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September 26 - October 2, 2012


TRIP BURNS

K

JACKSONIAN KELLI STOUT

elli Stout likes to say that southerners think about food a lot. “It’s just all about the food,” she says. “At breakfast, you’re talking about what you want for lunch. At lunch you’re talking about what’s for dinner, and at dinner it’s like, ‘OK, what are we eating tomorrow?’” Although Stout, 53, was born in Oklahoma and moved around as a child, she was raised mainly in Baton Rouge. The southern, and specifically Louisianan, focus on food never left her even as she began her career as an interior decorator. Two decades ago, she moved to Jackson for a job, but after 20-plus years as a commercial interior designer, she was completely burned out. “So I thought, what do I want to do with the second half of my life?” she says. “What I really love to do is cook, so I decided I’ll just go to culinary school.” She enrolled in an abbreviated program at the Atlanta Culinary Business Academy and began business as a personal chef upon graduation. She caters small parties or stocks families with home-cooked meals to last several months. “I come to your house, and when I leave, your freezer is full,” she says. Then, in fall 2010, Viking opened a branch of its cooking school in Ridgeland and hired Stout as one of its chef instructors. Now the Viking School offers classes every day, and Stout teaches four or five

CONTENTS

classes a week in addition to working with her personal clients. The school has classes for every age group, from 6-year-olds to adults, and focuses more on teaching basic skills that people can incorporate at home, rather than what Stout calls the “technical minutia” of culinary school. Her favorite foods to cook for herself and her husband, Carey, as well as teach, are the Cajun and Creole classics she grew up with. ”That’s what I know and love, and that’s what I like to eat,” she says. “Which is really, honestly, based on French cooking. Creole cuisine is a combination of French and Spanish and African and all that stuff, it’s such a melting pot, but a lot of the principles are based on classic French cooking, which I like to do.” Although not her goal originally, Stout finds teaching satisfying. “I like to see people’s eyes light up when they go, ‘Oh! That’s why you do that!’” she says, “It’s like you can see the light bulb go off in their head, and that’s very rewarding.” Stout has no plans to leave teaching for a restaurant any time soon. “You couldn’t get me to open a restaurant for all the money on the planet,” she says with a laugh. “The restaurant business is 24/7, and that’s not what I want to do. I want to have a life. I like where I am today, so I’m just going to enjoy the ride.” —Kathleen M. Mitchell

Cover photo by Trip Burns More covers: jfp.ms/covers

8 Give it the Finger A Mississippi Department of Human Services pilot program for childcare is problematic for parents.

38 Singing the Blues The Bridging the Blues Festival, which stretches from Vicksburg to Memphis, offers more than 50 events over a week and a half.

40 Football Faltering Nearly all the college teams in Mississippi are struggling so far this season. Mississippi State University holds the best record of the bunch, helped largely by the Bulldogs’ stout defense.

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4 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ................................ FALL FOOD 32 .............................. DIVERSIONS 33 .......................... BOOKS & FILM 34 ....................................... 8 DAYS 35 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ....................................... MUSIC 39 ......................... MUSIC LISTING 40 ..................................... SPORTS 41 ................................. ORGANICS 43 .................................... HITCHED 45 .............................. ASTROLOGY 50 .................................. FLY HOME

COURTESY MSU; LARRY MORRISEY; TRIP BURNS

SEPTEMBER 26 - OCTOBER 2, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 3

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Walking with Mr. Meredith

“F

*ck you, n*gger!” It was Oct. 1, 1962, and James Meredith was finally a student at the University of Mississippi. “On the night of September 30, 1962, I entered the most sacred temple of white supremacy in America, the campus of the University of Mississippi at Oxford, Mississippi, and triggered the climax of the most momentous clash between federal and state authority since the Civil War,” he writes in his new and very compelling book, “A Mission from God: A Memoir and Challenge for America” (Atria Books, 2012, $25), written with William Doyle. “I started the whole thing. I am a moment in history.” That he is. But this book is much more than a powerful narrative of the “Ole Miss Riots” of 1962; it takes the reader inside white supremacy in a way I haven’t experienced since reading “The Autobiography of Malcolm X.” Like with Malcolm X, you get to know a very complicated man. He is an iconoclast, and he can ramble and puzzle in real life, but don’t dare overlook what he can get each of us to think about. In his book, we walk through the battleground with the friend I always call “Mr. Meredith”—even though his wife, Judy, teases me about it—and feel the deep-seated hate that spews out of people who had supposedly been taught to be proper and sophisticated. Here, you really see and hear the ugly from young people raised to hate “those people” in order to protect a backward way of life that ultimately hurt us all. We wake with Mr. Meredith as he gets up at 5:30 a.m. to the sounds of the soldier pacing outside his dorm room in Baxter Hall. We sniff his “sweet-smelling aftershave” as he applies it, and before we reach the bot-

tom step of the stairs out of his dorm, we hear, “Hey, n*gger! There’s that n*gger!” We walk with a dignified, fearless black man and a team of U.S deputy marshals as he goes to class amid a chorus of “n*gger, n*gger, n*gger,” sometimes “accompanied by cherry bombs, epithets and broad-daylight shouted threats to kill me.” We dodge bricks, sticks, stones, not to mention kicks and attempts to trip him, and us. As we see the haters watching his dorm steps 24 hours a day, we learn that race hatred isn’t episodic; it is constant. Victims live with it each day even as purveyors believe they’re trying to save … something. Prettily coifed girls yelled vicious words at him alongside the boys. But they could turn sweet again on a dime: “Classes were a different thing. The same little white coed who might be yelling, ‘Why doesn’t someone kill him?’ would act as humane as any other person in America if she was sitting in a classroom,” he writes. But don’t call James Meredith a civil rights hero. That’s holding him to a lower standard than he desires or deserves, he argues provocatively. And he, like Malcolm X, was and is adamantly opposed to the non-violence that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights protesters adopted. “[T]he rhetoric and vocabulary of the American civil rights movement has always seemed upside-down and backward to me,” Mr. Meredith writes. “In fact, I always found it grossly insulting to me, to you, and to every American citizen, because it always begins with the assumption or concession that some or any of our civil rights are up for negotiation.” Again like Malcolm, Mr. Meredith writes that he believed the Movement could not be won in Mississippi without the use of force to meet force—lots of

guns, preferably on the hips of federal officers (which he got). Ultimately, although our history books don’t reveal this, he was right. This state, which had gotten the richest from slavery, was using violence to keep at least segregation in place: the last vestige of the Lost Cause. And as much we must applaud the courage of civil rights veterans (I do more than he does), many battles wouldn’t have been won here without the fear of black men’s threats to arm themselves against the Klan—whether the Deacons for Defense or everyday daddies. (See my related story at jfp.ms/briggs.) Mr. Meredith is an enigma—“a real odd bird,” he calls himself—but that’s why he’s so great. In my many conversations with him—at his house, at our office, at Kroger—this hero challenges me to think. Like him, I don’t blindly bow to partisanship, but I need to be prodded to think beyond the most obvious answers. Take the idea of “black studies,” which he loathes. I learned much about Malcolm X at Columbia University (also Mr. Meredith’s other alma mater). I attended Manning Marable’s “Black Intellectuals” class and did research for his Malcolm X project (now a book)—precisely because I wanted to learn vital history nobody taught me at Neshoba Central or Mississippi State. It was one of the more valuable experiences I’ve ever had. But I was the only white woman and one of two whites in the class. And that’s where Mr. Meredith’s challenges come in: Why do Americans study on two tracks? Shouldn’t important “black” studies be everyone’s history? Isn’t “black history” in Mississippi actually all of our intertwined past? How can we become post-racial when we don’t study, or read, or interact, in a diverse way? I see it all the time in interns here: black students who’ve read

Richard Wright; white interns who love Willie Morris—and they’re lucky if they’ve heard of the other Mississippi author. I’m still not ready to kill off “black studies,” but Mr. Meredith’s point is well-taken. That brings me to Mr. Meredith’s “mission from God.” Yes, it was to challenge white supremacy, and he changed the state. (I thought of him last weekend in Oxford when I read quotes by Ole Miss’s black, and female, student-body president about its first black homecoming queen.) But now it is to challenge us all to really look at systemic racism in our churches, businesses and political life. (See his quote on page 8.) Most of all, he implores us to support and strengthen public schools, and not allow bigotry to reduce the education kids get—a vital lesson in a state and city where so many people are content to allow their kids to get a lesser education, public and private, because they’re only surrounded by others who look and believe and think like them. “I challenge every American citizen to commit right now to help children in the public schools in their community, especially those schools with disadvantaged students,” he writes in his call-to-action chapter. He and other educational experts list multiple ways we can all help our kids and our public schools. He’s so right. We live in a climate where many politicians are trying to weaken, or close, our public schools—and purposefully or not, are content to have an uneducated, crime-infected underclass. We have to work together to break these cycles, and I will make you this wager: If you read Mr. Meredith’s book, you will be more motivated to help our schools and use our shared history to make this state a better place. Please give it a try. James Meredith’s work is not done. Nor is ours.

September 26 - October 2, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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Kathleen M. Mitchell

Josh Marks

Whitney Menogan

Larry Morrisey

Matt Bolian

Jim Pathfinder Ewing

Kimberly Griffin

Ross Cabell

Kathleen Mitchell spends much of her time eating, cooking, experimenting in culinary photography, thinking about the next meal and watching television shows about food. She coordinated and wrote for the cover package.

Josh Marks appeared on FOX’s “MasterChef.” Originally from Chicago, Ill., Josh came to the dirty south to get an education and play basketball at Tougaloo College. Follow his blog at iShootOnions.com. He wrote for the cover package.

Editorial intern Whitney Menogan holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College. She enjoys mind-blowing conversations with friends. She hopes to travel around the world one country at a time. She wrote an event blurb.

Larry Morrisey is the director of grants programs for the Mississippi Arts Commission. He is a host for “Mississippi Arts Hour,” the agency’s arts interview radio show on Mississippi Public Broadcasting. He wrote a music feature.

Matt Bolian is a full-time redhead, Christian, husband, Army officer and property developer (blackwhitedevelopment.com) who loves ultimate Frisbee, tacos, fruit smoothies and dreaming big. He wrote a film feature.

Jim Pathfinder Ewing is an organic farmer, author and journalist. He has written give books on energy medicine and eco-spirituality. He lives in Lena with his wife, Annette, at their ShooFly Farm. He wrote organics features.

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.

Ross Cabell is a Mississippi native, and was a feral child until the age of 16. He is teaching himself the English language by writing for the Free Press. He wrote a music review.


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COURTESY JUDY MEREDITH

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

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You like us! You really like us!

Janice Hogan: Chef Danny Eslava (Eslava Grill) ... his fried oysters are simply divine.

We got overwhelming response to our redesign and 10th birthday issue last week. Here is a sampling: TRIP BURNS

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE JACKSON CHEF AND WHY?

James Anderson: Great crew...great publication...continue to continue...we need you in our midst. ‌ You continue to be light in the wilderness. Rock on, y’all. Rope Burns: Now, shoot for a Pulitzer!

Melissa Fowler: Darling Chef RoachÊ (Rochez). The only chef in town for true foodies. Dylan Ray: Tom Ramsey’s food is so good! He fed me and some friends on our prom night, and it was the best food I’ve ever had probably inside or outside of Mississippi! Underground 119 is a really cool place too, which doesn’t hurt! But it’s all about the food! Jessica Myrick Singleton: Personally I’m a huge fan of Dan Blumenthal (BRAVO!, Sal & Mookie’s). Not only is he a great chef, but he puts amazing people in charge at his restaurants who incorporate new and fun dishes. All of his (and Jeff’s) restaurants have such a friendly and fun atmosphere and are simply AMAZING people to work for. Nick Thompson: Lee Hurley at Parlor Market. Makes the finest gourmet pb & j for his close friends. His 4th of july cookout was a feast. Sherri Hughes: Chef Nicholas Wallace of The King Edward. A toss up between the great meal which was prepared at the Clash in The Kitchen, a WONDERFUL fish and the Mediterranean Shrimp Taco and Black Eyed Pea Gumbo, which are both on the menu at the King Edward, you can’t go wrong with whatever you may choose. Troy Berch: Derek Emerson....Walker’s (Drive-In) Mac and Cheese is close to heaven on Earth, and his scallops are served at the Pearly Gates.

September 26 - October 2, 2012

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com. Tweet us: @JxnFreePress.

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Katherine Wright Pitts: 10 Years‌that’s a long time to continually be the Best! #Congratulations! #articles #news #local @noeldidla: Hearty congrats on ten ! Wish you many, many more Donna, Todd and staff, past and present ! #JFP turns 10 @biatweets: Nice article from Jackson Free Press about the strides made in Jackson’s art community. Islander Oyster House: HAPPY BIRTHDAY JFP!! Laura Lillard: Happy 10th anniversary, JFP! Y’all are the best!

Cat Leatherwood: I’m a film student at USM and I’m always really happy to be able to read your film articles online. I wish we had something similar down here on the coast. Maybe someday soon! Keep up the good work! Melishia Grayson: Happy Birthday to Donna Ladd and the Jackson Free Press!! I am so proud of the work that they do, and the journalists they produce. #igetitonceaweek

ED PAYNE: DON’T LOOK A DAY OVER 8.

Amy Haimerl: Happy birthday beautiful friends. Jayne Jackson: I get it once a week!

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jacksonfreepress.com


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6FDEV Wednesday, Sept. 19 The Hinds County Republican Party and District 4 Supervisor Phil Fisher file a federal lawsuit claiming that the majority-black Hinds County Board of Supervisors impermissibly considered race when redrawing district lines.

Friday, Sept. 21 Grady Brown, a former Ocean Springs Middle School teacher and wrestling coach, is sentenced to spend 30 years in prison for sexual battery of a student. ‌ Colorado’s 4,700-acre Chimney Rock Archaelogical Area is designated a national monument. Saturday, Sept. 22 Southern University beats Southwestern Athletic Conference rival Jackson State 28-21. ‌ Animal lovers worldwide celebrate World Rhino Day to raise awareness of the endangered species. Sunday, Sept. 23 The New Orleans Saints fall to the Kansas City Chiefs 24-27. ‌ A giant panda cub at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., is found dead.

September 26 - October 2, 2012

Monday, Sept. 24 The Mississippi Democratic Party formally endorses Democratic state Rep. Earle Banks of Jackson, who is vying to unseat Chief Justice Bill Waller Jr. on the Mississippi State Supreme Court. ‌ After a court battle, controversial new ads equating radical Muslims with “savagesâ€? are posted in 10 NYC subway stations.

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Tuesday, Sept. 25 Michael Dowda, a convicted murderer who escaped from the Mississippi State Penitentiary over the weekend, is captured in Macon, Georgia. ‌ President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Gov. Mitt Romney speak at former President Bill Clinton’s Global Initiative. Get breaking daily news at jfp.ms and jfpdaily.com. Subscribe free.

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Finger Scanners Spark Concerns by R.L. Nave

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etra Kay is stuck behind the front though DHS trained workers on how to use the reception area and presses her colorful counter at the Northtown Child De- the machines, training parents is left up to finger to a scanner sitting atop the counter velopment Center, sitting in front of the individual centers, meaning that a mem- because she’d forgotten to check in earlier. two computer screens. BeRosie Mack has grandchilcause part of the center’s mission is dren at Northtown but has not yet to help children from low-income signed up for the finger-scanning families, Kay’s more than 30 years program. It’s inconvenient to drive of experience as an early childhood across town to the DHS office on educator would probably better be Medgar Evers Boulevard, which spent writing grants to improve the is outside her daily travel radius, center’s service or working with the she said. 110 children enrolled there. “I drive on one tank of gas a Instead, she’s filling in as the week. Every mile counts,� she said. center’s receptionist. Northtown The concerns of Kay and is one of 20 child-care centers in Mack echo those of a number of central Mississippi taking part in providers across Mississippi who are a Mississippi Department of Hunot only frustrated about the buggy man Services pilot program. DHS computer systems, but cite privacy administers the state’s child-care asconcerns and say that piling on sistance, or certificate, program for extra restrictions could force some poor families and pays providers parents to stop working to care like Kay who accept the certificates. for their kids at home. Providers Parents and child-care providers have concerns about Starting Sept. 4, parents and guardand parents have lodged so many ians of children receiving a subsidy a new state program that requires a finger scan when complaints about the system that picking up or dropping off kids at day care. must scan their finger when dropSen. Albert Butler, D-Port Gibson, ping off or picking a child up from chairman of the Senate Investigate day care. ber of Kay’s staff must remain on standby at State Officers Committee, scheduled a hearIn a letter dated July 31, 2012, Xerox all times to help people work the machine. ing to take place Oct. 10. assured child-care providers that the com- Also, because the system relies on unique Carol Burnett, executive director of the pany would install the equipment at no cost. finger scans, staff members cannot override Biloxi-based Low-Income Childcare InitiaIncluded in the packet of information from the system or check the kids in and out when tive, says she’s talked to parents and providers Xerox was a provider agreement that said parents forget. When that happens, provid- who are worried about how DHS will use while the machines came at no cost, provid- ers might not get paid. their personal information. ers would be responsible for paying for any “It’s a mess,� Kay declares, with a hint of “They need (day care), and this service damage to the machines. desperation in her voice as she demonstrates has been proven to have a huge difference for Kay and other child-care center opera- the equipment and online payment system. families. We need to make it easier for chiltors say implementing the new system has Almost on cue, a woman in her early dren to get into the program,� Burnett said. been nothing short of nightmarish and that 20s wearing a white sweater and red T-shirt Burnett added the number of kids the problems are eating into revenues. Al- with bright green fingernails, bounces into participating in the state’s certificate TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Sept. 20 During legislative budget hearings, Mississippi’s 15 community and junior colleges ask for $101.7 million more for the 2014 budget year. ‌ More than 500 people presumed to be university students overwhelmed police barricades in protests against an anti-Islam video that sparked deadly demonstrations in Muslim countries.

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program has already been cut in half in the past two years, and she worries that the new cumbersome scanning requirement will force some day-care centers to stop accepting certificates. Others could close their doors, she said. Currently, 8,050 children are on DHS’ waiting list to get into the certificate program.

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A recent Mississippi Economic Policy Center analysis of U.S. Census data found that Mississippi has the highest child poverty rate in the nation at 31.5 percent. Nationally, around 22 percent of children live in poverty. “Programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

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and supports like child-care certificates play a critical role in keeping families afloat in a poor economy,� wrote MEPC fellow Amarillys Rodriguez in the report. Shirley Hampton, who co-owns Jamboree Child Development Center on Northside Drive, said the state should be investing more in early childhood education

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instead of “ridiculous programs� such as the biometric scanners. “We want to be education centers not just baby sitters, but if you don’t get rid of all these burdens, we’re never going to get there,� Hampton said. Comment at jfp.ms. Write R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com

Sewage Woes Hit Home by Jacob D. Fuller

This bypass pump on Sheffield Drive runs 24 hours a day to help divert sewage past a break in the city’s line that runs under the street.

city will not release any further details until the decree is finalized. The issue on Sheffield Drive is only one of several prominent issues with the city’s sewage and wastewater system, and the city has to find room in the budget for all of them. Once the consent decree is final, the city will no longer have the choice to ignore the wastewater and sewage issues—not that Johnson’s administration ever has. When Johnson first took office in 1997, he put a water and sewer master plan into action. Since then, under his administration, the city has spent close to $200 million on water and sewer repairs. Previous mayoral administrations didn’t cause the current situation through lack of action, either, Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon told the JFP at City Hall Monday. “This is not a problem that started even 25 years ago,� said Barrett-Simon, who has been on the City Council since

1985. “This has become a problem for older cities all over the country. The infrastructure that is underground right now in some of the areas of the city has been down almost 100 years.� The city will get no grants from the federal government to pay for the repairs. That burden rests solely with the city and ratepayers. Mims said Johnson and the council are going to explore every avenue for funding available to minimize the effect on taxpayers. Those avenues include the state’s revolving-loan program for water-pollution control, which is funded, in part, by the state and federal governments and administered through the DEQ. The city must pay the loans back at an agreed-to interest rate at or below market rates. To fund the improvements, the city will also look into bond issues and a sales-tax increase, which the city has sought from the state Legislature for at least two years. The bill failed to pass both years.

jacksonfreepress.com

break. He said the problem is a primary example of why the city will soon have to sign a consent decree from the U.S. Environment Protection Agency and the state Department of Environmental Quality that will likely require the city to spend hundreds of millions of dollars over the next couple of decades on wastewater and sewage systems. The city has been in negotiations with the EPA over the consent decree for about two years. The negotiations have ended, and Jackson City Council will likely vote in the coming weeks to approve the terms of the decree, which council members cannot discuss until they approve it. Ward 4 Councilman Frank Bluntson said he has not had time to read the whole decree. “Did you see how long it is?� Bluntson asked the JFP, while holding his hands to indicate the stack of documents is 2-to-3 inches thick. Johnson said the negotiations are very beneficial for the city. The EPA originally asked the city to complete the work, which will equal almost an entire overhaul of the sewage and waste water systems, in 10 years. During negotiations, the EPA extended the timeline first to 15 years, and then to a period longer than 15 years, which Johnson would not specify. Many cities across the country have faced similar decrees over the past decade due to violations of the Clean Water Act. City Communications Director Chris Mims said the EPA has estimated U.S. cities need $300 billion in water and sewage repairs, combined. “The U.S. Conference of Mayors really put a lot of pressure on EPA. EPA issued, back in October of last year, in fact, a memorandum to (the southeast) region basically saying, ‘OK, lighten up, be more flexible in your dealings and negotiations with municipalities.’ And they did,� Johnson said. That allowed the city to negotiate more time for the repairs, at least. The

JACOB D. FULLER

A

manda Adams, her husband, Kelly, and their two sons moved into their home on Sheffield Drive in late May. A few weeks later, a noisy, smelly and unwelcome guest appeared in the street directly in front of their house. Since June, the Adams and their neighbors have had to listen to the round-theclock work of a bypass pump that diverts sewage around a break in the line under Sheffield Drive to where the line is in working condition. The pump is so loud that Sharon Jackson, who lives two doors down from Adams, said she can hear it inside her house. Adams said it was difficult for her family to sleep through the noise in the beginning. “At first, we had to adjust,� Adams told the Jackson Free Press over the noise outside her house. “Now we’re used to it. I only notice it when (the city) comes and shuts it off, because we wonder where (the sound) went.� Adams said the street always floods during rains. After a particularly hard downpour in June, a sinkhole appeared down the street from her house, and sewage began flowing into the street and her neighbors’ yards. The city’s Department of Public Works came in soon afterward and covered the sinkhole with a piece of plywood and bags of cement to hold the board down, all of which are still there. That is also when they installed the pump in front of her house to keep the sewage out of the streets. A few weeks ago, after months of dealing with the pump, Adams noticed the city put a fence around it and completely blocked the stretch of Sheffield Drive between Ridgewood and Old Canton roads to all through traffic. “I guess that means it’s not going anywhere anytime soon,� Adams said. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said the city is working to find the funds to fix the sewage

9


TALK | politics

REGISTER TO VOTE BY OCT. 5

by R.L. Nave and Dylan Watson

T

September 26 - October 2, 2012

10

chairman of the Oktibbeha County Democratic Executive Committee. A Vietnam War veteran, Gore says he has completed 91 jumps as an Army parachutist and received numerous military honors, including the Purple Heart, Bronze Star and Meritorious Service Medal. He has degrees from Millsaps College and Duke Divinity School. Marty Wiseman, executive director of the John C. Stennis Institute on Government at Mississippi State University, said incumbents’ raising money despite lacking a ADAM LYNCH

he way Republican U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker is raising campaign cash, you would think his opponent was former Vice President Al Gore, not retired preacher Albert N. Gore Jr. For most of the summer, Wicker has averaged about one fundraiser per week, according to information compiled by Political Party Time, a project of the Sunlight Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based campaign-finance watchdog group. The events included a June 19 fundraiser for Wicker’s birthday, benefitting his Responsibility and Freedom Work Political Action Committee, RFWPAC. Billed as a rooftop celebration at 601 13th St. N.W., the birthday party cost $250 to $1,000 for individuals and $1,000 to $5,000 for PACs. In all, Wicker, a first-term senator from Tupelo, has raised $2.6 million in the past year alone, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Records show in the three months between April 1 and June 30, 2012, Wicker spent about $103,000 from the fund, including $18,000 on “media, advertising and direct mail,� $15,000 in consulting fees to Seitchik HQ, a California-based fundraising firm, and $10,330.67 on fundraising, campaign dinners and other events. The remaining sum went to seemingly routine campaign operations. Wicker’s campaign spent $10,172.35 on phone and Internet service, $7,473.24 on travel-related items, including airfare, hotel stays and gasoline. Also, $1,971.59 went toward a monthly car note of $565.87 as well as payments for OnStar navigation and Sirius XM radio services. Calls to Wicker’s Jackson campaign office about this story were not returned. So far, Gore, Wicker’s Democratic opponent, hasn’t raised any money nor filed any quarterly campaign reports with the Federal Elections Commission. Gore is the

Despite lacking a serious threat, Republican Sen. Roger Wicker’s campaign continues to raise millions.

serious adversary has long been the practice among politicians. “Whatever excuse you can come up with to hold a fundraiser, those with the means to give will give it,� Wiseman said. When donors give to comfortable incumbents, it’s usually not to ensure a victory but to show loyalty and signal you’re worth listening to, Wiseman said. Since replacing retiring Majority Leader Trent Lott in 2007, Wicker has raised $9.7 million for his re-election campaign. Although Wicker has led all Mississippi federal candidates in fundraising, other incumbents with large war chests and slight

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opposition also continue to raise funds. As of June 30, Bennie Thompson, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lone Democrat in Congress, has a war chest large enough that after raising $842,599 and spending $1.3 million in the two-year cycle, he still has $1.2 million in cash on hand. Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challengers include independent Cobby Mondale Williams, a teacher and economic-development consultant from Canton, and Republican Bill Marcy. Williams and Marcy have raised $14,400 and $181 during the cycle and have $2,114 and $5,853 on hand, respectively. A fourth candidate, Lajena Williams of the Reform Party, has not reported any contribution information. In the 1st District, incumbent Republican Rep. Alan Nunnelee has raised a little over $1.1 million and spent $965,903, leaving him with $267,659 in the bank. His Democratic opponent, Brad Morris, has raised $100,600 and spent $89,886, leaving him with only $10,749 to spend. Of course, the candidates will be fundraising and spending up until the day of the election; these numbers only reflect the most recent filing, June 30. Nunneleeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most generous donor is Telapex Inc., a telecommunications conglomerate based in Ridgeland, while the Communication Workers of America gave Morris his largest donation. This is Nunneleeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first re-election battle after defeating incumbent Travis Childers in 2010. Morris served as Childersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chief of staff during his only term in office. During Childersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; re-election battle, he

managed to raise and spend almost $1.8 million and still lost. In District 3, Republican Gregg Harper has raised $647,340 and spent $452,683, leaving him with $235,788 cash on hand. Democrats are not fielding a candidate against Harper. After the Mississippi Democratic Party announced that Madison Attorney Vicki Slater would square off against Harper, she decided not to run. Meanwhile, District 4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steven Palazzo has raised $763,358, spent $562,322 and has $254,013 on hand. Northrop Grumman, an aerospace and defense technology company, has been the most generous donor to Palazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign. The Democratic Party also announced on Sept. 5 that Matthew Moore of Biloxi is entering this race. Moore hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t filed any fundraising information with the FEC yet. Moore has never held public office. Write R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Raising and Spending


TALK | politics

Who Are the 47 Percent? by Ronni Mott

WHO DOES AND DOESNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T PAY INCOME TAX?

old ($26,400 for a family of four in 2011). The elderly get an additional standard deduction that lowers their tax liability. Some may receive non-taxable income from Social Security. Many working poor are eligible to claim an Earned Income Tax Credit (a program put in place in 1975 under Republican President Gerald Ford) to reduce their tax liability. A family of four with two kids could make up to $45,775 last year and end up with zero liability using the EITC. In the other benefits category are people who have taken advantage of a hodgepodge of other programs and deductions that reduced their federal tax liability to zero. Those include disability payments, interest on bonds, tax credits for education, charitable contributions, mortgage interest and other itemized deductions. Included in this last category are soldiers serving in war zones and, as The Atlantic magazine reported, roughly 7,000 millionaires. Is It All About Income Taxes? As the graph below shows, the majority of those who paid no federal income taxes did pay payroll taxes, which includes state taxes and contributions to Social Security and Medicare, programs designed to provide income and medical care for the elderly. Not specified are other taxes people may pay, such as property, sales and state income taxes, which vary from state-tostate and city-to-city.

WHO PAID FEDERAL TAX IN 2011?

 3D\IHGHUDOLQFRPHWD[ /THERSDON´TPAYFEDERALINCOMETAX BECAUSE  /RZLQFRPH  %HQH¿WVIRUWKHHOGHUO\  %HQH¿WVIRUWKHZRUNLQJSRRU DQGFKLOGUHQ  2WKHUEHQH¿WV CREDIT: TAX POLICY CENTER

Of those who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay, Low income includes people not required to file (earning less than $9,500 per year), and those whose income falls below a certain thresh-

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Where Are the 47 Percent? The Tax Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;another nonpartisan tax research groupâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;compiled data showing where the majority of those not paying income taxes lives. Nine of the 10 states with the highest rate of non-payers are in South. Not coincidentally, they are also among the poorest states in the union. Mississippi ranks at the top of the list of non-payers, which excludes those not required to file a returnâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one in four Mississippians live below the federal poverty threshold. Of all the Mississippi returns filed in 2010, 44.5 percent had no tax liability. Roughly 1.3 million Mississippi individuals and households filed federal tax returns in 2010. Beyond that, determining exactly who paid federal taxes is difficult. Of those returns, 68 percent had taxable income; 55.5 percent, or 712,035, paid federal taxes. The difference between the two is likely attributable to a myriad of tax credits. With three-quarters of all Mississippians reporting adjusted gross incomes of $50,000 or less, many of those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay taxes fall into this middle- and low-income group, especially if they have children. Fifty-one percent of filers came in at less than $25,000, and of those, about a third reported they paid federal income taxes (meaning their taxes werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t zero). About 72 percent of those making $25,000 to $50,000 paid federal taxes. For filers with incomes greater than $50,000, the overwhelming majority paid taxes. As in other areas of the country, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disabled and the elderly are among those who probably have no federal tax liability. Disabled people account for slightly more than 16 percent of all Mississippians; however, the rate of disabled increases as income decreases. In 2008, for example, about 37 percent of low-income adults in the state were also disabled, reported Marianne Hill, senior economist for the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solving Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poverty Problem.â&#x20AC;? Are the 47 Percent all Democrats? Romney suggested that the 47 percent who pay no income tax are the same 47 percent who support Obama â&#x20AC;&#x153;no matter what.â&#x20AC;? That analysis is inaccurate; todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democratic voters are not necessarily the same group that does not pay federal taxes. So, who are the Democrats? The Associated Press quantified them as follows: â&#x20AC;˘ Sixty-two percent work; including 10 percent part time. A fourth are retired. Five percent are temporarily unemployed. â&#x20AC;˘ Most earn higher-than-average

wages: 56 percent have household incomes above the U.S. median of $50,000; 20 percent have incomes of $100,000 or more; 16 percent have incomes below $30,000. â&#x20AC;˘ They skew younger than Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voters: 20 percent are senior citizens, and 12 percent are under age 30. â&#x20AC;˘ Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more educated than the overall population: 43 percent have fouryear college degrees or above; 21 percent topped out with a high-school diploma. Looking strictly at the 46.4 percent of people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay federal income taxes, their voting habits arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as simple as Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement. The poor generally vote Democratic, but they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a monolithic block, and they are less likely to vote. Seniors are more likely to cast a ballot than the poor. More than any other factor, income determines the party of the voter. As a general rule, the more money you have, the more likely it is that you will vote Republican. REPUBLICAN VOTE SHARE IN 2010 ELECTION BY ANNUAL INCOME 70% -

64%

60% -

53%

50% 40% -

56%

46% 40%

30% 20% 10% 0% -

Under $30$50$100- More than $30,000 50,000 100,000 200,000 $200,000 CREDIT: CNN ELECTION CENTER

Why Is This Important? Since the days before Ronald Reaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rhetorical â&#x20AC;&#x153;welfare queenâ&#x20AC;? days, the modern Republican Party has a history of demonizing the poor. In that context, Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement is just more of the same. However, the 47 percent is neither a monolithic voting block nor is it static; someone who owed no taxes last year may well owe this year. Both the Republican and the Democratic parties have enacted tax policies that keep the poor and elderly from paying federal taxes that would be burdensome. Those who understand these dynamics know that non-payers are not irresponsible moochers and freeloaders, as Rom11 neyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement would have us believe. jacksonfreepress.com

L

ast week, a videographer caught Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in an unguarded moment during a political fundraiser. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it, that thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an entitlement. And the government should give it to them. And they will vote for this president no matter what. â&#x20AC;Ś These are people who pay no income tax.â&#x20AC;? He then added: â&#x20AC;&#x153;[M]y job is not to worry about those people. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.â&#x20AC;? Regardless of where you stand politically on Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;inelegantâ&#x20AC;? statement, as he called it later, a big question looms: Do 47 percent of Americans not pay federal income tax? The short answer is yes. Well, sort ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the people who paid no federal income taxes in 2010 is 46.4 percent. The longer answer is more complicated. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the breakdown on who pays and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay income taxes, specifically federal income taxes:


TALK | business

ADP Tight-Lipped on Office Closing by Jacob D. Fuller

September 26 - October 2, 2012

ary 2013. The office is closing with an employment between 80 and 86 employees. In a press release, ADP stated it is providing “outplacement support services” to employees, who “have been encouraged to apply for open positions at other ADP facilities.” The office is one of three ADP “solution centers” where employees take client calls and do accounting functions for the Fortune 500 company. Next year, ADP will consolidate the services it offers from the Clinton office with the other solution centers, located in El Paso, Texas, and Augusta, Ga. ADP released a statement about the closing, in which the company incorrectly wrote that the office is located in Jackson. Twice. “ADP regularly conducts careful assessments of its operations to ensure we are operating in the most efficient manner. After thoughtful consideration, we will be consolidating some of our back-office administrative functions and closing our facility located

12

in Jackson, Mississippi, effective February 22, 2013,” the statement reads. When this reporter brought the mistake to the attention of Michael Schneider, spokesman for ADP, he did not know the information was incorrect. “The zip code of the municipality that that’s located in is not Jackson?” Schneider asked. ADP employs 57,000 nationwide and offers a range of payroll, human resources and employee benefit outsourcing services. Schneider, who referred most of the JFP’s questions to ADP’s less-than-100-word statement on the closing, would not say if the closing had anything to do with financial troubles at the company. “It’s an office consolidation. It’s not necessarily driven by anything else,” Schneider said. “We’ve issued our statement; outside of that, there isn’t really that much to say. It’s an office closing. It’s a small office. Other than our statement, we don’t really have anything else to add to it.” The company first opened in Clinton in 2008, with claims it would one day employ more than 1,000 people in the office, located in the South Pointe Business Park,

COURTESY ROOFING MS

A

fter promising to employ more than 1,000 workers, Automatic Data Processing announced it will close its office in Clinton in Febru-

ADP announced it is closing its office at the South Pointe Business Park in Clinton in February 2013.

the former home of WorldCom. With the 1,000-employee claim, ADP could have taken advantage of incentives from the Mississippi Development Authority. The company’s peak employment never got much higher than its current level, though, and therefore never qualified for any of the MDA assistance. The lack of growth at the office was largely a result of the economic recession that peaked soon after ADP opened its doors in Clinton in 2008, Hinds County Economic Development Authority Executive Director Blake Wallace told the JFP. A large portion

of ADP’s business comes from providing technology and software resources to 25,500 auto dealers, a sector that suffered especially hard declines in business starting in 2008. The Clinton office was the last of the three solution centers ADP opened. The other two had time to get up and running at a higher capacity before the recession hit, but the one in Clinton did not. “They were never, ever really able to gain the momentum to increase employment here,” Wallace said. The office is not closing due to a lack of income for ADP, though. The company reported an 8 percent increase in revenues in fiscal year 2012, up to $10.7 billion. In 2011, Fortune magazine ranked ADP No. 269 its 500 largest corporations in the U.S. list. That year, the company saw a 10.4-percent increase in revenues to $9.879 billion. Clinton Mayor Rosemary Aultman said she doesn’t think the closing will have a big impact on the city’s job market. “ADP came in with quite a flash, and it never lived up to the hype that they had,” Aultman said. “Losing 80 jobs is losing 80 jobs, and you never want anybody to lose their job.”


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13


Deacon Mechanics for Defense

S

mokey â&#x20AC;&#x153;Robinsonâ&#x20AC;? McBride: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am very pleased to see so many involved, aware and concerned citizens of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ghetto Science Communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; participating in the Ghetto Science Team Political Action Committee Voter Registration Drive. I am very glad that you are determined to motivate disenfranchised citizens to run like Forrest Gump to the polls and vote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of negative sentiments and inflammatory statements toward the middle class, poor, elderly, unemployed, etc., the Ghetto Science Team Political Action Committee will apply some of the political organizing methods used during the Civil Rights era. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of you will be assigned to counteract â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;voter vigilanteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; groups attempting to intimidate minorities who have every right to vote. Additional security assistance and transportation to the polls will be provided by the Church Deacon Mechanics for Defense,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; courtesy of Rev. Cletus Car Sales Church. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nurse Tootie McBride and her â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;CNAs (Certified Nurse Assistants) for a Brighter Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will also be present at the polls to help transport disabled voters and administer emergency medical treatment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rudy McBride of the Let Me Hold Five Dollars National Bank will fund get-out-the-vote drives, phone banks and door-to-door canvassing to identify favorable voters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vendors such as Bubba Robinski, Earnest â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Monday Night Football Headâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Walker, Mr. Habib, Brother Hustle and the Cream-O-Wheat Man will provide snacks, hot food and drinks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, our technology specialist, Aunt Tee Tee Hustle, will help prevent subtle acts of voter suppression with her newly patented â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Anti-Voter Suppression Surveillance and Detection System.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vote time! Remember to register by Oct. 5.â&#x20AC;?

n o i t a c fi i Chick

September 26 - October 2, 2012

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14

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Scanners More Useless Regulation?

W

ith little notice, the Mississippi Department of Human Services rolled out a program that requires poor parents and guardians to scan an appendage before they can drop off or leave with their little one. At first blush, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to see the downside of implementing the new beefed-up childprotection measure, especially in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world where finding registered sex offenders is easy as a clicking a mouse. As far as we can tell, so far, child security didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t figure too prominently in DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decision to require the biometric scans. The main purpose of the scanners seems to be to regulate how the state pays child-care centers that accept subsidies designed to enable parents who might otherwise have to stay home to take care of young children to get an education or go to work. To say that the change has operators ticked off would be an understatement. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already annoyed that state budget cutbacks have greatly reduced the number of certificates issued and that they now have to devote precious resources to fiddle with the glitchy scanner system. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even more infuriating is that center operators have had to fork over their bank account info to Xerox, which sold the scanners to the state, and are on the hook if the machines get damaged. Above all, child-care centers are scratching their heads most about the fact that they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gotten a clear answer from DHS on

why the change was made in the first place. In many ways, the introduction of the scanners is reminiscent of efforts in Mississippi and elsewhere to introduce voter-ID requirements, the argument being that extra regulations are necessary to protect against misdeeds that may be taking place (but likely are not). For anyone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already have a state-issued photo identification card, voter ID laws force citizens to go out of their way to get a government ID card in order to exercise oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitutional rights. The rule could result in citizens in giving up their rightsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to cast a ballot in the case of voter ID to apply for public benefits with the finger scanners. And we sure hope DHS wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do this on purpose to reduce the number of people claiming child-care help. As with voter ID, the finger-scan policy represents a particular hardship for women, poor people and people of color who are likely to employ an intergenerational approach to child care whereby family members and neighbors all pitch in to make sure kids get to and from school safely and on time. The DHS threatens to disrupt these systems by requiring every single person who may be responsible for picking up a child from day care to get scanned. For the time being, only 20 centers have the scanners, but the state plans to introduce them statewide by February 2013. A Senate hearing takes place on Oct. 10. If you want to speak up for your rights, plan to attend.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


EMORY WILLIAMSON Come Out as an Ally EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Intern Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

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is cold, blue eyes—that’s all I remember. It was the late 1990s, and during a routine day at school, one of my friends called another student a “f*cking weird faggot.” We didn’t really know the boy’s sexual preferences, but we thought he was gay. He shrugged off the remarks and moved on with his schoolwork. Not straying far from the norm, the moment didn’t register with me until I looked into his eyes. I can’t recall the subsequent reactions or anything else from that day; all I can remember about that moment was seeing the boy’s eyes. They were filled with pain and fear, anger and resentment. His blue eyes, the same color as my own, were eerily cold and distant. Like usual, I chose to do nothing at that moment. As one of many who often stood by and watched others endure this type of daily pain, I was part of the problem. For years, I continued to stand by and allow anyone to taunt, bully, and ridicule others based on their actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. Often, with contempt or in jest, I engaged in this bullying behavior when I told others they were “faggots” or “homos” or said, “That’s so gay,” when I witnessed something I thought was beneath me. Even as I aged, got educated and learned other perspectives, I remained silent when others spewed words of hate and bigotry toward people for being who they are. Although I believed in equality and supported LGBT rights, I rarely mustered the courage to voice my concerns in person. I was fearful of others calling me gay or questioning my masculinity. But that veil of insecurity perpetuated the problem. Many heterosexuals support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights. Many also support anti-bullying measures, LGBT adoption, same-sex marriage and the repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act; however, they continue to remain silent. Coming out as an LGBT ally can be difficult to do, but it pales in comparison to the difficulties LGBT folks experience who come out every day. We don’t generally face discrimination in the workforce, in public places or schools because of our sexual orientation. We don’t have politicians and religious figures vehemently speaking against us and our personal lives. I grew up in a socially conservative neighborhood, attended socially conservative schools and churches, and associated with numerous socially conservative individuals. Coming out as an ally is a continuous and often challenging process. I’ve remained silent, cowered or retracted from confrontations concerning my view that all people are equal and, subsequently, that we should treat them equally.

It would be far from reality to say my journey of coming out as an ally is complete. I’m merely in the beginning. Last year, I decided to confront my insecurities. I created a group called Straight Against Hate in the early months of 2011. I want the group to partner with local LGBT groups and emphasize the involvement of heterosexuals in a joint effort to end discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Straight Against Hate is a small step, but it is progress. Too many heterosexuals consider the LGBT-rights movement as something they can’t be a part of, but they’re wrong. It isn’t just a “gay rights” issue, it’s a human rights issue. The more we advance LGBT rights, the more we advance human rights and help move America toward the dreams it promises. Think about it: In Mississippi, where no statewide protections exist, people can be fired from their jobs, denied housing or public accommodations for simply being perceived as LGBT. In American schools, LGBT students are more likely to be bullied and more likely to attempt suicide. Only a handful of states legally permit same-sex marriage, which would grant same-sex couples the same 1,138 rights, benefits and protections as married heterosexual couples. Something isn’t right. Human beings, not just LGBT individuals, should never face such unfathomable discrimination. It’s time for straight people to wake up. There are millions of silent ally voices that need to be heard. Coming out as an ally, whether it is in the workplace, in school, church or at the dinner table, can be difficult and straining; however, voicing your concerns with others, signing petitions or getting involved in advocacy will not only help you, it will help your fellow citizens, too. Imagine your former school as a place that ensures a safe, positive learning environment for all students. Imagine your place of worship as a holy sanctuary that is open, affirming and welcoming of all people. Imagine local, state and federal governments as appreciative, compassionate and protective of all people. Imagining these wonderful things might give you a warm, fuzzy feeling inside, but without action, it simply isn’t possible. I was part of the problem and now, I’m hoping to be part of the solution. If you haven’t done so already, I hope you’ll consider doing the same. For more information about Straight Against Hate, send an email to nohateky@ gmail.com or visit the organization’s Facebook page.

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15


TRIP BURNS

Sharpening My Skills

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

September 26 - October 2, 2012

W

16

hen it comes to cooking, I am enormously interested, but easily intimidated. I want to be able to whip up a delicious homecooked meal for my family and friends like so many of the great chefs in our city, but I need a little guidance on where to begin. There are lots of ways to become a great chef: culinary school, mentorships, selfteaching, following a great cookbook or even learning from a celebrity chef on TV. While Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to save full-blown culinary school for my next career, the Viking Cooking School invited me to experience one of the classes they offer in Ridgeland. I figured Basic Knife Skills was as good a place as any to get some fundamentals. I walked into a kitchen full of gleaming stainless steel and blonde wood and every pot and pan you could possibly imagine. Our instructor, Kelli Stout, offered wine to start out with. (My kind of class!) Eventually, all seven of the students arrived. With six women and one man, it was a small classâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they can accommodate over double that numberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which meant we got a lot of hands-on time. Trays of colorful vegetables were awaiting our blades, but before getting our hands dirty, we sat down to talk about knives. There are lots of different knives, the instructor told

us. The most vital knife in a cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arsenal is a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knife. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the one you see on all the cooking shows), and if you only own one good knife, make it a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knife. The standard chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knife is 8 inches long, Stout told us, but they also come in

a 60-inch length for petite hands and â&#x20AC;&#x153;if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a big oleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; honkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; man, it comes in a Freddy Krueger size, the 10-inch,â&#x20AC;? Stout said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Halloween knife. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all the same knife, just different sizes. The best knife for you is the one that fits your handâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

ANATOMY OF A KNIFE TIP or POINT

CUTTING EDGE

HEEL

HANDLE

BUTT

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BOLSTER or SHOULDER RIVETS TANG (not shown) Runs from the bolster to the butt inside the handle

let anybody tell you youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to have one over the other, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same knife.â&#x20AC;? Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knives have long, straight spines and slightly curve up at the tip on the blade side, which aids in creating the proper rocking motion while cutting. Knives come in many shapes, with many purposes: Santoku knives, cleavers, boning knives aka filets, bread knives, meat forks, cheese knives, slicing knives and even tomato knives (and more). Easily the most useful thing we learned was also the first: how to hold a knife, and the motion to use while cutting. All seven of us students were doing both of these things wrong when we arrived for class. To hold the knife, Stout instructed us to pinch the back of the blade just past the bolster (avoid the sharp part, obviously, but really hold the blade) with the thumb and forefinger and then wrap the rest of the hand around the handle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hold it by the blade, not way down by the handle. You have to work much more,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you hold it by the blade, you have lots more leverage. Now the knife is doing the work, and not your arm.â&#x20AC;? The next step is the motion. We learned that the tip of the knife should almost never leave the cutting board. You draw back, dragging the tip on the board, and then push down and through, which is the part of the motion that does that actual slicing and dicing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pick up and pull back, push down


TRIP BURNS

Coast-to-Coast Collaboration by Kathleen M. Mitchell, graphic by Kristin Brenemen

T

he culinary field is one of the oldest on earthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;after all, since mankind has existed, we have been eatingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;yet it is still ever-evolving. One of the major ways chefs keep their skills knife-sharp is by working with other culinary minds, teaching and learning from them. Chef Derek Emerson of Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In (3016 N. State St. 601982-2633) and Local 463 (121A Colony Crossing, Madison, 601-707-7684) is a prime example. He travels all over the country cooking with other chefs at events and fundraisers, picking up a trick or two in every city.

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COURTESY 99 SERIES

CHEF EMERSON RECOMMENDS: â&#x20AC;&#x153;99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Going to Culinary School,â&#x20AC;? by Regina Varolli (99 Series, 2012, $12.97).

and through,â&#x20AC;? Stout instructed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think of an old-fashioned locomotive.â&#x20AC;? Cutting with the back of the knife is all about using letting the knife do the work for you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the powerhouse of the knife, not at the tip,â&#x20AC;? Stout said. As we all practiced slicing invisible tenderloins and carrots (and drank more wineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, no one lost a finger),

Stout gave us the basics of cutting terminology. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s julienne (which means cut into strips); dice; small dice and brunoise (cutting into small squares or cubesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;regular, small and tiny); rondelle (into round slices, like carrots); batonnet (long strips with square sides); and mince (a very fine chop). She helped us adjust our grip and our method, laughing that she wishes she could

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get her own mother to follow her advice. Stout shared one type of student that tends to get off the hook when it comes to knife skills, though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a guy one night, and he was doing this (mimes little tiny cuts), and I said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sir can I show you an easier way?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Stout recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a surgeon.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Never mind! You can do it however you want to. He was doing it so meticulously, I was thinking heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be doing it all night, but once I heard he was a surgeon, I was like, whatever youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing with a scalpel is fine.â&#x20AC;? At last we got to put our new skills to good use. We chopped a variety of vegetables for salsa, learning tricks for cutting onion and bell pepper without pieces going all over the cutting board. We marinated and then cut chicken, sliced strips of mushrooms and more vegetables, and finally cranked up the

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COURTESY BLD; COURTESY VIVA LA FOODIES; COURTESY SALTY SOW; COURTESY JON CURRENCE; COURTESY ARTSMEMPHIS; COURTESY RESTAURANT IRIS; COURTESY THE GENUINE KITCHEN; COURTESY KEVIN RATHBUN; COURTESY SOUTH BEACH WINE AND FOOD FESTIVAL; COURTESY HEARTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DELIGHT; COURTESY ICC

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fire to turn everything into fajitas. As I bit into what we had madeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe not quite gourmet, but certainly excitingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I was proud of my small moment in a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot more to learn, but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t 17 wait for the next culinary adventure.


September 26 - October 2, 2012

18

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COURTESY FOX

Josh Marksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; culinary school experience on the reality show â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? was uniquely public.

Class Under Fire

&ROM TO

I

walked into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? kitchen with the confidence of an actual chef. In fact, I thought I knew all there was to know about cooking and food. From day one, I realized that certainly wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the case. Walking into my hotel room for the first time, I met my roommate Joe Maeillano. We got to know each other while on lockdown (aka being sequestered). His cooking style is upscale, and he uses unusual and inexpensive ingredients such as bone marrow, calfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brains, kidneys, hearts and all that â&#x20AC;&#x153;crazy stuff.â&#x20AC;? Getting to know Maeillano and learning how he uses cheap â&#x20AC;&#x153;unwantedâ&#x20AC;? ingredients and makes them gourmet was one of my first lessons in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? kitchen. Unfortunately, he did not advance to the next round, and his stay in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? kitchen was short-lived. But I will never forget my first offal (aka nasty-looking animal innards) lesson. The knowledge Maeillano passed on to me prepared me for a later challenge in the Top 15 round. His advice inspired me to put together a sexy chicken-liver dish with salsa verde and plantain chips.

TALK LIKE A CHEF

I knew I had the skills and potential to be greater than a â&#x20AC;&#x153;home cook,â&#x20AC;? but I just had to go through the tangible lessons of life to release my potential. We took cooking classes that taught the essential components of baking, butchering small animals and fish, and as time progressed, we learned advanced lessons as well. Of course, the mentoring and lessons we learned from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? judges were huge as well. If a contestant can retain that knowledge to propel them along the way, they just might win, or get pretty damn close. Some of the best lessons came from losing, because I became filled with humilityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and everybody needs that. When I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t perform as well in the challenges, I was rewarded with knowledge on how I can come back in the fight with another advantage over my opponent. The actual challenges were the best learning experiences for me, because I gained so much cooking experience and was introduced to so many opportunities that I would have never received. For example, cooking for Guy Savoy, Alain Ducasse and Daniel Boulud was one of the most honorable experi-

SOURCE: ATOMICGOURMET.COM

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ences in my chef life, especially because they praised my food so highly. I met a chef in New York that recognized me from the show and he was impressed, because he has been applying for a job at Daniel Bouludâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant. Contestants are also put into situations where we are not prepared, like mystery-box challenges. They gave us two seconds to come up with a dish using a hodgepodge of ingredients and it is up to us to find a recipeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether it instantly comes from the heart, a memorized recipe or you pray for a better idea! The people that use the first and the last method usually are the best in each competition and have the endurance to fight to the end. I fought my heart out in each challenge, and I fought to the end. Even though I placed second in the overall â&#x20AC;&#x153;MasterChefâ&#x20AC;? competition, I am going to get my prize. It 19 just takes patience.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Josh Marks


September 26 - October 2, 2012

20

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly


COURTESY ANDREW ALLEN

Learning the Rules by Andrew Allen

“Y

es, Chef! No, Chef! I will have it right away, Chef!” For the past three years, these words have been my main vocabulary in the kitchens at the New England Culinary Institute. Starting out as a lowly line cook aspiring to be a chef in Mississippi, I had no idea about the world of rules and regulations in a kitchen. I thought it consisted of coming in, doing your job and going home. Working throughout the state, I learned from chefs such as Ken Dixon and Ty Thames that it is so much more than that. My grandmother and grandfather’s garden in Carthage was my first introduction to real food. Every time I stayed at their house in the country, I would eat three fresh meals out of their dirt each day. It wasn’t until I was a young adult that I realized how important to me this was. After talking with Chef Thames of Restaurant Tyler in Starkville one night after work, he inspired me to consider culinary school at his alma mater, the New England Culinary Institute in Montpelier, Vt. “This place is great,” Thames said to me. “Instead of showing you how to debone a chicken and then move on, they show you how to debone a chicken, and then give you a case of whole chickens and tell you to get after it.” It was these words that sold me. Two months later, I was in the snowy mountains of the American Northeast freezing my Mississippi ass off and wondering, hoping that I had made the right choice. My first year at NECI was, in retrospect, quite humorous. I thought I was the man. I went in there thinking I was going to have this school begging me to become an instructor. But the chef instructors quickly put me in my place. Once I got over myself and started to take in what these culinary professionals had to teach me, I was amazed at the knowledge they put at my fingertips. My first class schedule overwhelmed me: Classic French Cuisine, Baking I, History and Culture of

Cuisine, Product Management, Meat Fabrication I. The chefs taught me so much more than I ever expected to learn: differences in beurre rouge and beurre blanc, the different mixing methods for pastries, the origins of different cuisines, how to identify certain products and where they come from, how to break down a whole pig into its specific cuts of meat— and this was only my first semester. After that semester, it was time for my first internship, a six-month stint. I went to work for Shane Ingram and ONE Restaurant in Chapel Hill, N.C. There, I learned a lot from a seasoned chef who, like my chefs at school, had no time for any crap. I learned quickly that I had better keep my head down and do my work and respond quickly with a “yes, Chef,” a “no, Chef,” or Andrew Allen has followed his love of food from his grandparents’ garden in when asked, a brief explanation to why I Carthage to culinary school at the New England Culinary Institute. was such a f*** up. But I was able to hone my new skills in the real world. Upon returning to school after that first internship my me the importance of not only being able to create good food, classes were harder. I was expected to keep my knives razor- but being personal with your guests: Get to know them, and sharp, and have near-excellent knife cuts and a crisply ironed, make them feel at home in your establishment. clean brigade (aka chef’s uniform). In this semester I learned Now, one last internship is all that stands between me how to perfect plating, make different cured meats, orches- and graduation. The last six months here have been the hardtrate banquet dinners, and I became one hell of an omelet- est yet. Rarely in the kitchen, we learned the importance of making machine. The chefs were tougher, and the work was being good business people. Many accounting, ethics and enharder, but the results were more rewarding. trepreneurship classes later, I am pleased with the education I My second internship was at Parlor Market in Jackson. I have received. worked for a brief time under Chef Craig Noone. Before his If I could give advice to someone considering culinary passing, I learned a lesson that I will never forget: To be suc- school, it would be to do research. Find the school that is right cessful, you have to make relationships. Chef Noone taught for you—you will get out what you put into it.

CREATIVE COMMONS

EARLY INFLUENCES

G

Julia Child was one of the TV chefs that inspired Dan Blumenthal to pursue a culinary career.

rowing up as I did in the culinary wasteland that was Jackson in the mid to late 1970s, I was just plain lucky to have watched with great interest the early old-school cooking shows broadcast on MPB/PBS television. These shows included Julia Child’s “Julia Child & Company,” Graham Kerr’s “The Galloping Gourmet,” Justin Wilson’s “Louisiana Cookin,” Jeff Smith’s “The Frugal Gourmet,” Martin Yan’s “Yan Can Cook,” and of course, the “Great Chefs” series. These shows predated the most famous of all “modern” cooking shows, “The Essence Of Emeril,” hosted by none other than Emeril Lagasse. There is no doubt that these shows had an early influence on my decision to become involved in the restaurant industry, and to ultimately attend culinary school and learn the chef’s trade. However, watching these shows as an early teen didn’t move me quite enough to go into my home kitchen and explore cooking on my own. No, at that pubescent age, I was too absorbed in manly teen activities such as cars, girls, athletics, guns, motorcycles, skateboarding, cycling, music and such. It wasn’t until I landed my first

part-time job at Wendy’s when I was 15 (the only place that would hire me that summer!), that I started my full slide into the culinary world. Strangely enough, years later, the very same Martin Yan, whom I watched as a youth on “Yan Can Cook,” turned up as one of my teachers at California Culinary Academy. He was hilarious to watch and a real icon in bringing the art of cooking Chinese food to the masses. Then, of course, there is the master, Julia Child. Enough just can’t be said about Child’s influence on modern French cuisine and all cooking in general. She was the end-all be-all in bringing cooking to a level that was not just about feeding the poor masses, or royalty on the other end of the spectrum, but putting the culinary arts in the hands of the average person via the medium of television. The others just jumped on Julia’s wave and added their own flavor to the culinary landscape of the time. They were all important early pioneers and I can now look back and see how important they were in not only my life, but the culinary world as it is today.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Dan Blumenthal

21


Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages

601-982-9991

by Victoria Sherwood

WIKICOMMONS

1405 Old Square Road Jackson MS

Rice Country Classic Charleston red rice was one of the first dishes Chef Alex Eaton learned in culinary school.

11:00 a.m. Worship Service

Lunch Buffet

Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS

-Voted Best of Jackson2003 - 2012

601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

Mon - Fri: lunch 11-2 dinner 5- 9:30 Sat: 4-9:30

A

lex Eaton of Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-420-4202) has spent his whole culinary career in the South. He attended culinary school at Johnson and Wales University in

North Carolina. This dish includes Carolina gold rice, one of the first dishes he learned to make while in rice country. To purchase Charleston gold rice, visit ansonmills.com.

CHARLESTON RED RICE

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Monday - Friday

1/2 cup bacon fat 1/2 cup Bentonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bacon, diced small 3 cups onion, diced small 1 cup celery, diced small 1 cup green bell pepper, diced small 1 cup red bell pepper, diced small 2 fresh chilis (optional) 3 tablespoons fresh garlic, minced 1 teaspoon chili flake 2 tablespoons salt 1 tablespoon pepper 1/2 cup tomato paste 1 28-oz can of diced San Marzano tomatoes 2 quarts chicken stock 1 quart Charleston gold rice (or long grain rice) 2 bay leaves

September 26 - October 2, 2012

TALK LIKE A CHEF

22

Other Special Offers: Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat & Sun 11 - 10

601-956-5040

(finish with hot sauce, fresh parsley, green onions)

Render bacon (cook over low heat until the fat melts off and the meat crisps) in bacon fat. SautĂŠ the onion, celery, bell pepper, chili, garlic, and chili flake together. Next, add salt, pepper, tomato paste and tomatoes. Simmer for five minute, then add chicken stock and bring to a boil. Add rice and cover. Bake rice covered in 350-degree oven for 25-35 minutes until al dente. Stir in hot sauce, generous amounts of parsley and green onions. Adjust seasoning if necessary. Serves 8-10.

SOURCE: ATOMICGOURMET.COM

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MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/30/12 - 10/6/12 [ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ]

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jacksonfreepress.com

 8IGLRSPSKMGEPP]%HZERGIH -RGVIHMFP])JJMGMIRX

23


MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/30/12 - 10/6/12 [ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ]

Highland Village 4500 I-55 North Jackson, MS

6592 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601.977.0563

601.956.9562

www.amerigo.net

www.charrestaurant.com Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Lunch Menu $11

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Dinner Menu $25

SALADS choice of

APPETIZER choice of

CEASAR SALAD

CHEESE FRITTER

SPRING MIX

SALADS choice of

with Roasted Bell Peppers and Red Onions

CEASAR SALAD

SALAD choice of

ENTREÉ choice of

SPRING MIX

CHAR SALAD

SPAGHETTI

ENTREÉ choice of

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Lunch Menu $13

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Dinner Menu $35

APPETIZER choice of

APPETIZER choice of

CHAR SALAD

BBQ SHRIMP

Greens, bacon, egg, cheddar and tomato with your choice of dressing

CEASAR SALAD

Crisp romaine with Parmesan, croutons and roasted garlic dressing

SPINACH CRISP

ENTREÉ choice of

CEASAR SALAD

CHICKEN TENDERLOINS

ENTREÉ choice of

CHOPPED STEAK

PICCATA

DAILY SPECIAL SALMON

Seared and served over couscous with sautéed shiitake mushrooms, arugula and lemon and tarragon butter sauce

DESSERT choice of DOUBLE CUT FUDGE BROWNIE PECAN CARAMEL BUTTER CRUNCH

Lightly breaded pan-roasted chicken breat or veal with sautéed spinach over garlic smashed potatoes, finished with a classic lemon caper butter sauce

Traditional Caesar with Parmesan Cheese

Traditional Tomato Sauce with Jumbo Meatball

FETTUCCINE CHICKEN ALFREDO Fettuccine Pasta tossed in a Parmesan Cream Sauce served with Flamed Grilled Chicken

ROASTED VEGETABLE PENNE

Sun-dried Tomatoes, Peppers, Squash, Asparagus and Garlic in a Light Herb & Pesto Vegetable Broth

PORK CHOP

DAILY SPECIAL

SALMON

DESSERT choice of

DESSERT choice of

TIRAMISU

DOUBLE CUT FUDGE BROWNIE

VANILLA CREAM & KAHLUA CHOCOLATE

SHRIMP SCAMPI CHICKEN PICATTA FLAMED GRILLED SALMON FILET

DESSERT choice of TIRAMISU VANILLA CREAM & KAHLUA CHOCOLATE

361 Township Avenue Ridgeland, MS

601.707.0587

601.707.7950

sombramexicankitchen.com

www.anjourestaurant.net

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Lunch Menu $10

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Dinner Menu $18

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Lunch Menu $14

Restaurant Week Prie Fixe Dinner Menu $25

ENTREÉ choice of

APPETIZER choice of

SALADS choice of

APPETIZER choice of

TACOS DE CAZUELAS

CHEESE DIP

LA SALADE ANJOU

BEIGNETS DE COURGETTES

GUACAMOLE

SOUPE AU PISTOU

Pulled Chicken, Refried Beans, Mexican Peppers and Onions, Melted Cheeses, Pico De Gallo, Black Olives, Guacamole, Sour Cream

ENTREÉ choice of

ENTREÉ choice of

CHILE

Grilled Marinated Skirt Steak or Marinated Chicken wrapped in flour tortillas, Poblano Peppers, Green Peppers, Onions, Grape Tomatoes, Lettuce, Sour Cream, Guacamole, Pico de Gallo. Served with refried beans and mexican rice.

Choice of Corn or Flour Tacos, Choice of Pulled Chicken, Ground Beef or Pulled Pork, Salsa Taqueria

White American Cheese with Hatch Green Chiles

LAYERED BOWL

Made fresh to order

Award Winning Chile, Cheddar Cheese, Pico de Gallo, Jalapeno Wheel. Served with fresh Guacamole.

DESSERT choice of WARM BUTTER CRUNCH CAKE September 26 - October 2, 2012

LASAGNA

PECAN CARAMEL BUTTER CRUNCH

140 Township Ave. #100 Ridgeland, MS 39157

24

CHICKEN ACUTO

French Vanilla Ice Cream, Tequila Caramel Sauce

BAJA BROWNIE

Brownie, Cinnamon Ice Cream, Cajeta Sauce

Join us for Fiesta Hour ALL WEEK!

TACOS AL CARBON

BURRITO

Flour Tortilla, Choice of Pulled Chicken, Ground Beef. Choice of Red Chile, Green Chile, Rachero, Christmas Sauce or Cheese Sauce. Served with refried beans and mexican rice.

FISH TACOS

Corn or Flour Tortilla, Beer Battered Catfish, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Tomatillo Avocado Salsa. Served with refried beans and mexican rice.

Mixed greens with bacon lardons, tomato and red onion Vegetable and pesto soup

CROQUE MONSIEUR

Warm French Style ham & cheese on sour dough bread, topped w/ Gruyere cheese & béchamel

CREPE POULET FLORENTINE

Roasted chicken, spinach, bacon lardons & Parmesan cheese topped w/ béchamel & fresh spinach

LINGUINI DE CREVETTES

Shrimp, andouille sausage, mushrooms, diced tomato and Creole cream sauce

DESSERT choice of PROFITEROLES AU CHOCOLATE Cream puff filled with ice cream on a bed of chocolate sauce

CRÈME CARAMEL Caramel Custard

Zucchini Beignets w/ Creamy Feta

ASSIETTE DE FROMAGE Plate of French cheeses

SALADS choice of LA SALADE ANJOU SOUPE A L’OIGNON French Onion Soup

ENTREÉ choice of SAUMON PROVENCALE

Pan seared salmon served with ratatouille topped with sautéed mushrooms

CREPE AU POULET ET ASPERGES

Grilled chicken, mushrooms, asparagus, Mascarpone topped w/ sherried tomato chutney served with fresh vegetables

LINGUINI DE CREVETTES

Shrimp, andouille sausage, mushrooms, diced tomato and Creole cream sauce

LA COTE DE PORC

9 0z. bone-in Duroc pork chop with sautéed sweet potatoes, fresh vegetables and herb-onion demi glace

4 for $4 from 4 pm to 6 pm

DESSERT choice of

$4 Margaritas • $4 Draft Craft Beers $4 Layer Dip • $4 Guacamole

WARM BUTTER CRUNCH CAKE

DESSERT choice of

BAJA BROWNIE

PROFITEROLES AU CHOCOLATE CRÈME CARAMEL


MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/30/12 - 10/6/12 [ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ]

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 6ISIT OUR'R OCE 3TOREN RY EXT DOOR

LSO 7EA R CATE

LUNCH & DINNER ANY SANDWICH, FRIES & A DRINK $7.00 ANY ENTREE, A DRINK $10.00

EXCLUDING COMBINATION PLATE, COMBO KABOB PLATE, LAMB CHOPS PLATE AND BIG COMBO PLATE

ANY ENTREE, A DRINK & DESSERT $11.00

EXCLUDING COMBINATION PLATE, COMBO KABOB PLATE, LAMB CHOPS PLATE, BIG COMBO PLATE AND TIRAMISU

20% OFF ALL APPETIZERS AND DESSERTS OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED.

Restaurant Fixed Price Menu ENTRĂ&#x2030;E Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steak Medallions

Topped with Jumbo Lump Chesapeake Bay Crab and Bearnaise sauce

DESSERT White Chocolate Mousse $22.99

$INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

7%$%,)6%2

)RQGUHQ%HOKDYHQ80&DUHD

,AKELAND$R *ACKSON -3 7HORU )D[

2IDGE7AY 3TE% &LOWOOD -3 7HO )D[

Charity Taco Night Benefitting the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

September 26

$9 1 Lightweight Roll $11 2 Lightweight rolls $13 1 Lightweight & half of a Grand Champion Roll $18 3 Grand Champion Rolls All the above comes with choice of edamame or miso soup and 1 non-alcoholic beverage. 3100 N. State St. Ste 102 | Jackson, Ms 39216 at the corner of North State Street & Duling Avenue 769.216.3574 | fatsumosushi.com

Open All Day Wed - Sat

Mon & Tue: Lunch: 11am-2:30pm | Dinner: 5pm-10pm Wed - Sat: 11am - 10pm | Bar stays open til last call

Purple Dress Run October 25

5:00 Check In â&#x20AC;˘ 6:00 Run Begins Grab your running shoes and favorite purple â&#x20AC;&#x153;dressâ&#x20AC;? for a sunset 5k through downtown Jackson. Proceeds benefit the Domestic Violence Services Center of Catholic Charities

$30 for Individuals â&#x20AC;˘ $100 for teams of 4

for more information 601-326-3714 or 601-326-3758

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Restaurant Week Prix Fixe Options

Featuring Our Orange Chicken Taco And Blood Organ Martinis

25


MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/30/12 - 10/6/12 [ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ] Opens at 4pm on Tuesday-Friday and 6pm on Saturday Entertainment starts at 8pm Tuesday -Thursday and 9pm Friday-Saturday 119 South President Street Jackson, Mississippi 601.352.2322 www.underground119.com

Gjyfe!Qsjdf!Nfov!%26!

Home of the blues, jazz, bluegrass music, & something or ’nother.

Tbmbe

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Fousf

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shrimp diablo Grilled jumbo Gulf shrimp marinated in our hose seasoning and Sriracha.

four cheese ravioli & pesto

Fresh pasta stuffed with mozzarella, ricotta, Parmesan and Romano cheeses and topped with Pecan-Basil Pesto.

fruit and cream

2211!Kpio!S/!Mzodi!Tusffu!}!Tvjuf!B!!Kbdltpo-!NT!}!87:/362/6333!}!uifqfohvjont/dpn

Jackson Restaurant Week Fixed Price Menu

$8.55 Menu Drink Not Included. “The Sandwich Platter”

September 26 - October 2, 2012

restaurant week prix fixe menu $25

Add grilled shrimp – 5.00

Difftfdblf

26

TASTE WHAT WE’RE KNOWN FOR

Includes one sandwich. Your choice of:

Choose two sides:

Smoked Chicken

Slaw

Smoked Pork Shoulder

Potato Salad

Smoked Beef Brisket

American Fries

Smoked Ham

Baked Beans

Smoked Turkey Breast

Sweet Potato Fries

Loaded Hamburger

Onion Rings

Garden Salad

Grilled Cheese

601-956-779 • 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson

Champagne-macerated, Asian-spiced fruit topped with Hendrick’s Gin and cilantro infused whipped cream.


MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/30/12 - 10/6/12 [ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ]

SEPT. 30 - OCT. 6

Lunch Soup or Salad, Choice of Pasta & Brownie $18 Dinner Soup or Salad, Choice of Pork Chop Zatarainaise or Paneed Gulf Flounder over Yukon Gold mashed potatoes with pancetta, rosemary & apples in a citrus-champagne jus and, of course, a slice of tiramisu for dessert! $28 Lunch Two Slice Daily Special, Choice of Side Salad, Choice of Drink & Choice of Ice Cream $10 Dinner Choice of Side Salad, Choice of Any Dinner Pasta, Choice of Drink & Choice Of Ice Cream $20

jacksonfreepress.com

Lunch & Dinner Choice of any Sandwich, Choice of Side & Choice of Cookie $10

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5A44 FX5X

DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Spicy Chipotle Turkey Burger with applewood smoked bacon, chipotle mayo & smoked gouda cheese on a cheddar jalapeño bun.

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street District offering a savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 F Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

Italian Done Right

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

September 26 - October 2, 2012

ITALIAN

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BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland

601-956-2929

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’lboys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events.


DINEJackson

Paid advertising section.

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

Viva con Sabor (Alive with Flavor) -Mentioned in Boom Jackson Magazine Autumn 2010 Edition-

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

WEDNESDAY 9/26

Tamales

Legacy

(Traditional Irish)

COFFEE HOUSES

FRIDAY 9/28

Otis Lotus

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Enchiladas & Refried Beans • Tortillas Made Fresh To Order • Mexican Cokes (with real cane sugar) • Authentic Not Tex-Mex

6610 Old Canton Road Suite J Ridgeland, Ms|Behind Dominoe’s Pizza Wed. - Mon.10am - 9:30pm|Closed Tue. Call for ToGo Order|601-899-8821

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

(Grateful Dead Tribute) SATURDAY 9/29

Sofa Kings (Rock)

MONDAY 10/1

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 10/2

Open Mic hosted by A Guy Named George

Try our new wraps while they last.

• Reuben • Summer Veggie •Jerk Chicken and more!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made spring rolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

(Acoustic)

THURSDAY 9/27

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

Bob Ray

Keep it Real hot talk, local singles

FREE TRIAL

601.706.0393 More local numbers: 1.800.811.1633 18+ www.vibeline.com

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Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes with real cane sugar.

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jacksonfreepress.com


BOOKS & FILM p 33 | 8 DAYS p 34 | MUSIC p 38 | SPORTS p 40

A ‘Big Menu’ for Blues Fans by Larry Morrisey

September 26 - October 2, 2012

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LARRY MORRISEY

B

lues in the Delta is still alive, and now it’s getEllisville bluesman L.C. ting organized. Over Ulmer will perform at the past 10 years, the the Highway 61 Blues promotion of blues in the region Festival in Leland Sept. 29, one of the has grown, including new muse“anchor” events for ums and festivals. the “Bridging the These groups are workBlues” series. ing together on “Bridging the Blues,” a new effort to encourage blues fans to extend their visit in the area. From Sept. 27 through Oct. 8, communities across the Delta will host a series of concerts, festivals and other programs focused on the music. The project developed from a change of date. The producers of Leland’s Highway 61 Blues Festival decided to move their event from mid-June to the last weekend of September. They made the change hoping to attract blues fans who would be in the region on the first weekend of October for the King Biscuit Blues Festival, an internationally renowned event based in Helena, Ark. “A lot of blues fans who come to the region for multiple days will plan their trip around a large festival like King Biscuit,” explains Scott Barretta, an Oxford-based blues writer and adviser to “Bridging the Blues.” Seeing the potential to create a “bridge” between the two weekend festivals with more programming, tourism groups from Mississip- Rush at Club Ebony in Indianola. Barretta pi, Arkansas and Tennessee came together notes the important role the club has played and encouraged Delta communities to offer in the musical history of the Delta. blues-related events during the period. “It’s one of the last major chitlin circuit The program schedule has more than clubs that’s still in operation,” he explains. 50 events taking place from Memphis to Barretta also points out Club Ebony’s inVicksburg, including concerts, exhibits, fes- timate feel, something missing from blues tivals and book signings. shows that are staged at larger venues. The series kicks off Sept. 27 with Jack“When you’re at a show at Club son blues artist Stevie J performing at the Ebony, the people are right there [next to Ameristar Casino in Vicksburg, followed the performer],” he explains. “A lot of the the next evening with a show by Bobby importance in blues is placed on the call-

and-response between the performer and the audience.” The first “anchor” event in the series, the Highway 61 Blues Festival, takes place in Leland on Saturday, Sept. 29. The festival focuses on promoting musicians from the mid-Delta. Featured performers from the area include Eddie Cusic, John Horton and Mickey Rogers. Joining them will be fellow Mississippi musicians L.C. Ulmer and Jimmy “Duck” Holmes, among many others. The Holly Ridge Jam, an informal

jam session featuring local blues musicians is held the following day at the Holly Ridge Store outside Leland. Barretta believes this event is a great place to pick up on the Delta vibe. “It’s a change of pace from the festival; there’s no structure to it,” he explains. “You never know exactly what’s going to happen, but there’s a real sense of community among the performers.” While the larger events take place over the two weekends, a number of special programs are being held during the week. These include a tour on Oct. 2 of the historic Dockery Farms plantation outside Cleveland and an exhibition of blues photography by folklorist and Mississippi native Bill Ferris at the E.E. Bass Cultural Center in Greenville. “Bridging the Blues” hits its high point Oct. 4 to 6 at the King Biscuit Festival in Helena. One of the most highly regarded blues festivals in the U.S., the “Biscuit” features the stars of the blues (this year’s headliners include Bonnie Raitt and Taj Mahal) as well as notable regional performers. The celebration winds down Sunday, Oct. 7, with Clarksdale’s Cat Head Mini Blues Festival and the Pinetop Perkins Homecoming at the Hopson Plantation. Barretta sees “Bridging the Blues” as a great opportunity for blues lovers to have a deep Delta experience. “For blues fans who are thinking about coming to the region, ‘Bridging the Blues’ has a big menu from which they can pick and choose,” he states. “This is a great time to visit the Delta. The weather’s going to be good and there will be lots to do.” To view the full schedule for “Bridging the Blues” visit bridgingtheblues.blogspot.com.


DIVERSIONS | film

Accepting the Legacy by Matt Bolian

O

n the 50th anniversary of James Meredith’s enrollment at Ole Miss, Mississippi Public Broadcasting presents “Integrating Ole Miss: James Meredith and Beyond,” a film about how the event shaped the future of the university. The documentary presents Ole Miss as a microcosm for the larger Civil Rights Movement. As the documentary explains, though integration came to the university slowly and with resistance, much has changed at Ole Miss over the past 50 years. David Rae Morris, son of the late Mississippi author Willie Morris, served as the independent producer and filmmaker for the documentary. This project represents his debut in documentary filmmaking. The documentary premieres Sept. 30 at 6:30 p.m. on MPB TV. See mpbonline.org.

How did it feel to interview Mr. James Meredith at a library named after your father?

When he agreed to meet with me, he suggested we meet in the Willie Morris library. I thought that was poetic and appropriate. He comes there all the time. How did you choose which material to keep in the film and which to cut?

We had enough material for a mini-series and trying to boil that down into 26 minutes was like trying to thread a needle with an industrial rope. There was so much material from good people.

D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

How did your father influence your work?

RRIS

To be completely honest, the photojournalism industry is in bad shape. Besides, I have wanted to shoot a film since I was in high school.

In terms of a state of mind, he set the bar for me—a really high one. I feel like I have a lot to live up to. It is a tough act to follow. There was a time when I just wanted to run away; I didn’t want h i s career to guide me. That was like swimming upstream, like running away from you really are. 10 to 15 years ago, I decided to accept his legacy. When I allowed him to, I think he inspired me to do good work that matters and comes from the heart. I think that is his lasting legacy in Mississippi.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Sept. 28 - Thurs. Oct. 4 2012 Looper

DIVERSIONS | books

A MAD INSURRECTION

by Donna Ladd

“James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot: A Soldier’s Story” by Henry T. Gallagher (University Press of Mississippi, 2012, $26) How must it have been to be a soldier on the Ole Miss campus during the 1962 “insurrection” that might have turned into another civil war? You can experience what then U.S. Army 2nd Lt. Henry Gallagher experienced, especially as he became the officer-in-charge of the rebel Meredith’s security detail. In this book, we learn more about what the white students believed and displayed from nasty defiance to belief that John F. Kennedy was leading a communist invasion of their school—a poignant history lesson in a time when red-baiting is sweeping the nation in response to a black president.

“Mississippi: The Closed Society” by James W. Silver (University Press of Mississippi, 1964/Reissued 2012, $30) The classic book by then Ole Miss professor James Silver, who died in 1988, was recently reissued and is a mustread for anyone wanting to understand the difficult history of Jim Crow Mississippi and, especially, of the climate at Ole Miss in 1962. The book starts with a harrowing account of Sept. 30, 1962, as he and his wife watched American solders “assailed with firebombs.” He writes: “I was alternately enraged and heartsick that my fellow Mississippians, particularly the students, felt called upon to engage in a mad insurrection against their own government.”

R

The Master

R

3-D Hotel Transylvania PG

3-D Resident Evil Retribution R

Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG

3-D Finding Nemo

Won’t Back Down

PG

Trouble With The Curve PG13 End Of Watch R House At The End Of The Street PG13 3-D Dredd

R

G

Last Ounce Of Courage PG Arbitrage

R

Lawless

R

2016 Obama’s America PG The Odd Life Of Timothy Green PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY DA VID RAE MO

Why did you switch into filmmaking from documentary photography?

“A Mission From God: A Memoir and Challenge for America” by James Meredith with William Doyle (Atria Books, 2012, $25) James Meredith’s new book (also see page 4) is an account like no other. The reader walks in his shoes as he integrates campus, slogs to class amid hatred and even when he was shot during his “Walk Against Fear” in 1966. You meet the real James Meredith here: He’s egotistical but self-effacing; intense but droll. And always challenging.

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

I am going back to the Yazoo (City) project. I received a grant from the Mississippi Council that allowed me produce a trailer and a rough 30minute draft. I just applied for another grant that will help me include more interviews and make it feature length.

I want people to watch this documentary because it is history, and we don’t want to forget the lessons our past taught us. Integration at Ole Miss was only 50 years ago—that is within my lifetime.

F

Open Road

Do you have another film idea in mind after you finish this project?

What do you hope people will gain from the film?

ifty years ago this week, James Meredith integrated Ole Miss, causing violent upheaval. Here are three books from men in the thick of the uprising.

Friday, September 28, 2012

33


THURSDAY 9/27

SATURDAY 9/29

MONDAY 10/1

DJ George Chuck is on music duties at Zoo Party Unleashed at Highland Village.

Mac McAnally performs during WellsFest at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park.

Monday MayHAM/Alternative Night is at Soul Wired Cafe.

BEST BETS SEPT. 26 OCT. 3, 2012

Historian Charles Eagles talks about James Meredith and Ole Miss during “History Is Lunch” at noon at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The Jackson Restaurant Week VIP Party is at 6:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). $39; vip.eatjackson.com. … Cherub and Mansions on the Moon perform at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $8 advance, $10 at door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … The play “Angel Street” is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts; runs through Sept. 29. $10; $5 students and seniors; call 601-965-7026.

THURSDAY 9/27

September 19 - October 2, 2012

NICKNAMEMIKET/FLICKR.COM

Charity Taco Night for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is from 5-9 p.m. at Jaco’s Tacos. Call 601-405-0499. … The Jackson Zoo’s Zoo Party Unleashed, a JFP-sponsored event, is from 6-10 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy music from DJ George Chuck, Jesse Robinson and the Chad Wesley Band. For ages 21 and up. $75; call 601-352-2500. … The play “Pinkalicious” is at 7:30 p.m. at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl); runs through Sept. 30. $15, $10 seniors, students and military; call 601-664-0930. … The Jimmy Herring Band performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m. $20 in advance, $25 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

34

The Guest Chef Dinner Series with “Top Chef” contestant Edward Lee (right, with Paul Qui) is at Parlor Market Oct. 1 at 6:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 9/28

Shellie Michael of the Mississippi Minority Business Alliance speaks during Friday Forum at 9 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Free; email jonathan.lee@ msprodinc.com. … The Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s Purple for Peace, a JFP-sponsored event, is at 11:30 a.m. at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). $30, $300 tables; call 601-981-9196. … Jackson Bike Advo-

cates’ Community Bike Ride is at 6 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook. … The Habitat Young Professionals Picnic for ages 21-40 is from 6-9 p.m. at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). The Red Hots perform. Bring food and supplies. Free; call 601-353-6060. … Ronnie McDowell performs at 7 p.m. at Historic Saenger Theater (201 Forrest St., Hattiesburg). Reserved seating. $15-$25; call 601-584-4888. … The James S. Sclater Chamber Series I is at 7:30 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) in Aven Hall. $25, $10 students; call 601-925-3440.

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

WEDNESDAY 9/26

SATURDAY 9/29

The Highway 49 Fest kicks off at 7:30 a.m. at Richland Eastside Park (100 Furr Drive, Richland). Free admission; call 601-420-3400. … WellsFest, a JFP-sponsored event, is at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park (1398 Lakeland Drive); includes a race at 8 a.m., a pet parade at 9 a.m., and a festival at 10 a.m. Benefits the Farish Street YMCA. Free admission; race: $20$60; call 601-353-0658. … The Market @ Liberal Trinity is from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Liberal Trinity BY LATASHA WILLIS Church of God in Christ (725 W. Northside Drive). Free JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM admission; call 601-942-9355. … The Artsfusion Open Air Market FAX: 601-510-9019 is from noon-7 p.m. at The Commons. . $10, children free; DAILY UPDATES AT email artsfusion2012@hotmail. JFPEVENTS.COM com. … The Salute to Our Heroes Gala is at 6 p.m. at the Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). Benefits the Mississippi Brain Injury Association. $125, $1000 table, sponsorships available; call 601-981-1021. … Once Upon a Fall Festival ... There Was a Storybook Ball is at 6:30 p.m. at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Advance tickets only. $30, $20 children under 18; call 601981-5469. … Band Together for Lupus Awareness at Suite 106 includes an information session and food from 6-8 p.m. ($10), and music from Kerry Thomas and LAV at 9 p.m. (free drinks until 10:30 p.m.). Call 310-994-1841.

EVENTS@

SUNDAY 9/30

The Gluckstadt GermanFest is from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church (127 Church Road, Gluckstadt). Die Mitternachters performs. Free admission, $5-$6 meal tickets; call 601-856-2054. … The Metro Jackson Heart Walk is at 1 p.m. at the Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Benefits the American Heart Association. Donations welcome; call 601-321-1216. … Shirley Simpson portrays comedienne Gracie Allen at 2 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). Champagne reception for sponsors. $25, $100 sponsorship; call 601-948-3531. … The Back Forty Beer Tasting is from

Lisa Palmer (above) performs with son Brian Fuente at Underground 119 Sept. 30 at 7 p.m.

5-7 p.m. at Sal and Mookie’s. $35; backfortysalandmookies. eventbrite.com. … Brian Fuente and his mother, Lisa Palmer, perform at 7 p.m. at Underground 119. For ages 21 and up. $15 advance, $20 at door; call 800-745-3000.

MONDAY 10/1

The Guest Chef Dinner Series with Chef Edward Lee is at 6:30 p.m. at Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St.). RSVP; seating limited. $75 four-course dinner, $35 optional wine pairing; call 601-360-0090. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts Monday MayHAM/Alternative Night.

TUESDAY 10/2

Fondren Theatre Workshop’s Playwright Night with Katrina Byrd is at 7 p.m. at Brent’s Diner (655 Duling Ave.). Food prices vary; call 601-301-2281. … The Korean Children’s Choir performs at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494.

WEDNESDAY 10/3

Author Henry T. Gallagher talks about and signs copies of his book about James Meredith during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free, $26 book; call 601-576-6998. … Martin’s hosts Ladies Night. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). â&#x20AC;˘ Jobs for Jacksonians Job Fair and Business Engagement Summit Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Learn about employment and educational opportunities. Free; call 601-961-4JOB. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keeping Your Home and Your Dollarsâ&#x20AC;? Finance Seminar Oct. 1, 6 p.m., in the Community Meeting Room. Registration required; limited seating. Free; call 601-982-8467. Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson Technology and Startup Meetup Sept. 27, 6 p.m., in the Leggett Center. This meeting includes a startup group pitching an idea, tips on business organizational formation, and an overview of building a website with Wordpress. Free; call 601-919-5265. â&#x20AC;˘ Millsaps Friday Forum Sept. 28, 12:30 p.m., at Ford Academic Complex, room 215. Historian Randall Norris speaks on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Highway 61: Heart of the Delta.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-974-1305. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reel Mississippiâ&#x20AC;? Film History Class Sept. 26, 6-8 p.m. Learn about places that were movie backdrops. $40; call 601-974-1130. â&#x20AC;˘ Abnormal Psychology Class Sept. 25 and Sept. 27, 4-6 p.m. For high school students. Registration required. $50; call 601-974-1130. Events at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton). â&#x20AC;˘ Dyslexia Conference Sept. 27, 7:30 a.m., in Anderson Hall. Educators learn teaching strategies for students with language-based disorders. Box lunch included. $75; call 601-925-7766. â&#x20AC;˘ Mary Libby Payne Endowed Lectureship Series Sept. 27, 5 p.m. The speaker is Thomas D. Morgan, professor at George Washington University Law School. $50; call 601-925-7172. Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson Restaurant Week VIP Party Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m. Enjoy wine and beer tastings, food and music from Raphael Semmes. Cocktail attire. Limited tickets. $39; vip.eatjackson.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Dog Day Afternoons Sept. 30, noon. Bring your dog to the Art Garden to play. Shelter dogs available for adoption. Free; call 601-960-1515. Events at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Free; call 601-932-2562.

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Record Keeping for a Small Business Sept. 27, 1-3 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Registration required; seating limited. Free; call 601-979-2795. Dore Open House for Families Sept. 27, 4-7 p.m., at Dore Jackson (1850 Lakeland Drive, Suite P-221). Learn more about Dore, a multisensory program for children with learning disabilities. Free; call 601-326-5550. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting Sept. 27, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). The monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0004. Homebuyer Education Class Sept. 29, 9 a.m., at Jackson Housing Authority (2747 Livingston Road). Class required to qualify for a JHA loan. Free; call 601-362-0885, ext. 115. Writing a Winning Business Plan Sept. 29, 11 a.m., at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Seating limited; registration required. Free; teamdbs.biz. The Glitz and Glam Expo Sept. 29, 11 a.m.5 p.m., at Optimum 1 Dance Studios (Jackson Square Promenade, 2460 Terry Road, Suite 2000). Meet exhibitors who specialize in event planning. Free; call 601-376-5341. Jackson State Homecoming Reunion Luncheon Registration through Sept. 30, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). For graduates of classes ending in 2 or 7, but all alumni may attend. The luncheon is Oct. 19. $40 class members, $25 guests; call 601-979-6944. Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 1, 6 p.m., at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). ESPN columnist Mark Schlabach is the speaker. $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186. Mississippi State Fair Oct. 3-14, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). Advance tickets available at a discount through Oct. 3. $5 plus cost of ride tickets ($5 and up), children under 6 free, parking $5 and up; call 601961-4000 or 601-353-0603. more EVENTS, page 36

COURTESY SUSAN DOBBS/ JAMES KEGLEY

Learning Out Loud

â&#x20AC;˘ Game On! Sept. 27, 4-6 p.m. Play Xbox 360 games; no mature games permitted. â&#x20AC;˘ Brown Bag Luncheon Sept. 28, noon. WXVTTV assistant news director Anne Martin tells stories about the Mississippi Delta. Bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert provided.

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35


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7%,,.%33 Power of Pink: Celebrating Women’s Health Sept. 28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). The health screenings for women are in the atrium. By appointment only. Free; call 601-948-6262.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings include readings. Call 601-366-7619. • “John Saturnall’s Feast” Sept. 26, 5 p.m. Lawrence Norfolk signs books. $25 book. • “Crossroads at Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta After World War II” Sept. 29, 5 p.m. Francoise N. Hamlin signs books. $39.95 book. • “Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s” Oct. 1, 5 p.m. John Shelton Reed signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $38 book. • “Abandon Not My Soul” Oct. 2, 5 p.m. Sherye Simmons Green signs books. $25.95 book. • “James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot: A Soldier’s Story” Oct. 3, 5 p.m. Henry T. Gallagher signs books. $26 book. Children’s Author Series at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). From 3-5 p.m.; includes book. Call 601-981-5469. • Obert Skye Sept. 26. Skye signs “Potterwookie: The Creature From my Closet.” $18. • Eric Rohmann and Candace Fleming Sept. 27. The authors sign “Oh, No!” Additional event for librarians from 5-7 p.m. $25. • Augusta Scattergood Sept. 28. Scattergood signs copies of “Glory Be.” $23. Story Time Tuesday Oct. 2, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Free with paid admission; call 601-352-2580.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Applause Dance Factory (242 Stephens St., Ridgeland). $10, $5 students; call 601-856-6168. • Latin Dance Class: Rumba Sept. 26, 7 p.m. • Ballroom Dance Class: Waltz Sept. 28, 6 p.m.

Anthony DiFatta and Dr. Mina Li Art Show through Oct. 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). The art reception is Sept. 27 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4056.

"%4(%#(!.'% Events at Lake Caroline Golf Course (118 Caroline Club Circle, Madison). • Mississippi Community Education Center Golf Tournament Sept. 28, 8:30 a.m. Proceeds benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center. Sponsorships available. $100; call 601-853-4023. • Salute to Our Heroes Charity Golf Classic Sept. 28, 8 a.m. Proceeds benefit the Brain Injury Association of Mississippi. Sponsorships available. $150, $600 team; call 601-981-1021. Taste of Rankin Sept. 28, 4:30-8 p.m., at Richland Community Center (410 E. Harper St., Richland). A portion of the proceeds benefits the South Rankin Food Resource Center. $10, $5 children; call 601-668-0346 or 601-420-3401. Run for Sterl Sept. 29, 8 a.m., at Country Club of Canton (183 Country Club Road, Canton). Proceeds benefit the Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis. Register by Sept. 28. $20 5K, $30 10K, $55 half-marathon, $15 fun run; $10 extra if payment made at packet pickup; call 601-859-1722. Miles for Meals 5K Sept. 29, 7:30 a.m., at Wilson Drive, Richland. Proceeds benefit South Rankin Food Resource Center. Extra fee for strollers. Registration fees vary, canned good donations welcome; call 769-216-3149. Ride2End Domestic Violence Rally and Ride Sept. 30, 4-6 p.m., at Smith Park (Yazoo Street). Sisters with a Throttle hosts the motorcycle ride. The program includes a victim memorial and resources. Free; call 877-356-6163. Dine Out for No Kid Hungry Campaign, at Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd., Flowood). Purchase a bruschetta appetizer through Sept. 30, and Mellow Mushroom will donate $1 to Share Our Strength. Free; call 601-992-7499. National Night Out Celebration Oct. 2, 6 p.m. Jackson neighborhood associations and groups host block parties, cookouts and other events to fight crime and improve police-community partnerships. Organizers should register with the city so that staff may attend. Free; call 601-960-1084.

Introduction to Mosaics Workshop Registration, at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton). Materials included. Register by Sept. 27. Attend Oct. 11-23. $100; call 601-925-3263.

MadCAAP’s Food for Thought Oct. 2, 6 p.m., at Plantation Commons (105 Plantation Cove, Gluckstadt). Benefits Madison Countians Allied Against Poverty. $50; call 601-407-1404.

September 26 - October 2, 2012

Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Call 601-213-6355. • Ballroom Preview Class Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. through Oct. 25. Learn the rumba, waltz, cha cha and fox trot. $10 class, $70 series. • Contemporary Dance Class through Oct. 29. Front Porch Dance leads the five-week series. $10 per class, $45 all five classes. • Belly Dance Class Tuesdays at 6 p.m. through Oct. 30. $10 per class, $50 for all six classes.

• Artists on “Artists by Artists” Sept. 29, 11 a.m., in the Donna and Jim Barksdale Galleries. Exhibiting artists share their experiences on creating portraits. Free with exhibit admission. • Open Studio Sept. 29, 1:30-4 p.m. Learn about the creative process for an exhibit and create art to take home. Adults must accompany children ages 10 and under. $5, members free.

Adult Acrylic Painting Class, at Daniel MacGregor Studios (4347 Lakeland Drive, Flowood) Thursdays from 7-9 p.m. Bring a 11-by-14-inch canvas for a $5 discount. $15; call 601-992-6405.

Riders Against Domestic Violence Call for Donations through Oct. 6. Donate toiletries such as soap and shampoo by Oct. 6, and RADA will deliver the items to domestic violence shelters Oct. 14. Free; call 601-954-9997.

36

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515.

Oil Painting Classes, at Pat Walker Gallery (133 W. Peace St., Canton) Tuesdays from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 601-855-0107 for price.

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Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Jason Turner Friday, September 28

Thursday - September 27

LADIES NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

with Snazz

THURSDAYS

09/27

FRIDAY

09/28

SATURDAY

09/29

Friday - September 28 & Saturday - September 29

THE WERKS

One the Edge

Night Shift

Hillcrest GUNBOAT Saturday, September 29

9 Ball Tournament 7pm

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Fri)

601-961-4747

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

Sunday - September 23

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

MONDAY

10/01

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

September 27

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday September 28

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

GUYS NIGHT COLLEGE NIGHT 7pm - until| $2.25 longnecks $3.25 well drinks

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

10/02

SHRIMP BROIL 5 - 10 PM MATT’S LATE NITE

KARAOKE $1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

WEDNESDAYS

10/03

RETURN OF LADIES NIGHT

MON & THURS NIGHT MENU Buffalo Shrimp Tequila Lime Wings Hamburger Sliders Chili Dogs Smoked Chicken Nachos Taco Chili Nachos Philly Cheese Steak Chili Cheese Fries Gravy Queso Fries 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

Debauche Saturday

September 29

Royal Thunder

w/ Adam Faucett Monday

October 01

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

October 02

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday October 03 KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

Wednesday - September 26

37


DIVERSIONS | music

Wild Nothing, Fully Realized by Ross Cabell

Tatum moving past his influences and further developing his own sound. Tatum embraces the obvious ’80s indie-pop COURTESY CAPTURED TRACKS

T

his summer saw Jack Tatum, the master responsible for the Brooklyn-based Wild Nothing, on tour behind one the biggest names in indie pop, Beach House. The tour brought Wild Nothing to Jackson in July while they were in between dates on the Beach House tour. Supporting such a big name speaks for how far Wild Nothing has come and may be a glimpse to where the band is heading. Captured Tracks released Wild Nothing’s “Nocturne” Aug. 28. This could be the album that raises Tatum’s profile even higher. The record is the follow-up to his breakout debut album, “Gemini,” which he recorded during his senior year at Virginia Tech. With “Gemini,” Tatum seemed to be writing more for himself, and in interviews, he admitted that he had no idea that anyone would ever hear the album. “Nocturne” proves that the attention he garnered for “Gemini”—and the excellent “Golden Haze” EP, which consisted of B sides from “Gemini” and two new tracks—was more than warranted. “Nocturne” is a different beast than the last album, and the most notable shift is in production value. Every drum fill is exactly where it needs to be, the guitar lines are crisp and the synth parts are all laid out meticulously. It’s evident through the album’s quality that Tatum spent a healthy amount of time revising and editing the songs. This record is a clean and smooth study in how to make an album that borrows from a style of music without being to greedy. The end result is 11 strong tracks that find

“Nocturne” is a different beast for Wild Nothing than the band’s previous albums.

influences, most notably on the title track “Nocturne,” on which he croons, “I know where to find you, I know where you go,” in a voice that belongs on a soundtrack to a John Hughes movie.

Tatum told the music website Pitchfork in an interview over the summer that when it came to songwriting, he was less concerned with lyrical content and more interested in setting a mood. He more than accomplishes that with “Nocturne.” The haze surrounding it has come to be a defining quality to a Wild Nothing record. Each song carefully blends into the next one, creating a cohesive album that puts the listener in an almost hypnotic-like state. However, the album’s cohesiveness may be the only thing working against it. The record might be a little too easy to immerse yourself in. The single and first track on the album, “Shadow,” is the outlier of the album. It’s a song that proves that Tatum has the capacity to write memorable guitar hooks (with some strings thrown in) that require the listener to play the track ad infinitum in their head. The only problem is that as individual songs, aside from “Shadow,” they can’t really stand up on their own. As a whole, each song complements the others and fits together perfectly—but separate the tracks and they start to lose their power. The rest of the album struggles to hold the attention of listeners who may be looking for something the same speed as “Shadow.” “Through the Grass” and the track “Nocturne” are exceptions early in the album, but it isn’t until “Paradise” that the listener can identify a song that’s mixtape worthy. “Nocturne” certainly doesn’t disappoint, and indiepop enthusiasts who have a sweet spot for a new ’80s sound will be more than satisfied with this record.

natalie’s notes

by Natalie Long

Remembering Linda

September 26 - October 2, 2012

38

she would often come out to hear what I like to call my “Mississippi homemade musicians” at singers/songwriters night. I would also see her out supporting other musicians, such as Hunter Gibson and The Gators, Wyatt Waters and Scott Albert Johnson, just to name a few. And while friends reminisce that Linda loved The Beatles and Dan Fogelberg, her true favorite musicians were right here in Jackson and throughout the state. At one time she had pictures of all the local bands she loved hanging up on her walls at her home. Linda was also a talented songwriter in her own right. She was a featured writer for the UK-based MOJO magazine, and was president of the Jackson chapter of the Nashville Songwriters Association International. She shared many stories with me about attending The Bluebird Café and hearing all the incredible musicians who had performed there. She also shared that she enjoyed writing songs with Hunter and was not only a fan of his, but also a dear friend. When she wasn’t writing songs, she worked at the University of Mississippi

COURTESY HUNTER GIBSON

I

met Linda Dendy Watts three years ago at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.) when friends gathered there to host a benefit for her. Linda had been diagnosed with kidney cancer, and community and family came together to help and support her. Former Hal & Mal’s manager Charly Abraham had just asked if I was interested in hosting singer/songwriters night there, and when my musician friends mentioned that Linda was a former singer/songwriter-night hostess in Nashville and Jackson, I immediately sought her out, asking a thousand questions at lightning speed. From that night on, Linda became my mentor, not only with hosting the event at Hal and Mal’s, but also giving me advice about dealing with difficult musicians, performing live, songwriting and sometimes even love advice. She helped me immensely with getting singers/songwriters night off the ground, she would always have a smile on her face, and would even keep you smiling with her quick wit and humor. She was an avid music supporter, and

The Jackson music scene will miss local warrior Linda Dendy Watts (right), pictured with musician Hunter Gibson.

Medical Center as an office manager, and also worked at The Education Center. On Sept. 3, Linda lost her battle with kidney cancer. When I think of those that support Jackson’s music scene, Linda Watts was at the top. She was the epitome of class and encouragement to all musicians. She played an integral part in the singer/songwriter movement here in Jackson, and

several bands were formed from her hosting events for musicians in Jackson years ago. She enjoyed all types of music and was genuinely passionate about music. She supported all musicians in the City with Soul, even if the cancer treatments kept her home on the nights her friends would play. Linda encouraged me to continue hosting, continue writing, continue singing and to never give up on what my real passion was in life. She also encouraged women to get out there and perform their songs to the public. One of the quotes on her Facebook page totally describes who Linda Watts was during her time here on Earth: “Well-behaved women rarely make history.” I wish we had more people here and everywhere that supported local music like Linda did. I will miss seeing her at shows and concerts. I will miss her sweet, hilarious remarks on my Facebook posts, and I know she will be terribly missed by her friends, family and musicians from all around. Rest in peace, sweet friend.


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THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 9/26 Cherub w/ Mansions on the Moon (Red Room) New Bourbon St. Jazz Band (Dining Room)

THURSDAY 9/27 Brad Biard Band (Red Room) Scott Chism & the Better Half (Dining Room)

FRIDAY 9/28

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, September 26th

TAYLOR HILDEBRAND

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, September 27th

VOO DAVIS

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, September 28th

VASTI JACKSON

Mustache (Red Room) Raphael Semmes (Dining Room)

Saturday, September 29th

SATURDAY 9/29

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Sun Ballet (Red Room)

MONDAY 10/1 MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 10/2 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Dining Room)

Coming Soon THU 10.4: T Bird & The Breaks with Flowtribe SAT 10.13: JJ Grey & MOFRO THU 10.25: Robert Earl Keen

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

JIMBO MATHUS Tuesday,October 2nd

JESSE ROBINSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

(Blues) 6-10, $5 Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

Wednesday, October 3rd

ZACH LOVETT

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, October 4th

BOOKER WALKER

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, October 5th

JOHNNY SANSONE

(Rock) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 6th

DUMPSTAPHUNK FT. IVAN NEVILLE

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

3%04 7%$.%3$!9

JARO VACEK

MUSIC | live

39


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

No one in this country has become bigger whipping boys than the NFL replacement officials. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even matter if they get the calls right, everyone still just wants to complain instead of giving these guys a break.

THURSDAY, SEPT 27 NFL (7:20-11p.m. NFL Network): The Cleveland Browns at 0-3 are looking for their first win of the season against the Baltimore Ravens. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (8-11p.m. ESPN) Stanford looks to stay undefeated on the road against the Washington Huskies.

Tough Weekend for Miss. Teams by Bryan Flynn

I

t was a tough weekend overall for Mississippi college football teams. Ten teams that were featured in the JFP College Football preview played Saturday, and only four won their games. Mississippi College and Millsaps had the week off and will be back in action next week. COURTESY MSU

the best in sports over the next seven days

FRIDAY, SEPT 28 College football (7-10p.m. ESPN): Due to time zone issues, it is hard to see the Hawaii Warriors play football, but they come to the mainland to face the BYU Cougars.

SATURDAY, SEPT 29 College football (7-10p.m. CBS Sports Network): Southern Miss looks to avoid a 0-4 start at home against a ranked Louisville Cardinals team. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (8 -11 p.m. ESPN) Ole Miss faces the number one ranked team in the country, Alabama Crimson Tide, on the road.

SUNDAY, SEPT 30 NFL (3-6p.m. Fox): After a 0-3 start the New Orleans Saints now must play the Green Bay Packers on the frozen tundra of Lambeau Field in need a victory.

MONDAY, OCT. 1 NFL (7:30-11p.m. ESPN): Two preseason picks to make the playoffs face off in Monday Night Football as the Chicago Bears take on the Dallas Cowboys in Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World.

TUESDAY, OCT. 2 Documentary (7-8:30p.m. ESPN): The award-winning ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x153;30 for 30â&#x20AC;? series returns with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broke,â&#x20AC;? directed by Billy Corben.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3

September 26 - October 2, 2012

MLB (6-9p.m. ESPN): Teams to be announced. Both the Southern Miss Golden Eagles (Louisville) and the New Orleans Saints (Green Bay) face tough tests this week. It still would be a nice time to see both teams get their first win of the year.

40

A

Of all the college football teams in the state, Mississippi State has the best record so far this season.

Mississippi State so far is having the best season of any of team in this state. The Bulldogs moved to 4-0 on the year with a 30-10 victory over South Alabama this Saturday. MSU hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looked great on offense since their big win over Auburn, but the Bulldogs defense has been stout all season long. The meat of the MSU schedule hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even started, and this team will have a chance to be undefeated before heading to Alabama on October 27. Mississippi State is off this week and returns in October to face Kentucky in SEC play. Ole Miss is 3-1 after spanking a bad Tulane team 39-0 on the road. The Rebels bested the weaker teams (Central Arkansas, UTEP and Tulane) on their schedule to start the season, but Texas took them behind the woodshed. Now the Rebels enter the meat of their schedule.The next six games against Alabama, Texas A&M, Auburn, Arkansas, Georgia and Vanderbilt will determine if Ole Miss can reach six wins for a possible bowl berth. Auburn, Arkansas and Vanderbilt havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been great this season. The Rebels are close in tal-

JFP Top 25: Week 4

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ent with all three teams and wins over all three wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a huge surprise. Belhaven set a school record in single game scoring by scoring 70 points against Campbellsville University (Ky.). The Blazers won the game 70-28 at home for their first win of the 2012 season and to move to 1-3 on the season. Belhaven also set records for most touchdowns (10) and extra points (10) in a game. Holmes Community College won its second game in a row. The Bulldogs downed Itawamba Community College 14-12 to up their record to 2-2 on the season. Southern Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; terrible start to the season continued this past Saturday. Western Kentucky defeated the Golden Eagles 42-17 in a game that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as close as the final score would indicate. The Golden Eagles are struggling on both offense and defense this season, and they are 0-3 to start the season for the first time since 1976. Their consecutive winning season streak could end this year if things donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn around quickly. Jackson State faced a Southern University team that lost to Mississippi Valley State 6-0 the week before. JSU did nothing for three quarters as Southern built a 28-0 lead to head into the fourth quarter. The Tigers mounted a furious comeback, scoring 21 points in the fourth quarter but falling short as Southern escaped with a 28-21 victory. JSU falls to 1-3 on the season and 1-1 in SWAC play. Alcorn State faced FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) team Arkansas State last Saturday. The Braves were overmatched talentwise on the field and it showed. Arkansas State was up 42-0 at halftime and cruised to a 56-0 victory over ASU. Alcorn State falls to 1-3 this season. Mississippi Valley State hit the road Saturday to face Northwestern State. The Delta Devils couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t build off of their win over Southern, falling 45-14 in a game Northwestern State led 28-7 at halftime. MVSU is now 1-3 on the season but 11 in SWAC play. Northwestern State didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count in the SWAC standings. In fact, all three Mississippi SWAC teams are 1-1 in conference play. Alabama A&M is 3-0 in the SWAC East and is likely

         

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to be the team that JSU, ASU and MVSU will chase. Delta State dropped its Gulf South Conference opener in a 20-12 loss to North Alabama. The Statesmen are 1-2 on the season and 0-1 in GSC play. Hinds Community College dropped their second game in a row after losing to rival Copiah-Lincoln Junior College 21-6. The Eagles are 2-2 on the season.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant 3AINTS´7OES

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HITCHED p 43 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 44 FLY HOME p 46

Four Season Growing: A Garden Cornucopia by Jim PathFinder Ewing

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

N

ow that fall is officially here, a lot of gardeners think their work is done. Well, not quite. That is, not if you expect bountiful harvests

next year. The reason? Soil fertility. The big agribusinesses talk a lot about â&#x20AC;&#x153;inputsâ&#x20AC;? when producing crops because there are a lot of â&#x20AC;&#x153;outputs.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;outputs,â&#x20AC;? simply put, are the fresh fruit and vegetables (and weeds) that your garden produces. When you pull these plants out of the garden, you are removing nutrients in the soil contained in the plant. If enough of these â&#x20AC;&#x153;outputsâ&#x20AC;? occur, without any new â&#x20AC;&#x153;inputsâ&#x20AC;? of new nutrients, the soil becomes exhausted. That means, unless you work to keep your soil fertile, you may only have stunted plants, puny produce and lots of disease and insects.

Big industrial farms dump synthetic fertilizers as â&#x20AC;&#x153;inputsâ&#x20AC;? to boost production, but without soil-building practices, future yields suffer, and farmers have to use more chemicals on the soil to fight diseases and insects, while the nutrient value of the crops declines. Organic growing, however, is holistic: The soil is as important as the crop, so we want to ensure that our soil is healthy, so that our produce is healthy, what we eat is healthy, and we are healthy. The easiest way is to simply keep a compost pile and add compost periodically to the garden. That way, you are at least putting back into the garden what you take out. Another easy way is to use â&#x20AC;&#x153;green manure.â&#x20AC;? That is, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t throw away the weeds you pick out of the garden; instead, compost

Cover crops are important for returning fertility to soil in between seasons.

and return them. You can also plow under any plants that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t harvest. Now is the best time for this method: Plant a cover crop that will actually add fertility to the soil over the winter. Clover is a great winter cover crop, adding nitrogen at the rate of 60 pounds or more per acre. Another suggestion: Why not use a cover crop you can eat? Fava beans (which actually are a type of vetch) are filled with essential nutrients, especially phosphorus, potassium, vitamin

K, vitamin A and iron. They are low in sodium and high in fiber and, for women, contain phyto-estrogens that herbalists say ease menopause. Fava beans are routinely listed as among the top 10 anti-cancer foods, as they contain herein, which research has shown to block carcinogens in the digestive tract. The best news for your garden is that they can produce a whopping 200 to 300 pounds per acre of nitrogen. They can withstand temperatures down to 10 degrees, so they make a great cover crop in Mississippi. Cover crops are often called the keystone of organic agriculture because they do so much while the farmer does so little. They crowd out weeds, provide habitat for beneficial insects, return fertility to the soil by fixing nitrogen from the air into the soil and they help the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s climate change by sequestering carbon. Not only that, but when they finally succumb to winter or live out their cycle and are turned under as â&#x20AC;&#x153;green manure,â&#x20AC;? they improve the texture of the soil by adding organic matter as well as fertility. 41 Quite a lot for a little work, huh?

jacksonfreepress.com

Re-Energize Your Soil

COURTESY CHELSEA GREEN

ever, modern urban farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as well as also called high tunnels, work by using homesteaders, suburbanites and rural layers of plastic to trap warmer daytime folks wanting easy access to homegrown air inside and minimize heat loss from foodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;can nearly match that producthe system at night. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to tion by using cold frames. be big or towering affairs. You can bend Simply stated, a cold frame is a plastic pipes over metal rebar spikes box similar to a 4-foot by 8-foot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pounded into the ground and cover plotâ&#x20AC;? but has a removable, clear glass or them with plastic. plastic top. Consider it a mini-greenHoop houses can range from small house. Just make sure to vent the top tunnelsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;perhaps 3 feet tall and any during the day. At night, keep the cold length you preferâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to large edifices that frames closed, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll retain heat. you can make portable with wheels. You )RUZLQWHUJURZLQJLQIR Cold frames can be simple DIY can even pull them with a tractor to roUHDGÂł)RXU6HDVRQ +DUYHVW2UJDQLF projects, such as planting between a few tate crops. 9HJHWDEOHV square bales of hay and recycling old winFor more information on hoop )URP<RXU+RPH*DUGHQ dows or shower doors as the removable houses, visit msucares.com/crops/ $OO<HDU/RQJ´E\ tops. You can also purchase pre-made hightunnels/index.html. (OLRW&ROHPDQ &KHOVHD kits from local garden stores or online. Growers in Mississippi who use *UHHQ  You can build a cold frame anyhigh tunnels will be meeting to share tips where; just make sure it has southern at the Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable sun exposure. Even a small frame can Growers Association and the Mississippi produce a lot of leafy vegetables if you correctly prune them: Agritourism Association conference in Jackson Nov. 28-29 at Pick old leaves first, in effect pruning the plant so that its the Hilton Hotel on County Line Road. For more info, visit energy goes into new leaves. msfruitandveg.com or email info@msfruitandveg.com. You If you have more space, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another option using the can also contact Candi Adams at 662-534-1916 or cadams@ same principle that can contain more crops. Hoop houses, ext.msstate.edu.

FLICKR

N

ow that you are either tending or contemplating a fall garden for freshly grown, organic crops, you might consider four-season farming for year-round food. If the weather cooperates, it can be fairly easyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and can be done even in the urban setting of a small yard or next to a patio. Today, because of industrial agriculture, we think that farming is all done out in rural areas and large tracts of land, but that actually is counter to historical fact. In Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cities across the land prior to the mechanization of farming following World War II, small plots of land were located throughout population centersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;complete with chickens and livestock! This was common in most urban areas globally. For example, Paris at one time devoted 6 percent of land to food production and produced 100 percent of its fresh vegetables. One of the more popular methods of growing during winter was to heap horse manure and then build an enclosed structure on top of it for growing. Called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot house,â&#x20AC;? the removable top kept vegetables protected from the elements while the decaying manure provided heat from below. Today, horse manure in cities is no longer an abundant, cheap source of soil fertility. Moreover, for health reasons regarding soil and plant contamination, I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend trying to recreate such methods using uncomposted manure as a heat source without thorough study of safe designs. How-


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42

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LIFE&STYLE | hitched

by Katie McClendon

JOSH HAILEY

JOSH HAILEY

I

f youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking to have a fun wedding, I suggest having a table of French fries and sweet-potato fries available for snacking during the ceremony. Other options for an enjoyable time: have the Southern Komfort Brass Band play Hava Nagila; serve specialty cocktails before, during and after the ceremony; or incorporate a singer-songwriter, two bands and a rocking playlist for a night of dancing. And if you manage a wedding with all the above? Well, you might just throw the perfect party. Of course, I would expect nothing less from the wedding of Chris Myers and Rachel Jarman. The Jackson Free Press featured Chris as a Man We Love in 2009 and Rachel as a Woman We Love in 2011. And we do. We love them for the many ways they contribute to making Fondren and Jackson a place we love to call home. Rachel works for the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, Chris for Cooke Douglass Farr Lemons Architects and Engineers. Chris led a group working to keep the Fondren Strip alive, was a co-director of the Crossroads Film Festival and is known around town for hosting amazing barbecues with former roommate Arthur Jones. Rachel was a vocalist for the Bachelorettes, an organizer for Figment and host of the first Hanukkah party I ever attended. When the readers of JFP voted the two â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cutest Coupleâ&#x20AC;? in the City Superlatives in 2011, no one was surprised. Chris and Rachel were engaged the night before to the 2011 Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parade, and Roy Adkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; photograph of the two the morning of the parade remains one of the cutest pictures Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen. Their wedding was one of the few where the bride and groom were equal in the planning and implementation. It incorporated their love for Rachelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jewish culture, good food, Jackson and her arts. Chris designed and built a chuppah (a traditional Jewish wedding canopy) under which the couple would make their vows, using limbs found near the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fondren home. The couple planned to hold the ceremony in their back yard, but the Tuesday before the wedding, friend and WJTV meteorologist Morgan Ashley warned them of the high chance of rain on the wedding day. Instead, the couple married in the planned recepThe Southern Komfort tion site, Duling Hall. Nagilaâ&#x20AC;? at the reception. While changing the wedding venue the week of the wedding would cause most couples anxiety, Chris and Rachel rolled with the punches. The change of venue worked beautifully and allowed for easy transitions between pre-ceremony social time, the ceremony and the reception. Janine Julia Jankovitz, a friend from Rachelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s days as an intern with the Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, performed the mostly traditional Jewish ceremony on the stage of the Duling Hall. Due to the spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s layout, I had a great view for the ceremony even in the back of the room (and I had those fries at armâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reach). When asked by the bride to officiate the wedding, Janine responded by asking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I just be a bridesmaid?â&#x20AC;? But the couple had chosen to have a wedding party of two, so

Chris Myers and Rachel Jarman wed in a ceremony filled with community blessings and personal touches.

Janine agreed to go through the American Marriage Ministries to become a legal officiant. She worked with the couple to adjust the traditional Jewish ceremony to their sensibilities. The ceremony started with a procession of the bride with her parents, a welcome blessing under the chuppah, and then Kiddush, which is a blessing of the wine. The couple drank wine from a Kiddush cup given to the couple from the groomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents. The couple asked the guests to contribute by taking vows of a sort, to support Rachel and Chris in their marriage. Seven of the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends and family members read the blessings of love, wisdom, health, art and beauty, community, friendship and celebration to the couple. A traditional Jewish celebration would not be complete without the breaking of the glass (and I got to yell â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mazel Tov!â&#x20AC;?) Brass Band played â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hava I have a few regrets in life, but one is that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t partake of the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donuthole â&#x20AC;&#x153;wedding cake.â&#x20AC;? I was busy eating those French fries and drinking Prosecco (Note: Weddings should always be celebrated with bubbly) from the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drink menu of old fashioneds, Prosecco and fondropolitan (the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s take on a cosmopolitan). Luckily, Fondren Cellars was across the street, so after the first 20 bottles of bourbon were gone, more could be purchased. If food and drink werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entertainment enough, Southern Komfort Brass Band and Julia & the Strange Pilgrims performed. Following the live music there was much dancing (line and group, including a Zumba dance to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jai Ho,â&#x20AC;? from the movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slumdog Millionaireâ&#x20AC;?). And did I mention there were French fries?

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jacksonfreepress.com

A Couple We Love

Katie McClendon is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy. She is an insane South Carolina Gamecock fan. Her friends probably describe her as a crazy cat lady with a bacon fixation.

43


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

Luxury Lashes

I

September 26 - October 2, 2012

TRIP BURNS

f you read this column regularly, you natural lashes. Though time-consuming, know of my affinity for reality shows. the end result appears totally natural, and So it’s really no surprise that after ex- it lengthens and thickens lashes. It looks tensive “Real Housewives” franchise like you have on mascara when you don’t. and Kardashian marathon-watching In fact, it’s recommended that you not use while on the elliptical machine, some of mascara while wearing the extensions.) their beauty predilections eke their way The lashes come pre-curled, too, so you into my consciousness. No, I’m not talking about getting collagen injections or Botox (yet). Rather, I have come to absolutely covet their eyelashes. They have fabulous luxurious (fake, I assume) lashes all the time. I also vividly recall an episode of “The Rachel Zoe Project” in which she styled Jennifer Garner for an awards show, and Garner quoted Team Zoe discussing her makeup look. “Lots of lashes,” she said, with an expressive hand gesture. And so, with increasing frequency, I hear “Lots of lashes. Lots of lashes” on repeat in my head. If the eyes are, in fact, the window to With a bit of an investment, Judith Morris can take your eyelashes from limp to luscious. the soul, it only makes sense that the window should have a good curtain, no? I began to do research. I quizzed a can put away your eyelash curler—which, friend about her experience, with Latisse, let’s face it, looks like an instrument of tora prescription eyelash enhancer, but that ture anyway. whole chance that it may stain your eyeMaintenance of the extensions is balls scared me too much. Also, I love fake pretty simple: It merely requires brushing lashes, but lack the hand-eye coordination them out twice a day and using a special to artfully apply them myself. eye makeup remover (or baby oil). BeWhat was I to do? cause eyelashes grow in a cycle, the natuEnter Judith Morris of William Wal- ral lashes to which the falsies are attached lace Salon (2939 Old Canton Road, 601- shed as they grow. NovaLash recommends 982-8300). When I learned that Morris maintenance about every four weeks to rerecently received training in Novalash place those that fall out. The maintenance eyelash-extension application, I wasted no sessions only take half an hour and cost time contacting her. OK, truth be told, I significantly less than the initial set. If you wasted no time in Googling eyelash ex- don’t want to maintain them, you can just tensions to read any cautionary horror let the extensions grow out and go back to tales, but left reassured by my research, I your natural lashes. was ready to run, not walk, to get some. Now for the verdict: I love these lashNovaLash touts itself as the “healthiest” of es. My Latisse-using friend was amazed by lash extensions in terms of its adhesive and them, too. Just waking up and looking like methods, so there was that, too. you have mascara on is kind of amazing. After arriving at the salon and sign- And unlike glue-on drugstore lash strips ing consent forms, Morris put on music, or clusters, I don’t feel like there’s someand I lay down on a massage table for the thing on my eyelid that doesn’t belong duration. The process takes a while, and there; they feel like a part of me. because your eyes have to remain closed Judith starts taking appointments for the whole time, I actually dozed off for a eyelash extensions in October. A full set bit at one point. It takes approximately costs $225, and refills (maintenance) start an hour and a half to apply the full set of at $50. If you want to add some glamour lashes; Each individual (synthetic) lash to your life, it’s definitely an investment is bonded with adhesive to one of your that’s worth it.

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45


A Stylish Space by Kathleen M. Mitchell

A room

without books

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â&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a nerd, so when we moved back to Jackson, our books received the utmost careâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they were meticulously packed, sealed and transported. The only problem was our new house has no built-in storage, so our books had to stay boxed up while visions of a beautiful bookcase danced through my head at night. Finally, we acquired a bookcase that fit our needs perfectly, and we could get our old friends out of storage and onto a shelf.

It was important to me that the bookcase be interesting and attractive as well as useful. A lot of interior decorators prefer to have very open, sparse shelves, but we have a ton of books, so that aesthetic doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work for us on a functional level. However, we also didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want just a dense block of books. We managed to get about half of our total collection on the shelves, along with some favorite home items and knickknacks. There are tons of great ways to style bookcases, but here are some tips on what worked for me.

is like a body without a soul.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Marcus Tullius Cicero

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v11n03 - Fall Food Issue: Kitchen Class