. From an early age, “Benji” was inspired and encouraged to sing, study and seek his place in the tradition of musical worship. As a child, Cone was surrounded by gospel and blues. His father was the spiritual adviser for Malaco Records and also served as on-the-road pastor for the Mississippi Mass Choir and Mississippi Children’s Choir. Best known for his spoken-word “sermonettes,” his father passed away Sept. 16, 2012, after an extended illness. “My father was a legend,” Cone says, his voice warmed by deep love and respect. Cone III is well on the way to becoming as much a legend as Cone, père. In 1997, after a period of soul-searching prayer and fasting, Cone was called to start his own group, and the choir, aptly named Worship, came into being. “We started as an a cappella group because I didn’t play any instruments,” Cone says. “I had 12 singers to start. Within six months, we had 25.” Over the years, Worship has expanded to 50 singers and a full band that includes Benjamin’s 15-year-old son Christian Jean-Michael, who plays the drums. The group has recorded and toured extensively, backing gospel greats such as Dorothy Norwood and the late Rev. James Moore. Benjamin Cone III and Worship’s single, “The Race,” is currently available on iTunes and Amazon. The group’s debut album, “When Praise Meets Worship,” is scheduled for release next spring.

Chasing Edom

COURTESY WILL JACOB

by Whitney Menogan

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hree and a half years ago, three best friends, Aaron Thomas, 18, Will Jacob, 18, and Brennan White, 17, met at Northwest Rankin High School and were joined together by their love of music and for Christ. “Chasing evil out of your life is kind of a freespirited kind of thing,” Jacob says. The name of their band, Chasing Edom, comes from the Bible passage Jeremiah 49:19: “Like a lion coming up from Jordan’s thickets to a rich pastureland, I will chase Edom from its land in an instant. While the band is named after a Bible verse, it is not a worship band. Dave Matthews Band is the members’ biggest influence and following close behind are Coldplay, Louis Armstrong, and a variety of reggae and jazz. Thomas’ biggest influence are The Beatles, which he call “my roots,” along with Mississippi Delta guitarist Robert Johnson. White, on the other hand, has been “listening to Nat King Cole for the past three weeks.” Because they listen to such a variety of music, the musicians like to say that their genre is indescribable.

Chasing Edom’s sound is eclectic and draws the listener into the sounds of the bass guitar, the drums and the voice of lead singer White. They bring a positive vibe to their audience with their original music. “Our mission is to try to spread the love that Christ has for us,” Jacob says. The band members do not wear shoes when they perform. It serves as a reminder that they are children of the earth and if they become famous, they will always remember where they came from. Follow the band on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Its first EP, “The Island of My Beloved,” is available on iTunes, and the second, “Silverscreen,” is free on Facebook.

A+ Plus by Whitney Menogan

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hen I listen to A+ Plus, I hear the smoothness of J. Cole, the ruggedness of Tupac and country-boy flavor of UGK all rolled into one artist. Born and raised in Jackson, 20-yearold Antonio Mack, aka A+ Plus, is studying graphic design at Jackson State University. When he makes it in the industry, A+ Plus intends to marry his love for the arts with his music career by going into film. A+ Plus has been rapping and writing since he was eight

years old; his first song was entitled “My Pimp Life.” “I didn’t know anything about pimping,” he says with a laugh. Now older and more knowledgeable, A+ Plus has diversified. “I write about life,” he says. “I like to write music about having a good time—music for everyone to enjoy.” He has a variety of musical influences ranging from Nas, Tela and Biggie Smalls to Sonny Boy Williamson II. “They all have a

way of switching up their styles in the middle of their verses, and that’s what I like to do. I like rhyme patterns,” he says. A+ Plus feels as though he has to save music before it goes too far down a negative road. “I want to preserve good music,” he says. He believes artists like Curtis Mayfield, The Whispers, The Spinners and Bob Marley created what he likes to call “good music.” He is currently working on a throwback ’90s-style mixtape he plans to release in January. Listen to and download A+ Plus’ mixtapes at aplusmuzik.bandcamp.com. More ARTISTS TO WATCH, see pg 20

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COURTESY EDDIE BROWN COURTESY A+ PLUS

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COURTESY BENJAMIN CONE

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the music issue Artists

to Watch from page 19

Hollywood Luck

by Genevieve Legacy

by Darnell Jackson

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October 10 - 16, 2012

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Conor Oberst, singer and songwriter for the band Bright Eyes. “I owe a lot to other musicians, but I get the most out of performing my own songs,” Lovett says. He has been test-driving his original material at Fenian’s Pub for the last couple years, playing at the pub’s open-mic night. When he’s not going solo, Lovett plays with Dandy and the Lions, a band he formed with his college roommate, Spencer Thomas, while attending Delta State University in 2011. He describes the band as “folkgrass with a strong bluegrass influence.” For a quick listen, check out Dandy and the Lions on YouTube, performing “The War.” Check out Zach Lovett “on any given Tuesday” at Fenian’s Open Mic at 9 p.m. or at one of his upcoming performances. On Oct. 17, he performs solo at Fenian’s (901 E. Fortification St., 601-948-0055). Dandy and the Lions perform at Fenian’s Nov. 24. Both shows are free and start at 9 p.m. COURTESY PEYTON WOFFORD

ach Lovett, whose grandmother describes him as “an old soul who is not that old yet,” speaks with the ease and confidence of a practiced musician and performer. If anything belies this 20-year-old singer-songwriter’s age, it is his passion for making music. Lovett has been playing the guitar since he was 12. He sings and plays the banjo, harmonica and a little piano. “My heart is in the banjo,” he says about his favorite instrument. “I’ll play the fire out of it if I get the chance.” Though neither of his parents is a musician, Zach attributes his love of music to their influence. He and his twin brother, Dylan, grew up listening to modern-day troubadours such as John Prine and Neil Young. Their father, who Lovett calls “a huge words man,” instilled a deep appreciation of lyrics and songwriting. “I’ve always been interested in the creative side,” Lovett says. His biggest influences are alt-country singer Ryan Adams and

K

DARNELL JACKSON

Zach Lovett

nown as Hollywood Luck, or simply just Luck, Jackson’s rising hip-hop artist Deunta Butler is blazing the club scenes, music-downloading sites and local radio air waves with his smash hit single, “Dance in Dat.” The 28-year-old Jacksonian’s hits have a deep south Mississippi-rap dance swag. Off the heels of his provocative first hit, “Pole in My Pants,” Luck’s music video for his latest single “Dance in Dat,” is doing increasingly well, reaching 165,000 views and counting since posted on YouTube Sept 12. “I consider myself an artist. Even if I did country music, I just want to make good music,” Luck says. He doesn’t distinguish himself as just a hip-hop artist or a rap artist. “I feel like I can make any kind of music.” “I have been doing music forever,” the 2003 Callaway High School graduate says. “I can remember playing drums when I was five.” By the sixth grade, the artist was teaching himself keyboard and beginning to produce his first music tracks. As an artist and music producer, Luck has produced and been featured on various mainstream Mississippi artist tracks including rapper David Banner’s 2012 mixtape, “Drugs, Sex and Video Games.” Boo Rossini, Kamikaze and Atlanta rapper OJ Da Juice Man have also featured Luck on their songs. He has also had the opportunity to open for major acts such as 2Chainz, Webbie and Zedzilla. Luck currently is signed to his own label, 1st Up Entertainment, but was formerly attached to NBA basketball star Clarence Weatherspoon’s 35/35 Entertainment, where he got the opportunity to produce for the late southern rap pioneer Pimp C. Hollywood Luck’s music is available for purchase and downloading at iTunes.com, 1stUpLuck.bandcamp.com, datpiff.com and livemixtapes.com. To watch videos by Hollywood Luck visit 1stUpLuckTV at YouTube.com.

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the music issue Artists

to Watch from page 20

by Briana Robinson

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October 10 - 16, 2012

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good idea,” Tadlock says. Spirituals’ sound is original, but it is made almost entirely from samples. “Recording a lot of things is fun. ... It really teaches you to accept sounds from all over, not just from old records or from old tapes,” he says. Tadlock will release his next album on Articulated Works, a new label conceived by Tadlock and friend Justin Peake to promote both musical and visual artists. Tadlock has finished the music for the album. It is set for release later this year or early next year. Listen to Spirituals at soundcloud.com/ spirituals, and find Spirituals on Facebook for more info.

Tawanna Shaunté by Genevieve Legacy awanna Shaunté’s music and vocal style is multi-faceted. When listening to this singer/songwriter, expect to hear a mosaic of influences—broad sweeps of soul, shades of blue, tints and tones of gospel, and hints of contemporary jazz. Her thoughtful lyrics are a call to change. Put all this together, and the result is this self-described “artist with a purpose.” Her single, “Shades of Color,” the title track of her upcoming album, is a clear example of a song that points to the need and possibility for change, both social and individual. “Human beings are constantly evolving,” Shaunté says. “There is no expiration date on the potential to change.” Shaunté, 34, was born in Florence, Miss., and grew up in a musical family; her father played guitar, her mother played piano and everyone—aunts, uncles and many cousins—sang. “Someone would just start sing-

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ing a gospel hymn; then everyone would join in,” Shaunté says. “My family embraced the positive influence and spiritual connection that music fuels.” Fueled is exactly how Shaunté hopes people will feel when listening to her music. She started singing professionally in 2006 as the lead vocalist for Eclectik Soul. After two albums, she decided to embark on a solo career. In May of this year, Shaunté joined Ojah Media Group, the independent music and concert production company spearheaded by Jackson natives Cassandra Wilson and Rhonda Richmond. Watch the “Shades of Color” video at tawannashaunte.com. Download the single on iTunes. Shaunté’s next performance is Oct. 20 at 9 p.m. at Yellow Scarf Listening Room (741 Harris St., Suite E, 347-7540668). Visit yellowscarf-jackson.com for more info. COURTESY TAWANNA SHAUNTÉ

yler Tadlock of Pearl, Miss., moved to Portland, Ore., after graduating from Belhaven University in 2008. Now he’s back, living in the Millsaps Avenue Arts District in Midtown since January. The mastermind behind Spirituals, he plans to stay for awhile. “I make really awful attempts at dance music songs. They aren’t very good, but I like them, and it’s fun,” Tadlock says. He can’t be that awful, though, seeing as how Pitchfork Media gave his 2010 debut self-titled album a 7.6 rating. “Tadlock’s synthesized soundscapes are busy but well behaved, full of precisely whirring, subtly interlocking little pieces,” Pitchfork writer Joshua Love wrote. Tadlock, 27, started the one-man group Spirituals after moving to Portland and finding himself with nothing to do, surrounded by his vast collection of records from different genres. He bought Ableton Live, a music-editing software. Originally a drummer, the graphic designer took his love for vinyl and dance music and started to throw samples together. “The trick is to listen to a ton of music,” he says. His most noticeable influences are Caribou and Four Tet. “Caribou’s album ‘Start Breaking My Heart’ really convinced me that chopping things up on the computer can be a

AARON PHILLIPS

Spirituals


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Holly wood & The Way To Go Band

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Artists to Watch

the music issue

COURTESY VICTORIA CROSS

Victoria Cross/ Static Ensemble by Briana Robinson

WEDNESDAY 10/10 New Bourbon St Jazz Band (Dining Room)

THURSDAY 10/11 Vice Presidential Debate Watch Party (Red Room)

FRIDAY 10/12 Brad Biard (Dining Room)

SATURDAY 10/13 JJ Grey & Mofro w/ Nic Cowan (Dining Room)

MONDAY 10/15 MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 10/16 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Dining Room) Presidential Debate Watch Party (Red Room)

Coming Soon

10/18: Micky & The Motorcars - Red Room 10/19: Bill & Temprance - Dining Room 10/24: Frontier Ruckas w Shovels & Rope & Water Liars - Red Room 10/25: Robert Earl Keen - Red Room 10/27: International Vintage Guitars in NOLA presents their 20th anniversary show: Leroy Troy w The Avon Suspects & The Kenny Vaughn Trio - Red Room 10/30-31-Rocky Horror Picture Show - Big Room 7:30 10/31-Rumprollers & Otis Lotus Halloween Show - Red Room

NOVEMBER 11/9: Crooked Creek - Dining Room 11/9: The “Recognize The Real” Tour - Red Room 11/17: England in 1819 w Ice for Eagles - Patio 11/23: Molly Ringwalds - Big Room 11/28: The Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show - Red Room 11/30: Jarekus Singleton - Red Room

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her music as opposed to covers. “It’s a whole ’nother experience seeing that someone out there relates to my music,” she says. Cross has some tracks completed for her solo project. Rapper 5th Child is the main producer for the album, and Trumpcard co-wrote two songs with Cross. She hopes to release the album by spring 2013. Static Ensemble also hopes to record some original songs soon, Cross says. “After that, we just want to see what happens. It’s going to be a ripple effect as far as how many people our music can touch and whether that means right here, statewide, nationally or worldwide,” she says. “None of us came into this looking for any sort of fame or recognition. We’re all just trying to get by and love to play music, and we want people to love it with us.” Static Ensemble performs Nov. 9 at the Ole Tavern at George Street (416 George St., 601-960-2700). Visit the band’s Facebook page for more info.

The Mount Rushmores by Greg Pigott

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ince 2011, Hattiesburg indie-rock band The Mount Rushmores has prided itself on being a “different kind of band.” The Mount Rushmores is supposed to be a “big name for a band that doesn’t really care about being big,” Stricklin says. The Mount Rushmores is all busiCOURTESY THE MOUNT RUSHMORES

THIS WEEK

genuine love for old-school funk music with a ton of soul is the driving force behind Static Ensemble, a newer Jackson-based cover band. “When (audiences) see us, they have no idea what they’re going to get. They are trying to figure out what genre of music we’re going to play. They see me—a black girl with an afro—a Korean and a couple of white boys,” says vocalist Victoria Cross, explaining what makes them different from other local cover bands. “That allows us to be able to play whatever we want.” Songs that Static Ensemble plays come from groups such as Parliament, Funkadelic and Chaka Khan. The group also will throw in more modern hits from time to time, but the members make it all their own by adding a funk twist. “There’s a reason why classics are classics,” Cross says. “The elements that make up classic funk are what inspire us: a strong bass line, an undeniable melody and lyrics that everybody can relate to whether it’s about the struggles of life or love.” “R&B meets jazz meets hip-hop” is how Cross describes her original music, which she creates for her solo project under her own name. When it comes to performing, she loves seeing the audience’s reaction to

ness when it comes to music, but the band members also love to have a lot of fun while doing it. “From our goofy stage costumes to our out-of-nowhere lyrics to our humble attitudes that show we are all about the fans, we like to make people remember our show,” lead singer Jeremiah Stricklin says. With Stricklin on lead vocals and guitar, the band also includes Ethan Manning on guitar, Josh Stricklin on bass, Charley Tynes on keyboard and guitar and Paul Howayeck on drums.

Stricklin says the band claims Coldplay, Death Cab for Cutie, Switchfoot and Mutemath as influences, but the Rushmores still has a style that is very distinct. “We like to do every show in ties. You can tell we take our shows very seriously, but we still love to have fun. People also listen to our songs and wonder where we’re going (with them). Then, I finally tie it all together with our lyrics,” Stricklin says. They don’t want to be a cliché band. On Oct. 7, The Mount Rushmores performed at the Jackson Jamboree at the Spencer Perkins Center. Stricklin emphasizes that the band was humbled to play in a show that included greats like Switchfoot. The Mount Rushmores expects its debut album, “A Happy Home for Your Haunted Heart,” to be released in December 2012. It will be available on iTunes, Spotify and Amazon. The band is also planning for shows at Hal & Mal’s for later this year with dates to be announced. The Mount Rushmores’ EP, “Who You Hope To Be,” is now available on iTunes and themountrushmores.com. For more information, find The Mount Rushmores on Facebook.


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10/10

HALF-OFF ALL DRINKS FOR LADIES & ENTER MONTHLY DRAWING FOR A GIFT CERTIFICATE EVERY WEDNESDAY TO THE “W” BY AZWELL IN FLOWOOD. MUSIC STARTS AT 8! THURSDAYS

10/11

COLLEGE & NFL FOOTBALL NIGHT KICK IT OFF AT 7PM WITH $3 WELLS & $2 DOMESTIC LONG NECKS!

FRIDAY

10/12

FIRE UP THE GRILL

RIBEYE STEAKS, BAKED POTATO, SALAD & FRENCH BREAD!

Mississippi Shakedown SATURDAY

10/13

SUNDAY

10/14

The Bailey Brothers FOOD SERVICE INDUSTRY NIGHT 5 P.M. UNTIL! 30% OFF ALL DRINKS! ���YOU TAKE CARE OF US, NOW LET US TAKE CARE OF YOU!” COME WATCH THE GAMES WITH US! SUNDAY TICKET, NFL NETWORK. MONDAY

10/15

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL KICK IT OFF AT 7PM WITH $3 WELLS AND $2 DOMESTIC LONG NECKS. OPEN MIC 10 P.M. TUESDAY

10/16

SHRIMP BOIL 5PM JUMBO SHRIMP, CORN, POTATOES, SAUSAGE & LATE NIGHT DRINK SPECIALS START AT 10PM - 12AM $1 HIGH LIFE & PBR’S, $2 MARGARITAS MATT’S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE 10 P.M.

UPCOMING SHOWS FRI. OCTOBER 19 CEDRIC BURNSIDE PROJECT SAT. OCTOBER 20 FLOWTRIBE

SEE OUR NEW MENU

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VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

MUSIC | live

27


FILM p 30 | 8 DAYS p 31 | SPORTS p 34

Can I Get A Witness? by Jacob D. Fuller

HEIDI MAY

H

opefully, Henry Rollins’ live act is more dynamic than his interviews. Known for his usually high-energy performances, Rollins was about as enthusiastic during our interview Sept. 27 as today’s Bieber-and-GaGa-crazed music fan base would be for a new Black Flag album. Not that that will ever happen. “I think I’m done with (music),” Rollins, former frontman of Black Flag and the Rollins Band said when I asked if he’d ever release new music. “I don’t really think lyrically anymore. So if I can’t write a new song, I’m not going to go out there and play old material. It’s like living in the past.” Rollins’ agent came up with the idea for this fall’s “Capitalism” tour, during which Rollins will perform his standup comedy/commentary act in all 50 state capitals in 60 days. He’ll cap the tour off with a show at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 5, the eve of the presidential election. The radio-show host and former punk frontman is bringing his socially and politically charged one-man show to Duling Hall Oct. 14. What will people see on this tour?

I’ll be on stage alone. There’s no real production to it. A lot of what I talk about is informed by where I go. It’s a lot of travel stories. I travel pretty far and wide, so I bring that. Last year, I did a lot of work in National Geographic, filming all over the place. I’ll talk about that. I made trips to places like North Korea, Sudan, Haiti and Cuba on my own. I’ll talk about that. Also, it’s an election year in America, so I remind my fellow Americans that they really should vote, if they are able to. I never advise who they should vote for, but that they should if they can. You mentioned you traveled to places a lot of Americans would be afraid to go. Why do you pick these kinds of places to travel?

October 10 - 16, 2012

I think that’s where you can learn a lot of lessons. This just a lot to be learned there in these less-traveled paths. Since a lot of people don’t go there, it just makes it more interesting, at least to me.

28

Where have you been recently that has helped change or broaden your point of view?

(There’s) nothing that really changed or broadened it. The last real travel I got to do that wasn’t for a show was Cuba and Haiti. That was at the end of last year. ... Cuba was interesting; it was just a lot of propaganda about how great Fidel Castro is and all of that. That’s interesting. It was very rough in Haiti. The cleanup after the earthquake is still going on. In parts of the city, Port-au-Prince, there’s really no signs of much being done. That was tough.

Former Black Flag frontman Henry Rollins will bring his “Capitalism” tour to Duling Hall Sunday, Oct. 14.

It seems like, in this election, there is, in a lot of people, a fear that the person they are not supporting is going to win. Do you address this in your show, the idea that things are going to be so terrible if the other guy wins?

I think, to a certain degree, life goes on, no matter who becomes your president, Democrat or Republican. You keep going to work. You keep doing your thing, water keeps coming out of the well, to a certain extent. What might change would be America’s foreign policy. If you had a guy like Romney in office, he probably would start putting the heat on Iran to get some kind of conflict happening, like John McCain wanted to do. He seemed to be all about that during the (Republican National Convention), during his speech. So perhaps a guy like Mitt Romney would lend more of an ear to that. Or he’d listen to the government of Israel in a different way than Mr. Obama would. On a lot of levels in America, things would remain the same. I think for the poor, single moms and people who are in need of government assistance now and then, it might get a little tougher on them. With this tour and with your radio show, are you trying to provide a different voice than what people hear from most of the mainstream media?

No, I’m not a journalist. I just tell you what I see and how I feel about it. That’s it. I’m just a witness. It’s not for me

to speculate or have a crystal ball. I think a lot of this stuff is real simple to understand. Any political issue, you can go to the street and get your understanding. The street never lies. What do you want people who see your show to take away from it?

Hopefully, it was interesting. The first thing is you don’t want to be a bore. Why do you want to sit around and endorse some insufferable boring thing on stage? So don’t be boring. And maybe the audience gets to walk out with something they didn’t have on the way in, maybe some information, or maybe a different perspective from someone who went somewhere they haven’t gone. Something like that, maybe they’re somehow inspired. I think you just go out there, and you tell your own twisted version of the truth. These are people with minds who can take from it what they will. I’m not there to teach. I’m not a teacher. I’m barely able to get through the day on my own, myself. It’s not for me to instruct, but (I) can definitely provide some perspective. Henry Rollins’ “Capitalism” tour hits Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601-754-3101) Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. Cocktails start at 7 p.m. The show is open to ages 18 and up. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, and can be purchased at ticketmaster.com.


29

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DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

A Stupendous Mechanism

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Argo

for Thur. R

Here Comes The Boom PG

Pitch Perfect PG13 Looper

R

Sinister

R

Seven Psychopaths

3-D Hotel Transylvania PG

R

Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG

Atlas Shrugged Part II PG13 The Perks Of Being A Wallflower PG13 Taken 2

PG13

3-D Frankenweenie PG Frankenweenie (non 3-D) PG

End Of Watch R House At The End Of The Street PG13 3-D Finding Nemo

G

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

October 10 - 16, 2012

Tim Burton pays homage to classic monster films with “Frankenweenie.”

Trouble With The Curve PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

30

by Anita Modak-Truran

Fri. 10/18

COURTESY WALT DISNEY

Listings 10/12 –

Friday, October 12, 2012

GOOD PAPER 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

D’Lo Trio

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

Movieline: 355-9311

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

601-362-6388

“F

rankenweenie” is a bugaboo farce about life after death. Tim Burton, the fabulously outrageous and creative spinner of timeless yarns, reincarnates his 1984 live-action short film of the same name. The original film scared the kiddies and was shelved into oblivion. Digging deeper into the bones of the story and adding some tangible kid friendliness, Burton ambitiously resurrects the dead short into a visually sophisticated, black and white, stop-motion animated feature. The film is set back in a time where moms still wear hourglass dresses of the Christian Dior-June Cleaver era and read romance novels after vacuuming. Dads are patient and never yell at their families. Kids still want to win the science competitions and there’s a weird, cute girl next door with a poodle. In Burton’s homegrown surreal version of a Norman Rockwell America, you can find a boy named Victor Frankenstein (voiced by Charlie Tahan) and his only friend Sparky, a four-legged terrier with a long snout and wiggly tail. Victor is a loner among his creepy peers. A girl with long white hair carries around her clairvoyant kitty, Mr. Whiskers. Mr. Whiskers leaves a V-shaped turd in the litter box—an omen that something bad is going to happen to Victor. The girl warns Victor that Mr. Whiskers is never wrong. Shortly after that, Sparky gets struck by a car. The screenplay, written by John August, is bland. It lacks the zesty cleverness of “Beetlejuice,” featuring a married pair of ghosts and a frisky pocket-sized demon, or “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” where the living dead warble out fearsome tunes. But the story is heartfelt in a “Big Fish” way (for which August also wrote the script). “Big Fish” delved into the death of a parent; this film looks at the death of a pet. The first time most kids deal with death is through a pet. It’s a difficult transition, and “Frankenweenie”

takes on a child’s make-believe perspective of everlasting doggie life. Danny Elfman’s score blurs the emotions, and if you have ever lost a beloved pet, the movie may cause you to evoke a tear or two. The high point of the film is the attic resurrection scene, where Burton’s creative visual energy is on warp speed. We see the pale student of unhallowed arts (that would be Victor and basic science) kneeling beside his dead dog, which he has taken from the pet cemetery after his science teacher demonstrated the use of electricity on a dead frog. Victor had to sneak the corpse past his snuggled-up parents, who are watching the live action version “Dracula,” starring Christopher Lee, on the television set. Victor places Sparky on the gurney and electrifies his best friend back to life. “He’s alive!” gleefully shouts a hunchback classmate of Victor named Edgar E. Gore when the dog gets loose. Victor’s classmates conspire to learn his secrets, and Victor feels the weight of what he has done. Should the dead be brought back to life? “Frankenweenie” is an incredible piece of moving art, well suited for adults and younger audiences, but particularly for Burton fans, who will appreciate the homage to classic monster films. For instance, buried in the local pet cemetery is a turtle named “Shelley.” The turtle, which gets zapped back to life and grows impossibly large because of an unfortunate helping of Miracle-Gro, shares its name with Mary Shelley, the author of the novel “Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus.” “Frightful must it be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavor to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world,” Shelley wrote. This film stabs into the nutty and incongruous and endeavors to understand the stupendous mechanism of life ever after.


SATURDAY 10/13

SUNDAY 10/14

THROUGH 10/26

J.J. Grey and Mofro perform at 9 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s.

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church hosts the Bluegrass Mass and Goat Roast.

The Agriculture and Forestry Museum’s Pumpkin Adventure kicks off this week.

BEST BETS OCT. 10-17, 2012

THURSDAY 10/11

COURTESY ANNIE CHADWICK

The Canton Flea Market is from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse Square, Canton). Free admission; call 601-859-1307. … The Brandon High School PTO Golf Tournament is at 11 a.m. at Patrick Farms Golf Club (300 Clubhouse Drive). $85, $300 team of four; call 601-573-7775. … See the film “Safety Not Guaranteed” at 7:30 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). $6-$8; call 601-898-7819.

The New York City Slickers perform at the Southern Cultural Heritage Center Oct. 10 at 7:30 p.m.

… James Patterson’s photography show is from 5-7 p.m. at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). Free; call 601-291-9115. … Girl’s Night Out is from 6-8 p.m. at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-957-3744.

FRIDAY 10/12

Bring your kids to Fossil Friday from 10 a.m.-noon at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). $4-$6; call 601-576-6000. … The Juried Flower Show is from 1-5 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Con-

tinues Oct. 13 from 10 a.m.-noon. Free; call 601-960-1515. … The “Time” Art Show is at 7 p.m. at Attic Gallery (1101 Washington St., Vicksburg). Free; call 601-638-9221. … “Ragtime: The Musical” premieres at 7:30 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) at Aven Fine Arts Building; runs through Oct. 21. $15, $10 BY LATASHA WILLIS students and children; call 601-9253440. … The Charlie Mars Band performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $12 in FAX: 601-510-9019 advance, $15 at the door; call 601292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … DAILY UPDATES AT NEEDTOBREATHE performs at JFPEVENTS.COM 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $20$25; call 800-745-3000.

EVENTS@

SATURDAY 10/13

The Central Mississippi Down Syndrome Society’s events at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) include the Buddy Walk at 9 a.m. ($15) and Steve Azar’s performance at 6 p.m. ($40-$50). Call 601-397-3696. … Gone Krazi: A Fashion Show Experience is at 6 p.m. at the Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). $8-$10; call 601982-8467. … The Mississippi Opry Fall Show is at 6 p.m. at the Pearl Community Room (2420 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). $10, children under 18 free; call 601-331-6672. … Preston Chamber Music Series: An Evening of Diamonds I is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. $10, $5 seniors, free for students with ID; call 601-974-6494. … Brantley Gilbert performs at the Mississippi Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. . $20-$35; call 800-745-3000. … J.J. Grey and Mofro perform at 9 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $17; call 800-745-3000.

SUNDAY 10/14

The Bluegrass Mass and Goat Roast is from 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton Road). Free admission, $10 plate; call 601-956-5788. … JSU Basketball Madness is at 8 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) at the Williams Athletics and Assembly Center. Free; call 601979-5506 or 601-979-1457. … Henry Rollins performs at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $20 in advance, $25 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

MONDAY 10/15

See art from Anthony DiFatta and Dr. Mina Li at the Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive) through Oct. 29. Free; call 601-432-4056. … Emily Harris

See Dr. Mina Li’s handwoven baskets at the Mississippi Library Commission through Oct. 29.

performs during Opera Underground at 7 p.m. at Underground 119; food prices vary. Art and free wine at 5 p.m. upstairs at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119. $20; call 601-960-2300.

TUESDAY 10/16

Unburied Treasures: Greatest Hits at 6 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) features curator Robin C. Dietrick and violinist Marta Szlubowska. Free; call 601-960-1515. … The Melvins Lite perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $14 in advance, $18 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … Author Sandra Beasley’s poetry reading is at 8 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-968-8996.

WEDNESDAY 10/17

Enjoy live music during Live at Lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … The play “Henry V” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at the Belhaven University Center for the Arts in Blackbox Theatre; runs through Oct. 20. $10; $5 students and seniors; call 601-965-7026. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

jacksonfreepress.com

The annual Pumpkin Adventure at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) is from 9 a.m.noon; runs through Oct. 26. $6, children under 2 free; call 601432-4500. … Political party pundits Rickey Cole and Jim Herring speak at the Jackson 2000 Luncheon from 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net. … Author Susan Haltom speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The New York City Slickers perform at 7:30 p.m. at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). $5; call 601-631-2997.

COURTESY GLORIA WASHINGTON

WEDNESDAY 10/10

31


#/--5.)49 Mississippi College MBA Luncheon Oct. 11, noon, at Biaggiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (970 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland) Learn more about the graduate program. RSVP. Free; call 601-925-7367.

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

Mobile Consulate of Mexico (Consulado mĂłvil de MĂŠxico) Oct. 13, at St. Paul Catholic Church (5971 Highway 25, Flowood) and Oct. 14, at Catholic Charities (200 N. Congress St., Suite 100). The consulate will issue license plates and passports to the Mexican population living in the area. Bring two passport photos, a birth certificate, proof of residency, etc. Appointment required. Passports: one year for $32 (only for children under 3), three years for $74, six years for $101; $27 five-year consular fee; call 877-639-4835 (Mexitel line).

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music october 10 - 16

wed | october 10 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | october 11 Shawn Patterson 5:30-9:30p fri | october 12 Detour 6:30-10:30p

Nature Nuts Preschool Program Oct. 17, 10-11 a.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton), in Price Hall. For children ages 2-5. Registration required. $8, $5 members; call 601-926-1104.

sat | october 13 Lucky Hand Blues Band 6:30-10:30p

Golf-A-Palooza Oct. 15, 2-8 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership hosts. Beginners welcome. The after-party is at 6 p.m. $180, $600 team of four, $85-$300 golf lessons, $20 after-party only; call 601-948-7575.

sun | october 14 Chad Perry 4:00 - 8:00p mon | october 15 Karaoke tue | october 16 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

Minority Business Network Meeting Oct. 11, 6 p.m., at Divine Ministries (1417 W. Capitol St.), in the Multipurpose Center. The speaker is Jackson mayoral candidate Jonathan Lee. RSVP and bring business cards. Free; call 601-750-2367 or 601-316-5092; minoritybusinessnet.org.

1060â&#x20AC;ŠEâ&#x20AC;ŠCountyâ&#x20AC;ŠLineâ&#x20AC;ŠRd.â&#x20AC;Šinâ&#x20AC;ŠRidgeland Openâ&#x20AC;ŠSunâ&#x20AC;?Thursâ&#x20AC;Š11amâ&#x20AC;?10pm Friâ&#x20AC;?Satâ&#x20AC;Š11amâ&#x20AC;?Midnightâ&#x20AC;Š|â&#x20AC;Š601â&#x20AC;?899â&#x20AC;?0038

Fall for Clinton Market Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., on Jefferson Street, Clinton. Vendors sell their goods on the brick streets of Olde Towne Clinton. Talent show at 10 a.m. Free; call 601-924-5472. Sidewalk Sample Sale Oct. 13, 9 a.m., at Easely Amused (Trace Harbor Village, 7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Free; call 601707-5854.

Wednesday - October 10 KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - October 11

LADIES NIGHT

Kid Vicious Friday, October 12 & Saturday, October 13

O

On the Edge Saturday - October 13

Snazz

Sunday - October 14 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night

Monday Night Football

with DJ Reign

October 10 - 16, 2012

Monday - October 15

32

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

During the Game

601-961-4747

Critters and Crawlers Oct. 13, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). For toddlers ages 2-3. Prices vary; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241. Youth Storytelling Club Oct. 11, 3:30 p.m., at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison). For grades 2 and up. Free; call 601856-2749. Mendenhall Health Fair Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mendenhall Junior High (733 Dixie Avenue, Mendenhall). Free; call 601-382-1371. Mississippi Main Street Training Oct. 16-17, at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in Anderson Hall. The topic is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Design: Emphasis in Outdoor Spaces.â&#x20AC;? Registration required. $125; email denisehalbach@msmainstreet.com. How to Develop a Business Plan Oct. 11, 1 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Registration required; seating limited. Free; call 601-979-2795. Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515. â&#x20AC;˘ New Docent Training Oct. 15-19, 9 a.m. Docents receive training on giving tours and more. Registration required. Free. â&#x20AC;˘ Putting It in Context: The Art and Life of William R. Hollingsworth Jr. Oct. 15-29, 5:30 p.m. The seminar is an exploration of how Hollingsworthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life influenced his artwork. Preregistration required. $50, $45 members. Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 15, 6 p.m., at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). Former National Championship head coach Gene Stallings is the speaker. $30 nonmembers; call 601-506-3186. 143rd Foundersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Week at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo) through Oct. 21. The annual celebration includes lectures, luncheons and signature events. Most events free

Artists Through the Lens

Friday - October 12

$1.50 Mugs & 2-for-1 Domestics

Precinct 2 COPS Meeting Oct. 11, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol Street). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0002.

-Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

Q2FWDWSP)LVFKHU*DOOHULHVZLOOKRVW -DPHV3DWWHUVRQÂśVÂżUVWVRORJDOOHU\RSHQLQJ VLQFHKHPRYHGLQWRD)RQGUHQVWXGLRVHYHUDO \HDUVDJR7KHVKRZHQWLWOHGÂł7KH$UWLVW2EVHUYHG´ LVIRFXVHGRQDVHULHVRISRUWUDLWVRIDUWLVWVFUDIWV PHQPXVLFLDQVDQGZULWHUVIURPDFURVVWKHVWDWH  Âł:HPLJKWKDQJDEHDXWLIXOO\GRQHSRUWUDLWRI VRPHRQHOLNH.HLWK5LFKDUGVRU-RKQQ\&DVKRQRXU ZDOOEXWJRWRVRPHERG\ÂśVKRXVHDQGKRZPDQ\ James Pattersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Artist UHDOO\JUHDWUHYHDOLQJSRUWUDLWVRIIDPLO\PHPEHUVDUH Observedâ&#x20AC;? features photo portraits of RQWKHZDOO"´3DWWHUVRQVD\V Mississippi creatives.  7KLVVHULHVLVWKHSURGXFWRIDQDUWLVWÂśVIHOORZVKLS 3DWWHUVRQUHFHLYHGIURPWKH0LVVLVVLSSL$UWV&RPPLV VLRQDQGWKH1DWLRQDO(QGRZPHQWIRUWKH$UWVWRSURGXFHSRUWUDLWVRI0LVVLVVLSSLDUWLVWVLWZLOOEHIHDWXUHGLQ FRQMXQFWLRQZLWKDQH[KLELWFDOOHGÂł$UWLVWVE\$UWLVWV´DWWKH0LVVLVVLSSL0XVHXPRI$UW  $VDSKRWRJUDSKHUZKRSULPDULO\VKRRWVSRUWUDLWV3DWWHUVRQVHHVWKDWKHLVDSURWHFWRURIDQDVSHFWRI SKRWRJUDSK\WKDWLVRIWHQQHJOHFWHGWKHVHGD\VÂł:KHQ\RXJREDFNDQGORRNDW\RXUJUDQGSDUHQWVRUJUHDW JUDQGSDUHQWVSKRWRV\RXJRÂľ'DPQWKDWZDVDQLFHSRUWUDLWWKLVLVEHDXWLIXOϫKHVD\V  3DWWHUVRQ¡V´7KH$UWLVW2EVHUYHGÂľH[KLELWZLOORSHQDW)LVFKHU*DOOHULHV 16WDWH6W6XLWH RQ 2FWDQGLVVFKHGXOHGWRKDQJDSSUR[LPDWHO\WKUHHZHHNV)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO)LVFKHU*DOOHULHVDW RUYLVLWĂ&#x20AC;VFKHUJDOOHULHVFRP     ²6DP6XWWOH

TRIP BURNS

with Snazz

Vice Presidential Debate Watch Party Oct. 11, 7 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.), in the Red Room. The Hinds, Madison, and Rankin County chapters of the Mississippi Democratic Party are the hosts. Raffle prize included. Free, donations welcome; rankindemocrats.net.

Conference on Eliminating Health Disparities Oct. 11-12, at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pathways to Affordable Healthcare.â&#x20AC;? Registration required; space limited. Free; call 601-979-1101.


7%,,.%33 Poker Run Oct. 10, 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland) Participants receive five playing cards during the three-mile run/walk, and those with the best and worst hands win prizes. Free; call 601-899-9696. Free Depression Screenings Oct. 11, 8 a.m.5 p.m., at Hinds Behavioral Health Services (3450 Highway 80 W.). For children and adults under age 65. No appointment required. Free; call 601-321-2400. Free Depression Screenings for Seniors Oct. 11, 8 a.m.-noon, at Hinds Behavioral Health Services, Cedars Office (5410 Executive Place). Adults ages 65 and up receive screenings. No appointment required. Free; call 601-982-4588. Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) Health Fair Oct. 9, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Jackson Campus (3925 Sunset Drive), in Bivens Auditorium. Includes a blood drive. Free; call 601-987-8109.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Time Stands Still” Auditions Oct. 16, 6:30 p.m., at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl). Production dates are Dec. 6-9. Call 601-664-0930.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings feature readings. Call 601-366-7619. • “La Befana: The Italian Christmas Legend” Oct. 8, 5 p.m. Paul V. Canonici signs books. $25 book. • “We Have the War Upon Us: The Onset of the Civil War, November 1860-April 1861” Oct. 9, 5 p.m. William J. Cooper signs books. $30 book. • “The Three-Day Affair” Oct. 10, 5 p.m. Michael Kardos signs books. $24 book. • “Little Black Daydream” Oct. 11, 5 p.m. Steve Kistulentz signs books. $14.95 book. • “The Color of Mississippi” Oct. 15, 5 p.m. Paul Smith signs books. $38 book. • “Southern Sides: 250 Dishes That Really Make the Plate” Oct. 16, 5 p.m. Fred Thompson signs books. $35 book. • Lemuria Story Time. Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. Books for Tots Campaign Kick-off Oct. 11, 4-7 p.m., at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). Deloris Jordan, mother of Michael Jordan, signs “Salt in His Shoes.” Donate books or money to any Jackson/Hinds Library System branch through Dec. 19. Free admission, $17.99 book, donations welcome; call 601-968-5807.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Applause Dance Factory (242 Stephens St., Ridgeland). $10, $5 students; call 601-8566168. • Ballroom Dance Class: Waltz Tuesdays, 6 p.m. through Oct. 30. • Latin Dance Class: Cha Cha Wednesdays, 7 p.m. through Oct. 31.

• Swing Dance Class: East Coast Swing Wednesdays, 8-9 p.m. through Oct. 31. • Latin Dance Class: Salsa Fridays, 6-7 p.m. through Oct. 26. • Latin Dance Class: Mambo Fridays, 7-8 p.m. through Oct. 26. • Ballroom Latin Swing Dance Party Fridays, 8-10 p.m. through Oct. 26. “Paint Your Punkins” Oct. 13, 2-4 p.m., at Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Bring up to three pumpkins. RSVP. $15; call 601-707-5854. Basic Digital Photography Class Oct. 13, 10 a.m., at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (1800 N. State St.). Digital camera required. $55 (cash or credit); email info@lisette.co to RSVP. Events at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Free; call 601-932-2562. • Mississippi Magnolia Tatters Oct. 9, 1:30 p.m. No materials fee for the lace-making class. • Anime and Manga Night Oct. 15, 6 p.m. Attendees also discuss cosplay costumes for the Oct. 29 Fall Family Festival. Creative Arts Club Oct. 17, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). Bring and paint pumpkins. Free; call 601-856-4536. Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). $10 per class; call 601213-6355. • Ballroom Preview Class Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. through Oct. 25. • Contemporary Dance Class Mondays, 7:30 p.m. through Oct. 29. • Belly Dance Class Tuesdays, 6 p.m. through Oct. 30. Wine and Cooking School Oct. 10, 6 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Features three Burgundies and how to make coq au vin. RSVP. $49; call 601-420-4202.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 “Mirrors of Clay” Gallery Talk Oct. 11, 6 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Gallery. JSU art professor Yumi Park talks about the current exhibit of Andean ceramics. Free; call 601-979-2121. Open Space Oct. 15, 7 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). The Mississippi Improv Alliance hosts the event. Local creatives are welcome to express themselves through their art forms. Free; call 601-497-7454. Wolfe Studio Art Exhibition Opening Reception Oct. 11, 5:30-8 p.m., at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road). The show hangs through Nov. 11. Free; call 601-366-1844.

"%4(%#(!.'% Operation Christmas Child Kick-off Oct. 13, 6 p.m., at First Baptist Church of Richland (1102 Highway 49 S., Richland). The program involves filling shoeboxes with gifts for needy children. The goal is 23,000 boxes. Free; call 601-939-1715. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

9.99

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Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

October 11

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday October 12

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Chicka Booms Saturday October 13

Damn

Fine Company Monday

October 15

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

October 16

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday October 17 KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, October 10th

THE AMERICANS

(Folk Rock/Americana) 7-10, No Cover, Wine Specials All Night

Thursday, October 11th

BRET MOSLEY

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, October 12th

FEARLESS FOUR

(Funk/Rock) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 13th

VASTI JACKSON

(Electric Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday,October 16th

CHARLES SCOTT

(Piano) 7-10, NoCover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

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11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

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- see schedule for details; call 601-977-7871; tougaloo.edu.

33


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE Triumph and Tragedy at the Halfway Point by Bryan Flynn

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant 4HE2IGHT#ALL

M

34

I

JFP Top 25: Week 7 October 10 - 16, 2012

October 10 - 16, 2012

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Ole Miss (3-3) will wonder what might cut the Golden Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lead to 27-24 early in have been if Head Coach Hugh Freeze hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the fourth quarter but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep UAPB decided to go for it on fourth down and one out of the end zone. The Tigers (2-4) ended at his own 39-yard line. The up falling 34-24. Rebelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; running back was Alcorn State (2-4) stuffed, and Texas A&M finally got its second win scored the winning touchof the season. The Braves down a few plays later. led Southern UniverNo rain equaled no sity 7-0 at halftime and chance for Southern Miss jumped out to a 14-0 lead (0-5) against Boise State. in third quarter before the The Broncos grabbed a Jaguars rallied. 23-0 halftime lead and Southern tied the cruised to a 40-14 win. game at 14-14 as the third The only thing left quarter ended and took to watch for in the USM a 17-14 lead early in the season is if they can avoid fourth quarter. Give Allosing two more games, and corn State major credit for escape their first losing sea- Mississippi State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not folding and scoring son in 19 years. Southern Chad Bumphis broke an with seconds left to pull MSU record for touchdown Miss has suffered through receptions this weekend. out the 20-17 victory. a coaching change-up and Mississippi Valley injuries that have killed State (1-4) was taken bethis season. hind the woodshed in a 35-0 loss to the best Jackson State continued with their up team in the SWAC, Alabama A&M. The and down SWAC play. JSU allowed Arkan- Delta Devils were down 21-0 at halftime sas-Pine Bluff to race out to a 21-7 lead in the and never recovered. first half, and the Tigers were never able to Delta State entered the fourth quarcatch up. Jackson State rallied somewhat to ter down 28-15 to Tarleton University. The Statesmen outscored their opponent 23-7 in the final 15 minutes to pull out a 38-35 victory. The win moved DSU to 2-3 on the season. Millsaps (4-1) finally played a bad game on defense, and it cost them their undefeated +ROOLGD\WRPDNHWKHRXWEXW+ROOLGD\KHOGKLPVHOI EDFNWKLQNLQJ.R]PDZDVJRLQJWRJUDELW,QVWHDG season. The Majors couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop HuntingQHLWKHUPDGHWKHFDWFKDQGWKHEDOOGURSSHGLQWR don, and the team fell 45-24 at home. The WKHOHIWÂżHOGJUDVV road-weary Majors, who had played three  $WZRUVWLWORRNHGOLNHWKH%UDYHVZRXOGKDYHWKH straight on the road, gave up 404 yards on EDVHVORDGHGZLWKRQO\RQHRXWRUWKH\KDGVFRUHG DFRXSOHRIUXQVDVWKH&DUGLQDOVSOD\HG.H\VWRQH defense and missed chances on offense de.RSVLQWKHRXWÂżHOG,QVWHDGOHIWÂżHOGXPSLUH6DP spite gaining 430 yards. +ROEURRNLQFRUUHFWO\VLJQDOHGWKDWWKHÂłLQÂżHOGĂ&#x20AC;\ Mississippi College (1-4) made history UXOH´ZDVLQSOD\  7KDWFDOOPHDQW6LPPRQVZDVRXWDQGWKH in a bad way Saturday. The Choctawsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 75-42 %UDYHVÂśUXQQHUVZHUHRQO\DEOHWRDGYDQFHWRWKLUG loss to Sul Ross became the highest-scoring DQGVHFRQG²DQGPRUHLPSRUWDQWO\WKHUHZHUHWZR game in MC history. Mississippi College RXWVLQWKHHLJKWK%UDYHVÂśIDQVVWDUWHGWKURZLQJFDQV couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get stops on defense all day. DQGERWWOHVLQWRRXWÂżHOGLQ7XUQHU)LHOGLQRXWUDJH  ,QVWHDGRIXVLQJUHSOD\WRÂż[WKHFDOODQGDWOHDVW Hinds Community College (3-3) broke JLYH$WODQWDWKHEDVHVORDGHGZLWKRQO\RQHRXWWKH a three-game losing streak with a 38-14 SOD\VWRRG7KHEORZQFDOONLOOHGWKH%UDYHVÂśUDOO\ victory over Southwest. Holmes Com %DVHEDOOKDVWRH[SDQGLWVXVHRIUHSOD\VRZH GRQÂśWKDYHWROLYHZLWKWKHLUVKDPUXOHRISURWHVWLQJD munity College had a three-game winning JDPH*HWWKHFDOOULJKWRQWKHÂżHOGRUXVHUHSOD\WR streak snapped with a 35-0 loss to East MisJHWLWULJKWEHIRUHWKHQH[WSOD\ sissippi on their Scooba campus. COURTESY MISSISSIPPI STATE

A

t the midway point of the college football season, some fan bases want the season to never end (mainly in Starkville), while others canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for it to be over (Hattiesburg). Mississippi State didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to be sharp on offense against Kentucky. The Bulldog defense easily controlled a young and injuryplagued Wildcats team. Tyler Russell threw for 269 yards and two touchdowns as MSU moved to 5-0 with a 27-14 win over Kentucky. Chad Bumphis broke the Mississippi State record for touchdown receptions with 18 (and counting) in his career. The Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense has been very good in nearly every game, but the offense was, again, sluggish at times. MSU was the first team this season that failed to score at least 30 points on Kentucky. Stat geeks, taking over football like they have in baseball, preach that teams shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t punt. Just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask Ole Miss fans if they believe what the stats say after their Saturday night loss to Texas A&M. The Rebels forced six turnovers and held a 10-point lead midway through the fourth quarter. That is, until redshirt freshman quarterback Johnny Manziel rallied the Aggies to a 30-27 win.

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34

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by Bryan Flynn

Plenty of sports to keep you warm as the temperatures begin to drop. College football, NFL and MLB playoffs might make October the best sports month of the year.

THURSDAY, OCT. 11 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NFL Network) Pittsburgh Steelers, coming off a win over in-state rival Philadelphia, travels south to face the Tennessee Titans. FRIDAY, OCT. 12 College Football (7-10 p.m. ESPN 2) Friday night football on ESPN has been entertaining this season, and who knows what will happen between Navy and Central Michigan? SATURDAY, OCT 13 College Football (11-2:30 p.m. CBS) Ole Miss must put its heartbreaking loss to Texas A&M behind them because their bowl hinge on beating Auburn at home â&#x20AC;Ś College football (8-11 p.m. ESPN 2) Mississippi State faces their toughest test of the season so far against the Tennessee Volunteers at home. SUNDAY, OCT. 14 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NBC) Green Bay hits the road in a must-win situation against a Houston Texans team that might be the best team in the NFL. MONDAY, OCT. 15 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN) AFC West rivals collide as the Denver Broncos and the San Diego Chargers to get back to winning after both lost this past Sunday. TUESDAY, OCT. 16 MLB (TBA on TBS) game three of the American League Championship Series could feature opposing storybook season if the Oakland Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Baltimore Orioles can advance. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17 MLB (TBA on Fox) game three of the National League Championship Series might have the surprise teams in Cincinnati Reds vs. the Washington Nationals. This weekend is my makeup upset from week one. I picked Louisiana Tech over Texas A&M, and I am still going with the Bulldogs at 8 p.m. on ESPN U. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports

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       15


FOOD p 36 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 40 FLY DIY p 42

Honor the Tree by Jim PathFinder Ewing

P

around our neighborhoods and, well, everywhere thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a medium ready to plant. tree. People are busy raking and bagging them up, in fact, so Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a great way to expand your garden. If, say, you they can be picked up in urban areas to be have a 4-foot by 8-foot Jimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plot and thrown away. Country folk often just pile want to double it in size, just put down /CCUPY9OUR,AWN them up and burn them. Why let this free cardboard or layers of old newspapers vegetable matter go to waste? Or, worse, (to block weeds) in the new area, and 2FFXS\ <RXU /DZQ ZLWK add to pollution? put leaves on it and cover it with plastic. UDLVHG EHG ÂłODVDJQD JDU GHQLQJ´ RXWOLQHG E\ *DLQ Think for a minute: The trees took When you uncover it in the spring, voila! LQJ *URXQG Âą 3USTAINABIL nutrients from the soil last spring and New garden! ITY )NSTITUTE OF -ISSISSIPPI mixed with sunlight, air Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;lasagna gardening.â&#x20AC;? MISPVODVDJQDJDUGHQLQJ and water came up with That is, layering paper or cardboard and these glorious leaves to leaves like lasagna to create a raised bed for shade us all summer. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plants. No tilling. No muss, no fuss. a lot of energy expended. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of soil Some purists will say that one type of leafâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;say oak, or nutrients. Why dump it in a landfill? pine or pecanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is too acidic or whatever to use in this way. Honor the tree. Recycle! Ask your Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about it. If you, as I always recommend, take neighbor (if you are sure he or she hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been a soil sample each spring to be tested for fertility, pH, etc., spraying trees with poison) if you can take you can determine exactly which amendments are needed to those piled leaves. produce the food you want to grow. (For more information, You can just dump them in your gar- see the Mississippi State University Extension website: jfp. den, as thick as you like, and cover them ms/soiltest.) with plastic (black or clear, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter), The main thing is to not waste this opportunity. Now and next spring you will have nicely com- is the time to prepare for spring. Let the seasons do the work posted leaves with added nutrients from for you, so you can enjoy your garden come spring. the other yard(s) to your gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;free im-LP3DWK)LQGHU(ZLQJÂśVQHZERRNÂł&RQVFLRXV)RRG6XVWDLQDEOH*URZLQJ ported fertilizer. It should be decomposed 6SLULWXDO(DWLQJ´ )LQGKRUQ3UHVV VKRXOGEHLQERRNVWRUHV1RY)LQG-LP Using leftover vegetation and leaves from your yard and neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; as enough to mix with compost you have saved RQ)DFHERRNIROORZKLP#HGLEOHSUD\HUVRUYLVLWEOXHVN\ZDWHUVFRP compost will help prepare your garden for spring. also to provide a rich, dark, loamy growing

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

S

ome folks may remember that first ers online. A 50-foot by 83-inch roll costs frost came early for central Missis- about $20 at growerssupply.com. sippi last year, at the end of OctoUnfortunately, if all you are trying to ber. While frost is a pleasant milestone protect is 4-foot by 8-foot Jimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Plot, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of the seasons for most people, it can be something of a wasteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unless you cut it tragedy for fall gardeners. At least, with- up and give away what you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to out precautions. friends or neighbors. Get a smaller size Commercial growers use a light- (two 14x14-foot pieces) for $39.99 at weight, white material called Agribon Peaceful Valley: groworganic.com.) to protect their crops Urban homesteadfrom frost. It comes in ers are always looking different thicknesses for a cheaper way to #REATEÂł#LIMATE for ever greater frost use, reuse or repurpose #HANGE´IN9OUR protection, some as whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on hand, so "ACK9ARD much as 8 degrees bethey shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel ob&UHDWH ÂłFOLPDWH FKDQJH´ LQ \RXU low freezing. ligated to spend money RZQJDUGHQZLWKORZWXQQHOV6HH You can order it to protect from frost DUWLFOHE\(OLRW&ROHPDQLQ0RWKHU from any of a number when it can be done for (DUWK1HZVMISPVORZWXQQHOV of commercial supplifree. Such a route is to

The first frosts of the season can destroy plants if you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepared.

use old bed sheets or a light blanket, just enough to keep the frost off tender shoots. The main concern is that the covering must be light so that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t crush the plants. If the weather is really cold, rather than just throwing it on at night, it should be white or translucent to allow some sun to penetrate and hold heat if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left on during the day. (You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to smother your plants.) Some farmers use Agribon as a season-

al cover that performs multiple tasks: keeping plants protected from frost; acting like a mini-greenhouse, holding in solar heat for greater soil temperature; and protecting from insects. They usually use the lighter weights of Agribon, rather than the heavy, thick versions. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t protect much below 32 degrees, but it does offer protection from a dip in temperature and/or biting winds. That should be enough for any cold snap we might get now. We normally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a hard, killing frost until around the end of November to the first of December. As winter approaches, more intensive measures may be required. For example, a simple way to keep winter greens from freezing is to simply take a few plastic soft drink bottles or milk jugs, fill them halfway with water, and put them between the rows of your plants. That passive solar heating will keep the plants from freezing below the level Agribon alone offers and especially if placed under 35 Agribon with the plants.

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Prepare for an Early Frost

FLICKR/GANAST

FLICKR/CARBONNYC

eople who garden can always find things to do. Sometimes, it seems we have too little time to actually enjoy our gardens. So why waste time, or a season, for that matter? You can get a head start on next springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organic garden now and free yourself for relaxation and enjoyment. How? Take advantage of â&#x20AC;&#x153;freeâ&#x20AC;? vegetative matter to build up your next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden bed with leaves. Fall brings leaves by the ton, not only in our yards but


LIFE&STYLE | dining

Muffaletta Wedges

Who Dat Tailgate

This gorgeous, extremely flavorful and filling sandwich is a New Orleans staple. Traditionally, it is assembled on large round loaves of Italian bread— about 7 inches in diameter and 2 inches high. The olive salad is the key ingredient, and making this sandwich ahead of time is ideal so that the oil and flavor can soak into the bread—making it perfect for a picnic. For ease at your tailgate party, cut into wedges and wrap each wedge individually for easy pick up.

by Jane Flood

I

JANE FLOOD

was introduced to the New Orleans Saints by marrying into the Flood family. My mother-in-law, Beverly Flood, was a huge fan of the team from the beginning of their organization in 1967. I have 40-year-old letters in which she called them “my boys” and was a faithful supporter throughout her life. She had seven boys of her own and infused all of them with the love of Saints. The day after my wedding, a cousin gifted us with tickets to the Superdome, and I became initiated in Saints fever and have never looked back. I was even able to teach several team members as a Pilates and personal trainer. It turned out to be a great highlight in my career. The focus, dedication and discipline that Easy muffalettas are perfect for a weekend of watching the Saints. the players exhibited was impressive and gratifying. I even had one Saint tell me that my the group close and then a hot stew to wrap cold hands Pilates helped his ankle strength more then the league’s around and finally, rich, tasty sandwich wedges which can conditioning did. be easily picked up and carried to the game. Don’t forget So, with my background steeped in Saints and my pas- to have favorite cookies or brownies available to round sion steeped in cooking, I came up with a fabulous tailgate out the meal. I’ve included a recipe for Mississippi Mud tradition. Grilling not required! A couple of dips to keep Squares, which are always popular with Jacksonians.

Olive Salad:

2/3 cup green olives, coarsely chopped 3 cloves of minced garlic 1 fillet of anchovy (rinse first), well minced 1/2 cup chopped parsley 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/4 tablespoon black pepper 1/2 cup olive oil

Mix all ingredients well, cover and marinate 12 hours. This makes enough olive salad for two loaves of bread. To make muffalettas, slice bread in half horizontally. Spread olive salad on both halves of bread and layer with ham, Genoa salami and provolone cheese slices. Cut into wedges.

Louisiana Shrimp Pâté with Horseradish Sauce Serving this beautiful and delicious appetizer adds just the right touch of lavishness to a tailgating party and is deceptively easy to make.

Buffalo Wing Dip 16 ounces cream cheese 8 ounces Frank’s Red Hot sauce 3/4 cup chopped celery 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded 1 cup shredded mild cheddar cheese Tortilla chips for dipping

Combine cream cheese, hot sauce and celery. Heat in microwave until cream cheese is melted. Stir; add chicken and cheddar cheese. Mix together. Put into a baking dish. Top with more shredded cheddar cheese. Sprinkle a little paprika over it. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Serve with tortilla chips.

Mississippi Mud Squares Named after the rich, thick mud along the Mississippi River, these delicacies are always popular.

October 10 - 16, 2012

1 cup unsalted butter 1/2 cup cocoa 2 cups sugar 1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1-1/4 cups chopped pecans 1/4 teaspoon salt 4 eggs, beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2-1/2 cups miniature marshmallows

36

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Farenheit. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat; add cocoa, mixing well. Remove from heat and let cool. Combine sugar, flour, pecans and salt in a large mixing bowl; stir well. Add eggs and vanilla, stir until blended. Stir in melted chocolate mixture. Spoon batter into a lightly greased and floured 13 x 9 x 2 inch baking pan. Bake for 30 minutes, or until a wooden pick in-

serted in center comes out clean. Immediately sprinkle marshmallows over top of hot brownies. Spread cocoa frosting over marshmallows. Cool and cut into squares. Yield: 15 servings.

Cocoa Frosting:

1/2 cup unsalted butter 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons milk 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons cocoa 1 (16 ounce) package confectioners’ sugar, sifted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Combine butter, milk and cocoa in a small saucepan; cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until butter melts and cocoa is well incorporated. Remove from heat and transfer to a medium mixing bowl. Add sugar and vanilla. Beat with an electric mixer on low speed until smooth. Yield: 2 cups.

WIKICOMMONS/FRANK MULLER

Always popular, this dip combines the spiciness of chicken with celery and the dressing all in one bite.

2 pounds boiled shrimp 1/4 cup chopped Vidalia onion 4 tablespoons softened butter 1/2 cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce Salt, to taste 1 recipe horseradish sauce Parsley and lemon slices for garnish

Horseradish Sauce:

1 cup bottled chili sauce 2 tablespoons grated horseradish 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Finely chop shrimp in a food processor. Add butter, mayonnaise, lemon juice and Tabasco. Puree. Add onion and puree. (Onion is added lastly to the mixture so that it does not overwhelm the flavors or get “mushy.”) Using a pastry brush, coat a small ring mold with mayonnaise. Spoon in the shrimp mixture and chill for at least 2 hours. Unmold onto a large plate. Mix together the horseradish sauce ingredients and pour into the middle of the mold. Serve with small, plain crackers. Serves 12 to 15 as an appetizer.


DINEJackson

5A44 FX5X

Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

R and R’s Eatery (3618 Rainey Road, 601-346-6111) Short order and take out at it finest. Southern delicacies include fried catfish, fried chicken and chicken and waffles. Healthy options include grilled chicken salads and turkey burgers. Mon. Thru Thur. 11-9:30. Fri. And Sat. 11 to 11. Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street District offering a savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

CRABCAKES now on the menu

ALL CRAB, NO FILLER 4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

October 25

5:00 Check In 6:00 Run $30 Singles $100 Teams of 4

Info: 601-326-3714

Purple Dress Run 601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

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STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowfin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes.

37


Watch. Drink. Eat. Come watch your favorite teams play and enjoy 99¢ beer & $6 dollar oysters

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm • Mon - Fri Other Special Offers: Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

October 10 - 16, 2012

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland • 601-956-5040 Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 • Sat & Sun 11 - 10

38


DINEJackson

Paid advertising section.

VOTE

Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

OR DIE

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes with real cane sugar.

BALLOT

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

COMING

OCTOBER 31

FOR ADVERTISING 601.362.6121 X11

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and buildyour-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made spring rolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

Summer Vacation is year round at the Islander! &IEGL:MFIˆ.MQQ]&YJJIX8YRIW

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jacksonfreepress.com

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

39


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

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October 10 -16 , 2012

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40

My Mother’s Wisdom

M

y mother is a smart lady. Sure, she teaches calculus (a subject that confounded me), but she’s also smart in other ways. For instance, she taught me important things about being a lady, like to always have a pair of red shoes. Most importantly, she instilled in me a confidence in developing my personal style.

your boots clean, waterproofed and conditioned lengthens their life and makes them look new again. Most shoe shops carry sprays that accomplish this with minimal effort. Next up, I had a new fall dress that needed some attention. This one needed a professional: It arrived from the store with an unfinished hem so it could be altered to a custom length. I headed to Custom Tailoring by Al (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, 601-607-3443). I put on the dress, stood in front of the mirror, and Al Guevara immediately folded the hem up to a perfect length, marked it, and I was on my way. A few days later, it looked great. It’s good to know a skilled tailor; fit really is everything, and when you purchase offthe-rack, having things tailored to fit your body makes a big difference. Finally, I needed to Although my mother shied away from “dry clean only” circle back to that process labels, I put my trust in Kolb’s and am never disappointed. that kept me away from certain clothes as a teen: One of the things that I always remem- dry cleaning. Despite my mother’s reticence ber about our shopping outings is her mat- to buy dry-clean items in my youth, I now ter-of-fact consideration of an item’s main- own more than a few. I like that the Kolb’s tenance. Anything with a “dry clean only” in Fondren, housed in a classic old building, label required special consideration. Unless it feels so friendly and personable and knows was a special outfit, she’d usually put it back. me by name. (Kolb’s Grand Cleaners, 2933 Once I grew up and left the nest, I N. State St., 601-366-1453, plus multiple can’t say that particular lesson is one that in- locations in the metro area). I also like that formed my own choices in what clothes to the service is quick, they offer delivery, and buy, but the idea of taking care of my clothes through my years in Jackson they managed did stick. And so I thought of my mother to remove stains that I thought were hopethe other week as I made several trips to local less, all while never once ruining anything. businesses that help me do just that. Speaking of not ruining things, if you’ve I love high heels and wear them all the keep up with fashion, you’ll know that leather time, even as I walk around downtown every is back big time for fall, much to my delight. day, where the cracked sidewalks and pave- Caring for it properly is key, though. Both ment can wreak havoc on stilettos. Metro Shoe Repair and Kolb’s specialize in When I start to hear that distinct metal leather cleaning, but here’s an additional tip “click” on a hard floor, I know I’ve walked I learned the hard way: if you have a leather through the caps and it’s time to visit Metro dress or top, don’t wear deodorant when you Shoe Repair (113 W. Capitol St., 601- don it. It’s cooler weather, so hopefully that 969-2996). I consider them miracle work- mitigates any concerns of sweatiness. Or ers—insert “save your sole” pun. Best of all, maybe you can try out the much-touted manager David Green lets me stand there Botox-in-the-armpits-to-prevent-sweating barefoot and wait while he recaps the heels. thing. The reason to go deodorant-free is At any other shoe shop, I would get funny that when it inevitably rubs off on your garlooks from the proprietors and be told I’d ment, the cleaner uses a chemical to remove have to leave the shoes with them for days. I it that is harsh on the leather and will wear it can’t really imagine being without my favor- down prematurely. ite pairs for that long, and I remain grateful Clothes and shoes are an investment, that David understands. and to look your best, they need the proper Now that it’s fall, it’s time to break out care. I’m glad to have found folks in town the boots, which means time to condition who can help me make sure that mine last my favorite suede and leather pairs. Keeping … and I think they’d be mom-approved.

TRIP BURNS

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu


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41


On the Dotted Line by Kathleen M. Mitchell

.ECESSARYSUPPLIES

F

all is in the air, and it’s time to get festive. When I lived in Boston, Mass., every fall we would trek up to Keene, N.H., for apple-picking, cider-sipping and the Keene Pumpkin Festival. For years, the festival held the record for the most carved, lit jack-o’-lanterns in one place. Although a city in Illinois topped their record last year, Keene’s festival remains an impressive sight. In 2011, 16,186 carved pumpkins illuminated the town square for one

night—simple pumpkins and giant pumpkins and funny pumpkins and incredible, elaborately carved pumpkins. Unfortunately, I don’t have the fine motor skills to produce anything sophisticated with a gourd, but I still love the ceremony of it as a sort of welcome into fall. Plus, who doesn’t love plunging their hand into that stringy, goopy mess of seeds and orange flesh? This year, I tried a new way of carving I read about on Pinterest. Here’s what to do:

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Clean your pumpkins and lay down newspaper. (If you live in a house that is anything like mine, allow your pets to thoroughly inspect the pumpkin.) Cut the top off your first victim and take out the guts.

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Decide on the design you want. I went with a simple and graphic chevron, but you can get as creative and complex as you’d like. I used a marker to draw where the holes would go for the first row of chevrons, and then used my electric drill to create the design. For the second row, I just freehanded using the drill, following the first row of holes.

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Here is an important tip I learned the hard way: The holes need to be fairly large to let enough light through to see the design well. My drill is very small, and the largest bit is only 1/8 inch. This was way too small to really see the design. I didn’t want to try to use the drill to widen them (too tedious), so I grabbed a screwdriver that created 1/4-inch holes and pushed it through each of the smaller, drilled holes. The larger holes were much more visible and made a stronger impact. 6WHS)RXU

Another tip: If you are using real candles, they need a good supply of oxygen to stay burning and keep the design illuminated. If the holes aren’t letting enough air in (as mine weren’t) you can either leave the top off or cut a larger hole in the back of the pumpkin, where it won’t be seen, to allow oxygen in. "RIGHTIDEA

October 10 - 16, 2012

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42

My verdict? This is a bit time-consuming, but very easy, way to create cool, modern pumpkins. Plus, because you aren’t using a blade, it’s a good (supervised) option for kids.

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v11n05 - When The Sun Sets The Music And Nightlife Issue; The Music And Nightlife Issue