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August 22 - 28, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 50

contents FILE PHOTO

TRIP BURNS

8 Better Education? Charter schools are becoming an increasingly more important issue in the upcoming election cycle. VICTORIA SHERWOOD

Cover photograph of Joseph LeBeau (left) courtesy JSU photography

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THIS ISSUE:

as they once were, he says. “It is causing colleges to increase their tuition and, in many cases, makes it difficult for students and parents to come up with the money.” The Gateway to College National Network is a new program this year. It focuses mainly on recent high-school dropouts. The program creates specialized curricula that enable students to earn high-school and college credits at the same time. “I get a lot of satisfaction out of serving these students,” Muse says, adding, “I am hopeful that we will be taking people who have dropped out of college and teach them a specific skill so they will have success.” Originally from Hickory Flat in Benton County, Muse earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Delta State University in 1952, and a master’s in education and doctorate in school administration from Mississippi State University, in 1961 and 1969, respectively. He received an honorary doctorate from Delta State University in May of this year. “I have been really fortunate,” he says. As a father of three, grandfather of eight and great-grandfather of six, Muse says he always encourages his tribe about their schoolwork. He often reads with them to engender his own zest for learning. “In today’s world, if you are going to have success, you will have to have an education,” he says. “Most of all the jobs available require some education beyond high school.” —Elyane Alexander

32 Fresh Tanlines After six years, the River City Tanlines are back with a new album, “Coast to Coast.” TRIP BURNS

Dr. Clyde Muse could be the poster guy for community-college success. His first degree was an associate’s from East Central Community College in 1949. In July, Muse, president of Hinds Community College since 1978, received the inaugural Excellence in Government Award in Local and District Government from Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant. Muse, 82, attributes much of his success to faith. “When you read in the book of Matthew, somebody asked Jesus how he became the greatest. Jesus said, ‘If you want to be the greatest you have to be a server,’” Muse says. “I don’t see any other calling than being sensitive to the needs of people that are around you.” He also says that his education opened doors for him. He could never have become an educator or a coach without a degree, he says, and considers himself fortunate to have earned basketball scholarships to ECCC and Delta State University. “It helped me get through school, because my family couldn’t afford to send me,” he says. At Hinds CC, one of Muse’s passions is opening those doors to others. He helps students reach what they thought were unattainable goals by giving them skills and funding to pursue degrees and become successful. Working with the Army National Guard, the Gateway to College National Network and Rankin County, Muse actively looks for ways that students can attend college without worrying about funding. State sources of funding aren’t as available

36 New ‘Cue We’ve got the low-and-slowdown on the newest pork port in town, State Street Barbeque.

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clyde muse

A Polish manifesto illuminates new ideas about how today’s youth live on, rather than simply use, the Internet. COURTESY RIVER CITY TANLINES

4 ............... Editor’s Note 4 ....................... Sorensen 6 ............................... Talk 10 ........................... Tech 12...................... Editorial 13 .................... Opinion 13.................... Mike Day 14 ............... Cover Story 26 ................. Diversions 27 ............................ Arts 28 ....................... 8 Days 30 ........................... Film 30 ................ JFP Events 32 ......................... Music 33 .......... Music Listings 35 .............. Life & Style 36 .......................... Food 39 ................... Astrology 41 ...... Running Month 42 ............ Fly/Shopping

Web Kids

3


Bryan Flynn Sports writer Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippi native who just moved to north Jackson. He lives with his wife and their four cats. Follow him @jfpsports. He wrote the cover stories.

Elyane Alexander Editorial intern Elyane Alexander is a native of Madison. She is a fourth-grade teacher. Her hobbies include reading, writing and shopping. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Briana Robinson Deputy Editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a junior at Millsaps College.

Vergie Redmond Editorial intern Vergie Redmond studies journalism at Belhaven University. She plays video games and watches anime in her spare time. She was sad when Harry Potter ended. She wrote an arts feature this issue.

Larry Morrisey Larry Morrisey is the director of grants programs for the Mississippi Arts Commission. He is a host for “Mississippi Arts Hour,” the agency’s arts interview radio show on Mississippi Public Broadcasting. He wrote a music story for this issue

Sara Sacks Editorial intern Sara Sacks studies English and communications at Millsaps College. She runs for the Millsaps cross-country and track and field teams. She wrote a running story.

Jim PathFinder Ewing Jim PathFinder Ewing is an organic farmer, author and journalist, formerly with The Clarion-Ledger. He has written five books on energy medicine and eco-spirituality. He lives in Lena with his wife, Annette, at their ShooFly Farm.

August 22 - 28, 2012

Korey Harrion

4

Web Producer Korey Harrion is a saxophonist who runs a small computer-repair business. He enjoys reading, writing and playing music, origami and playing video games. He loves animals, especially dogs.

editor’snote

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Beating the Spread

W

hen I think of my childhood, I remember love and drama, my alcoholic daddies, a hard-working mother and lots of football. Sports was our out, I guess, as it is for so many. It’s a way to win, or at least pray and root for a win, when other things aren’t going so well. There is no real secret why sports— perhaps the ultimate diversion—is so important to communities in trouble. Sports can help you forget, at least for a little while. I’d planned to write about my love of football for this annual issue (which Bryan Flynn is singlehandedly knocking out of the park, to mix my sports metaphors). I’ve been thinking about screaming until I was hoarse at Neshoba Central football games; then later going neardeaf amid all the cowbells we State students rang throughout entire football games, often right here at Memorial Stadium. Thinking of football inevitably reminds me of my stepdad who never had children of his own; I became his “son” when it came to sports. He loved all sports as much as my real daddy loved baseball before he died when I was 8. I remember my stepdad cheering in the stands during games and halftime shows when I wore my white go-go boots and twirled my flag. I could always pick out his voice. He loved me dearly, and tried, but he couldn’t afford to take care of me (although he liked to buy cars we couldn’t afford, steeping us in debt). My real dad, although loving and lovable, could not provide, either. By the time I came along, he couldn’t keep a job due in no small part to his alcoholism and bad health. When my real dad died, it was hard for my mother and me. We lived in a house his brother’s construction company had built us, but we had to pay for it. My mother worked in a pants factory by day, and my grandmother took care of me when Mama was gone. There were never any savings. My people didn’t grow up among people who had enough money to save. It was always hand-to-mouth, day-byday, week-by-week. I remember my mother rolling up nickels to buy me an Easter basket and how hard we had to save to afford my NCHS class ring. The odds were against me breaking out of that cycle, especially since my stepfather would prove so difficult for us. His troubles always meant a series of debts, stuff we couldn’t pay for, and living in a series of mobile homes and apartments. There was a house in there I loved and paid for by cooking and scrubbing pizza pans at Pasquale’s in the 10th grade, but my mother gave it up when I was in high school to move back in with my stepdad—into a trailer he had bought. Love isn’t always smart. But through it all, I had a small safety net. When my father died, I started drawing a Social Security check. The money helped me get through school and put food on our table at times. It helped me afford the go-go boots and my flute. It made a childhood better than my parents’ possible even with its imperfections. When it came time for college, I didn’t

want to go down the road to East Central Junior College, as it was called then, like so many people I knew were doing if they were going to college at all. I wanted to attend a university, meet new people, learn stuff, see the world. I desperately wanted to leave Mississippi—closed attitudes were wearing on me hard—but I just couldn’t afford to. But my eyes were big enough to believe I could go “straight to State,” as we called skipping junior college and moving to Starkville. Tuition was low by today’s standards, but I didn’t have the money. But I got lucky and got a $1,000-a-year John C. Stennis Scholarship in political science. It might as well have been a MacArthur grant as far as I was concerned. It wasn’t enough, though, especially since my mother’s health was failing, and she needed my help. So I managed to go to Mississippi State on the scholarship, federal grants, my daddy’s Social Security check and a series of jobs, mostly secretarial. (I type like a maniac.) Over the summers, I would work in pizza or fast-food joints as needed. I managed to keep my car up and send a little money home to Mama—a remarkable woman whose life had been crippled because her daddy had never enrolled her for a day of school. Not one. She had to cook for the men who worked the fields. That meant she couldn’t read or write or help her kids with homework—but it also meant she wanted the best for us and was willing to teach us to count pennies, save Green Stamps, work more than one job at a time as needed and fill the holes with whatever government help we could get. This was about survival and giving me chances she never had. She gave me my grit. She urged me to find educated mentors, and to find time for activities like band, even though we couldn’t

afford it. Like my stepdad, she showed up at football games and screamed in support of me—even if she wouldn’t have known what to say in a parent-teacher conference. I couldn’t have asked for a better mother. But, and please understand this, she could not have lifted me to a different place and given me a better life on her own, despite her determination. We needed government help to eat sometimes, much less put me on a meritocratic path for an Ivy League master’s degree some day, as well as research fellowships and any chance of owning and running my own newspaper. Brains aren’t enough when your often-single mother can’t make ends meet. These memories have tempered my enthusiasm this year for “football season”— which to me means everything about my beloved autumn—due to all the contempt we’re now hearing toward people who need welfare to get by, or food stamps to eat, or grants to attend college. I can’t stop thinking about the cruelty and selfishness of Rep. Paul Ryan, in particular—a man who also drew Social Security checks after his father died, who used grants to go to college, whose family got wealthy off government contracts. What helped Ryan, though, he doesn’t want to remain for other young people—even kids like him and me who also want a piece of the American dream, but need to afford shoes before they have bootstraps to pull on. On behalf of all the Americans who got where we are thanks to government help, I am embarrassed and saddened at the ignorant, hateful way so many people now treat the poor. It is contempt and, with Ryan, sheer hypocrisy. I can’t imagine paying back a society that helped me by adopting such an attitude: I’ve got mine, so screw the rest of you.


5

jacksonfreepress.com


news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, Aug. 16 D.L. Johnson Consultants present four city redistricting options to citizens and the Jackson City Council for the first time at the Jackson Medical Mall. ... Shooters kill two sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deputies in separate shootings in LaPlace, La. Friday. Aug. 17 Jonesboro, Ark., police release video of the arrest of Chavis Carter, of Mississippi, who they claim shot himself in the head while handcuffed in the back seat of a police squad car. ... A Russian court sentences three members of the all-female punk band Pussy Riot to two years in prison for hooliganism motivated by religious hatred for a performance of an anti-Putin prayer inside a Moscow cathedral last March. Saturday, Aug. 18 Officials find Recardo Harris, who was serving 23 years for robbery and aggravated assault at the Kemper County Regional Correctional Facility, dead of an apparent suicide in his cell. ... Peyton Manning goes 16-of-23 for 177 yards and two interceptions in the Broncos 30-10 preseason loss to the Seattle Seahawks. Sunday, Aug. 19 The Huntsville Stars rack up four runs in the eight inning to beat the Mississippi Braves 4-3 at Trustmark Park. ... Authorities find the body of Tony Scott, best known for directing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gun,â&#x20AC;? after he apparently jumped from the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, Calif.

August 22 - 28, 2012

Monday, Aug. 20 Jackson Public Schools representatives present the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget proposal to the City Council. ... Comedian Phyllis Diller dies in her Los Angeles home at the age of 95.

6

Tuesday, Aug. 21 The Mississippi Braves announce that the Atlanta Braves will play an exhibition game at Trustmark Park in Pearl March 30, 2013. ... Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad has to stop her attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida after severe jellyfish stings and a lightning storm pushed her off course. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Redistricting Raises Eyebrows by Jacob D. Fuller

T

he Jackson City Council finally has its redistricting options in hand. However, a few of the plans have citizens and council members on the offensive. It is clear that none of the four plans will please everyone on the council or in the city. One of the four plans, Option 2, shows only small changes in the current ward boundaries, just enough to equalize the ward populations, as required by law. The other three have major changes that some believe are excessive if not altogether foul play. Several midtown residents are worried after seeing Option 3 that D.L. Johnson Consultants proposed for the city. The map involves almost completely redrawing wards 3 and 7. Under the plan, Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ward 3 would lose most of its heavily-populated northern half along Northside Drive. In place of that loss, Ward 3 would take on the less-densely populated southern two-thirds of Ward 7. Ward 3 would also shift to the west along Fortification and Capitol streets, taking on a portion of what is now Ward 4. The plan would split the Midtown Neighborhood in two. At the moment, the entire neighborhood is in Ward 7. Woodrow Wilson Avenue borders the neighborhood to the north, Fortification Street to the south, West Street to the east and Mill Street to the

west. Redistricting Plan 3, if approved, would split the neighborhood, with part of it in Ward 3 and the other portion in Ward 7. Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said Cooper-Stokes brought the design for Option 3 to D.L. Johnson Consultants. CooperStokes was the only councilmember who submitted her own map, Barrett-Simon said. Cooper-Stokes confirmed Aug. 20 Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon is concerned at City Hall that Op- about one redistricting option that would take half of the Midtown Neighborhood out of her ward. tion 3 is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Ward 3 option.â&#x20AC;? Derrick Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know whether (the councilson, state NAACP president and head of members) want us to tell (who influenced D.L. Johnson Consultants, said that his which option),â&#x20AC;? D.L. Johnson Consultants company drew all four of the maps under partner Hollis Watkins said at the meeting. consideration of the council membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sugMidtown residents spoke out against gestions and requests, but he refused to say splitting the neighborhood at an Aug. 16 which options were most strongly influ- meeting at the Jackson Medical Mall. Jenenced by which council members. REDISTRICTING, see page 7

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TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, Aug. 15 U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services officially enacts President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan to allow amnesty for immigrants who came to the U.S. as children.

The first football player on a Wheaties box was Jackson State graduate Walter Payton of Columbia, Miss.

Sen. Todd Akins misspeaks about rape and sort of apologizes. p. 9

GOING PRO As of 2011, 726 football players had gone on to play in the NFL after attending Mississippi institutions of higher learning, according to Neil White, editor of the book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100 Greatest Football Players of All Timeâ&#x20AC;? (Nautilus Publishing, 2011, $45). From each school:

University of Mississippi: 181 Mississippi State University: 127 University of Southern Mississippi: 97 Jackson State University: 89 Alcorn State University: 51 Mississippi Valley State University: 26 Delta State University: 8 Mississippi College: 7 Millsaps College: 2 Rust College: 1 Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community College system: 137


news, culture & irreverence

REDISTRICTING, from page 6

LOHO neighborhood. Whitwell said he prefers Option 2, which keeps the LOHO neighborhood in Ward 1. “If Belhaven, midtown and Fondren can remain a cohesive neighborhood, LeFleur East deserves to remain a cohesive neighborhood,” Whitwell said at City Hall Aug. 20. As part of the exchange in Option 4, Ward 1 would include the Jackson-Evers International Airport, which is currently part of Ward 7. Ward 1 would not gain many residents, but Barrett-Simon, Whitwell and Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. confirmed Aug. 20 that at there are least two to four votes from the region in most elections. All three said they did not know who the voters were, but that the city owns all of the land in the airport district. Whitwell and Barrett-Simon said they have made unsuccessful attempts to find out who the voters are. D.L. Johnson Consultants presented the four versions of the redistricting maps to the City Council and citizens for the first time Aug. 16 at the Jackson Medical Mall. The main goal of redistricting is to adjust the wards’ boundaries to set the populations as close to an average as possible. The average population of the seven wards in the city is 24,788. All four plans have Ward 4 as the largest ward with 25,691 citizens, 3.64 percent over the average. All of the plans, except Plan 3, have Ward 3 as the least populated ward with 24,065 residents, 2.92 percent under the average. The City Council has put the redistricting vote on the agenda for its Aug. 21 meeting. Under city rules, any ordinance must be on the agenda for at least two weeks before going to a vote. Unless the Council votes to suspend the rules, the earliest they can vote for a ward-redistricting plan is Sept. 4. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Feel the funk coming on in Fondren?

W

atkins Development is facing law- men in this community, taking over this suits from subcontractors who say project, hopefully, we won’t have to have developer David Watkins has not any litigation whatsoever.” paid them for work they did at MetrocenGarrett said that all subcontractors ter Mall. are still under contract The city, which with Garrett Enterplans to move six deprises. It is his intention partments into the forto allow Watkins to mer Belk building this pay his debts, but Garfall, made one thing rett Enterprises has the clear Monday: they will financial plan to pay not pay for David Watthem, if needed. kins’ mistakes. Watkins did not reWatkins and his turn phone calls by partners at Watkins De- Retro Metro partner Leroy press time. velopment signed a dis- Walker says that the former Belk association agreement building will be ready for one city JPS: Cut the Jobs department to move in by Aug. 31. with the remaining partCity Council memners in Retro Metro, the group that is cur- bers were not happy with Jackson Public rently renovating the former Belk building Schools’ request for a higher budget than at Metrocenter. Retro Metro partner Leroy the one JPS board agreed to June 26. Walker told the city council that Watkins JPS originally scaled back its opresigned from the mall project to focus on erations budget from $72.5 million in the Farish Street entertainment project. 2011-2012 to about $69 million for the The City Council met Monday with 2012-2013 school year. When board presWalker and Socrates Garrett, two of the ident Sharolyn Miller and superintendent three remaining partners in the Metrocen- Cedric Gray presented a budget to the city ter project, at City Hall. City Attorney Pi- council Monday, many of the previous eter Teeuwissen assured council members cuts were gone. that the city is not liable for any legal acMiller said JPS had to hire replacetions against Watkins. ments for some of the 100 teachers who “Whatever problems Mr. Watkins left, buy new textbooks and make imhas, those are his problems,” Teeuwis- provements to school buses. sen said. “We do not have any obligaThe district has to find a way to tion to pay any lawsuits that he may be pay $2.3 million toward a pair of bond involved in.” issues they received in 2006 and 2008, Teeuwissen said that as of Monday, totaling about $150 million. When the no one had notified his office that there district received the bond issues, they were any claims against the city. Ward 2 were supposed to pay them off with Councilman Chokwe Lumumba asked gradual tax increases. Instead, the disTeeuwissen if he saw any possible legal trict used their reserve funds to make claims related to the Metrocenter project payments on the bond issues. coming in the future. To make the payments, JPS will likely “I do see something on the horizon, need the city to approve a millage increase. but it would be from the city taking legal Mills are a way of measuring property taxaction, not legal action against the city,” es. One mill is equal to about $10 in taxes Teeuwissen said. “Hopefully, with Mr. on a house value of $100,000. Walker, Mr. (Howard) Catchings and Mr. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob Garrett, who are three respected business D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com. TRIP BURNS

nifer West, president of the Midtown Neighborhood Association, said she understands that because of regulations, the city has to redistrict, but she wants the city to consider what the people of midtown want. “In the midtown area, we’re doing a lot of great things,” West said at the meeting. “We have strong relationships with organizations (in) Fondren (and in) Belhaven. We’d like to keep those relationships going with the way that we’re shaped now.” The U.S. Department of Justice will have to approve whatever plan the City Council chooses before it takes effect. Cooper-Stokes’ husband and Hinds County Supervisor Kenneth Stokes said at the meeting that the DOJ will pay close attention to the fact that Jackson lost white population over the past decade. Stokes said only Plan 3 would allow for a black councilperson to represent Ward 7. The other plans set the Ward 7 voting population between 51 percent and 54 percent African American. Plan 3 would make the ward’s voting population 69.57 percent black. “You cannot gain black population and don’t create black leadership,” Stokes said. Barrett-Simon said Ward 7, which she has represented since 1985, has been majority black for a long time. “I just think (Stokes) is misguided. I have represented a majority-black ward for some years now,” Barrett-Simon said. Option 3 also creates the highest white population in Ward 1 of any proposal. Under that plan, 68.89 percent of Ward 1 voters would be white. The nexthighest percentage would come from Option 2, at 62.36 percent. Another major change was in Options 1, 3 and 4. Those options included Ward 7 taking over the area between Lakeland Drive and Meadowbrook Road, from Interstate 55 on the west to Ridgewood Road on the east, known as the

METROCENTER, JPS BUDGET WORRY COUNCIL by Jacob D. Fuller

It’s a good thing our walk-in clinic is only five minutes away.

The doctor will see you now. No appointment necessary

Ground Floor of The Colonnades 601.714.6444

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7 Patient 1st JFP 6 col x 3 5-12.indd 2

5/29/12 11:33 AM


educationtalk

by R.L. Nave

Can Charters Plug the ‘Pipeline’?

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August 22 -28, 2012

FILE PHOTO

fficials in Meridian and LauderWhile the state struggles with academic dale County appear to be running a performance, Mississippi is spending millions school-to-prison pipeline. An Aug. to incarcerate children. In 2007, Mississippi 10 U.S. Department of Justice re- incarcerated 219 youth at a cost of $426.51 a port found that the Lauderdale County Youth day each, or $93,405.69 a day for all of them, Court, the Meridian Police Department and according to the Children’s Defense Fund’s the Mississippi Division of Youth Services have “America’s Cradle to Prison Pipeline” report. committed a series of constitutional violations. That comes to more than $34 million Specifically, the Meridian Police Department Mississippi spent in 2007 alone to incarcerate fails to adequately assess “probable cause that kids. Nationwide, states spent about $5.7 bilan unlawful offense has been committed prior lion in 2007 to imprison 64,558 youth comto arresting children at local schools,” and the mitted to residential facilities. Lauderdale County Youth Court fails to proOleta Fitzgerald, director of CDF’s vide children with due-proSouthern Regional Ofcess rights. African American fice, says suggesting charter children and children with schools as a panacea to the disabilities are the students problem is an empty converthis system most affects. Mesation. “It is misguided to talk ridian is 62 percent black. about what happened in Me“Children arrested in ridian and say that it would local schools become ennot have happened if we had tangled in a cycle of incarcharter-school options—as if ceration without substantive all children are going to be and procedural protections able to go to charter schools,” required by the U.S. ConstiFitzgerald said. Oleta Fitzgerald is not a fan tution,” the report stated. Critics say charter The state has struggled of charter schools. schools, which are privately with high-profile incidents run with taxpayer funds, are related to schools and the criminal-justice often unkind to students with disabilities and system. The report sparked indignation from kids with special needs such as discipline probsome unexpected places. In response, the lems. In June, the Government Accountabilconservative Mississippi Public Policy Center ity Office announced findings of a compreasked: What if these kids had a charter-school hensive study on charter schools’ enrollment option? Forest Thigpen, the MCPP’s executive of special-needs children. The report showed director, said the DOJ probe shows a need to that while, overall, charter-school enrollment establish charter schools in Mississippi. has exploded, enrollment of disabled students “If parents knew what was taking place, has not kept pace. they could send their child to a different Fitzgerald said the state’s schools are pushschool,” Thigpen said. ing kids, particularly African American males, Thigpen’s group, the earliest backer of a out of schools through the use of zero-tolercharter-school program here, points to the low ance discipline policies. She added that the graduation rates at Mississippi’s public schools, CDF is about to release a study that examines referring to them as dropout factories. the affects of zero-tolerance policies. “Talking Statewide, Mississippi’s graduation rate of about charter schools (as if they) would solve 71.4 percent is one of the nation’s lowest. Jack- this problem is an absolute false premise, and son Public Schools has an even lower gradua- it’s disconcerting,” Fitzgerald said. tion rate of 61.8 percent. The national rate is Write R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreearound 75.5 percent as of 2009. press.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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womantalk

by Ronni Mott

Is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Forcibleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Better than â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Legitimateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;?

JOSHUA STEWART

difficult time bringing a rapist to justice, as will those who have been lied to, such as children who may not understand the dynamic of rape and incest, or those who believe they have no choice but to submit to sex, such as women married to abusive men. In a world where one in five women say they have been victims of sexual assault, and as few as six rapists in 1,000 will serve time for their crime, narrowing the definition of rape

for ideological purposes may do more harm than good. Rape is not about sex; it is the ultimate expression of power and control that a perpetrator can inflict on a victim, as Sandy Middleton, executive director of the Center for Violence Prevention, has said repeatedly. As long as myths about rape fester, victims will remain silent. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com

Cause of Riot Revealed by R.L. Nave

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School professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology, told the Times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To suggest that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some biological reason why women couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get pregnant during a rape is absurd,â&#x20AC;? Dr. David Grimes, a clinical professor in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina told the Times. In the wake of the firestorm following his comments (some of his own party members said he should resign), Akin sort of apologized for misspeaking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was talking about forcible rape,â&#x20AC;? Akin told conservative radio host Mike Huckabee on the former Arkansas governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was absolutely the wrong word.â&#x20AC;? But conservatives want to change the definition of rape by adding the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;forcibleâ&#x20AC;? to the laws. Republicans in the U.S. House unanimously passed the No Taxpayer Funding For Abortion Act in 2011, which narrowed the definition of rape specifically to restrict abortion in cases of statutory and incapacitated rape, where the victim may be drunk, drugged or otherwise incapable of giving consent. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advocates say the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;forceâ&#x20AC;? is already a problem in many state rape statutes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the idea of consent is a sexual interaction obtained through force, it implies that a woman who does not fight back cannot be raped,â&#x20AC;? said Michele Alexandre, an associate law professor at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, in a Jackson Free Press interview earlier this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So even if the woman protests or says no or even fights back in some way, she might not have fought back hard enough,â&#x20AC;? she added. The word â&#x20AC;&#x153;forceâ&#x20AC;? means that a victim who is incapacitated will have a much more

jacksonfreepress.com

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nless youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been hiding from everything electronic this week, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard about Rep. Todd Akin, a sixterm Republican from Missouri, making comments about rape last weekend. In a nutshell, Akin said that if a woman was a victim of â&#x20AC;&#x153;legitimateâ&#x20AC;? rape, she could not become pregnant. That concept is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;canard that will not die,â&#x20AC;? wrote Garance Franke-Ruta, senior editor at The Atlantic, characterizing it as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;contemporary equivalent of the early American belief that only witches float.â&#x20AC;? Fr a n k e - R u t a points that the idea is neither new nor without purpose for those who want to end legal abortions in the United States: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arguments like his have cropped up again and again on the right over the past quarter century, and the idea that trauma is a form of birth control continues to be promulgated by anti-abortion forces that seek to outlaw all abortions, even in cases of rape or incest. The push for a no-exceptions anti-abortion policy has for decades gone hand-in-hand with efforts to downplay the frequency with which rape- or incest-related pregnancies occur, and even to deny that they happen, at all. In other words, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just Akin singing this tune.â&#x20AC;? The implication is that a pregnant woman cannot also be the victim of trauma such as rape or incest, a theory that medical professionals have thoroughly debunked, including in a 1996 study published by the scholarly and peer-reviewed American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. That study, reports The New York Times, estimated â&#x20AC;&#x153;that 5 percent of rapes result in pregnancy.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are no words for thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it is just nuts,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Michael Greene, a Harvard Medical

9


techtalk

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

Beyond â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The End of Historyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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Bonjour!

August 22 - 28, 2012

First Friday of Each Month Free Spanish Class

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its symbolic or â&#x20AC;&#x153;signâ&#x20AC;? value. (See Baudrillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Simulacra and Simulation,â&#x20AC;? University of Michigan Press, 1995.) For example, a smartphone may have added value as a sign when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Blackberry, Droid or iPhoneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it says more about the user than its maker. But of greater significance, perhaps, the manifesto adds further credence to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The End of Historyâ&#x20AC;? ideas Baudrillard and others esVICTORIA SHERWOOD

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n a fascinating article: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We, The Web Kids,â&#x20AC;? Pietr Czerski, makes a statement that is as startling as it is startlingly true: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do not use the Internet, we live on the Internet.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Internet to us is not something external to reality but a part of it: an invisible yet constantly present layer intertwined with the physical environment,â&#x20AC;? he writes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We made friends and enemies online, we prepared cribs for tests online, we planned parties and studying sessions online, we fell in love and broke up online. The Web to us is not a technology which we had to learn and which we managed to get a grip of. The Web is a process, happening continuously and continuously transforming before our eyes; with us and through us.â&#x20AC;? Written to be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;manifestoâ&#x20AC;? against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) for TechDirt.com, March 1, it was translated from Polish and has since gone viral. It does clearly draw a line between todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth and their parents. A critical point: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did not experience an impulse from reality, but rather a metamorphosis of the reality itself,â&#x20AC;? he writes. In effect, the Internet and this generation is a symbiosis of electronic and physical sensation, each feeding upon the other, enunciating a new relationship between human and technology to become a human technology. (If you want to see the future, imagine iPhoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Siri with a higher IQ.) Some will see the manifesto as a new challenge to existing ways of viewing the world, but the late postmodern theorist Jean Baudrillard predicted it. When things are reduced to their image or sign value, he posited, societies become enmeshed in â&#x20AC;&#x153;hyperreality,â&#x20AC;? and reality, as it is known, â&#x20AC;&#x153;dies out.â&#x20AC;? Reality hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappeared (frogs still see as frogs see; birds as birds, etc.), but human consciousness has adopted a â&#x20AC;&#x153;simulated versionâ&#x20AC;? of a more coherent vision or concept that shapes ideas about reality. Hence, an object loses the primacy of its functional or exchange values and gains in

Growing up with 24/7 access to the Web, todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth live on the Internet.

poused that, with the end of the Cold War and of the rise of a global worldview, history defined as a progression of events is no longer a valid way of viewing the world. Rather, as the manifesto notes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Global culture is the fundamental building block of our identity, more important for defining ourselves than traditions, historical narratives, social status, ancestry or even the language that we use.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Web Kidsâ&#x20AC;? are not in awe of The End of History as his parents were, but have lived through it and have gone on. The Arab Spring, for example, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen in a faroff land; it was here and now, instantaneous with Twitter, shared visually with YouTube and chronicled on Facebook within friendship and familial circles. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the narrative sense of history as previously defined, but an organic, nonlinear presence that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;happeningâ&#x20AC;? in multiple places simultaneouslyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an

ongoing dialogue of signs. As Baudrillard says: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The simulacrum is never what hides the truthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it is truth that hides the fact that there is none. The simulacrum is true.â&#x20AC;? Driving history now is the sign of freedom, youth and a new global reality that is, essentially, itself unfolding. That is an exciting development, watching not â&#x20AC;&#x153;historyâ&#x20AC;? but a new â&#x20AC;&#x153;his/her story.â&#x20AC;? Are we to despair that reality shall progress along ever more shallow lines and superficial values? To the contrary: In fact, it may drive the search for meaning ever more vigorously. One example is the rise of â&#x20AC;&#x153;slow food,â&#x20AC;? and toward more pesticide-free food, grown locally and organically, though not necessarily having the government-sanctioned USDA certified organic stamp. Web Kids not only grew up with the Internet, but fast food. They witnessed firsthand the commodification of food, yet they seem to be the ones leading a movement against fast food, using the tools that are uniquely theirs. The Web Kids embracing slow food is evidenced on Twitter with popular hashtags: #realfood, #slowfood, #ecofarming and #organic are its positive signifiers. The rise of #foodies and appreciation of chefs as superstars is another hopeful sign for a return to an appreciation for healthful, nutritious food and a caring attitude toward the Earth. This philosophy of good, clean and fair is almost a mantra of Web Kids, and a is welcome addition to ways of looking at the world. It is the underlying theme of such outward protests as Occupy Wall Street, and it is breaking out all over the globe, with the Arab Spring, perhaps, being its most virulent expression. Despair? No! The rise of the Web Kids is cause for celebration! Preferably with good food and friends. Read the translated article â&#x20AC;&#x153;We The Web Kidsâ&#x20AC;? at jfp.ms/webkids.


jacksonfreepress.com

11 JCV7210-15 Event Week August 20 JFPress 9.5x6.167.indd 1

8/17/12 12:11 PM


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Rape Is Not A Political Weapon

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he last week has been a tough week for women, especially rape victims. And it’s been a very revealing one. It blew up when Rep. Todd Akin, a Missouri Republican running for Senate, argued that women don’t get pregnant from “legitimate” rapes— as opposed, we guess, to those in which they are somehow at fault, or that some would say imply consent or if they’re a minor being seduced by an older man. There is nothing real in this. It’s all a lie. What’s more, it’s the latest version of a lie that Akin, and other House members including Reps. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Alan Nunnelee of Mississippi have pushed in their quest to make it impossible for women to get an abortion. This one is about limiting the number of rape victims who can terminate pregnancies resulting from rapes, including those by older men who seduce children old enough to get pregnant. The men know that rape victims and their families are a weak point in their quest to outlaw abortion (not to mention many forms of birth control and in vitro fertilization). The scuffle really came to life when these men and other House conservatives tried to pass a bill that would allow abortion for “forcible rape” cases—but not those in which young women were victims of statutory rape and other socalled questionable kinds. In other words, Congress wants to decide if your rape was real and whether or not you have to carry a resulting pregnancy to term. This is nasty stuff. It was also abhorrent when Nunnelee stood on the floor of the House last year trying to defund Planned Parenthood (which helps women with much more than abortion, including effective birth control). He declared that Planned Parenthood protects those “who have raped our granddaughters.” Ironically, Nunnelee tried to change the definition of “real” rape to “forcible rape,” with Akin, Ryan and others. Only Democrats voted against the bill, which passed the House, but thankfully stalled afterward. What would that mean for those granddaughters? A dirty old man could convince her to have sex, get her pregnant, and she’d have to have his child. This is Akin’s thinking, along with more than 200 members of Congress. Make no mistake: These men are not trying to protect your daughters. They are playing politics with women’s lives. They all must be called out for it.

FEEDBACK

Saggy Pants and JSU

August 22 -28, 2012

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am writing in regard the editorial cartoon that appeared in the Aug. 8-14, 2012, issue of the Jackson Free Press, which depicted Hinds County Supervisor Kenneth Stokes’ effort to regulate saggy pants. While I understand the cartoon was intended to poke fun at Stokes’ attempt to better our region’s youth, it took an unfair swipe at Jackson State University students. The young man in the saggy pants featured in the cartoon was wearing a baseball hat bearing the name “Tigers”—which is the name of the sports teams at Jackson State University and at Jackson’s Jim Hill High School. As a proud graduate of Jackson State University, I am offended by this caricature of a young black man, whom most readers will associate as a JSU student. If the cartoonist spent some time on the Jackson State University campus, he would likely see hundreds of neatly dressed, intelligent young men who look nothing like the youth depicted in the cartoon. Like other students at our metro-area colleges and universities, Jackson State students are aspiring young professionals who are preparing to become engineers, teachers, doctors, judges, musicians and artists. If a local team name was needed to put on the young man’s cap, I wonder if the cartoonist considered the Majors, the Blazers or the Choctaws—which represent Millsaps, Belhaven and Mississippi College respectively. My guess is probably not. It’s unfortunate that one of our hometown papers is not only perpetuating a stereotype of young black men, but is trying that stereotype to students at the city’s only historically black university. —Terry L. Woodard President, Jackson State University National Alumni Association

Editor responds: While we regret that Mike Day’s use of a generic Tigers cap offended some JSU alumni, it was not meant to refer to JSU or any other specific institution as we said in last week’s editorial (see jfp.ms/tigers_editorial). The JFP supports JSU and appreciates concerns about perceptions, but the greater danger is assuming that a teen in baggy pants reflects poorly on any school or on the 12 young person himself. We urge everyone to reject these stereotypes about kids.

MY TURN

BY REP. CECIL BROWN

‘Parent-Trigger Law’ Important

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n their push for a more expansive charter-school law in Mississippi, charter proponents have attempted to repeal our existing charter-school law. Their explanation is that the law is too weak. In fact, while it is not a comprehensive charter law, the Mississippi law is part of a nationwide movement to give parents of kids in failing schools an opportunity to take over control of their local schools and to give their kids a chance at educational success. This provision was adopted in the 2010 legislative session by an overwhelming vote of members of both political parties and signed by Gov. Haley Barbour. Known nationally as a “parent trigger law,” Mississippi’s law allows parents of children in chronically under-performing schools to take over governance of the school. By a vote of parents of more than 50 percent of the kids in the school, the parents can elect a “local management board” for their school, remove some or all of the school’s teachers and administrators, develop their own curriculum and schedules and, in essence, convert the school to a charter school. The school would remain a public school and would receive the same local, state and federal support it received before the conversion, but would no longer be governed by the local school board. Under federal law, the provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act would continue to apply, but administration of the school would be left up to the school’s duly-elected local-management board. Day to day operations could be contracted out to a charterschool operator such as KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program), or the board could hire its own personnel.

The law applies to schools that are in the lowest three categories of performance for three consecutive years, and there is no limit on the number of schools that can convert. The three-year measurement period has now passed, so the current 20122013 school year is the first year that the conversion will be available. Based on the most recent available data, dozens of Mississippi schools will be eligible to be converted to charter schools under the parent-trigger law. Already, a number of parent groups have contacted the State Department of Education to inquire about the process. Unfortunately, the uncertainty caused by the proposed repeal of the legislation has caused these groups and the department to slow down the application process. Mississippi was the second state in the country to adopt a parent-trigger law. As of June 2012, more than 20 states have considered parent-trigger legislation, and seven of them have enacted some version of the law. Among the states with new parent-trigger laws are Louisiana, Texas, Indiana and Ohio, all with Republican governors. Obviously, we were at the forefront of this innovative wave of reform. I believe Mississippi will adopt a new charterschool law, and I support reasonable charter legislation. But the existing parent-trigger law will not conflict with that legislation and should be preserved. There is no reason to repeal this progressive legislation while other states across the country are adopting similar provisions. Rep. Cecil Brown, a Democrat, represents Jackson in the Mississippi Legislature.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


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Not Better, Just Regular

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atching the last two weeks of preseason games, I have decided that NFL fans have been hoodwinked, bamboozled, had the wool pulled over their eyes … well, you get the idea. Unless you don’t watch football—or you live under a rock—you couldn’t have missed the announcers saying that the NFL is using replacement officials. If you were watching the New Orleans Saints play the Jacksonville Jaguars last Friday night (Aug. 17), you heard Tim Brando rail against those replacements. Brando almost made the game unwatchable. One of his major complaints was the number of replay reviews, but he failed to mention that replay officials asked for every replay. The night before, during the Atlanta Falcons-Cincinnati Bengals game on Fox, former head official Mike Pereira explained that replay officials were the regular replay officials, not replacements. Although part of the official referees union, the replay officials have a separate collective-bargaining agreement. Replay officials look at every touchdown and turnover (fumbles and interceptions) in the game, and every play in the final two minutes of each half. The NFL started reviewing touchdowns last season and started reviewing turnovers this season. Every game will have turnovers and touchdowns that someone needs to review. Now, did the officials at the Falcons-Bengals game get the reviews right? I’m not sure, because the few plays they reviewed were 50/50 plays that could have been upheld or reversed. Brando also complained about the length of the game, but it wasn’t the longest, not even of that night. I had the Saints game on one TV and the Baltimore Ravens vs. Detroit Lions game on another. The Saints game ended, and the Lions-Ravens game was still going. I listened to the Saints’ postgame show, while I watched the ending of the other game. His comment shows that Brando doesn’t know that preseason games often go longer than regular games. Teams put more players on the field in the preseason, and play normally slows down. Since the preseason began, I have seen tweets by Peter King about how bad the replay officials are and an Ashley Fox article on ESPN.com about how the NFL needs to bring back regular officials. I feel I have to remind King, Fox and anyone else who thinks the regular officials are so great that they are wrong; all they are is regular. Remember how those regular officials blew a coin toss in overtime on Thanksgiving Day in 1998 in a game between the Detroit Lions and Pittsburgh

Steelers? The Steelers’ Jerome Bettis called tails on the overtime coin flip (on a mic on national TV), and official Phil Luckett said Bettis called heads. Detroit took the ball and scored to win the game. That same year, officials missed a Jerry Rice fumble in a playoff game that cost the Green Bay Packers a win against Rice’s San Francisco 49ers. Now, I know what you are thinking: “Bryan, those were two calls in 1998. This is 2012, and these guys are terrible.” Let’s break it down some more: Ed Hochuli’s bad call in 2008 screwed the San Diego Chargers and saved Jay Culter from a fumble as the Denver Broncos won. This is a guy Fox says the NFL needs back—right now. How about the regular officials blowing several calls in Super Bowl XL between the Seattle Seahawks and Pittsburgh Steelers? We need those guys back? The bad calls go on and on. How about the 2002 playoff game between the New York Giants and the 49ers? And even the NFL admitted that the officials missed a couple of roughing-the-passer calls on Brett Favre against the Saints in the NFC Championship where they played the Minnesota Vikings in 2009—the year the Saints won the Super Bowl. Finally, I have four words for you (Raiders fans, hide your eyes): the Tuck Rule Game. The whole argument about how great the regular guys are just doesn’t seem to make sense to me. How can about 120 people out of more than 300 million people in this country be the only ones qualified to officiate an NFL game? Another big complaint about replacement officials is that the speed of the game in the regular season will overwhelm them. Well, most NFL officiating crews are mainly mid-aged or older white guys. Are those guys the only people with eyes good enough and in the best shape to call NFL games? Heck, there isn’t one woman on the regular NFL crews, but does that mean a woman can’t officiate in the NFL? Hell no. Folks, it doesn’t matter if the NFL is using replacement officials or regular officials, because bad calls are going to happen no matter who is officiating. That’s right: No matter who calls the games, they are going to make mistakes. Why? Because officials are human. Not only am I an honesty broker, I am solution oriented as well. So, to solve potential bad calls, I propose giving coaches three challenges per half and the ability to challenge penalties. But, even with my fix, mistakes will occur, because humans still make the calls.

Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS 601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

2012 Project Redirectory Phone Book Recycling Sponsored by The Real Yellow Pages

Bins Are Located At: Flowood:

Central Fire Station Lakeland Drive

Jackson:

Farmer’s Market 929 High Street Hudson Salvage Terry Road

Ridgeland:

Hudson’s Salvage on HWY 51

Madison:

The Ark, 525 Post Oak Road

Clinton:

Public Works Dept, Springridge Road

jacksonfreepress.com

BRYAN FLYNN

13


JFP  College Football Preview /.4(%'2)$"29!.&,9..´3 3/0()34)#!4%$7),$ !33'5%33%3

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here seem to be more questions than answers heading into the 2012 college football season for Mississippi teams. Especially at quarterback, nearly every college and university has question marks, and uncertainty fills the air. I would wager every program is entering the season with fears. Can the Mississippi State Bulldogs continue their rise? Will the Southern Miss Golden Eagles keep their streak of winning seasons alive without quarterback Austin Davis and head coach Larry Fedora? Without quarterback Casey Therriault, what about the Jackson State Tigerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SWAC title hopes? Will the Ole Miss Rebels finally win an SEC game after going winless for the last year?

In the smaller schools, will a new coach and moving the game against Jackson State back to Lorman spark Alcorn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program? Can Delta State keep building into a Division II powerhouse after a great two-year playoff run? Will Mississippi College, Millsaps or Belhaven make a run to the playoffs that could steal the spotlight from the bigger schools? Is there any chance Mississippi Valley State begins its rise from the ashes? I always say that the best part about sports is that the stories write themselves. We can speculate around the dinner table, on the Internet or at the barber shop in the preseason how this season will turn out for our favorite team, but all these worries and hopes will end up being played out right before our eyes each Saturday this fall.

COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

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 SEASON 6:$&WLHGIRUILUVWSODFH6:$&(DVW

3TADIUM0LVVLVVLSSL9HWHUDQV0HPRULDO6WDGLXP 2ADIO$0 ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION

August 22 - 28, 2012

Jackson Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season was bittersweet last year. The Tigers finished in a three-way tie for first place in the SWAC East but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play in the conference title game even if they won the tiebreakers because of academic issues for the players. Casey Therriault left his mark on the JSU record books but is gone this season after using up his eligibility. Hopes now rest in the Tigers finding a quarterback to stay at the top of the East division. Former Louisville High School standout Clayton Moore (a transfer from Akron) will battle Dedric McDonald for the starting quarterback job. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if Moore or McDonald wins the starting job as long as they can produce. Therriault might be gone, but Jackson State will have preseason SWAC defensive player of the year Joseph LeBeau back at defensive end. LeBeau had 16 sacks and an amazing 24.5 tackles for losses last season. With eight returning starters, the defense will have to carry the load for JSU. No question: JSU can repeat the same success that it had last season. Even if the Tigers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t post a nine-win season, they shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall too far from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record.

14

/UTLOOK I was nearly dead on with the Tigers prediction last season. Not a bad job, if I do say so myself. Quarterback play will make or break this season for Jackson State. JSU will need to play a little better on defense,

because Therriault is not going to be in the offensive huddle when the Tigers are down late in a game. LeBeau will have to be a leader for this team and play up to his preseason awards. JSU should be in the

Joseph LeBeau (No. 14, right)

mix playing for a SWAC championship this season. 0REDICTION 8-3 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, at Mississippi State; Sept. 8, Tennessee State (Memphis, Tenn.); Sept. 15, at Texas Southern; Sept.

22, Southern; Sept. 29, Prairie View A&M; Oct. 6, at Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Oct. 13, at Alabama State; Oct. 20, Mississippi Valley State; Nov. 3, at Grambling State; Nov. 10, Alabama A&M; Nov. 17, Alcorn State


Charles Sawyer

5NIVERSITYOF3OUTHERN-ISSISSIPPI'OLDEN%AGLES (EADCOACH(OOLV-RKQVRQ ILUVWVHDVRQRYHUDOO

 SEASON &86$(DVW &86$&KDPSLRQV+DZDLL%RZOZLQ 3TADIUM005REHUWV6WDGLXPÂł7KH5RFN´+DWWLHVEXUJ 2ADIO)0 ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION Southern Miss is celebrating 100 years of football this season and doing so after one of the most successful seasons in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. The Golden Eagles are going to have to try to repeat last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feat with a new head coach and without quarterback Austin Davis, who rewrote the USM record books. Larry Fedora jumped from USM to North Carolina (good luck with that academic scandal), and the Golden Eagles hired Ellis Johnson, the defensive coordinator at South Carolina. Johnson hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been a head coach since leading The Citadel to a 6-6 record in 2003. USM will need to find a new quarterback, and true freshman Anthony Alford could end up being the starter at some point this season. Without an experienced quarterback, the Golden Eagles running back stable must pick up the load. This team will need the defense to jell quickly, with only four starters returning, and Jamie Collins needs to be the leader of this unit. If USM wants to run its 18 straight winning seasons up to 19 straight, both the offense and defense must grow up quickly. /UTLOOK I nailed my prediction last year, even though I got the teams wrong that Southern Miss would lose to. I was right that USM would lose two games, and that the losses would be shockers (UAB and Marshall). This season will see Southern Miss face Nebraska (road), Boise State (home), Western Kentucky (home) and Louisville (home) in non-conference games. Three of those four teams reached a bowl game last season (Western Kentucky was left at home with a 7-5 record). USM faces all four non-conference opponents in

the first five weeks of the season. If USM can split their non-conference games, it will give the Golden Eagles the confidence to reach an 11th straight bowl game and a 19th straight winning season. 0REDICTION 8-4 (could represent C-USA again); 19th straight winning season; 11th straight bowl 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, at Nebraska; Sept. 15, East Carolina; Sept. 22, at W.K.U.; Sept. 29, Louisville; Oct. 6, Boise State; Oct. 13, at U.C.F.; Oct. 20, Marshall; Oct. 27, at Rice; Nov. 3, U.A.B.; Nov. 10, at S.M.U.; Nov. 17, UTEP; Nov. 24, at Memphis

/UTLOOK I blew this prediction last year pretty good. If I blow it this year, it will be a great season for Rebels fans. Things will stay much like last season, or theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get worse before they get better. Freeze will need to recruit players that fit his system and clean house of non-team first players. Ole Miss will have some growing pains, but Freeze has been successful everywhere he has coached. This season will not be pretty, but the future could look brighter if Ole Miss can pull off an upset or two. 0REDICTION 3-9 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, Central Arkansas; Sept. 8, UTEP; Sept. 15, Texas; Sept. 22, at Tulane; Sept. 29, at Alabama; Oct. 6, Texas A&M; Oct. 13, Auburn; Oct. 27, at Arkansas; Nov. 3, at Georgia; Nov. 10, Vanderbilt; Nov. 17, at LSU; Nov. 24, Mississippi State

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

I have no nice way to talk about last season for Ole Miss. Last year, Ole Miss quit on their coach, Houston Nutt, and on their season. The low lights were numerous and just got worse as the season went on. Ole Miss never really got any traction. The Rebels blew the opening game of the season against BYU. They lost to Louisiana Tech by 20, and LSU took a knee over the final five minutes in the fourth quarter to avoid running the score up even higher than 52-3. What might have hurt worse was the loss to archrival Mississippi State for the third straight year (31-3) and failing to win a conference game. I have to mention that the fan base was torn apart by a decision to change the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mascot to a black bear. The Rebels have yet to embrace the bear, but it seems the Ole Miss fans are resigned to finding a place in their hearts for him. At the end of the season, Ole Miss showed Nutt the door and lured Hugh Freeze from Arkansas State.

Freeze is known as an offensive coach who installs a high-powered passing offense. Freeze needs time to rebuild this team, which is in the toughest conference in the country. Barry Brunetti and Bo Wallace will battle for the starting quarterback job, but neither will be able to make a big difference with holes all over the roster.

Jamie Collins

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

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15


COURTESY MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

FROM PAGE 15

Johnathan Banks

-ISSISSIPPI3TATE5NIVERSITY"ULLDOGS (EADCOACH'DQ0XOOHQ IRXUWKVHDVRQRYHUDOO

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August 22 - 28, 2012

If Mississippi State had pulled off victories in close games against Auburn and South Carolina, that 8-4 prediction would have been perfect. The Bulldogs did make a bowl game, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m calling that a win. This seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hopes rest with quarterback Tyler Russell and his ability to throw the ball. After sitting behind Chris Relf for two years, Russell is now the man, and all the weight of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success or failure falls on him. Russell needs to provide big plays for this offense in the passing game. Success this season will depend on opposing teams fearing Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arm mixed with a solid ground game. MSU is in the SEC West, the strongest division in college football, but the Bulldogs need to beat another division foe other than Ole Miss. Alabama, LSU and Arkansas to be considered the â&#x20AC;&#x153;classâ&#x20AC;? of the conference, but Auburn and Texas A&M are beatable. Coach Dan Mullen has done a good job turning this program around after taking over for Sylvester Croom. Last year, the Bulldogs won the games they were supposed to win and kept pace with the SEC heavyweights. Over the next two years, MSU has to take the next step by beating some of the big boys and challenging for a division title in the SEC West. If the Bulldogs take care of business early in the season, their schedule sets them up for big things.

16

/UTLOOK After taking a slight step back last season from 2010, this program needs to take a step forward. MSU returns most of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense with cornerbacks Jonathan Banks and Corey Broomfield leading the way. I am not going to lie. The Bulldogs could start the season 7-0 if they can take care of Auburn and Tennessee at home. The schedule becomes much tougher starting Oct. 27 at Alabama. 0REDICTION 8-4 with a third straight bowl game 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, Jackson State; Sept. 8, Auburn; Sept. 15, at Troy, Sept. 22, South Alabama; Oct. 6, at Kentucky; Oct. 13, Tennessee; Oct. 20, M.T.S.U.; Oct. 27, at Alabama; Nov. 3, Texas A&M; Nov. 10, at L.S.U.; Nov. 17, Arkansas; Nov. 24 at Mississippi


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jacksonfreepress.com

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17


A Day In The Park For CARA

Host an Exchange Student Today ! (for 3, 5 or 10 months) Make a lifelong friend from abroad.

Camilla from Italy, 16 yrs.

Enjoys dancing, playing the piano and swimming. Camilla looks forward to cooking with her American host family.

A Day In The Park for CARA Community Animal Rescue & Adoption, Inc.

Karen

Lunch by Outback Steakhouse • Live Music • Silent Auction • Dogs On Parade Free Children’s Carnival • Blessing of the Pets • Arts & Crafts Market Pet Educational Sessions • Bring Your Pet

at 1-800-473-0696 www.assehosts.com or email info@asse.com.

Voluntary Admission: Bag of Dog Food or Cat Litter

Karen at 1-800-473-0696 (Toll Free) www.assehosts.com or email info@asse.com.

Pelahatchie Shore Park at the Reservoir Saturday, August 25 • 10am - 3:30pm

mer

Enrich your family with another culture. Now you can host a high school exchange student (girl or boy) from France, Germany, Scandinavia, Spain, Australia, Japan, Brazil, Italy or other countries. Single Daniel from Denmark, 17 yrs. parents, as well as couples Loves skiing, playing soccer and with or without children, watching American movies. Daniel may host. Contact us ASAP hopes to learn to play football and for more information or to live as a real American. select your student.

(Toll Free)

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

Founded in 1976 ASSE International Student Exchange Program is a Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization. For privacy reasons, photos above are not photos of actual students

www.carams.org

960 North Flag Chapel Road, Jackson, MS 39209 601.922.7575

!"#$%&'()"*+%,-./01 !-2/%3'01"*'0/ (*%455-0.(6)/%70"8/9 !"#$%&#'(&)%*(+,-&)%./(0"&)%+-1&%(21%,03/*023&)% 4#5%/(6-%*/#5&(21&%#'%$#1-"2%0*-$&%*#%./##&-% '"#$%(*%7!8%9#1-"2:%;-%1#%#5"%+-&*%*#%<"#601-% 4#5%=0*/%/03/>?5(,0*4%(''#"1(+,-%'5"20&/023&%'#"% 4#5"%/#$-%(21%#'@%.-)%(21%306-%4#5%*/-%5,*0$(*-% &/#<<023%-A<-"0-2.-:

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August 22 - 28, 2012

THE SECOND ANNUAL CLASH IN THE KITCHEN COMPETITION FEATURING:

18

Jesse Houston from Parlor Market Tom Ramsey from Underground 119 Nick Wallace from King Edward Hotel,

A Fundraiser to Benefit: The Mississippi Burn Foundation 7 PM Thursday, August 23rd, at the Mississippi Craft Museum 950 Rice Road, Ridgeland/Phone: 601-856-7546 Tickets available online at www.msburn.org or at http://jacksonclashinthekitchen.eventbrite.com

Get$25Off & FREE SHIPPING to the U.S and Canada

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(EADCOACH Norman Joseph (36-36; eighth season; 57-56 overall)  SEASON3-7 (2-6; 7th place American Southwest Conference) 3TADIUMRobinson-Hale Stadium, Clinton 2ADIOgochoctaws.com ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION 5-5 It was a tough season for Mississippi College with two three-game losing streaks and ending the season with three straight losses. The Choctaws want to get off to a fast start against major rival Millsaps. MC plays in one of the toughest Division III conferences, the ASC, and will have to outperform preseason expectations by the other head coaches who picked MC to finish sixth in the conference. /UTLOOK The Choctaws are breaking in a new starting quarterback this season, and that is a tough proposition in an already tough conference. MC will have to play way above expectations to compete for a conference title. Mississippi College plays in a top-heavy conference. Finishing in the near the middle of the eight team ASC would be outstanding. 0REDICTION4-6 3CHEDULE Aug. 30, at Millsaps; Sept. 8, Webber International; Sept 15, at West Alabama; Sept. 29, at Hardin-Simmons; Oct. 6, Sul Ross State; Oct. 13, at Howard Payne; Oct. 20, at Texas Lutheran; Oct. 27, East Texas Baptist; Nov. 3, Louisiana College; Nov. 11 at Mary Hardin-Baylor

T

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(EADCOACH Jamey Chadwell (0-0; 1st season; overall 22-14)  SEASON11-3 (3-1 Gulf South Record; reached semifinals of Division II Playoffs) 3TADIUMTravis Parker Field, Cleveland 2ADIO 930 AM ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION 9-2 (another prediction I nailed). Delta State made another deep run in the Division II playoffs last season behind quarterback Micah Davis. The Statesmen will enter this season without Davis or last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coach Ron Roberts. Jamey Chadwell took over after Roberts left to become head coach of Southeastern Louisiana. DSU has plenty of talent left in Cleveland, but the Statesmen will have to grow up quickly. Delta State faces Fort Valley State, a major contender in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, in game one of the season. Overall DSU will face three teams ranked in top 15 of the Division II preseason top 25. /UTLOOK Chadwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last job was at North Greenville University, where he turned the program around and led it to the Division II playoffs last season. NGU lost to Delta State in the playoffs last season. DSU should be in good hands with Chandell and is ranked in the top 15 of the Division II to start the season. Look for the Statesmen to make another run at the DII playoffs. 0REDICTION7-3 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, Fort Valley State; Sept. 8, at Elizabeth City State; Sept. 22, North Alabama; Sept. 27, Abilene Christian; Oct. 6, at Tarleton State; Oct. 13, West Georgia; Oct. 20, at Valdosta State; Oct. 27, West Alabama; Nov. 3, at University of Indianapolis; Nov. 11 at Shorter University

(EADCOACH Aaron Pelch (11-9; third season; 11-9 overall)  SEASON4-6 (3-3; 4th place Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference) 3TADIUMHarper Davis Field, Jackson 2ADIO gomajors.com ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION 8-2 (I blew it.) This is the first season that the Majors will participate in the Southern Athletic Association. In fact it will be the first season any team participates in the SAA after it formed last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;teams had to honor their commitments to their last conference, the SCAC. Millsaps returns 15 starters from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad with nine starters returning on offense and six defensive starters back. The Majors get both quarterbacks, Garrett Pinciotti and Konner Joplin, back this season. /UTLOOK With as many starters back for Millsaps, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d think a good season has to be in the works. The Majors may be in a new conference, but they already know their conference opponents because they all left the SCAC together. 0RUH&ROOHJH)RRWEDOOVHHSDJH

jacksonfreepress.com

(EADCOACHKarl Morgan (1-20; 3rd season; 1-20 overall)  SEASON1-10 (1-8 SWAC, 5th place SWAC East) 3TADIUMRice-Totten Stadium, Itta Bena 2ADIOsportsjuice.com ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION 2-9 The rebuilding process at Mississippi Valley State has to be tough on Delta Devils fans. MVSU head coach Karl Morgan enters his third season with just one win, a 12-9 victory over Texas Southern. Still, the team showed some signs of improvement. The Delta Devils played JSU to a one-point loss and lost to Grambling State, Southern and Prairie View by nine points or less. /UTLOOK Things have to turn around eventually for MVSU, but lack of funds to build a proper program doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make for a quick rebound. I was optimistic last season for the Delta Devils, and I think they will take another step forward this season. The offense has to improve greatly; it only scored more than 14 points four times last season. 0REDICTION3-8 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, Concordia (Ala.); Sept. 8, at Alabama State; Sept. 13, at Southern; Sept. 22, at Northwestern State; Oct. 6, Alabama A&M; Oct. 13, Grambling State; Oct. 20, at Jackson State; Oct. 27, at Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Nov. 3, Alcorn State; Nov. 10, Prairie View A&M; Nov. 17, Texas Southern

2012 JFP Top 25 by Bryan Flynn

COURTESY ALABAMA CRIMSON TIDE

(EADCOACHJay Hopson (0-0, 1st season/0-0 overall)  SEASON2-8 (1-8 SWAC, 4th place SWAC East) 3TADIUMJack Spinks Stadium, Lorman 2ADIO 90.1 FM ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION7-3 Alcorn State made headlines this offseason by hiring Jay Hopson, the first white head coach in SWAC history, and deciding not to play Jackson State in Jackson, killing the Capital City Classic this year. The Braves are on their third coach in three years after Melvin Spears lasted only one year since replacing Earnest Collins. The Hopson hiring made headlines but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean anything in the grand scheme of things if he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win games. ASU is returning most of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense and defense starters, so there should be a few more wins. But the offense ranked 109th in FCS (Football Championship Subdivision) and must improve dramatically. (Side note: JSU had the best offense in FCS last season.) /UTLOOK Hopson hired quarterback coach Fred McNair, so there goes a connection to ASU past. The Braves defense ranked 82nd ranked last season, meaning they have a mountain to climb on both sides of the ball. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look for ASU to compete for a SWAC title this season, but expect improvements and more wins. Hopefully, I am closer on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prediction than last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven wins I dreamed up. 0REDICTION 4-7 3CHEDULESept. 1, Grambling State (Shreveport, La.); Sept. 8, at James Madison; Sept. 15, Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Sept. 22, at Arkansas State; Sept. 29, Alabama State; Oct. 6, Southern; Oct. 13, at Alabama A&M; Oct. 20, at Prairie View A&M; Nov. 3, at Mississippi Valley State; Nov. 10, Texas Southern; Nov. 17, at Jackson State

19


&ROOHJH)RRWEDOOIURPSDJH

Millsaps will have a very good chance to capture the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first championship. Then again I could be wrong, like I was last year. 0REDICTION 7-3 3CHEDULEAug. 30, Mississippi College; Sept. 8, at LaGrange; Sept. 15, at Point; Sept. 29, at Centre; Oct. 6, Huntingdon; Oct. 13, Sewanee; Oct. 20, at Rhodes; Oct. 27, at Trinity; Nov. 3, Austin; Nov. 10, Birmingham Southern

(EADCOACH Joseph Thrasher (15-18 4th season/28-34 overall  SEASON 5-6 (3-3; 5th place Mid-South Conference West) 3TADIUMH.T. Newell Field, Jackson 2ADIO blazers.belhaven.edu ,ASTYEAR´SPREDICTION 5-6 (somebody get me to Vegas before this season starts). Belhaven returns Conerly Trophy finalist Justin Gaines at running back. The Blazers will rely on Gaines but will also have quarterbacks Alex Williams and Jimmy Brasford returning as well. Both QBs saw plenty of action last season with Williams getting the majority of the passing attempts. Belhaven has a new offensive coordinator, but Craig Bowman is familiar with the Blazers offensive players because he was wide-receivers coach last season. /UTLOOK Belhaven was picked to finish fifth in the MSC West division. The bad news for the Blazers is that five teams on their schedule were either ranked or received votes in the NAIA Football Coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Spring Top-25 Poll. 0REDICTION 5-6 3CHEDULE Sept. 1, at University of the Cumberlands (KY); Sept. 8, Louisiana College; Sept. 15, at Cumberland University (TN); Sept. 22, Campbellsville University (KY); Sept. 29, at University of Virginia at Wise; Oct. 6, Kentucky Christian University; Oct. 13, Bluefield College; Oct. 20, at Lindsey Wilson College; Oct. 27, at Faulkner College; Nov. 3, Pikeville College; Nov. 10 Bethel University

THIS IS MY MUSEUM.

August 22 - 28, 2012

MAKE IT YOURS.

20

Become a member today.

WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 601-960-1515

(EADCOACHGene Murphy (148-44-5; 20th season; 148-44-5)  SEASON 7-3 (5-1; second in South division) 3TADIUMJoe Renfroe Stadium, Raymond 2ADIO 99.1 FM Hinds Community College returned to the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges (MACJC) playoffs in 2011 for the first time since 2004. Gene Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with 148 wins, the winningest active coach in National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; leads the Eagles. HCC is entering this season as the sixth-ranked team in the NJCAA preseason poll. Last year, East Mississippi Community College (the eventual national champion) beat the Eagles 5524 in the playoffs to end their season. This year, Hinds was picked second in the South division, with Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College at No. 1. Mississippi Gulf Coast starts the season ranked fourth in the NJCAA preseason poll. /UTLOOK Hinds returns a wealth of talent on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. The Eagles look to be a playoff contender in 2012, challenging Mississippi Gulf Coast CC for the top spot in their division. 0REDICTION8-1 3CHEDULE Aug. 30, Mississippi Delta CC; Sept. 6, Coahoma CC; Sept. 13 at Mississippi Gulf Coast CC, Sept. 20 Co-Lin CC, Sept. 29 at East Central CC, Oct. 4 Southwest Mississippi CC, Oct. 11 Jones CC, Oct. 18 at Holmes CC, Oct. 25 at Pearl River CC

(EADCOACHJeff Koonz (2-7; second season; 2-7 overall)  SEASON2-7 3TADIUMRas Branch Field 2ADIO 103.9 FM Holmes CC struggled last year in Jeff Koonzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first season. The Bulldogs lost seven games by an average 19.4 points. The closest loss last season for Holmes was a three-point loss to Southwest Mississippi Community College. The high point of the season had to be a 23-point victory over Mississippi Delta Community College. Holmes also held off Coahoma Community College for a dramatic 15-14 win. /UTLOOK Holmes just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the talent to compete in the tough Mississippi Junior College system right now. The Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lack of talent was evident when the team held open tryouts in May. This squad was picked to finish fifth in the North division. 0REDICTION 3-6 3CHEDULEAug. 30, at Jones CC; Sept. 6, Mississippi Gulf Coast CC; Sept. 13, Northeast CC (at Madison Central); Sept. 20, at Itawamba CC; Sept. 29, Mississippi Delta CC; Oct. 6, East Mississippi CC; Oct. 11, at Northwest Mississippi CC; Oct. 18, Hinds CC; Oct. 25, Coahoma CC


COURTESY SOUTHERN MISS

COURTESY SOUTHERN MISS

*OHNATHAN"ANKS #ORNERBACK -ISSISSIPPI3TATE"ULLDOGS Banks is the early leader for the award and took the most press this preseason. The cornerback has made nearly every preseason watch list and All-American team. Last season, Banks had 71 tackles, eight for a loss and five interceptions. The senior from Maben first made headlines in his freshman season intercepting Tim Tebow twice.

Tracy Lampley

Banks will have to compete with a teammate, senior Corey Broomfield, who is the cornerback opposite of him. Broomfield doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the same publicity that Banks gets but is a solid football player. 4YLER2USSELL 1UARTERBACK -ISSISSIPPI3TATE"ULLDOGS If there is an offensive leader for the Conerly Trophy, it has to be Russell, a junior, who is entering his first season as the fulltime starter. Russell will have one of the best receiving groups in the state. Throwing to players like Chad Bum-

Jamie Collins

phis, Chris Smith and Arceto Clark could help Russell accumulate some good stats. Last season, Russell completed 69 passes on 129 attempts for 1,034 yards with eight touchdowns and four interceptions. Mississippi Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hopes of three straight bowls rest with Russell. A big season with great stats and a big upset could seal up the trophy.

*AMIE#OLLINS $EFENSIVE%ND,INEBACKER 3OUTHERN-ISS'OLDEN%AGLES As a hybrid defensive end/linebacker, senior Collins could continue the line of star defensive players at Southern Miss. He will have to show that he can still be productive without Cordarro Law lining up opposite of him. Last season, Collins had 98 tackles and 6.5 sacks as part of a relentless attacking defense run by the Golden Eagles last year. Collins will get most of the headlines if he can produce big plays and wreak havoc on opposing offenses.

#LAYTON-OORE 1UARTERBACK *ACKSON3TATE4IGERS Moore, a junior, was a standout at Louisville High School and accepted an offer from Ole Miss before a run-in with his coach made the Rebels pull his scholarship. 4RACY,AMPLEY That left Moore to walk on at Ole Miss be7IDE 2ECEIVER 3OUTHERN fore leaving to attend Mississippi Gulf Coast -ISS'OLDEN%AGLES Community College for the 2010 season. Lampley might be the He transferred to the University of Akbest receiver in the state, ron for the 2011 season, during which he but this season he will have completed 147 pass in 309 attempts with to work to show it since nine touchdowns and nine interceptions. Afhe will have neither Larry ter Akron finished last season 1-11 he transFedoraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-powered of- ferred to Jackson State. fense nor Austin Davis If Moore can win the starting job for the throwing to him. Last sea- Tigers and lead JSU to SWAC champion-

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son, Lampley caught 47 passes for 574 yards with four touchdowns. The senior wide receiver from Waynesboro, Miss., is also a threat in the running game. Lampley ran the ball 91 times for 463 yards with three touchdowns. He is dangerous in the return game, producing 52 punt returns for 356 yards and one touchdown and 19 kickoff returns for 405 yards.

Now Serving Lunch Tuesday-Fridayâ&#x20AC;˘11:00am-2:00pm

Clayton Moore

COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

A

fter the 2012 season ends, the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame will award the Conerly Trophy to one player from a four-year university or college as the best college football player in Mississippi. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner Southern Miss quarterback Austin Davis graduated, so there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a repeat winner. As stated in another article (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Have the Quarterbacks Gone?â&#x20AC;?), most of the colleges and universities will start a different quarterback from their first games of last season. That opens the door a little wider for a defensive player to win the award. It is tough for defensive players to show their true value since most do not accumulate gaudy offensive numbers. Most defensive players need to make several game changing plays over the course of a season to stay in votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; minds. The preseason favorites for the Conerly trophy:

by Bryan Flynn

ship, he has to be in the mix for the Conerly Trophy. If not this year, Moore will have one more year of eligibility left. *OSEPH,E"EAU $EFENSIVE%ND *ACKSON3TATE4IGERS LeBeau has stats from last season that most defensive players can only dream of. He had 16 sacks and 24.5 tackles for loss as well as 75 tackles. The senior defensive end was named pre-season SWAC defensive player of the year at the Southwest Athletic Conference media days. LeBeau will be in the Conerly mix this season as long as he keeps harassing and terrorizing opposing offenses. A standout season with crazy defensive stats could make LeBeau the first Jackson State player to win the Conerly. *EFF3COTT 2UNNING"ACK /LE-ISS2EBELS Ole Miss needs offensive play-makers if they are going to just be competitive this season. One player who could be a game changer is running back Jeff Scott. Scott ran for 529 yards on 116 carries with six touchdowns, and he was useful in the passing and return game. The school suspended running back for the last two games of the year for violating team rules. Ole Miss has won the most Conerly Trophies with five, and Scott is their best chance for the sixth.

jacksonfreepress.com

#/.%2,9(/0%&5,3

21


by Bryan Flynn COURTESY USM PHOTOGRAPHY

Southern Miss is replacing record-breaking quarterback Austin Davis. The Golden Eagles will put their 18 straight winning seasons in the hands of an unknown commodity after Davis graduated as several quarterbacks battle for the job. Mississippi State started Chris Relf to begin last season, but an injury forced MSU to replace him with junior Tyler Russell. Now Relf has graduated, and Russell will be the full-time starter as the Bulldogs move from a running-oriented offense to a passing offense. Almost every college in Mississippi has a new quarterback, including Southern Miss. Casey Therriault rewrote the Jackson State record books but, like Relf and Davis, exn 1997, singer Paula Cole asked â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Have All the hausted his college eligibility. The Tigers could turn to Cowboys Gone.â&#x20AC;? Well, I am sure top men are working former Akron Zips quarterback and Louisville, Miss., on finding out the answer to what could be the biggest native Clayton Moore this season. question of our time. Alcorn State started Brandon Bridge, known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Air This college football season in Mississippi could Canada,â&#x20AC;? at quarterback to begin last season but Bridge, be a parody of that song called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Have All the the lone caller, left the team midway through last season. Quarterbacks Gone.â&#x20AC;? Nearly every team this sea- Sophomore Darius Smith took over the quarterbacking son will have a different quarterback under center duties after Bridge left and will be the starter this season. in game one this season, that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start game one Tommy Reyer led Mississippi College as the starting last season. quarterback last season, but he is now a student assistant

I

because he is no longer eligible. The Choctawsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only quarterback with prior playing time is sophomore Jonathon Redd who saw limited action. Several players will get a chance to earn the starting job. Southern Miss and Jackson State are not the only schools replacing a record-setting quarterback. Delta State must find a replacement for Micah Davis who led the Statesmen to the Division II playoff semifinals. Ole Miss is starting over with a new coach and a new quarterback after Zack Stoudt left football due to â&#x20AC;&#x153;health related issues.â&#x20AC;? Senior Randall Mackey replaced Stoudt last season, but he is now a wide receiver and out of the quarterback race. That leaves junior Barry Brunetti, who replaced Mackey, in the lead to start in 2012 but will be challenged by sophomore Bo Wallace. (Rebel fans might need a flow chart just to follow all the quarterback changes.) Not every school is replacing a quarterback this season. Millsaps will have seniors Garrett Pinciotti and Konner Joplin back to quarterback the Majors. Belhaven is returning junior Alex Williams back under center for the Blazers. The Delta Devils of Mississippi Valley State might be facing tough times but will have Garrick Jones back this season. Mississippi State looks to be in the best position with Russell getting a lot of action on the field last season. Jackson State, Mississippi College, Southern Miss and Delta State could all see hopes of a winning season go up in smoke thanks to a new starter at quarterback.

by Bryan Flynn

Xxxx College football starts in a week. Tigers, Eagles,

by Bryan Flynn

F

August 22 - 28, 2012

FILE PHOTO

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22

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23

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24

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ARTS p 27 | FILM p 30 |MUSIC p 32 TRIP BURNS

A Place for Living by Briana Robinson

W

August 22 - 28, 2012

hen she sent a letter to 150 people a few months ago, the Rev. Molly MacWade was unsure of the responses she would get. “Oh please Lord, help people respond,” MacWade prayed. Her letter requested assistance for the upcoming annual Grace House fundraiser. Her prayer worked. From that letter, MacWade raised enough money to fully pay for the fundraiser expenses, so that all of its proceeds can go to Grace House. Almost 20 years ago, MacWade and a group from St. Andrew’s Cathedral started Grace House. With the help of the community, the project was a success. “We saw the need for a place for people living with AIDS. Back then the medicines were not as good as they are now, so we had a lot of sick people here,” MacWade says. “Now people are living full lives.” Grace House is having its annual fundraiser, “Saving Grace” on Thursday, Aug. 23, at St. James Episcopal Church. It features an assortment of live music, food and drinks. The funds raised will go toward renovating the home’s kitchen and dining area. “There’s always a need to improve the houses themselves,” MacWade says. Right now, they don’t have a large enough space for everyone to meet or share a meal. Grace House is actually made up of seven homes in Jackson. The main one, affectionately dubbed the Big House, houses seven people. In all, Grace House has about 35 residents. “It’s really a blessing. We’ve grown a lot,” MacWade says. She refers to the organization as a transitional ministry. It provides a place for homeless or about to be homeless people who are HIV-positive or have AIDS to live until they save enough money to sustain themselves. Residents must have a job or be looking for one. Some are in GED programs or are pursuing college degrees. There is no minimum or maximum amount of time that the residents can stay because people come in from all levels of need. “Before the drugs were better developed, people were living here a lot longer,” MacWade says. “Now the drugs are allowing them to feel better and to get better, and that’s when they can get to the next step of getting a job and saving some money.” Most people who come in are in dire need of support. “We give them that here. We give them a sense of community and belonging and hopefulness,” she says. Residents come from a variety of situations: Some have been recently released from prison and have nowhere to go to; some have families who rejected them because of the HIV. “Once they get here, they know that they’re not alone,” MacWade says. Lots of individuals, churches and organizations have al26 ways come forward to help. “It’s a community-supported non-

Rev. Molly MacWade helped start Grace House almost 20 years ago for people in need living with HIV/AIDS.

profit ministry. It’s not just one organization,” MacWade says. Volunteer social workers and counselors help out at the House. Each resident is able to participate in groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, life-skills programs and support groups. Grace House also has programs for those out in the community living with HIV/AIDS who still need support. In addition, it has an educational outreach program to teach and inform the community about the virus. “HIV/AIDS affects all of us … and can affect anybody,” MacWade says, and that is what they teach. This year, Grace House residents started a community garden, which was in the planning stage for a couple years. “It feeds their souls and feeds their need to contribute to Grace House,” MacWade says. “And it feeds them.” MacWade says that the volunteers on the board of directors are involved in all aspects of Grace House life. “It’s just as much of a blessing for the volunteers who work here and the staff members who work here as it is for people who live here,” she says. Bill Love, the chairman, has been on the board for 20 years. MacWade refers to him as “the heart of this place.”

Grace House is unique in central Mississippi. “It’s a blessing that we’re here, but there’s always a waiting list,” MacWade says. Last year’s “Saving Grace” event brought in around 550 people, and MacWade is hoping for 600 this year. Sugar Magnolia Takery donated all the food, including tapas such as shrimp étouffée, cheese and red ribbon-decorated cookies. Silver Leaf Wine and Spirits and Southern Beverage will provide the drinks. This year’s event is hosted by Bill Ellison and Othor Cain. The music line-up for “Saving Grace,” organized by Raphael Semmes, includes Swing de Paris; the Grace House Choir, featuring singers from Grace House and Safe Harbour Family Church; James Martin; Dr. Russell Thomas; Fred Knobloch and Fingers Taylor; and Latinismo, in that order. “Saving Grace” is 5-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oak Ridge Drive, 601-982-4880). Admission is $35. Call Grace House (601-353-1038) or the Rev. Molly MacWade (601-540-8447) for advance tickets, or purchase them at the door.


DIVERSIONS|arts

Art with Heart by Vergie Redmond COURTESY MIRANDA JORDAN

ter an animal. Earlier this year, the kennel lost its building after the city did not renew the lease. Jordan and her partners, Angie Saathoff, Hart Koller, Kacee Mott and her husband, Keith Armstrong, began working on the craft show fundraiser for the Madison Ark before it lost its building. Now, the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proceeds will help the Ark find a new facility. Australian-born Jordan has always had an interest in arts The Mississippi Craft Show features up-andand crafts. She enjoys painting coming artists from across the state, such as and creating jewelry. Her favorKristen Ley of Thimblepress. ite type of jewelry to make is what she calls a â&#x20AC;&#x153;reliquary peniranda Jordan got a diagnosis of dantâ&#x20AC;? which is a combination Hodgkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lymphoma, a cancer of of resin pendants. While growing up, she the lymph nodes, in December sold some of her work in a local boutique 2003. At one point, she was so sick in Tasmania. Her dedication to art is so great that she thought she might not make it. Her that even while she was sick in the hospital, doctor began looking for clinical trials for her. she found the energy to practice her craft. She went through â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every day that I chemotherapy and was well enough, radiation treatment I would paint and at St. Dominicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, draw something for and, when that the nurses,â&#x20AC;? she says. did not work, she Jordan also underwent stem found a great love cell treatment at in helping animals. University of MisShe considered a casissippi Medical reer as a veterinarian, Center. In spite of but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t handle it all, Jordan was seeing animals dydetermined to not ing. As she grew give up. older, she had bigâ&#x20AC;&#x153;I promised ger dreams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had myself in that hosthis idea of buildpital, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If I could ing this incredible just get out of here, shelter,â&#x20AC;? she says.  ?1A<X[[Ta7XVW[XUTQ^cc[Tb I will start doing Without the funds all the things I alto build one of her ways said I would own, Jordan dedo,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Jordan says. cided to volunteer Several years later, Wendy Lloydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Frames & Thangs will also with the Madison she is in remis- be for sale at the show. Ark. Now the craft sion and making show brings her two good on her promise while mak- interests together for a good cause. ing Jackson a more beautiful and petFor less-experienced artists who would friendly place. like to display work but feel they do not Jordan is in charge of the Mississippi have enough artworkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or are nervous about Craft Show, which combines her passions: starting out aloneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the craft show has an arts and crafts and animals. The 100-per- option called â&#x20AC;&#x153;booth buddies,â&#x20AC;? which allows cent handmade craft show will feature pieces craftspeople to share a booth with a friend. from artists across the state and is only open Vendors will sell a variety of artwork to Mississippi artists. All the proceeds bene- during the craft show including jewelry, fit the Madison Ark, or Animal Rescue Ken- stained glass, paintings, pottery and mixednel. Although several veteran craftspeople media art. Prices for the art start at $5. will be featured, the show is geared more The Mississippi Craft Show is Aug. 25 toward newcomers. and 26 at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are specifically choosing people Mississippi St., 601-354-7051). Admission that are totally inexperienced but would like is $5 each day, or present Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ticket on to have a go,â&#x20AC;? Jordan says. Sunday for a discounted entry fee of $2. Show Besides receiving the proceeds from hours are Saturday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunthe event, the Madison Ark will also have day 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, a booth set up for patrons to adopt or fos- visit mscraftshow.com or call 601-790-0654.

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27


BEST BETS Aug. 22 - 29, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

FRIDAY 8/24

Author Carolyn Brown discusses her book “A Daring Life: A Biography of Eudora Welty” during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Blues legend B.B. King performs at the B.B. King Homecoming Festival at 1 p.m. at the B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center (400 Second St., Indianola). After-party at Club Ebony (Highway 49 and Highway 82; $25-$60). $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 662-887-9539. … Hunter Gibson is at Fitzgerald’s. … Pieworks has live music Wednesdays at 6 p.m. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers & Blues. … John Mora performs from 6-9 p.m. at Papitos. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike. … Ole Tavern, Pop’s, Club Magoo’s and Last Call have karaoke.

The annual Skeet and Trap Shoot is at 10 a.m. at Capitol Gun Club (1622 Capitol Gun Club Road). Proceeds benefit the Make-a-Wish Foundation. $150, $750 team of five; call 601-366-9474. … The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents “Fed Up” at 6 p.m. at Brookwood Byram Country Club (5001 Forest Hill Road, Byram). $49; call 601-937-1752 to RSVP. … Catfish and Soul is from 6-9 p.m. at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) in Sparkman Auditorium. The Mo’ Money Band performs. Proceeds benefit Harbor House. $25; call 601-371-7335. … The Mississippi Opera hosts Dance with the Stars at 7 p.m. at the Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The Jackson All-Stars Band performs. $150, $1200-$1500 tables; call 601-960-2300. … The Bill Perry Trio performs at 8 p.m. at Yellow Scarf. Doors open at 7 p.m. BYOB. $15 in advance online, $20 at the door; call 347-754-0668 or visit yellowscarfjackson.com. … Kolectiv Rhythm performs at 8 p.m. at The Penguin. … The Back 2 School Bash with hip-hop artist M.E and DJ Shanomak is at 9 p.m. at Slicks Bar & Grille.

COURTESY SUJAN GHIMIRE

WEDNESDAY 8/22

SATURDAY 8/25

The Mississippi Craft Show kicks off at 9 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.) and runs through Aug. 26. Proceeds benefit Madison Ark, a no-kill shelter. $5, children 12 and under free; call 601-790-0654; mscraftshow. com. … The Mississippi Corvette Club Classic Car Show is from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. Net proceeds benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation. $5, children free; mscorvetteclub.com. … The Dog Days of Summer festival is from 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at Pelahatchie Shore Park (Lakeshore Drive, Brandon). Proceeds benefit Community Animal Rescue and Adoption. Dog-food or cat-litter donations welcome; call 601-842-4404. … Support local artists at the Artsfusion Open Air Market from noon-7 p.m. at The Commons. $10, children free; email artsfusion2012@hotmail. com. … Rhonda Richmond performs at Jazz Picnic in the Park at 4 p.m. at Belhaven Park (Poplar Blvd. and Kenwood Place). Free; call 601-352-8850. … At 5 p.m., Martin’s celebrates the life of owner Calvin Stodghill, who passed away Aug. 19. … Salsa Mississippi’s Sujan Ghimire (pictured, right, with Sarah Ghimire) competes in Dance with the Stars Aug. 24 at 7 p.m. at the Country Club of Jackson.

August 22 - 28, 2012

Saving Grace: A Benefit for Grace House is at 6 p.m. at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Raphael Semmes performs. $40; call 601-540-8447. … Mad (Wo)Men Against MS Cocktail Night is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Wear “Mad Men” attire. Proceeds benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. $50-$80; call 601-856-5831, ext. 81203. … The Vibe Worship Band performs at 7 p.m. at Christ United Methodist Church (6000 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-956-6974. … Clash in the Kitchen is at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Burn Foundation. $40; call 28 601-540-2995. … DouleShotz is at Que Sera Sera.

SUNDAY 8/26

The Mississippi’s Got Talent Music Awards kicks off at 8:30 p.m. at Mediterranean Grill. $7; call 601-291-6493. … The GenerationNXT Indie Concert Series is at Dreamz JXN. … Lizz Strowd performs at Burgers & Blues.

MONDAY 8/27

WJSU Cool Jazz Mondays is from 6-8:30 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel. Free; call 601-979-2285. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts MayHAM Mondays/Alternative Night. … Ironwill and Kublai Khan play at 7 p.m. at The Carter. $5.

TUESDAY 8/28

Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “Red Rum” at 7 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). $42.50; call 601-856-9696 to RSVP. … Kerry Thomas, LAV, AI, the Twinz and Chino Blackwell perform during A Night of R&B for the Ladies at Suite 106. Doors open at 9 p.m.; show at 10:30 p.m. $5.

WEDNESDAY 8/29

Millsaps College Library director Tom Henderson presents “Finding Hooch and Homicide on the Gold Coast” during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601576-6998. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers & Blues. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Kerry Thomas performs during A Night of R&B for the Ladies at Suite 106 Aug. 28 at 9 p.m. COURTESY SUITE 106

THURSDAY 8/23

The All White to the Night Party and Fashion Couture is at 6:30 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel in the ballroom. Wear white attire. Proceeds benefit the National AIDS Association. $20-$25; call 601-506-7545. … The 48 Hour Film Project Screenings kick off at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). $9; 48hourfilm.com. … Tawanna Shaunte’ performs at Yellow Scarf at 9 p.m. BYOB. $15 in advance online, $20 at the door; call 347-754-0668; yellowscarf-jackson.com.


Mississippi Craft Show August 25 & 26 Mississippi Trade Mart

This show is 100% Mississippi handmade. With a mix of veteran and first time exhibitors. Madison Ark will be on site during the show managing an adoption drive with dogs and cats in need of a forever home. Many of the artists will be conducting demonstrations of their crafts in their booths during the show. We will also have door prizes and live musical performance by local guitarist, Chad Evans.

Saturday, August 25th, 2012 9am - 7pm Sunday, August 26th, 2012 11am - 4pm

General Admission - $5 donation Children Under 12 Free For more information visit www.mscraftshow.com Benefits Madison Ark www.madisonark.org

     

jacksonfreepress.com

Mississippi Trade Mart at State Fairgrounds High Street, Jackson, MS

29


Treasuring â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sparkleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; COURTESY SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

by Anita Modak-Truran

W

August 22 - 28, 2012

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Dog Days of Summer Aug. 25, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., at Pelahatchie Shore Park (Lakeshore Drive, Brandon). The annual fundraiser for Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA) includes food, entertainment, craft vendors, a pet parade and more. Dog food or cat litter donations welcome; call 601-842-4404; carams.org.

COMMUNITY Events at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison). Call 601-856-2749. â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Book Sale Preview Party Aug. 23, 3-6 p.m., in the meeting room. The membersonly party is for the Friends of the Madison Library. Memberships sold at the door. â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Book Sale Aug. 24-25 and Aug. 27, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The Friends of the Madison Library host the sale in the meeting room.

Sister (Carmen Ejogo), Dee (Tika Sumpter) and Sparkle (Jordin Sparks) shine most in the musical numbers from the Whitney Houston-produced â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sparkle.â&#x20AC;?

hitney Houston sparkled her way to the top of the pop charts in the late 1980s. Back in Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bright and shiny years (the era of large, prosperous hair and big shoulder pads), her music crossed genres. Her freshfaced beauty and distinctive mezzo-soprano voice mesmerized audiences. She easily transitioned from a singing sensation to a movie star, taking our breath away in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Body Guardâ&#x20AC;? and holding her own in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Preacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wifeâ&#x20AC;? with Denzel Washington. But Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect career unraveled. During the past 25 years, we watched her tumble, then rise again, then stumble and then reinvent herself. We readied ourselves for another comeback. The vehicle was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sparkle,â&#x20AC;? a remake of Joel Schumacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1976 film of the same name. Not only is Houston executive producer, she plays the formidable and overbearing mother of three daughters who all shared their motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical talents. While Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legacy abruptly ends after â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sparkle,â&#x20AC;? her performance shines, and the movie has captured Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cautionary tale: The music business eats people up and, for many, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end well. Directed by Salim Akil (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jumping the Broomâ&#x20AC;?) from a screenplay written by Mary Brock Akil, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sparkleâ&#x20AC;? centers on a middle class matriarchal household in Detroit in 1968, though the civil-rights landscape barely infiltrates this musical melodrama. Rather, this film keeps on a linear progression of girl group on the rise, then the fall, and then the rise again. (Sound familiar?) Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gone. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where he is, and no one seems to miss him. Emma (Houston) is tough enough to be both parents for her three daughters. Sister (Carmen Ejogo) is the oldest, nearly 30 and not married. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s returned home after a short-lived attempt at singing in a bigger venue. Dee (Tika Sumpter) doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care that much about singing, because her dream is to attend medical school. Sparkle (â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idolâ&#x20AC;? winner Jordin Sparks) tries to be her mammaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best girl, but she refuses to obey her mother and 30 give up music. Sparkle is a natural songwrit-

jfpevents

MAMIE TILL BRADLEY

DIVERSIONS|film

er, filling pages and pages of notebooks with fabulous prose. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to one day be able to sing her songs, but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shadow and hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet built up her confidence and chops. The motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smothering, however, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop Sister and Sparkle from sneaking out of the house at night so that Sister can perform Sparkleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ditties in local clubs. The opening scenes of this film are sumptuous. Ejogo takes full possession of the show-stealing character Sister. The camera just soaks up her performance, and everyone else fades in the background. (Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if Ejogo gets nominated for an Oscar in the Best Supporting Actress category). Sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s act and Sparkleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s songs catch the eye of a young entrepreneur named Stix (Derek Luke), who has a nose for music and the hustle and flow to make it pay off. Stix, with some help from his cousin Levi (Omari Hardwick), help Sister, Sparkle and Dee form a girl group, and gets them on a televised show, where they become overnight celebrities. The girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; growing fame leads to the disintegration of the family. Sister moves out and marries a slick and sleazy comedian named Satin (Mike Epps), who gets her hooked on cocaine and beats her during fits of rage. Sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life models her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own tragic story. The only singer left in the group is Sparkle. Over her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objections and without any family support, Sparkle pursues her dream. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sparkleâ&#x20AC;? is an uneven crowd pleaser. It looks great on-screen. But it also often sags when it should sizzle, lags when it should energize and plays only in the safe zone. It mixes and matches a montage of other musically based films, such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreamgirls,â&#x20AC;? and other girl groups, like Diana Ross and the Supremes. The freshest moments are the vocal performances, particularly Houston signing â&#x20AC;&#x153;His Eye is on the Sparrowâ&#x20AC;? during a church service and Sparkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full-out performance when she strikes it out on her own. I saw the film with a predominantly female audience, and I treasure the experience. The best part was when the audience sang along with music. Sparks were flying then.

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. â&#x20AC;˘ Garden Partners Meeting Aug. 23, 10:30 a.m. The support group focuses on garden-related events, volunteer opportunities and educational programs. Potential members welcome. â&#x20AC;˘ Dog Day Afternoons. Bring your dog to the Art Garden for an afternoon of play Sundays at noon through Sept. 30. Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). â&#x20AC;˘ Mad (Wo)Men Against MS Cocktail Night Aug. 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Enjoy a cooking demonstration, a silent auction, door prizes and a drawing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mad Menâ&#x20AC;? attire encouraged. $50$80; call 601-856-5831, ext. 81203. â&#x20AC;˘ Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership WIN Meeting Aug. 28, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. For women professionals; includes lunch. RSVP; space limited. $25, $20 members; email dgreen@greater jacksonpartnership.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 22, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Author Carolyn Brown discusses her new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Daring Life: A Biography of Eudora Welty.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting Aug. 23, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0004. 84th Vicksburg Coin Show Aug. 25, 9 a.m.6 p.m., and Aug. 26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Battlefield Inn (4137 Interstate 20 Frontage Road, Vicksburg). Buy, sell or trade coins, and get verbal appraisals. Free; call 601-616-7140. Homebuyer Education Class Aug. 25, 9 a.m., at Jackson Housing Authority (2747 Livingston Road). The class is required to qualify for a JHA loan. Free; call 601-362-0885, ext. 115. Bridges Out of Poverty Seminar Aug. 25, 9 a.m.3:30 p.m., at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive), in Fowler Hall. Learn ways to help the poor in your community. Jodi Pfarr of J. Pfarr Consulting is the speaker. $50; call 601982-4880. Artsfusion Open Air Market Aug. 25, noon7 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Weltyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). Buy art and enjoy music, food and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities. $10, children free; email artsfusion2012@hotmail.com. Ready. Set. Glow! 5K Run/Walk Aug. 25, 6:3010:30 p.m., at University of Mississippi Medical Center (2500 N. State St.). The UMMC School of Medicine Class of 2015 is the host. The race begins at the Student Union. Door prizes and gifts included. $25 run/walk, $12 fun run; eventbrite.com. Coach Don Meyer Leadership Tour Aug. 28, 9 a.m., at Jackson Preparatory School (3100 Lake-

Two of the stops on the Spiritual Pilgrimage to the Mississippi Delta revisit the Emmett Till story.

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land Drive, Flowood). The former NCAA coach gives a seminar on servant leadership. Registration required. $20-$60; call 601-939-8611. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Got Talent Music Awards Aug. 26, 8:30 p.m., at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Performers receive awards in several categories. $7; call 601-291-6493.

WELLNESS Canton Chamber of Commerce Blood Drive Aug. 22, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Canton Chamber of Commerce (100 Depot Drive, Canton). Donate at the Mississippi Blood Services donor coach. Bring ID. Call 888-90-BLOOD. HealthTalk Seminar: Fighting Foot Fungus Aug. 23, noon, at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). RSVP. Free; call 877-907-7642. West Nile Virus Support Group Meeting Aug. 24, 1 p.m., at Methodist Rehabilitation Cen-


jfpevents

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Otis Lotus 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

Zip39 Dodgeball Tournament Aug. 25, 10:30 a.m., at Madison County Sports Zone (213 Industrial Drive N., Madison). The young professionals group Zip39, the Madison County Chamber of Commerce and Raising the Barr Fitness are the hosts. Proceeds from team registrations benefit Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project. Free admission; call 601-605-2554. All White to the Night Party and Fashion Couture Aug. 25, 6:30 p.m., at King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.), in the ballroom. Enjoy cocktails, shopping and a fashion show. White attire mandatory. Proceeds benefit the National AIDS Association. $20-$25; call 601-506-7545. Catfish and Soul Aug. 24, 6-9 p.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive), in Sparkman Auditorium. Enjoy food from Pennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and music from the Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Money Band. Proceeds benefit Harbor House Chemical Dependency Services. $25; call 601-371-7335; hhjackson.org. Clash in the Kitchen Aug. 23, 7-10 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Local chefs Jesse Houston, Tom Ramsey and Nick Wallace compete in a cooking competition. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Burn Foundation. $40; call 601-540-2995. Mississippi Craft Show Aug. 25, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., and Aug. 26, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Purchase from Mississippi artisans, and enjoy music, door prizes and face painting included. Proceeds benefit Madison Ark, a no-kill shelter. $5, children 12 and under free; call 601-790-0654; mscraftshow.com. Saving Grace: A Benefit for Grace House Aug. 23, 6 p.m., at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Enjoy tapas-style refreshments and music from Raphael Semmes. Proceeds go toward renovations at Grace House, a home for people living with HIV and AIDS. $40; call 601-540-8447. ter (1350 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), in the BankPlus Conference Center. Free; call 601-981-1234. Rehoboth Health Fair and Community Festival Aug. 25, 8 a.m., at Zion Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church (361 Robinson Road, Canton). Includes a 5K walk, a health fair, games, food, entertainment and vendors. Free; call 601-720-7107. Blood Drive and Health Fair Aug. 25, 9 a.m., at Rehoboth International Ministries (3209 Greenfield Road, Pearl). Donate blood and get health screenings. Free; call 601-664-6700. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Are the Cureâ&#x20AC;? Cancer Prevention Conference Aug. 25, 2 p.m., at Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Learn how to prevent and treat the disease. $20; call 601-813-9712 or 601-366-1602.

STAGE AND SCREEN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fed Upâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater Aug. 24, 6 p.m., at Brookwood Byram Country Club (5001 Forest Hill Road, Byram). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre performs. RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752. Dance with the Stars Aug. 24, 7 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The dance competition pairs local celebrities and business leaders with dance instructors. The Jackson All-Stars Band performs. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Opera. $150, $1200 table of eight, $1500 table of 10; call 601-960-2300. Jackson 48 Hour Film Project Premiere Screenings Aug. 25, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Filmmakers compete for prizes such as $5,000 and a screening at the Cannes Film Festival. Admission TBA; 48hourfilm.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marvelous Murderâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater Aug. 25, 7 p.m., at Parker House (104 S.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre performs. RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Rumâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater Aug. 28, 7 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries performs. RSVP. $42.50; call 601-856-9696. â&#x20AC;&#x153;West Side Storyâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 24-25, 7:30 p.m., and Aug. 26, 2 p.m. at Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). $12, $10 seniors, $7 students, $5 ages 12 and under; call 601-636-0471.

MUSIC Events at Yellow Scarf (741 Harris St., Suite E). BYOB. $15 online, $20 at the door; call 347754-0668; yellowscarf-jackson.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Tawanna Shaunteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aug. 25, 9 p.m. She is known for being the lead vocalist of Eclectik Soul. â&#x20AC;˘ Bill Perry Trio Aug. 24, 8 p.m. The Oxford jazz group performs. One Night of Worship Aug. 23, 7 p.m., at Christ United Methodist Church (6000 Old Canton Road). The Vibe Worship Band performs. Free; call 601-956-6974. Westhaven Church Music Workshop Aug. 25-26, at Blackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chapel M.B. Church (3425 Robinson Road). The workshop ends with a concert Aug. 26 at 3 p.m. $30, free concert; call 769-218-9860. WJSU Cool Jazz Mondays Aug. 27, 6-8:30 p.m., at King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.). Enjoy live jazz music and a cash bar. Free; call 601-979-2285. A Night of R&B for the Ladies Aug. 28, 9 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). Kerry Thomas, LAV, A1 and the Twinz perform. $5; find @suite106 on Twitter.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Signings at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 North, Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. â&#x20AC;˘ Aug. 23, 4 p.m., illustrator Peter Brown signs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creepy Carrots!â&#x20AC;? $16.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ Aug. 29, 4 p.m., Shannon Hale signs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palace of Stone.â&#x20AC;? $16.99 book.

Pick Up All Your A charity baseball game Aug. 23 benefits the Mustard Seed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seedstersâ&#x20AC;? like Logan, right, shown with her mother Cindy Chew.

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NEEDS! Tailgate packages now include ribs

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lo Trio Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. August 24- Thurs. August 30 2012 Premium Rush PG13 The Apparition PG13 2016 Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s America PG Hit And Run

R

Expendables 2

R

Sparkle

PG13

3-D ParaNorman PG ParaNorman (non 3-D) PG

CREATIVE CLASSES

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS

Adult Acrylic Painting Class, at Daniel MacGregor Studios (4347 Lakeland Drive, Flowood), Thursdays from 7-9 p.m. Bring an 11-by-14-inch canvas for a $5 discount. $15; call 601-992-6405.

Indigo Dye Day Aug. 28, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). See fiber artisans dye their natural materials to use in weaving projects. Free; call 601-856-7546.

Shut Up and Write! Classes at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for one of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Laddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popular nonfiction and creative writing classes. Fall classes forming now.. $150 ($75 deposit required); call 601-362-6121, ext. 16; get on mailing list at class@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Tailgate

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

The Odd Life Of Timothy Green PG The Bourne Legacy PG13

The Campaign Hope Springs

R

PG13

Total Recall PG13 Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: Dog Days PG 3-D Step Up: Revolution PG13 The Dark Knight Rises PG13 Ice Age Continental Drift(non 3-D) PG Opens Wednesday 8/29 Lawless R Oogieloves In The Big Balloon G

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Mississippi Corvette Club Classic Car Show Aug. 25, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Enjoy Corvette and Harley-Davidson exhibits, food, games and a silent auction. Gravity Feed performs. Net proceeds benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation. $5 donation, children free; mscorvetteclub.com.

COURTESY MUSTARD SEED

BE THE CHANGE Annual Skeet and Trap Shoot Aug. 24, 10 a.m., at Capitol Gun Club (1622 Capitol Gun Club Road). Check-in at 10 a.m. or 1 p.m. All skill levels welcome; registration includes lunch. Proceeds benefit the Make-a-Wish Foundation. $150, $750 team of five; call 601-366-9474; ms.wish.org.

Movieline: 355-9311 31


DIVERSIONS|music

Stretching Their Sound ‘Coast to Coast’ by Larry Morrisey

COURTESY RIVER CITY TANLINES

“There were older songs that I had written in 2007 and ’08. Your mind changes over the years because it was so long in the making.” “Coast to Coast” has plenty of garage- and punk-influenced sounds, but Trout also showcases her pop songwriting skills on the record. The strong melodies of songs like “Stop My Heart” and “Pretty Please” hearken back to the classic pop-rock radio of the late ’70s. The band also takes detours on the record into classic metal riffs (“Black Matter”) and noisy post-punk squall (“Waiting for Nothing”). The album has built new ties The River City Tanlines (from left: Alicja Trout, Terrence Bishop, John Bonds) expand to Mississippi for the band. Big beyond punk and garage roots on its latest album, “Coast to Coast.” Legal Mess Records, a subsidiary of Fat Possum Records in Oxford, released “Coast to Coast.” Trout he River City Tanlines are back with some new sounds. recorded it at Dial Back Sound in Water Valley, a studio owned The Memphis-based trio, led by singer and guitarist by Big Legal Mess label head Bruce Watson. Although the TanAlicja Trout, recently released “Coast to Coast,” its first lines were reluctant to part with Dirt Nap, its previous record album in six years. The band is a product of the Mound label, Trout could not pass up the convenience of working close City’s punk and garage-rock scene and is known for energetic to home without being in her own house live shows that they bring to Jackson on a regular basis. It has “I had too much going on to keep my house as a home expanded on its garage roots to include pop and even some studio,” she says. “I didn’t really want to leave Dirt Nap, but metal sounds. the fact that Bruce was nearby and had a studio … we decided, Trout, the band’s primary songwriter, credits the range of ‘We’ve got to go there.’ We wanted to work with a southern styles on the new record to the length of time since its last re- label as well.” cord (2006’s “I’m Your Negative”). The sound of the new record is heavily reliant on the “It’s been a long time making the record,” she admits. band’s rhythm section, made up of bass player Terrence Bish-

T

Natalie’s Notes

op and drummer John Bonds. The duo played together for many years in different bands prior to joining with Trout in 2004. Bishop and Bonds have a strong musical connection that Trout appreciates. “They are a unit,” she says. “They get really mad if one of them is playing in a band and the other one isn’t, unless it’s a band they don’t like. They function well together and know how each other works.” Although Trout and her band do not currently have a show scheduled for Jackson, the city has played an important role in the Memphian’s life as a performer. Several of her past groups (including The Lost Sounds and Mouserocket) have played here, and they have always received an enthusiastic response. “It’s usually really fun down there,” she says. “(Jackson) people get into it kind of the way they do at Memphis shows. They stand up and yell at you. Something funny usually happens.” The Tanlines are hitting the road over the next few months to promote “Coast to Coast,” including short tours in the midwest, northeast and Europe. After years of touring and performing for audiences of all sizes, Trout does not worry over small turnouts. “I’ve never been a person who’s been crushed when only 10 or 12 people are at my show, because I remember seeing (legendary Memphis garage rockers) Oblivians shows where there was almost no one there, but everyone had the best time,” she says. “For me, an ideal show today is one that we’re playing by midnight and not going on at 2 in the morning. … And the P.A. works.” “Coast to Coast” is available now on Big Legal Mess Records. Buy it at Morningbell Records (622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, 769233-7468) for $14.99. For more information on the River City Tanlines, visit myspace.com/rivercitytanlines.

30 Years and Going Strong

by Natalie Long

August 22 - 28, 2012

32

of opening for acts such as Percy Sledge, Starship, Irma Thomas and The Radiators. While Gibson stays busy performing all over the southwest region, he has managed to find time to write TV and radio commercial jingles; he won an Addy Award for a Gulf Oaks Hospital commercial in 1990. COURTESY HUNTER GIBSON

O

ver the years, I have seen Hunter Gibson perform everywhere from weddings and private parties to corporate events and local venues. At the annual Sweet Potato Queens Come On In Party this year at the Hilton on County Line Road, he and his band had Sweet Potato Queen Wannabes getting up from their seats and shaking their tiaras, boas and margarita glasses. A Jackson native, Gibson, 49, started out at age 6 with piano lessons, and as he grew up, he began playing in rock bands in high school. In 1982, he decided to become a solo artist. He began to perform as just “a guy playing the piano,” covering singer/songwriter hits from the ’70s from artists such as Elton John and Billy Joel. Over the course of 30 years performing, Gibson has played an assortment of musical genres, from country

to hip-hop and rap. During the mid-1990s, Gibson also picked up the guitar and harmonica and started incorporating these instruments into his shows, becoming a one-man band. Gibson’s passion for music led him to visit cities such as Nashville, Atlanta and Los Angeles, hoping that his singing and songwriting skills would get noticed—and they did. In the late 1980s, he released an album under the now-defunct Terminal Records. Soon after that, Gibson started his own label, Baby j Records, and released two more original albums. He decided, however, that performing his own material to an audience of strangers was too personal for him, which is uncommon for songwriters, and he wanted to form a band that played a wide variety of music. In 1991, he formed Hunter and The Gators. The Gators are local party favorites and have opened for Greg Allman and Better Than Ezra. Gibson has also had the privilege

Hunter Gibson plays the piano and sings at his very first concert in 1982.

He also has written and produced music albums at his studio. He composed and wrote the theme song for the Outdoor Channel’s “Chasing the Dream” in 2001 as well as the movie score for 2008’s “The Avarice.” Now, Gibson is working on a Christmas album and another album of original music. Gibson, along with The Gators, has won numerous awards in the JFP’s Best of Jackson including second place in this year’s Best Local Musician, and in 2011 the Jackson Music Awards awarded the band Best Pop Group. This year marks 30 years of performing for Gibson. There are not a lot of people in this world who can make a living out of performing for 30 years, so congratulations to Hunter Gibson. We owe it to him, Jackson, for getting us to shake our tail feathers or linedance the polish off the floors. Help Gibson celebrate Thursday, Aug. 30, at Olga’s (4760 Interstate 55 N., Suite D, 601366-1366) at 7 p.m. during a free concert.


livemusic AUG. 22 - WEDNESDAY 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RSœV6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLSœVRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE¹'UITAR² 3MITH &OXE0DJRRœV+ARAOKE /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE )LW]JHUDOGœV(UNTER'IBSON 8QGHUJURXQG*OEY0LUNKETT 3LHZRUNV0DGLVRQ7EEKLY,IVE -USICSPFORVH )HQLDQœV3EAN-ULLADYFOLKHOP

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AUG. 27 - MONDAY

New Blue Plate Special

+DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3"LUES 3OCIETYSP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE 7KH3HQJXLQ!MOS"REWER SAXOPHONIST SP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH-AY(!--ON !LTERNATIVE.ITESP .LQJ(GZDUG+RWHO7*35´S#OOL *AZZ-ONDAYSSP 7KH&DUWHU)RONWILL +UBLAI+HAN SP

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music august 22 - 28

wed | august 22 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | august 23 Aaron Coker 5:30-9:30p

AUG. 28 - TUESDAY

fri | august 24 John Clark Band 6:30-10:30p

+DO 0DOœV0UB1UIZ 2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQœV/PEN-IC 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT 0DUJDULWDV*OHN-ORASP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH%ROTIC/PEN-IC .IGHT 8QGHUJURXQG*ESSE2OBINSON %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE¹'UITAR² 3MITH 6KXFNHUV,ARRY"REWER

sat | august 25 Detour 6:30-10:30p sun | august 26 Liz Strowd Acoustic Jam 4:00 - 8:00p mon | august 27 Karaoke

AUG. 29 - WEDNESDAY 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RSœV6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLSœVRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE¹'UITAR² 3MITH &OXE0DJRRœV+ARAOKESP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 7DEOH(UNTER'IBSON 3LHZRUNV0DGLVRQ7EEKLY,IVE -USICSPFORVH +DO 0DOœV"EN-ILLER"AND22 6HQGPXVLFOLVWLQJVWR 1DWDOLH/RQJDW PXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP RUID[WRE\QRRQ 0RQGD\IRULQFOXVLRQLQWKH QH[WLVVXH0XVLFOLVWLQJVPXVW EHUHFHLYHGE\)ULGD\WREH FRQVLGHUHGIRU(LJKW'D\VSLFNV

tue | august 28 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

Kid Vicious

Wednesday - August 22

Saturday, August 25

Thursday - August 23

Friday, August 24 &

NEW KARAOKE SHOW 9:00pm - 2:00 am Open Mic w/ Eric Robinson 7-11 Ladies Night

)RUPXVLFYHQXHDGGUHVVHVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

Friday & Saturday August 24 & 25

On The Edge

ES-O-TER-I-CA:

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens â&#x20AC;˘ Pendulums Books â&#x20AC;˘ Wands â&#x20AC;˘ Moldavite Jewelry & More National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

Sunday - August 26 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

jacksonfreepress.com

A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

33


Weekly Lunch Specials

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

CALVIN STODGHILL 1958 - 2012

9.99

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

August 23

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday August 24 Vagabond Swing

THIS WEEK

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

WEDNESDAY 8/22

Wednesday, August 22th

Restaurant Open As Usual

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

THURSDAY 8/23

Thursday, August 23th

Barry Leach (Dining Room)

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

FRIDAY 8/24

Friday, August 24th

Mark Whittington (Dining Room)

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

SATURDAY 8/25 The Geeslin (Dining Room)

JOEY PLUNKETT

BOOKER WALKER

ZAC HARMON

Saturday, August 25th

JAREKUS SINGLETON

MONDAY 8/27 MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 8/28

You will be missed & never forgotten. CELEBRATION OF HIS LIFE

SAT. 8-25 5 P.M. UNTIL

PUB QUIZ

Saturday

w/ Erin & friends (Dining Room) August 25

MARTINS WILL CONTINUE BE, & ALWAYS WILL BE MARTINS!!!

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

Don’t Forget To Stop By Our

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

Coming Soon

Unknown

Scott Albert Johnson Monday August 27

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

August 28

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

August 22 - 28, 2012

Wednesday

34

Hinson September 22, 2012

214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

August 29

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites!

Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday,August 28th

JESSE ROBINSON’S “OPEN AMP” GUITAR NIGHT

Come compete with other blues guitarists in an old-fashioned Juke Joint Head-cuttin’ 6-10, $5 Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

Wednesday, August 29th

JASON BAILEY

(Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, August 30th

BONFIRE ORCHESTRA

(Acoustic/Americana) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, August 31st

FEARLESS FOUR

(Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, September 1st

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

(Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com


LIFE&STYLE

DOMESTICITY, CREATIVITY, & DIY

FOOD p 36 | RUNNING MONTH p 41 | FLY p 42

One Seed at a Time SANJAY ACHARYA

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

A

s summer continues to blaze, some of our earlyplanted varieties will start to bolt, or produce seeds. This offers an opportunity for organic gardeners not only to save the seeds but share them with othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and help save our planet. Giant transnational seed companies are buying up small seed companies globally and discontinuing their lines of stock in favor of bioengineered seeds they can patent. As the 2008 documentary film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food, Inc.â&#x20AC;? noted, with the de-

velopment of such genetically modified organisms (GMO), for the first time in history, these biotechnology giants are becoming the architects and â&#x20AC;&#x153;ownersâ&#x20AC;? of life. With seed â&#x20AC;&#x153;ownershipâ&#x20AC;? and fewer natural, openly pollinated seeds being sold, food-plant biodiversity suffers. Couple this with conversion of open land to farming monocultures (where farmers grow only selected plants such as GMO corn or soybeans and use herbicides to kill all other plants), and loss of habitat thanks to urban and suburban growth, and extinction of whole plant species is under way. Seedhead News reports that of all types of commercial veggies grown at the turn of the century, only about 4 percent still exist today. Just three grain cropsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;rice, wheat and cornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make up more than half of all the food consumed globally. By contrast, when Europeans touched foot on North America, Native Americans used up to 5,000 different species of food plants. Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future is not bright unless we reverse these trends. Practicing seed saving, sharing seeds with friends and neighbors, and supporting seed-saving libraries that conserve local and native species are a few of the ways we can do that. Not only will you help the planet by collecting your organic, heirloom and nonhybrid, open-

pollinated seeds, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll improve your own garden over time. Drought? Blight? Insect damage? Keep the seeds of the plants that survive, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll likely pass that resistance to their offspring.

7HO/WNS&OOD Â&#x2021;$PHULFDÂśVVHHGVDUHRZQHGE\DKDQGIXORIFRUSRUDWLRQVWKDWKDYH ERXJKWXSWKHVHHGVWRFNVIRUIRRG+HUHÂśVDFKDUWFRPSOLHGE\ 0RWKHU(DUWK1HZVKWWSELWO\.4=R Â&#x2021;$QL3KRQHDSSFDOOHG6KRS1R*02KHOSVFRQVXPHUVDYRLGEX\LQJ JHQHWLFDOO\HQJLQHHUHGIRRG)LQGLWLQWKH$SSOHL7XQHVVWRUH Â&#x2021;6HHG6DYHUV([FKDQJHRIIHUVDQRQOLQHGDWDEDVHRQKRZWRFROOHFW VHHGVIURPYDULRXVZLOGDQGGRPHVWLFSODQWVLQFOXGLQJIUXLWV YHJHWDEOHVDQGĂ&#x20AC;RZHUV9LVLWELWO\-:7I-S

(EREAREAFEWSEEDRESOURCES Â&#x2021;6HHG6DYHUV([FKDQJHVHHGVDYHUVRUJ Â&#x2021;1DWLYH6HHGV6($5&+LQ7XFVRQ$UL]SXEOLVKHV6HHGKHDG1HZV QDWLYHVHHGVRUJ Â&#x2021;/HDUQKRZWRVWDUWDVHHGOHQGLQJOLEUDU\ULFKPRQGJURZVRUJ VHDUFKIRUÂłVHHGOHQGLQJ´LIQHFHVVDU\

Why Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prop. 37 Matters by Jim PathFinder Ewing

PATTY MOONEY

sphere). If big companies donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell in California, they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stay big for long. As California goes, so goes the country. If Prop. 37 passes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more likely that companies will simply label foods containing GMOs instead of increasing costs and creating non-GMO product lines in an attempt to capture both markets. This is already happening with soy milk and cereal products in groceries that stock organic foods. The real reason ag and food giants donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want labeling is because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to give up market share, spend money to develop new products or spend more for non-GMO ingredients. In other words: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about short-term profits. Labeling GMO foods will likely accelerate the already phenomenal growth of organic food purchases away from â&#x20AC;&#x153;conventionalâ&#x20AC;? foods, brought to you by pesticide-laden, syn-

thetic chemical farming, which makes food far cheaper to produce. Polls repeatedly show that 90 percent or more of Americans want labeling of GMO foods. Why? No one has shown that GMOs are safe. Under a quirk of U.S. food-safety laws, the U.S. considers GMO seeds, crops and foods safe without any independent testing. No one knows what the long-term effects will be on human health or the environment. Because of this, European countries, Japan and other countries require labeling on food products containing GMOsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which come mostly from the United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and have outright bans on GMO seeds and crops. Why does Prop. 37 matter to the rest of the United States? If the proposition passes: â&#x20AC;˘ Big companies will change their crop purchasing to non-GMO. This, in turn, also could boost organic farming, which bans GMOs. â&#x20AC;˘ More â&#x20AC;&#x153;conventionalâ&#x20AC;? farmers will turn to organic farming where prices are higher, especially if big companies are willing to sign contracts for organic products. â&#x20AC;˘ Seed companies, which are being bought up by giant GMO producers to limit competi-

tion, will promote more heritage, heirloom and non-GMO seeds for farmers due to increased demand and loss of GMO market share. â&#x20AC;˘ Because there will be fewer GMOsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which producers genetically engineer to withstand spraying with chemical pesticides and fertilizersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;less chemical spraying is likely, which is good for the environment. â&#x20AC;˘ It may be possible to halt or reduce honeybee colony collapse disorder. Experts suspect the causes of bee population decline to be certain GMO corn varieties and some pesticides used with GMO crops. â&#x20AC;˘ Fewer potential human-health and environmental risks could arise from the unknowns of growing GMO crops, as the market for GMO dries up. Overall, labeling GMO is an attempt to wrest control of food choices from the big ag, seed and Food conglomerates and put it back into the hands of consumersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where it belongs. Read about GMO myths and truths at earthopensource.org/index.php/reports/58 Find out more about Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proposition 37: California Right to Know Campaign 35 (carighttoknow.org). jacksonfreepress.com

I

f you care about food safety, human health and the environment, and if you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heard of Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proposition 37, yet, please read on. Prop. 37 seems innocuous enough. It simply requires that all food containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) or genetically engineered ingredients should say so on the label. Why do the giant food and agriculture companies fear this so? They allege it would be too costly to label products differently for only one state. Some companies would simply not sell in Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and limit those citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consumer choices, they protestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and â&#x20AC;&#x153;it will cost jobs!â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a straw-man argument. California is home to 37 million Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the largest state in the country by population (and the second largest â&#x20AC;&#x153;stateâ&#x20AC;? in the western hemi-


LIFE&STYLE|dining

Where’s the Smoke?

State Street Barbeque opened in Jackson Aug. 15 with a less-than-traditional way of smoking meat in the region—plus a killer sauce.

A

ny lover of Memphis-style barbecue knows the first rule of a good barbecue joint is judged with the nose. Standing anywhere in the vicinity of the restaurant should leave no question as to the validity of barbecue’s most telling trait. That’s why it is always perplexing when after entering the restaurant, the customer is left with the question: Where’s the smoke? State Street Barbeque opened Aug. 15 near the corner of State and Fortification streets. After I tried several of the meats they have to offer, the question of smoke, which many barbecue connoisseurs con-

sider vital to good barbecue, still hung in the air. That’s because owner L. Allen Langford chose to go with applewood to smoke his meats, instead of hickory, the tradition in barbecue from Memphis to East Texas. Head further west in Texas, or to the Carolinas on the east coast, and you’ll find pit bosses using other woods like oak, mesquite and pecan, all of which give a distinct, heavy aroma and flavor to the meat. Maple and fruitwoods like applewood and cherry provide a much-milder, often-sweeter taste to the meat. Langford said he made his decision in part because

he didn’t want to go home coughing up hickory smoke every night. “Hickory can be overwhelming. We like to let the meat speak for itself,” Langford said. Langford’s home recipe of spices on his St. Louis-cut pork spare ribs is a unique, impressively flavorful mix, and the ribs were cooked to near perfection, leaving just enough firmness for the meat to stay on the bone until eaten. Why State Street Barbeque left cutting the rack of ribs to the customer was perplexing, considering those who have spent little-to-no time dividing racks of ribs can quickly become frustrated by hitting bone with the provided plastic knife. The most impressive meat on the menu was the beef brisket. Langford said he smokes the meat for about 14 hours, which is required to turn the hunk of cow’s breast from extremely tough to melt-in-your mouth tender. The salty mix of seasoning State Street Barbeque puts on the brisket leaves little reason for sauce or longing for a stronger taste of smoke. The pulled pork, however, is a different story. The meat made famous worldwide on hickory-filled pits across Tennessee and Mississippi leaves the customer begging for flavor. Langford’s practice of using applewood adds little to the meat, requiring customers to dowse it in State Street Barbeque’s homemade sauce. Saturating pork in sauce is definitely not a bad thing, and Langford has created a fabulous sauce. Not-too-sweet, mildly spicy with a perfect touch of tang, the sauce is the result of months of trial, liter-

WIKICOMMONS/RUDI RIET

Prized Pudding by Alonzo Lewis

August 22 - 28, 2012

I 36

have always been very fond of rice pudding (or rice puddin’ as most people around these parts know it), the way my mother used to make it. It would be so moist and creamy. I was over in Knoxville, Tenn., on a military assignment back in the ’90s. I would eat in the base chow hall every day. This was one of those little perks that come with military assignments. Each day I chose rice pudding for dessert. Folks, let me tell you a secret, this was the best rice pudding ever. I fell in love with this lady’s pudding from the first time I tried it. I asked for the chef’s name and the last day I was there, I worked up enough nerve to ask her for the recipe. She told me that she did not have a recipe but she would give me the ingredients. I went home and over the years, I have put together the right combination and amounts of those initial ingredients to make it as good as or better than she did. This is absolutely one of the best recipes for rice pudding I have ever owned, and the only reason I am sharing

Although it seems deceptively simple, finding the perfect balance for superb rice pudding requires the right ingredients in just the right amounts.

this recipe now is because this lady shared it with me. Trust me, I have been selfish over the years since she gave it to me. I have refused to share it with anyone. But now is the time. So, consider yourselves blessed to be able to receive, in my opinion, a truly wonderful recipe.

ally thousands of experimental recipes and teamwork with friends at Panola Peppers, of Lake Providence, La., Langford said. Along with the beef brisket, the sides (try the fried okra and mac-and-cheese), the sauce is the star of this restaurant. Sauce, however, should not be a requirement to enjoy good barbecue. Precook spices and unquestionable smoke flavor are key elements, to which sauce can build the final framework for barbecue that will keep customers coming back. There is one certainty about State Street Barbeque: It offers something different in a region where most barbecue is strictly hickory-smoked. So if you’re looking for a new take on all-things barbecue, and a cold beer to wash it down, there’s a new place in town.

TRIP BURNS

TRIP BURNS

by Jacob D. Fuller

Diners at State Street Barbeque can look forward to applewood-smoked brisket, pulled pork and more.

RICE PUDDING Ingredients:

1 cup uncooked long grain rice 1/2 stick margarine 2 cups sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 or 2 boxes sun-dried raisins 2 medium eggs, slightly beaten 1- 14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk 1 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 cup evaporated milk

Mix all ingredients and pour into your baking dish. Bake at 400 degrees for approximately 45 minutes. I generally use disposable aluminum foil pans to bake. It creates less clean-up time. Note: One cup of long grain rice equals three cups cooked rice. Add the hot rice to the margarine and sugar so that it can dissolve under the heat before you add the other ingredients. Then, let the rice cool some before you add the beaten eggs.


Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet. Lunch only. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Savory haven with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food. BAKERY Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, lunch, dinner. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork and more. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates. PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) P izzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami. STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs. SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Plus live music and entertainment. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best Live Music Venue 2012. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pup. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers, full bar, beer selection and live music most nights. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care. ASIAN Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own vegan diner.

Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

Spicy Chipotle Turkey Burger

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011

with applewood smoked bacon, chipotle mayo & smoked gouda cheese on a cheddar jalapeño bun.

Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

NEW MENU Happy Hour

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2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

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318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

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DINEJackson

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Best Pizza 2009-2012 Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

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August 22 - 28, 2012

Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, A Mutual Insurance Company, is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 速 Registered Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.

40


DIVERSIONS|jfp sports

Stay Injury Free

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu COURTESY WAYNE JIMENEZ

Physical therapist Wayne Jimenez has been caring for runners for more than three decades.

R

unners can be stubborn people. Often, runners stick out that last one or two miles even if they’re experiencing pain. Unfortunately, because of the shock to our feet and legs with every workout, runners are prone to injury. Wayne Jimenez is 55 but does not look a day older than 40. A physical therapist at Medicomp in Jackson, he has been practicing PT and running for 33 years—something that has probably contributes to his youthful demeanor. With a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from Louisiana State University Medical Center in New Orleans and an advanced degree from the University of Alabama in Birmingham, Jimenez knows the ins and outs of the injuries runners commonly face. What is the most common runningrelated injury? It would either be IT band syndrome (the iotibial band is a fibrous connector from hip to knee), where there’s an injury in the lateral part of the knee, because runners run too much on one side of the road, and it develops a problem; or basically what most therapists call runner’s knee, where the kneecap rubs excessively on the end of your thighbone, which causes a friction. After so much friction, it gets irritated and causes a problem. How do you prevent these kinds of problems? The most important thing is to make sure you stretch well before and after. There are some strengthening exercises you can do for your thigh and the side of your leg that would help strengthen those areas, but running is a repetitive sport. So, over the long haul, just like anything—you throw too many pitches in baseball, your arm gets sore—running’s the same way. You’re going to eventually get a foot, or a knee or a hip problem because it’s a repetitive, overuse type of sport. What good habits should runners get into to keep them prevent injury? The biggest thing is making sure the shoes are correct. Sometimes people think that shoes may look pretty on the outside, but if they’ve had them for six months, it’s time to throw them out. Flexibility and strengthening are just kind of hand-in-hand to stay injury-

free. So I would say you don’t need a lot of equipment to run, you just need a good pair of shoes and to keep flexible and strong. When a runner begins to feel pain, should he or she stop and see a therapist? I use a three-day rule. If you’re still hurting after three days, whether it’s a therapist, or a doctor, or an athletic trainer, it’s time to at least take a look at it. After three days, if it still hurts, and you want to manage it on your own, I always recommend waiting another three to four days of rest. If you’re worse, you definitely need to seek medical attention. If you’re better, then you can slowly inch back into running. Don’t try to resume the kind of mileage that you were doing.

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What do you think about the “barefoot” running trend or shoes like Vibram Five Finger? It’s the latest fad, and I see a fair amount of people running “barefoot.” Personally, I couldn’t do it. I think the pounding with that is just too hard. If you’re running maybe two miles, I can see possibly doing that. As a physical therapist, I think it lends to a quicker injury, but I don’t have any scientific data to back it. I’m sure as this fad grows more and more, there will be more research being done on the effects of running basically barefoot, or at least without any kind of structured support. How can nutrition and hydration affect a runner’s inclination toward injury? With hydration you just have to drink water, whether you’re running a 5K or a marathon. Your body is like a car. You put gas in the car to make it go. Well, the same thing for the body. The gas is just water, or some sort of supplement or nutrient. There are a lot of supplements that people take for various reasons, whether it’s just eating a banana for potassium, which decreases risk of muscle cramps, or whether it’s a nutritional enhancement that allows you to run longer with more endurance or something for lactic acid buildup. There’s just a number of things out there, but I think for the most part, it’s common sense. Eat well before you run, drink a lot of water and, for the most part, you’ll do OK.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY GIZMODO

by Sara Sacks

41


Model Off Duty by Meredith W. Sullivan

H

ave you ever had one of those days where you just don’t feel like dressing up but you have a quick meeting? Or a lunch date? Or errands that you can’t put off (again)? My friends and I like to call this easily thrown-together look for such occasions, “Model Off Duty.” Translation: skinny jeans and an oversized tee, topped off with a blazer, a top-knot and a little color on the cheeks. Voila. Comfy, casual and still very chic.

Gold heart earrings,

imyourpresent.com, $3

NARS cream blush in Lokoum,

William Rast blazer,

Coattails, $22.50

Clothing and Closets, $25

Lash Extensions, William

Wallace Salon, $225 Current Elliot rolled skinny jeans,

James Perse tee, 4450, $55

4450, $220

Tan booties, Frock

Fashions, $59

Where2Shop: Custom nameplate necklace,

imyourpresent.com, $18

SHOPPING SPECIALS Easely Amused (7048 Old Can-

TWELVE OAKS accessory garden (140 E. Front St., Hattiesburg,

601-602-2428) Smoking slippers should be on everyone’s must have list for fall. Ditch the cigs but rock the trend with suede and studs!

W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-853-1313; ImYourPresent, imyourpresent. com; Frock Fashions, 111 Colony Crossing, Suite 160, Madison, 601-8984643; William Wallace Salon, 2939 Old Canton Road, 601-982-8300

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com. Private Collection Consignment (101B Village Blvd., Madison,

601-607-6004) Everyone loves a tag sale! Take 25% off all green tags, 50% off all khaki and white tags. Turquoise tags are now 75% off!

JUICY DRAMA (372 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-919-1302) From handcuff charms to big bold beads, Juicy Drama has got you covered with a new shipment of statement necklaces.

THE ROGUE (4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-362-6383) The Rogue is offering a free lunch from Newk’s Café with the purchase of a Peter Millar shirt—grab a collared shirt with your college logo for tailgating!

August 22 - 28, 2012

ton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland, 769-251-5574) All sessions for the remainder of August are $20. Come in to paint something pretty at the newly remodeled Ridgeland store.

4450, 4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-3687; Clothing and Closets Consignment, 898 Centre St., Ridgeland, 601-955-3304; Coattails, 111

42

Check out flyjfp.com or @FlyJFP on Twitter and Instagram for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


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CLASSIFIEDS, PAGE 11

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