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vol. 11 no. 04

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October 3 - 9, 2012


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN TONJA MURPHY

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ou can’t talk at them; you want them to be a part of the conversation that you’re having with them—about them.” Tonja Murphy is describing the parenting method she uses with her three children, Alexandria, 22; Gregory, 13; and Jordan, 12. Murphy, a single mother, is Jackson Public Schools’ “Parent of the Year,” and the after-school mentoring program coordinator at Rowan Middle School for Operation Shoestring, where she mentors both parents and children. Murphy provides some examples of bad dialogue and good dialogue. She advises not to say: “I told you not to do that” or ‘“why is that?” Instead, she suggests: “So tell me what you think about what you did.” After several years of working with nonprofits, Murphy says confidently that she will stay in that line of work. But that wasn’t always the case. Once she graduated from Murrah High School in 1991, she attended Jackson State University for a year, then moved to Hinds Community College, and eventually entered the career world in accounting as the director’s assistant for circulation at The Clarion Ledger in 1999. But she began to notice a pattern. When opportunities to contribute at community events and charities arose, she devoted copious amounts of her time and energy toward those causes. It came to a tipping point when, in 2006, she was offered a job at Habitat for

CONTENTS

Humanity. However, with a family to provide for and a steady job already secured, she shied away from the opportunity. Fortunately, the job became available again a few months later and, in the interest of good health and a rewarding career, she seized it, resumed her studies at JSU and has never looked back. She earned her bachelor’s degree in social and behavioral sciences in 2008. Murphy’s mentoring has led her to some important discoveries about the function of human relationships. “Anybody who is successful had somebody in their life who took the time to encourage and educate them,” she says. She credits her sisters, Gale and Sharon, and her parents, Emma Robinson Dillard and the late Rev. Johnnie Robinson. Problems arise when generations neglect communication with each other. “Nobody just wakes up and says to themselves, ‘Hmm, I think I’m going to do something illegal today to support my family,’” she says. “Somebody at some time or another didn’t take the time to have a conversation with them.” This is why Murphy is adamant about “date night” with her two sons. She dedicates one night a week to relaxing and speaking candidly about the issues they encounter as they grow up. “Children understand when their parents are involved,” she says, “and when they know someone cares, that gives them the right to be the best they can be.” —Sam Suttle

Cover vintage poster, public domain More covers: jfp.ms/covers

11 JPS vs. the City

Superintendent Cedrick Gray is taking the city to court after the City Council refused to increase taxes to meet JPS’ proposed budget.

35 Moveable Feast

LurnyD’s Grille, a food truck serving gourmet burgers, is gearing up to open for business this month in downtown Jackson.

39 An Impossible Ideal

“No wonder we are a nation of eating disorders. If these bodies are ‘natural’ then, in addition to liposuction, so is anorexia and so is bulimia—all in an attempt to fulfill an impossible ideal.” —Jim Pathfinder Ewing, “The United States of Anorexia”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 17 ............................ COVER STORY 24 .............................. DIVERSIONS 26 .......................................... ARTS 26 ............................... JFP EVENTS 27 ....................................... 8 DAYS 30 ....................................... MUSIC 31 ......................... MUSIC LISTING 32 .......................................... FILM 33 ..................................... SPORTS 35 ......................................... FOOD 39 .............................. BODY/SOUL 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 42 ............................................. FLY

COURTESY SHAPE; COURTESY LAUREN DAVIS; TRIP BURNS

OCTOBER 3 - 9, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 4

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Raising An Army

T

his past Monday night, I sat in an auditorium at Millsaps College packed with students—mostly female, but many males as well—and watched the documentary “Half the Sky.” It is the powerful film version of a book by the same name by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof and his wife and fellow journalist Sheryl WuDunn. “Half the Sky” is about the severe problems women face around the world. It is chilling, covering routine violence spanning from the sex trafficking and gang rape of toddlers in Cambodia to the routine rape of young women in Sierra Leone. Then, to add insult to horror, the victims are dispelled from their homes because they’re the ones who shamed their families—not the rapist (who is often a member of the family or a pastor or such). “Half the Sky” also explains the cycles of despair and poverty that often continues in the women’s children and grandchildren, and not just the females. The images of, for instance, the teen girl whose eye had been gouged out by the man who owned her in a brothel are horrifying— and makes an American realize that we complain about the wrong things so often (or as one student put it afterward, “we complain about having to get up for an 8 o’clock class). The film makes it clear that we Americans must be more engaged in what is happening to women around the globe (and sometimes as a result of globalization when it comes to sweatshops and working conditions). But here’s the thing. I may live in a very different world than the teen girl raped by her pastor in Sierra Leone, but there are disturbing parallels that tell us that the state of women everywhere needs serious work. As I’ve written about in the recent past, like that teen, I was raped by someone with perceived stature. I was held down. And I believe—probably rightly—that no one would

(a) believe me or (b) do something about it. Why? Because there is a horrific double standard right here in the United States: Men often get the wink-wink “boys will be boys” response while women are blamed for what we wear or, you know, for just being women. We are often presumed to be the guilty one until we’re proved innocent—when we’re actually the victims of violence and disrespect. Like in Sierra Leone, my rapist got away with it. Tragically, her father forced her and her mother out of the home because she tried to do something about it and made her rape public. Think for a moment about the men who blame the proverbial “ho” for their despicable anti-women talk or videos right here in Jackson for a parallel. How many young men (and women) are taught that women ask for rape with their actions and their dress? Or by dancing at a club? The talk at Millsaps wasn’t all about horrors against women and girls outside the United State. Carol Penick of The Women’s Fund stood up before and after the film and talked about the fact that Mississippi is routinely found to be the worst state in the United States to be a woman. Why? Because of our poverty; our antiquated laws about sexual assault, divorce and stalking (which are slowly improving thanks to amazing women’s advocates); our inadequate publiceducation system; our teen pregnancy rates; our poor systems of sex education; our lack of early childhood education; and more. But the reason they’re not considered priorities by state officials comes down to one thing: attitudes. We live in a state where few women are elected to public office and where very few women actually have public voices on issues that matter. For example, on The Clarion-Ledger’s front page you see a whole bunch of male blogger faces and no women; likewise, when is the last time you’ve seen a woman in pretty much any state media other

than the JFP write about serious political and policy issues? Most lawmakers at the state capitol don’t take women’s concerns seriously at all—and that includes members of both parties. They don’t want to lose a vote of some old white guy because they dare speak up about an issue that will help women and children (and thus everyone) because they might be conceived as too “liberal.” Just look at the last legislative term. Mississippi voters (especially women of both parties) spoke loud and clear last fall by rejecting “personhood” by a resounding margin. We came together over an effort (led by mostly men) that treated women like expendable second-class citizens. They tried to tell women that we can have an abortion even if our lives are in danger or if we’re a 13-year-old girl raped by our daddy. Oh, and we can’t have any kind of hormonal birth control, either. Women saw through that effort to control our health and our decisions. But the Legislature came back into session and, once again, used our rights as a political toy, trying to close the state’s only abortion clinic (although saying little about abortions performed in private doctor’s clinics on women who can afford them). Then this mess of a presidential election kicked in full force—and for some reason, many conservative men felt like they had permission to really let the women-hate fly in their efforts to pass laws to control all sorts of things we can do—and even want to allow our employers to tell us whether or not our insurance is welcome to pay for contraceptives. Ronni Mott’s cover package this issue lists many of these ridiculous quotes, showing how far backward we’ve gone from a time when being for or against abortion was the biggest issue. Now, it’s about whether or

not women should use birth control—and whether or not a particular politician thinks rape is “forcible” enough to actually qualify as rape. The good news is that, like last fall, women can find our voices. Even if we disagree on some issues, we can come together to demand that our needs are taken seriously—and to demand respect, and apologies, from men who behave like cavemen. It is vital that women find our voices and use them—and develop the kind of strength that doesn’t make us easy to shout down or take for granted. That’s where our attitudes come into play: We have to show that we will not take a war on women lying down. As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says in the film: We are fighting “deep cultural stereotypes about the worth of women.” Many men will continue to see us as lesser than them, or even as slaves and concubines, if we allow them to. Instead, we must invest in girls and women: failure to do so amounts to “planned poverty,” as the film teaches. The good news at Millsaps Monday night was that the film contained much hope. In each of the segments, we met grown women and teens who were rising to meet horrendous challenges. They were inspirational in how they were facing violence and poverty, determined to make something of themselves and change the cycle. And they were doing it with the help of other strong women spreading love and joy. After the film, students reacted with shock and determination. Sara del Castillo sat near the front in a Kappa Delta sweatshirt, her hair in a topknot. “We must generate our own army of people,” she suggested. She’s right. It’s time for women, and men who love and respect us, to raise our own army. We must fight a war for women. Comment at jfp.ms. Watch “Half the Sky” segments at jfp.ms/halfthesky.

October 3 - 9, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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Ronni Mott

Brian Johnson

Funmi “Queen” Franklin

Jacob Fuller

Tom Speed

Manivanh Chansprasith

Andrea Thomas

Erica Crunkilton

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-wining writer and the JFP’s news editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She wrote the cover story.

Brian Johnson is the former managing editor of the Jackson Free Press. He is currently a science editor in Chicago where he lives with his wife and adorable son. He wrote a political film review.

Funmi “Queen” Franklin is a word lover, poet and advocate for sisterhood. She has a weakness for reality shows and her puppy, Shaka. She wrote a column.

Reporter Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He covers the city for the JFP.

Tom Speed is a writer, amateur kazooist and peanut butter enthusiast. He co-founded the music magazine Honest Tune and has written for Paste, Blurt and Living Blues magazines. He lives in Oxford He wrote a music feature.

Manivanh Chansprasith is a Mississippi College grad student and a mother of two. Her roots go back to Laos, Arkansas and New Jersey. She can’t get enough of papaya salads and deep meditations. She wrote a food feature.

Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland and is a recent Antonelli College graduate. She loves to sing, dance and write poetry in her free time.

Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton was raised in the Missouri Ozarks She migrated to Mississippi to attend Ole Miss and never left. She lives in Flowood with her fiancé with their two neurotic dogs and a kitten named Starbuck.


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TRIP BURNS

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

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Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com. Tweet us: @JxnFreePress.

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WHAT WOMAN SHOULD RUN FOR OFFICE IN MISSISSIPPI?

Cheers to an Ally! I just finished reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come Out as an Allyâ&#x20AC;? (jfp.ms/lgbtally) in the Sept. 26 edition of the Jackson Free Press. As an out member of the LGBT community, I am so happy to see someone in the state taking a stand for the basic rights of LGBT citizens. I am new to Mississippi, so have been a bit cautious about being out. It gives me great hope to see articles like the column written by Emory Williamson. I expect that you will receive a letter or two (maybe more) suggesting that the article shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been printed, or that LGBT people are the cause of the evils that are happening in this country. Like most other LGBT people, I am just trying to do my job and contribute to society. I know that I still run the risk of discrimination at work, where I live, and the places I frequent. Knowing there are allies in the community who have my back helps me to feel safer. Thank you again for printing this piece! Lore M. Dickey Via email

October 3 - 9, 2012

This is inspiring. And takes guts, even in 2012. Congratulations Emory.

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Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got amazing things ahead of you. I am really proud to know you and share a hometown and alma mater with you. mlindenberger Posted at jfp.ms Thank you, Emory Williamson, an example of what is good and progressive down in Mississippi. But this article also speaks in a larger sense to those in the Republican Party who profess not to be homophobic privately but stand by silently and enable their party to be run to appeal to the many homophobic bigots (a redundant term for the dunderheads who direct social policy for the GOP) in the partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s base. Enabling bigotry when one is not a bigot is even worse to me. It is cowardly. It is, moreover, a form of cultural appeasement. Kevin Sessums, NYC author, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi Sissyâ&#x20AC;? (St. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Press, 2007) Via Facebook As a Mississippian, this is inspiring to see, especially printed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to know there are people like Emory in this country and state. Brad Batson Via Facebook

Steve Monts: Cristen Hemmins--for her intelligence, humanity, style and class. And oh yeahâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fox as well! Eddie Outlaw: Lori Garrott because B*TCHES GET SH*T DONE! Tom Head: Colendula Green for mayor. Sharp, charismatic, and wellconnected. Nsombi Lambright would be a great voice to have in the legislature. Keisha Real Talk Varnell: I think Sandy Middleton. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a firecracker and gogetter- people pay attention to her. Jill Butler: Laurie Bertram Roberts for councilman or legislator. Richard Perry: Jill Conner Browne sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smart as a whip, she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take sh*t from anybody, she uses humor effectively, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-connected on both sides of the aisle, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the right values. Anne Scott Barrett: Cristen Hemmins and Donna Ladd. (Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: Ladd says NO!)

Charles Filhiol: Jill Butler for Governor, and Laurie Bertram Roberts for Lt. Governor. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know Cristen, but maybe she could be attorney general, if Jennifer R. James doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the job. CJ Rhodes: I think Nsombi Lambright, Donna Ladd, Pam Shaw, Noel Didla ... Jay Pearson: Mayor Cheri Barry of Meridian for Lt. Gov. Casey Ann Hughes: Cristen Hemmins for any office she wants. Laurie Bertram Roberts: I would love to see Michelle Colon but I am sure Mississippi is not ready for her. Atlee Parks Breland: I want to see Lydia Quarles in office. We need her voice on the Supreme Court. Cristen Hemmins: Atlee Parks Breland needs to run for something! Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so on top of legislation, and I would think she was a lawyer if I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.


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jacksonfreepress.com


¹/H YEAH 9OU WERE BORN A GUY IN-ISSISSIPPI WHITE9OU WERE ALREADY ON THIRD BASE BUDDY²

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Thursday, Sept. 27 Despite record droughts, the Department of Agriculture predicts higher-than-average farm income for 2012 from crop insurance. â&#x20AC;Ś A federal judge approves a $37.5 million settlement in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;toxic FEMA trailerâ&#x20AC;? case. Friday, Sept. 28 One hundred eighteen inmates from the Mississippi Department of Corrections inmates receive educational and vocational diplomas at a ceremony. â&#x20AC;Ś During the broadcast of a high-speed car chase in Tonopah, Ariz., Fox News inadvertently airs live footage of the driver committing suicide. Saturday, Sept. 29 Mississippi Gaming Commission arrests three Mississippi Coast residents, alleging a scheme involving the exchange of counterfeit chips for cash. â&#x20AC;Ś Los Angeles County Sheriff finds himself under fire after the release of a report alleging misconduct and abuses. Sunday, Sept. 30 Severe weather in Stone County, Miss., tears the roof off a McHenry home. â&#x20AC;Ś NASA announces the completion of water-impact tests for the new Orion spacecraft.

October 3 - 9, 2012

Monday, Oct. 1 The 50-year anniversary of James Meredithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrollment at the University of Mississippi is celebrated. â&#x20AC;Ś New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman slaps JPMorgan Chase & Co. with a mortgage securities lawsuit.

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Tuesday, Oct. 2 Entergy Nuclear locks union security personnel out of its Claiborne County plant and decides to replace them with non-union workers after union negotiations failed. â&#x20AC;Ś A Pennsylvania judge rules that new voter ID requirements will not take effect until after the Nov. 6 presidential election. Get breaking daily news at jfp.ms and jfpdaily.com. Subscribe free.

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Following the DHS Scanner Money by R.L. Nave

M

ississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and the lobbying firm of former Gov. Haley Barbour have all benefitted from political donations from imaging giant Xerox, which holds the contract to manage the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s controversial e-Childcare payment and tracking system. In September, the state agency that oversees several programs for low-income families, including the federal child-care subsidy, or certificate, program installed biometric finger scanners at 20 child-care centers in the Jackson metro. In order for the centers to get reimbursed by the state, parents and guardians must scan his or her finger when picking up or dropping off their child. DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; move prompted a firestorm of complaints from child center directors who say the new system is wrought with problems and raises concerns about personal information security and privacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a headache, constant monitoring. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to do anything but monitor and make sure everyone is signed in,â&#x20AC;? Shirley Hampton, co-owner of Jamboree Child Development Center in Jackson, said last week. The switch also raised questions from Hampton and other providers about why DHS moved away from its previous computer system, implemented only in February 2012. Jill Dent, director of DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office for children and youth, told the Jackson Free Press that the agency is introducing new technology in phases that will help pare down the list of more than 8,000 children

waiting for subsidy assistance. Dent added that the agency is sensitive to concerns of parents and providers and stressed that the agency will not be capturing information about parents DHS doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already have in its databases. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not putting it out for the public to see. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be very confidential and nobodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be FILE PHOTO

Wednesday, Sept. 26 The Mississippi Department of Public Safety reverses an earlier decision and allows Robert Everhart to change the name on his driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license after taking his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last name. â&#x20AC;Ś Mitt Romney speaks on foreign aid at a forum presided over by President Bill Clinton.

¹4HE TRUTH IS    WOMEN RUN THEWORLD BUTMEN JUSTDON´T KNOWIT²

Gov. Phil Bryant, Lt. Gov.Tate Reeves and the lobbying firm of former Gov. Haley Barbour have all benefitted from political campaign donations from imaging giant Xerox.

able to see that,â&#x20AC;? Dent said. Xerox sent a letter to child-care providers in late July announcing the new childcare time and attendance program. The letter states that the new program requires the installation of new equipment, which comes at no cost to the provider. Also in-

MADISON MAYOR MARY HAWKINS BUTLER SURROUNDED BY: KNOWN FOR: COLLABORATORS: CURRY: CLASSIC QUOTE: FOCUSED ON: ASSOCIATED WITH: COMMENTS ON:

VS.

cluded in the 15-page packet were a provider agreement, a federal W-9 request for taxpayer-identification number form and a settlement authorization form. The settlement authorization form asks for providersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; banking account and bank routing numbers in order to get paid. Dent said child-care providers had been clamoring for the state to offer direct deposit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Xerox is a national company and does a lot of corporate business. They are very careful,â&#x20AC;? Dent told the JFP in response to providersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worries about being forced to give their bank information to Xerox. Over the years, Xerox and its subsidiary, Affiliated Computer Systems, have banked millions of dollars in state contracts, including the agreement to manage the finger scanner program. An acquisition approval form dated Oct. 6, 2011, shows a contract between DHS and ACS that includes $1.7 million for 1,815 finger scanners and VeriFone machines that resemble credit-card readers, and another $12.8 million to service the equipment until 2017. In February 2011, the state of Mississippi contracted with ACS to handle the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EBT payments and child-support enforcement. According to an acqui-

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represent a substantial portion of Xeroxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual revenues of $23 billion. To earn its government contracts, ACS has spent $3 million on lobbying and $7.1 million in direct contributions since 1990. Xerox has given $1.5 million in direct political contributions and spent $12.4 million lobbying since 1990. Of the lobbying firms ACS hired, $1.2 million since 2004 has gone to BGR Group, the government-affairs consulting and lobbying firm of which former Gov. Haley Barbour is a founder and partner. BGR stands for Barbour, Griffith and Rogers. The companies seem especially interested in Mississippi. In 2011, Xeroxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate political action committee donated $5,000 and $2,500 to the election campaigns of then-Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant and then-Treasurer Tate Reeves, respectivelyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;two of the few state-level candidates to whom Xerox gave donations last year. David McMillin, a pricing and contracts consultant for Xerox, also gave $1,000 to Bryant, who now as governor has purview over state agencies. DHS will hold a public hearing on the e-Childcare finger scanners on Oct. 10 to gather comments. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

sition form received Feb. 8, 2011, DHS, which also oversees child support collections, would also pay ACS up to $13.1 million over a five-year period, through January 2016. In all, since 2009, ACS has gotten approximately $23 million to administer Mississippi programs for the departments of revenue, transportation, human services as well as the Mississippi Tax Commission, according to state records. Meanwhile, $6.8 million has been paid to various Xerox vendors in the same period, records show. Based in Norwalk, Conn., Xerox holds the contracts to manage child-care tracking in 11 states, including Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Ohio, New Jersey, North Carolina, Alabama and Mississippi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(E)ChildCare is saving states significant amounts of money by improving accuracy of attendance tracking and reducing inadvertent overpayments,â&#x20AC;? Xerox spokeswoman Jennifer A. Wasmer wrote in an email. Wasmer cites Oklahoma, where taxpayers have saved $120 million since November 2003 by switching to Xeroxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s management system. Revenues from local and state contracts

9


TALK | elections

.%7315):

by Brian Johnson

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to run off to fantasyland. Almost no one Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza interviews has met Obama, and none of those few knows him well. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza interviews friends of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father in Kenya, but why would Obama share the views of people he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know? Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza applies the radical COURTESY OBAMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AMERICA FOUNDATION

onservatives have been abuzz this year about â&#x20AC;&#x153;2016: Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s America,â&#x20AC;? a documentary by Dinesh Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza, claiming to expose the â&#x20AC;&#x153;realâ&#x20AC;? Barack Obama. So who is Obama really? According to Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza, he is a communist revolutionary consumed by the anticolonial passions of his Kenyan father. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza presents his film as a stark warning. If voters make the wrong choice in November, the United States as we know it will disappear by 2016, replaced by a thirdworld dictatorship. As you may have guessed already, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film is one of the kookiest, most dishonest documentaries ever made. There are distortions and outright falsehoods in almost every minute. The central premise of the film is that Obama is secretly a communist who was shaped by Kenyan resistance to British rule. This is a disturbing claim that demands strong evidence, but the movie does not present any real evidence at all. The entire argument hangs on guilt by association and quotes taken out of context. Ultimately, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza offers viewers little more than a quote from the end of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s autobiography, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreams From My Father.â&#x20AC;? Weeping at his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grave, Obama makes peace with his father and forgives him for his flaws, which he recognizes in himself. It is a deeply personal passage about family and identity. For Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza, this passage signals that Obama shares every one of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beliefs, including an allegedly rabid anticolonialism. He is not discouraged by the fact that Obama met his father only once, when he was 10. It does not matter to him that Obama shared none of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experiences and first visited Kenya when he was nearly 30. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit like someone ascribing to you all the beliefs of a crazy aunt you met at only one family reunion. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza thinks he needs

Dinesh Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary makes tenous connections between Obama and a myriad of global evils.

beliefs of nearly anyone loosely associated with the president. If any of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college professors believes a thing, Obama must believe it, too. If Obama ever read a book, he must agree with it completely. And if a family friend Obama knew as a teenager became a communist in the 1940s, that means Obama must be a communist, too. Guilty by association. Many parts of the film are laughable. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza sees dark signs in every corner, including even office decor. He makes a great deal of Obama returning a bust of Winston Churchill to the British, for this supposedly

The Mississippi Witness Project (A Cancer Awareness Organization)

Invites You To The

8th Annual Pink Ribbon Gala October 3 - 9, 2012

October 6 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ The Regency Hotel

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Mistress of Ceremony Evelyn Reed â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jazzy DJâ&#x20AC;? Featuring the Jazz Lounge with Wanda â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lady Jâ&#x20AC;? Music by Katrina Jefferson and 5th Element

For Tickets Call 601-576-7466 or 601-316-7091

signals rage at British colonialismâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;although a nearly identical bust of Churchill remains in the White House. The other bust was only a loan, and the British always expected its return. In its place, the Oval Office now displays a bust of Abraham Lincoln. Obama clearly takes inspiration from Lincoln, who steered the country through troubled times. (Not to mention, Lincoln was actually an American.) If Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza is willing to misinform his audience about something so trivial, why would we trust him on anything else? The movie grows ever more unhinged as Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza claims that a second term for Obama will destroy the country. He warns that Obama has deliberately weakened America by reducing our nuclear stockpile to 1,500 warheads in the New START Treaty. Apparently, treaty supporters like Henry Kissinger and James Baker are also anticolonial communists if that is the standard. The film then claims that Obama plans to unilaterally dismantle the rest of our nuclear weapons, without reductions from any other country. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only evidence is that Obama hopes the world will one day be free of nuclear weapons. But Ronald Reagan said precisely the same thing. Neither Reagan nor Obama ever said that America should disarm unilaterally. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza also claims that Obama has deliberately built up deficits to impoverish the U.S., so it will become a third-world country. He never confesses that the deficit stood at $1.2 trillion the day Obama took office. Even if Obama does not win re-election, deficits will fall by at least $200 billion under his administration, or about 25 percent as a percentage of GDP. By contrast, George W. Bush took us from a surplus in 2001 to a deficit of $1.2 trillion in his last year. The film tries to hide these facts by talking about the increase in deficits since 2000, conveniently blaming Obama for deficits that grew under Bush. Do Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deficits mean that he was secretly a communist intent on destroying

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Fever Dreams of Obama

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America because of a troubled relationship with his father? It would be easy to go on about all the things this movie gets wrong, all the truth it buries, all the hilarious claims it makes. But you get the point. The truth is that there is no â&#x20AC;&#x153;realâ&#x20AC;? Obama, no secret communist freedom fighter hiding within the completely ordinary Democrat on the surface. Conservatives are entirely free to dislike Obama and vote for Romney. But they should stick to the facts and criticize the policies Obama has actually enacted or proposed. Those who follow Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza off into the woods of paranoia and delusion do a disservice both to the country and to themselves. They harm the country by debasing our political discourse, which has been filled for years now with wild-eyed madness about birth certificates and FEMA camps. Frankly, they should be embarrassed by such kooky hogwash. But the conservative movement has become an echo chamber, where lies are held up as truth the liberal media tries to hide. Fortunately, most Americans are repulsed by extremist conspiracy theories, and they will never embrace an opposition that looks deranged. If Republicans hope to win national elections, they need to clean house, because folks like Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza do not deserve a place at the table. They belong out in the back yard, howling at the moon. Brian Johnson is an award-winning journalist and the former managing editor of the Jackson Free Press. He is now a science editor in Chicago. Comment at jfp.ms.


TALK | education

JPS Takes City to Court by Jacob D. Fuller

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ment null and void, she responded like an attorney whose entire case rides on that one question. “That’s a question for the judge,” Turner said. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. had little to say about the legal issue after the city council work session at City Hall Monday. He said he didn’t know much about it and that he cannot comment on ongoing legal affairs, but that he knew the process is just getting started. The school board and Superintendent Cedrick Gray presented its new $88.8 million budget to the council Aug. 20, at which time Council members requested JPS do all they can to reduce that budget. Johnson and sevSuperintendent Cedrick Gray is making waves early at JPS eral council members by taking the city to court over the Jackson City Council’s expressed frustration that refusal to increase property taxes to meet the school JPS did not send a repredistrict’s proposed budget. sentative to the meeting Sept. 14 to answer their $88.6 million budget that JPS first requested questions. Sherwin Johnson, JPS communiin August and that would require another 2 cations specialist, told the Jackson Free Press to 2.5 mill increase. after the meeting that Gray was out of town Mills are a way of assessing property and unable to attend. taxes. One mill is equal to about $10 in taxes “If this (increase) was important to on a house valued at $100,000. them, they should have had a representaThe Council rejected JPS’ latest bud- tive here,” Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret get because city attorneys said the school Barrett-Simon said at the meeting. district failed to give proper public notice of The approved JPS budget includes an the budget. JPS advertised the $86 million operational budget of $69 million, a debudget, including the possibility of a millage crease from last year’s $72.5 million. The increase, but failed to publicly advertise the additional money will go toward paying off $88.6 million budget, City Attorney Pieter a pair of bond issues JPS received in 2006 Teeuwissen said. and 2008 worth $150 million. The school JPS attorney Dorian Turner said the district owes $2.3 million on those bonds in district filed a bill of exceptions on Sept. 24, the upcoming year. which she said is any citizen or agency’s route During the Aug. 20 presentation to the to appealing a city council decision they be- city council, JPS board president Sharolyn lieve to be unlawful. She said it is her opinion Miller said the district needed the increase to that the district’s notice of the $86 million hire replacements for some of the 100 teachbudget is all the law requires. Further, state law ers who have left, to buy new textbooks and also requires that the city set the millage rate to to make school-bus improvements. meet the budget that the JPS board approves. JPS warned of legal actions to come “In regards to the millage, we do not almost immediately after the council’s Sept. believe the rate the Council approved Sept. 14 decision in a press release. 14 is sufficient to cover the JPS budget,” “We will monitor the funds received Turner told the Jackson Free Press. throughout the 2012-2013 school year. If Turner filed the case in Hinds County the funds are not generated at the requested Circuit Court on behalf of JPS. The case $88,897,985.28 level by the District, we will will come down to interpretation of the law, pursue all legal remedies that are available to Turner admitted. The question is whether ensure that the ad valorem taxes levied yield the judge believes the district’s original ad- the funds we need to operate the District as vertisement of the $86 million budget was required by State law,” the statement said. sufficient notice. When this reporter asked “This may include pursuing legal action or if the JPS board amending the budget af- the issuance of additional debt to cover any ter the notice makes the original advertise- resulting shortfall amounts.”

jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

ackson Public Schools is taking the city to court over the City Council’s refusal to approve a millage rate to support the school district’s approved budget. The Council voted Sept. 14 to approve the school district’s original budget of $86 million and the 2.5-mill increase in property taxes it requires. It did not approve the

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TALK | business

What’s the Harm in Drilling?

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by R.L. Nave

COURTESY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

he battle over a proposal to open up natural gas exploration in Mississippi that has been raging for almost a year is shaping up to be another protracted showdown between environmentalists and boosters of fossil-fuel energy development in Mississippi. On Sept. 21 the Mississippi Development Authority, which formulated rules for how the state would conduct offshore gas and oil leasing, rejected drilling foes’ appeal to halt a lease sale from taking place. New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network and the Mississippi Sierra Club, which have been fighting to block the state from leasing state-controlled waters off the Mississippi Gulf Coast, say they will appeal MDA’s most recent decision to Hinds County Chancery Court. “People don’t come down here to be in an industrial zone,” Robert Wiygul, an Ocean Springs-based attorney who represents the environmental groups, told the Jackson Free Press last week. While natural gas is abundant, relatively cheap and clean compared to other sources of fossil fuels, state environmentalists have enumerated a number of economic and ecological concerns that serve as the basis for clawing tooth and nail to keep energy companies away from the Mississippi coast. Wiygul said MDA did not follow state law that requires an economic-impact statement. Under the statute, agencies proposing new rules or significant amendments—defined as costing more than $100,000 to comply with—must consider the rule’s economic impact. Earlier this year, MIT-trained engineer Jeffrey K. Bounds conducted an analysis that concluded that even if one in 20 visitors—5 percent—stay away from the Gulf Coast, the loss of state tourism revenue over the life of the reserve would amount to $168.5 million, wiping away the state’s anticipated revenues from sales of oil and gas leases. Louie Miller, executive director of the

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Mississippi Sierra Club, argues that MDA didn’t consider possible environmental threats in drafting its rules. He points to the potential for an hydrogen sulfide gas release and subsidence, or cratering, which can erode the coastline as reasons Gov. Phil Bryant should put the kibosh on coastal drilling. Colorless, flammable and carrying a rotten-egg stench, hydrogen sulfide occurs naturally in hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Hydrogen sulfide’s danger lies in the fact that because the gas is heavier than air, it travels along the ground and may collect in low-lying enclosures such as basements and sewer lines. Besides the danger of combustion, the gas is an irritant and chemical asphyxiant, highly dangerous to people and pets. In low doses, the gas can irritate respiratory functions. High concentrations can cause convulsions and an inability to breathe, either of which could result in coma or death. During Hurricane Isaac, 5 million pounds of pollution seeped into the water and air, including 277 tons of sulfur dioxide

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and 1,200 pounds of hydrogen sulfide from just one refining station. In Sept. 2007, such a gas release caused a halfdozen people to see a local doctor after they reported feeling ill. Just because the release appeared to be an isolated incident doesn’t mean cause for alarm does not exist, said the Gulf Restoration Network’s Mississippi organizer, Raleigh Hoke. “It doesn’t happen every summer. It doesn’t happen every year, but when it does, it’s certainly detrimental to human health,” Hoke said. In the event of a H2S release, emergency management officials tell people to remain in their homes with the windows and door closed, which isn’t an option for the hundreds of visitors to the barrier islands on a given day, Hoke added. Gulf Island National Seashores, a division of the National Parks Service, echoed the concerns of Miller and Hoke in its official comments to MDA on the drilling rules implementation. Evidence of drilling’s potential deterioration of the Mississippi coast-

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line can be found in neighboring Louisiana, Miller said. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Louisiana State University issued a 2003 report warning that portions of the Gulf Coast were dropping at an “alarming rate,” with the possibility that coastal Louisiana and Mississippi could lose up to one foot of elevation in the ensuing decade. Researchers at the University of New Orleans in 2009 determined that subsidence along the Louisiana Gulf Coast was the result of tectonic activity, sediment compaction, sediment loading, glacial isostatic adjustment, surface-water drainage and fluid withdrawal, which includes oil development. Of the five primary causes of subsidence, fluid withdrawal caused the most shrinkage, up to 23 millimeters per year. Brent Christensen, MDA’s executive director, wrote to Sierra Club attorney Wiygul that “fair and adequate consideration given to the comments of all interested persons, the economic-impact statements were adequate for the adoption of the rules and regulations, and the rules and regulations took into consideration the public trust.” MDA spokesman Dan Turner declined further comment on this story, citing the likelihood of litigation. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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Romney: Not Presidential

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hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an old adage that says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When someone shows you who they are, believe them.â&#x20AC;? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been following the 2012 presidential election, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been inundated with sound bites. Each candidate wishes to impress upon you who he is and the reasons why he should be the one to lead us the next four years. As an independent voter who votes person, not party, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become increasingly clear to me that Mitt Romney isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the best choice. Yes, Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business experience is impressive; as a businessman, I can respect his acumen. But from what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen and heard, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little â&#x20AC;&#x153;presidentialâ&#x20AC;? about him. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike me as a diplomat. His comments in London about the Olympics denote that, and his comments about China hammer that home. If those werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough, there are his hasty, ill-timed comments after a U.S. ambassador was assassinated in Libya. Romney doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike me as compassionate. His comments about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;47 percentâ&#x20AC;? at a private fundraising dinner show that. In fact, he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike me as having a bloody clue about what goes on with anyone not in his world. Nope, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not â&#x20AC;&#x153;presidential.â&#x20AC;? To me, he is simply an ambitious man who seeks an office to pad his resume. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been â&#x20AC;&#x153;running for presidentâ&#x20AC;? for nearly a decade. He is a wealthy man who has no idea how to act or connect with people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in his tax bracket. He is a successful businessman who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know much about foreign policy other than he thinks it should work like a Fortune 500 company. None of those things are bad, except that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tried for a year to show us how he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any of those things. And that raises a red flag for me. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little advice, Republican Party, from an independent voter who recognizes that occasionally you guys do indeed have good ideas. Stop parading rich white guys in front of us. Start learning how the majority of America lives ... and works. Stop assuming that those of us who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rich white males are lazy and shiftless grifters who refuse to work. Stop letting guys like Todd Akin make stupid, inaccurate statements that alienate an entire demographic. Stop letting guys like Allen West represent the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Republican voice.â&#x20AC;? Do I believe President Obama has shown us the â&#x20AC;&#x153;real Barackâ&#x20AC;?? Doubt it. But Mitt Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest faux pas was showing us exactly who he was and what kind of president he would make. And that guy wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get my vote. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the truth ... shonuff!

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October 3 - 9, 2012

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Women: Grab a Chair

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f thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s any doubt in your mind that the political War on Women is a reality, reading this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover storyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even browsing through the quotes and sidebars and graphsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;may change your mind. The conservative drive to overturn Roe v. Wade has, in the last several years, become an all-out assault on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive rights. Lawmakers are blocking some bills designed to make life better for women and introducing others bills to limit womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights. The airwaves and Internet are awash in a flood of inaccurate reproductive informationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from people who really should know better. Women in the political arena in Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like women everywhere in the United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;report good and bad news from the trenches. The good news is that the small numbers of women in politics are all fighters. They have to be. These are the women who are strong and bold enough to push their way into the proverbial smoky back rooms where the â&#x20AC;&#x153;realâ&#x20AC;? decisions get made. We shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be so foolish to believe, just because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re now held in smokefree facilities, that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;meetings before the meetingsâ&#x20AC;? donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen every day, out of sight and out of mind of the majority of voters. The bad news is that women simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the political numbers, yet, to swing politicians their way. Depending on the position, the percentages of women in office are be-

tween 8 percent for mayors of large cities to a high of around 24 percent in state legislatures nationwide. And those numbers have dropped or plateaued in the past few years. Linda Tarr-Whelan, in her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women Lead the Way,â&#x20AC;? writes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;A sprinkling of women at the top, however inspirational, is not enough to change how companies or governments operate. The weight of cultural inertia is too great. But when the sprinkling grows until the leadership group is about one-third women, important things happen. Different decisions are made, and the move toward true parity in leadership gains momentum. If we can get to at least 30 percent women as partners at the power tables, we have a chance to change the world.â&#x20AC;? [emphasis ours]. Few with power will give it up willingly. To claim their rightful place, women have to be willing push their way, if necessary, to a seat the table. That isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easy, but few worthwhile things in life simply get handed to people who want them. It takes work. Just being outraged isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough. Women must set aside their timidity to claim their power. If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not able to do that, they must be willing to give their support to women who canâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the enlightened men who get it. For a seat at powerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crowded table, first understand why you want that place, and then be willing to do what it takes to make it happen.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


FUNMI “QUEEN” FRANKLIN Not Just a White Thing EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Intern Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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’m not sure how many of my sisters truly understand that there is a War on Women happening right before our eyes. I have to question this because I often see white women on Facebook and at rallies joining together to make their voices heard (with a splattering of black female faces here and there). But I don’t see enough black women to convince me that we actually know what’s happening. Maybe we don’t care. Maybe we just don’t understand. I am now at the point where I pray daily for women’s rights. At the blink of an eye, we could easily wake up the day after the November elections and no longer have the right to decide what we want to do with our bodies. It’s just ridiculous that in 2012 we are still fighting for our feminine liberties. This election isn’t just about a Republican attack on the middle class. The party has placed us in an all-out fight for our rights as women! Women of all nationalities are at a dangerous place in history. Republicans are supporting legislation to lead us back to the Dark Ages—a time when women had no freedom of choice, and our voices held no value. I beg you to take some time and read about Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan’s position on Planned Parenthood. They plan to stop its federal funding or, to put it plainly—get rid of it. This is not a “white thing.” This is a woman thing. Are we just inclined to let the next group of people stand in the trenches while we pray that they are successful? Has the face of this battle been given to white women when the blatant disrespect is aimed at all females? Some black women are lost in struggle every day. We are fighting on our jobs to prove that we are not all angry and disgruntled. We are fighting in our relationships to prove that we are valuable and lovable. So when called upon to fight for what doesn’t seem as pressing as making ends meet and feeding our children, the significance of the issue tends to fall between the cracks of our everyday lives. I’m sure many people think that there is no difference between the black woman’s existence and that of a white woman. That’s not true: White women have an advantage that black women can never possess: being born white. Deny it all you want. A group of white women standing in front of the capitol in protest is viewed as a group with something to say. If black women gathered for the same reason, we’d be looked at as a gang of angry black women shouting. As a matter

of fact we should be screaming louder than most because our rights will go first. The personhood issue, while it’s an attack on all women, was designed to affect women who can’t afford to have babies or abortions and women without access to information they need on birth control. Who do you think monopolizes the focus of these attacks? It’s not the white homemakers who show up at the capitol, form support organizations, meet with their friends over cocktails planning a course of action that will legitimize their efforts and who recognizes that there is power in numbers and in information. No, it’s women who live check-to-check and who get up every day with a strike against them just because they are black and female; who stay home with their children because they can’t afford day care; who work minimum-wage jobs because they don’t have experience or education to do better; who have not been afforded information on pregnancy prevention. Many believe everyone has access to cable and the Internet, but they are sadly mistaken. Our charge is to become educated about the issue and then to stand up for our rights. We can no longer fall under the radar, giving the impression that we don’t care about the laws being made to keep us silent. We have been complacent and unengaged long enough. Black women have an authentic voice birthed from struggle and pain. This voice is just as important as any man’s or white woman’s. It’s time we stop passing the buck and hoping that the creator has enough pity on us to let those who march and protest on our behalf win our battle for us. Black women prove daily that we are strong enough to endure the struggles of life. We prove our strength with eyes closed. Problem is, while our eyes are closed, we are missing the repeated jabs we endure from rich and powerful men. We must take a stand for ourselves and our daughters. We are believed to be uninterested, ignorant and irrelevant to the issues at hand. Wrong! It’s time that we support each other and our sisters of other ethnicities. Not just about personhood and abortion, either. We must stand together and demand respect on our jobs, in our community, in our homes, in our relationships. We must stand steadfast and dig deep enough to know and believe that if you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything. Funmi “Queen” Franklin is a word lover, poet and advocate for sisterhood.

We must take a stand for ourselves and our daughters.

more national & state

news than ever

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Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

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Hall!’

Mississippi Women in Politics by Ronni Mott

A

lyce Clarke remembers her first day at the Mississippi Capitol. It was 1985, and Clarke was the first African American woman to serve in the state Legislature. When she asked where the women’s rest room was, she was told the building had only one restroom for her. She and her women colleagues eventually remedied the situation. But even with access to more facilities, in those days, women frequently had to make long treks to other parts of the building. Clarke said one of her collºeagues would use a men’s room if necessary, shouting “woman in the hall!” as she entered. This year is Clarke’s 27th year serving the people of Jackson in the House of Representatives. She declined to give her age, but her iron-gray and silver hair gives a hint. She walks slowly with a cane, but age isn’t the problem: Clarke has been living with multiple sclerosis longer as she’s been in office, about 30 years. She prefers to define the MS acronym as “magnificent spirit,” and she believes her work keeps the worst of the debilitating disease at bay. “That might just be one of the things that keep you alive,” her doctor said when Clarke told him she was running for office. For Clarke, her years in office are on a continuum of caring for people. She’s the daughter of a teacher and a handyman who stressed the need for education in a world that was—and continues to be—harsh for

women and people of color. Instead of allowing their daughter to run off to Chicago after high school, Clarke’s parents insisted she go to college. She graduated from Alcorn State University in 1961, and went on to Tuskegee University for her master’s degree. Her degrees, in home economics and nutrition, might seem anachronistic, but for Clarke, they provided a laser-like focus into the issues women face: reproductive health, poverty, domestic violence, access to education and jobs, all complicated by race. The political landscape might have shifted in Mississippi, but in 2012, women are still struggling with the same issues. She Doesn’t Run Clarke believes that many of the problems women continue to face could be resolved if more women held elected positions, which stands at about 17 percent nationwide. Of 174 seats in the Mississippi Legislature, women hold 29—16.7 percent. “If we had more women, I think our state and our nation would be a much better place,” she said. “We take our time and really think about what it is that we’re doing.” Some of her female colleagues in the Mississippi Legislature may not agree. Sen. Deborah Jeanne Dawkins said she frequently shoots from the hip. “When I get pissed off, I tend to do something about it,” Dawkins said. Being “pissed off” is what got her into politics in the first place with her only previous position was president of her local Parent Teacher As-

Among the women in Mississippi politics are (above, left to right): state Rep. Adrienne Wooten, activist Atlee Breland, Rep. Alyce Clark, activist Cristen Hemmins, former Greenville Mayor Heather McTeer and state Treasurer Lynn Fitch.

sociation. She never believed she would win. “I thought to myself, ‘I’ll just go on and qualify, and then somebody else will jump in, and then I can help them,’” she said. “But once I was in there, I was in it.” It was a different kind of pissed off that got Flonzie Brown-Wright into politics. In 1963, she was in Biloxi, when she heard the news of NAACP field secretary Medgar Evers’ assassination in Jackson. “At this point, I knew I had to learn more about what was going on,” she said. Brown-Wright, now 70, began to attend civil-rights related events. Shortly after moving to Canton in 1964, Wright befriended civil-rights activist Annie Devine, who encouraged her new friend’s interest. In 1967, Devine convinced BrownWright to run for public office. The following year, she ran for and won the race for election commissioner in Madison County, becoming the first black woman in Mississippi to hold elected office. Dawkins entered the Mississippi Senate in 2000. She bemoaned the fact that those in power, especially in Mississippi, don’t even consider women for political office. “[M]ost first-time candidates are groomed and encouraged,” she said. “… In most instances, it’s a bunch of rich old white guys deciding … who will be their boy.” Men aren’t always the reason for low

numbers of women in politics. “Men Rule: The Continued Under-Representation of Women in U.S. Politics,” a study released in January by the Women & Politics Institute at American University’s School of Public Affairs, identified seven reasons that women don’t run for office: 1. Women perceive the electoral environment as highly competitive and biased against female candidates. 2. Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin’s candidacies aggravated women’s perceptions of gender bias in the electoral arena. 3. Women are less likely than men to think they are qualified to run for office. 4. Female potential candidates are less competitive, less confident and more risk averse than their male counterparts. 5. Women react more negatively than men to many aspects of modern campaigns. 6. Women are less likely to receive suggestions to run for office—from anyone. 7. Women are still responsible for the majority of childcare and household tasks. The women who spoke to the Jackson Free Press confirmed the study’s premises. But not one of them believed they were reason enough not to get politically active.

Women, see page 18

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY ADRIENNE WOOTEN; COURTESY ATLEE BREELAND; TRIP BURNS; COURTESY CRISTEN HEMMINS; XXXXX; COURTESY LYNN FITCH

‘Woman

in the

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women, from page 17 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;An Imperfect Lawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Nothing gets people fired up quicker than attempts to take away their rights. Over the past several years, Republican politicians have introduced hundreds of bills proposing limitations to womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive rights in the U.S. Congress and several state legislatures. In this state, last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personhood ballot initiative, which asked voters to declare that life begins at the moment of fertilization, lit a fire under many women, including Jackson computer programmer Atlee Breland and Oxford resident Cristen Hemmins, who helped stop the initiative from passing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All I set out to do was to put a little FAQ out on the Internet,â&#x20AC;? Breland, a founder of Parents Against Personhood, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś That was going to be my contribution to humanity. It turned out to be a little bigger than I bargained for.â&#x20AC;? Even before the United States granted women the right to vote in 1920, religious and morally upstanding folk outlawed birth control in America. The U.S. Supreme Courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 galvanized the forces opposed to abortion to wage a war to get the law overturned. Personhood is one salvo in their arsenal. At least six states and the U.S. House of Representatives have

tried to pass Personhood bills, but beginning with Mississippi, not one has passed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doubtful that anyone believed Mississippi votersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;arguably the most conservative citizens in the most conservative stateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; would defeat the initiative, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what happenedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by a vote of 58-42. The vote hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stopped some state lawmakers from attempting to bypass voters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I give them every credit for having sincere motivations. They feel that is what their religion calls for,â&#x20AC;? Breland said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not everybody, and not every Christian, feels that way. We all have different judgments about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acceptable. â&#x20AC;Ś Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the core of the issue.â&#x20AC;? Personhood is also not only about religion, and as Hemmins said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about free dadgum birth control. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about insurance companies covering medications that our doctors prescribe us,â&#x20AC;? which includes oral contraceptives used to treat painful conditions such as endometriosis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people like (Gov.) Phil Bryant seriously think that voters were misled,â&#x20AC;? said Hemmins, the mother of three. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś He personally said to me â&#x20AC;Ś â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sorry about what happened to you, but that baby has every right to life that you do.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;Ś They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respect our vote.â&#x20AC;?

Heather McTeer, executive director of the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute for Excellence at Mississippi Valley State University, believes that women candidates must reframe the abortion issue into one of reproductive rights, taking some heat off the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;abortion,â&#x20AC;? which is practically a curse word in this state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talking about contraceptives; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talking about decreasing the teen pregnancy rate; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talking about how we save the taxpayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s money based upon being able to better help women define what are their own health needs,â&#x20AC;? she said. Clarke is concerned that the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last abortion clinic may shut down because of a law passed last year requiring doctors to have hospital admitting privileges. That means even if a woman is a victim of rape or incest, she will be unable to get an abortion in the state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid that it will cause more people to do what women did years ago,â&#x20AC;? she said, referring to dangerous self-induced abortions and resorting to back-alley hacks. The legislator believes that recriminalizing abortion is misguided. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to eliminate abortions ever since I got here with sex education,â&#x20AC;? Clarke said. She sponsored the bill passed last year to allow abstinence-plus programs in schools. None of the

women who fought for that legislationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including Clarkeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;believes it goes far enough. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really happy that the law passed,â&#x20AC;? Carol Penick, executive director of the Jackson-based Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund, said cautiously. She added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an imperfect law.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Teenagers) have all these misconceptions,â&#x20AC;? she said, such as girl canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get pregnant if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on top during sex, or that chlorine kills sperm, so sex in a hot tub is safe. Among the changes Penick would like to see are making the program opt-out. Opting in is too easy for parents to ignore, she said. They can simply avoid making a decision and not deal with it. Opting out would require parents to make an active choice. She also wants to eliminate gender-separate classrooms that could strain an already underresourced public-school system with three classesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one each for boys, girls and optouts. She said focusing on appropriate behaviorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as respecting â&#x20AC;&#x153;noâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;is difficult in segregated classrooms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sex education ... should be about relationships,â&#x20AC;? Penick said. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unexpected Excellenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A conversation about womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights is incomplete if it only focuses on reproductive rights. It must include equality issues, such as

Republicansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 55 Blows to Women

R

epublicans in the 112th Congress have been almost unanimous in voting against bills that would strengthen the wellbeing of American women and in voting for bills that would restrict womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how their votes break down:

11

October 3 - 9, 2012

Republicans voted 11 times to cut womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access to preventive care, LQFOXGLQJ

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They voted 17 times to allow health-insurance companies to discriminate against women E\FKDUJLQJ

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They voted 10 times to restrict or roll back abortion rights or access to legal

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Seven times, they voted to cut funding for key nutrition programs for women,LQFOXGLQJYRWHVIRU

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Republicans blocked access to reproductive and maternal care services three times, LQFOXG

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They voted 6 times against protections for

women from violence and discrimination,

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They undermined Medicare and Medicaid programs three times, LQFOXGLQJYRWHV

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They voted 14 times to weaken environmental laws that protect pregnant women, LQFOXGLQJ

YRWHVWREORFN(3$UHJX ODWLRQVWKDWZRXOGSURWHFW SUHJQDQWZRPHQDQG ZRPHQRIFKLOGEHDULQJ DJHIURPH[SRVXUHWR PHUFXU\DSRWHQWQHX URWR[LQWKDWSRVHVSDU WLFXODUULVNVWRWKHEUDLQ DQGQHUYRXVV\VWHPRI XQERUQFKLOGUHQ SOURCE: â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ANTI-WOMEN VOTING RECORD OF THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 112TH CONGRESSâ&#x20AC;? BY THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE, MINORITY STAFF, SEPTEMBER 2012


+ INDICATES A VOTE SUPPORTIVE OF AAUWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POSITION

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SOURCE: AAUW, CONGRESSIONAL VOTING RECORD

the multi-ethic group, many of whom have backgrounds of poverty. She strives to give them the â&#x20AC;&#x153;nuts and boltsâ&#x20AC;? of the workplace, including understanding how the media portrays women and how others may see them. Equality issues are about basic human rights for many women McTeer counsels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very difficult for a woman in the Mississippi Delta to talk about equal pay when they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a job in the first place. The jobs that are available, either theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not properly trained for, or theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not aware of, or they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make the link to itâ&#x20AC;? in other ways, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś People want to talk to them about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;you should be getting paid the same as your male counterparts,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re saying: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Look. Just let me get paid. Give me something just to get a check.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Politicians often overlook poverty when it comes to womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights. In the U.S., where 15.9 percent of all people lived in poverty in 2011, women and children top the statistics. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rate of poverty is even higher: Recent statistics from the U.S. Census show that one in every four Mississippians live in povertyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;more than 744,000 people. Single motherhood is the most significant predictor of future poverty, said Marianne Hill, senior economist at the Center for Policy Research and Planning for the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning. In 2010, 42 percent of working mothers were the only job holder in the family in the state. Several factors play into poverty for woman with children, including a lack of policies for maternity and family leave, and few options for affordable, quality child care. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look at the history of poverty ... the people who are always the poorest are single women with kids,â&#x20AC;? said Janice Brockley, associate professor of history at Jackson State University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This nation, for whatever reason, has always been very reluctant to invest for providing services and support for those women compared to other countries.â&#x20AC;? Equal pay for equal work also remains elusive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The pay gap is real,â&#x20AC;? wrote Linda D. Hallman, executive director of the American Association of University Women, a Washington, D.C.-based nonpartisan advocate group, in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Simple

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Which is More Important?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; $ERUWLRQVPDNHXSÂłZHOORYHUSHUFHQWRI ZKDW3ODQQHG3DUHQWKRRGGRHV´ For consultants in the private-prison ²6HQ-RQ.\O 5$UL] industry, the numbers of children who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t making it by third grade become the predictor for how many more cells prisons will need in the next 10 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A number of states take (lottery) money and Experts say that pre-K education, start- send the kids to college,â&#x20AC;? she said, and chaling with children at age 3, can break cycles lenges anyone to go to Louisiana and count of poverty and crime. Yet, Mississippi is one the Mississippi license plates at businesses of 11 states without a public program. selling tickets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippians are playing the â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough money (for lottery; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just not getting the money.â&#x20AC;? pre-K education),â&#x20AC;? Clarke said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but we have McTeer tossed out this statistic: For evenough to incarcerate them.â&#x20AC;? ery $1 states put into early childhood educaâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford a lot of things, yet (law- tion, they save $7 in prison and social benefit makers) still find a way to put the money costs. But education must also deal with the into (them),â&#x20AC;? Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D- current situation of teen motherhood. Hinds and Rankin, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called prioritizâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Very few of us who are focusing on the ing.â&#x20AC;? Wooten, 38 and a lawyer, has been in teenaged mother to train her and teach her the Mississippi House for five years. what she needs to do to ensure (her) childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is it more imsuccess early on in portant to try to deter life.â&#x20AC;? Part of her work crime by investing through her church more into our educais teaching young tional system so that mothers what they we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to keep should be doing for pumping money into their kids from birth the prison system?â&#x20AC;? to age 3. she asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Which is more important?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Do It!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; State Treasurer Voters may Lynn Fitch, a Rechallenge women publican from Holly entering politics in Springs, agrees, and ways that they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t she intends to make a confront men. That difference in the area. includes questioning â&#x20AC;&#x153;Education is keyâ&#x20AC;? to a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compeWomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund Executive Director the health of our econtency, questioning Carol Penick offers strength and comfort to another woman. omy, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those her personal and children become our family relations, and workforce.â&#x20AC;? She also asking questions they wants to introduce financial literacy classes would never ask men, such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking to schools. care of your kids?â&#x20AC;? Voters elected Fitch and Commissioner McTeer advocates solid preparation. of Agriculture and Commerce Cindy Hyde- â&#x20AC;&#x153;People will question everything,â&#x20AC;? she said. Smith last year in surprising victories over â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are people who still think that GOP men considered the front runners. there are certain positions that women just They are the third and fourth Mississippi arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ready for in Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? she said. women to hold statewide office. McTeer recalled a comment an older woman That short list contains former lieuten- made during her congressional race. ant governors Evelyn Gandy (1976 to 1980) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to be congressmen, not and Amy Tuck (2000 to 2008). congresswomen,â&#x20AC;? the woman said. Sen. Dawkins is drafting a pre-K bill for â&#x20AC;&#x153;My response to her was â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I hope that next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legislative session. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s under no one day, when your granddaughter or your illusions. Her opponents will say thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no daughter is in a position, that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able money for it, but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll propose it anyway. to call her congresswoman, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be OK,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The infrastructure is already in place, so it McTeer said. wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost that much,â&#x20AC;? she said. Rep. Clarke is exploring a state lottery Women, see page 20 19 supplement the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education resources. COURTESY CAROL PENICK

equal pay, and education and opportunity. In 2004, when she was 27, McTeer became the first woman and the first African American mayor of Greenville, a position she held for eight years. In 2011, she ran for a spot in Congress in District 2. She lost that race to incumbent Rep. Bennie Thompson, but that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stopped her activism. Today, she has a law practice and an educational consulting business for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues, in addition to her work at Mississippi Valley. The Institute for Excellence is the brainchild of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s president, Donna H. Oliver, and focuses on leadership development and skills training for female students, preparing them for work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have a lot of challenges,â&#x20AC;? McTeer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We take it for granted that they know certain things, such as how to dress for an interview. There is a basic level of training we have to do.â&#x20AC;? She said the program promotes putting unlikely women in leadership positions. The theme this year is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unexpected Excellence.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look for the young ladies who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t part of every organization,â&#x20AC;? she said of

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Truth About the Gender Pay Gap,â&#x20AC;? an AAUW report published this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[W]omen working full time in the United States typically earned just 77 percent of what men earned, a gap of 23 percentâ&#x20AC;? in 2011, the report states. In Mississippi, that gap was slightly larger: Women earned 73 percent of what men earned, putting the gap at 27 percent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe that we still have jobs where men make more than women,â&#x20AC;? Clarke said, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the reality.


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Women, from page 19 During her campaigns, McTeer held round-tables, â&#x20AC;&#x153;kitchen cabinets,â&#x20AC;? where she would get â&#x20AC;&#x153;all of the hard questionsâ&#x20AC;? thrown at her from people she trusted. Her training as an attorney made those sessions a natural part of her research. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to be intense; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to be real,â&#x20AC;? she said. The work paid off during public forums. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never lost my cool,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never lost respect for (my opponents) or myself.â&#x20AC;? McTeer also spoke to the issue of campaign funding. Parties generally wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide funds in primary races, but she said that if a woman has built good connections, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be more than able to raise funds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of it comes from the candidate actually getting on the ground going and talking to people and making those relationships. ... It really takes a lot of ground work. ... Women cannot be afraid of going and having the meetings and building the relationships and selling themselves as the candidates. ... You have to over and over and over again.â&#x20AC;? Rep. Wooten takes her lawyerly training for preparation onto the floor of the House. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a young black woman. So all of those categories, people would say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wrong, wrong, wrong.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very outspoken, and I think I have just as much intelligence as those men folk who sit on the floor,â&#x20AC;? Wooten continued. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trust me: You will be challenged. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) part of the process that you will have men folk stand up and question you. If you know your information well enough, then you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything to be concerned about.

â&#x20AC;Ś Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no such thing as fear for me.â&#x20AC;? Fitch, like other women in this story, wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have run without her familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unanimous support. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Running for office was one of the hardest things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever done in my life but certainly the most blessed,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run for office without having several things intact,â&#x20AC;? she said. Fitch said her faith was most important in her successful first run, followed by her family and a strong support network. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be prepared to give 110 percent of yourself as you go through the process of running for that position.â&#x20AC;? Sen. Dawkins highly recommended women read â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Runs for the Legislature?â&#x20AC;? by Gary F. Moncrief, Peverill Squire and Malcolm E. Jewell (Prentice Hall, 2000, various prices online), which she says is full of practical advice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We politicians sign up to take a certain amount of abuse,â&#x20AC;? she said. On the other hand, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rocket science.â&#x20AC;? Penick said that women mistakenly believe they have to have mountains of education and experience to run, adding that men donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have those kinds of concerns. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple, she said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need (women) to get angry. We need them to get active.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do it! Do it! Do it!â&#x20AC;? was McTeerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enthusiastic advice. Women can kindle passion for others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women have to see other women who can stand fearlessly, unafraid, intelligently and boldly, and declare, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is who I am, and this is who I stand for, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m standing for you and your daughters and our grandmothersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

State Rep. Alyce Clarke was the first African American woman in the Mississippi Legislature. She was elected in 1985 and has served continuously for 27 years.

and our sons and our brothers and our fathers.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;Ś Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Fannie Lou Hamer did, and Unita Blackwell and Shirley Chisholmâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what they did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They did it in the face of knowing that there was no way in Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green earth, that they may or may not be successful, but the statements that they made and the lives that they changed, just by them standing and showing that they were fearless, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to get back to.â&#x20AC;?

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Running the World Clarkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice is soft. To hear her clearly, a listener might have to lean in. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a sign of weakness. And although she says her foray into politics wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t her idea, she hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been shy about leaving her mark on the Mississippi Legislature. Among her many accomplishments, she counts youth courts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;where you sentence people to treatment instead of prison,â&#x20AC;? bringing the federally funded WIC health and nutrition program (Women, Infants and Children) to the state and bringing the International Baccalaureate program to Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jim Hill High School. She hopes the program can have students enter college as sophomores. Would she do it all again? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would have started younger to get a few more things accomplished,â&#x20AC;? she said. Clarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calm nature belies an unshakeable belief in the power of women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The truth is,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;women run the world, but (men) just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it.â&#x20AC;?


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23


8 DAYS p 27 | MUSIC p 30 | FILM p 32 | SPORTS p 33 CAESAR SEBASTIAN

Electric Freestyle

Electronic DJ Bassnectar will perform in Jackson Oct. 8.

by Briana Robinson

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October 3 - 9, 2012

hen Lorin Ashton entered college, he wanted to teach U.S. history and be a guidance counselor. Eventually, he decided that he wanted to make a larger impact on the world than he could in an office setting. He never intended to be a professional musician, but he met Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction, who asked him to help produce a new record. Then things exploded, and he played Madonna’s birthday party in Los Angeles. Ashton, 34, now is the force called Bassnectar. Ashton released his first album, “Freakbeat for the Beatfreaks,” in 2001 and now is one of the most-respected electronic dance musicians in America. As part of his new fall tour, Bassnectar will perform in Jackson for the first time Oct. 8 at the Jackson Convention Complex.

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Tell me about the EP you’re working on. I was working on it last winter as well when I put out “Vava Voom.” I could only put so much on “Vava Voom,” and I kept working through the spring. I’ve got like 25 songs right now, and I have to choose five that I’m going to put out and mess with all the details. Actually one of my favorite parts of making music is when the songs are all pretty much finished, and you just go through every microsecond and make a little tweak here and a little suction noise there and an explosion sound there. Did you say you have 25 songs right now? I always have close to 100 songs in progress—like collaborations with people, remixes with people, reworking old material, starting up new ideas. … I move from song to song

when I’m working. Yeah, right now I have about 20 or 25 done for the fall tour, and then I’m picking five for the EP. And then I’m going to make a freestyle mixtape that’s just like a live set where it flows from one song to the next. We’re going to give that away for free. How do you prepare for your live shows? The day of the show I might start off with this kind of style, this kind of vibe, and I’ll go for five minutes. Then I’ll go into this routine for 10 minutes, then that one which is five and that one which is 15. And then inside of each routine are all these options where I could do this version of the song or that version of the song and make it sound like this. Or take the chords from this song and mix it over the beat from that song and just blend it all up. It’s really good for me now because basically it was a lot of preparation a couple years ago when I was building all the templates in Ableton Live, the computer program I use, and now it’s just kind of like freefor-all mayhem. It just flows really naturally, so I can have a lot of fun up there. How do you like to describe your music? The word I would probably use would be freestyle. It could encompass anything. So it might be this, it might be that. You might expect it to do this and it never is or it will be again it always is. Not being harnessed by people’s expectations, not being harnessed by what other people are doing, but not doing it in an insensitive way. Definitely I perform at shows to delight people, and I’m not there for myself.

Do you still call your music omnitempo maximalism? I do, and another word for that would be freestyle. Omnitempo means that the rhythm of the song is moving at any or all speeds. It’s just free whereas most DJ sets are locked into tempos. Maximalism kind of means like if you’re making soup you put everything in it, not just three ingredients. So kind of like combining everything into one limitless combination where no rules apply. I made up that phrase, omnitempo maximalism, as a joke probably about 10 years ago, but it literally does make sense, but freestyle is a good term. What do you listen to the most? I don’t sit around and listen to music. In fact, I can’t remember the last time that I did. I collect records like an obsessed lunatic. I collect almost every sound that comes out and fast-forward and skim through it to find pieces that I like, kind of like a collage artist. If you ever make a collage for art school or something, you go through different magazines looking for any image you like and you cut it out then you put them all in a big box. So then you have this box of images. That’s project one; it’s like aggregating content. And project two is sitting there putting an actual piece together. You might take an eyeball, a butterfly and a dolphin and put them in a convertible car then have the car on a wave, then have the wave shooting from Saturn. ... Really, a DJ can be like that. I’m also a producer, so I make things from scratch. Read the entire interview at jfp.ms/bassnectar. Bassnectar, along with Gramatik and Gladkill, performs at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St., 601973-7002) Monday, Oct 8. The all-ages show starts at 6 p.m.


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DIVERSIONS | arts

TheWolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road, 601-3661844) art exhibition opening reception is Thursday, Oct. 11, from 5:30-8 p.m. The show hangs through Nov. 11.

Home Sweet Studio by Kathleen M. Mitchell

Name: Elizabeth â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bebeâ&#x20AC;? Wolfe Job: Owner of The Wolfe Studio, an art gallery and ceramic shop first opened by her parents, Karl and Mildred Wolfe, in 1946. What was it like to grow up around an art studio? FE

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Jackson Restaurant Week Sept. 30-Oct. 6. Dine at participating restaurants by ordering from the Restaurant Week menu, and vote at the end of the meal for one of five selected charities to receive $10,000. Visit eatjackson.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 3, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Author Henry T. Gallagher discusses and signs â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot.â&#x20AC;? Free, $26 book; call 601-576-6998.

October 3 - 9, 2012

R

YUKI SHIMAZU

A Friendly Game

26

Of course, it was quite wonderful, actually. One thing that was really nice for me was that my parents were both around all the time. They had the studio right next to the house. They were busy, they had work to do, but they were always right there and I could see what they were up to. That was always really fun, and there was always something interesting

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going on, so I just absorbed everything in a really natural kind of way. What did it instill in you?

kind of at the heart of everything for me. How does the memory of your parents live on in the studio?

It instilled a huge appreciation for visual art in all its forms. My mother taught art history at Millsaps at a time when I was in middle school. I would come home and sit down with her and she would be getting her slides in order. I would get interested in the pictures and slides and she would more or less give me the whole lesson. So it was an absolutely painless, osmosis kind way of learning about everything. Art was never separate from anything for me

Well the forms that they did long ago, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still making their forms. â&#x20AC;Ś Still, all of the ceramics we make, which is what the studio is about now as far as business, all are things that they started. â&#x20AC;Ś The nativity scenes that we make are, for me, very much linked to my father. He really loved Christmas, and he loved medieval art. He had been to Europe and seen all the cathedrals there. And this was kind of his expression of that.

What is your favorite art to make?

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a big question mark that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite know the answer until it happens. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having a kind of group show in October of people who work at the studio, including me. The theme is birds, but not itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s necessarily about Wolfe Birds (the ceramics sold at the studio), just birds of any kind. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been an exciting thing. ...Who knows, maybe it will even inspire me to be painting again and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a show of my own work later on.

I guess I know more about painting than other forms, just from my own knowledge and skill and all that. I have a great love for sculpture and a feeling for it and like to do it. â&#x20AC;Ś But I think the root of all of it for me is drawing. I have a great love for drawing and really spent a lot of time developing that while I was in art school. Drawing for me has so much to do with movement and sort of the kinetic connection to things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Friends of the Quisenberry Library Book Sale Oct. 3-5, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Oct. 6, 10 a.m.5 p.m., at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). Books for all ages for sale. Free admission; call 601-924-5684. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund of Mississippi Annual Meeting Oct. 3, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Topics include a new grant and the sexual health website factnotfiction.com. RSVP. Free; call 601-326-3001. Mississippi State Fair Oct. 3-14, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). The annual fair includes livestock shows, rides, food, games and concerts. $5 plus cost of ride tickets, children under 6 free, $5 and up for parking; call 601-961-4000 or 601-353-0603. Presidential Debate Watch Party Oct. 3, 7 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.), in the Red Room. Local chapters of the Mississippi Democratic Party are the hosts. Free, donations welcome; rankindemocrats.net. Else School of Management Forum Oct. 4, 8:30 a.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.), in Leggett Special Events Center. Steve Battista of Under Armour is the speaker. Breakfast buffet at 7:45 a.m. RSVP. $15; call 601-974-1250. Hinds Community College Alumni Recognition Dinner Oct. 4, 4 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond), at Mayo Gymnasium. Honorees include attorney David Yewell and LogoStoreUSA president Keith Ferguson. $30; call 601-857-3363. Precinct 1 COPS Meeting Oct. 4, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 1 (810 Cooper

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next for The Wolfe Studio?

Road). The monthly forum is designed to resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0001. Fall Flower and Garden Fest Oct. 5-6, 9 a.m.2 p.m., at Truck Crops Experiment Station (2024 Experiment Station Road, Crystal Springs). Includes plant sales, tours, wagon rides, exhibits and seminars. Free; call 601-892-3731. Free Spanish Demo Classes Oct. 5, 6:30-9:30 p.m., at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy free classes at 6:30 p.m. and free Hawaiian, Colombian, and Brazilian food from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Music included. Guests may bring food, beer and wine. RSVP. Free; call 601-500-7700. Delta Paranormal Project: A Paranormal and Metaphysical Event Oct. 5-6, at Keplerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Grill (533 Highway 82 East, Greenville). Includes vendors, exhibits and guest speakers. VIP tickets include a ghost hunting expedition Oct. 6. Proceeds benefit St. Jude Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. $25$100; deltaparanormalproject.com. toLabor Doula Training Oct. 5-7, in Brandon (call for location). Topics include conducting prenatal and postpartum visits, providing support to the mother during childbirth and maintaining client confidentiality. $365; call 769-232-9968. Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk Oct. 6, 8 a.m., at Mayes Lake at LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Adults must accompany children under 15. Free, $3 car entrance fee. Free; call 601-956-7444. more EVENTS, page 28


THURSDAY 10/4

SATURDAY 10/6

SUNDAY 10/7

Jackson 2000’s Friendship Golf Outing is at Colonial Country Club.

The Town Creek Arts Festival kicks off at the Mississippi Museum of Art.

The Mississippi Walk for Diabetes is at Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance.

BEST BETS OCT. 3-10, 2012

ATLANTIC RECORDS

WEDNESDAY 10/3

Patrick Harkins performs during Live at Lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Bring or buy lunch. Free; call 601-960-1515. … Author Henry T. Gallagher speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) about guarding James Meredith. Free, $26 book; call 601-576-6998. … Pianist Dr. Kristin Elgersma performs at 7:30 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Free; call 601-974-1422.

THURSDAY 10/4

Christopher Gardner, author of “The Pursuit of Happyness,” speaks at the Mississippi Minority Business Alliance Awards Gala Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. at the Hilton.

1557. … Dress for Success Metro Jackson’s Little Black Dress with a Tie Fundraiser is at 6:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). $50 advance, $60 at door; call 601-985-9888. … The UMMC Candlelighters Art Auction is at 7 p.m. at The Commons. Benefits the Children’s Cancer Program. $75; email umccandlelighters@gmail.com. … T-Bird and the Breaks perform at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $5 advance, $10 at door; call 800-745-3000. … Trio Settecento performs at 7:30 p.m. at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton Road). $20, $5 students; ancientmusic.org.

FRIDAY 10/5

SUNDAY 10/7

Women’s Fund Executive Director Carol Penick speaks during Friday Forum at 9 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Free; email jonathan.lee@msprodinc.com. … The Mississippi Minority Business Alliance Awards Gala is from 6-8 p.m. at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). $125; call 601-965-0366. … The Millsaps Singers perform at 7:30 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Free; call 601-974-1422.

The Jackson Jamboree is from 1-6 p.m. at Spencer Perkins Center (1831 Robinson St.). Switchfoot, the Mississippi Mass Choir, Dathan Thigpen and Vernon Moore perform. $7, $5 children 12 and under; call 601-354-1563. … The GenerationNXT Indie Concert Series is at Dreamz JXN.

SATURDAY 10/6

Bassnectar performs at 7 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $25; call 800-745-3000. After-party at 11 p.m. at Club Friction at the Joint for ages 18 and up ($5-$10). … Soul Wired Cafe hosts Chill and Converse Monday.

The 4 the Record Swap is from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). $2 ($5 early bird), children under 12 free, $25 vendors (must register); 4therecordswap.com. … The Mississippi Museum of Art’s (380 S. Lamar St.) Town Creek Arts Festival, a JFP-sponsored event, is at 10 a.m. Free; call 601960-1515. … The Euro Fest Auto and Motorcycle Show is from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Renaissance (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Free; euro-fest.net. … The “Tats for Ta-tas” bikini bike and car wash is at 11 a.m. at Eternal Body Art (361 Interstate 55 S.). Benefits breast cancer programs. $10 bikes, $20 cars and trucks; call 601-346-5963. … The Mississippi Walk for Diabetes is at 2 p.m. at Southern Farm Bureau (1401 Livingston Lane). $20 and up; msdiabetes.org. … The Mississippi Funk Summit is at 6 p.m. at Underground 119. For ages 18 and up. $15 advance, $20 at door; call 800-745-3000. … Benjamin Cone III and Worship performs at 6:30 p.m. at Anderson United Methodist Church South (1315 W. McDowell Road). $10. … The Manhattan Short Film Festival is at 7 p.m. at Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $8; manhattanshort.com. … The Brock McGuire Band performs at 7 p.m. at St. Richard Catholic Church (1242 Lynwood Drive). Benefit local sobriety houses. $10-$15; call 601-946-0578. … Mississippi Witness Cancer Survivors’ Project’s Pink Ribbon Gala is at 7 p.m. at Regency Hotel. $50; call 601-576-7466 or 601-316-7091. … Nameless Open-mic is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5, $3 to perform.

MONDAY 10/8

TUESDAY 10/9

Music in the City with vocalist Viola Dacus is at 5:15 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free, donations welcome; call 601-960-1515. … The BY LATASHA WILLIS grand re-opening of Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM (528 Bloom St.) is at 5:30 p.m. Call 601-960-1457. … The New York FAX: 601-510-9019 City Slickers perform at 7 p.m. at DAILY UPDATES AT Millsaps College, Ford Academic JFPEVENTS.COM Complex (1701 N. State St.). $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1130.

EVENTS@

WEDNESDAY 10/10

The ANYI LU Couture Comfort Designer Shoes Trunk Show is from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at Joseph at Maison Weiss (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 109). Free; call 601-981-4621. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

jacksonfreepress.com

D.B. KING/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Jackson 2000 Friendship Golf Outing is at 8:30 a.m. at Colonial Country Club (5635 Old Canton Road). $125, $500 team of four; call 601-948-3071 or 601-957-0434. … Meet “As I Lay Dying” cast members from 4-6 p.m. at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Limited tickets to the JFP-sponsored event. $35, $25 Crossroads members; brownpapertickets. com. … Fondren After 5 is from 5-8 p.m. Call 601-981-9606. … James Patterson’s exhibit reception is at 5 p.m. at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). Free; call 601-291-9115. … The Pink Tie Gala is at 5:30 p.m. at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Benefits Susan G. Komen for the Cure. $50, $100 VIP, $400$800 tables; call 601-441-1889 or 601-932-3999. … The Artists’ Guild of Mississippi Exhibition reception is at 6:30 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-

Switchfoot headlines the Jackson Jamboree Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. at the Spencer Perkins Center.

27


)5203$*(

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAYS

10/03

LADIES NIGHT MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM

GIVEAWAYS FROM THE W BY AZWELL THURSDAYS

10/04

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

COLLEGE

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

October 4

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday October 5

NIGHT Mobley 8PM - UNTIL • 9 FLAT SCREENS

$2.25 LONGNECKS • $3.25 WELL DRINKS SATURDAY

10/06

MS RAIL COMPANY MONDAY

10/08

w/ Vinyl Thief Saturday

October 6

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

GUYS NIGHT $2.25 longnecks $3.25 well drinks

TUESDAY

10/09

SHRIMP BROIL 5 - 10 PM MATT’S LATE NITE

KARAOKE $1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

October 3 - 9, 2012

MON & THURS NIGHT MENU

28

Buffalo Shrimp Tequila Lime Wings Hamburger Sliders Chili Dogs Smoked Chicken Nachos Taco Chili Nachos Philly Cheese Steak 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 8, 6 p.m., at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). CBS Sports analyst Phil Fulmer is the speaker. $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186. Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership Lunch and Learn Oct. 9, noon, at Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership (201 S. President St.). The topic is advertising opportunities for GJCP’s community map. RSVP. Free; email dgreen@ greaterjacksonpartnership.com. Snow Skiing and Snowboarding Seminar Oct. 9-10, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at Baptist Healthplex, Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton), in the conference room, first floor. Learn basic techniques and safety tips. Limit of 20 participants. Registration required. $10, $5 students, free for members and military; call 601-925-7901.

7%,,.%33 Events at Ridgeland Recreational Center (Old Trace Park, Post Road, Ridgeland). Registration required. Call 601-856-6876. • Yoga Classes. Mondays and Fridays from 11 a.m.-noon. $10. • Tai-Chi Fusion on the Reservoir for Seniors. Wednesdays from 11-11:30 a.m. $5. • Zumba Fitness Class for Seniors. For ages 40 and up. Thursdays from 1-1:45 p.m. $5. Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) Health Fair Oct. 9, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Jackson Campus (3925 Sunset Drive), in Bivens Auditorium. Includes screenings and a blood drive. Call 601-987-8109.

COLLEGE NIGHT 7pm - until| OPEN MIC 10pm

DigMe Social Media Conference Registration. Maris, West and Baker Advertising is the host. Learn ways to optimize your digital marketing strategy. Lunch included. Register by Oct. 8. The conference is Oct. 25 at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). $45; call 601-977-9200.

Gary Burnside Monday

October 08

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

October 09

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Breast Cancer Screening Overview Oct. 10, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in the Baptist for Women Conference Room. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-2562; mbhs.org. Poker Run Oct. 10, 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Participants receive five playing cards during the run/walk, and the people with the best and worst hands win prizes. Free; call 601-899-9696.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “A Little of This, a Little of That” Oct. 4, 11:30 a.m., at Ridgecrest Baptist Church (7469 Old Canton Road, Madison). Mayberry Ministries presents a music and variety show that includes a tribute to the late Andy Griffith. Lunch included. $7; call 601-856-6876; email connect@rcbc.org.

Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday October 10 KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings feature readings, excluding Oct. 8. Call 601-366-7619. • “James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot: A Soldier’s Story” Oct. 3, 5 p.m. Henry T. Gallagher signs books. $26 book. • “Last Chance Texaco” Oct. 6, 1 p.m. Joe Lee signs books. $22.95 book. • “La Befana: The Italian Christmas Legend” Oct. 8, 5 p.m. Paul V. Canonici signs books. $25 book. • “We Have the War Upon Us: The Onset of

the Civil War, November 1860-April 1861” Oct. 9, 5 p.m. William J. Cooper signs books. $30 book. Teen Book Club Oct. 10, 9 a.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). Youth in grades 9-12 can register and pick up Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian.” Discussion on Nov. 14 includes pizza. Free; call 601-856-4536.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Ridgeland Recreational Center (Old Trace Park, Post Road, Ridgeland). Call 601-8566876. • Country Line Dancing Class. Mondays from 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7:15-8:45 p.m. for advanced students. $10 or $40 per month. • Thread, Yarn, Crochet and Coffee Group On second and fourth Mondays from 1:30-3 p.m. Bring supplies. Free. • Painting with Pastels Fridays from 9:30 a.mnoon. Registration required. $65 per month; call 601-856-1802; email b1108@live.com. Figure Drawing Class Oct. 5, 6-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Ginger Williams-Cook is the instructor. Supplies not included. To register, send an email with “Figure Drawing Class” in the subject line. $10; email gcook@msmuseumart.org. Animation Workshop Oct. 10 and Oct. 24, at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). Children in grades 6-12 learn basic stop-action animation techniques. Register by Oct. 5. Free; call 601-856-4536.

"%4(%#(!.'% Jackson Touchdown Club Golf Classic Oct. 4, 1:30 p.m., at Country Club of Canton (183 Country Club Road, Canton). Proceeds go toward several charitable projects. Register by noon Oct. 3. $100 per person; call 601-856-1059 or 601-540-5364. Riders Against Domestic Violence Call for Donations. Donate toiletries such as soap and shampoo by Oct. 6, and RADA will deliver the items to domestic-violence shelters Oct. 14. Free; call 601-954-9997. Bike MS: Bike to the Battlefield Oct. 6-7, at Baptist Healthplex, Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton). Take a two-day, 150-mile ride to Battlefield Inn in Vicksburg and back. Proceeds benefit the Alabama-Mississippi Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Riders should raise at least $250. Teams welcome. $40 through Oct. 4, $50 Oct. 5-6; call 601-856-5831. Blessing of the Pets Oct. 7, 4 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.), on the columbarium. Bring pet food donations for the Animal Rescue Fund, CARA and the Mississippi Animal Rescue League. Free; call 601-354-1535. Pink Car Giveaway, at Chelley’s Italian Catering (1929 Christine Drive, Byram). Buy raffle tickets for a chance to win a 2004 custom pink Infiniti. Proceeds benefit the Central Mississippi Breast Cancer Society. Winner announced Dec. 24. $25 per ticket; call 769-257-4737. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


WEDNESDAY 10/3

Andrew Duhon THURSDAY 10/4

Legacy With Justin Murphy FRIDAY 10/5

3 Hour Tour SATURDAY 10/6

AJC & The Envelope Pushers MONDAY 10/8

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 10/9

Open Mic hosted by Jason Bailey

Try our new wraps while they last.

jacksonfreepress.com

• Reuben • Summer Veggie •Jerk Chicken and more!

29


DIVERSIONS | music

Charlie Mars: Keeping It Real

The Charlie Mars Band performs at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601-292-7121) Friday, Oct. 12. Maggie Eckford performs at 7:30 p.m. Cocktails at 6 p.m. The show is for those 18 years and over. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Visit charliemars.com.

by Tom Speed JOSH FRANER

As part of a nationwide tour to support his latest and sixth full-length album, “Blackberry Light,” Mars will perform at Duling Hall on Friday, Oct. 12. Though much of this tour is marked by solo performances and supporting roles for Steve Earle and Citizen Cope, the Oxford resident will play this home state gig with a full band in tow. That’s a good thing, because while Mars’ vocals and songwriting are the main crowd-pullers, he and his mates cook up an enticing sonic stew on “Blackberry Light.” The record elicits a comfortable, atmospheric Laurel-native Charlie Mars has finally found a sound that distinguishes him from other singer/songwriter rock stars. space for Mars, one that infuses barefoot grooves and acoustic jams with reggae beats and harlie Mars has been writing songs and playing even a dash of funk here and there. in bands since he was a high schooler growing On the track “Picture of an Island,” for instance, up in Laurel. That has been quite a few years ago sparse percussions and an infectious whistling refrain set now, and his career has seen quite a few transfor- the stage for a suave vocal delivery with Mars coaxing mations over those years too. But he hit his stride with the listener to hop in a boat and “take something to ease 2009’s “Like A Bird, Like A Plane” on the heels of the our minds.” Similarly, the smooth sway of the title track breakout hit song “Listen to the Darkside.” benefits from a chorus as catchy as anything he’s ever

C

written along with a reggae groove with a deep low-end and a swirling organ fuel “Let the Meter Run.” Sonically, the album is akin to the previous release in that it possesses an ethereal quality that Mars credits in part to producer Billy Harvey (who also helmed “Like A Bird”) and Tchad Blaton, who mixed “Blackberry Light.” “Tchad Blaton mixed the record, which has been a big difference,” Mars says. “He mixed the last two Black Keys records. He mixed Crowded House, Peter Gabriel’s Up. He’s just someone I always dreamed of working with. It took a long time to do. He did a great job.” That atmospheric tone provides a common thread to these songs, but that doesn’t mean they’re all easy-going. Mars gets gritty with the bluesy bluster of “Back of the Room” while “How I Roll” is a funky, hard-driving rocker that explores themes such as indulging predilections for mind-altering substances and generally embraces one’s darker tendencies. It’s a balance that works well for Mars, who says he feels that he has finally found his own sound to distinguish himself from similar artists. But the field for singer/ songwriter rock stars is still a crowded one. “There’s just so many dudes like me out there with their acoustic guitars singing about their girlfriend,” Mars says. “I’m well aware of it. It has been done. So what are you bringing to the table? I hope that I am doing something different. I’m just always trying to keep it real.”

key of g

by Garrard Lee

Musing at Morningbell

October 3 - 9, 2012

30

a show featuring a rock band and a rapper in Jackson doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But just remember, we aren’t that far TRIP BURNS

O

n Sept. 7, 5th Child celebrated the huge, seeing as how two of Jackson’s most release of his newest album, “Love beloved acts were combining forces. I’ll put it Letters and Suicide Notes,” at Morn- this way: 5th sold out the CDs and shirts he ingbell Records (622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, brought with him with at least a dozen peo769-233-7468) with a performance by 5th ple still looking to make purchases. You don’t Wolf, a combination of himself and Jackson see that very often. (Note: the CD is available rock band Spacewolf. Here are some of my at the store and I suggest you go cop one.) random thoughts from the night. “This is really special.” As I looked “Man, I love Morningbell.” In less around, I couldn’t help but feel proud of than a year, Morningbell has gone from an my city. My main goal as a Jackson music idea in the minds of Drew and Sarah McK- supporter and promoter has been to unite ercher to not only the go-to place to buy the different scenes within Jackson into one records, CDs, and other music-related stuff, cohesive scene with collaborations that bring but also one of the most coneveryone together. It’s cool to sistent live music venues in see that vision play out in real 5PCOMINGEVENTS the city. The store supports life, and 5th Wolf was a conAT-ORNINGBELL every facet of the Jackson crete embodiment of that. On 2ECORDS music scene, and we are all top of that, Jackson rock duo 3TUDIOS 2FW² *UHJ*LQQ grateful and better for it. Plus, Liver Mousse is featured on a 2FW²1R&RPSO\ what’s better than watching track off of 5th’s new album. 2FW²HYHQ7KLUW\ music while standing in the A local saxophone player ´+HDYHQ·V&RPSXWHUµ 5HOHDVH6KRZ record aisles? joined 5th Wolf on stage for 2FW²0XWXDO'LWFKLQJ “Wow, there’s a lot of the night. Cross-pollination people here.” Morningbell will continue to, as those of is one of the cozier venues in the city, and this us within the city who share that vision have is especially true when there is a good turn- all kinds of shows, records, and new collaboout. The excitement level for this show was rations coming your way soon. For some,

A night at Morningbell Records leads to introspection on Jackson’s music scene.

removed from the days where touring black singing groups had to play in the South to rooms with a white line down the middle to separate races. “Whoa, Caitlin is crying.” To be fair, Caitlin Cox (of Liver Mousse) cries a lot. Her sweet and empathetic nature requires it. I re-

ally understood where the tears were coming from on this night, for sure. The crowd at Morningbell was beautiful. People of different ages and races with different musical tastes were jammed in the room. One of the biggest complaints I hear from people who complain about things is that Jackson’s music scene is segregated by both genre and race. As I mentioned, that is being worked on, and on this night it wasn’t an issue. It’s funny to me, I must say, that the people I hear complain about a segregated music scene or that there is nothing to do in Jackson are the people that you never see out at anything. Lame. “Frank Ezelle is the coolest person in Jackson.” If you don’t know Frank, you need to. If you support local music in Jackson, you have probably seen him diligently videotaping shows all over town. Ezelle, 60, goes to more stuff than even my wife and me. Not only does he record the shows and post videos on his YouTube page (Jackson MS Music), he also burns DVDs of the shows and carries them around in his camera bag to give out to everyone involved. “I absolutely love Jackson.” At this point, that goes without saying. Peace.


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)RUDOLVWRIPXVLFYHQXH DGGUHVVHVDQGSKRQH QXPEHUVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/3 Presidental Debate Watch Party (Red Room)

THURSDAY 10/4 T-Bird and The Breaks with FloTribe (Red Room) Jason Turner (Dining Room)

FRIDAY 10/5

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, October 3rd

ZACH LOVETT

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, October 4th

BOOKER WALKER

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, October 5th

Bantam Foxes (Red Room) Swing de Paris (Dining Room)

(Rock) 9-1, $10 Cover

SATURDAY 10/6

Saturday, October 6th

NY CitySlickers (Red Room) DoubleShotz (Dining Room)

MONDAY 10/8 MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 10/9 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Dining Room) Jesse Robinson & Friends Blues Night (Red Room)

Coming Soon

SAT 10.13: MOFRO THU 10.18: Mickey & the Motorcars WED 10.24: Frontier Ruckas THU 10.25: Robert Earl Keen SAT 10.27: Kenny Vaughn Trio w The Avon Suspects SAT 10.27: Leroy Troy & Mike Armistead

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

JOHNNY SANSONE

IVAN NEVILLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DUMPSTAPHUNK

outside (New Orleans Funk) 9-1, $15 in advance $20 at the gate

Tuesday,October 9th

CAROLINE CRAWFORD (Piano) 7-10, NoCover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

MISSISSIPPI FUNK SUMMIT! featuring

IVAN NEVILLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

DUMPSTAPHUNK! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 6 P.M. TICKETS ON SALE FOR $15 AT UNDERGROUND 119!

HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG!

TILL 7 EVERY OTHER NIGHT!

2-FOR-1 â&#x20AC;¢ DRAFT BEER â&#x20AC;¢ WELL DRINKS â&#x20AC;¢ APPETIZERS!

HIGH GRAVITY

BOMBERS on sale

$5.50 ea.

WHILE THEY LAST! 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

COURTESY ACADEMY OF ANCLENT MUSIC

MUSIC | live

31


DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Closing the Loop

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Taken 2

for Thur.

PG13

3-D Frankenweenie PG Frankenweenie (non 3-D) PG Pitch Perfect PG13 Looper

R

Trouble With The Curve PG13 End Of Watch R House At The End Of The Street PG13 The Master

3-D Resident Evil Retribution R 3-D Finding Nemo

G

Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG

Arbitrage

R

Lawless

R

Won’t Back Down

2016 Obama’s America PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

October 3 - 9, 2012

Movieline: 355-9311

32

Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis are captivating as young and old versions of the same character in “Looper.”

R

3-D Hotel Transylvania PG

PG

by Anita Modak-Truran

Fri. 10/11

COURTESY ENDGAME ENTERTAINMENT

Listings 10/5 –

Redkin Smoothing System starts at $100

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist

- 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson 601.906.2253 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

E

very time-travel sci-fi flick is cursed (or blessed) with a unique creative metabolism. The realm of time gets gobbled up and digested into a mushy mass of past, present and future. “Looper,” written and directed by Rian Johnson (“Brick” and “The Brothers Bloom”), doesn’t attempt to explain how time travel works. Old Joe (Bruce Willis) tells Young Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) that it would take a couple days to explain how a person can exist in the same time dimension as his 30 years older self. Johnson ingeniously uses the vehicle of time travel as a predicate for the meeting of the young and old self. It’s called “closing the loop.” But I think of it as a philosophical interpretation of the circle of life, as so eloquently expressed by Elton John and Tim Rice: “It’s the circle of life, and it moves us all, through the despair and hope, through faith and love, till we find our place on the path unwinding in the Circle, the Circle of Life.” Old Joe has been through the loops of life; Young Joe has barely started. This film doesn’t aim for philosophical eloquence, although it is smart and thought-provoking. The loop gets closed when a looper (a specialized assassin using a large, inefficient bazooka-styled weapon) kills his older self, who has been sent back in time because the mysterious Rainmaker says so. The looper doesn’t know it’s his older self until after the kill, because the old self is trundled up and wears a potato sack over his head. The reward for closing the loop is a load of gold bricks carried on the back of the old self and recovered by the young self before the young self incinerates the old self. If you are confused, that’s the point. Don’t ponder the logistics, or your head will hurt. Abe (Jeff Daniels), Young Joe’s boss, sums it up: “The time travel thing fries the brain like an egg.” By suspending any discussion of how and why time travel works, Old and Young Joe can focus on the jigsaw puzzle that pro-

pels the story forward. “I’m gonna stop this guy,” says Old Joe to Young Joe. The “guy” Old Joe refers to is the Rainmaker, a faceless criminal who spreads and controls anarchy and chaos across continents in 2074. He’s a one-man show, and Old Joe seeks to kill the Rainmaker’s younger self. Through skillful filmmaking, we learn that the Rainmaker’s henchmen in 2074 find Old Joe in China and send him back in time to be shot by his young self. Only Young Joe hesitates. Old Joe isn’t wearing the potato sack on his head. His hands aren’t cuffed. And Old Joe’s one mean and scarily resourceful fellow. He knocks his younger self down and escapes. Because Young Joe hasn’t closed the loop, Abe and his posse of half-cocked loopers go after both Joes. Young Joe wants his life to return to normal, and the only way that can happen is for Young Joe to close the loop. Young Joe knows that Old Joe plans to kill three possible children who may be the Rainmaker, and he sets up shop at a remote farmhouse where a young mother named Sara (Emily Blunt) and her young son Cid (Pierce Gagnon) live. This film, which opened the Toronto Film Festival, works because the personal story among Old and Young Joe and Sara takes on the weight and shape of the solution to a mystery. At times, this film pops and crackles with “Pulp Fiction”-like vitality. This could be because Bruce Willis shoots down a lot of bad guys in both movies, but I suspect it’s because Johnson places his finger on the dramatic fun of each scene. He also gives élan to scenes that were intentionally confusing so that the film jumps from each dramatic highlight without any lagging in between. Johnson charges right through the weak spots (i.e., the time travel) and pulls together a highly stylized and visually and emotionally engaging cinematic work. Gordon-Levitt’s chameleon-like appearance and performance are mesmerizing. “Looper” is one of the best films of the year.


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

T COURTESY MILLSAPS

his last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme for college football in Mississippi is all about streaks: Some bad ones continued and a few hot ones remained. After a stellar start, Mississippi State was off this week and will return to the field

The Millsaps Majors are enjoying one of the rare winning streaks this season in Mississippi college football.

Saturday in a road game against Kentucky. The Wildcats leaned hard on South Carolina for a half before the Gamecocks recovered, so beware, Bulldog fans. Also back after a bye is Mississippi Valley State. The Delta Devils get back to action at home against undefeated Alabama A&M. Now onto the streaks. (Bad news first.)

Ole Miss (3-2) faced the Alabama Crimson Tide, the number-one ranked team in the country, this past Saturday night. The Rebels were the first team to lead Alabama this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;albeit for 15 seconds. Early in the second quarter, Ole Miss had a 7-6 lead over the Tide after scoring a touchdown following two first-quarter field goals by Alabama. After the Rebel touchdown, the Tide took the Ole Miss kickoff, 99 yards to pay dirt for 13-7. After the kickoff return to regain the lead, Alabama never trailed in the game again, cruising to a 33-14 lead. Ole Miss out-scored the Tide in the third quarter 7-0 as their other highlight of the game. Ole Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss moved their losing streak to Alabama to nine straight. The last time the Rebels defeated the Tide was 2003. Southern Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (0-4) losing streak reached four games after a 21-17 loss to Louisville. On a rainy night in Hattiesburg, the Golden Eagles led the Cardinals 17-15 until Louisville found the end zone with just over five minutes left to play. USM drove the field but came up short on a fourth down at the Louisville 25-yard line. The Golden Eagles started their third-string quarterback

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant Âł#ROOM´7ORTHA7ATCH

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Ricky Lloyd after injuries to their other two quarterbacks. The seat is getting hot on USM head coach Ellis Johnson, who has Boise State coming to town this week. Southern Miss will likely be 0-5 after the Broncos leave town. Speaking of four-game losing streaks, Alcorn State (1-4) opened the season with a win against Grambling, but has lost four straight games since. Most recently, the Braves were beat down 54-14 at home by Alabama State, though here is a chance for the Braves to get a win this week when they face Southern University. Mississippi College (1-3) is on a twogame losing streak after falling to HardinSimmons 31-0 on the road. The Choctaws never had a chance in a rainy game in Texas. Delta State (1-3) is also on a two-game losing streak with a 34-28 loss to Abilene Christian University. Adding insult to injury, the losses were at home as well. Hinds Community College (2-3) has seen its third loss in a row with their 26-21 defeat to East Central, despite opening the season on a two game winning streak. Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feel a little better about ourselves with some winning streaks. Jackson State (2-3) defeated Prairie View A&M 34-13 for their first home win of the season. The Tigers are now 2-1 in SWAC play. Millsaps (4-0) is having a sensational season, and the Majors have yet to taste defeat in 2012. The Majors won their first conference game with 33-16 victory over Centre on Saturday. Belhaven (2-3) started the season on a three game losing streak. The Blazers have turned things around and are on two game winning streak after their 52-14 win against Virginia College at Wise. Holmes Community College began the season on a two-game losing streak, but things have turned around for the Bulldogs, now on a three game winning streak after their homecoming win over Mississippi Delta Community College. The HCC Bulldogs are 3-0 in conference play this season.

         

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The New Orleans Saints have a chance to add to NFL history when they play the only team to start a season 0-4 and make the playoffs. Maybe fate is at work for the boys.

THURSDAY, OCT. 4 NFL (7-10 p.m. NFL Network) the surprising and undefeated Arizona Cardinals hit the road to face Sam Bradford and the St. Louis Rams. â&#x20AC;ŚHigh school football (7-10 p.m. Fox Sport South) Picayune at Pascagoula in a primetime game spotlighting undefeated teams. FRIDAY, OCT. 5 College football (6 p.m.-12 a.m.) ESPN has a college football double header on Friday night with Pittsburgh at Syracuse and followed by Utah State at BYU. (Check listings for MLB wild card playoff games played on TBS.) SATURDAY, OCT. 6 College football (11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CBS) MSU puts their undefeated season on the line against SEC opponent Kentucky in Lexington. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fox Sports South) USM looks for their first win of the at home against Boise State. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN U) Ole Miss welcomes SEC newcomer Texas A&M to Oxford in a game where both teams could use a win. SUNDAY, OCT 7 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NBC) San Diego hopes to extend the New Orleans Saints losing streak to five games. MONDAY, OCT. 8 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN) The undefeated Houston Texans travel to the Big Apple to face a dragging New York Jets. TUESDAY, OCT. 9 Documentary (7-8:30 p.m. ESPN) ESPN 30 for 30 continues with 9.79* on Ben Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steroid-tainted 100m final at the 1988 Seoul Games. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10 MLB (all day, TBS and MLB Network) Teams and times TBA, but TBS will show three games from the ALDS and NLDS. MLB Network has the fourth. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports

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jacksonfreepress.com

Streaking Bad

by Bryan Flynn

33


New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music

Diesel 255 Saturday, October 5

LADIES NIGHT

wed | october 3 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

with Snazz

Friday - October 5 & Saturday - October 6

thu | october 4 John Clark Acoustic Trio 5:30-9:30p

sat | october 6 Jessie Smith Band 6:30-10:30p sun | october 7 Adeebs Acoustic 4:00 - 8:00p mon | october 8 Karaoke tue | october 9 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

Hairicane

Sunday - October 7 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

Monday - October 8

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night

Monday Night Football

with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

Dmbttft!gps!Fwfszpof!Jodmvejoh; Mfwfm!2!Dmbttft

Npoebz!Mfwfm!2!!!8;26!qn Uvftebz!Mfwfm!2!2;26!qn Uvftebz!Mfwfm!2!7!qn Xfeoftebz!Mfwfm!2!8!qn Uivstebz!Mfwfm!2!2;26!qn Tbuvsebz!Mfwfm!2!:!bn

Njyfe!Mfwfm!Dmbttft

October 3 - 9, 2012

On the Edge

Saturday, October 6

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

34

KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - October 4

october 3 - 9

fri | october 5 Triple Threat 6:30-10:30p

Wednesday - October 3

Npoebz!Mfwfm!304!6;41!qn Xfeoftebz!Mfwfm!3!6;41!qn Uivstebz!Njyfe!Mfwfm!7!qn Gsjebz!Mfwfm!203!6;41!qn

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4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

$1.50 Mugs & 2-for-1 Domestics During the Game

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner


BODY/SOUL p 39 ASTRO p 41 FLY STYLE p 42

Twisted Tailgate Nachos

Amiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crab Nachos

by Manivanh Chanprasith

This one is a hit for any tailgate party! TRIP BURNS

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Amia Edwards shakes up plain nachos with seafood and Middle Eastern spices for a twist on the old classic.

just about cooking.â&#x20AC;? Her meals are prepared with a careful liberation of her love for life. When sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not busy marketing homes in the Jackson metro area under her own agency, Amia Edwards Realty, or teaching credit counseling classes, you can find her perfecting traditional dishes in the kitchen of her south Jackson home.

MEALS ON WHEELS

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2 tablespoons butter/margarine 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 cup milk 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon cumin 1/4 teaspoon red pepper 2 6-ounce cans white crabmeat *Optional: 1 pound cooked deveined shrimp 1 11-ounce can Mexican style corn 1 4-ounce can diced green chilies or jalapenos 1 package shredded Monterrey Jack cheese 1 bag tortilla and/or blue corn chips

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt butter and sautĂŠ garlic. Add flour and milk and stir until mixture thickens. Stirring constantly, mix in cheese (make sure to leave some for garnish), salt and other seasonings. Continue to cook and stir until cheese has melted. Drain and add crabmeat and half can of green chilies. Stir until all ingredients are well blended. Pour cheese sauce over chips of your choice. If you really want to bring the wow, mix tortilla and blue corn chips. Garnish with corn, peppers and leftover cheese.

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

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COURTESY LAUREN DAVIS

Jesse Houston and Parlor Market Part Ways

Ingredients:

Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first food truck, LurnyDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille, will be hitting the streets soon.

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jacksonfreepress.com

hen Jackson real-estate impresario Amia Edwards gets ready to tailgate before the game, she usually whips up a smorgasbord of intercontinental cuisine. Almost all these traditional dishes have her own added twist because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just who she isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a multi-hyphenated professional with a love of melding exotic ingredients. Edwards, who has not had any formal culinary training, is a self-professed food artist. Her meals are prepared with affection for turning a simple idea into a glamorous dish for the taste buds. One afternoon, she decided to change up the classic and casual nacho by adding some seafood and traditional Middle Eastern spices. She came up with nachos dosed with crabmeat and cumin, but perfected it to Amiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crab Nachos. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow up learning how to cook,â&#x20AC;? Edwards says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As I got older, I started playing with different ingredients and fancied-up traditional dishes. I went through lots of trial and error to come up with my own perfection.â&#x20AC;? For the extra wow factor, Edwards suggests adding cooked deveined shrimp and mixing tortilla chips with blue corn chips for a colorful fare. This pick-up-with-your-finger dish is perfect for a tailgate party or any friendly gathering because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to make and easy to eat. Cooking has been reported to be therapeutic for some, and for Edwards that was the case: therapy for the struggles of everyday living. Over the years, she developed a love affair with cooking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned a lot from the kitchen,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were a lot of recipes that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

35


5A44 FX5X

DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

CRABCAKES now on the menu

ALL CRAB, NO FILLER 4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street District offering a savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

October 25

5:00 Check In 6:00 Run $30 Singles $100 Teams of 4

Info: 601-326-3714

Drop In For Our

Purple Dress Run

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

Friday, October 5, 2012

“Hardluck” Chuck Schimpf

In Town & in the USA -Food & Wine Magazine-

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover D’Lo Trio

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

October 3 - 9, 2012

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name

36

Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowfin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events.


DINEJackson

Paid advertising section.

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes with real cane sugar.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

jacksonfreepress.com

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made spring rolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

37


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901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 | Flowood, MS in front of Walmart flowood@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-992-3488

2155 Highway 18, Suite E | Brandon, MS across from Home Depot brandon@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-706-4605

4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 | Jackson, MS in front of Kroger jacksonms@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-321-9465

October 3 - 9, 2012

Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

38


LIFE&STYLE | body/soul

The United States of Anorexia

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Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s magazines, even those that claim to promote health and fitness, project largely unattainable body images to young females.

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tanding in line at CVS Pharmacy waiting for my 90-year-old mother-in-lawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heart medication prescription to be filled, I see arrayed before me on the counterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and above it, below it, and off to the sideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;brightly colored summer magazines featuring bikiniclad women. They have one thing in common: Not one of them has what could be considered a â&#x20AC;&#x153;normalâ&#x20AC;? adult womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body, not in this cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or planet. You know the score without saying it: the abnormally large chests, the wasp-like waists without tan lines or wrinkles orâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heaven forbidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;stretch marks and nary a freckle. They all give more than a hint of toned muscle and, apparently, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fashion: thinnish hips. Perhaps the latter is meant subliminally to exude youth, as if puberty could occur with designer hormones dictating breasts or thighs, tuning up one and dialing down the other. The message, stated or not, was â&#x20AC;&#x153;You, too, can look like this!â&#x20AC;? (Just buy this magazine.) Obviously, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lie. Admittedly, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a while since I visited the beach. But, as I recall, slim waists and thighs werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the norm, for adult male or female bodies. Statistics bear me out, with the Insti4HE3CARY3TATISTICS

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tute of Medicine reporting that two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, and that the number of people who are morbidly obese (weighing twice the ideal body weight) is seriously rising. If these trends continue, 42 percent of Americans will be obese by 2030. Yet, standing here in line at the local CVS, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m staring at a body universe where 99.9 percent of the female humans look like Barbie, and the few males depicted look like unshaven accessories. Perhaps, the artisans of popular culture have created an ideal form that cannot be found in the natural world. This ideal is like that of any art form: the result of painstaking detail to simulate reality while at the same time rejecting it to make a statement. Perhaps this statement is: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You were born inferior and can never achieve desirability.â&#x20AC;? No wonder we are a nation of eating disorders. If these bodies are â&#x20AC;&#x153;naturalâ&#x20AC;? then, in addition to liposuction, so is anorexia and so is bulimiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all in an attempt to fulfill an impossible ideal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The anorexic body seems to say: I do not need,â&#x20AC;? writes Marya Hornbacher in her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimiaâ&#x20AC;? (Harper Perennial,

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1998, $14.99). â&#x20AC;&#x153;It says: Power over the self.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rejection of the power that culture has over the self, the family, institutions, every facet of life. It says that the victim is actually in control. Can obesity be seen as a meaty fist shaking at the world: You cannot control me! The answer may be more pedestrian: Magazine covers displaying fat people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell. But between the extremes, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrong with nourishment? Of mind, body and spirit? America has some serious issues with food. How, as a society, did we lose our way? The pharmacistâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a woman shaped like a normal human beingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;came back to the counter and rang up the prescription, and I left the two-dimensional bikinied art projects behind. For some reason, I was famished. Disclaimer: The author is not a medical doctor, and his article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY VOGUE

COURTESY ELLE

COURTESY SHAPE

by Jim Pathfinder Ewing

39


Keep it Real hot talk, local singles

FREE TRIAL

601.706.0393 More local numbers: 1.800.811.1633 18+ www.vibeline.com

40

www.jfp.ms

October 3 - 9, 2012

Hey! Music Loversâ&#x20AC;Ś CLICK!

for the latest listings


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41


Lady in Leather by Meredith W. Sullivan

G

et ready, because a little leather will go a long way this fall! With temperatures cooling off outside, we tend to want to bundle up, but leather will keep you sizzling through the next season while still being sleek and sexy. Blank NYC beige leather jacket,

The Shoe Bar at Pieces, $95

Black top with leather bib, Frock

Fashions, $59 Flying Tomato jeans with leather, Paperdoll

Boutique, $42.95 Sleeveless leather vest, Libby Story, $54

Leather shorts with tribal detail, Paperdoll

Boutique, $36.95 White leather sleeveless dress, Apricot Brown leather dress,

Lane, $98

Frock Fashions, $64

WHERE2SHOP:

Apricot Lane Boutique, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5008, Ridgeland, 601-707-5183; Frock Fashions, 111 Colony Crossing, Suite 160, Madison, 601-898-4643; Paperdoll, 180 Promenade Blvd., Flowood, 601-919-2442; Libby Story, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5003, Ridgeland, 601-717-3300; The Shoe Bar at Pieces, 425 E.

Mitchell Ave., 601-939-5203

October 3 - 9, 2012

20% OFF 42

in the store with this ad Trish Hammons, ABOC | 661 Duling Ave. 601.362.6675 | www.customoptical.net


High Quality Modern Home Furniture at Affordable Prices

• Pedicure & Manicure • Gel Acrylics • Shellac/Gel Polish • Dresses • Shoes • Formal Dresses for Homecoming • Accessories • Much more… Nail services by appointment only.

Where fashion meets beauty…

OVER

IFN Modern is the perfect one-stop shop for all your home and office furnishings. Let us help you decorate your living space.

100,000 visits last month…

Were you one of them? Come Come see see the the

NEW SITE!

Get $25 Off & FREE SHIPPING to the U.S and Canada

Use code IFN2514 to receive this Special Offer and save an additional $25 plus get FREE Shipping on your purchase. Offer is valid until December 31, 2012. Visit our website: www.ifn-modern.com or call us toll-free at 1-888-459-2168.

jacksonfreepress.com

Trace Station 500 Hwy 51 Suite L Ridegeland, MS 601.427.5163

5440 Executive Place STE B2 | Jackson MS 601.364.2869 | naturalusalon.webs.com

www.jfp.ms

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

From sofas, tables, chairs, beds and lightings, you have thousands of modern items to choose from at IFN Modern. We do our best to provide you with high-quality affordable furnishings for !"#$%&"'(%)*+%",-%.(/%)*+%012(%!"#%3&(%#431')3(% shopping experience.

43


R e d P e n g u i n I c e C r e a m

An Introductory Workshop

The Perfect Event Treat,

No Party Too Big Or Small

Led by Tony Bland, Zen Monk Saturday, October 6 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Informal talks cover the history of Buddhism and Zen, core teachings, and meditation instruction. Suggested donation: $30-$50. To register, contact us at jacksonzengroup@gmail.com

601-519-9901 • 601-720-7393 Weddings • Corporate Events Birthday Parties • Holiday Parties

or 601-940-7230. www.zeninmississippi.org

w w w. r e d p e n g u i n i c e c r e a m . c o m

Book Your Next Event With Us

Available for Corporate Events, Wedding & Showers mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

coffee • culture • community

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Joseph Dennington Here to meet your lanscaping needs!

P/RZ5DWHV P1R&RQWUDFW P)UHH7HUPLQDO

• Lawn Care

• Leaf Removal

Custom Furniture

• Seasonal Decoration -installation & removal-

made from recycled materials 601-960-3008

koinoniacoffee.com 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Adams & Metro Pkwy between Downtown & JSU)

Mon-Fri 8-5 & Sat 8-12

601.499.5300 www.mstms.com

Come see the showroom at Hoarding Stopper Consignment Store. Homelitejohns.com • 601.955.3304

Hoarding Stopper Consignment Shop • 898 Centre St. Ridgeland, MS www.hoardingstopper.com • Mon. - Sat. 10:00am - 5:00pm

601-503-8565

4325 Lakeland Dr. • Flowood, MS 39232 • 601.936.7000 (Behind Parkway Theatre)

$5.00 OFF 2 Hibachi Dinners

with purchase of 2 drinks

FREE APPETIZER (Cheese Won Ton, Spring Roll or Gyoza)

with minimum purchase of $30

must present coupon. not valid with other offers. 1 coupon per party. dine-in only. exp date: 10/30/12


v11n04 - Mississippi Women's Turn: Breaking the Political Ceiling