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September 19 - 25, 2012


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN MARQUIS ‘KEKE’ LOWE

M

CHARLES A SMITH

arquis Lowe didn’t used to be very good at sharing. It wasn’t that he was selfish person. It’s just that growing up under the care of his grandparents in West Jackson’s Shady Oaks neighborhood, his family couldn’t afford to replace his toys if they got broken. “Sharing was something that I wasn’t used to. I wasn’t used to letting people play with the things I had, and I wasn’t used to playing with other peoples’ toys,” he said. That all changed when he entered sixth grade and became involved with the Algebra Project, a program that Mississippi Freedom Summer leader Bob Moses founded that evolved into the Young People’s Project. Moses exhibited such care and openness with the youth in the program that Lowe started to alter his attitudes about giving to other people, particularly in his community. “Without his support, I would be strictly focusing on self because that’s how you survive. That’s how I was brought up,” he said. “Now, I don’t mind helping anybody.” In that sense, Lowe believes he remains on the trajectory he was on 10 years ago when he was the Jackson Free Press’ first Jacksonian. At the time, in addition to working with the Algebra Project, Lowe was a 19-year-old computer science major at Tougaloo College who also played point guard for the Bulldogs. A decade ago, in September 2002, Lowe wore the uniform of a college student: over-

From 2002

CONTENTS

sized red Ecko T-shirt, red-and-white Nikes, and a long chain adorning his neck. Today as the program director for the YPP, Lowe oversees after-school programs for 60 to 75 elementary school-aged kids. On a recent visit to the YPP offices, located in the Jackson Medical Mall, Lowe sported an untucked blue-and-white striped Oxford with the sleeves rolled up. Brown loafers replaced the white kicks, and two small gold diamondshaped earrings were his only jewelry. Besides switching his major from computer science to business—he graduated from Tougaloo in 2005—and starting a mobile detailing business that he does on weekends, Lowe doesn’t think he’s changed much in the past decade, and nor has Jackson. Like many people, he believes the city should have more recreational outlets to keep kids from getting in trouble. And although YPP has good relationships with several other not-for-profit organizations and schools, he expresses frustration that nonprofits and government agencies don’t collaborate more. Nevertheless, Lowe remains undeterred for one reason: his 6-year-old son, Jalen, whom he wants to grow up with opportunities Lowe never had and in a different kind of Jackson than the one where he came of age. “That’s pretty much my fight now. That’s why I’m so passionate about what I do,” Lowe said. —R.L. Nave

Flag and cover design by Stephen Barnette More covers: jfp.ms/covers

11 Supreme Seat Earle S. Banks Jr. dishes about the significance of fairness in his endeavor to become Mississippi Supreme Court chief justice.

16 We’re 10! The Jackson Free Press celebrates a decade of stirring things up by looking back at how far our fair city has come—and how far we still have to go—in the worlds of development, business, arts, music, fitness, food, local love and more.

35 A Poet’s ‘Thrall’ National Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey visits Jackson State University to speak and read from her latest book, “Thrall.”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ........................PUBLISHER’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 9 ............................................ TALKS 10 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 16 .......................... JFP BIRTHDAY 35 .............................. DIVERSIONS 36 ....................................... 8 DAYS 37 ............................... JFP EVENTS 39 .......................................... FILM 40 ....................................... MUSIC 41 ......................... MUSIC LISTING 43 ..................................... SPORTS 44 ......................................... FOOD 49 .............................. ASTROLOGY 49 .................................... PUZZLES 50 ........................... FLY SHOPPING

MATT VALENTINE ; LOGO BY ARISS KING; TRIP BURNS

SEPTEMBER 19 - 25, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 2

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PUBLISHER’S note

by Todd Stauffer, Publisher

Celebrating 10 Years

N

ot everything about the JFP’s first 10 years has been easy. The Jackson Free Press launched in the fall of 2002, as I like to say, backed by some of the “largest banks” in the world—Chase, Citibank … Discover—and has spent the last decade scraping and scrapping and pulling things together to get a paper out every week and a website up every day. We’ve gotten better at it—and more used to it—but it continues to be a battle and a blessing all at once. From the outset, we’ve had wonderful people who’ve believed in us and made us better. While we always felt like we had the experience to put out a newspaper, it’s been a learning curve when it came to building a sustainable business. We’ve learned a lot. Donna likes to tell the staff the stories of my trepidation back when we were first getting started. Within three to four issues of our launch, we had an Anthony DiFatta painting of Trent Lott on our cover, criticizing and contextualizing the then-junior senator from Mississippi—and recent majority leader—for his comments praising Strom Thurmond’s Dixiecrat run for the presidency. I had paced and pounded the floor a few nights before press, talked to Tony on the phone and negotiated changes to his original painting of Lott. I ultimately won concessions on Lott’s tie—Tony changed it from a Confederate battle flag to the Mississippi state flag, with the stars and bars in the knot—and on the letters “KKK” in the background, which Tony changed to “CCC” to better fit the story. He also changed them so that I could get at least some sleep that weekend knowing that within six months of sinking everything I had into a newspaper in Mississippi—where I had lived all of a year and spare change—we had not put “KKK” on the cover. (Yet.)

We didn’t shy away from criticizing Lott—fairly. It was around that time that I either coined or cribbed the phrase “Do the right thing … and wait.” That phrase would be tested just a few weeks later in March 2003, when we pulled an interview with the police chief from the cover in or-

Do the right thing ... and wait. der to run a story to coincide with President Bush’s announcement of our invasion of Iraq. The story was a package of the reasons why the war was a bad idea, including specific context regarding the lack of evidence of WMDs in that country. Again, I paced. We lost three distribution spots that week (including one that was apologetic, but concerned it would upset his customers). But by the next issue, we weren’t just still in business, but had sold more ads than ever up to that point. A few months after that, in June 2003, I was thrilled and touched when we learned over the phone—because we couldn’t afford to attend the conference—that we’d been accepted on our first attempt as a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies (now “Newsmedia”), the first member from the state of Mississippi. We’d been vouched for by the folks in Memphis and lobbied for by Donna’s former publisher in Colorado Springs. Our small, bi-weekly newspaper was given the nod, and we busted out the bubbly. Since that time, the Jackson Free Press has been one of the most awarded

weekly newspapers in the country, winning 26 writing and design awards in nine years of eligibility. (See page 28.) More recently, Donna and the team has been piling them on from the southeastern region of the Society of Professional Journalists as well. Unfortunately, the Mississippi Press Association won’t let us in as full members because we don’t require people to pay for copies of the paper.) Some of the most compelling awards have been for team coverage in the Public Service and Investigative categories, where the news staff has won awards for their body of work on Frank Melton, James Ford Seale, Two Lakes, Jackson Public Schools, domestic violence and the personhood campaign. As we close out our 10th year, a few really exciting things are happening. We launched our new website—we call it JFP 3.0—this summer, nearly doubling our online traffic, including roughly one-third of our pageviews now coming through our revamped mobile site. (More updates on that one soon.) We’re working on some other Web projects to roll out this fall including the bestofjackson.com overhaul and—well, you’ll see. Donna likes to say that we’ve now got the best team of staffers that we’ve ever had—we’ve had tons of wonderful, talented folks over the years (as you’ll see in this issue, many of them recount their favorite JFP moments), but 2012 has found us with a team that has a special spirit and focus to reach for the “Why” statement we developed at a retreat earlier this year—to “connect our community through truth and the pursuit of excellence.” That’s the goal, and it starts anew this week with the first full-fledged redesign of the paper in our history by our tireless art director, Kristin Breneman, with help from her team and co-owner Stephen Barnette. I’ve joked all along that we’re a “low-

profit” business. Still, we’ve grown revenues every year for the past 10, including during recessions and a massive disruption in the world of print news. We hope to continue to grow by focusing on two fundamentals: (a) building a strong newsroom to serve our readers and (b) creating programs to effectively promote local businesses. We serve the citizens of Jackson and its neighboring cities by uncovering the facts and offering the context that they don’t have time to seek out themselves, and then presenting it in a format that’s entertaining and enlightening. Whether it’s on paper or computer screens or smartphones, we plan to be there. With our staff of 19 full- and parttimers—and a team of fabulous freelancers—we’re pleased to be job creators in the Jackson economy. We’re now 52 weeks per year in print distributed in over 600 locations, plus four quarterly editions of BOOM Jackson magazine, five-days-aweek of JFPDaily.com and a 24/7 Web site. And we’re thrilled to do our best to offer timely, relevant information to help you plan your evenings and weekends, and learn more about what’s going on in your community. We have a thriving small business and local media outlet. Did we “build it ourselves”? No. We’ve put in a lot of sweat and tears, but we’ve had tons of help from supporters, cheerleaders, advertisers and, most of all, our readers, who make the whole thing possible. Together, we’ve all made a difference in Jackson and Mississippi in the past decade. I think that over the next 10 years, there’s even more excellence, connection and community to which we can all aspire. Thank you all for our first decade! Email Publisher Todd Stauffer at todd@ jacksonfreepress.com.

September 19 - 25, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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Donna Ladd

Latasha Willis

R.L. Nave

Jacob Fuller

Kathleen M. Mitchell

Kristin Brenemen

Briana Robinson

Trip Burns

JFP editor and co-founder Donna Ladd is a Neshoba County native. After being in exile from Mississippi for 18 years, she came on back where she damn-well belongs. She planned the cover package.

Events editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a freelance designer, and the mother of one cat. She shamelessly promotes her design skills at latashawillis.com. She managed events for this issue.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. He contributed to the cover package.

Reporter Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He contributed to the cover package.

Features editor Kathleen enjoys birthdays. She shares hers with Leonardo da Vinci, Catherine I of Russia and Emma Watson. She contributed food and arts stories to the cover package and edited for the issue.

Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dystopianism. Her Victini and Rarity costumes for the summer are coming along nicely. She designed the cover and most of this issue.

Deputy editor Briana Robinson’s hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a junior at Millsaps College. She contributed a music story to the cover package and edited for the issue.

Staff photographer Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He took many of the photos in this issue. He also probably fixed something in the office last week.


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jacksonfreepress.com


S KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

tarting with this 10th birthday issue, the Jackson Free Press is devoting a page to YOU each issue. We’ll collect the best of your emails, letters, tweets and Facebook comments to the JFP. Send letters and short rants to: letters@jacksonfreepress.com (up to 100 words!). Include daytime phone and head shot, please. And send us a photo of you and your JFP someplace interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

[YOU & JFP] .!-%/L]/DQFDVWHU

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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE JFP MOMENT? For the inaugural YOU page, we posed this question to members of the JFP Nation on social media. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what you told us: Melissa Kelly: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The real faces of the Affordable Care Act (by Adam Lynch). Of course, my girl was one of them, but I thought it was excellent and needed.â&#x20AC;? Emily Braden Knight: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The chick in the crown!â&#x20AC;? (She is referring to the chick then-intern Natalie Irby borrowed from a feed store to â&#x20AC;&#x153;modelâ&#x20AC;? for the 2004 Chick Issue cover. Photographer James Patterson photographed it at his gallery, and designer Jimbo Harwell Photoshopped a crown onto its little headâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;see this issueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover.)

September 19 - 25, 2012

Lynne Lott Schneider: Casey Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; award-winning 2005 feature about Pro-Life Mississippi, including clinic protester, Roy McMillan, and his wife and doctor, Beverly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was the first story I remember that jumped out and said someone is a darn good reporter and writer! Very in-depth and very fair to the subjects.â&#x20AC;? And: â&#x20AC;&#x153;On a community outreach note, the work

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you and other JFP staff did with Murrahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hoofbeat newspaper before I was an employee there.â&#x20AC;? Tom Head: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adam Lynchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last big featureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on Phil Bryantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which completely changed my assessment of the governor-elect. I seem to remember a feature about Amy Tuck, some years before that, that also blew my mind. The domestic-violence pieces Donna Ladd and Ronni Mott, wrote which covered ground nobody else had covered before in Mississippi. And the (Frank) Melton coverageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that goes without saying. The Dee/ Moore slayings. I could go on.â&#x20AC;? Sheila A. Bedi: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tyler Edmonds story (about kids tried as adults). The pieces you did in the early days of the training-school abuse scandal.â&#x20AC;? Jayne Jackson: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite is always the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Best of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;!â&#x20AC;? See jfp.ms/jfpmoments to add your own and for links to stories mentioned above.

The JFP Sucks File: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Might I Be So Bold?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

H

istorically, the JFP has gotten very little hate mail aside from anonymous missives on local blogs personally attacking our female editors. Our favorites are by a blogger of many names who was kicked off the site for threatening our former visiting reporter Matt SaldaĂąa under an immigration story. He called editor Donna Ladd a â&#x20AC;&#x153;journalistic slutâ&#x20AC;? for interviewing former Sheriff Malcolm McMillin and asked in a headline if Ronni Mott is â&#x20AC;&#x153;a liar, hack or just plain stupidâ&#x20AC;? because she blogged about the Obama administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s then new recovery.org site. In the last two weeks, new Features Editor Kathleen Mitchell got a long, nasty letter slamming her for her first serious editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note. In it, someone claiming to be a psychotherapist never mentioned what she actually disagreed with, but recommended: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got an awful lot of growing up to do. Might I be so bold as to suggest that you consider undertaking psychotherapy as an avenue from which to launch your investigation of your own self-hatred, which you so transparently project onto those with whom you disagree?â&#x20AC;? The writer than said Kathleenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neck is unfortunate and that she needs to get a new hairdresser. Then, just before this issue went to press, Editor Donna Ladd got an unsigned handwritten note furious that she had criticized Mitt Romney in her editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note last week (â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Inconvenient Jokeâ&#x20AC;?), apparently not grokking that columns are, well, opinion. S/he wrote in part: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never read a newspaper that was so biasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an openly bias oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the first line starting out making snide remarksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;making fun of Romney (sic). â&#x20AC;Ś An intelligent editor should know better.â&#x20AC;? And s/he ended: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would sign my name but you would print this and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a no-no. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trust you.â&#x20AC;? PDFs of both these letters are at jfp.ms/feedback.

READER QUOTES Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; THE WEEK ´7DON DERXW D IULYRORXV ODZVXLW7KH\¡YH DOPRVW JRWPHVXSSRUWLQJWRUWUHIRUP$OPRVWÂľ ² EUMRKQ MISPV LQ UHVSRQVH WR DQ $VVRFLDWHG 3UHVVWRU\WKDWDMXGJHKDGNQRFNHGGRZQ*RY3KLO %U\DQWÂśVODZVXLWDJDLQVWWKH$IIRUGDEOH&DUH$FW ´$PDWHXUVDUHGDQJHURXV,ZDQW0U5RPQH\WRNHHSYHU\IDU DZD\ IURP 86 IRUHLJQ SROLF\ +H LV QRW UHDG\ IRU SULPHWLPH H[FHSWSHUKDSVIRU61/ Âľ ²'*DUULQUHVSRQVHWR5RPQH\ÂśVPXFKEDOO\KRRHGVWDWHPHQWLQ UHVSRQVHWRWKHHPEDVV\DWWDFNV


When We Say Local, We Mean

Greg and Kathy McDade

Now In Yazoo City MAYWOOD MART • 1220 E. NORTHSIDE DRIVE • 601-366-8468

ENGLISH VILLAGE • 904 E. FORTIFICATION STREET • 601-355-9668

WOODLAND HILLS SHOPPING CENTER • FONDREN • 601-366-5273

WESTLAND PLAZA • 2526 ROBINSON ROAD • 601-353-0089

jacksonfreepress.com

Through hard work, smart growth and a strong dedication to their customers, the McDades have expanded in less than a decade from their original McDade’s Market location to four fullservice grocery stores (and one beautiful wine showroom) in Hinds County, serving thousands daily and providing over 350 jobs in the area. The McDades are committed to the neighborhoods their stores serve, offering high quality customer service and low prices every day.

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Music by:

DJ George Chuck • Jesse Robinson • The Chad Wesley Band

Tickets: $75.00

Available online at www.jacksonzoo.org/events Beverages sponsored by Capitol City Beverage ~ Cathead Vodka Kat’s Wine & Spirits ~ Traditions Fine Wines & Spirits

September 19 - 25, 2012

Food provided by Amerigo ~ Anjou ~Babalus Tacos & Tapas ~ Beagle Bagel Biaggis ~ Bravo ~ Broad Street ~ Char ~ Flap’s Hot Tamales ~ Jaco’s Tacos ~ Julep King Edward Grill ~ Sal & Mookies ~ Sombra

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Cigar Bar sponsored by Hop’s & Habana’s Cigar Bar sponsored by Hop’s & Habana’s   


news, culture & irreverence

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City Denies JPS Budget Increase by Jacob D. Fuller

JACOB FULLER

T

he Jackson City Council voted Friday to deny Jackson Public Schools the extra $2.7 million it requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The request was in addition to JPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; original budget proposal. Instead, the Council approved the $86 million budget that JPS approved and presented to the public June 26. City attorney Pieter Teeuwissen advised the Council not to approve the additional $2.7 million, because JPS had not given sufficient public notice and publication of the request, in his opinion. Both budgets necessitate property tax increases. The school board and Superintendent Cedrick Gray presented its new $88.8 million budget to the council Aug. 20, at which time Council members requested JPS do all they can to reduce that budget. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. and several Council members expressed frustration that JPS did not send a representative to the meeting Friday to answer their questions. Sherwin Johnson, JPS communications specialist, told the Jackson Free Press that Gray was out of town and unable to attend the meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If this (increase) was important to them, they should have had a representative here,â&#x20AC;? Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said at the meeting. The approved budget includes an increase in property taxes of 2.5 mills. Mills are a way of assessing property taxes. One mill is equal to about $10 in taxes on a house valued at $100,000. The additional money will go toward paying off a pair of bond issues JPS received in 2006 and 2008 worth $150 million. The school district owes $2.3 mil-

Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba pushed through a budget amendment to help needy Jacksonians before the Council approved the budget.

lion on those bonds in the upcoming year. During the Aug. 20 presentation to the City Council, JPS board president Sharolyn Miller said the district needed the increase to hire replacements for some of the 100 teachers who have left, to buy new textbooks and to make school-bus improvements. The approved JPS budget includes an operational budget of $69 million, a decrease from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $72.5 million. Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes proposed an amendment Friday to approve the larger $88 million budget. Cooper-Stokes said the Council should not require JPS to have a representative at the meeting, especially because the Council approved the airport and library budgets Thursday without speaking to representatives from either of those groups.

AS THE DECADE TURNS IN 2002 Charter schools . . . . . . . . . . . . The Olsen Twins . . . . . . . . . . . Supersizing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Netbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snake 2 on your phone . . . . . . Solitaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Osbournes . . . . . . . . . . . .

IN 2012 Parent advocacy Honey Boo Boo Pop-Up restaurants Upcycling Smartphones GTA3 on your phone Angry Birds The Kardashians

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are evidently in dire straits, or I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe they would ask for it,â&#x20AC;? CooperStokes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is not politically expedient to vote for a tax increase in an election year, but I believe our children need it. I believe they deserve it, and I believe the citizens are solidly behind the schools.â&#x20AC;? Gray was not available for comment, but the superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office released a statement shortly after the meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will monitor the funds received throughout the 2012-2013 school year. If the funds are not generated at the requested $88,897,985.28 level by the District, we will pursue all legal remedies that are available to ensure that the ad valorem taxes levied yield the funds we need to operate the District as required by State law,â&#x20AC;? the statement said.

JFP staffers compiled changes weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen and experienced over the past decade.

IN 2002 Pens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Three kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Organic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Junior High School . . . . . . . . . 12-years-old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bacon is the best food ever. . . . Home Depot, south Jackson . .

IN 2012 Markers Six kids Locally grown Married with kid An adult! Bacon is the best food ever Northern Tool & Equipment, Interstate 55

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Wednesday, Sept. 12 Elton John performs at the Mississippi Coliseum. ... Phil Schiller, Apple senior vice president of worldwide product marketing, announces the new IPhone 5 in San Francisco. Thursday, Sept. 13 Jackson City Council votes against the proposed city budget 3-4. Council PresidentTony Yarber recesses the meeting until Friday. ... Federal Reserve Chief Ben Bernanke announces the Fed will spend $40 billion a month on mortgage-backed securities to stimulate the economy. Friday, Sept. 14 Jackson City Council votes to deny Jackson Public Schools the extra $2.7 million it requested and approved the original $86 million budget. ... County Circuit Judge Juan Colas strikes down the controversial Wisconsin law limiting collective bargaining. Saturday, Sept. 15 The Ole Miss Rebels lose to the Texas Longhorns 66-31, and Mississippi State defeats Troy 30-24 to go to 3-0 on the year. ... Thousands of protestors in China march outside the Japanese Embassy after Japan bought disputed islands, known as Diaoyu in China and Senkaku in Japan, from a private Japanese owner. Sunday, Sept. 16 The New Orleans Saints lose their second game of the season against the Carolina Panthers giving them at 0-2 record. ... An Afghan police officer kills four U.S. service members, and a NATO air strike kills eight women in separate attacks in Afghanistan. Monday, Sept. 17 The City of Jackson announces it will hire an outside auditor to determine exactly how developer Retro Metro spent $50,000 for new wiring at Metrocenter. ... Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mayor Emanuel files a lawsuit in Circuit Court asking the court to order striking teachers back to school. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Two Terry High School students are hospitalized after their school bus collides with a car. ... The French court ordered the French magazine Closer to hand over all the digital files of photos of a topless Kate Middleton and refrain from republishing any of them. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

TALK|JXN

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TALK | BUDGET %8'*(7IURPSDJH

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This may include pursuing legal action or the issuance of additional debt to cover any resulting shortfall amounts.â&#x20AC;? Teeuwissen said at the meeting that he does not believe the city will be held liable for any school-district budget shortfall.

September 19 - 25, 2012

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Daily Buzz by JFP Staff

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City Approves Amended City Budget On Thursday, after more than an hour of arguments and failing to pass the city budget, Council President Tony Yarber recessed the special meeting until 9:45 a.m. Friday. On Friday, only Barrett-Simon, Ward 5 Councilman Charles Tillman, Yarber and Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba were present. Lumumba quickly used his leverage in a four-member vote to push an amendment he proposed Thursday. The amendment would set aside $75,000 in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget to fund organizations that help citizens on fixed incomes pay their electric and water bills. The Ward 2 councilman said the city has many needy citizens who already struggle to pay their bills. Water and sewer rates will soon go up as a result of a consent decree from the U.S. Environment Protection Agency that will likely cost the city hundreds of millions of dollars in water and sewer repairs over several

years. Lumumba said the city should help citizens in need however it can. The amendment failed by a vote of 3-3 Thursday, with all Council members present and Yarber abstaining from the vote. Ward 4 Councilman Frank Bluntson and Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell, who both voted against the amendment, were not present during the budget vote Friday. Lumumba, who has announced he is running for mayor next year, said he would approve the budget if his amendment was part of it. He then made a motion to add the amendment. The motion passed 3-1, with Barrett-Simon voting against it. With the amendment on the books, the city budget passed by a vote of 4-0. The JPS budget, which is separate from the city budget, became a distraction during city budget talks Thursday. Some council members did not want to approve the city budget with the JPS budget still up in the air. After it became apparent the budget would not pass Thursday, Yarber recessed the meeting until Friday. Mayor Johnson highlighted that the city budget did not include any tax increases or layoffs. It also did not include any raises for city employees. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@ jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


TALK | ELECTION

Family Ties: Earle S. Banks Jr. by R.L. Nave

It’s a lot more driving. Before, I never had to spend a night away from home campaigning, and now I’m spending nights and days away from home campaigning throughout the state. Before, when I was campaigning as a legislator, I might use a tank of gas every couple days.

It wasn’t hesitation. I was approached about running rather late, and it was something that I had to consider and talk to my family about, my business and law partners about. Of course, by the time you talk to your family, you have to pray over it. You have to come with a very deep examination because this is not an office that just anybody can hold. It takes a lot of confidence; it’s going to take a lot of discipline. And it’s just something you have to decide: Do I really want to do this? After doing that and talking to my cousin, Fred Banks, about it, I felt it was something I needed to do.

bated over the last 21 years—whether they’re criminal issues or civil issues, issues dealing with workers comp or unemployment, economic development or eminent domain, I’ve been a part of those issues. What I know I would bring to the court is a sense of fair-

What do you think about Supreme Court justices having to run for their seats?

Mississippi has always liked to elect its officials. When you think about judges being appointed, it puts it into the hands of the governor. Being elected to judge, that means the people get to trust who will decide their legal matters. What do you think you can accomplish on the court that you can’t in the Legislature?

One of the things that I know I would bring to the judicial branch of government is that most of the laws that will be considered by the court will be laws that we have de-

What do you think the court’s role would be in a situation like that? We may be looking at a situation where this governor, who’s refused to expand Medicaid …

I really can’t speak as to how I would vote on certain things that would come before the court, as required by the Code of Judicial Conduct. What are some of the more interesting cases the court has taken up in the last 20 years?

The demographics of this district are favorable to you. Did that figure into your decision?

This is a district that my cousin Fred Banks ran in years ago, and he was able to win it. After talking to him, he told me it would be a good, tight race. We don’t know who’s going to vote or who won’t vote. We’re going out there and talking to all the people, regardless of demographics.

er to get Democratic-type legislation passed, if you can call anything Democratic-type legislation. But we have protected worker rights; we also balanced that with bringing in large businesses.

One of the most recent things was Gov. Haley Barbour’s pardons of almost 200 state inmates. What were your thoughts on the pardons? Rep. Earle S. Banks Jr. counts his two decades of legislative experience as a top qualification to serve on the Mississippi State Supreme Court.

ness, a sense of representing the people of Mississippi. Not special interest groups, but regular, working-class people. It’s not just that it’s become too hard to serve as a Democrat in the Legislature?

I have had the honor and privilege of serving the Democratic Party in the past … and now I’m running as required by law for the Mississippi Supreme Court in a nonpartisan race. … Since the Senate was taken over by the Republicans, and now that the House has been taken over by the Republicans, it’s hard-

I am a legislator, and I know what we have voted on. As a legislator (with respect to the constitutional notification provision), I know what we have voted on. And having the Supreme Court say no, (inmate notification) doesn’t have to happen … that’s what the Supreme Court is supposed to do. What else do you really people to know about you?

Most people don’t understand the significance of fairness on the Supreme Court. The people need someone who will stand there and make sure that court does not bend to big business, to little business, public outcry or whatever it may be, but this justice is going to uphold his oath of office and be fair, and rule on the issues. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

How is this campaign different from running for the Legislature?

You qualified right up against the deadline. What was the hesitation?

TRIP BURNS

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f he weren’t running for a seat on the Mississippi State Supreme Court, Earle S. Banks Jr. would be in a graveyard. Banks’ family, which owns People’s Funeral Home on Farish Street, also operates Autumn Woods Memorial Gardens, a cemetery on West Northside Drive. Banks, a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives since 1991, said he likes to relax by working on the cemetery’s landscaping. “I can take off my black suit, my white shirt and tie, and get out there and run a backhoe and a bulldozer with the best of them,” said Banks, an attorney and one of a handful of funeral directors in the Legislature. Instead, Banks is suited up, crisscrossing central Mississippi in an attempt to unseat Bill Waller Jr., the chief justice on the state’s highest court. Even though Waller is the son of former Gov. Bill Waller and recently secured the endorsement of the Mississippi Republican Party, Banks is undeterred. The court’s District 1 includes 21 counties across central Mississippi, including Hinds County and several that lean Democratic in the Mississippi Delta. Banks believes the fact that his cousin, Fred Banks Jr., won a seat in the district in 1991 and held it until 2001, bodes well for his chances against Waller. Banks recently spoke with the Jackson Free Press about his campaign.

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TALK | business

WeatherVision Joins with JSU by Jacob D. Fuller

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September 19 - 25, 2012

JACOB D. FULLER

eatherVision has been bring- celebration. She said JSU has produced one ing local weather forecasts in every four African Americans who hold a to communities across the bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in meteorology. country for more than two â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, since (JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) creation, they decades. Now it will help teach students have typically only had one track. That is reto do the same. The localized, outsourced search,â&#x20AC;? Foxworth said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students that were weather-forecast service celebrated its move interested in broadcast typically went to othto the Jackson State er institutions that had University Digital Mebroadcast programs. â&#x20AC;? dia Center at the MisSt. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; created sissippi e-Center Sept. WeatherVision, origi13. There, WeatherVinally named National sion will not only proWeather Network, in vide the weather fore1985 as a radio sercasts to more than 100 vice. WeatherVision markets daily, it will became the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also help teach JSU first provider of outstudents the broadcast sourced, localized side of meteorology. television weather Edward St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is about to start â&#x20AC;&#x153;JSU will tie our teaching JSU students about forecasts in 1990. It meteorology program, meteorological broadcast. now offers weather the only one of its kind forecasts to more than for historically black universities in Amer- 100 TV and radio stations and websites. ica, with WeatherVision activities,â&#x20AC;? David St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said teaming up with JSU takes Hoard, JSU vice president for institutional the company to another level. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to do advancement, said at the opening celebra- more,â&#x20AC;? St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to do things that we tion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be internships, class work, havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accomplished yet. I do think that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a media lab right here in the natural transition for us to be somehow now facility for our students.â&#x20AC;? involved with education in the university.â&#x20AC;? Edward St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, president, founder and St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will soon move his radio station, CEO of WeatherVision, said joining JSU WLEZ 100.1, to the e-Center as well. He gives his company new meaning. It is a com- said the station will offer students the oppormercial broadcast world he operates in, but tunity to get hands-on experience in radio getting to teach students to do what he does production and even on-air broadcasting. gives WeatherVision a deeper purpose. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re) sort of like almost sleep-walk- Tiger Sports Network ing through it at this point, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing JSU has created a network that will alit so long,â&#x20AC;? St. Peâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This gives us a bit of low fans to keep up with Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home sportnew inspiration, to teach a new generation of ing events on the radio, TV and online. kids how to do TV weather. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rewarding.â&#x20AC;? The Tiger Sports network will expand JSU President Carolyn Meyers said JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radio network for all home and away Hoard brought her the idea to bring games from six stations to 12, including WeatherVision to JSU. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew who (St. WHLH 95.5 FM in Jackson. About 30 staPeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) was,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was very impressed tions will carry three or four football games with him.â&#x20AC;? She added: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wonderful this year. In addition, Tiger Sports Network learning opportunity for our students and will broadcast video of home games live onall the students after them. It changes and line. Comcast Sports South will air delayed enhances our program. We are about build- broadcasts of the games immediately following deep quality in all our programs. This ing the real-time games. enables that in meteorology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a major undertaking,â&#x20AC;? Wesley Jessica Foxworth, a senior meteorol- Peterson, athletics media relations manager ogy student at JSU, spoke at the opening for JSU, said in a press release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been planning about a year for a 2013 launch, but we moved up the timetable and quickly tied .%7315): everything together over the summer.â&#x20AC;? An outside agency previously provided :KRVDLGÂł:HZLOOQHYHUKDYHWKHHOLWH VPDUWSHRSOHRQRXUVLGH´" JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radio coverage. By creating its own network, JSU now controls all aspects of its :KDWZDVWKHQDPHRIWKH86DPEDVVDGRU sports properties, Peterson said. ZKRGLHGLQ/LE\DODVWZHHN" All JSU sports will be available for free :KDWEXGJHWGLGWKH-DFNVRQ&LW\&RXQFLO online. Fans can go to jsutigers.com for DSSURYHODVWZHHNZKDWGLGWKH\UHMHFW" broadcast schedules. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


BULLETIN BOARD

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JFP OP/ED

opining, grousing & pontificating

READER RANT Making Roads Safer

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magine driving behind someone who is swerving from side to side. For years, we would have probably assumed that driver was drinking and driving. Now, there is a growing problem that is just as deadly: distracted drivingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and more specifically, the use of cell phones while driving. The use of cell phones has become an overwhelming problem in our culture, and it is injuring and killing people every day. In 2010, 18 percent of injury crashes were reported as distraction-affected crashes, reports the website distraction.gov, a site run by the U.S. Department of Transportation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drivers who use hand-held devices are four times more likely to get into crashes serious enough to injure themselves,â&#x20AC;? the site states. This is alarming and a serious matter. Across the country, states are passing laws to ban cell-phone useâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from texting and driving, to cell phone use without a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hands-freeâ&#x20AC;? device. Mississippi is one of only 10 states without such a law. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for lack of trying. One senator has presented a bill each year for the past five years. Many in the state Legislature see this as a controversial bill, but an overwhelming majority of citizens ask, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we have this type of bill already?â&#x20AC;? I am asking for your help to pass an upcoming bill that will make our roadways safer for everyone. This bill may mean you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a call right now or that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll send an â&#x20AC;&#x153;LOLâ&#x20AC;? some other time. It can also mean that your destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the destination of others on the roadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is not the emergency room. So, how exactly can you help? First, make a personal commitment to stop using your cell phone while in the car or, at least, stop texting and driving. Second, please take two minutes to complete our survey. You can find it here at bit.ly/MissDistractedDrivingSurvey. Your feedback is absolutely invaluable. Thank you for your commitment to safety and making our roads safer. Josh L. Sullivan Mississippians Advocating for Safer Transportation mssafetrans.org

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September 19 - 25, 2012

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EDITORIAL Stop Wasting Our Time

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ere we go again. Back in 2010, Gov. Haley Barbour ignored advice from Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorney General Jim Hood when the AG told him that suing the federal government over the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was a waste of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time and moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; plenty of other states already had it covered, Hood said, in essence. As it turns out, Hood was ultimately correct. Adding Mississippi to the list of petitioners wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a game changer. It was, however, a symbolic act of solidarity against the Obama administration, much like the 13 times Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives passed bills to repeal the ACA, knowing that the U.S. Senate would never go along. These are defiant acts that Gov. Phil Bryant means to follow. Back in July, Bryant joined with 10 others to sue over the ACA once again, this time focusing on allegations that the act would force citizens to disclose medical information to insurers, violating their right to medical privacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a sovereign people, we exist not to serve the government, but have instead created the government to serve us,â&#x20AC;? the plaintiffs stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We therefore have empowered the courts to protect our constitutional rights, especially those few, special rights we deem fundamental. Because the individual mandate infringes upon our fundamental right to privacy, the individual mandate must be declared unconstitutional, else we must acknowledge that sovereign authority no longer resides in the people.â&#x20AC;?

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some high-fallutinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ideological language from the leaders of a state that scrapes the bottom of the barrel in nearly every prosperity, health and well-being marker ever devised. Mississippi is the poorest state in union, with median incomes hovering between $36,000 and $37,000 when the rest of the nation is closer to $50,000. We lead the nation in obesity and its numerous sidekicks, including high blood pressure, heart disease and more. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at or near the top for teen pregnancy, smoking and infant mortality. High-school dropout rates in some Mississippi counties exceed one quarter of its students; in Amite County, the dropout rate is 44 percent. More than half a million Mississippians have no health insurance, and more people go to bed hungry than in any other state in the union. Despite all the enormous hurdles the state faces, our leaders (many of whom, like Bryant, have health insurance at citizen expense) continue to waste energy and resources on fighting against a program that could actually make a difference to the people most in need in Mississippi. U.S. District Judge Keith Starrett threw out the suit last week. The group was jumping the gun, because the individual mandate hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gone into effect, yet. He also stated that Bryant, because he gets coverage from the state, has no standing as a plaintiff. Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and our countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;be better off if our leaders actually stood for those who need a voice instead of just against their political foes? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to set aside animosity and get to work.

Email letters and rants to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


MATTHEW BOLIAN Downtown’s Hidden Boom EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Intern Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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owntown Jackson is in the middle of a hidden economic renaissance. This growth will be hard-pressed to continue unless city and state leaders commit to the new mantra of economic development: Jobs follow people. Let’s start with a history lesson. We all know that Jackson, like most cities, hemorrhaged people over the past three decades due to suburbanization. In 1980, Jackson hit its peak population (202,895), but by 2010 the census recorded a loss of approximately 30,000 people—a 15 percent decrease. During the same time, its suburbs grew by more than 43 percent. Population analysis, however, is not the only way to examine growth and decline, especially in downtown areas where, historically, few people live. A unique factor—high-rise building construction—is a much better tool. During the pre-Depression period (1923-1930), downtown Jackson built a new high-rise building every 1.8 years. After World War II, the city saw a new high-rise building every 3.3 years. Then, it suddenly stopped in the ’70s, when the effect of suburbanization hit downtown. Despite being a relatively economically prosperous period (1975-2012), the city saw only two new high-rise buildings go up downtown: one every 18.5 years. So, the history of high-rise construction sings the same song of decline as Jackson’s population loss, right? Well, not exactly. When you count fullscale renovations, the numbers reveal a hidden renaissance happening before our eyes. Since 2006, downtown Jackson has renovated eight of its 16 high-rise buildings, averaging a new renovation every eight months. Analyzing all renovations and new construction completed between 2005 and 2011, I found an even more convincing statistic: Every three months, downtown Jackson built a new building or renovated an old one. And much of this development happened during the nation’s worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. Since 2005, investors have injected more than $500 million into downtown. Why are people pouring money into Downtown Jackson? First, in 2006, the state Legislature created historic tax credits that augmented the federal historic credits launched in the late 1970s. This made building renovations in downtown financially viable. The first to capitalize on these incentives was the Electric 308 Building. Second, downtowns nationwide experienced huge growth during the 2000s by responding to the demand of urban living. They converted shabby office buildings and dilapidated factories into residential spaces. Few people thought this strategy would work in Jackson. “Who wants to live downtown?” skeptics asked. The answer: a lot of

people, apparently. Apartments in the King Edward and Standard Life currently boast nearly 100 percent occupancy rates and waiting lists longer than a year. The third reason—public officials recognizing the new nature of economic development—holds the key to regional competitiveness for Jackson and Mississippi. One of the old conundrums of cities is this: Cities are good places to work, but bad places to live. This logic derives from the viewpoint that the clustering of people in cities is good for production (increases in businesses’ productivity) and bad for consumption (increase in congestion, pollution, crime, etc.) This old concept no longer governs the primary way cities operate. In today’s knowledge-driven economy, the success of cities hinges more and more on cities’ roles as centers of consumption. In other words, cities are not only good places to work today, but also good places to live. This understanding has several implications: (1) that urban amenities matter; (2) urban amenities attract human capital; and (3) amenity cities are economically successful. Mountains of academic research support these implications, which are exacerbated by the fact that businesses are increasingly becoming more mobile than people. In other words, it’s becoming easier for a business to move from one place to another than it is for a person. This new reality inverts an old tenet of economic development—that people follow jobs. These days, jobs follow people. For continued growth and economic development, we must retain our local human capital and prevent brain drain. But spending millions of dollars each year hoping to lure large businesses into the state is no longer the best solution. To retain and attract human capital, you have to know what people demand. Studies by prominent scholars such as Richard Florida, Alan Ehrenhalt, Arthur C. Nelson, Eugenie Birch and Christopher Leinberger demonstrate that people—young and old— increasingly desire urban amenities: short commutes to work, a variety of restaurants, a walkable environment, beautiful public spaces and good public services. As Mississippi’s only true urban fabric, Jackson is uniquely positioned to capitalize on the new economic reality. It all starts with our leaders inculcating the importance of investing in people rather than merely the prospect of business. Harvard economist Edward Gleaser conveys this idea concisely in his book “The Triumph of the City” when he says, “[T]he best economic development strategy may be to attract smart people and get out of their way.” Matt Bolian is a full-time redhead, Christian, husband, Army officer and property developer who loves dreaming big.

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15


King Edward building in 2002

MIKE PETERS; TRIP BURNS

TRIP BURNS; COURTESY JULIE SKIPPER

King Edward Hotel in 2012

Fondren Corner building in 2002

Fondren Corner building in 2012

Developing Jackson: A Decade of Progress by Jacob D. Fuller and R.L. Nave

September 19 - 25, 2012

16

believed downtown Jackson needed, was a luxury hotel. “(The plan) was not totally complete. We felt like we needed a community that would make it sustainable, so it wouldn’t just be in isolation, a hotel over there all by itself,”

the furniture, fixtures and equipment.. The rest of the public funding came in the form of tax credits, including federal and state new market tax credits, Gulf Opportunity, or GO Zone, tax credits, which the federal government made available to areas affected by Hurricane Katrina, and federal and state historic tax credits. “For the three years prior to (2005), my job was getting legislation changed that would allow state historic tax credits, because the building would never work without the state historic tax credits,” Watkins said. He and others succeeded in getting the legislation changed in 2005. “Somewhere between 60 and 70 percent of the building was financed through tax credits, CDBG and MDA loans.” Watkins Development turned the Standard Life The rest, Watkins said, was building from a police station to a multi-story, built with funds from a commercial luxury apartment complex. loan from Capital One and a little more than $6 million in investWatkins said. “It was important to have an ments from the partners, including former apartment complex as part of it, so it would Ole Miss and New Orleans Saints running be more than just a hotel.” back Deuce McAllister. To fund reviving the King Edward, Getting all the funding was no easy Watkins and HRI used both public and task. Watkins said he and his partners spent private investments. The first public funds $2 million on legal fees. He said for eight or came in 2006, in the form of a $2 million nine months, he was having weekly conferloan from the Mississippi Development ence calls with 40 to 50 people, including Authority to do a selective demolition, test lawyers, to discuss the financing. the structural integrity of the building and Once the money was in place, contracremove all asbestos. tors began cleaning the building and pumpMDA also loaned Watkins and his part- ing out the water that had collected for years ners another $3.5 million from federal Com- in the basement. Watkins said there was very munity Development Block Grant funds for little structural damage to facade or founda-

TRIP BURNS

I

n 2002, Jackson looked in many ways like a city doomed to decay. The city lost 6.3 percent of its population between 1990 and 2000, and the numbers continued to decline. The downtown population was virtually non-existent, and business in the area wasn’t looking much better. At the top of the skyline of decline stood two monuments both to the city’s former promise and its unforgotten prejudice. The King Edward Hotel, once revered as one of the finest hotels in the South, had stood empty since white patrons abandoned it soon after desegregation in 1967. What was once the meeting place for the state’s elite had become a filth-filled shelter for wild animals and the homeless. On the same block, the Standard Life building was largely going to waste. The largest reinforced concrete building in the world when built in 1929, by 2002 it housed only the Jackson Police Department, with most of the space unused. Then, in 2002, New Orleans-based developers HRI Properties approached Jackson lawyer David Watkins with the desire to develop the former King Edward building, and asked for his advice as a lawyer and lobbyist who understood the city. It didn’t take long for Watkins to realize the building was not beyond repair. The structure was sound, despite what Watkins called “debris four-feet thick” on the ground floor of the hotel. He also saw available historic and new market tax credits that could help fund rebuilding the King Edward. What Watkins and HRI wanted, and

tion of the building, which was built in nine months for $1 million in 1922 and 1923. After $90 million in renovations to the hotel, the King Edward reopened its doors as a 186-room Hilton Garden Inn and a luxury apartment complex on Dec. 17, 2009. “For us to be able to take this building that became the symbol of the decay of the city of Jackson, and turn it around into this beautiful structure that it is now, it showed that we can do anything. Anything we put our minds to as a community, we can do,” Watkins said. After opening the King Edward, Watkins set his focus on the Standard Life building. Less than nine months and $35 million in renovations later, Standard Life reopened with 76 apartments and 2,671 square feet of retail space. The apartments are now filled to 97.5 percent capacity, with more applicants on the waiting list than number of apartments, showing something few thought possible 10 years ago: a lot of people want to live, and stay, in downtown Jackson. Convention Center Booms In 2002, Jackson was the only capital in the southeastern U.S. that didn’t have a convention center. But a host of city leaders decided that was unacceptable. In 1995, Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. and local business leaders convinced state legislators to authorize more than $17 million to build the Telecommunications and Conference Center, the neighboring piece to the Convention Center. Then, in 2004, the Legislature approved


THE SAGA OF FLOOD CONTROL by Donna Ladd

E

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education and the programs that the universities put together.â&#x20AC;? JSU Engages Neighbors Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no secret that Jackson State University ruffled feathers of nearby neighbors when former president Ronald Mason tried to use eminent-domain proceedings to wrestle land for a development at Dalton and Lynch streets. However, after getting past the acrimony of the attempted land grab and early financing hiccups, One University Place, the largest private development in west Jackson in 30 years, opened in the fall of 2010. Dr. Kimberly Hilliard, JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director of community engagement, said the experience of building One University Place is emblematic of the relationship between the school and surrounding neighborhoods, it shows how JSU is always looking for ways to strengthen community partnerships. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to plan with you instead of for you,â&#x20AC;? Hilliard said. Some of that takes place through the Center for University Based Development, which allows residents to offer input on new development projects, she said. Hilliard earned her doctorate in urban and regional planning from JSU in 2007, but has had a hand in community development since 2004. She cites the construction of new schools of engineering and business, Campbell College Dormitories, Walter Payton Recreation & Wellness Center and the completion of the liberal arts college as signs of tremendous growth at the 135-year-old institution. The February 2002 Ayers settlement, which required the Legislature to provide a half-billion dollars to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historically black public universities, helped fuel the growth. Hilliard said the Ayers settlement helped JSU develop its urban and regional planning graduate program of which is she is a graduate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson State University is intentional about being a catalyst for change in our community,â&#x20AC;? Hilliard said. Largest Outdoor Mall Returns Jackson Square originally opened on Terry Road in south Jackson in 1968 and was PRUH'(9(/230(17VHHSDJH

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jacksonfreepress.com

MELISSA WEBSTER

TRIP BURNS

a referendum to allow Jackson residents to serious problems for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts. Roy Decker, co-founder of Duvall vote for an increase in hotel and restaurant Negotiations between TCI and the city Decker, said the duplexes and what he called taxes to fund the Convention Center. The ref- broke down over the next few years, finalizing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;six-plexâ&#x20AC;? provide more population than erendum was a huge step for the capital city, with the Jackson Redevelopment Authority single-family homes, while providing a more which is often unable to get financial support rejecting TCIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal in December 2011. community-driven design than traditional from the state Legislature. Later that month, the city council gave apartment complexes. Two years later, the Telecommunications the city administration permission to take The houses have three bedrooms and Center opened, and on Jan. 14, 2009, Jack- whatever action necessary to get the land fenced yards. What makes them unique in the son welcomed 20,000 visitors to the grand back from TCI, which it has not yet done. city, and even in the state, are their sustainabilopening of the Jackson Conity. Solar panels sit on top of the vention Center. Combined, homesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; carports and provide enthe complex offers 330,000 ergy to the buildings. The units square feet of space for conalso have energy-efficient appliventions, meetings, concerts ances and windows positioned and more. to make it easy for residents to â&#x20AC;&#x153;It allowed us to really follow the safety principle of become a player in trying to â&#x20AC;&#x153;eyes on the streets.â&#x20AC;? attract conventions and meetâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We are excited to bring ings, both on a statewide and a to Jackson, and the state of regional basis,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. Mississippi, the first solar-powThe Jackson Convenered, sustainable, green, enertion Complex brought in gy-efficient affordable housing more than $21 million and development,â&#x20AC;? JHA Executive 128,590 visitors in 323 event Director Sheila Jackson told days in 2009. It contributed the JFP in May 2010, when $583,143 in event jobs and Jackson has seen major progress since 2002. If some of the proposals the city broke ground on the currently on the table come to fruition, the next 10 years may bring $182,256 in sales tax revenue even more progress to the capital city. project. to the city. Decker said one major In 2010, attendance issue with development over jumped to 146,635 in 343 event day. Eco- Johnson said the city is still negotiating how the past couple of decades has been a lack nomic impact rose to more than $28.5 mil- it will get control of the land back from TCI. of players who are looking out for the good lion, with job creation nearly doubling to â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;purchaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; would be the of the community. Developers work toward $1.1 million. term that we would use,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. making a profit, and city officials maintain But the convention centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working out the details.â&#x20AC;? city regulation. Neither, Decker said, really limited without more hotel rooms downtown look out for the community. for conventioneers. The next step, Johnson Midtown Making Ground â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who takes up the public good in desaid, is building a convention center hotel, an Much of the Midtown neighborhood velopment?â&#x20AC;? Decker asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That responendeavor that has proved much more diffi- near Millsaps has fallen into disrepair over the sibility is being taken up by neighborhood cult than city leaders originally expected. years with dilapidated homes dotting the area, organizations, like Midtown Partners, like In 2007, then-Mayor Frank Melton which has been plagued with poverty. Jackson Housing Authority.â&#x20AC;? made it very easy for friends at Dallas, TexasDuvall Decker Architects, along with Duvall Decker is now working on a based Transcontinental Realty Investors pur- Midtown Partners, the Jackson Housing master plan, similar to the one it designed chased four blocks across Pascagoula Street Authority and a growing Millsaps Avenue for Midtown, for community organizations from the Convention Center with the plans artist community, is working to turn the in west Jackson. He said he and other develto build a mixed-used development that neighborhood a better direction, though. In opers need to focus on making the best of would include a hotel, condos, retail space 2008 and 2009, Duvall Decker, spearheaded the city we already have. and a parking garage. The company later a master plan for the community, which is â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really import culture. Culscaled back the plans to a $90 million hotel bordered by Woodrow Wilson Avenue, Mill, ture already exists. All you can do is enand skywalk to the Convention Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but Fortification and West streets. hance the character of culture thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already showed little movement and even got beThe first phase of the project is almost here,â&#x20AC;? Decker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you think about hind on property taxes on the land. The fact complete. It includes eight low-income du- Jackson, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to invent Jackson. that they own land so desperately needed for plexes and a group of six individual housing Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already here. What we need to do a hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and that presents an eyesore across units connected by a courtyard, designed af- is enhance the arts community, access to from shiny convention centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has created ter New Orleans-style units. entertainment venues, enhance access to

17


THEN AND NOW

DEVELOPMENT, from page 17

The architects of Duvall Decker designed eight new energy- efficient duplexes and one â&#x20AC;&#x153;six-plexâ&#x20AC;? in Midtown Jackson.

September 19 - 25, 2012

new baby-blue look, repaved the parking lot and added 60 grass islands to the lot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was out of my mind,â&#x20AC;? Wright said when asked why he purchased the property. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I purchased it because it has a potential to start thriving again as it did 25 years ago.â&#x20AC;? In April 2012, Wright reopened the shopping mall as Jackson Square Promenade. Then, 18 of the 30 available spaces in the center were occupied by stores, churches, bars, a teen club, a salon and even a daycare. Now, tenants have rented 28 of the 30 spaces. The Hinds County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department has even rented office space in the mall.

18

Metrocenter Collapse A slow decline had begun at Metrocenter Mall, like many urban and suburban shopping malls across the country, by 2002. At the time, though, the mall still boasted three major anchor stores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, McRaeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Sears â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and plenty of smaller stores between. In 2004, the possibility of the mallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eventual demise became apparent when Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announced it was closing the mallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s south anchor. Hope came a few years later, though, when in 2007 Burlington Coat Factory opened a store in the lower floor of the former Gayfers building, which had been empty since 1999. The hope did not last long, though, as smaller national chains, including Waldenbooks, Lane Bryant and Sbarro Italian Eatery left the mall. In fall 2009, the mall took another major hit when Belk closed its anchor store in Metrocenter, as the company focused on its stores in Northpark Mall in Ridgeland and Dogwood Festival Market in Flowood. In 2009, the city council voted to buy the former Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building. In 2012, they

hired an outside consultant to help them find a tenant for the building, which the city has not been able to do. Then, in 2012, Sears closed its doors at the mall, leaving the mall with only Burlington Coat Factory to anchor it. In an attempt to bring revitalization to the mall, the city agreed to move six city departments into the former Belk building in 2011. Developer and owner of the property Retro Metro has partially completed renovations to the building for the city. At the time of print, the city is working to hire an outside auditor to look into the $50,000 it paid to developer Retro Metro for telecommunications wiring for the building. Until the audit is complete, it is not likely any city departments will move into the mall. Farish Falters Hearing that Farish Street will one day be an entertainment and nightlife mecca in Mississippi has become kind of like hearing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll soon get a hover car. Everyone loves the idea, but by the time you hear it a couple dozen times, you stop holding your breath. Architect Steven Horn first brought the idea to return Farish Street, once the center of African American art and culture in Jackson, to its former glory to city leaders in 1983. Not until the Jackson Redevelopment Authority brought in Performa Entertainment Real Estate, developer of Memphisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Beale Street, in the 1990s did anyone make any real attempts to rebuild the area. Performa looked to be out of its element with the massive reconstruction that was needed on the dilapidated buildings, though. After years of delays and Performa accomplishing very little, Watkins Development purchased the project from Performa in 2008 for $425,000 and the $1.5 million of debt Performa had accrued. Less than four years later, Watkins Development is hoping to open at least one club, B.B. Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Club, by the end of 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a date that been pushed back numerous times already. Watkins said he does not want to give any definite dates, as of yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not talking years, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking months,â&#x20AC;? Watkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time I give a date, I realize itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mistake, because if we miss if by a week we get yelled at. If we miss it by a year, we get yelled at.â&#x20AC;? Watkins Development is working to finalize $11 million worth of historic and new market tax credits that the company will offer as collateral for a $10.2 million bond issue from the city, the final funding needed for the first block. Watkins said he expects to close on the tax credits Oct. 31. The city council will have to approve the bond issue after Watkins has the tax credits in hand. The issue will come in two parts. Watkins will focus the first part on opening the first four entertainment venues on the

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street. The other portion will go towards completing the rest of the block from Amite Street to Griffith Street. Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Renaissance In 2002, two of the largest buildings in Fondren were empty. The former home of the state Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks at the corner of Fondren Place and State Street and the former Duling School on Duling Avenue had little to nothing going on inside aside dust collecting. Mike Peters, of Peters Real Estate, decided to change all that. In early 2004, Peters bought the for DWFP building, with little idea of what he would do with it. To get some inspiration, Peters said he took a flash field trip to Memphis, Birmingham, Atlanta and New Orleans to check out their midtown neighborhoods. After the field trip, Peters decided to TRIP BURNS

TRIP BURNS

home to more than 30 stores and restaurants. Over the years, stores began to move out of the mostly-residential area one by one, until only two bingo halls and a church were left in the 350,000-square-foot facility. In February, 2010, California native Jessie Wright, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development firm First Boise Investments also owns shopping centers in Southaven and Birmingham, Ala., bought Jackson Square and starting giving the shopping mall a complete facelift. He replaced the facade on the front of the buildings with a

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Jackson State University has built several new buildings, including schools, dorms and a wellness center in the last decade.

turn the building into Fondren Corner, which he called the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first truly mixedused development, with restaurants, retail stores and residential apartments. To do so, Peters had to totally renovate the building. Now, little of what used to be the inside of the DWFP building is left. When it came time decide what color to paint the outside of the building, Peters said he wanted input from the neighborhood. So he painted big blocks of the StateStreet side of the building in different colors, numbered them and asked locals to email or mail in their choices for the building. Today, the blue, yellow and red building houses apartments, a parking garage, an exercise facility, offices, restaurants and several retail outlets including art galleries, furniture

and decorations stores, clothing stores, a nail salon and more. While Peters was working on Fondren Corner, he noticed Duling School was also an untapped space. During his visit to Atlanta, he saw a renovated high school in the Little Five Point neighborhood that gave him the inspiration to do something similar with Duling School. It took a few years to get the school board, which owned the building, on board, Peters said. Eventually, Peters was able to purchase the property, though. Beside the school, Peters build a new, multi-story building. Together with the former Duling School, the building became Fondren Place, a mixed-used development of office space, restaurants and retail stores. Today, Fondren Place is home to multiple restaurants, retail stores and Duling Hall, one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier live music venues, which, with the help of promoter Arden Barnett, has hosted concerts from the likes of the Flaming Lips, Neon Indian, The Blind Boys of Alabama and Neon Trees. Health Care Explodes In 1995, Dr. Aaron Shirley had a vision. Jackson Mall, built in 1968 on Woodrow Wilson Boulevard as the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first retail mall, had been abandoned to began decay in 1978. Shirley envisioned turning the mall into a hub for medical care, focused on providing services to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poor. Shirley and other Medical Mall leaders partnered with JSU, Tougaloo College and University of Mississippi Medical Center and began renovations in 1996. The Jackson Medical Mall opened its first clinics in 1997. In 2002, the Jackson Medical Mall began to boom. In 1996, the mall brought in $744,695. In 2002, it brought in $8,221,723. Today, it is home to independent medical service providers, 18 retail stores and restaurants, nine non-profit organizations, 16 business offices, 13 JSU departments and offices and 27 UMMC clinics and services. In 2012, the Jackson Medical Mall is once again teaming with UMMC, this time to create a healthcare corridor along Woodrow Wilson Boulevard that could create a one-stop medical hub for the entire southeastern U.S.


19

jacksonfreepress.com


COURTESY JSU

FILE PHOTO

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Diversity Matters

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The JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Best of Jackson party has been an extremely diverse gatheringâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by race, age and otherwiseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to celebrate the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s renaissance since the first one at the Ironworks loft building in January 2003.The invitation-only party is now always the last Sunday in January and in a location that represents Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential. Some spaces are more raw than others. Hint: Subscribe to JFPDaily.com.

Creative Class, Still Rising

I

n the Jackson Free Pressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; very first cover story, publisher and co-owner Todd Stauffer wrote about Carnegie-Mellon professor Richard Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative classâ&#x20AC;? concept and how well Jackson fared on his scale (very well; higher at No. 21 than even Memphis, Atlanta or New Orleans.) Vital to Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic-development concept is what he calls the Diversity Index that, when high, attracts high-tech companies, good-paying jobs and economic growth. He emphasizes the need for tolerance of people with different backgrounds, ethnicities and sexual orientations in order to improve a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The more tolerant a city is, the more creatives will stick around,â&#x20AC;? Stauffer wrote in the Sept. 22, 2002, issue as he introduced the concept of â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative classâ&#x20AC;? to Jackson. Since then, the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative classâ&#x20AC;? has become common in local economic-development circles even as some who use it might not fully grok the tolerance component. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting there.

September 19 - 25, 2012

WHAT JACKSON CREATIVES WANTED THEN (AND NOW):

20

1 More active downtown

2 Restaurants open later

3 Greater support for local arts

4 More mixed-race attendance at events

6 More green space. 5 Tolerance for alternative lifestyles/ sexual orientations

"ESTOF*ACKSON-OMENT

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ust before the JSU Sonic Boom drum line surprised the crowd at the 2008 party at the art museum, editor Donna Ladd asked the band director if she should announce that people should clear a path in the packed space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll move,â&#x20AC;? he said with a smile. And they did. See bestofjackson.com for more â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bestâ&#x20AC;? stuff and the 2013 ballot starting Nov. 1.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? T he following Jacksonians were on the cover of the first JFP. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who they are and what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing now:

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The 24-page preview issue of the Jackson Free Press, published Sept. 22, 2002, came out of the gate swinging about the need to celebrate diversity in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the importance of tolerance to a successful creative-class city.Todd Stauffer wrote the cover story.


The Changing Faces of Jackson

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By R.L. Nave

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hen Shawna Davie came to the capital city 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201D;with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population growth from St. Louis to attend Jackson State Uni- matching that of its suburbs. Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s versity, like many college students, she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t population had dropped approximately know what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d do with her life. 6 percent over a decade, from 184,256 in Then, around the time she graduated from JSU, oppor- 2000 to 175,561, according to the U.S. tunity knocked. Davie got a job with the American Civil Lib- Census Bureauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimate for 2011. erties Union, first as an intern, then as a lobbyist. It occurred Even so, the loss in the past decade to her that in Jackson, she had the opportunity to sit across was actually slower than the previous one. the table from policymakers where her status as a fresh-faced From 1990 to 2000, the capital city shed college graduate might have been a liability in a larger city. 6.3 percent of its residents. Also, from 1990 to 2000, nearâ&#x20AC;&#x153;I absolutely fell in love with not just the city but the ly 35,000 white residents left the city. Whites went from state of Mississippi because of the making up almost half of the work I was doing,â&#x20AC;? she said. cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population to a little more Shawna Davie Davie represents some of the than a quarter. The past decade SNAPSHOT OF METRO moved to most exciting demographic shifts actually represents a slowing of 0OPULATION aaaaaaaaaaaaa  Jackson from 0OPULATION aaaaaaaaaaaaa  now taking place around the Unitthat trend, albeit a slight one. St. Louis for )NBOUNDINCOMEPERCAP  aaaa  college and fell ed States. For the first time in more The city lost 19,485 white /UTBOUNDINCOMEPERCAP aaa  in love with the than 100 years, growth of cities is residents from 2000 to 2010, .ON MIGRANTINCOMEPERCAP  a  capital city. -ILLENNIALPERCENTAGEOFPOPULATIONa  outpacing growth of suburban areven as it added 7,976 black eas. The main force behind the sea residents. By the most recent change are young professionals, for American Community Survey, whom the economy has made the thought of buying subur- from 2005 to 2009, the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population was majority Afrilonger than four years. ban homes and commuting to work every day less attractive. can American. Racially, however, Bolianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research found that African In June 2012, the Associated Press analyzed U.S. Interestingly, Hispanics in Jackson more doubled their Americans comprise just 17 percent of downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s populaCensus data on 18- to 29-year-olds, who represent onenumbers over the past few years, tion, in a city where blacks represixth of the total U.S. population and determined that 52 jumping from 0.6 percent of the sent nearly 80 percent of the overall out of 73 cities with populations above 250,000 saw faster areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population in 2000 to 1.6 population. Jackson is not unique year-over-year growth in 2011 than their average growth percent in 2010. in this regard. The downtowns of over the past 10 years. Ed Sivak, executive direcmajority-black cities including Ataaaaaaaaaa  After Hurricane Katrina effectively shrunk the size of tor of the Mississippi Economic lanta and Washington D.C., have New Orleans in 2005, the city experienced the most rapid Policy Center, said Census inalso been slow to attract to black aaaaaaaaaa  growth relative to its suburbs. While the NOLA suburbs formation shows that Jackson residents. aaaaaaaaaa  grew by 0.6 percent, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population exploded by 3.7 metropolitan area has grown Young blacks who live !PRIL%STIMATE  percent, AP found. Cities including Pittsburgh, Milwaukee since 1990. But more people, at downtown, like Davie, are *ULY%STIMATEa  and Minneapolis even erased years of population shrinkage. least until 2011, were deciding bucking that trend, how #HANGE a  

Jackson is just starting to experience this kind of reto live in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surrounding ever. She says of downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth, posting the first population growth in 20 years in bedroom communities. From a renaissance: â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was a regional development standpoint, it is counter productive student, there was a tree growing out of the top of the for one part of the capital city region to gain at the expense King Edward. Now I live in that buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m -$&.621960(75232/,7$1*52:7+ of another part of the region, he said. very proud of that.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When one part of region doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do as well as other        parts of the region, the whole region doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t maximize its poLQFUHDVH LQFUHDVH LQFUHDVH tential. Likewise, if all parts of region do well then all of us are going to be more well off,â&#x20AC;? Sivak said. Evidently, Jackson is doing something right. In fact, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forward progress was sufficient to twice earn the %THNICITY    distinction of one of the 100 Best Communities for Young 7HITE    People from the Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise Alliance, most recently "LACK    in 2012.   All the young energy is being felt in downtown Jack!MERICAN)NDIAN       son. Matt Bolian, who grew up in the metro region and is a   LQFUHDVH (ISPANIC    Jackson Free Press intern, surveyed downtown for his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GHFUHDVH GHFUHDVH dissertation at the London School of Economics and Political !SIAN    Science. His research revealed that millennialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;people born SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 0ACI½C)SLANDER    in the early 1980s through the early 1990sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;comprise 53 SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU percent of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residential population. Of those down    21 town dwellers under 34 years of age, 56 percent plan to stay

POPULATION SHIFTS

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DOLLARS AND SENSE

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Living Local by Donna Ladd

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hen the Jackson Free Press launched in 2002, one of our primary goals was to help strengthen locally owned businesses. We knew that the authenticity of

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were open, and Rainbow Whole Foods was the heart and soul of what was possible, as well as the small strip that appeared in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Helpâ&#x20AC;? recently. Fondren Corner hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happened, yet, nor had the artists moved in. The areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best days were ahead. Over the decade, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never backed off on our campaign to get people to â&#x20AC;&#x153;spend local first.â&#x20AC;? We always feature items available at locally owned businesses in our shopping and gift guides. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been thrilled to see more businesses and even corporate-owned media (ironically) picking up the meme. Now, the locavore and local-food movements are trendy across the nation, including in Jackson. We encourage you to keep spending your dollars locally first to keep more money, residents and tax base in Jackson.

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SMOKE AND THE CITY by Ronni Mott

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a communityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, thus, its likelihood to keep residents and attract news onesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hinges in no small way on the variety of local shops and restaurants that give the city its flavor. And letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be honest: In 2002, you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find much of a local movement in Jackson. Many businesses had moved to the suburbs, and big-box chain stores dominated shopping time for many residents. Heck, there was only one McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Groceryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the original Maywood Mart locationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and only one real farmers market. The JFP set out immediately to seed a â&#x20AC;&#x153;locavoreâ&#x20AC;? movement in Jackson. The cover package of our issue No. 3, published Nov.

21, 2002, was themed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think Global, Shop Local,â&#x20AC;? and asked readers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;vote for your community with your dollars.â&#x20AC;? I wrote an essay about the wisdom of caring about the world beyond Jackson (â&#x20AC;&#x153;think globalâ&#x20AC;?) while investing dollars in the local businesses that would held rebuild the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future (â&#x20AC;&#x153;shop localâ&#x20AC;?). â&#x20AC;&#x153;[I]f all us Jacksonians want an active retail and entertainment base in the heart of our city badly enough, it will happen,â&#x20AC;? I wrote then. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to wait around for it; we must go make it so. That means supporting our own: buy local gifts this holiday, eat in local restaurants, seek out the wares of local artists, support businessesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attempts at longer hours.â&#x20AC;? The fashion shoot included a diverse group (including now-Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager Jane Halbert) wearing fashion from local boutiques and shopping at the Greater Belhaven market, which was then in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jitney 14â&#x20AC;? parking lot on Fortification Street. (Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four local stores and the vendors have moved to other markets.) Back then, even Fondren wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t what it is now: Ron Chane had a fabulous store there, Que Sera Sera and Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In

September 19 - 25, 2012

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THE BEST OF THE LAST 10 YEARS:

EATS

Best New Restaurant

Rise of the Foodies by Kathleen M. Mitchell

TRIP BURNS

T

here has never been a better time to be a foodie in Jackson. A decade ago, the city enjoyed plenty of quality chefs, but diners rarely knew them by name. These days, chefs at popular restaurants are local celebrities. Events centered around food—such as Iron Chef Jackson, Clash in the Kitchen and pop-up restaurants—are big hits, and customers want to eat locally grown, interesting dishes. “We have, here locally, seen a true food renaissance,” says Grady Griffin, director of education at the Mississippi Hospitality and Restaurant Association. “We continue to celebrate easily one of the greatest independent restaurant markets anywhere in the country. The chains, as important as they are to the industry, haven’t taken over the metro area, and I think that speaks a lot to our community.” Having traveled around the country working with other chefs, Chef Derek Emerson of Walker’s Drive-In and Local 463, agrees. “For our size, there’s probably not a city with more locally run quality restaurants,” Emerson says. In addition, Jacksonians have more reasons to stay downtown than ever before. No longer do residents have to trek out to Flowood or Madison for a fine dining experience. Parlor Market, which opened in 2010, thrived under founder Craig Noone’s guiding hand, and more recently under Chef de Cuisine Jesse Houston’s. With the revitaliza-

More restaurants, such as Table 100, are shifting toward using as much local produce as possible in their kitchens.

tion of the King Edward and Standard Life buildings came dining opportunities helmed by chefs Nick Wallace and Luis Bruno. Food diversity has blossomed, too, from the Ethiopian Abeba to the taquerias and sushi joints around the metro. Of course, the last decade has experienced a lagging economy, which has affected many restaurants. “The two most recurring challenges that we continue to hear are profitability and finding and retaining good help,”

Griffin says. “It’s just tough … to maintain what is, and historically always has been, a low profit-margin business.” But Emerson sees the food economy in Jackson surviving better than in other cities. “I have friends in L.A. where, when the economy went bad, things got really hard. That didn’t seem to happen as much here,” he says. Collaboration is at an all-time high between chefs and restaurateurs. Chefs share an attitude of respect and a willingness to learn from one another. From Parlor Market’s various PM events, which have collaborated with historic soul-food joint Peaches and Fondren favorite Sal & Mookie’s, to the art museum’s Palette Café handing the reins over to Hattiesburg chef Robert St. John for four days, to the creative minds behind Mangia Bene starting a creative consulting branch to advise up-and-coming restaurants—chefs want to cook together, work together and help each other. Another important shift in the food industry is the locavore movement. “The consuming public has never been more educated about wanting to know where their food is coming from, and the more we can connect restaurateurs and our local growers, I think it’s going to help everybody in the long run, from the mom-and-pops to the growers being more successful and creating healthier opportunities and lifestyles,” Griffin says. Foodies are taking notice. Andrew Zim-

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mern, host of several food shows on the Travel Channel, told the JFP in April, “I loved, loved the energy (at the Appetite of Jackson event). And I also like something about cities your size where an entire community really can gather in one place. I mean, you don’t have that in a city like New York. It’s impossible. … There’s a lot of really great food that’s going on down in Mississippi.” Even with all the growth, Jackson is still in the heart of the South, which means some things will never change. Perennial favorites Two Sisters Café, Walker’s Drive-In and Primos Café have managed to succeed in the aughts and beyond by, for the most part, sticking to what made them great in the first place: good ole southern cookin’. “People want to come to Jackson to open restaurants because we have a good dining clientele,” Emerson says. “People go out to eat and spend time with their family. It’s a southern way of life.”

LIESL

FROM THE GARDEN by Jim PathFinder Ewing partment of Agriculture and Commerce in the past 10 years expanded the facilities for farmers who want to bring their produce to market. In 2005, MDAC phased out the old market on West Street. Now located at the Mississippi State Fairgrounds, the improved market offers an all-weather building with 18,000 square feet and 32 stalls. In 2009, the Belhaven Market—which has sold locally grown herbs and produce since 2001—also moved to the fairgrounds. Farmers markets have cropped up elsewhere in the metro area, too, such as the Livingston Farmers Market in Madison County. Local groups are also planting seeds for their own health and wellbeing by creating community gardens. The Tougaloo-Rainbow Community Garden Farm Project started in 2008 and is located at Tougaloo College. It provides opportunities for organic gardening and permaculture projects. Who could have guessed 10 years ago that growing food at local schools would become a national trend and that Jackson would serve as a model? The farm-to-school movement in Mississippi started

The farm-to-school movement in Jackson has grown significantly in the past 10 years.

10 years ago, when the Mississippi Department of Education partnered with MDAC and the Department of Defense Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program to make locally raised produce available to Mississippi schools. In 2010, Michelle Obama visited Jackson as part of her Let’s Move program for nutrition and exercise, recognizing the public schools’ goals. The schools are working with FoodCorps and, since 2004, helped reach more than 20,000 Jacksonians through school garden and nutrition programs. Some, including the Wisdom Garden at Spann Elementary 23 in Fondren, have been noted nationwide for their efforts. jacksonfreepress.com

O

ne area where the Jackson area bloomed in the past 10 years—literally!—is in terms of local and organic food, foodies and gardens. “We’re trying to do more with everything local,” says Troy Woodson, 36, chef at High Noon Café at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative in Fondren (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602). Rainbow is pushing for local people to supply organically grown food, and customers are more interested in buying locally grown food. Some of the food is really local, Woodson said, noting that honey the café uses is not just from central Mississippi bees but is produced in Fondren at Bee Tree Meadows. Amy Breckenridge, 38, a baker who is approaching her 10th anniversary with Rainbow, has seen interest in locally grown organic food grow like a weed—as well as the number of stores selling organic food, she said. The Fondren cooperative’s membership has grown as well. In the past three years, membership has doubled, from 3,000 members to 6,000, Breckenridge said. Perhaps picking up on that need, the Mississippi De-


FITNESS

Fitness Reawakening by Molly Lehmuller

I

September 19 - 25, 2012

24

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Jacksonians eager for inexpensive, independent exercise. Two local organizations, Bike Walk Mississippi and Jackson Bike Advocates, make it their mission to protect bikers MIKE BAIRD

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an oft-quoted statistic that Mississippi is the most obese state and has been for a while. But in the capital city, at least, folks are working together to get healthier. Terry Sullivan founded liveRIGHTnow, an organization that promotes healthy living and eating, and helps its clients maintain health goals through individualized plans. The group hosts hill runs in Fondren, helps runners train for races and marathons, and provides support and ideas for healthy-living via social media. Over the last 10 years, the healthyliving scene has changed for the better, Sullivan says. The running community has grown less isolated, and visibilityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;through national marketing campaign from sports outfitters, as well as neighbors seeing one another pick up the habitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has surged. Running for fitness and pleasure â&#x20AC;&#x153;is more popular recently because of the economy,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Running is something that more people can pick upâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you just need a pair of shoes.â&#x20AC;? In general, Sullivan says, Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even southernersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;have spent the last decade becoming aware of healthy living. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People have started to realize that you need to something besides going outside and walking around to stay in shape. For running enthusiasts, it seems likes 5Ks and distance events are popping up like wildflowers. Warrior Dash, a 3.34-mile race through mud, barricades and fire, came to Jackson for the first year in 2011 and attracted thousands of dedicated runners and probable drunk college students alike. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi has hosted the Mississippi Blues Marathon and HalfMarathon since 2008, and 5Ks and fun runs are popular in the metro area. Races have evolved into a fun, productive way to support local charitable organizations, schools or other good causes. (And the de facto happy hour after most races is a definite draw.) Several running clubs, both casual and highly organized, keep pace around Jackson. Fleet Feet Sports puts on poker runs, where runners and walkers pick up playing cards from checkpoints along a three-mile course. The individuals with the best and worst hand win a prize. Bicycling, too, has found favor with

Biking has become a popular way for Jacksonians to increase activity.

and promote the burgeoning community. Melody Moody, executive director of Bike Walk Mississippi, told the Jackson Free Press that with biking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the return on investment in Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health or economic developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be ignored.â&#x20AC;? Exercise fads have kicked Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drooping bottoms over the last decadeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including power yoga, Zumba, Wii Fit, boot camps, even pole dancing. However, the greatest shift in our collective workout routines is â&#x20AC;&#x153;going toward shorter and more intense workout sessions,â&#x20AC;? Sullivan says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of spending an hour in the gym on the treadmill, watching two TV shows â&#x20AC;Ś you do 30 minutes of intense cardio. Studies have shown that these are more effective.â&#x20AC;? Sullivan explains that during the aughts and early teens, our eating habits began to change for the better as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eating-wise, everything is going back to basics â&#x20AC;Ś What I preach is going back to real food,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s and the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s and early 2000s, we were wrapped up in convenience ... and now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re paying for that convenience. (In 2012,) weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving away from the convenience factor and being more involved with food.â&#x20AC;? So if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent the last decade slowly experiencing a fitness reawakening, the next 10 years look promising for a healthyliving rebellion.

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ARTS

The Paradox by Kathleen M. Mitchell

TRIP BURNS

The Art Garden at the Mississippi Museum of Art, which opened last year, allows the museum to host many more community events.

W

jacksonfreepress.com

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER / ARTIST: ROY ADKINS

hen it comes to the arts in Jackson in the last weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen the birth of a lot of new festivals and events sippi schools is setting our children up to be disadvantaged decade, art enthusiasts are quick to point out and gatherings.â&#x20AC;? from day one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the last 10 years, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen less fundthat the city has made great strides. Other thriving initiatives include the recent public-art ing for arts in the schools. Mississippi, about 20 years ago, Betsy Bradley has seen the evolution first project converting downtown traffic-signal boxes into street- began to unceremoniously and sort of quietly eliminate hand, having been a part of the art world in Jackson for the corner paintings and the Crossroads Film Festival, which (physical education) and the arts from the curriculum â&#x20AC;Ś past two decades. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exciting, fresh, energetic group of began 13 years ago and has grown eliminating exercise, movement, artists, different than it was 20 years ago,â&#x20AC;? she says. into a huge event for the state. joy, play and the arts from our Ten years ago, Bradley became the director of the MisIn addition, neighborhood classrooms. To which I say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Look Âł, ZRXOG UHDOO\ OLNH WR VHH D FRQWLQXDWLRQ RI WKLV NLQG RI VHOISXEOLFDWLRQ ',< VSLULW WKDW \RX VHH sissippi Museum of Art, overseeing both its successful move efforts to bring the arts into their at us now.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re first on every HVSHFLDOO\LQWKHKLSKRSFRPPXQLW\ZKLFK,WKLQN to a larger and more creative venue in 2007 and the open- communities have picked up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list we want to be last on, last on KLVWRULFDOO\LVGLUHFWHGLQWKDWZD\%XWWKLVSURGXF ing of the Art Garden last October, which paved the way for great to see the level of support every list we want to be first on.â&#x20AC;? WLRQRISUHVVLQJ\RXURZQDOEXPVDQGGLVWULEXWLQJ LW\RXUVHOI7KLVQRWLRQZKHUH\RXKDYHORFDOSRHWV greater community involvement for the museum. at the municipal level growing,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is amazing is that in ZKR MXVW SULQW WKHLU RZQ ERRN DQG GLVWULEXWH LW The idea of an involved arts community is hugely im- Bradley says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that neighthe last 10 years, all of the research, E\WKHPVHOYHV$UWLVWVZKRPD\EHWKH\ÂśUHUHSUH portant to Bradley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;About 10 years ago there just seemed to borhoods like Fondren and Belall the data, all the studies concluVHQWHGE\DJDOOHU\EXWWKH\ÂśUHDOVRSDUWLFLSDWLQJLQ be a lot of younger artists moving into the city or graduating haven have found that having art sively tell us that the arts are critiSRSXSDUWVKRZV  Âł,ZRXOGORYHWRVHHWKDWVSLULWFRQWLQXHDQG from school and staying in the city,â&#x20AC;? Bradley says. just in the neighborhood and at cal to a fundamental education,â&#x20AC;? LWZRXOGEHLQWHUHVWLQJWRVHHORFDOHFRQRPLHVGH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before, it seems like people felt like they needed to the pedestrian level is an important White continues. YHORSWRIDFLOLWDWHWKDW7RIDFLOLWDWHWKHSURGXFWLRQ leave Jackson to be in an artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; community. But these people way to create community. Now â&#x20AC;&#x153;The brain has two sides and RIWKHREMHFWDQGSURGXFWVWKDWDUHDVVRFLDWHGZLWK WKHDUWIRUP´ ²GDQLHOMRKQVRQ are a community â&#x20AC;Ś and they really have provided each other weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re calling this creative placemakitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine to learn data and to know with a great support system, and several of them really have ing, but I think that a lot of us have science and to be good at solving become successful entrepreneurs.â&#x20AC;? known for a long time that aesthetand memorization and all that, but Artist daniel johnson, who prefers to spell his name ic designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;good design, whether its in a park or a building in order for a learner to have a complete education, they abwith lowercase letters, believes having venues for artists to get or a utility stationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all of that matters to the way our com- solutely must have the arts. But yet, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve eliminated the arts, to know one another and work together has been huge for munity connects with itself and with each other.â&#x20AC;? weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved almost exclusively to testing and to teaching to growing an arts community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The development of the JackThe collaborative nature of the art community in place the test, and the results â&#x20AC;Ś I mean, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to tell you where son Free Press for one (has helped),â&#x20AC;? johnson says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having a today has also helped it thrive. johnson notes the collabora- we are with education. The results have been devastating.â&#x20AC;? central place for events, and people who are covering the local tion in higher education circles, such as the Millsaps College White points to programs such as Whole School, a sysarts scene just so that we can be aware of each other. â&#x20AC;Ś The art and Belhaven University dance departments, and well as tem of teaching all subjects through the arts, and VSA, an development of venues and gathering places, and print and local musician Laurel Isbister Irby hosting an art art program for both children and adults with disabilities, as online portals to discover each other and be show to accompany her album release, ways to reach kids through the arts. Both programs have lost in communication have been huge.â&#x20AC;? and the historic collaboration in the hip- a great deal of federal funding in the past two years. Malcolm White, executive director of hop community. He says growing that Bradley is a bit more hopeful, pointing out that the prithe Mississippi Arts Commission, sees adcooperation is important going forward. vate sector has in many ways begun to provide the art educavancement in arts and entertainment of all â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would like to see more partnership tion lacking in the school district. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting because I types in Jackson. council, where you have people from the think that we used to have a very narrow definition of what â&#x20AC;&#x153;The organizations in Jackson who business world or the art world or the aca- art education was,â&#x20AC;? Bradley says. fund and see after and service the arts comdemic world just get together once every â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a new sense in the private secmunity are doing well,â&#x20AC;? White says, listother month and have a discussion,â&#x20AC;? john- tor that this is something that there is a real market for, so I ing the symphony, the international ballet son says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know Midtown has a creative feel like I see more arts summer camps and after-school lescompetition, the Arts Council of Greater task force that meets with the Else School sons in all the disciplinesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you know, music, dance and art Jackson and New Stage Theatre as examof Management at Millsaps. The Hinds and theater.â&#x20AC;? ples. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built the crafts center for the County economic development meets Despite how far the city has come, White asserts the craftsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guild, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve opened the new there, the arts commission is there, the need to continue bringing creative and energetic minds into childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen a complete arts center is there, and I would like to see Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where are the visionaries?â&#x20AC;? he asks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t renovation and moving and prospering more of that type of consensus-building we all over this creative economy? Why are we not encouragMississippi Museum of Art in that period, Public art, such as the series of master plan conversation happening in a ing the creative class to come to our community and set up weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built the Convention Center, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve traffic light boxes downtown, sustained way.â&#x20AC;? shop and open small businesses? What can we do to attract a had the revitalization of the King Edward has popped up in Fondren, But there is one area in which the arts smart, young, diverse population?â&#x20AC;? (Hotel) and downtown in the last 10 years. Belhaven and downtown over are failing: K-12 school. White believes the His questions linger in the air, hoping to be answered in the past decade. 25 Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen the renaissance of Fondren; lack of arts education throughout Missis- the next 10 years.


MUSIC

How Far We’ve Come by Briana Robinson

A

September 19 - 25, 2012

COURTESY 5TH CHILD

t the first installment of the Blender series this sumArden Barnett has been promoting shows for close to mer, That Scoundrel, James Crow, 5th Child and 30 years, and is becoming a major player in the music scene Furrows performed, attracting both rap and rock today. He is currently selling tickets for about 23 concerts of fans to Martin’s. Toward the end of the concert, 5th touring musicians for this month and next. Child did a few songs with the band Furrows, which was arBarnett moved back to Jackson around 1986 from Birguably the best part of the night. The collaboration between mingham, Ala. Back then, he says, there were not enough the rapper and local rock band went smoothly, and the crowd people willing to promote shows and own venues here to seemed to be into the groove more than ever. bring folks to the city. “It looks really good in Barnett booked mumy eyes to see fans of two sic for Hal & Mal’s and different genres coming toJubilee!JAM for eight years. gether like that,” 5th says. The Jackson Arts and Mu“That stuff is really cool. sic Foundation indefinitely That’s where we’re headed cancelled Jubilee!JAM, right now—using music to which used to be Jackson’s bridge the racial barrier.” largest music festival, due to Local musician Cody low attendance and lack of Cox and JFP columnist Garcorporate sponsors in 2010. rad Lee organized the BlendWeems thinks that what we er series. The next one is set have now is more sustainto be in Knoxville, Tenn., and able and cost-efficient. Liver Mousse will perform Various smaller festiwith 5th Child there. vals such as Jacktoberfest, 5th Child also perSneakyfest and Babalooza formed earlier this month have popped up. These with the band Spacewolf at mini-festivals “probably MorningBell Records and have a bigger impact on Collaboration in the music scene, such as the one Studioes as 5thWolf. They people,” Weems says. He between 5th Child and Spacewolf, is one of the major mainly performed 5th Child components of today’s music scene in Jackson. also admires Barnett’s work songs with a live band instead with Ardenland to bring in of a computer-generated beats high-quality acts from other behind him. parts of the country at reasonable prices. “Since I’ve been here, Murph Caicedo, the drummer for Spacewolf, came up I feel like there hasn’t been anything really like that,” he says. with the idea after hearing a collaboration that 5th Child did “We’re on par with damn near any city, if you ask me,” with a rock band while in New Orleans several years ago. Barnett says. “For our size of a town, I think our music scene Spacewolf hopes to release a collaboration album with 5th is as good as anyone.” Child next year. Venues such as Duling Hall, Martin’s, Ole Tavern, Un“It was packed, and there was a really mixed crowd,” 5th derground 119 and Hal & Mal’s have live music almost every Child says about the Blender series. He feels that these types weekend and sometimes during the week as well. While they of collaboration would not have been possible 10 years ago thrive along with urban spots like Freelon’s, Dreamz and The in Jackson. Musician, arranger and composer Jamie Weems Spot, 5th Child still thinks something is missing. feels the same way. “I would like to see a lot more live venues open their “I think that if I moved here for the first time today that doors to hip-hop and to know that we can draw a good I would have a much easier time getting in touch with what’s crowd and throw a good show,” 5th Child says. happening and getting in touch with whom to collaborate He feels like there is a stigma attached to hip-hop, causwith,” Weems says. ing promoters to steer away from booking those shows. His

26

most recent performances have been on the road. Brad “Kamikaze” Franklin, rapper and JFP columnist, has been the managing partner of Dreamz JXN for two years. As an artist and a businessman, he’s able to see both sides of the coin. Dreamz hosts showcases twice a month for independent artists. “Dreamz is trying to be at the forefront of being more accommodating for independent artists, especially in hip-hop,” Kamikaze says. Barnett believes that Jackson needs a larger-scaled venue. “I know it’s possible. I know it’s going to happen,” he says. “It has to happen with the way our town is growing.” For Cody Cox, the biggest change in Jackson’s music scene is a sense of community. Ten years ago, there may have been some diverse bands—take Storage 24, for example— but there weren’t as many working together. “There were a lot of great bands when I moved here (in 2000), but not a lot of them were playing with each other or sharing music or band members,” Cox says. Now there could be three or four bands playing somewhere one night, and they all have one or two of the same members. Instead of trying to get famous with one band, Cox says that Jackson musicians are working toward something bigger. “How can we get Jackson and what’s happening here on a bigger plane where more people across the country notice it?” he asks. Barnett and Kamikaze feel that the biggest change in the music scene in the past 10 years has to do with the rise of the Internet. “The first and foremost most drastic change in the music industry is the Internet. There are no ifs, ands or buts. That’s it. And social media,” Barnett says. According to him, the same types of music that there is today has always been around, we’re just able to access it easier. Kamikaze looks at it from a different perspective. “Ten years ago, you almost had to have a record label behind you,” he says. “The music industry has changed so fast; it has just blown my mind.” “The only reason you should want a record deal now is because you want to be famous,” Kamikaze says. He believes musicians should instead be focusing on perfecting their craft and that everyone should follow the independent model. Weems says there was a real shift in how people spent their money. “I feel like in the past three or four years, there’s been an increase in people that have an expectation that there should be good art and music (in Jackson),” he says. “I’m seeing more support from the public in this generation than I’ve ever seen,” Kamikaze says. “The love is definitely greater, but of course it can be better.”


27

jacksonfreepress.com


THE TEAM TRIP BURNS

Look out! The fearless JFP staff recently did our manifesto for our second decade. (See graphic on page 32.)

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JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biggest Stories

O

ver the years, the Jackson Free Press has dug in deep on a number of big stories and topics that produced major results for the city and state. Here are our biggest:

September 19 - 25, 2012

1. Uncovering the real Frank Melton: Staff coverage of the late mayor, and his foibles, started in late 2004 when he was running for mayor and continued through his death. Editor Donna Laddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series of interviews with Melton, and raucous ride-alongs in the Mobile Command Unit, captivated the city. And Adam Lynchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breaking story that Melton had led an assault on a duplex and its schizophrenic tenant landed Melton both in state and federal courtâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, more importantly, helped get the young people out of his home and the guns off his body. See more: jfp.ms/melton.

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2. Jailing a Klansman: When a Canadian filmmaker asked Donna Ladd and photographer Kate Medley to allow him to follow them to Natchez and Meadville in 2005 with the brother of a young man (Charles Moore) killed, along with his friend Henry Dee, by the Klan in 1964, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know they would find the main suspect alive (The Clarion-Ledger had reported him dead.) They also didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that he would die in prison as a result of the trip, the series of award-winning stories and a journal they discovered on a later trip there. See jfp.ms/dee_moore. &AVORITE*&0-OMENTSÂł,IHOOLQORYHZLWKMRXU QDOLVPWKHVXPPHU,LQWHUQHGDWWKH-)30\ LQWHUYLHZ ZLWK )UHHGRP 5LGHU +HOHQ 6LQJOHWRQ FRQWLQXHV WR LQVSLUH PH´ ²/LVD$QGHUVRQLQWHUQIURP2UHJRQ

3. Stopping Domestic Abuse: Editor Donna Ladd decided early on that in one of the most violent states for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where few people talked about itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;domestic abuse must be a primary focus for the paper. The JFP Chick Ball annually raises awareness and money to

&AVORITE *&0 -OMENTS ³, LQWHUYLHZHG µ,¶P QRW\RXU0DPD¶ 0UV 3DW )RUGLFH ,¶G QHYHU LQWHUYLHZHG DQ\RQH DQG ZDV DIUDLG 7KDQN IXOO\ 0UV )RUGLFH KDG EHHQ LQWHUYLHZHG VR PDQ\ WLPHV WKDW VKH ZDV D SUR , VDW LQ KHU ORYHO\ KRPH OLVWHQLQJ WDNLQJ QRWHV ZDWFK LQJ KHU WU\LQJ WR UHPHPEHU DOO 'RQQD WDXJKW PHLQ6KXW8SDQG:ULWHFODVVHV,¶PIRUHYHU JUDWHIXOWRWZR¿QH0LVVLVVLSSLZRPHQIRUJLY LQJ PH P\ VWDUW DW WKH -DFNVRQ )UHH 3UHVV´ ²/\QHWWH +DQVRQ &RS\ &KLHI  /\ QHWWHOLYHVLQ3RUWODQG2UHQHDUKHUVRQVDQG VWLOOZULWHVDQGEORJVUHJXODUO\

help with systemic change. And News Editor Ronni Mottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful and in-depth stories have put a human face on the abuse and helped lead to legislative change and abusers seeking help. See jfp.ms/domesticabuse. 4. Questioning a Bad Idea: The JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Lakes coverageâ&#x20AC;? revealed serious problems and costs with a costly flood-control devel-

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JFP RECOGNITION The JFP has won the following awards since it launched in 2002:

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TEAM JFP from page 28 opment and helped lead to a compromise when many people claimed there couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be one. See page 17 and jfp.ms/pearlriver. &AVORITE*&0-OMENTSÂł0\IDYRULWH-)3PR PHQW ZDV ZKHQ WKH -68 6RQLF %220 GUXP OLQH ZDV WKH VXUSULVH JXHVW DW WKH %HVW RI -DFNVRQ SDUW\ ZKHQ ZH KDG LW DW WKH 0LVVLV VLSSL 0XVHXP RI $UW LQ  $QG WKH ÂżUVW %220IDVKLRQVKRZ  -HII*RRGVOLQJLQJ GULQNV'DYLG:DXJKZRUNLQJWKHUXQZD\DQG DQDIWHUSDUW\IHDWXULQJ'-3KLQJDSULQW3ULFH OHVV´².LPEHUO\*ULIÂżQ$GYHUWLVLQJ'LUHFWRU .LPEHUO\VWDUWHGDWWKH-)3LQDVDSDUW WLPHGLVWULEXWLRQGULYHU

5. Telling Cedricâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story: Brian Johnson wrote an in-depth feature about Cedric Willis who was prosecuted by District Attorney Ed Peters and ADA Bobby Delaughter with shoddy evidence and then served 12 years for murders he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t commit. Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story revealed that the state gave Cedric nothing when he left prison; the late Rev. Ross Olivier was inspired by Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story to help lobby the state to change the restitution law. In addition, Cedric is a regular at the JFP, talking to interns and staffers about how and why Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story made such a difference to him and the world. See jfp.ms/cedric. &AVORITE*&0-OMENTSÂł3XWWLQJWRJHWKHUWKH -DFNSHGLDLVVXH,KDYHOLYHGLQ0LVVLVVLSSLP\ HQWLUHOLIH\HW,KDGQRLGHDWKDWWKHUHZDVWKDW PXFKWRGRLQ-DFNVRQ:KDW,PLVVDERXWWKH -)3LVWKHLQVSLUDWLRQDODQGFKDOOHQJLQJZULWHUÂśV ZRUNVKRS WKDW , WRRN DERXW HYHU\ 7KXUVGD\ RYHUWKHVXPPHU´ ²&DOOLH'DQLHOVLQWHUQ

September 19 - 25, 2012

6. Unpacking Personhood: The JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team coverage of the personhood amendment last year brought a national and a regional public-service award precisely because we refused to fit the story it an us-vs.-them frame. We told the entire story and published columns by â&#x20AC;&#x153;grassroots mamasâ&#x20AC;? that helped defeat the initiative last November. Now, our stories on the continuing attempts to shut down the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abortion clinic continue to attract national attention. See jfp.ms/personhood.

30

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7. Revealing Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pardons: In 2008, Ronni Mott and then-intern Sophie McNeil did research around the state and then revealed to the state and the world that Gov. Haley Barbour had pardoned a series of men

See and add more JFP Moments at jfp.ms/jfpmoments.

who had brutally murdered wives and girlfriends. Even though The New York Times and other national media paid attention to our warning, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s media ignored it. That is, until Barbour exploded with a long list of pardons on his way out of office in 2011; by then, it was too late to preemptively stop him. But our collective conscience is clear. See jfp.ms/pardons. &AVORITE *&0 -OMENTS Âł:KHQ , KDG DQ HDU LQIHFWLRQDQGZHZHUHZRUULHGWKDWWKHRIÂżFH PLJKW EH EXJJHG , FRXOGQÂśW KHDU \RXU ZKLV SHUVVRZHZHQWRXWLQEDFNVR\RXFRXOG\HOO WKHVHFUHWPDWHULDODWPH7KHUHZDVDOVRWKH WLPH0HOWRQWKUHDWHQHGWRVXHXV2UUDWKHU WKH PDQ\ WLPHV , UHPHPEHU 0HOWRQÂśV JRRQ Ă&#x20AC;LSSLQJXVRIIRXWVLGHRI&LW\+DOO´ ² %ULDQ -RKQVRQ 0DQDJLQJ (GLWRU  %ULDQOLYHVLQ&KLFDJRDQGLVDVFLHQFH HGLWRUIRU:RUOG%RRN(QF\FORSHGLD

8. Standing up for kids: A major focus for the JFP has been shining light on the horrible treatment of young people in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools and juvenile-justice system. Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advocates give us credit for helping bring training-school reforms to the state, and judges have told us our explanatory stories help them make better decisions. But much work is left to be done. See jfp.ms/youth. 9. Crushing the Voter ID myth: The JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coverage of voter ID has shown and continues to show the folly in costly legislation that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually stop existing voter fraud. Summer intern Vergie Redmond gets major props for stories that were picked up and mentioned by media across the country this year. See jfp.ms/voterid.

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10. Tweaking Tort Reform: In the early years, Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer spent much time at the Legislature reporting on the myths of tort reformâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the state media that only reported half the story. Time has proved us correct. See jfp.ms/hoodwinked. &AVORITE *&0 -OMENTS Âł/HDUQLQJ KDQGVRQ DERXW QDUUDWLYH QHZV ZULWLQJ DQG WHOOLQJ WKH KXPDQVLGHRIDVWRU\IRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHE\YLV LWLQJ *UDFH +RXVH DQG ZULWLQJ DOO WKH GHWDLOV DERXWWKHWKLQJV,VDZDQGSHRSOH,PHWZKLOH ,ZDVWKHUH´ ²'XVWLQ&DUGRQ-)3'DLO\DQG&RS\(GLWRU 'XVWLQVWDUWHGDWWKH-)3DVDQLQWHUQLQ DIWHU JUDGXDWLQJ IURP 8QLYHUVLW\ RI 6RXWKHUQ 0LVVLVVLSSL


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3TEPHEN´S"EST*&0 -OMENT 

SEPTEMBER 2002: THE JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MISSION What: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mission is to provide straightforward, in-depth, wellreasoned and insightful reporting about news, politics and cultural events in Jackson.â&#x20AC;?

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;To connect the community through truth and the pursuit of excellence.â&#x20AC;?

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A Brief History of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smart Alternativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

September 19 - 25, 2012

T

32

he Jackson Free Press started with no money but a big dream. Within weeks of Donna Ladd moving back to Mississippi in June 2001, and bringing Todd Stauffer with her, the two started talking about Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need for a locally owned, diverse and hard-hitting newspaper that celebrated what was great about Jackson and probed what its problems, and solutions, are. And give a voice to the voiceless. They were lucky enough to move into a Belhaven duplex being vacated by recent University of Southern Mississippi graduate Stephen Barnette (who was moving into a loft he had renovated downtown). The three became immediate friends, united in part by the vision that Jackson, and thus Mississippi, could become the kind of city and state that kept and attracted the best and the brightest, not the opposite, which seemed to be the predominant belief. We were concerned that Jackson had no local newspaper that was truly diverse in its coverage and its staffâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or that appealed to anyone under 40â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and believed the answer was a new alternative newsweekly. Todd and Donna started taking the idea seriously after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, when they decided it was time to start working to improve oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little postage stamp of the world, as William Faulkner famously said. Their good friend, editor Amy Haimerl, was laid off by a New York magazine after 9/11 and came to Jackson for several months to help develop a business plan. It was Amy who came up with the name Jackson Free Press while reading a history of the black press in Mississippi and learning about the Mississippi Free Press, a boycotted and maligned Civil Rights Movement newspaper produced by a multiracial group of progressive thinkers including Medgar Evers, Hazel Brannon

Smith and others in the 1960s on Farish Street. After talking and planning for nearly a year, the then all-volunteer team expanded to include Jackson State University graphics professor Jimmy Mumford and sales rep Alisa Price, who came from the now-defunct Planet Weekly to sell advertising (she got paid commission). The team was lucky enough to have Ăźber-photographers Jaro Vacek and Charles Smith volunteer to help as well as Deborah Noel who did the event calendars and wrote about wellness. Artist Tony DiFatta designed the first cover and many more, as did Jimbo Harwell. Bingo Gunter, then a manager at Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, was the first assistant editor. JoAnne Prichard Morris joined as senior/consulting editor. Amy eventually landed back in New York where she developed multiple pieces about Jackson at CNN Money and Fortune Small Business. The paper also acquired a sports guy named Doctor Sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to kill you if we told you his real nameâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a puffy, stump-tail office cat named Miss S (who was oddly enamored with Doctor S). Her S stood for â&#x20AC;&#x153;stump.â&#x20AC;? His did not. The JFP launched as a biweekly paperâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smart Alternativeâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;on Donnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late mother Katie Maeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday, Sept. 22, 2002, and the team initially worked out of a one-bedroom apartment on Fortification Street. Early the next year, Donna and Todd moved the thensmall staff into the other side of their duplex in Belhavenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; which had two floors and two bedrooms (and where their cats Willie Hoyt and King Eddie came and went at will). Donna was delighted that the JFP was headquartered across the street from the home of the man who used to run the (white) Citizens Councils of America. The JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next big milestone came in early summer 2004

when the paper decided to go weekly and to move into a real officeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;its current site in Fondren in a two-story building Doctor S fondly dubbed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;JFP tower.â&#x20AC;? The first weekly JFP was published the week before the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education; our issue commemorating the event had a DiFatta-designed collage of racist clippings from The Clarion-Ledger, the Jackson Daily News and other media outlets from the 1960s slamming the decision. The JFP has steadily grown through the years, even through the economic and newspaper downturns, and has a very diverse readership. Our staff has expanded to 22 (paid!) staffers with a variety of freelancers and a high-quality internship training program. We launched BOOM Jackson as an annual magazine in 2008 and took it quarterly in 2010. A very proud moment came when we doubled our office space in January 2008, ending up with almost an entire floor and a classroom! We went daily at jfpdaily.com four years ago and just this summer launched the amazing 3.0 version of our website (thanks, Matt Heindl!) and became a member of the Associated Press so Mississippians do not have to pay for wire news online in response to daily newspapers launching pay walls. One of our favorite moments was when the staff at the Mississippi Legislature replaced the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson Daily Newsâ&#x20AC;? placard with one reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson Free Press.â&#x20AC;? See and add JFP moments at jfp.ms/jfpmoments.

THEN AND NOW: CHALLENGING JACKSON â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jackson Free Press is the newspaper that Jackson needs. We will celebrate the old girl in every issue. We will show that we love Jackson, and we hate whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ailing her. But instead of complaining, we will offer solutions. That, we believe, is what a good alternative newspaper is about.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Editor in chief Donna Ladd JFP Cause Statement, 2002


1405 Old Square Road Jackson MS

601-982-9991

Lunch Buffet

WEDNESDAY 9/19

Jason Turner (Acoustic Rock)

THURSDAY 9/20

Spirits of the House (Traditional Irish) FRIDAY 9/21

Juvenators (Blues)

SATURDAY 9/22

Zach Lovett & Jeremiah Strickland -Voted Best of Jackson2003 - 2012

Mon - Fri: lunch 11-2 dinner 5- 9:30 Sat: 4-9:30

(Folk)

MONDAY 9/24

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 9/25

Open Mic hosted by Jason Bailey

Try our new wraps while they last.

â&#x20AC;˘ Reuben â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Veggie â&#x20AC;˘Jerk Chicken and more!

Â&#x2026;-PUTPG)FBMUIZ.FOV$IPJDFT Â&#x2026;(MVUFO'SFF0QUJPOT Â&#x2026;7FHBO0QUJPOT %PHXPPE'FTUJWBM %PHXPPE#MWE'MPXPPE .4



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33


34

September 19 - 25, 2012


8 DAYS p 36 | FILM p 39 | MUSIC p 40 | SPORTS p 43

MATT VALENTINE

Literary Photographer:

A Snapshot of Natasha Trethewey by C. Liegh McInnis

A

t first glance, a reader may not recognize Natasha Trethewey in the African American tradition of being innately political, but that is only if one is oblivious to the power of subtlety and the politics of the body. Trethewey, the Mississippi and national poet laureate, was born in Gulfport in 1966. She earned a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in poetry from Hollins University and a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in fine art in poetry from the University of Massachusetts. She uses subtle imagery and mapping (the visualization of abstract data) to draw the reader into the personal lives of her speakers. Trethewey is a literary photographer, according to past poet laureate Rita Dove, using the artifacts in her charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives to reveal their plight 5NITED3TATES0OET and their response ,AUREATE.ATASHA 4RETHEWEYZLOO to their plight. UHDGKHUSRHWU\ Trethewey is DW-DFNVRQ6WDWH more introverted 8QLYHUVLW\  in her subject mat-RKQ5/\QFK6W RQ 6HSWDWSP ter and presentaLQURRP tion than writers RIWKH'ROO\H0( such as Sonia 5RELQVRQ&ROOHJH RI/LEHUDO$UWV Sanchez, Nikki %XLOGLQJ)RUPRUH Giovanni or Amiri LQIRUPDWLRQDERXW Baraka. Her poWKLVIUHHHYHQWFDOO ems seem always WKH0DUJDUHW:DONHU &HQWHUDW-DFNVRQ to be in the form 6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\DW of introspective  thought or personRUYLVLWPZD# MVXPVHGX al letters to a single reader, which, as a technique, works to strengthen the intensity. Secondly, she employs the jazz tech-

nique of troping a European structure or form by filling, bending, or modifying it with African American artifacts and sensibility, especially in her celebration of the oppressed. Tretheweyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mastery of wit and imagery is seen clearly in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Storyville Diaryâ&#x20AC;? section of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bellocqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ophelia.â&#x20AC;? These letters by Ophelia show the nature in which western industrialization (specifically the international slave trade) has marginalized humanity, especially the humanity of people of color. Ophelia migrates from Mississippi to New Orleans in 1910 for better opportunity, but is only able to find work as a prostitute. This is compelling because Opheliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fate foreshadows and parallels the fate of many African Americans who traveled north to seek freedom and work but found only more poverty and oppression in the same way that Margaret Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jubileeâ&#x20AC;? and Richard Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Boyâ&#x20AC;? do the same. Thus, Trethewey is working in the tradition of art as social commentary if not art as protest. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectrum: February 1912â&#x20AC;? Tretheweyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portrait of the industrialized city smacks of the same disillusionment and depression as the work of Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Wright. Progress, in manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to reject the metaphysical to embrace the financial, has created death and decay: â&#x20AC;&#x153;No sun, and the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dull palette/ of grayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weathered ships docked at the quay, rats/ dozing in the hull, drizzle slicking dark stones/ of the streets. Mornings such as these, I walk/ among the weary, their eyes sunken/ as if each body, diseased and dying,/ would pull itself inside, back to the shining/ center â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photography: October 1911,â&#x20AC;? Trethewey contemplates more on what

Natasha Trethewey, the Mississippi and national poet laureate, speaks and reads passages from her new book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrallâ&#x20AC;? at Jackson State University Sept. 20.

humanity can and cannot see and obtain with technology. There is a notion that for all its advancement, some part of humanity is always lost, always not seen, always unattended. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bellocq talks to me about light, shows me/ how to use shadow, how to fill the frame/ with objectsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;their intricate positions/ I thrill to the magic of it â&#x20AC;Ś I look at what he can see through his lens/ and what he cannotâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;silverfish behind/ the walls, the yellow tint of a faded bruiseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;/ other things

here, what the camera misses.â&#x20AC;? Technology has usefulness, but it also misses much, unable, as Bellocqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camera, to capture human totality, such as the meaning of the lingering faded bruise. In both pieces, Trethewey shows that humanity is the primary casualty of industrialization without morality and that the enslavement and objectification of African Americans is a most clear example of the loss 35 of humanity. jacksonfreepress.com

Excerpted from â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Discussion of Contemporary African American Poetsâ&#x20AC;?


FRIDAY 9/21 & SATURDAY 9/22

FRIDAY 9/21

SATURDAY 9/22

John Maxwell presents the Religious Monologues at Broadmeadow UMC.

The Mississippi Greek Weekend Block Jam is at Dreamz JXN.

Bluesman Grady Champion performs at Underground 119.

BEST BETS

WEDNESDAY 9/19

Author Francoise Hamlin speaks during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … See the classic film “The Birds” at 7 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. … Seryn and Julia Sinclair perform at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $5 advance, $10 at door; call 800-745-3000. … Dialogue and Gena Hall Stringer perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. $10; call 601-292-7121. … The play “The Foreigner” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.); runs through Sept. 23. $22-28; call 601-948-3533.

THURSDAY 9/20

ALISSA ANDERSON

The artist reception for Beckie Barnett and Amy Giust is from 5-7:30 p.m. at Southern Breeze Gallery (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5005, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-607-4147. … Author Mary Elizabeth Smith signs copies of “Altars“ from 5-6:30 p.m. at View Gallery (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 105, Ridgeland). $19.95 book; call 601-278-3991. … The Center for Violence Prevention’s Masquerade Party, a JFP-sponsored event, is at 6:30 p.m. at The South (627 E.

September 19 - 25, 2012

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood performs at Duling Hall Sept. 23 at 8 p.m.

36

Silas Brown St.). Advance tickets only. $50; call 601-9324198. … The musical “Godspell” is at 7:30 p.m. at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon); runs through Sept. 23. $10$15; call 601-825-1293. … Mississippi Greek Weekend kicks off with the Mix and Mingle at 7:30 p.m. at One University Place (1100 John R Lynch St). More events through Sept. 23. $35 pass, some events free; msgreekweekend.com. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts Soul Lesson Thursday. … Set the Controls plays at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. For ages 18 and up. $8 advance, $10 at door; call 601-292-7121 or 800745-3000. … Symphony at Sunset is at 7 p.m. at The Cedars (4145 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-981-9606.

FRIDAY 9/21

Kelvin Moore of the Jackson Convention Complex speaks at the Friday Forum at 9 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Free; email jonathan. lee@msprodinc.com. … The Mississippi Greek Weekend Block Jam at Dreamz JXN includes happy hour at 5 p.m., the main event at 7 p.m. ($5) and the after-party at 10 p.m. ($5). msgreekweekend.com. … Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “Red Rum” at 7 p.m. at Cool Water Catering & Events BY LATASHA WILLIS (1011 Lake Harbor Drive, Ridgeland). BYOB. $40; call or 601-331-4045 JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM 601-668-2214 to RSVP. … Ruben Studdard FAX: 601-510-9019 and Sir Charles Jones perform at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. DAILY UPDATES AT $29-$54; call 800-745-3000. JFPEVENTS.COM … John Maxwell presents the dinner theater “Flower Child,” a JFP-sponsored event, at 7 p.m. at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Benefits CONTACT the Crisis Line. $35; call 601-713-4099. … Caroline Herring performs at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall. $12 advance, $15 at door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

AWEBB3296/FLICKR.COM

SEPT. 19-26, 2012

EVENTS@

SATURDAY 9/22

Music in the City featuring harpsichordist John Paul is at 5:45 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in Trustmark Grand Hall. Free, donations welcome; call 601-960-1515. … The JSU Tigers take on Southern University at the Battle of the Big Cats at 4 p.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). $25-$45; call 601-979-2420 or 800-745-3000. … The Farish Street Heritage Festival is at 4 p.m. on Farish Street. $10 advance, $15 at gate; call 601-948-5667. … Grady Champion is at Underground 119. … … John Maxwell presents the dinner theater “Fish Tale” at 7 p.m. at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Benefits CONTACT the Crisis Line. $35; call 601-713-4099. The fundraiser is a JFP-sponsored event. … Cruzin’ the Boulevard is from 5-7:30 p.m. at Clinton Plaza Shopping Center (200 Clinton Blvd., Clinton). Free; call 601-924-5472. … Runaway Sun is at Ole Tavern. For ages 21 and up. $5-$6.

SUNDAY 9/23

The Voter Registration Family Cookout is at 3 p.m. at Lake Hico Park (4801 Watkins Drive). Call 601-321-1966. … The Cathead Tasting at Bravo! (4500 Interstate 55 N.) is from 4-6 p.m. . RSVP. $25; call 601-982-8111. … The Chris Robinson Brotherhood performs at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall. $20 advance, $25 at door; call 800-745-3000. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts Sugar Water Purple Sunday Open-mic.

R&B star and “American Idol” winner Ruben Studdard performs at Thalia Mara Hall Sept. 21 at 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY 9/24

Blanket Truth and Liver Mousse perform at Morningbell Studios. … The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $5.

TUESDAY 9/25

WellsFest Art Night at Duling Hall includes a preview party at 5:30 p.m. and the live auction at 7 p.m. Chris Gill and Friends performs. Proceeds benefit the Farish Street YMCA. Art for sale; call 601-353-0658. … The wine dinner at 6:30 p.m. at Amerigo (6592 Old Canton Road) includes a four-course meal. $35; call 601-977-0563 to RSVP.

WEDNESDAY 9/26

The Jackson Restaurant Week VIP Party is at 6:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Wear cocktail attire. Limited tickets. $39; vip.eatjackson.com. … Cherub and Mansions on the Moon perform at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 18 and up. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


JFP EVENTS #/--5.)49 Events at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Black Tie Scholarship Gala Sept. 21, 6 p.m. The Jackson State University National Alumni Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundraiser includes dinner, a silent auction and music. $100; call 601-979-2281. â&#x20AC;˘ Girl Scouts of Greater Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Women of Distinction Awards Night Sept. 24, 6-9 p.m. The organization honors six women for their accomplishments and community contributions. Reservations required. $125, sponsorships available; call 601-326-5641. Classes at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). For high school students. Registration required. $50; call 601-974-1130. â&#x20AC;˘ Do You See What I See: Media and Meaning Mondays Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, 6-8 p.m. Learn how media images convey ideas and tell stories through advertising and other means. â&#x20AC;˘ Abnormal Psychology Sept. 25 and Sept. 27, 4-6 p.m. Learn about disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol dependence and eating disorders. Events at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Free; call 601-932-2562. â&#x20AC;˘ Computer Class for Adults Sept. 20, 10-11 a.m. Learn to use Microsoft Word. â&#x20AC;˘ Pajama Party Sept. 20, 5-6 p.m. Enjoy pancakes, stories and crafts. Bring a stuffed animal. Mississippi Propane Autogas Roadshow Sept. 20, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Test-drive vehicles and learn from industry experts. Registration is at 9 a.m. Free; usepropaneautogas.com. Precinct 3 COPS Meeting Sept. 20, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0003. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freedom for Birthâ&#x20AC;? Documentary Screening and Discussion Sept. 20, 6-8:30 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The film is about the midwifery and home birth movement. A discussion about maternal care in Mississippi follows. Free; call 662-607-8868. LABA-Link Planning Meeting Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., at Lingofest (7048 Old Canton

One Weekend Only

Road, Ridgeland). The Latin American Business Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s officers and interested parties meet. Free; email labalink@gmail.com. Home Depotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Do-It-Herself Workshop Sept. 20, 6:30-8 p.m., at Home Depot, Madison (211 Colony Way, Madison). Learn to install backsplashes and restore cabinets. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workshop included. Free; call 601-856-4660. Mississippi Paleontology Lecture Sept. 20, 7 p.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). George Phillips of the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science speaks. Free; call 601-926-1104.

F OOTBALL P ROMO

No Cover 10pm - Midnight Buy 1 Get 1 Free 10pm -Midnight

Make a Splash Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). The program allows students to explore water-related topics. $6, $5 seniors, $4 ages 3-18, children under 3 free; call 601-576-6000.

September 20 - 22 September 20 & 21 Amazin Lazy Boi Band

Arrow Dash Sept. 22, 8 a.m., at Northside Elementary School (451 Arrow Drive, Clinton). The race includes a run/walk and a one-mile fun run. Awards given. $25, $10 fun run, $20 ghost runner, $65 family (up to five); call 601-953-1464.

September 22 Jerekus Singleton

Successful Selling Systems Workshop Sept. 22, 8:30 a.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Learn selling philosophies and principles. Registration required. $249; call 601-540-5415.

303 North Farish St. Jackson, MS 601.983.1148 fjonescorner.com

Young Business Leaders of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall Banquet Sept. 24, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The keynote speaker is Major Jeff Struecker, the former U.S. Army Ranger featured in the book and movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Hawk Down.â&#x20AC;? Sponsorships available. $35, $280 table; call 601-201-5489. Jackson Touchdown Club Lunch Meeting Sept. 24, 11:30 a.m., at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). Mississippi State University head football coach Dan Mullen speaks. $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186. MS Dinner of Champions Sept. 24, 7-9 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The Alabama-Mississippi Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society is the host. $150; call 601-856-5831. Boy Scouts of America Four Man Scramble Golf Tournament Sept. 25, 8 a.m., at Lake Caroline Golf Course (118 Caroline Club Circle, more EVENTS, page 38

Llama Llamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Patient Mama

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY VIKING BOOKS

I

I\RXÂśUHDPRP\RXÂśYHEHHQWKHUH,WGRHVQÂśWPDWWHULI\RXDUHD VLQJOHPRPDPDUULHGPRPRUDGLYRUFHGPRP,WGRHVQÂśWPDWWHU LI\RXZRUNRXWRIWKHKRPHLI\RXVWXG\IUDQWLFDOO\IRUDQHZ GHJUHHZKLOH\RXUNLGVDUHDWVFKRROLI\RXVSHQG\RXUGD\VMXJJOLQJ WKLQJVDWRQFHIURP\RXUOLYLQJURRPRULI\RXPDQDJHVRPH FRPELQDWLRQRIWKHDERYH6RPHWLPHVVRPXFKVDQLW\GHSHQGVXSRQ WZRWLQ\VHFRQGVRIJURZQXSWLPHWRWDONWR\RXUEHVWIULHQGZLWKRXW EHLQJDVNHGÂł%XW:+<GRHV0LVV%ULWWDQ\IHHODQJU\ZLWK0U-RKQ" $QG0DPDZKHUHLVWKHVHZDJHWUHDWPHQWSODQW"&DQZHJRWKHUH" $QG0DPDFDQZHSOHDVHKDYHSL]]DIRUGLQQHU5,*+712:"´  2XUROGIULHQG0DPD/ODPDLVEDFNDQGVKHVHQGVWKHNLGVLQWR Take your little ones to WKHSOD\URRPWRSOD\WRJHWKHUZKLOHVKHVLWVGRZQWRHQMR\DFXS meet the original â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mama RIWHDZLWKDQHZQHLJKERU2IFRXUVHSOD\WLPHGRHVQÂśWJRTXLWHDV Llama,â&#x20AC;? author Anna 0DPD/ODPDPLJKWKDYHKRSHG,I\RXDQG\RXUOLWWOHVZDQWWRÂżQG Dewdney, at Lemuria RXWKRZWKHVDLQWHG0DPDGHDOVZLWKWKHODWHVWÂłOODPDPHUJHQF\´ Sept. 24. DQGWUDQVIRUPVDGLVDVWHUUHSOHWHZLWKORVVRIOLPEEDFNLQWRD SHDFHIXOSOD\WLPHGRQÂśWPLVVDXWKRUDQGLOOXVWUDWRU$QQD'HZGQH\ DW/HPXULDWRVLJQ\RXUFRS\RIWKHQHZÂł/ODPD/ODPD7LPHWR 6KDUH´ 9LNLQJ%RRNV RUDQ\RI\RXURWKHU/ODPD/ODPDIDYRULWHV  $QQD'HZGQH\ZLOOEHDW/HPXULD%RRNV ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH 6HSWDW SPWRVLJQFRSLHVRIKHUODWHVW´/ODPD/ODPDÂľERRN  ².HOO\%U\DQ6PLWK

37


JFP EVENTS

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

THURSDAYS

09/20

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

September 20

LADIES NIGHT w/ NIGHT DJ Stache COLLEGE

Madison). The tournament is a fundraiser for the Andrew Jackson Council Boy Scouts. Registration required. $150 individuals, $600 and up for teams, sponsorships available; call 601-948-6111.

$2.25 LONGNECKS • $3.25 WELL DRINKS

09/21

Kenny Brown Band

SATURDAY

09/22

LADIES DRINK FREE Friday September 21

Unknown

Hinson Liam Cathchings & The Jolly Racket

Today the Moon Tomorrow the Sun

Saturday Don’t Forget To Stop By Our

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

Coming Soon

September 22

Iron Feathers

with Runaway Sun

Monday

September 24

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

September 25

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday September 26 September 19 - 25, 2012

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

38

The Werks September 27, 2012 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

7:30 p.m. through Oct. 25. $10 class, $70 series. • Belly Dance Class Tuesdays at 6 p.m. through Oct. 30. $10 per class, $50 for all six classes.

Mayor’s Ward 6 Community Meeting Sept. 25, 6 p.m., at Anderson United Methodist Church South (1315 W. McDowell Road). Share suggestions, address concerns and receive information on services. Free; call 601-960-1084.

Discover Series - Real Men Craft Class Sept. 20, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Choose from blacksmithing or spoon carving. $25; call 601856-7546.

Jackson Audubon Society Chapter Meeting Sept. 25, 6:30 p.m., at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). Biologist Andrew Whitehurst of the Gulf Restoration Network is the speaker. Open to the public. Free; call 601-956-7444.

Mississippi Magnolia Tatters Sept. 25, 6-7:30 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). The lace-making class is open to the public. No materials fee. Free; call 601-932-2562.

Jobs for Jacksonians Job Fair and Business Engagement Summit Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Learn about employment and educational opportunities, and sign up for the city’s Jobs for Jacksonians program. Free; call 601-961-4JOB.

8PM - UNTIL • 9 FLAT SCREENS FRIDAY

)5203$*(

7%,,.%33 KNOW Hunger Nutrition Fair. The program includes health screenings and meal-planning tips. Volunteers and food donations welcome. Free; call 601-714-4660 or 601-973-7086. • Sept. 19, 3-6 p.m., at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St., Vicksburg). • Sept. 20, 3-6 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). It’s a Girl Thing Sept. 20, 5:30 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). The event for women includes a wine tasting, a light dinner and medical advice. RSVP. Free; call 877-907-7642.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Southern Hospitality” Auditions Sept. 22, 10 a.m., and Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m., at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Call 601825-1293.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings include readings. Call 601-366-7619. • “Bad Kitty for President” Sept. 20, 4 p.m. Nick Bruel signs books. $13.99 book. • “Strom Thurmond’s America” Sept. 21, 5 p.m. $30 book. • “Living Proof” Sept. 24, 5 p.m. Kira Peikoff signs books. $24 book. • “Man in the Blue Moon” Sept. 25, 5 p.m. Michael Morris signs books. $19.99 book. Natasha Trethewey Poetry Reading Sept. 20, 3 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the Dollye M.E. Robinson College of Liberal Arts, room 166/266. Trethewey is a Pulitzer Prize winner, and the Mississippi and national Poet Laureate. Reception in the Margaret Walker Center. Free; call 601-979-3935. “Once Upon a Fall Festival” Children’s Author Series: Obert Skye Sept. 26, 3-5 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Skye signs “Potterwookie: The Creature From my Closet.” $18 (includes book); call 601-981-5469.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Call 601-213-6355. • Ballroom Preview Class Thursdays at

"%4(%#(!.'% Project Homeless Connect Homeless Conference Sept. 20, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Galloway Memorial United Methodist Church (305 N. Congress St.). Includes testimonials and information on services. Free; call 601-213-5301. Flowood Chamber Cup Sept. 20-21, at The Refuge Golf Course (2100 Refuge Blvd., Flowood). Registration required. Proceeds benefit Mississippi Blood Services. $500 team, $5-$20 mulligans, $125 hole sponsorship; call 601-932-8007. Light the Night Walk Sept. 20, 7 p.m., at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl). Checkin is at 5 p.m., the remembrance ceremony is at 6:15 p.m., and the walk is at 7 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Free; call 601-956-7447. Hinds County Human Resource Agency Awards and Recognition Gala Sept. 21, 7 p.m., at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Proceeds go towards programs such as home-delivered meals and rural transportation. $50; call 601-923-1838. Cyclists Curing Cancer Century Ride Sept. 22, 7:30 a.m., at Baptist Healthplex, Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton). The bike ride along the Natchez Trace benefits Baptist Cancer Services’ Serenity Garden. $45; call 601-968-1038. Quarterly Youth Leadership Meeting - Central Region Sept. 22-23, 10 a.m., at Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Road). Youth ages 10-18 learn about becoming activists. Lunch included. RSVP. Free; find “Mississippi Youth Hip Hop Summit” on Facebook. The Pink Plate Event Sept. 23, 2-6 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). The three-course meal with door prizes benefits the Susan G. Komen Foundation. $65, $120 couples; call 769226-3725 or 601-213-7902. Wine Pairing Fundraiser Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m., at Olga’s Fine Dining (4760 Interstate 55 N.). Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training. Limited seating. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. $50; call 601-366-1366. Bottom Line for Kids Benefit Dinner and Auction Sept. 25, 6 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The program includes a cocktail hour, live and silent auctions, and dinner. Patrick Harkins performs. Proceeds benefit Southern Christian Services, a nonprofit that helps abused and neglected children. $100; call 601-354-0983; email scscylisa@bellsouth.net. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F

No Rules for Money

South of Walmart in Madison

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Sept. 21 - Thurs. Sept. 27 2012

LUCKY MONKEY PICTURES

Trouble With The Curve PG13

Last Ounce Of Courage PG

End Of Watch R

Arbitrage

House At The End Of The Street PG13

The Possession PG13

3-D Dredd

R

Unconditional PG13 The Master

R

3-D Resident Evil Retribution R 3-D Finding Nemo

“Arbitrage” provides an excellent part for Richard Gere’s low-key style.

“A

rbitrage” opens on a large jet surfing the clouds. Robert Miller (Richard Gere) owns the jet, the people in it and half of Manhattan. He lives high, operating under a credo that money can fix anything. He lies, cheats, deceives and breaks all sorts of laws to hoard mountains of money. Robert loves wealth more than his family. He is a rotten socio-money-path. He’s also on the brink of financial ruin if he doesn’t sell his business before the audit turns up fraud. You may wonder why anyone would invest time, money and energy in making a film about such a loathsome character. Is it because financial crooks like Robert ignited a global economic downturn? Is it because Robert represents the epidemic insidious greed that threatens to eat us all? Or is it the relentless fascination some folks have with the super rich (the type of curiosity that sells Vanity Fair and other uppity rags)? I don’t know the answer. What I found intriguing was that at some point in this melodramatic family financial thriller, the Machiavellian oligarchy yanks us into his self-created nightmare. This is a testament to the narrative power of the film, written and directed by Nicholas Jarecki. The jet that opens the film makes a perfect a landing bringing Robert back down to Earth. He breezes off the plane and into his waiting sedan. He arrives in good spirits for his 60th birthday party. It’s an intimate gathering that includes his wide-eyed and wonderful wife, Ellen (Susan Sarandon), two grown children who work for the company, their spouses and the grandchildren. After Robert gives a sentimental speech about family, he rushes off to spend time with Julie (Laetitia Casta), his plump-lipped French mistress, who lives in an apartment Robert’s company leases and works in an art gallery that his company finances.

It’s a complicated arrangement, but Robert’s that kind of guy. He’s made “arbitrage” his lifestyle. For those who are as hedge-fund ignorant as I am, here’s the investopedia. com definition of arbitrage: It “exists as a result of market inefficiencies; it provides a mechanism to ensure prices do not deviate substantially from fair value for long periods of time,” That’s the way Robert evaluates relationships and events. Robert juggles one challenge after another, but then gets involved in his own Chappaquiddick. He takes Julie on an impromptu getaway, falls asleep at the wheel, crashes the car and flips it over. The girl with the enchanting accent dies with her eyes wide open. Robert kicks his way out of the car. As he turns to look back, the car bursts into flames. This moves him into action. He flees the scene and calls a young black man named Jimmy (Nate Parker) to pick him up. Detective Michael Bryer (Tim Roth) finds the thread of deception that leads him to Robert and Jimmy and their connections and conspiracies and so on. The movie, which starts off sluggishly, picks up the pace when Detective Bryer gets on the case. Bryer’s not a shining white knight of serve-and-protect virtue; he bends rules, calls in favors and curses out judges. He is part of a bureaucratic system, but it’s not a system that binds the Millers. Jarecki tells us that money has no rules. I won’t spoil the dramatic jerks in the story, but the acting holds together. Gere’s charisma and low-key style make his character work better than one would expect. I’m not sure where the time goes, but 30-plus years ago, Gere hit the jackpot in “American Gigolo.” He still has “it” going on for him on the screen. The scene-stealer, however, is the wife, Ellen. Sarandon provides the light in a morality play without any sense of right and wrong.

G

Lawless

R

R

2016 Obama’s America PG ParaNorman (non 3-D) PG The Odd Life Of Timothy Green PG The Campaign R

Friday, September 21, 2012

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Otis Lotus D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

by Anita Modak-Truran

39


DIVERSIONS | music

Sweet Caroline

How did you begin playing music? When I was living in Oxford, Mississippi, I started playing in a bluegrass band, The Sincere Ramblers, then developed my career in Austin, Texas. How does your background in southern studies influence your music? The songs are in many ways exactly what I studied in school like folklore, short stories. ... It was a great degree for a southern musician. Sometimes I wonder if I write about things people in the south don’t want to hear about or people not in the South don’t care about, but that’s when I’m feeling cynical. I am writing about what I know, in hopes that the story is bigger than me or the region I’m in, and I think in many times it is.

by Victoria Sherwood

NAME: Caroline Herring

How did you transition into folk music? I loved folk music in college and listened to it a lot, I’ve always loved folk music. Playing on ones own, folk music is a lot easier to play, but I enjoyed playing blue grass. There are some similarities.

FROM: Canton, Miss. CURRENTLY LIVING: Atlanta, Ga.

What do you love about the south? I love the diversity of people, the importance of music and literature, and the spirituality inherent in the south.

INTERESTING FACT: Herring is a founder of Thacker Mountain Radio, which has been going on for about 15 years now. Hear it weekly on Mississippi Public Broadcasting.

What do you hope people will gain from listening to songs about these stories? I don’t go about the music with an agenda. I’m a musician. I like to put on a good show. I think it’s quality music, and people like to listen to intelligent music and listen to views that might not be their own. I hope they have a good time and come away learning something.

TOM FAHEY

Caroline Herring plays at Duling Hall (662 Duling Ave., 601-362-8440) Friday, Sept. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Purchase tickets at MorningBell Records, Babalu Tacos and Tapas or ticketmaster.com.

The Redneck Jazz of Jimmy Herring by Tom Speed

September 19 - 25, 2012

40

some way springs from the common nexus of Col. Bruce Hampton, who fronted the ARU and helmed several successive bands that served as a de facto training ground for a generation of improvisational musicians. Longtime ally and fellow Aquarium Rescue Unit alumnus Jeff “Apt. Q-258” Sipe is the drummer, bassist Neal Fountain played with Hampton in the Fiji Mariners and keyboardist Matt Slocum also plays with Oteil and the Peacemakers, a group led by the Allman Brothers and Aquarium Rescue Unit bassist Oteil Burbridge. Though each of these musicians is highly accomplished in both formal and informal settings, the music on the allinstrumental “Subject To Change Without Notice” manages to steer clear of academic pomposity. Like the Aquarium Rescue Unit, the Jimmy Herring Band samples a swatch of several styles by mixing them up in an improvisational maelstrom. The 11-track album is full of fun forays into a wide range of genres, shuffling effortlessly between gypsy jazz (“Red Wing Special”), funk blues (“Bilgewater Blues”) and gospeltinged tunes (“Aberdeen”). To capitalize on the talent in the band,

the artists kept the eight original songs intentionally simple, Herring said recently via telephone. “I kind of had the ideas of songs,” he says. “I’d written eight songs, and COURTESY ABSTRACTLOGIX

G

uitarist Jimmy Herring has made a career as a stalwart of the jamband scene. He’s played with the Grateful Dead and the Allmans. He was a founding member and crucial cog in the wheel of the seminal and highly influential proto jam band the Aquarium Rescue Unit, and he’s currently the lead guitarist for Widespread Panic. But in his solo career, Herring avoids imitating the sounds of his more highprofile gigs. He has always leaned towards the jazzier side of the jam equation. Since high school, his bands have been steeped in the jazz-fusion of the ’70s, covering music by the likes of Dixie Dregs and the Mahavishnu Orchestra. He even married the two sides of his musical career in the 1990s with the band Jazz is Dead, which performed jazz-fusion renditions of Grateful Dead songs. Herring arrives in Jackson Sept. 27 to play a show at Duling Hall in support of his second solo album, “Subject To Change Without Notice.” He comes with a stellar cast of compatriots who comprise his Jimmy Herring Band—the same group that performed on the album. Each of them in

“Subject to Change Without Notice,” the latest solo venture from Widespread Panic’s lead guitarist, delivers a smattering of genres.

I basically just slipped them the tunes and they came up with their own parts.” Whereas Herring’s solo debut, 2008’s “Lifeboat,” fit more firmly in the jazz fusion genre, “Subject To Change Without Notice” is notable for its more traditional song structures featuring promi-

nent melodies that mimic what a human voice might sing. “It’s just where I am right now,” Herring said. “I think from so many years of playing with singers and songwriters that it just kind of rubbed off on me.” In addition to the original songs, the three cover songs reveal something about the range of influences that are part of the musical stew, too. The Beatles’ “Within You Without You” features an appearance by Herring’s 18-year-old son, Carter, on cello. The group tackles Mahavishnu Orchestra’s “Hope” with the help of saxophonist Bill Evans and summon a soul jazz groove on Jimmy McGriff’s “Miss Poopie,” long a concert staple. With the Jimmy Herring Band, rock, jazz, funk, soul, country and more are all mixed up into a sound that Herring jokingly refers to as “Redneck Jazz.” Jimmy Herring performs at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601-362-8440) Thursday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. The show is for ages 18 and up. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000 or visit ardenland.net for more information.


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THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 9/19

Restaurant Open As Usual

THURSDAY 9/20 Stiff Necked Fools (Red Room) Thomas Jackson (Dining Room)

FRIDAY 9/21 Southern Comfort Brass Band (Red Room) Jason Turner (Dining Room)

SATURDAY 9/22 King Taylor Duo (Dining Room)

MONDAY 9/24

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, September 19th

JASON BRUCE

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, September 20th

LISA PALMER

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, September 21st

GRADY CHAMPION

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, September 22nd

GRADY CHAMPION (Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday,September 25th

JESSE ROBINSON’S “OPEN AMP” GUITAR NIGHT

MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

Come compete with other blues guitarists in an old-fashioned Juke Joint Head-cuttin’ 6-10, $5 Cover

TUESDAY 9/25

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT!

PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Dining

-Tuesdays Only-

Wednesday, September 26th

TAYLOR HILDEBRAND

Room)

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Thursday, September 27th

VOO DAVIS

Blue Plate Lunch

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

with corn bread and tea or coffee

Friday, September 28th

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, MS

VASTI JACKSON

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, September 29th

JIMBO MATHUS (Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

MUSIC | live

41


Wednesday - September 19 KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - September 20

LADIES NIGHT with Snazz

One Less Reason Friday, September 21

Friday - September 21 & Saturday - September 22

Trademark

Together Tomorrow Saturday, September 22

Sunday - September 23 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Fri) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music september 19 -25

wed | september 19 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | september 20 Acoustic Crossroads 5:30-9:30p fri | september 21 Evans Geno 6:30-10:30p

September 19 - 25, 2012

sat | september 22 Jason Turner Band 6:30-10:30p

42

sun | september 23 Wes Lee 4:00 - 8:00p mon | september 24 Karaoke tue | september 25 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

We ranked Mississippi State in the JFP Top 25 a week before the national media figured out that the Bulldogs are for real. Once again, we are ahead of the trend.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 20 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NFL Network): Cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers host the defending Super Bowl champion New York Giants. â&#x20AC;Ś College Football (8-11 p.m. ESPN): BYU gets a taste of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smurf Turfâ&#x20AC;? as they hit the road to face Boise State.

Capital Sports

T

he Jackson sports landscape in the capital city and surrounding areas has changed a lot since the JFP was born 10 years ago. It is easy to be negative about sports in the Jackson area. I can remember more teams folding or leaving the area in my

FRIDAY, SEPT. 21 College Football (7-10 p.m. ESPN): After nearly upsetting SEC teams in back-to-back weeks LouisianaMonroe, the little team that could, hosts the Baylor Bears. SATURDAY, SEPT. 22 College Football (11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fox Sports South): Ole Miss hopes to beat Tulane. â&#x20AC;Ś College Football (7-10 p.m. ABC): Cap Saturday off with a Top 25 matchup between Florida State and Clemson in a key ACC game. SUNDAY, SEPT. 23 NFL (noon-3 p.m. CBS): No team has ever made the NFL Playoffs after an 0-3 start to the season. That is what the New Orleans Saints face if they lose to the Kansas City Chiefs. MONDAY, SEPT. 24 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): After a bumpy start, the Green Bay Packers are looking for their second win of the season against rookie quarterback Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks. TUESDAY, SEPT. 25 Documentary (6-7 p.m. ESPN U): This installment of the series â&#x20AC;&#x153;SEC Storiedâ&#x20AC;? tells the tale of the first African American head coach in SEC historyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sylvester Croom at Mississippi State. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 26 Volleyball (7-9 p.m. ESPN U): Wednesday Night College Volleyball features an SEC battle between Tennessee and Kentucky. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports

I

JFP Top 25: Week 3

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Minor League Baseball returned to the Jackson area in 2005, when the Mississippi Braves chose Pearl for their new home.

by Bryan Flynn part of the independent Central Baseball League, and the team won a league championship in 2003. The CBL left Jackson before the 2006 season and disbanded, leaving the city without a baseball team. Baseball did return to the area in 2005 when the Mississippi Braves began play after the team failed to reach an agreement for a new stadium in Greenville, S.C., but they went to Trustmark Park in Pearl. The M-Braves just completed their eighth season in Pearl; they won a Southern League title in 2008. Sports in the metro area have grown since the Braves moved to the area. The area has welcomed a couple of new sports teams that are flourishing. In 2006, professional soccer came to Jackson when the Mississippi Brilla was founded and began play in 2007 in the USL Premier Developmental League (PDL). The Brilla has slowly built a solid franchise with a loyal fan base and is still going strong after five seasons.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

early years than success stories. At the founding of the JFP in 2002, the capital city was home to the Jackson Bandits, a professional hockey team that played in the East Coast Hockey League. The Bandits were founded in 1998, but by 2003 the franchise was gone. Declining attendance, and failure to build a new arena, hurt building up hockey in Jackson. But perhaps the biggest reason hockey failed was the MCI Worldcom scandal in the early 2000sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Bernie Ebbers, former Worldcom CEO, was one of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owners. Jackson got a rare treat from 2006 to 2008, when the New Orleans Saints held their training camp at Millsaps College post-Hurricane Katrina. The city welcomed the Saints, and when they left for training camp in their new facility in Metairie, La., it was one of the sadder sports moments in recent Jackson history. Smith-Wills Stadium has been the home for baseball in the capital city since before my early childhood. The last baseball team to play their home games at Smith-Wills was the Jackson Senators. From 2001 to 2005, the Senators (also known as the Diamond Kats) were

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Jackson even has a roller derby team that was founded in 2008. The Mississippi Roller Vixens started play in November of 2008, and home for the team is the Jackson Convention Center. Early in 2011, the Roller Vixens were accepted into the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flat Track Derby Association. The city will welcome a professional basketball team later this year when the Jackson Showboats begin play as part of the American Basketball Association. The capital city and surrounding areas have added and expanded walking tracks, bike trails and adult recreational sports in the 10 years since the JFP printed its first issue. High school and local college and university sports have grown stronger, too. Jackson-area sports enthusiasts can be proud of teams from Madison Central and Pearl high schools as well as the Jackson State University Tigers, among the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s numerous hard-playing school teams.

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jacksonfreepress.com

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

KE N LUND

the best in sports over the next seven days

43


ASTRO p 49 FLY STYLE p 50

Spice Up Your Routine at Abeba by Liz Hayes and Molly Lehmuller

ANDREW DUNAWAY TRIP BURNS

September 19 - 25, 2012

Abeba, which means â&#x20AC;&#x153;flower,â&#x20AC;? is the first traditional Ethiopian restaurant in Mississippi.

44

No matter the customer, they leave satisfied. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the food is goodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I make it every day, and every day itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gone,â&#x20AC;? Woldtnsea says. Abeba offers healthy Ethiopian food choices for Jacksonians both carnivorous and vegetarian. Utensils are optional; the spicy vegetable dishes and perennial favorites like doro wat (chicken and hard-boiled eggs in a savory sauce) are scooped up with spongy injera flatbread. However, adamant meat-and-two fans will find comfort in Abebaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest menu additions. Woldtnsea paired up with Chef Wyatt Williams to add soul food and a southern flair to his Ethiopian recipes to create the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heart and Soulâ&#x20AC;? buffet. Abeba boasts a full bar with American drinks and beer as well as Ethiopian

beer and honey wine, both imports. Before coming to Mississippi, the chef lived in Dallas, Texas, where a larger immigrant community and more international palates meant Ethiopian restaurants were easy to come by. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were no Ethiopian restaurants in Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? Woldtnsea says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People had to travel to New Orleans or Memphis, just to eat and drive back.â&#x20AC;? The transition from Texas to Mississippi wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t very easy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people are friendlier but to become a successful establishment is harder,â&#x20AC;? he says. The multilingual chef was able to adjust to the southern drawl, but attracting customers was the hard part. Successfully adding a lunchtime buffet attracted businesspeople and local Ethiopians. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ethiopian community here in Mississippi is much smaller,â&#x20AC;? Woldtnsea says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here, there are about 100, and in (Dallas,) Texas, there were about 20,000.â&#x20AC;? Chef Woldtnsea takes pride in being a part of his customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dining experience. He shows guests unfamiliar with Ethiopian food and dining customs firsthand how to enjoy a meal like a local. All of Abebaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dishes are made from Woldtnseaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family recipes. Woldtnsea feels his restaurant can reach beyond the clientele it has been serving. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It could make a difference and be a place for JSU students as well,â&#x20AC;? he says. The restaurant has wireless Internet access, and Woldtnsea hopes it will become a place for students to study in the afternoons with a strong cup of Ethiopian coffee. When Woldtnsea isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in the kitchen, he spends time thinking of more ways to improve the restaurant, volunteering, supporting the Boys and Girls Club or staying involved with local arts. He has several pieces by local painters on display in his restaurant. Though the chef himself doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t paint, he says, laughing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I make art in cookingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I design food!â&#x20AC;? Abeba (3716 Interstate 55 N., 601-713-1500,

TRIP BURNS

N

ot even a year after opening the Abeba Ethiopian Restaurant, owner and chef Molley Woldtnsea is shaking things up. Abeba Ethiopian Restaurant is a local hot spot, a favorite among University of Mississippi Medical Center students and employees in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health-care and hospital sector. On Sundays, bartenders and servers flock to the restaurant for a relaxing meal or after-work cocktail.

At Abeba, Chef Molley Woldtnsea offers a taste of the Horn of Africa, flavored with southern charm.

abebajxnms.wix.com) caters events and parties, and offers boxed lunches with delivery for orders larger than six. Their active Facebook page (facebook.com/Abeba. Ethiopian.Restaurant) lets fans know about the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly events and specials, which include everything from happy hourâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Monday through Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;local bands, Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Night on Sundays (7 p.m. to midnight) and Wednesdays (6 p.m. to 8 p.m.) and a private room for events and special occasions.

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45

jacksonfreepress.com


September 19 - 25, 2012

46

6592 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

Highland Village 4500 I-55 North Jackson, MS

140 Township Ave. #100 Ridgeland, MS 39157

361 Township Avenue Ridgeland, MS

601.977.0563

601.956.9562

601.707.7950

601.707.0587


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

5A44 FX5X Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street District offering a savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Spicy Chipotle Turkey Burger with applewood smoked bacon, chipotle mayo & smoked gouda cheese on a cheddar jalapeño bun.

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

jacksonfreepress.com

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

47


DINEJackson

Family Fun Night! Every Saturday 6-8:30 at Fernando’s Fajita Factory

• Clown • Face Painting • Balloons

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

getting it daily?

+ • events • sports • music

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes with real cane sugar.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

jfpdaily.com

news as it occurs 1149 Old Fannin Road • Brandon, MS 39047 • 601-992-6686 5647 Highway 80 East • Pearl, MS 39208 • 601-932-8728 Open 7 Days A Week

Paid advertising section.

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm • Monday - Friday

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

September 19 - 25, 2012

ASIAN

48

Other Special Offers: Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 • Sat & Sun 11 - 10

601-956-5040

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Authentic Thai food cooked fresh daily. Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012, Thai house offers a variety of freshly made spring rolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes. Thai house also has a great selection of Thai beer! Open Monday- Friday for lunch 11-2 and dinner 5-9, Saturdays 4-9.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.


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49


Juicy Couture velour track jacket, Orange

BCBGirls pointed shoes, Orange

Peel, $21

Peel, $12

Happy Birthday, JFP!

Free People shrunken floral jacket, Repeat

Street, $35

by Meredith W. Sullivan

S

ince the JFP is celebrating 10 years, I though it was appropriate to use this FLY page to revisit the fashions of the last decade. From velour tracksuits and UGG boots to the emergence of designer denim, we’ve covered it all! I recently set out on a hunt in the metro area to reminisce on the good (fashion) times and bad. I found a few things that should stay in fashion’s past, but I also happened upon a few previously loved pieces to add to my closet. After all, it is true what they say … what’s old becomes new again. (Just ask your parents!) Happy Birthday, JFP! Congrats on 10 beautiful years and wishing you many more.

Purple military jacket, Kim’s Closet,

$15

Yoanna Baraschi dress, Repeat Street,

$25 Hello Miss printed tunic/dress, Repeat

Street, $22 People Like Frank black leggings, Kim’s Wide belt,

Closet, $35

Orange Peel, $5

September 19 - 25, 2012

Hair Stylist: Alexis Walters • Nail Tech: Keri Hemba

50

L ACE Y ’S S

A

L

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ce ss or Hair & Ac

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ie s

Redkin Smoothing System start at $100

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

601.906.2253 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

WHERE2SHOP:

Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 602-364-9977; Repeat Street,

242 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601605-9123; Kim’s Closet, 898 Centre St., Ridgeland, 601955-3304


Just In Time For Fall

1220 E Northside Dr. Jackson, MS 39211 Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | 601-362-9553 www.nandyscandy.com

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Trace Station 500 Hwy 51 Suite L Ridegeland, MS 601.427.5163

• Pedicure & Manicure • Gel Acrylics • Shellac/Gel Polish • Dresses • Shoes • Formal Dresses for Homecoming

The Shoe Bar @ Pieces

• Accessories • Much more… Nail services by appointment only.

425 Mitchell Ave.

601.939.5203

Where fashion meets beauty…

Book Your Next Event With Us

Available for Corporate Events, Wedding & Showers mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

coffee • culture • community

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

601-960-3008

koinoniacoffee.com 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson

jacksonfreepress.com

(Adams & Metro Pkwy between Downtown & JSU)

51


MARKET PLACE

adver tise here star ting at $75 a week

Go Tigers!

JSU vs SU Black Out Game

Custom Furniture

made from recycled materials

Get Your T-Shirts NOW

Come see the showroom at Hoarding Stopper Consignment Store. Homelitejohns.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.955.3304

Hoarding Stopper Consignment Shop â&#x20AC;˘ 898 Centre St. Ridgeland, MS www.hoardingstopper.com â&#x20AC;˘ Mon. - Sat. 10:00am - 5:00pm

579 Hwy 51 North â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland Village 601.856.8886 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.260.1904

601.706.0393 More local numbers: 1.800.811.1633 18+ www.vibeline.com

'PPUCBMM 'PPUCBMM

or 601-940-7230. www.zeninmississippi.org

TATTOO REMOVAL â&#x20AC;˘ Newest FDA Lasers â&#x20AC;˘ Safe & Effective â&#x20AC;˘ Military/Veteran Special Pricing â&#x20AC;˘ Free Consultation

601-260-0153

420 N. Bierdeman Rd Pearl, MS 39208

601.933.1120

Background information available upon request.

Hey! Music Loversâ&#x20AC;Ś www.jfp.ms

FREE TRIAL

Informal talks cover the history of Buddhism and Zen, core teachings, and meditation instruction. Suggested donation: $30-$50. To register, contact us at jacksonzengroup@gmail.com

Drew Hassin Attorney At Law

601.499.5300 www.mstms.com

hot talk, local singles

Led by Tony Bland, Zen Monk Saturday, October 6 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Minimize Your Damage. Know Your Rights.

Mon-Fri 8-5 & Sat 8-12

Keep it Real

An Introductory Workshop

DUI?

P/RZ5DWHV P1R&RQWUDFW P)UHH7HUPLQDO

601.362.6121 x11

Visualize a beautiful Ă&#x153;, and I will glamour the Natural Ă&#x153;!

CLICK!

for the latest listings

5440 Executive Place STE B2 | Jackson MS 601.364.2869 | naturalusalon.webs.com

/PUUIFPOMZXFFLFOETQPSU *UTOPUXIFUIFSZPVXJOPSMPTF*UTIPXNBOZUJNFTEJEZPVTDPSF 

Romantic Adventures +BDLTPOTWFSZOJDF OBVHIUZTIPQ )XZ&BTU

v11n02 - The Big Ten: Celebrating a decade of news, noise and never settling.  

The Big Ten Celebrating a decade of news, noise and never settling. Our Best (and Most Infamous) JFP Moments Living Local Development: Prog...