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July 25 - 31, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 46

contents TRIP BURNS

TRIP BURNS

6 Jackson Campaign Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. is working to develop a plan to rejuvenate the city’s image. COURTESY SPOTIFY

Cover painting by Kristen Ley

10

THIS ISSUE:

not an anger-management class, but a program that gets to the abuser’s core beliefs about themselves and their relationships, and helps abusers learn how to express themselves without hostility and violence. We teach people to be strong and not express their feelings—men, especially, because it is a sign of weakness, she says. The BIP classes are filled with abusers who initially thought they did not belong there or who attended only because a judge ordered them to go. Wyatt says most people leave with a different attitude. Although she knows she cannot reach all of them, she knows she has made an impact on many. “Anger is a powerful feeling that can move you away from your true feelings,” Wyatt says. Wyatt also works to improve and update the program, train new counselors and facilitators, and host seminars to update veteran facilitators and counselor’s knowledge. “We always need to be improving as facilitators,” Wyatt says. Bringing awareness to domestic violence is one way of curbing the tide. In the meantime, Wyatt helps everyone involved. She hopes that shelters like the Center for Violence Prevention and the programs it offers can expand to other cities so she will be able to “reach more souls.” “I hope to expand my vision and to continue to witness true transformational change in individuals,” she says. —Whitney Menogan

34 Get Nekked? An unorthodox Christian play is coming to Jackson this weekend. It’s not what you think. TARA BURKIETT

Helping abusers and victims of domestic violence get to the root of their problems is “a passion in my heart sent from God,” Mollie Wyatt says. A licensed psychologist, Wyatt counsels groups, families, couples and individuals in her private practice at Recovery Consultations in Highland Village. She is also a facilitator for the Batterers’ Intervention Program offered through the Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl and leads group-counseling sessions for domestic-violence victims. A Jackson native, Wyatt, 61, earned her doctorate in psychology from Mississippi State University. She lived in Nashville, Tenn., for about 20 years, but returned 10 years ago to be closer to her parents. She has a daughter, Jennifer, 33 and a granddaughter, Laya, 15. Wyatt is dedicated to helping those affected by domestic violence, whether they are victims or abusers. Her work focuses on helping them realize the issues behind their behavior. Judges who hear domestic violence cases can order offenders to participate in the 24week BIP program instead of sending them to jail. In her role as a program facilitator, Wyatt has led all-male and coed classes. The violent abusers are not just males, Wyatt stresses. “More females are coming out about being abusers,” she says. She adds that anger builds for abusers—whether male or female—often based on histories of abusive childhoods. Domestic violence is a cyclical, generational problem. The BIP, however, is

43 Weddings Abound Richard Coupe recalls his experience at a Muslim wedding in Starkville.

jacksonfreepress.com

mollie wyatt

Spotify is quickly replacing Pandora with its almost unlimited supply of music. DIANA HOWELL

4 ............... Editor’s Note 4 ....................... Sorensen 6 ............................... Talk 10 ........................... Tech 12...................... Editorial 13 .................... Opinion 13.................... Mike Day 14 ............... Cover Story 17 ....... Chicks We Love 20 ......... Auction Guide 28 ................. Diversions 29 ......................... Music 30 .......... Music Listings 32 ........................... Film 34 ............................ Arts 35 ....................... 8 Days 36 ................ JFP Events 38 ........................ Sports 39 ................... Astrology 40 .......................... Food 43 ..................... Hitched 46 ............ Fly Shopping

A New, New Radio

3


Ronni Mott Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-wining writer on domestic abuse and the JFP’s managing editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She wrote the cover story.

Andrea White Andrea White is a third-year student at George Mason University, working toward a bachelor of science degree in psychology, as well as minors in both gender studies and legal studies. She contributed to the cover story package.

Dylan Irby Dylan Irby is a college student from Colorado who occasionally stays in Jackson with his father. He aspires to be a game developer someday. He wrote a Chicks We Love profile.

Whitney Menogan Editorial intern Whitney Menogan is from Madison and holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College. She enjoys reading, writing and having mind-blowing conversations with friends. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Darnell Jackson Contributor Darnell “Chris” Jackson is a writer, photographer, graphic designer and so much more. Darnell is a Jackson native and Jackson State graduate. He owns J.Carter Studios. He wrote a Chicks We Love profile.

Allie Jordan Allie Jordan is a senior at Millsaps College who loves Wilco, photography, and Mexico. She denies her brick city hometown and strictly identifies herself as a Jacksonian. She wrote a Chicks We Love profile.

Richard Coupe Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote the Hitched feature.

July 25 - 31, 2012

Erica Crunkilton

4

Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton migrated to Mississippi to attend Ole Miss and never left. She currently lives in Flowood with her dashingly handsome fiancé. She spends her free time collecting neurotic pets. Let’s be honest: She runs this place.

editor’snote

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Yes, It Was That Bad

W

hen I was a teenager in Philadelphia, Miss., there wasn’t a lot for young people to do. On the weekends, we would go “riding around.” I would get all dolled up, get together with one or more girlfriends, fill the tank, and we’d cruise. We first drove in a big circle in the parking lot of the A&J Drive-In (before and after it closed), then about half a mile along Beacon Street, turning left onto Holland Avenue, passing all the mammoth “nice” historic homes and then looping around the Sonic. Then we would retrace our path and start over. We always hoped to attract the attention of “cute boys” in one or the other parking lots. Sometimes we’d go riding around with them, flirting and maybe necking a little in the back seat, and then come back to our cars. This is what everyone did on the weekends. One night, on our requisite A&J loop, a couple of guys flagged us down and asked us if we wanted to go to a party. One of them was an older football player, who had won various honorifics and even one with Mr. in front of it. He wasn’t my grade, and I had never run in his circles. He was flirting with me—me! It never occurred to us that we shouldn’t crawl into their car to go to the party. Turns out, the “party” was at Mr. Popular’s house south of town. And the four of us were the only ones invited. When you’re 16, and live in a town where everyone knows everyone, you don’t expect to get hurt. Inside, he turned on music and pulled me toward him. Meantime, my friend had wandered away with the other guy, and I wasn’t sure where they were. The lights were dim. Mr. Popular suddenly turned sweet and started saying nice things about my hair or such: stuff girls like. He kissed me, and I could feel him pulling me toward another room. It was the first moment I started to feel fear. But I let him pull me in there—a moment I’ve replayed hundreds of times in the decades since. Why did I go? In his bedroom, Mr. Popular turned the music up and took me in his arms, tenderly at first. Then, suddenly, everything changed. He threw me back on the bed and climbed on top of me, all in one move. I started saying, “no, no, no,” and struggled to push him off. But he was strong. He planted his left elbow planted close to my right ear, and suddenly that hand covered my mouth, muffling what was becoming a scream. He kept that hand there, and rather expertly pinned my legs with his as he used his right hand to unzip and jerk my jeans down and unzip his fly. Then, with his left hand still covering my mouth and with my tears soaking it, Mr. Popular raped me. It didn’t take long, and then he rolled over on his back and let me go. By then, I couldn’t say anything, but just lay there and sobbed. He turned his head to look at me and said, “See, that wasn’t so bad, was it?” Mr. Popular then got up, zipped his jeans and left the room.

I was so shaken that it was hard to stand and pull my jeans up, but I managed. I was overwhelmed with shame and anger—at myself, for allowing this to happen to me. Me. As soon as I could, I walked out into his parents’ living room where he was drinking a beer and avoiding looking at me. Somewhere in the fog, my friend and her new buddy emerged, and we all got into the car. He drove us back to the A&J and dropped us at my car. My life had changed. It never occurred me to go to a hospital for a test, and I knew no one would believe me if I reported him. He was the big man on campus; he had “picked me up,” I had gone to his house (under false pretense, but still), and I had gone into his bedroom. I don’t remember what I was wearing, but I was out on a weekend night, so it was probably at least a touch sexy by Neshoba County standards. For the next 15 years, I would blame myself for being raped. I drank too much, and I did stupid things. It was hard to learn to trust—especially men—and my self-esteem was only surface, and I over-compensated in ways I’m not proud of now. As a result, it was hard to sustain a good relationship, and I ended up in some really bad ones. I was caught in the cycle that sexual assault too often creates. My catharsis came when I moved to New York City and finally managed to dump a perennial cheater, and met a remarkable man who helped me restore my confidence in myself, even though I was far from ready for a good relationship, I realize now. (He is still my friend, and my partner Todd’s friend, even though we don’t see him often enough.) At the time, I got involved with a small newspaper, even though I had no real idea

how to actually do one. But I had heart. During my virgin voyage into newspapering, I decided to write about being raped. After I wrote my story in a play-byplay fashion (not unlike this one), I let the male music editor read it. That simple act started my recovery, especially when the guy read it and cried. I didn’t publish my story, though. I wasn’t quite ready, nor have I been for all these years, to tell the story publicly. I sure wasn’t going to tell it when my mother was still alive. I’ve alluded to it here and there, but it wasn’t until this year, when we decided to focus the Chick Ball on sexual assault, that I knew it was my turn to come out, so to speak. I meet many young women who blame themselves for being assaulted. I meet women and men who excuse men for not being able to control themselves if a woman flirts, dances a certain way or even wears sexy clothes around them. (“Boys will be boys.”) And almost everyone I talk to about sexual assault manages to blame the victim, without even knowing it, just as they do with domestic abuse. They ask about her role first: why she/we (a) dressed sexy or (b) went with him or (c) didn’t scream loudly enough or whatever other excuse they can find not to ask: “Why does he rape?” Rape is a crime of violence and power, not of sex or passion. It is time we all talk about it, and often. Let’s start here: No means no—no matter what. Men who refuse to take “no” for an answer should go to prison. My rapist didn’t go to jail or prison, and I pray he never raped again. Even as I know he probably did. Donna Ladd will host the JFP Chick Ball this weekend to raise funds for a rape-crisis center. Get details at jfpchickball.com.


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jacksonfreepress.com


Mississippi Center for Justiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whitney Barkley is the lead attorney on the case against Virginia College. p9

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center reports that rape costs the United States $127 billion annually, more than any other crime. news, culture & irreverence

Wednesday, July 18 The Mississippi Center for Justice files a lawsuit in U.S. District Court on behalf of seven plaintiffs against Virginia College. ... Jennifer Tyrrell, a mother who was the leader of a Bridgeport, Ohio, Tiger Cub den, brings 300,000 signatures to the Boy Scoutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; national office in Irving, Texas, after dismissal on the count of her sexuality.

Friday, July 20 The state Board of Education recognizes the 2012 Parent of the Year, Karen Bedells of Clinton. ... President Obama slams Mitt Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medicare plan, telling seniors in Florida that his rivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal would force them to fend for themselves and hurt them financially. Saturday, July 21 Authorities work to clear dangerous explosive materials from inside James Holmesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; suburban Denver apartment. Holmes, 24, was arrested for allegedly opening fire in an Aurora, Colo., theater, killing 12 people. Sunday, July 22 Mississippi Braves manage just one run off seven hits in a 2-1 loss to the Jacksonville Suns.

July 25 - 31, 2012

Monday, July 23 Gov. Phil Bryant says he will resist expanding the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medicaid program under the federal Affordable Care Act. ... Faced with concerns about his swastika tattoo, Russian singer Evgeny Nikitin pulls out of one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-known opera events, the Bayreuth Festival in Germany.

6

Tuesday, July 24 Ward 3 voters go to the polls for a third chance to elect either Joyce Jackson or LaRita Cooper-Stokes to the City Council. ... The new chief of Pakistanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spy agency urges the United States to end drone strikes on Pakistani soil and identify targets that the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s security forces can then attack. Get daily news, and now Associated Press reports, at jfp.ms and jfpdaily.com.

by Jacob Fuller

T

he City with Soul may soon get a fresh company in 2011 and have created market- print media, combined with non-traditional advertising campaign. Mayor Harvey ing plans for the state Head Start Association advertising, including the Internet and smart Johnson Jr. has asked the Jackson City and Jackson State University. This will be the phones, to show the positive sides of Jackson. Council to approve a deal with Fahren- companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first project for a municipality, but The best way to market the Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s posheit Creative Group to create a new marketing Thomas is not a stranger to such endeavors. itives, Thompson said, is to allow the people plan for Jackson. who live here to tell their stories. After the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to be able to touch session Monday, Johnson every citizen in Jackson and anyone said that the deal was not who would find the story of Jackson for the actual marketing interesting. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s everyone in campaign, only the plan for the country and across the world,â&#x20AC;? a campaign. The purpose, Thompson said. he said, is to accentuate the At the work session, Dean positives in the city. said that it is no secret Jackson gets â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a lot of good its share of negative criticism. The things that are going on here goal of the marketing plan is to get in the city of Jackson. Too ofJacksonians and people from around ten, those things get buried by the state excited about eating, shopsome of the challenges that we ping and living in the capital city. have,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. Johnson said he wants to see â&#x20AC;&#x153;So what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to The city is working with Fahrenheit Creative Group to create a the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distinctions highlighted in new marketing plan to highlight Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positive aspects. do is create a strategy that will the marketing. brand the city based on posiâ&#x20AC;&#x153;When people start thinking about tive experiences, not just for our citizens, but Before starting Fahrenheit Creative, though, the city of Jackson, what is foremost in their for visitors as well.â&#x20AC;? she worked for Quicksilver Creative, where mind are all of these positive things that we If the city council approves the deal, she helped create Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Go 80 campaign have: the attractions, the cultural diversity, bewhich is on the agenda, at its regular session to help revitalize the Highway 80 corridor. ing the state capital, being the hub of finance July 24, Fahrenheit Creative Group will take Thompson said he and Thomas have and medical facilities, and that kind of thing,â&#x20AC;? the lead on the marketing plan. been talking with Anthony Dean, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Johnson said. Olivia Thomas and Jason Thompson director of marketing, for a couple of weeks The deal on the table for Fahrenheit head Fahrenheit Creative Group, located about the plan. He said the plan will use REBRANDING, see page 7 at 921 N. Congress St. The two started the traditional ad venues, such as television and TRIP BURNS

Thursday, July 19 The U.S. Department of Education grants Mississippi a waiver of No Child Left Behind requirements, forcing the state to close the achievement gaps for students with disabilities and economic disadvantages, as well as racial minorities and students who are learning English. ... In Lebanon, fighting seizes neighborhoods encircling Damascus for a fifth straight day on Thursday, a day after President Bashar al-Assadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key security aides died in a bombing attack.

Rebranding Jackson

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talk

news, culture & irreverence

REBRANDING, from page 6

what services are offered,” Whitwell said. Johnsonsaidthefocusoftheplanisformarketing in the Jackson metro area. The city will talk with the Convention and Visitors Bureau about using their resources to implement the campaign within a 100-mile radius of the city. Separate from the new marketing plan, the city will soon broadcast a television commercial in 20 markets across the southeastern U.S. aimed at promoting tourism to Jackson.

Thompson said it is time for Jackson to have a full-scale marketing plan, especially with similar plans popping up in towns like Madison recently. “The support is there with the administration, and citizens are ready for something,” Thompson said. Councilman Charles Tillman, Ward 5, and Council President Tony Yarber, Ward 6, said at the meeting that they, too, are ready to

CITY BEAT: Campaigns, Panhandlers and Buses of City Hall that he could campaign from his seat all he wants now, since he is no longer council president. JACOB FULLER

Campaigning from the Chair Ward 4 Councilman Frank Bluntson said earlier this month that he will not officially announce his candidacy for the job of Jackson’s mayor until next year. The black Chevy Tahoe he has been driving around town with three large “Frank Bluntson for Mayor” decals on the windows seems to have beaten him to the punch. Meanwhile, Bluntson has been priming anyone who’ll listen about next year’s mayoral campaign. In recent months, he has used nearly every chance he’s had to criticize Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. during Jackson City Council meetings. He was at it again Monday during the council’s work session. When Johnson spoke about the new ADA-compliant bus stops, Bluntson wanted to know why the project was taking so long. Johnson then took a stab at Bluntson’s late buddy Frank Melton by pointing out that the project had the needed funds when Melton took office. Bluntson quickly turned it back on Johnson. “You’ve been back nearly four years, and you’re still just getting this started,” Bluntson said. More than a couple of fellow councilmembers made it clear they didn’t appreciate Bluntson campaigning from his council president’s seat when they voted Tony Yarber, Ward 6, as the new council president July 10. After that meeting, Bluntson told WAPT reporter Scott Simmons on the steps

Ward 4 Councilman Frank Bluntson, a candidate in next year’s mayoral race, has taken every chance he can to oppose Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. at City Council meetings.

Whitwell v. Panhandlers Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell introduced an amendment in the Intergovernmental Committee meeting July 5 to a city ordinance that would triple the fine for panhandling and introduce second- and thirdoffense penalties that could include jail time. The amendment passed in committee and will go before the entire Council.

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see Jackson cast in a better light. “I’m excited about us even looking at a marketing campaign,” Yarber said. “I find it absolutely hilarious that I can watch TV and see commercials about Madison and everybody else, and as soon as we start talking about doing a marketing piece, then people are commenting (negatively). It’s hilarious.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact Jacob Fuller at Jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

by Jacob Fuller

How someone who is already begging for change could afford to pay a fine or where police would house panhandlers—the county jail is already tight for space—doesn’t seem to be Whitwell’s concern. He said a city ordinance against panhandling is already in place, which fines those charged with panhandling. He just wants to remind people that it is there. At the council work session July 23, Whitwellindicatedthathomelesspeoplecome to Jackson because the city is easy on them. “It’s time people get their heads out of the sand,” Whitwell said. “Our homeless population is burgeoning. It’s becoming more enhanced and intense. There used to be a time when everybody knew old Joe down the road and what his situation was and what his story was and what the problem was. We’ve got people now that are coming here specifically with specific intentions.” Whitwell mentioned two Clarion-Ledger stories that he said clearly articulated the homeless problem, which the city must do something about. He also gave a shout-out, of sorts, to the Jackson Free Press. “Mr. Fuller’s paper wants to say I’m the most hateful, spiteful, mean person in the world because I want to go lock people up,” he said. “I don’t want to lock anybody up. I also don’t want anybody getting hurt. We’ve got people being accosted. We’ve got people being yelled at and screamed at. Their personal space is being violated. We’ve got to do something.”

Maybe the final draft of Whitwell’s amendment will include a change in the definition of panhandling to include “accosting, yelling, screaming and violating personal space” and drop the jail part. A New Place to Wait JATRAN passengers may find themselves at one of several new bus stops around the city in the coming months. The city council voted July 24 on an order to amend the city’s contract with Integrated Management Services with about $900,000 in improvements to 25 bus stops. The main goal of the project is to make the bus stops compliant with regulations in the Americans with Disabilities Act. The plan was originally started during Mayor Harvey Johnson’s first term. Johnson said when Frank Melton was elected and Johnson left office, the funds were in place to improve the bus stops. What happened to the project once Melton took over is unclear. Now the funding is in place once again, and the project is close to getting under way. Johnson said with the funding, part of which came from federal stimulus money, all parts of the bus stops must be made in the United States. One part that IMS was using was not made in the U.S., they discovered. So now they are purchasing Americanmade parts, Johnson said, and will soon begin construction. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

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Creative Group is worth $45,000. Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell said during the meeting that the city won’t be doing a lot of marketing with that amount of money, but Johnson said that the deal is for the group’s professional expertise in creating a plan, not an entire marketing campaign, which would include creative services and media placement costs. “We need to make sure we know exactly

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businesstalk

by Sonya Lee

Of Skates and Smiles

S

Tell me about yourself and where you’re from. I was born here, but I was raised in Chicago, Illinois. I have three children. My daughter, Shenera, is 24 and attends Jackson State University. My two sons, Doniven, age 17, and Deymeion, age 16, attend Chamberlain-Hunt Military Academy in Port Gibson, Mississippi.

Your daughter owns a store in Jackson Square? Yes. She owns Kharisma Boutique. What sparked you to start up a roller rink here in Jackson? I just wanted to see if it would be fun, and it’s actually pretty cool to transform a warehouse into a skating rink.

Shanetha Lewis Skate and Shake, a new roller rink in south Jackson, opens July 28.

but it closed down, and everybody had to go to Gary, Indiana. I’ve been to several other places though: St. Louis, Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, and Cleveland, Ohio—just those three central areas. What do you have planned for the adults? I am trying to incorporate different nights, different themes like Old School Night, Hallelujah Sundays, Throwback

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July 25 - 31, 2012

Will this business have summer and after-school job opportunities for kids?

Do you have any other long-term aspirations, business-wise? This is it for me. I’ve had several other different business adventures. I pray to God that this works out and brings much success to me as well as the city of Jackson. What other business adventures have you had? Well, I’ve owned my own dump trucks; I’ve had a construction crew. I have worked for Allstate as well as the Metrocenter Mall. Are you currently involved in any business associations in Jackson? No, but (I) probably (will) in the future. Will you advertise your business on Facebook or Twitter? I’m trying to incorporate it now. I am developing a web page as we speak. We’re just waiting on finishing (the space) so I can take pictures and put those on there.

ES-O-TER-I-CA:

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What are your hours of operation? Right now, since school is out, we’re going to open at 10 in the morning until midnight. Then, when school starts, we’ll go in after-school and stay open just a tad bit longer on the weekends—just a tad.

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Do you have fond memories of roller-skating in roller rinks as a child? Yes, and we actually went out of town. Chicago had a roller-skating rink

Thursdays, Fun Fridays, Come Represent Yo Hood Night. I’ve got some wonderful ideas. I just can’t wait to get started and get open!

FACEBOOK

hanetha Lewis is all smiles at the front door of her soon-to-be-opened roller rink, Skate and Shake, in the Jackson Square at 2416 Terry Road. Underneath the powder-blue siding, a purple ’70s-type mural is painted on the windows, with the Skate and Shake logo in the center. A schoolgirl with long flowing hair frames one side of the logo. She skates with her left leg cocked at an angle and wears a purple Skate and Shake T-shirt; she looks like she doesn’t have a care in the world. As if mesmerized, a schoolboy in a green Skate and Shake shirt and green baseball cap stares at the girl from the other side of the mural. He looks as if he’s too scared to ask her to dance—but too cool to skate. Green and pink ribbons and stars surround him. The window also displays a big roller skate and more stars, beckoning passersby to come in and skate their problems away. At the time of our interview, the inside was still a work in progress, with remnants of construction remaining, the walls unadorned. But Lewis led me to each room, outlining the amenities her new establishment will offer: a kiddie skating room, birthday-party rooms, a spacious open skating area in the back, a game room, even a no-kids-allowed area for the adults to play pool and hang out while their kids skate and shake. She then filled me in on her new business venture.

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Yes. I think I have incorporated quite a few college students. … I have 20 employees. You told me that you have hired additional security. I’ve hired an entire force. (Capital City Security will have) five security officers patrolling the parking lot and inside the building with cameras installed, just to make sure that everyone is doing what they’re supposed to be doing.

Do you have any advice for anyone who is maybe thinking of starting a business in the city of Jackson? It’s a lot of hard work. Be patient; continue to pray and hope that God sends (you) in the right direction. He put me on this path, and I’m going to just stick this out until the end. With the Man behind me, I can’t go wrong. You can’t go wrong. The Skate and Shake (2416 Terry Road, Suite 1600, 601-850-6398) grand opening is July 28, and admission is $8 to skate all day. Regular admission is $2, and skate rental is $3 to $4. The menu includes carnival-concession food: fries, tots, nachos, chilli dogs, cotton candy, popcorn, hot wings and burgers.


educationtalk

by R.L. Nave

College Promises: Too Good To Be True

TRIP BURNS

legal argument. For-profit universities—sometimes called proprietary schools—have experienced huge profits and accelerated growth in recent years but, because many of the institutions are privately owned, it’s difficult to get an accurate revenue picture. The Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities estimates that of the more than 2 million students its member institutions serve, 94 percent are eligible for federal aid. Considering that the average annual cost of attending college is $17,633, and private colleges generate $31.7 billion in revenues just from federal sources. Whitney Barkley, the Mississippi Center for Justice’s lead attorney on the case, said the organization started investigating after receiving complaints from Virginia College’s students about not doing enough live blood draws to be certified phlebotomists. Barkley said that the problems the plaintiffs face in finding employment aren’t just the result of the economic slowdown. “The problem is they’re not qualified for even a tough job market,” Barkley said. Washington and Anderson, the plaintiffs, say they feel disappointment more acutely because they lived up to their part of the bargain, attending class daily and studying hard. Both women graduated with honors. Washington said even though she observed the school’s failings, she didn’t want to see its flaws because she was excited about the bright future she thought was ahead. “I came in wanting to be better. My expectation was to get the education to allow me to be self-sufficient, where I did not have to remain on (public-assistance) benefits, where I could start somewhere and work my way up. That never happened. That’s not because I did not apply myself, because I did,” she said. “I just wanted them to be fair, because it wasn’t cheap. Now I’ve got this big old amount hanging over my head and I’m still jobless.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

S

hirley Washington and Tiffeny Ander- some books at all, Washington said. Nor did lent practices of Virginia College, and its failure son had been kicking around the idea she know what portion of the $26,000 in fed- to adequately train, educate, and certify plainof going back to school when they came eral funds she borrowed to pay for school went tiffs has left them deeply in debt, unable to find across advertisements for Virginia Col- for books or anything else—she never saw a employment, and unable to make minimum lege. Actually, Washington stresses, the college statement until after graduation. monthly payments on their student loans.” ran “constant ads” on daytime television. After completing an externship at the Furthermore, Virginia College’s medical A single mom who graduated assistant program did not meet from Clinton High School, Washthe minimum requirements of ington was receiving public assis“its own accrediting agency”— tance at the time. She wanted to the National Healthcareers Aswork in health-care administration sociation. for the good wages and medical The college’s attorney, benefits, but also to show her chilRobert L. Gibbs of the Jackson dren that it’s never too late in life to firm GibbsWhitwell, PLLC, get more education. told the Jackson Free Press July “I wasn’t going to let that be 20 that he couldn’t comment my crutch,” Washington said of on the ongoing litigation except receiving government aid. She and that his client denies the allegaAnderson both enrolled in Virginia tions. He added that informaCollege in the fall of 2009. Antion on graduation, tuition and derson, who is married with three placement are available on the children and lives in Brandon, took Shirley Washington is one of seven women suing Virginia College in school’s website. classes at night so she could keep Jackson for misrepresenting the school’s credentials. Students in the college’s her job waitressing at Cracker Barmedical assistant diploma/cerrel during the day. Sonny Montgomery Medical Center, passing tificate program have a 60 percent job placeBoth women signed up for the medical- the National Healthcareers Association certi- ment rate. The Jackson campus’ rate is higher assistant program, they say, because admissions fication exam, and graduating with honors, at 62.8 percent, according to Virginia College’s representatives told them that at the end of the Washington hasn’t been able to find a job. website. 15-month-long program students would be She’s applied for 30 positions at the VA HosBirmingham, Ala.-based Educational certified phlebotomists and electrocardiogra- pital and put in applications at St. Dominic, Corporation of America, operates for-profit phy (EKG) technicians as well as medical as- Baptist, University Medical Center and River schools in 14 states, including 25 Virginia sistants, fields that offered wages of between Oaks Hospital—and has not had even one College campuses. $12 and $21 per hour. interview since finishing the Virginia College The company also owns a golf academy Washington, who is African American, program in December 2010. and culinary and business schools. Willis Stein noticed that her classes were overwhelmingly Anderson, whose experiences at the & Partner, a private-equity firm headquartered filled with black women (Anderson noticed school mirror Washington’s, found a job work- in the Chicago area, owns ECA. she was one of very few white women in her ing as a geriatric nurse’s aid earning $8.50 per The lawsuit against Virginia College, program). hour but says she’s disappointed because she’s which the Mississippi Center for Justice filed Despite what she was told during the ad- not doing what she trained for. along with Jackson attorneys Warren L. Marmissions process, Washington said she never “It hurts. It feels like I’ve been cheated,” tin and Kenya Martin, states that Virginia read an EKG from a human heart, and only Anderson said. “It’s like you’re not getting College LLC collected $292,658,424 in 2011 drew blood twice from a person and per- anything out of it after all that hard work, af- revenues, mostly from federal student aid. formed only three to four “finger sticks” to ter all that money. What are you going to do At the Jackson campus, Virginia College draw blood. with three certifications that you can’t use?” had $12,690,777 in revenues, 97 percent of There were other signs that something Anderson, Washington and five other which came from fees and tuition, also mostly was amiss, they say: Instructors skipped over women cemented their grievances in a federal from federal student aid programs. chunks of the textbooks, and they didn’t use lawsuit filed July 18. Plaintiffs allege “the frauduThe lawsuit only represents one side of a

9


techtalk

by Todd Stauffer

Spotify: Disrupting the Disruptions

I

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plication for Spotify and create your account—which requires a Facebook login—you’re shown an interface that’s not unlike iTunes. Your “library” and playlists are on the left side, with the various listings of music and search results appearing in the middle. The library tools offer some unique options, like the ability to comb through the “Top” music charts for songs, or to just see what’s new on the service.

sic sharing recently and wondered why.) This, by the way, is another excellent reason not to listen to Maroon 5, at least not on Spotify. I’m kidding. (I’m not kidding.) Actually, I’m kidding, but either way you can turn off sharing in Spotify if that’s not appealing to you; head to the Preferences and turn off the option Show What I’m Listening to on Facebook. Spotify also has a Private Session option (on a Mac you choose Spotify > Private Session to turn it on), which enables you to listen to all the Maroon 5 you want without anyone being able to see you. (Whew!) You can share songs with your friends by dragging a song directly from the lists in the middle of the screen over to their icon on the Friend bar; you can also create entire playlists of songs and then share them to friends on Spotify or on Facebook (or via Twitter and Tumblr, or you can email a link to your playlist). For premium ($10 month) users, the other killer feature kicks in—you can pick and choose songs that you’d like to have available on your mobile phone (in playlists), sync them up and then you’re good to go—you’ve got the MP3s in the Spotify app, meaning you don’t have to stream at the gym or on the road if your plan doesn’t allow it or to save on data costs. Of course you can stream from your mobile, if you want, and the radio functions are available there, too. Intrigued? Whether you’re liking the social aspects of it or just encouraged by the idea of listening to a ton of songs you can choose, move around, and even sync to your mobile—Spotify might be your next app. COURTESY SPOTIFY

2012 Project Redirectory Phone Book Recycling

t’s amazing how quickly the technology “disruptions” come these days. The iPod and iTunes store disrupted the CD and the music industry, iPhones and Androids disrupted the iPod hardware business, XM radio disrupted FM radio, Pandora disrupted XM radio—and now Spotify is disrupting Pandora. And that’s just in my world. Spotify (spotify.com) has caught fire in recent months partly because it’s just getting to the States; the Swedish firm, which has already dominated Europe’s online music market, celebrates its oneyear anniversary in the U.S. this week, telling us that users have listened to 13 billion songs during the first year; worldwide, the service boasts about 10 million users, 3 million of whom pay for premium service. The major differences between Spotify and Pandora (pandora.com), in case you’re not already a fan ready to disrupt yourself, are twofold: Spotify is more about freedom to listen to specific songs, and Spotify is all about sharing. Where Pandora encourages a sort of genre-based music exploration (and, to be fair, I won’t be getting rid of it any time soon), Spotify focuses a little more on letting you pull together your own library of music—free of charge, if you can put up with the ads—and sharing it with your friends. Pandora lives in your browser (paying users can get a desktop app), while Spotify offers apps for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android and Blackberry with Windows Phone and Symbian support planned for U.S. customers. (Palm support is planned for European customers. Maybe WebOS is more popular over there?) When you launch the desktop ap-

You can also choose the “Radio” options, which give you streams of music similar to Pandora—e.g. “Maroon 5 Radio” gives your Maroon 5 songs plus other whiny, dance-y, pop-y songs that sound a like Maroon 5. (I’m just sayin’.) On the right side of the interface is something new: a stream of what your friends are listening to on the bottom and links to your people that you’d added that you’re particularly interested in following or sharing with. Where does Spotify get those friends? Remember that Facebook login that was required? Spotify grabs people you know in Facebook and drops them in here, showing you what they’re listening to using Spotify. Likewise, by default, what you’re listening to in Spotify will show up on your Facebook page. (You may have seen more mu-

I O T N C U ! R E T -EN/F#HARAC

Don’t miss the live auction of the following remarkable (and their donated services) at the JFP Chick Ball, scheduled to begin at 8 p.m.: Terry Cooper (Owner, Absolute Fitness): 8 personal training sessions

Terry Sullivan (Owner, liveRIGHTnow): package includes yoga, training, tabata

Mitchell Early (Sommelier, BRAVO!): wine and cheese pairing

NIck Wallace (Chef, King Edward Hotel): Dinner prep for 10 in your home

Jesse Houston (Executive Chef, Parlor Market): private dinner for six

Sujan Ghimire (Dance Instructor, Salsa Mississippi): 4 hour-long private dance classes

Israel Martinez (Owner, LingoFest): 10.5 hours of Spanish lessons

Auctioneer: Dee Denton

July 28 • Hal & Mal’s Red Room • Cover $5 • 18+ • 6pm - Midnight For more info visit jfpchickball.com or follow us on Twitter @jfpchickball.


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7/20/12 9:55 AM


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Guns Kill Families

I

t may be an inconvenient truth in a state where so many people value their rights to own a firearm, but easy access to guns make women and children much less safer—in their own homes. The American Journal of Public Health warned that access to firearms increases the likelihood of intimate-partner homicide more than five times compared to situations where there are no guns. Put another way, while an abuser may choose a knife, a frying pan or their hands to try to kill his or her partner, a gun makes it a whole lot easier to kill, even from a distance. The facts are there if we’ll pay attention: American women killed by husbands or boyfriends are more likely to be killed with guns than all other methods combined, the Journal of the American Medical Women’s Association reported. Women are twice as likely to be shot and killed by life partners than they are to be murdered by strangers using any kind of weapon. Males most often use firearms to murder women, according to the Violence Policy Center of Washington, D.C. Handguns are the weapon of choice in domestic murders over rifles and shotguns. Studies show that a gun in the home presents more risk to health than benefit. The American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine reported that most gun accidents occur in the home—with about 50 percent being family members under 25—and that a gun in the home is a high indicator of successful suicides (that is, more suicides fail when other methods are used). The Centers for Disease Control reports that, in 2006 alone, 7,564 persons 24 years old or younger died as a result of gun injury. This, the CDC reported, is equivalent to one Boeing 737 crash every week for a year with no survivors. With these kind of gun dangers in our midst, what is the answer? That is a tough one in a country that refuses to have a serious dialogue even about banning military-style assault weapons—the kinds that very few people would ever have occasion to use for self-defense (and would likely have caused more deaths in a dark, tear-gassed theater if pulled on a shooter in head-to-toe body armory). Clearly, there is no immediate compromise regulation in sight on any kind of firearm in the United States. You can’t even bring up guns as a public-health issue without getting shouted down and called names (watch the comments under this editorial at jfp.ms to see what we mean). So, that means it is up to all of us to self-regulate and to have the real facts at hand. We must know the dangers of having easily accessible guns in the home— to our own families and children. It is simply fact that the risk is statistically greater then guns’ successful use for self-defense in the home. Choose wisely, friends. Your loved ones’ lives hang in the balance.

CHATTER Join the conversation at www.jfp.ms/comments

On ‘New Abortion Law: Medically Justified?’ Ventana29erRider: Clearly, the only place in the country where race is an issue is Mississippi. All medical offices are for-profit. All doctors (myself included) work for profit. The judge was right to block this ridiculous law. It is NOT medically necessary for a doctor to have hospital admitting privileges. The law is an attempt to block a legal right to an abortion. It is not about “protecting women.” Only an idiot would think it’s about protecting women. Anyone who needs emergency care can go to any emergency room where ER doctors have admitting privileges.

On ‘Voter Fraud Problem?’

July 25 - 31, 2012

goldeneagle97: As I mentioned in another thread, this isn’t about protecting the integrity of voting. It’s about voter suppression in the name of partisan politics. California congresswoman Barbara Lee opined yesterday on MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry that it’s ironic how this country wants to spread democracy around the world, but doesn’t want its own people to practice their democracy here.

On ‘Capital City Classic No More’

blackwatch: I am HBCU alum and a PWC alum and a football fan. The argument Alcorn is making assumes that the appeal and scope of the HBCU games/ classics is the same as an SEC or ACC game. It is not. I am not saying that there is a difference of import to the respective schools, but the appeal, what makes them marketable and interesting are quite different. HBCU football is about the expe12 rience; the appeal of SEC football is about the football, played by future pros.

KAMIKAZE

Scars Run Deep

M

ost people hear about victims of domestic violence. It’s always a friend or a relative of a co-worker or that woman you passed in a crowded bar whose name is bandied about in hushed tones. It may be the nameless couple that you see fighting outside the club or the noisy upstairs neighbors that you never see but always overhear. In most instances, we’re able to detach ourselves. It’s much easier to write it off that way as someone else’s problem. Domestic violence is something that happens to “other people,” and you can paint the victims as “stupid” or “crazy” for enduring such dangerous conditions. When it hits closer to home, your thoughts will change. I promise. I had never dated anyone who had been in an abusive relationship (at least, not to my knowledge) until I met my wife. Our relationship began like any other. I didn’t see the signs at first. But as we got more comfortable with each other, the remnants of past episodes emerged—the angry outbursts, the trust issues, the fear of getting closer and the reluctance to let her guard down. They came from an 11-year-long abusive relationship that she slowly began to tell me about. She suffered physical violence that left her with scars, some still visible to this day, and mental scars that only heal with time. I got angry hearing those accounts—really angry. I grew up watching a hard-working, caring man take care of his wife and family. Sure, my folks argued just like plenty of married couples, but I never knew a man that exhibited the violence my wife described. My father taught me that

a man never, ever, under any circumstances, puts his hand on a woman to hurt her. That lesson sticks with me to this day. And it’s a mantra I pass down to my sons and my daughters, so my sons don’t become abusers and so my daughters don’t open themselves up to abuse. I asked my wife many times why she stayed so long. Why 11 years? I couldn’t fathom it. I thought like many do that there is no way anyone would stay that long. But once she explained, once she talked about being brainwashed, having her self-esteem destroyed, having any personal goals postponed, I gained understanding. Fellas, in honor of the JFP Chick Ball, I implore you. If you are dating a woman who has been a victim of domestic violence or assault on any level, be patient, be loving and be compassionate. Be understanding. The scars run deep, and they are nothing that you can repair with trinkets and a “good talking to.” These victims are like mental slaves who have been emancipated but without the ability to foster a normal, loving, relationship—not at first. That’s where we (real men) come in. That’s where real friends step in. And after a while, these women will know what love is from the right mate. I salute you, Funmi Franklin. Your strength is otherworldly, and your journey has been a glorious one. Wife, mother, best friend, Queen: Thank you for confiding in me, and thank you for letting me love you. You’ve been through much but now, you must use your story to help others. And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


FUNMI “QUEEN” FRANKLIN

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Contributing Editor Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe,Tam Curley, Scott Dennis, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Genevieve Legacy, Amanda Michaud, Jessica Mizell, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matt Bolian, Aaron Cooper, Piko Ewoodzie, Ceili Hale, Lindsay Hayes, Dylan Irby, Christianna Jackson, Darnell Jackson, Allie Jordan,Whitney Menogan, Vergie Redmond, Sara Sacks, Sam Suttle, Victoria Sherwood, Ben-Cuda Stowers, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

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P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

Putting Down the Baggage

I

t would be awesome if we got the chance to wipe away every bad relationship before starting a new one. My life, though, tells a different story. The person I have become after being abused has directed every relationship I’ve encountered since that horrible time in my life. The damage has been tolerable—until now. I’m married, and the woman with the broken spirit and persistent baggage must die, and I mean to kill her. My husband often has to bear the burden of my emotional baggage and leftover emotions from the abuse I endured as a young adult. He’s written about it; I’ve written about it. We talk and pray about it together and individually. It is a huge mountain of pain that doesn’t go away just because I am now married to a great man whom I love dearly. Being a domestic-abuse survivor takes its toll on any partner she or he enters into a relationship with. And unless people evaluate these issues they linger, festering into a huge mess of a person. I often talk about the bruises and the physical pain, but rarely do I allow myself to retreat into the mental anguish that I went through during that time in my life, and never do I broach openly the subject of the pain that remains. I think it’s high time that I do that. The first time my partner hit me, he convinced me that I had created that monster in him. It was my fault, he said, and any man would have hit me for what I’d done. I should have kept my mouth shut. I led him to it. By the time he finished manipulating and blame shifting, I felt dirty and worthless. I actually felt sorry for him and the way I had hurt him. It was indeed my fault. His life had been hard; he had a difficult childhood. He watched his dad hit his mother. Even though I knew he had anger issues, I mouthed off to him anyway. He was on the edge, and I pushed him over. Of course I deserved to be kicked and pushed and punched like a rag doll. He was teaching me never to do it again. I cried, and I begged him to forgive me. The amount of self-worth I lost in this one event has taken me years to rebuild—I am still working on it. Maybe if I hadn’t been broken from the death of my father and looking for the love of a man in any form, I would have had the self-awareness to recognize that he was off his rocker. Then, I might have had the wherewithal to pack up my things and leave right then. Maybe I could have saved myself the next seven years of losing myself to

him again and again. Instead, I fell—head first—into an abyss of self-doubt and self-hate that’s been with me since that day. Sure, I learned to love myself again. Yet, the idea of completely loving another person—a man—scares me to no end. Yes, even after getting married and taking vows, doubt and fear tend to control me. Needless to say, I take every precaution to protect myself. I’ve tucked away this place in my head that consumes me when I feel vulnerable. It tells me that all I need is me. It sparks a vacancy in me that separates me from reality. I find solace in this place because it’s just me there. In this place of imaginary selfwisdom, I know that no one else can be trusted and everyone, at some time, will disappoint me, hurt me, fail me—but me. If I can’t depend on anyone else, I will never fail me. Fortunately, I’ve been blessed with a husband who loves me enough to listen and who’s confident enough to know that it’s not about him. He takes the time to reassure me that I no longer need that dark “me” place. Women who have been abused and get out of the relationship without dealing with the mental anguish take it with them into new relationships. It is indeed unhealthy. Our inability to forgive ourselves for not being strong enough is what ultimately breaks us. Our refusal to forgive lends refuge to the lack of trust, disbelief in real love and inability to acknowledge self-love. Oprah Winfrey said it best: “I am a woman in process. I’m just trying like everybody else. I try to take every conflict, every experience, and learn from it. Life is never dull.” For me, knowing that adversity and conflict build character, I accept my imperfections. I acknowledge my shortcomings. I recognize that time in my life where I didn’t do what was best for me; my broken spirit clouded my decisions. Today, I am more interested in mending the scattered pieces of my psyche. I’m working on being whole again so that I can give love without regret or anticipation of failure. I believe that I have come to a place in my life where there is no going back. I refuse to be in bondage to the pain that owned me years ago at the hands of one very cruel man. I deserve to be free of the baggage, and so does my ever-loving and tolerant husband. Funmi “Queen” Franklin is a word lover, poet and advocate for sisterhood. She has a weakness for reality shows and her puppy, Shaka.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


ENDING THE SILENCE, PART II:

The Real Roots of Evil by Ronni Mott

“When we speak we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcomed. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak.” —Audre Lorde

14

*Names have been changed in this story.

had sex, she said later, but they never had intercourse. Males in Jails Amara’s story points to numerous issues swirling around dysfunctional sexual relationships, including the cyclical nature of domestic violence and how it can put young people in the path of sexual predators. She is also African American, and while she never presumed to speak for a mythical monolith of “black people in America,” both the history of blacks in this country and the current reality of the culture inform her narrative. Sex with a 16-year-old girl in Mississippi—as in the majority of states—is not illegal. However, the power differential between a 39-year-old man and a 16-year-old woman is obvious. He had the control and the upper hand. He knew that, and admitted to her years

thanked her for not telling anyone. “I really had a lot of depression and emotional problems since then,” she said. “I look at that father-figure thing closer now.” Up to 95 percent of rape victims know their assailants, so it’s not a stretch to say that most sexual assault and rape occurs on the continuum of intimate partner or domestic violence, all of which centers around the perpetrator’s need for power and control. Short of intimate partner homicide, rape is the ultimate expression of that need, said Sandy Middleton, executive director of the Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl. “What could be more controlling than rape?” she asked, or the threat of rape. When it comes to domestic violence, the range includes everything from psychological and verbal abuse to stalking to physical assault, including rape.

tion he gave her, but she knew it was wrong. She didn’t tell her mama about it until years later. The older man drew the young woman in; his interest was something no one had ever shown her before. She felt wanted and loved for the first time. That night wasn’t the only time the two

later that he was wrong to take advantage of her. It wasn’t much of an apology, Amara said. The pastor told her she had to forgive him; not to do so was a sin. He also told her that he had noticed her from the start, even remembering the blue dress she wore her first day in the church when she was 14. He

For black women, though, rape is also fraught with historical baggage and its own set of rules. “Historically, we have learned the system, which in our minds is white folks, is not to be trusted,” CeCe Norwood, a rape-crises counselor in Toledo, Ohio told The Los Angeles

KRISTIN BRENEMEN / MODEL: JFP INTERN CHRISTIANNA JACKSON

July 25 - 31, 2012

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mara* showed up at the Jackson Free Press office unexpectedly one Thursday afternoon. Her rose-colored blouse was soaking wet from a sudden thunderstorm. Her big dark eyes scanned the room as she talked, and her hands, like her eyes, were in constant motion, fidgeting with her hair and plucking at her damp clothing. Her voice was soft and unaffected. When our eyes met, she would quickly look away, like a watchful doe on the lookout for danger. Her mother was 16 when she gave birth to Amara. Her parents did not marry, and her stepfather controlled and verbally abused her mother. “He didn’t respect her,” she said. Home wasn’t a happy place. While her stepdad never abused Amara, her mom frequently took out her pain and frustration on her oldest child. When she was 14, Amara’s family began attending a new church. One afternoon at youth choir practice, Amara was sitting in the pews crying. It was a typical teenage moment, she said. She can’t remember exactly why she was crying; perhaps someone had picked on her, probably calling her ugly or stupid. Her pastor put his arm around the teen to console her and offered her the love Amara yearned for. “He said if I wanted, he would be my father figure,” she said. “I didn’t ask for it.” For the next 18 months or so, the pastor gave Amara a refuge from her turbulent home life. She spent many days and nights at his family’s home. Looking back, she said was never alone with him. His wife and children were always around. Other church members noticed the special interest the pastor showed to his young charge, and some weren’t pleased. Even Amara’s grandmother felt it wasn’t quite right, though she didn’t know why. Amara didn’t care. The pastor was caring and nurturing. Anything was better than life with her mother and stepfather.

One evening in 1999, when the pastor offered her a ride home from church, Amara didn’t want to go. Instead, the two of them went back to his house. His wife and kids were out; they were alone together for the first time. As Amara stood at the kitchen sink doing dishes, he came up behind her and kissed her on the neck. She didn’t like it. “My feelings were really hurt,” she said. “I was really like in shock. Like, ‘I can’t believe this.’” The pastor was sexually excited, though, and despite her misgivings, Amara became excited as well. The sex was oral, she said. They ended up on the floor. She’s certain they would have had intercourse that night, but the pastor’s wife returned home. They had just enough time to pull themselves together. Amara was 16, the pastor 39. The experience left Amara confused and ashamed. She wanted the special atten-


Sexual Assault on Campus: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Time to Speak Out

Times during a National Sexual Violence Prevention Conference in 2004. UCLA professor Gail Wyatt first documented the phenomenon of black women protecting black men with silence in 1980. Black women, Norwood indicated, are supposed to protect the black community, not expose it. Some of that attitude is a holdover from Reconstruction and Jim Crow eras in the South, when a black men could be lynched for â&#x20AC;&#x153;attackingâ&#x20AC;? a white women. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an attitude that leaves many black rape victims making a Hobsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice between sexism and racism. If she reports an assault, could it result in putting another black man in prison? African Americans make up almost 40 percent of people in prison and jail, though they make up only about 13 percent of the U.S. population. Further complicating the issue are pervasive myths including that black women canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be raped. It is a falsehood with roots in American law. In 1859, for example, a Mississippi judge ruled that an older black slave

students whose â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was a victim and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t report because they were ashamed, afraid, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it was rape, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get anybody in trouble or any combination of those reasons.â&#x20AC;? As a victim, schools encourage victims to report sexual violence just as Laura Dunn did at the in 2004. You may not be fond of the idea, but it can often lead to closure. Try not to be afraid of informing law enforcement about what happened. To avoid sexual assault from occurring, many schools start by educating students. Jackson State University has offered â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not on Our Campus,â&#x20AC;? a program funded by the federal Office on Violence against Women, for three years. The program educates students about violence against women. And the campus chapter of the Na-

could not have raped a 10-year-old black girl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[T]he crime of rape does not exist in this State between African slaves,â&#x20AC;? he concluded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś Their intercourse is promiscuous.â&#x20AC;? In her poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof she wanted it,â&#x20AC;? poet Honoree Fannone Jeffers wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why do you think there are so few reports of rape in the black community / Because rape doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen in the black community.â&#x20AC;? Jeffers performed the poem in the 2006 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;No! The Rape Documentary.â&#x20AC;? The movie, produced, written and directed by Aishah Shahidah Simmons, confronts all aspects of sexual violence, focusing on the experiences of African Americans. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Role of Religion in Violence Against Women,â&#x20AC;? an essay in the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accompanying study guide, Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons wrote about the imbalance of men and women in black churches. The theme resonates in Amaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of her relationship with her pastor. Citing Delores Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters in the Wilderness,â&#x20AC;? Simmons wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black

tional Organization of Women at Millsaps College had a good turn out at a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s empowerment event, Conway said. Such programs are a beneficial and healthy way to spread awareness and gain knowledge. Being able to identify sexual assault is a key to protecting yourself and your friends. Omari offered this advice to college women: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being safe is important, although we must be careful not to blame the victim. Women should have the right to go wherever they want to go, dress anyway they want to dress and stay out as late as they want to without having to fear being sexually assaulted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That being said, however, I would say to women who are out drinking to always watch their drink and to use a buddy system, where they look out for each other

women have â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;accounted their perseverance on the basis of their faith in God who helped them make a way out of no way.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yet as Williams notes, black womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith has been used against them by men in their churches and in their mosques. She calls it â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a colonization of the femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind and culture.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;Ś Engrained notions have covertly justified male violence against women as menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right as heads of their households to rule with an iron fist (literally and figuratively) and to chastise â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;head strong and disobedient wives and girlfriends,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; often depicted as loud-mouthed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sapphiresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ball-busters.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Those notions are as old as Genesis, Simmons wrote. Long-held depictions of Eve being created as an afterthought and being responsible for bringing evil into the world have many leaders, black and white, castigating rape victims while holding ministers and male parishioners as blameless targets of a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sexual wiles and inherent dishonesty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gender role is learned as it is transmitted to a child almost from birth,â&#x20AC;? she

when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out partying. Know what you want out of any sexual encounter, and if you are uncomfortable and/or fearful about where a date is going, speak up! Trust your instincts: This is not the time to be polite or passive. And remember, rape of any kind is never the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fault. It is a crime motivated by the perpetratorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need to control, humiliate and harm.â&#x20AC;?

#AMPUS2ESOURCESFOR 3EXUAL!SSAULT6ICTIMS *ACKSON3TATE5NIVERSITY &RXQVHOLQJ6HUYLFHV &DPSXV3ROLFH -ILLSAPS#OLLEGE &RXQVHOLQJ6HUYLFHV &DPSXV3ROLFH "ELHAVEN#OLLEGE +RSHZHOO&RXQVHOLQJ6HUYLFHV  &DPSXV6HFXULW\ 0RUHMISPVUDSHBUHVRXUFHV

wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The child observes early the allotment of privileges such as the right to speak and be heard, to make decisions, and who wields the power in the home, in the political realm and in the religious institutions.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;He Really Liked Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; After she graduated from high school, Amara began college in New Orleans. She hoped leaving Jackson would give her some relief from the untenable situations she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to get away from here in town. She had begun a relationship with Damitri, who seemed to care about her. But he was abusive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had anger problems,â&#x20AC;? she said. She blamed his behavior on herself, thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why do bad things happen to me.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;He started choking me and really verbally abusing me.â&#x20AC;? He would call her names, like â&#x20AC;&#x153;ugly b*tch.â&#x20AC;? He kicked her in the back and sprained her thumb once. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But he really

jacksonfreepress.com

rape someone if they thought they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be caught or punished. Alcohol is a big factor in rape. About three-quarters of reported sexual assaults and rape are alcoholrelated. Consumption of alcohol or other drugs is not an excuse for rape; it does not matter if you drank or used drugs or if your attacker did. Under the law, being drunk or drugged makes a person incapable of giving consent, and without consent, sex becomes rape. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just being a woman on a campus makes you vulnerable, but drinking to excess at parties or in the clubs puts young women at a higher risk of being sexually assaulted,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Safiya Omari, director of the Southern Institute for Mental Health Advocacy, Research and Training at Jackson State University via email. In the aftermath of sexual assault, one of the most important things you can do is to reach out for help. Most colleges offer support to students who have been sexually violated, such as counseling or guidance in reporting. John Conway, director of campus life at Millsaps College, said that victims are â&#x20AC;&#x153;always encouraged to report their case.â&#x20AC;? While universities may report a low occurrence of sexual assault cases, that does not mean they are not happening at the nationally estimated rates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it means that women arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reporting (sexual assault and rape) for various reasons,â&#x20AC;? Omari said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get anecdotal reports at just about every education and/or outreach forum from

KRISTIN BRENEMEN / MODEL: INTERN DARNELL JACKSON

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oward the end of her freshman year at the University of Wisconsin in 2004, Laura Dunn attended a frat party where she drank way too many raspberry vodkas. Two guys she previously knew and trusted took her to another house. They were just making a stop before going to another party, Dunn thought. The men had other things in mind, she told NPR News in 2010. They raped her as she drifted in and out of consciousness. Dunn kept the incident to herself for 15 months, until a professor told Dunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class that rape victims could report their cases to the dean of students. Dunn reported the incident that same day. When you hear â&#x20AC;&#x153;sexual assaultâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;rape,â&#x20AC;? you might picture dark alleys in a big city instead of a college campus. In reality, students on campuses are vulnerable; rape and sexual violence are huge campus problems across the nation. It can happen to anyone, although girls aged 16 to 19 are four times more likely to be targets of sexual assault than any one else, the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network states. Many of those targets are college students: One in five college women will become victims of rape during college, the majority in their first year, a New York University study found, and 80 percent to 90 percent of victims will know their attacker. Like their victims, sexual predators could be people you know. In the NYU study, 35 percent of men reported that they might

by Andrea White

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ENDING THE SILENCE, FROM PAGE 15

July 25 - 31, 2012

don’t know if they believed me,” she said. But later, Fat Boy sent a message to Amara through Damitri: “Tell her I’m sorry.” ‘Abuse, Misuse and Exploitation’ Rape is a public health issue. Among the myriad of victim reactions to sexual assault are nightmares, depression, fear and distrust, anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The trauma that begins with the victim spreads outward to her family, friends and society. “Schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, campuses and cultural or religious communities may feel fear, anger or disbelief when a sexual assault happens,” states the National Sexual Violence Resource Center in its information sheet “What is Sexual Violence?” Rape costs taxpayers money, too, including medical services, criminal justice expenses, crises and mental-health fees, and lost productivity. Individually, the financial cost of each

‘My Library Card Saved Me’ Two things happened to Amara after Fat Boy’s attempted rape that opened her eyes. First, she found out she was pregnant by Damitri. Then, she attended a lecture about

When Amara went back to their apartment to collect some things she’d left behind, Raymond insisted that she pay the light bill that he couldn’t. “When I said I wasn’t going to pay it, he head butted me,” she said. “We had some issues in our relationship, too.” The cut required about 10 stitches. Like many women who have survived intimate partner violence, Amara has drawn on reserves of strength she hardly recognizes, although she struggles with depression. She supported herself and her son with home-based businesses, first as a “mystery shopper,” and she began a cleaning service. Relationships with men, she said, were going to be simpler, with no attachments. Even when she found herself pregnant with her second child, she didn’t ask for the father’s support, but they maintain a relationship. The minute she saw her baby, she fell helplessly in love, as nearly all mothers do. “I think what saved me was my library card,” she said. She tried to get counseling, but didn’t have the money to continue. Instead, between her classes at JSU, Amara began to scan the stacks, where she discovered self-help

domestic violence at Jackson State University. As the speaker told the audience about the warning signs, Amara recognized her life,. “I didn’t want to have a baby in this situation,” she said. Awake to the danger, she made an escape plan, just like she learned in the lecture. She reached out to a friend, Raymond, and asked him to help. On the night that she couldn’t take any more of Damitri’s abuse, Amara called Raymond and got out. Amara saw Raymond as a man she could finally trust, and they soon fell into a relationship. But Raymond turned out to be less than she thought. He didn’t have a high-school diploma, and he found it difficult to find anything but temporary jobs. Amara supported and tried to help him, correcting his spelling and grammar on job applications and offering her support in getting his GED. When it became clear to her that Raymond was not what she needed for herself and her son, she left him. What happened next left her with a scar that arcs through and over her right eyebrow.

books. She credits one author in particular, Iyanla Vanzant, for helping her to straighten herself out. Amara took what she learned and put it into practice. Today, Amara, 28, continues to work from home while she works toward her master’s degree at JSU. Her baby is almost 2 years old, and she home-schooled her firstborn, last year. Now 7 years old, he’ll probably go to public school next year. “He’s very outgoing,” she said. Amara is in what may be the first fairly stable relationship of her life. It’s not perfect, she said, but she’s stopped looking for a man to save her. Instead, she’s looking forward to being a successful business woman, and she is stronger for the lessons she continues to learn. “I’m in a better place, now,” she said. “Me and my library card. … I have a new-found feminism.” “I do think I am my own hero.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

KRISTIN BRENEMEN / MODEL: JFP INTERN VICTORIA SHERWOOD

liked me. I really felt like I needed to stay with him. Finally, somebody really likes me.” He would get angry and bang his head on the wall. Amara took it as a sign that he cared. One late summer day in 2004, Amara showed up at Damitri’s grandmother’s house, ready to help the woman sort clothing for Goodwill. “Come anytime,” his grandmother had told her, so she hadn’t called ahead. The woman wasn’t home, but the front door was unlocked. Amara went in—she knew where the clothes were—and started picking through the pile and folding the clothes. Out of the corner of her eye, she saw someone pass by the door of the room where she was working. “I heard the front door lock,” she said, “and I thought, uh oh.” A few seconds later, Fat Boy, Damitri’s cousin, stood in the doorway, wrapped in sheets as if he’d just gotten up. “Where you going?” he asked her when she tried to push past him. Fat Boy was naked under the sheets, except for the condom on his already erect penis. Amara tried to fight him, but the man easily overpowered her and pushed her to the floor. “She had these little labels on the dresser,” Amara said. “I just remember ‘Socks.’” She was screaming, but the house was in the country, isolated. She remembered thinking, “Nobody knows where I am.” He had some sort of a bat, she said, and threatened to hit her. Reaching up under her turquoise dress, Fat Boy ripped at her panties and discovered Amara was having her period. Enraged, he swore at her. “Get the f*ck outta here, nasty b*tch,” he yelled. She got away, taking the nearest exit from the trailer. She went out a window backward, cutting her leg, and ran across the street for help—to her attacker’s mother. Amara reported the attack to the police. The detective was nice enough, she said, but he didn’t offer her much hope or support. He kept wanting more information. “I did sign up for counseling,” she said, but it was too far from New Orleans, and she stopped going after a couple of sessions. The incident left her traumatized. She remembers feeling paranoid for months, afraid that any man she met would try to rape her. Amara soon moved back to Jackson. Pressured by Fat Boy’s mother to drop the charges, Amara found out that she couldn’t. The deputy had filed the assault charges for her. Still, she said, it was her word against his. She never met with a prosecutor, and a grand jury failed to indict Fat Boy. Police never arrested him, and he never did time. Some experts believe as few as six in 1,000 sexual perpetrators will ever spend a day behind bars; fewer than 85 percent of victims ever report rapes or sexual assaults. Amara found herself mired in a morass of family drama: The entire family rallied around Fat Boy, she said, trying to protect him from the woman he had tried to rape. She stopped going to Damitri’s family functions, afraid of running into her attacker, further strain16 ing her tenuous relationship with Damitri. “I

help,” he writes. “… We’ve been set up by the sense of superiority and entitlement, and the small benefits we gain to collude with and perpetuate sexism and male supremacy.” Kivel continues: “[I]t is particularly powerful when men challenge other men on issues of male violence, contradicting the myth that it is natural, inevitable or inconsequential for men to abuse women. … This is truly men’s work—to reclaim our own humanity and stop all forms of male violence and exploitation.” While women are not innocent of violent or abusive behavior, men are the perpetrators and women their victims in more than 85 percent of violent sexual crimes, and often, when men rape, their victims are also male. One in five women and one in 71 men will be rape victims at some point in their lives, concluded the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, published last year.

rape is $151,423 reported the Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology in 2010. The annual tally is higher than any other crime: $127 billion according to the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. “Sexual violence is a social justice issue that occurs because of abuse, misuse and exploitation of vulnerabilities,” the NSVRC states. “It is a violation of human rights and can impact a person’s trust and feeling of safety. Acts of sexual violence are not only about control and/or sex, but the rape culture exists, in part, because of disparities of power that are often rooted in oppression.” The way we raise boys is the start of much oppression—including the oppression of women—says social-justice activist and author Paul Kivel in “Men’s Work—To Stop Male Violence.” “We tell them to act like a man, to be tough, aggressive, in control, not to express their feelings, not to cry and never to ask for


8th Annual JFP Chick Ball

July 28, 2012 http://www.jfpchickball.com

Chicks We Love

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Christy Harrison

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hristy Harrison grew up with a desire to help others. Now she gets to every day as a social worker at St. Dominic Hospital specializing in victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Harrison understands the struggles her patients go through, having experienced violence both as a child and an adult. “There was always someone there to help me when I needed it,” Harrison says, “and I always want to be there for that person, too, whoever it is.” For much of her childhood, Harrison, 38,

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Constance Garnett

er motto is to put God first, focus on your dreams and be determined to make it happen. Constance Garnett, a self-driven businesswoman who has worked for Oce North America for the past four years as the sales manager, is driven to be successful. Originally from the Delta, this Mississippi native has made a way for herself. Garnett says it took a lot of focus and determination to be in corporate America for 19 years: “I have drive and ambition to succeed in everything I do.” She says in the business of sales, you have to build a relationship with custom-

Emberly Holmes

mberly Holmes, 43, feels fortunate to have a job that is both rewarding and enjoyable. Holmes monitors the STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program as division director for the program under the Division of Public Safety Planning for the Mississippi Department of Public Safety. “I’m paid to do a job that makes a huge difference and impacts individual lives,” she says. A STOP grant allows the Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl to offer free legal services and support to victims of domestic

Kristen Ley

rtist Kristen Ley is continually amazed by the amount of support she receives from the Jackson community for her work. “I’m still so humbled that people want to put my art on their walls. I’ve seen that when people are passionate about the city, the city becomes passionate about them.” Ley says. But, it’s really no surprise that she gets community support. The 27-year-old uses her talents in art and graphic design to uplift the city whenever possible. “We have so much talent here in Mississippi and Jackson. I’d love to help create opportunities for people who love art and who love to create to express that,” Ley says.

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provided a guiding hand for individuals in need, volunteering at a camp for children and adults with disabilities. Getting the idea to go into social work from a TV program, she would later earn both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Southern Mississippi. Now, Harrison is one of 12 social workers at St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson where she and the current ER director, Nikki Nissen, have rewritten protocol concerning how to deal with admitted assault victims. St. Dominic is a non-profit hospital, which

Harrison says benefits the way they deal with individual patients. “They’ve been very focused on the person and the patient, and not just the bottom line,” she says. Though Harrison experiences some difficult things in her career as a social worker, she finds value and self-fulfillment through her job. “I’ve got to be able to know that I’ve done something for somebody else at the end of the day,” she says. “I think that’s what we’re all here for. And it hurts my heart if I’m not doing that.” —Sara Sacks

ers by being a people person, and that she cares about people. Her long-term goal is to become vice president of a company. “I want to be the wind behind the wing,” she says. This Delta native owes all her success to her mom, Dorothy Clark. “She is the most instrumental person in my life. She taught me to be determined to be somebody at the age of 9,” Garnett says. Throughout her childhood, Constance also regularly attended camps that helped shape and mold her. “This experience has helped me to become versatile, relatable and to do presentations

on any level,” she says. She challenges parents today to do the same, asking, “What are you going to surround your children with now, that will help them in the next 10 years?” Garnett loves to give back in the community. “It is a privilege for me to be working with the Center (for Violence Prevention),” she says. Her sister, Candice, introduced Greene to the Center where she is now on the advisory board. They are a great organization, and any exposure will enhance their work and let the people know that they are a great outlet.” —Elyane Alexander

violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. “Without the funds, many women will stay in dangerous situations that might lead to homicide, which is the worst-case scenario,” Holmes says. The federal Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)—now stalled in Congress—authorized the STOP program. Its funding also aims to improve prosecution strategies and effective law enforcement in cases involving violence against women. “I thoroughly enjoy what I do,” Holmes says.

Holmes, a Jackson native, graduated from Murrah High School and received a bachelor’s degree in mass communications and a master’s in public policy and administration from Jackson State University. She has worked with other justice programs under the Department of Public Safety since 1995. Holmes is a single mother of two children: daughter Ember, 23, and son Emani, 17. She loves to play tennis, dance and travel. Her favorite place to travel? “Jamaica, ya mon!” —Christianna Jackson

Through her involvement in the Leadership Greater Jackson class from which she just graduated, she designed promotional materials for philanthropic programs at Oak Forest Elementary School and volunteered with those programs. She also created a set of fineart watercolor prints of her favorite places in Jackson, such as Brent’s Drugs in Fondren and the Standard Life building downtown. Though Ley graduated from Mississippi State University in 2007 with a degree in graphic design and a minor in marketing, she expresses her creativity in many forms. She enjoys painting, sewing, designing, woodworking and let-

ter-pressing. “It’s really therapeutic. Creating and doing things creates a satisfaction for me; it gives me a moment of quiet to get my thoughts out in a piece of art,” Ley says. Earlier this year she launched Thimblepress, a studio for her various art forms. Ley attended high school at Jackson Academy where she now works as a graphic designer. She also does freelance design, including this week’s cover art of the Chick Issue. Whenever Ley isn’t being crafty, she enjoys hanging out with her goldendoodle, Willow, and her cat, Norman. —Allie Jordan

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jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY KRISTEN LEY

BRIANA ROBINSON

COURTESY CONSTANCE GARNETT

COURTESY CHRISTY HARRISON

very year just in time for the JFP Chick Ball, we name our roster of “Chicks We Love.” Yes, we know they are powerful women; that’s why we pick them. But just as we did when we took back the word “chick” as the name of our annual domestic-abuse fundraiser eight years ago, we love calling them “chicks.” Maybe because the word was once meant to degrade us. Maybe it’s because there’s a fun vibe to the word that means that these women are serious, but like to have a great time while loving life and all sorts of people. That is the kind of woman we honor every year at the JFP Chick Ball; be in Hal & Mal’s Red Room around 8 p.m. Saturday to toast these women. They’re plain fabulous, no matter what you call them.

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8th Annual JFP Chick Ball from
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SHAWANDA JACOME

Janis Boersma

ou’ve probably seen her before. Maybe you remember her as a security guard dressed in fishnet stockings hitting people with a whip in the Sweet Potato Queens parade entourage, or perhaps she is your fitness instructor at the Courthouse or Baptist Healthplex. Maybe you have been to Nick’s Restaurant sometime in the last 23 years, and she was your server, or you spotted her walking out of her pink house on Mitchell Street. No matter how you know Janis Boersma, one thing is for sure: She is somebody you don’t easily forget.

Grace Greene

any corporations have profited for years off the poor living conditions and lack of regulations offered by third-world countries, but Grace Greene, 30, chose a different business model. As founder and CEO of Peru Paper Company, she didn’t just want to give women and their families the means to survive, she wanted to give them the means to live. By creating a business, she offered women who lived in poverty and suffered from low self-worth the opportunity to take control of their lives. Peru Paper Company (perupaper.com) is based in the city of Trujillo, Peru, where its employees produce handmade greeting cards using recycled materials. When Greene visited Peru

Rosemary Horne

osemary Horne lives by her favorite quote: “The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you.” With that guiding her, Horne is able to fight for victims of violent crimes. Now, she is the state project director for the Victims of Crime Act. Horne has worked with the Mississippi Division of Public Safety Planning under the Department of Public Safety managing federal funds awarded to the state to fund services for victims of violent crimes for the past five years. Horne says victims of child abuse, domes-

Lauren McGraw

hen her (now ex-)husband was not interested in buying a portable toilet company because he “didn’t want to be in the crap business,” Lauren McGraw decided to buy the company herself in 1997. She got the idea at a rental show meeting 15 years ago in New Orleans. McGraw is now the founder and CEO of the largest female-owned portable toilet company in the Southeast, Gotta Go. Gotta Go provides portable toilet rentals

July 25 - 31, 2012

VIRGIL W. SELF

COURTESY ROSEMARY HORNE

VIRGIL W. SELF

inston Churchill once said, “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” Heather McTeer takes that motto as a personal credo. “There are a lot of tough things a woman in politics has to go through, but you must keep on pushing and going,” McTeer says. “Don’t only follow the trail that’s been set before us, but also lay a trail for the young women after us.” McTeer was elected mayor of Greenville in 2003, and re-elected in 2007. Not only was she the city’s first female mayor, but McTeer was also the first African American to hold the position

ROBBY FOLLOWELLW

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Heather McTeer

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July 28, 2012 http://www.jfpchickball.com

of mayor. Being mayor was very challenging but extremely rewarding. “Every day I was able to improve the lives of people in the community. Not everyone agreed with me, but that is the nature of politics. It taught me how to build consensus,” she says. The National Women’s Political Caucus endorsed McTeer when she ran for Congress this year against Rep. Bennie Thompson. She is trying to get more women in politics, because Mississippi is one of four states that have never sent a woman to Congress. McTeer strongly supports

women’s rights and reproductive rights. McTeer, 36, graduated in 1998 from Spelmen College in Atlanta with a bachelor of arts in sociology, and she earned her juris doctorate at New Orleans’ Tulane University Law School. She is now a practicing attorney in Greenville. She also serves as the state director for Political Institute for Women; the national spokeswoman for She Should Run!, a program that encourages women to run for public offices, and as a chairwoman of EPA’s Local Government Advisory Committee. —Adria Walker

Boersma, a 58-year-old Arkansas native, moved to Jackson in 1987. Since then, she has worked at Nick’s Restaurant, and for the past five years Boersma won the Jackson Free Press’ Best Server in Jackson award. When it comes to revealing the secret to her success, she leans in and whispers, “It’s addictive; my customers are addictive.” Smart and energetic, this former librarian and photography teacher is so much more than an amazing server. She is a longtime member of the all-women So Fondren, So

Fabulous group, a fitness instructor, an avid church-goer and a staunch beer advocate. In fact, you could call Boersma the mother of brewpubs in Mississippi; state Sen. John Horhn cites Boersma as the inspiration behind his brewpub bill. So if you find yourself hungry on a Tuesday, Thursday, Friday or Saturday night, head over to Nick’s and meet Janis Boersma. She will greet you with bright blue eyes, a big welcoming grin and, if your timing is right, a hair color not found in nature. —Matthew Bolian

in the late ’90s, she had no idea that this would be on her horizon, but it was the first of many short-term missions she would go on throughout high school. Eventually, she decided to spend two and a half years in Trujillo teaching English for a group called Peru Mission. During this time the seeds were sown for what eventually became Peru Paper Company. “Charity often makes people feel more dependent,” Greene says. Their work not only provides for their family, it helps them realize their importance to the family and society. Now they are essentially in charge of Peru Paper, and “the direction it takes” Greene says, “is up to them.” The project that began with three em-

ployees and drastically limited funds, and resources has grown to be a thriving business with 15 employees. These women aren’t just putting food on the table now; they’re paying for their children’s education, for dental care and for housing renovations. Greene credits “a lot of work and a lot of prayer” as the reason why Peru Paper has done so well. She didn’t offer any other explanation because, like every good businesswoman, she’s busy, and, as every missionary knows, you can’t explain it. Locally, Greene is on the advisory board for the Center for Violence Prevention. —Sam Suttle

tic violence, sexual assault, homicide and other underserved victims of elderly abuse, human trafficking and cyber-bullying are the major categories of violent crimes she works to combat through her position. “I love what I do,” says the 42-year-old mother of two and proud grandmother of one. Throughout her 19 years of service with the state, Horne has worked in several departments, including the Mississippi Department of Health, Division of Medicaid and the Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS). This month, the Mississippi Division of

Public Safety Planning was awarded a $3.8 million grant for assistance and services for victims. Through her position, Horne will manage funds from this grant with priority attention going to victims of violence that she fights for daily. Funds also will go to assist victims of federal crimes, assault, robbery, gang violence, hate and bias crimes, fraud and more. Just as the JFP Chick Ball does annually with the Center for Violence Prevention, Horne enjoys working to help victims of violent crimes year round. —Darnell Jackson

for construction sites, disaster relief and special events. “We started renting toilets and a whole lot more,” McGraw said. Gotta Go also rents out shower trailers for places without running water, larger bathroom trailers, hand-washing stations and water delivery. For waste managing, the company provides dumpsters and recycling pickup. McGraw also owns Gotta Jump, an inflatable bounce-house company and the first liquor store in Flora called Cotton Exchange Liquor Store. Her entrepreneurial endeavors involve

about 16 employees, 10 trucks and 2,000 portable toilets. She services 10 Mississippi counties. Gotta Go went from simple toilet rentals to a multi-faceted organization that does a lot to help out the public. It provides services that people need and some that the state or city might not be able to pay for. Whether it’s helping out with a disaster, construction or events, Lauren McGraw has built a company that helps out people in the Jackson community, all the while being one of Jackson’s sassiest entrepreneurs. —Dylan Irby


S

SHAWANDA JACOME

halotta Sharp brings 16 years of ex- that point, she didn’t even know what a rape perience as a nurse and a passion for kit was. helping and healing to every aspect of “Basically, we were picked as warm bodher job with the ies” for the course, Sharp Mississippi Coalition said. Rush had a quota to Shalotta Sharp Against Sexual Assault. fill for the class, and she As a certified Sexual Aswas in it. sault Nurse Examiner, “I thought, ‘OK, or SANE nurse, Sharp cool: an 8-to-5, Monday joined the organization through Friday, easyfull time in 2010 so that breezy week for me,’ she she could teach others said. “Day one of the how best to help trauma content was so heavy that patients, specifically it was a little overwhelmthose who are victims of ing. I didn’t realize how rape and other violent much I didn’t know. By sexual encounters. day three, we had had a Sharp wasn’t thinklot of psychological coning about anything as tent, and it hit me that not specific as being a nurse only am I learning about for rape victims when sexual assault patients, she graduated from the but I’m learning about University of West Alabama in 1996 with an trauma patients. It hit home with people I had associate’s degree in nursing. Within a year, known in my life that had been through this.” though, she was working in the emergency One of those people was her youngest room at Meridian’s Rush Hospital. One day, daughter, Sharp said, who was raped while she her nurse manager picked her to attend a was in college. Sharp only found out about her week’s training for sexual assault victims. At assault when Jo tried to commit suicide months

later. “My daughter had a very difficult time after this event,” Sharp said. “She dropped out of school, out of life, lost her friends from Troy and had horrible bouts of depression.” “Like so many, I had thought, ‘Well, that’s sad, but get up and move on,’” Sharp said. Through the course, “It hit me how long-term these effects were.” She returned to Rush Hospital full of ideas on how to change procedures in the emergency room. She gives credit to Dr. James Cady for helping her start a SANE program at Rush. That program is now self-sustaining. Sharp began teaching others in 2005. Sharp, 47, lives in York, Ala., with her husband of 16 years, Ronnie. She travels all over Mississippi and to West Virginia training nurses, law enforcement and advocates on how to care for victims of sexual assault. Certified to care for both adults and children, she also continues her work in the ER at Rush Hospital. She is the only certified SANE pediatric nurse in Mississippi, and one of only about 300 worldwide. “If I had to do it all over again, I think I’d try to get involved sooner, Sharp said. “I can honestly say that this is my dream job. It’s the best job in the whole world.”

Men of Character Live Auction

D

on’t miss the live auction of the following remarkable (and their donated services) at the JFP Chick Ball, scheduled to begin at 7:50 p.m. Dee Denton is the auctioneer. Terry Cooper, owner, Absolute Fitness: 8 personal training sessions Mitchell Early, sommelier, BRAVO!: wine and cheese pairing Jesse Houston, chef, Parlor Market: private dinner for six Israel Martinez, owner, LingoFest: 4 private, 2-hour Spanish lessons each to one or two people Terry Sullivan, owner, liveRIGHTnow: package includes yoga, training, tabata Nick Wallace, chef, King Edward Hotel: Dinner prep for 10 in your home Sujan Ghimire, Salsa Mississippi: 4 hour-long private dance classes Eddie Outlaw, owner, William Wallace Salon: a cut and color with a personalized line of products

jacksonfreepress.com

Hero of the Year: Shalotta Sharp

19


JFP Chick Ball Auction Guide

July 28, 2012

http://www.jfpchickball.com

W

here can buy cool art, jewelry and furniture and help keep women and children safe all at the same time? The 8th Annual JFP Chick Ball, of course. It features a huge silent auction of donated items from local businesses, artists and so many other philanthropists. The proceeds from this year’s Chick Ball go toward funding a rape crisis center at the Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl. Flip through this silent-auction guide for samples of what will be featured from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, July 28. There’s still time to donate! Call 601-362-6121 ext 16 or email chickball@ jacksonfreepress.com to give or volunteer. And don’t forget to thank these donors, buy their art and shop in their local businesses.

3 Handmade necklaces, Genevieve Legacy

Art piece, Nola Gibson

Art Piece, lotion and cologne, Circa

Avon gift basket, Pepper Lyn’s Gifts and More

Earrings, Red Square

Painted feather, Feathermore by Elaine Peterson

Bracelets and earrings, Village Beads

Possum belly pipe lamp w/ bookshelf, Katie Katzenmeyer of Stella Bleu Designs

Art piece, Nola Gibson

Art piece, Nola Gibson

Art piece, Nola Gibson

July 25 - 31, 2012

Art piece, Nola Gibson

20

Cake stand, Caroline Debeukelar

2 Framed flower paintings, Glo

“Mallord Pond” Plate, Nola Gibson

Christmas ornament, Caroline Debeukelar

Stationary pack, Caroline 2 Photo albums, Caroline Debeukelar Debeukelar

Art piece, Nola Gibson

Ceramic frog luminary, Fat Cat Ceramics


Gift certificate, mug, t-shirt, Sneaky Beans

“Rise” painting, Kira Cummings

http://www.jfpchickball.com

Set of three cookbooks, Tony Parkinson

“Universal Women Night Dancing on the Beach,” Howard Jones

Earrings, Pink Bombshell

Little girl’s dress, Kasey McKay of Bug and Bell

Shirt, Red Square

Picture, Mitchell Davisph

Mississippi hummingbird picture with frame, Deveon Sudduth Photography

Art pieces, Heavenly Designs by Roz

“Powerless” wood-buring, Kira Cummings

Free bird dress size 2/3, Savannah Perry of Quirky Finch

Set of three framed pictures, Phyllis Robinson of On Location TV

Set of two prints, Paul E. Buford

Seashells in frame, Dana and Jonathan Larking of IMC Inc.

“Gilded Lily” art piece, Latasha Willis

Framed woodpecker photo, Jeff Monk

Two gift bags, Good Samaritan Center

Kathy Willingham painting, Marika Cackett

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP Chick Ball Auction Guide

July 28, 2012

21


JFP Chick Ball Auction Guide

July 25 - 31, 2012

Set of four handmade cards, Theresa Hebler

22

Purse, Libby Story

July 28, 2012

http://www.jfpchickball.com

Small framed Chick Ball watercolor, Wanda

Monk

Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Joe T’s Wine and Spirits

“Me” limited edition print, PHenson Studio

Hydrangea’s acrylic on canvas, Wanda Monk

Two Polo caps, Gordon’s Urban Wear

Lynn Green Root painting, Laura Tedder

“Facing A New Year,” Katie Farrar

Three T-Shirts, Swell O Phonic

Signed Deuce McAllister Ole Miss jersey, Jacob Fuller

Ralph Lauren sunglasses, Custom Optical

Bags and t-shirt, Pam Johnson

Painted wood blocks, Michele Campbell

Four purses and a bracelet, The Hair Boutique Salon

Book and CD, Butterfly Yoga

Picture frames, David Murray of the Flowood Flea Market

Tabl, David Murray of the Flowood Flea Market

B&W image, Photography by Christina

Artwork, Fair Trade Green


Best Sushi In Town sushi, steak, martini and more! 601.948.8808

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WHOLE CARE FOR YOUR PET,

naturally.

Intern at the JFP We currently have openings in the following areas: • Editorial/News • Photography • Cultural/Music Writing • Fashion/Style

• Arts Writing/Editing • Internet • Graphic Design • Communications: Marketing/Events/PR

Interested? Send an e-mail to interns@jacksonfreepress.com, telling us why you want to intern with us and what makes you the ideal candidate. *College credit available to currently enrolled college students in select disciplines.

Check out our selection of pure products for cats and dogs! U Pet food in bulk bins

UÊDietary supplements

U Homeopathic medicine

UÊFortified treats

jacksonfreepress.com

Hone your skills, gain valuable experience and college credit* by interning with the Jackson Free Press. You set your hours, and attend free training workshops.

23


JFP Chick Ball Auction Guide

Scarf and nail polish, Arco Avenue

Jewelry set, Nagrom Accessories

Family membership and a stuffed animal toy, The Jackson Zoo

Bath set, Hemline Ridgeland

July 28, 2012

http://www.jfpchickball.com

Indian silk letter holder, Noel Didla

Shirts and mug, Another Broken Egg

Art piece, Josh Hailey Studio

Two purse, Material Girls

Oil painting, Laurilyn Fortner

Hand-painted tees, S.Mack Tee’s

Artwork, Lisette’s Photography & Gallery

“Crow Man Blues,” Shannon Valentine

Gift basket, Nandy’s Candy

Zebra striped wrap dress, Attitude Not Included Boutique

NOTE: Items received after July 20 did not make the auction guide.

July 6 - 12, 2011

Gift Certificate Donations

24

$40 Gift certificate, Friends and Company 1 Month of gold level tanning gift certificate, Palm Beach Tan Gift certificate for manicure, Fondren Nails Gift certificate for piano tuning, Royce Boyer Gift certificate for a dance workshop, Tracie Wade of LaMornes Dance and Fitness Gift certificate for haircut, Glamour Salon $100 off computer repair gift certificate, Kismar Computer Services Gift certificates for beading classes, Village Beads

Three classes worth of Spanish gift certificate, Lingofest Language Center Gift certificates for 25 free subs and drinks, Susanne and Brian Atkins of Firehouse Subs in Flowood Three $10 gift cards, Koinonia Gift certificate for one hour massage, Massage Envy Two $50 gift certificates, Shoe Bar $50 gift certificate, Royal Bleau Boutique $20 gift certificate, Brent’s Drugs Gift certificate for two guitar lessons, Fondren Guitars Gift certificate, Sneaky Beans Two $10 gift cards, Yogn Frut Gift certificates for $45, Two Sisters

Gift certificate for manicure, Victoria Walker of Social Agenda Gift certificate for haircut, Kim Dismuke of Social Agenda Gift certificate for pedicure, Lauren Burns of Social Agenda $100 Gift card, Pure Barre $100 Gift certificate, Mi Cherie Treasures $50 Gift card, Heavenly Designs by Roz Two $25 gift certificates, Good Samaritan Center Two gift certificates for an evening of performances, Emma Wynters of MS Madness Music Management $100 Gift certificate, William Wallace Salon

$50 Gift card, Mangia Bene Gift certificate for a full makeover and a cut & style, Kate McNeely - Social Agenda $25 Gift card, Fondren Cellars Gift certificates for one month of unlimited classes, Butterfly Yoga Gift certificate for six classes, Butterfly Yoga Gift certificate for special event makeup application, Butterfly Faces Makeup Artistry Gift certificate for one art class, Artful Hours Painting Lounge $250 Gift certificate towards a wedding cake, Cakes by Iris $25 Gift certificate, Kincade’s Fine Clothing


TA K E A D V A NTA GE OF OUR PA TIO DURIN G...

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Host an Exchange Student Today ! (for 3, 5 or 10 months) Make a lifelong friend from abroad.

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Enjoys dancing, playing the piano and swimming. Camilla looks forward to cooking with her American host family.

Enrich your family with another culture. Now you can host a high school exchange student (girl or boy) from France, Germany, Scandinavia, Spain, Australia, Japan, Brazil, Italy or other countries. Single Daniel from Denmark, 17 yrs. parents, as well as couples Loves skiing, playing soccer and with or without children, watching American movies. Daniel may host. Contact us ASAP hopes to learn to play football and for more information or to live as a real American. select your student.



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25


     

50 STATES = $50 July 25 - 31, 2012

To celebrate Independence Day, the Baptist Healthplex invites you to show your allegiance to good health. In honor of our 50 states, you can join for $50 from July 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012. Two convenient locations: JACKSON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 601-968-1766 CLINTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 601-925-7900 www.mbhs.org

*Amount applies to the primary member for the month of July, 2012.

26 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 2012. 9.5â&#x20AC;? x 6.167â&#x20AC;?. Commissioned by Robby Channell.


BRIGHT PROSPECT, HINDS STUDENT. Register Now â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Aug. 10 Classes begin Aug. 13 JACKSON

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jacksonfreepress.com

Hinds Community College offers equal education and employment opportunities and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability or veteran status in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Dr. George Barnes, Vice President for Administrative and Student Services, 34175 Hwy. 18, Utica, MS 39175, 601.885.7001.

27


MUSIC p 21 | FILM p 32 | ARTS p 34 | 8 DAYS p 35 | SPORTS p 38 Chick Music: These girl acts perform at the JFP Chick Ball July 28. Line-up at jfpchickball.

Isbister Irby’s Influential Shows

10 Things About Valley and Melody by Matt Bolian

by Briana Robinson

DANE CARNEY

Is Today Opposite Day?

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COURTESY EMMA WYNTERS

Emma Wynters

by Greg Pigott

by Whitney Menogan and Briana Robinson

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Wynter Blues by Amanda Barber

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DIVERSIONS|music

Chicks: Make Music!

by Natalie Long

LIZZIE WRIGHT

A

s I did the music listings this week and worked on this article, I thought about our upcoming annual JFP Chick Ball and how much it means to me. I also thought about how hard the Chick Ball committee works to find a dynamic assortment of women entertainers here in the City With Soul. And while I am thankful for all the wonderfully talented women in this town, I can’t help but wonder: Why are there not more women expressing themselves musically? It’s not because this city’s female population is untalented—I’ve seen too many girls with the potential to be wonderful performers at open-mic nights and karaoke around here. Why aren’t more women musicians up front and running toe-to-toe with successful male bands here in Jackson? And why, when I did the listings, out of 100 shows, could I only count six female singers in the lineup? I’m not sure I know the reason behind it, but I will tell you from my point of view that maybe some women feel like they can’t measure up in music because it is a predominately male domain, and has been since the beginning. Tammy Wynette, in an interview

Someone mentioned to me the other years ago, talked about how women singers day that women in Jackson are too comwere considered “property” at the bars they petitive when it comes to music. I call BS performed in, and were pretty much seen like on that. Of all the women musicians in that in the recording studio. this town, I can’t think of a better group From my experience performing, I’ve had my fair share of guys come up to me with negative criticism on my singing and one even told me my ass needed to be in a kitchen somewhere, not behind a microphone. I’ve also had great talks with lots of my girlfriends who love music as much as I do and are knowledgeable about the history of music, and we’ve discussed how some guys cannot stand it for a girl to know more about music than they do. And what have we as women done in the past when Joan Jett is one female rocker Natalie Long looks up to. someone got mad at us for being a music lover? Backed down, or tried to keep upping the score by going even of women I’d rather work with and hear further with how much musical knowledge play live. We’ve all gotten along and even we know, only adding fuel to the fire. As my sang along when our bands are playing. As hero Joan Jett said in an interview, “People one couple from Austin, Texas, said to me don’t want to see women doing things they at Parlor Market’s PM Burger event, “Man, don’t think women should do.” all of you seem like one big family.”

I could not agree more. We are a family, not just in music, but in every aspect this city has to offer. I encourage the girls who are out there that want to play or perform in Jackson to do so. Find a guitar player, get up a band of musicians who share your vision of what you want to do musically, learn how to play an instrument, write songs, take vocal or instrument lessons, and don’t be scared of expressing yourself because of what someone might say (because, let me tell you, someone is going to say something negative at some point). Shake off any negative and derogatory comments that come your way. It is our time, ladies, to step up to the mic, and find our own musical voices. There are too many music enthusiasts in this town that would appreciate more women singing their songs and expressing themselves. We have the support and, of course, you have my support. Go out and find your voice. I’ll be there to sing along with you, too.

jacksonfreepress.com

Natalie’s Notes

29


livemusic JULY 25 - WEDNESDAY

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Coming Soon

July 25 - 31, 2012

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Hinson

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

July 31

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday

August 1

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

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Big Juv (Funk)

THURSDAY 7/26

Spirits of the House (Traditional Irish) FRIDAY 7/27

We brought the great outdoors indoors! Scan QR for more information

Jackson Only Indoor Bouldering Facility! 125 Dyess Road|Ridgeland, MS 39157|601-977-9000

So Chic

Triple Threat (Rock)

SATURDAY 7/28

TOWN CREEK ARTS FESTIVAL

ARE A N N U A L

WEDNESDAY 7/25

S E C O N D

C

AN ARTIST OR CRAFTSMAN

?

B E A PA RT O F T H E 2 N D A N N U A L F E S T I VA L !

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2012 THE ART GARDEN AT THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

Denton Hatcher

WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG

MONDAY 7/30

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

(Acoustic)

Karaoke w/ Matt

380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 601-960-1515

TUESDAY 7/31

Open Mic with Jason Bailey

A F T E R S C H OOL P ROGRAM S TUESDAYS @ 3:30 PM !"TINKER WITH TUESDAY

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

$7.98

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef

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FRIDAYS @ 3:30 PM !"FARM BUREAU SPOTLIGHT ""H'-$4%'."*1"'.,7/*'"A$-$*1(-"1%"*+'"F(1/."$%.,-*(0"16"/4($7,:*,('9"*+'"5/%0"7/(''(-"*+/* ".'/:")$*+"$*9"/%."+1)"$531(*/%*"$*"$-"$%"./02*12./0"13'(/*$1%-"$%"1,(":$A'-? "Presented Presented by: Farm Bureau

Thursday : Chicken Diane jacksonfreepress.com

or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or

Chicken & Dumplings 4949 Old Canton Road | 601-956-5108

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A M A LC O T H E AT R E

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ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. July 27Thurs. August 2 2012 The Watch

R

3-D Step Up: Revolution PG13 The Dark Knight Rises PG13 3-D Ice Age Continental Drift PG

3-D The Amazing Spiderman PG13 The Amazing Spiderman (non 3-D) PG13 Katy Perry: Part Of Me (Non 3-D) PG Magic Mike

R

Ice Age Continental Drift(non 3-D) PG

Ted

R

Savages

Madagscar 3 (non 3-D)

R

Brave (non 3-D) PG PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

July 25 - 31, 2012

Movieline: 355-9311

32

DIVERSIONS|film

A Satisfying Finale by Anita Modak-Truran COURTESY WARNER BROTHERS

6A0=3E84F

don (Gary Oldman) fist fights with Bane, but his heroism nearly gets him killed. Bruce visits his convalescing friend in the hospital. Gordon lays it out: “We were in this together, and then you were gone. Now this evil ... rises. The Batman has to come back.” “What if he doesn’t exist anymore?” asks Bruce. It begs the question: Who is Batman? He’s not a superhero. He doesn’t pander Batman’s new nemesis, Bane (Tom Hardy), to patriotic colors. He has no challenges the caped crusader (Christian Bale, right) in special gifts. Rather, Batman’s “The Dark Knight Rises.” an ordinary man with money and rage. His anger places him “The Dark Knight Rises,” the final installment on the flip side of the same coin as the villains in Christopher Nolan’s Gotham trilogy, should he seeks to stop. have been the cherry on top of a summer sunIn short, Batman is the Dirty Harry of dae of blockbusters. Instead, a tragic killing comic book heroes; he is afraid of no one spree during a midnight premiere in Colorado and bows to no man. When suited up and shrouds the movie in pain and grief. Only the masked, Batman’s soft-spoken voice sounds a most loyal fans gathered together with family lot like Clint Eastwood. and friends to attend late-night screenings, and “No guns. No killings,” he says. this review honors those fans, some of whom But unlike Dirty Harry, Batman only uses died or were injured by a murderer preying on his fists—and an occasional vehicle of mass detheir trust for a genial event. structioncreatedbyMr.Fox(MorganFreeman). Not all people in Gotham City believe olan pushes the envelope of chaos and Batman is a lost cause. Officer Blake (Joseph indulges us in the sinister nighttime of Gordon-Levitt), who grew up in the local Gotham City in “The Dark Knight orphanage, maintains his faith in the caped Rises.” The camera moves swiftly, crusader, as does a rich young heiress (Marion swerving the angles, diving deep into the sew- Cotillard) who financially supports Wayne ers, depicting a harsh and brutal cityscape Enterprises during its troubled times. Mr. Fox where crime festers and mayhem unfolds. hasn’t been idle, either: He’s stocked up on an Billionaire Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale), impressive warehouse of armaments knowing however, doesn’t care. Since Rachel Dawes’ that Batman would return. death eight years ago, Bruce has lost his soul to As suspense craftsmanship, “The Dark indifference. The public has smeared his alter Knight Rises” starts slowly, exploring Batman’s ego, Batman, as Harvey Dent’s killer, and the existential crisis, and builds to a spectacular clipublic remains ignorant of the truth—that is, max, which cannot be discussed in any fashion that Batman sacrificed his reputation to avoid for fear of ruining a cinematic experience. It tarnishing Dent’s. would be stupid to deny that “The Dark Knight What’s left for Batman except perhaps Rises,” which was directed by Nolan and codeath? He has no family, no friends, no em- written by Nolan and his younger brother pire, no hope. Yet, there’s Alfred (Michael Jonathan, is a stunningly well-made film that Caine), the ever-loyal servant who has been will turn on an audience. But it does not reach by Bruce’s side since he was a wailing infant. the heights of near perfection of 2008’s “The Alfred believes in Batman, and Caine’s master- Dark Knight,” which combined chaos, bruful performance sparks the movie’s strongest tality and humor with a hearty performance emotional pull. The scenes between Caine from Heath Ledger. Villain Bane lacks the and Bale are unbelievably complex, and at carefree spirit of the Joker. You can only imagtimes, you will be swept into something more ine the Joker asking Bane, “Why so serious?” tantalizing than basic good versus epic evil. The grimness of “The Dark Knight RisAs Bruce hides in the shadows of Wayne es” is essential to its hold on us. Batman comes Manor, a sleek cat burglar (Anne Hathaway) alive in the dark. He works alone, but is not steals his mother’s pearls. Meanwhile, a new afraid to ask for help. masked figure named Bane (Tom Hardy) Bale the actor and his character merge launches an army of evil underlings from the into a seamless performance where actor and sewers, while Bruce ruminates on life and character are one. Anne Hathaway demondeath. “No one cared who I was until I put strates that she possesses the magic “it” factor. on the mask,” Bane says. The mask hides and She lights up the film’s darkest hour. The rest protects and transforms the wearer. of the cast layers the story with rich details When Dent’s legacy crumbles to Bane and nuanced performances. This film is high and his thugs, the Gotham Police Department gothic drama and a most satisfying end to the is ill equipped to respond. Commissioner Gor- arguably best superhero trilogy made.

N


Robert Earl Keen THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 7/25

Restaurant Open As Usual

THURSDAY 7/26 SAJ (Dining Room)

FRIDAY 7/27 Lucky Hand Blues Band (Dining Room) M.O.S.S (Big Room) Raise Your Pints & Top Of The Hops Pre Party (Red Room)

SATURDAY 7/28 JFP ChickBall (Red Room & Big Room) Stiff Necked Fools (TOTH AfterParty) (Patio)

MONDAY 7/30 Central MS Blues Society “Blue Monday“

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25th!"!#$%!&!'$%()!"!*+,-pm !"#$%!&'(!"#$%!)*&!%+,#-)(.(#-/"&%0)(1-2(-3#% (4*/(5()*/6&(.(7,899,:;<,=999(.(*+>%?/*?>,?%!

TUESDAY 7/31 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Restaurant)

Coming Soon FRI 8.3:Molly Ringwalds (Red & Big) SAT 8.4: Wild Life Extravaganza After Pary (Red Room) Blair E. Batson Charity Event (Big Room) WED 8.8: BIG KRIT (Red & Big Room) THU 8.9: Virgil Brawley (Dining Room)

NOW SERVING Soft Shell Crab Po-Boys! MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Wednesday - June 25 NEW KARAOKE SHOW 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - June 26 Open Mic w/ Eric Robinson 7-11 Ladies Night

Friday & Saturday June 27 & 28

Dry County

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

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Sunday - June 29 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

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TICKETS ON SALE 10am SATURDAY

33


DIVERSIONS|arts

Religion Meets Raucous by Sara Sacks

Wednesday, July 25th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, July 26th

BOOKER WALKER

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, July 27th

DAVIS ROGAN

[FROM HBO’S - TREME] (New Orleans Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, July 28th

JAREKUS SINGLETON

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday,July 31st

JESSE ROBINSON

O

DIANA HOWELL

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

n a hot summer day in Fondren, Jackson, this time in Duling Auditorium of religion do not fit into Maxwell’s spirituthe Duling Auditorium is a cool, July 25 through 29. ality, and “Buck Nekkid for Jesus” mirrors shady respite from the heat that raMaxwell grew up on a cotton farm this. “There’s nothing wrong with glory and diates from the pavement outside. two miles outside rural Pickens. “Holmes hallelujah on a mountain top,” Maxwell The stage, ready for that day’s rehearsal, County really is the inspiration for ‘Buck says. “But when the cross meets that reality is empty but for a few chairs and a small Nekkid for Jesus,’” he says. Being from a of life, that’s when it’s most effective. And table. Away from where the yelthat’s what the play ultimately low and blue glow of the stage does. It takes the cross and sticks light might strike her, Denise it down into the mire and muck Halbach introduces herself to a of humanity.” security guard as the director of To reach the core of humanthe play about to be rehearsed. ity as natural sinners, Maxwell has “The play is called … get ready not censored his writing by any for this, get ready …,” she says means. Halbach admits that the to the stoic guard. “ It’s called language and content of the play ‘Buck Nekkid for Jesus!’” are a bit audacious for the com“Buck Nekkid for Jesus” mon conservative Christian attitells the story of a failing gas tude among the South. “It’s gritty; station owner, Billy Boston, it’s a gritty play. But it’s hysterically who lives in the small town of funny,” she says. Moon Mountain, “Missippi.” But along with randy lanBecause of the sins of his past, guage and a deep look at the realBilly struggles to surrender Joanne Robinson Chris Roebuck are in “Buck Nekkid for Jesus” ity of the human condition comes to the love of Jesus. But when at Duling Hall this weekend. redemption. “It doesn’t look at the eccentric faith healer Sister faith and redemption the way the Lurleen Ruda Lee Pearl sees Jeaverage religious drama does,” the sus floating above Billy’s head, she knows small town where everyone knows every- director says. “It’s a little different, but that it’s time to “go to work” on him, and to thing about everyone else, Maxwell was makes it even more effective.” help him lift up his shame to the Lord. deeply inspired by past relationships when “The play is riotous, and raucous and Playwright and native Mississippian John creating the play’s characters. outlandish in a way,” Maxwell says. “And the Maxwell started writing “Buck Nekkid for “We all know these people,” Halbach language is abrupt. But it also has, I think, a Jesus” in the mid ’80s. It hit the stage for the says. “If you were born and raised in Mis- deep spirituality about it once you get through first time at New Stage Theatre in 1996 and sissippi, you grew up with these people, you those bizarre characters and to the bottom of has since shown in Atlanta, Ga., Fort Worth, can put names on these people.” But if you it, that really is right next to my soul.” Texas, Birmingham, Ala., and Meridian. weren’t born and raised here, you’ll get a pretty “Buck Nekkid for Jesus” is at Duling Hall Maxwell has been fiddling with the good idea of what folks down home are like by (622 Duling Ave., 601-362-8440) Thursday, play since its conception. Now, on the watching the play. July 26, through Sunday, July 29. Tickets start at ninth revision, the play will show again in Tightly conservative and legalistic views $20. Call 601-301-2281.

(Blues) 6-10, $5 Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! Wednesday, August 1st

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, August 2nd

RUMPROLLERS

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, August 3rd

CUCHO RHYTHM REVUE (Latin Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, August 4th July 25 - 31, 2012

KING EDWARD

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(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

Rusty and Soothing

O

ne might not expect to see paintings of rusty cars on the walls of a modern women’s fitness facility. But every two months, the art gallery changes, providing the members of the all-women Fitness Lady North in Ridgeland with the chance to observe work from local artists or photographers from the Jackson area. “The art gallery is more of a mental release,” general manager Sissye Gory says. “Art soothes them.” This month’s artist is Paul Buford, who graduated from the Mississippi State University School of Architecture in 2000 and moved to Jackson in 2007. Buford is an architect at Canizaro Cawthon Davis. “Our goal is to minister to every woman’s need, whether it be physical, mental or spiritual,” Sissye Gory says. Gory is a general manager at the all-women Fitness Lady. As a workout facility, Fitness Lady caters to all three of these needs with their workout equipment as well as an art gallery

by Victoria Sherwood

and a chaplain, provided 24/7 for members to talk to or pray with. “We want women VICTORIA SHERWOOD

-Tuesdays Only-

Paul Buford’s watercolors are displayed at Fitness Lady until Aug. 8.

to be well-rounded,” Gory says. “Women are complicated.” Buford was pushed to paint in school but began building his collection of watercolors in recent years. “Watercolor has this pro-

cess of staining paper over and over until you have the right image,” Buford says. “Mixing the paints is a kind of controlled chaos that has always been appealing to me.” Buford’s art is on display at Fitness Lady until Aug. 8, providing the facility with a rustic feel through his images of truck grills and old buildings. “I have always liked cars growing up. I stink at working on them, so I paint them instead,” Buford says. “There is something nostalgic and mysterious about the decaying pieces that I find and work on.” Buford began his paintings of truck grills in order to rejuvenate some inspiration for his architecture. “If I could somehow incorporate (painting) into architecture, that would be cool,” Buford said. Paul Buford’s art will be on display until Aug. 8 at Fitness Lady (331 Sunnybrook Road, Ridgeland, 601-856-0535). Visit fitnesslady.com.


BEST BETS July 25 - Aug. 1, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

FRIDAY 7/27

Alanna Patrick and Betty Uzman of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History’s Paper Archives speak during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Fleet Feet Sports’ Pub Run starts at 6 p.m. at Soulshine Pizza, Township. Run two or four miles, and the first round of beer is free. Free; call 601-898-9696. … See the opera film “Der Rosenkavalier” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. … Hunter Gibson performs at Kathryn’s. … John Mora performs at Papitos from 6-9 p.m. … B Social at Soul Wired Cafe at 7 p.m. … Bill and Temperance perform at Underground 119. … Hunter Gibson is at Kathryn’s.

The BancorpSouth Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame Induction Weekend begins with the induction banquet at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.) at 5:30 p.m. $100; call 601-982-8264. … Jackson Bike Advocates’ Community Bike Ride is at 6 p.m. starting at Rainbow Whole Foods (2807 Old Canton Road). Find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook. … The Detectives present “Where There’s a Will ... There’s a Way” at 6 p.m. at Parker House (104 S.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752. … Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “The Bachelor Prince” at Cool Water Catering & Events (1011 Lake Harbor Drive, Ridgeland) at 7 p.m. BYOB. $40; call 601-668-2214 or 601-331-4045 to RSVP. … The Ballroom Dance Party is at 7:30 p.m. at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.). $10; call 601-213-6355. … Hip-hop artists perform at Summer Jam 2012 at 8 p.m. at Slicks Bar & Grille. Ladies pay $5 admission from 8-9 p.m. $10-$20; call 601-487-8388. … Soul Wired Cafe has music from the Smooth Funk Band.

SATURDAY 7/28

The BancorpSouth Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame Induction Weekend continues at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive) with an inductee meet-and-greet at 9:30 a.m. (museum admission applies), and the Drawdown of Champions at 6:30 p.m. ($50). Call 601-982-8264. … The SWACFest Family Picnic is at noon at Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.). Wear school colors. Free; find SWAC Festival on Facebook. … The Top of the Hops Beer Festival is at 4 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. After-party at Hal & Mal’s. $35, $75 VIP, $15-$25 designated driver; call 800-745-3000. … The eighth annual JFP Chick Ball is at 6 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. The event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this year’s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16. See jfpchickball.com. … The premiere of David Skato Productions’ film “I Am Woman” is at 7 p.m. at Jackson State University’s Dollye M.E. Robinson Building (1100 Dalton St.). Light dinner served. Limited seating. $10; call 601-7900178. … The weekly “Burn the Dance Floor” is at 9 p.m. at Fondren Theater Workshop presents “Buck-Nekkid for Jesus,” a play by John Maxwell (pictured) July 26-29 at Duling Hall.

The Hometown Hero and SUMITT Awards begins at 4 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex. Wear business attire. Free admission, $100 reserved table of eight; RSVP by calling 601-960-2321 or email lfisher@visitjackson.com. … Aaron Coker performs at Burgers & Blues from 5-9 p.m. … The opening reception for Roger Long and Jenny Thomas’ art exhibit is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). Exhibit hangs through Aug. 30. Free; call 601-432-4111. … Fondren Theatre Workshop presents the play “Buck-Nekkid for Jesus” at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall; runs through July 29. For mature audiences. Reserved seating. $20-$30; call 601-301-2281. … Dreamz JXN hosts Throwback Thursday. … Scott Albert Johnson is at Hal & Mal’s.

SUNDAY 7/29

Art House Cinema Downtown at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the films “A Cat in Paris” at 2 p.m. and “Polisse” at 7 p.m. $7 per film; msfilm. org. … The Mississippi Gospel Music Awards is at 5 p.m. at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). $20, $30 reserved; call 601-981-4035; jmaainc.com. … The GenerationNXT Indie Concert Series is at 6 p.m. at Dreamz JXN.

MONDAY 7/30

The Jackson Music Awards is at 6 p.m. at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). $20, $30 reserved; call 601-9814035; jmaainc.com. … WJSU Cool Jazz Mondays is at 6 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel, and includes jazz music and a cash bar. Free; call 601-979-2285. … Flatfoot 56 is at The Carter.

TUESDAY 7/31

Wayne Ammons performs at Kathryn’s at 6:30 p.m. … See Skylar Laine perform during American Idol Live at 7 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. Ticket price includes a $1 donation to the Heart Foundation. $27.50-$57.50; call 800-745-3000.

WEDNESDAY 8/1

Author John Pritchard speaks during “History Is Lunch” at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts B Social at 7 p.m. Free. … See the film “A Birthday Celebration: The Grateful Dead Movie Event” at 7 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601936-5856. … Club Magoo’s has Open-mic Night at 8 p.m. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

The Time to Move Band closes out the eighth annual JFP Chick Ball July 28 at Hal & Mal’s.The fundraiser kicks off at 6 p.m. JERT-RUTHA CRAWFORD

THURSDAY 7/26

Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.). Bring school supplies for needy students. $10, $5 with college ID; call 601-213-6355. … Iron Feathers and a special guest perform at 10 p.m. at Martin’s.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY JJOHN MAXWELL

WEDNESDAY 7/25

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jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS “Buck-Nekkid for Jesus” July 26-29, at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). John Maxwell’s play is a comedy about a faith healer’s extreme attempts to convert a gas station owner. For mature audiences. Shows are July 26-29 at 7:30 p.m. and July 29 at 2 p.m. Reserved seating; space limited. $20-$30; call 601301-2281. Top of the Hops Beer Festival July 28, 4 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The annual event includes more than 150 beer samples, seminars, games and live music. VIP guests receive entry at 3 p.m. with free food and an exclusive beer selection. After-party at Hal & Mal’s. $35, $75 VIP, $15-$25 designated driver; call 800745-3000; topofthehopsbeerfest.com/jackson. Eighth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 28, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this year’s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. Get involved, and donate art, money and gifts at chickball@ jacksonfreepress.com. More details at jfpchickball. com. Follow on Twitter @ jfpchickball. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). $20, $30 reserved; call 601-981-4035; jmaainc.com. • Mississippi Gospel Music Awards July 29, 5 p.m., Harvey Watkins and Stan Jones are the hosts. Recipients receive awards in 28 categories plus a Pastor of the Year award. • Jackson Music Awards July 30, 6 p.m., Rob J and Alice Marie are the hosts. Hip-hop and soul artists receive awards in 32 categories. Parents & Kids Magazine’s Back-To-School Pajama Party. The program for children in grades K-2 includes dancing, singing, stories, food and goody bags. Blankets welcome. The first 100 children receive a surprise fitness gift. Pre-registration required. Free; call 601-366-0901; email abigail@ parents-kids.com. • July 28, 10:30 a.m., at YMCA Flowood (690 Liberty Road, Flowood). • July 30, 6 p.m., at YMCA Downtown Jackson (800 E. River Place). “History Is Lunch” July 25, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Alanna Patrick and Betty Uzman of MDAH’s Paper Archives offer a look inside the Eudora Welty Collection with “Welty at Home.” Bring lunch; coffee and water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998. Pub Run July 25, 6 p.m., at Soulshine Pizza Factory, Township (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Run two or four miles. Register for door prizes before the race at Fleet Feet Sports. Fleet also pays for the first round of beers. Free; call 601898-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

July 25 - 31, 2012

Mayor’s Ward 1 Community Meeting July 25, 6 p.m., at Beth Israel Congregation (5315 Old Canton Road). Share suggestions, address concerns and receive information on services the city provides. The WIN Job Center will have a representative available to discuss job opportunities. Free; call 601-960-1084.

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Hometown Hero and SUMITT Awards July 26, 4 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The theme is “A Taste of Tourism.” The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau hosts the annual program and reception to acknowledge individuals who have contributed to the city. RSVP. Reserved table available ($100). Wear business attire. Free admission, $100 reserved table of eight; call 601-960-2321; email lfisher@visitjackson.com. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting July 26, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These

monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Free; call 601-960-0004. Moth Night: A National Moth Week Celebration July 26, 7 p.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton), in Price Hall. Dr. Bill Stark presents information on the environment and variety of Mississippi’s moths and caterpillars. See a photographic exhibit and a demonstration of light trapping as a technique for catching moths. Free; call 601-926-1104. Mississippi Sales Tax Holiday July 27-28. The holiday from the seven-percent state sales tax applies statewide to all consumer purchases of clothing and footwear with prices of less than $100. Some restrictions apply. Verify if your city has opted out of the holiday. Free; call 601-923-7015. SWACFest Family Picnic July 28, noon, at Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.). The event includes food, entertainment and information for prospective students. Free; find SWAC Festival on Facebook. Seafood Fest 4 July 29, 1 p.m., at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.), on the patio. Enjoy all-youcan-eat seafood and music from DJ Reese. Bring your own chair. The GenerationNXT Indie Concert Series also takes place inside at 6 p.m. $25; call 601-212-3207. Graduation Matters Institute’s English II Exam Workshop July 30-Aug. 2, 9 a.m.-noon, at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). The workshop is for high-school seniors at risk of not graduating because of low English II State Test scores. Limit of 40 students; registration required. Breakfast provided. Free; call 601-948-4725. Hinds Community College Summer Commencement July 27, at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Cain-Cochran Hall. State Rep. John Moore speaks to the academic and career-technical graduates at 10 a.m. Lanell Kellum of the Mississippi Community College Board speaks to the nursing and allied health graduates at 2 p.m. Call 800-HINDS-CC. Host an Exchange Student, at the Pacific Intercultural Exchange. PIE is looking for host families for the 2012/2013 school year. Register by July 27. Free; call 866-360-0598. Platinum Productions 4D Barrel Run July 27-29, at the Kirk Fordice Equine Center (1207 Mississippi St.). Youth compete in barrel races for prizes. Competitors must pay entry fee. Free; call 318-2818976 or 318-680-4159; platinumproduction.webs. com. BancorpSouth Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame Induction Weekend July 27-28, at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The induction banquet is July 27 at 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). July 28, meet the inductees at 9:30 a.m., and the Drawdown of Champions is at 6:30 p.m. The drawdown includes a sports memorabilia auction and a chance to win $5000 $100 banquet, museum admission applies for inductee meetand-greet, $50 drawdown; call 601-982-8264; msfame.com. Community Bike Ride July 27, 6 p.m., at Rainbow Whole Foods Co-operative Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road). Bikers ride to a different destination on the last Friday of each month. Jackson Bike Advocates is the sponsor. Free; facebook.jacksonbikeadvocates. St. Joe Bruin Burn 5K Run/Walk July 28, 7 a.m., at St. Anthony Catholic School (1585 Old Mannsdale Road, Madison). Registration is at 6 a.m., and the run, walk and one-mile fun run start at 7 a.m. Teams of up to five people allowed. $25, $10 fun run, $75 team; call 601-607-7054; active.com. Homebuyer Education Class July 28, 9 a.m., at Jackson Housing Authority (2747 Livingston Road). Topics include personal finances, home inspections and the role of lenders and real estate

BE THE CHANGE Miracle Treat Day July 26, at the Dairy Queen (724 Raymond Road). A portion of proceeds from Blizzard and Miracle Balloon sales benefit Children’s Miracle Network. Visit miracletreatday.com. Free; call 601-373-6262; miracletreatday.com. City of Jackson’s “It’s Cool to Be in School” Project July 28, 9 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Bring school supplies for needy students to the weekly “Burn the Dance Floor” Latin dance party ($10 cover, $5 students with ID), and the person with the largest donation gets a prize. Suggested items include crayons, washable markers, colored pencils, sanitizer, glue, manila paper and wide-ruled paper. Donations welcome; call 601-213-6355. 5000 Pencil Drive, at University of Phoenix, Jackson Campus (Stone Creek Blvd., Flowood). Donate pencils for Mississippi Children’s Home Services by Aug. 1. The goal is 5000 pencils. Free; call 601664-9505. agents. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Free; call 601-362-0885, ext. 115. International Tiger Day July 28, at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Learn fun facts about tigers, talk to keeper staff and enjoy craft projects. $10, $9 seniors, $6.75 children ages 2-12, members/babies free; call 601-352-2580. Outreach Expo 2012 Aug. 1, 10 a.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Learn about benefits that people on fixed incomes can receives such as free state IDs, senior citizen services and making homes more energy efficient. Free; call 601-982-8467.

WELLNESS Sinusitis: Facts and Fiction, July 26, noon, at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). Dr. Jay Young clears up misconceptions on the illness. Lunch and door prizes included. RSVP. Free; call 877-907-7642.

STAGE AND SCREEN Der Rosenkavalier July 25, 6:30 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The film of Strauss’ three-act comic opera stars Kristinn Sigmundsson and Thomas Allen. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. “Where There’s a Will ... There’s a Way” Dinner Theater July 27, 6 p.m., at Parker House (104 S.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the comedy about a family’s squabble over a deceased relative’s estate. RSVP. Tax and tip not included. $49; call 601-937-1752. “The Bachelor Prince” Dinner Theater July 27, 7 p.m., at Cool Water Catering & Events (1011 Lake Harbor Drive, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the medieval “whodunnit” about a prince’s reluctant search for a bride. Seating at 6:30 p.m. RSVP. BYOB. $40; call 601-668-2214 or 601-331-4045. “I Am Woman” Red Carpet Premiere July 28, 7 p.m., at Jackson State University’s Dollye M.E. Robinson Building (1100 Dalton St.). David Skato Productions’ film about abuse and neglect stars locals such as Elisha Roberts, Larry Johnson and Keeshea Harris-Pratt. Light dinner served. Limited seating. $10; call 601-790-0178. Art House Cinema Downtown July 29, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include “A Cat in Paris” at 2 p.m. and “Polisse” at 7 p.m. $7; msfilm.org.

MUSIC Summer Jam 2012 July 27, 8 p.m., at Slicks Bar & Grille (6340 Ridgewood Court Drive). DJ Jonasty and Durdy Costello host the hip-hop artist showcase. Ladies pay $5 admission from 8-9 p.m. $10$20; call 601-487-8388. WJSU Cool Jazz Mondays July 30, 6 p.m., at King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.). Enjoy live jazz

music and a cash bar. Free; call 601-979-2285. American Idol Live July 31, 7 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The top 10 2012 finalists perform, including Skylar Laine of Brandon. Ticket price includes a $1 donation to the Heart Foundation. $27.50-$57.50; call 800-745-3000.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS “Where’s Waldo” Event Finale Storytime July 28, 11 a.m., at LemuriaBooks.com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). Enjoy a reading of Bethanie Deeney Murgvia’s “Zoe Gets Ready” and Sujean Rim’s “Birdie’s Big-Girl Dress,” and a fashion show featuring children’s clothing store Pop Fizz. The program includes a grand prize drawing. Free; call 601-366-7619.

CREATIVE CLASSES Weekend Figure Drawing Workshop July 28-29, at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119—Fine Art & Framing (119 S. President St.). Jerrod Partridge teaches the class July 28 from 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m., and July 29 from 1-4 p.m. $140; call 601-668-5408. Ballroom Dance Party July 27, 7:30 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). The party features John Malone’s Second Floor Ballroom Studio from Madison. Bring a wine-andcheese pairing to share. $10; call 601-213-6355; salsams.com. Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Call 601-898-8345. • Teens Cupcake Workshop July 27, 9 a.m. Topics include making chocolate ganache and butter cream icing, working with marzipan and decorating with fondant. For ages 12-15. $69. • Celebration Brunch Class July 29, noon, Topics include making custard, cooking eggs, working with puff pastry, and making and glazing a fresh fruit tart. $59. • Lunch and Learn Ridgeland July 31, noon, in the Demo Theater. Instructors share cooking tips, showcase products and provide food samples. $15. Adult Acrylic Painting Class, at Daniel MacGregor Studios (4347 Lakeland Drive, Flowood). Daniel MacGregor teaches the class on Thursdays from 7-9 p.m. Bring your own 11-by-14-inch canvas for a $5 discount. $15; call 601-992-6405.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS “Add Art ... To Table, Walls and More” Artist Reception July 26, 5 p.m., at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See Roger Long’s portraits and Jenny Thomas’ glass work; hangs through Aug. 30. Free; call 601-432-4111. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


8th Annual

JFP Chick Ball July 28, 2012 | 6:00 pm Cover $5 | 18+ Hal & Mal’s Red Room Chick Ball Schedule Emcee: Tambra Cherie (97.7 FM On-Air Personality) 6 p.m.: Silent auction opens/welcome 6:05-6:25 p.m. Opposite Day 6:25: Spoken word (TBA) 6:35-7 p.m. : Emma Wynters 7:05: Spoken Word (TBA) 7:10-7:45: Pam Confer and Jazz Beautiful 8 p.m.: Live Auction of Men of Character

8:20-8:30: Best Dressed Awards, Presentation of Chicks We Love 8:30-8:40: Chick Ball Hero Award 8:40: Tango Demonstration 8:45-9:20: Melody Moody & Valley Gordon 9:30-10 p.m.: Laurel Isbister and Lazy Jane 10 p.m. Silent Auction Ends 10:30 p.m.: Silent Auction pickup/payment 10:10: Time to Move (closes out)

8 p.m.: Live Auction of Men of Character

Terry Cooper (Owner, Absolute Fitness): 8 personal training sessions; Mitchell Early (Sommelier, BRAVO!): wine and cheese pairing; Jesse Houston (Executive Chef, Parlor Market): private dinner for six; Israel Martinez (Owner, LingoFest): 10.5 hours of Spanish lessons; Terry Sullivan (Owner, liveRIGHTnow): package includes yoga, training, tabata; Nick Wallace (Chef, King Edward Hotel): Dinner prep for 10 in your home; Sujan Ghimire (Dance Instructor,Salsa Mississippi): 4 hour-long private dance classes; Auctioneer: Dee Denton

Sponsorships still available: Imperial Highness $5,000 • Diva $2,500 • Goddess $1,000 Queen $500 • Princess $250 • Chick $50 To donate arts, gifts, money or volunteer 601-362-6121 ext 16 | chickball@jacksonfreepress.com For more information jfpchickball.com follow us on twitter @jfpchickball

jacksonfreepress.com

Some of our sponsors include : Natalie Maynor, Kira Cummings, Nola Gibson, Dorothy Triplett, Larue Owen, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inmotion Consulting and Coaching - Deirdre Danahar, Kimberly Hilliard, Diana Jackson, Planned Parenthood Various, Davetta Lee, Dorsey Carson Mid-South Graduate Chapter of Swing Phi Swing Social Fellowship - Yolanda Walker, Adelia Bush, Russell and Nancy Morrison, Noel Didla, Karla and Nathan Elmore, June Hardwick, The Second Floor - John Malone, Wade Overstreet, James Anderson, Hal & Mal’s For a more detailed list, visit jfpchickball.com

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DIVERSIONS|jfp sports

Bryan’s Rant

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his Saturday, the Jackson Free Press will sponsor the 8th annual Chick Ball in its ongoing effort to stop domestic violence and sexual abuse. With the many important women in my life, I believe Chick Ball is a very important event, and that brings me to my rant this week. Last week, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant turned himself in to police after his mother made allegations of domestic abuse against him. Bryant is no stranger to making headlines off the field with financial troubles and minor incidences off the field. His mother accused the wide receiver of “grabbing her by the shirt and hair, hitting her in the face with his cap, striking her repeatedly in the hands and wrists, and pushing her in the chest,” reported ESPN, after the two engaged in an argument. Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo came out in support of Bryant later in the week. “Stuff happens, and we all wish that certain things wouldn’t, and I know that he’s going to try to make sure in the future those things don’t happen again,” Romo said. “But friends and your teammates don’t leave you during those moments. They come back, and they tell you that we’re here for you. Our football team is a close-knit team, and these moments should show that.” There is nothing wrong with Romo

saying he supports his teammate, but Romo should try to get Bryant help. The wide receiver will be 24 after the season, and his mother is 37. Bryant’s mother was only 13 at the time she gave birth to Dez, and I am sure that made growing up hard on both mother and son. I am not trying to pile on Bryant; I know his history. He has the ability to use his skills on the football field to help his family, but he can’t do that if he derails his career with bad off-thefield behavior. Romo, as the quarterback of this team, should take Bryant under his wing and urge his teammate to get counseling for striking his mother. Privately, Romo may be telling Bryant this. But publicly, Romo, the Cowboys and the NFL should come out against domestic abuse. To date, they haven’t. I also want to applaud athletes like Eli Manning for being part of the White Housesponsored “1 is 2 Many” public-service announcement in its effort to curb violence against women. Chick Ball is a wonderful event for a very important cause that affects us all. Earlier this month, I learned that my wife and I are having a daughter. That means I will have another important woman in my life, and I would love to see her grow up in a world where she is protected from abuse.

by Bryan Flynn

Football is coming and it is coming fast. But first: Xxxx the Olympics. THURSDAY, JULY 26 Football (7-8 p.m. ESPN 2): ESPN gets you ready for the start of college football by counting down the top 25 plays of the 2011 college football season. FRIDAY, JULY 27 Olympics (6:30-11 p.m. NBC): 2012 London Olympics begins with the Opening Ceremony at London’s Olympic Stadium.

July 25 - 31, 2012

SATURDAY, JULY 28 Olympics (7-11 p.m. NBC): Olympic coverage begins with swimming, track, men’s gymnastics and beach volleyball. Also, find Olympic coverage on NBCSN from 3 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on MSNBC from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.

38

SUNDAY, JULY 29 Olympics (3 a.m.-6 p.m. NBCSN): The U.S. Men’s Basketball team faces France, plus see women’s field hockey, beach volleyball and badminton. Olympic coverage also airs on MSNBC and NBC.

MONDAY, JULY 30 Olympics (3 a.m.-7 p.m.): The U.S. Women’s Basketball team takes the floor against Angola. Plus, see volleyball, equestrian sports and badminton showcased as well. TUESDAY, JULY 31 Olympics (7-11 p.m.): Women’s Gymnastics enters the team medal stage. Also on the schedule, see swimming and more showcased in primetime. WEDNESDAY, AUG. 1 Olympics (7-11 p.m.): The Men’s Gymnastics overall champion will be crowned tonight, with even more swimming and beach volleyball on tap. Sports overload the next two weeks with wall-to-wall coverage on NBC Sports Network, MSNBC, NBC and more. If that is not enough, football returns on August 5 with the Hall of Fame Game, and NFL training camps open this week starting with the Arizona Cardinals on Monday. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


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39


LIFE&STYLE|dining

Calling All Hopheads by Marika Cackett

July 25 - 31, 2012

40

style Abby Ales and other previously unavailable craft beers alongside longtime favorites from breweries such as Abita, Lazy Magnolia, GARY HAYGOOD

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bita Andygator. Tallgrass Velvet Rooster. Spaten Optimator. Westmalle Tripel. Until July 1 of this year, these beers and many other high-gravity varieties were illegal to sell in the state. Mississippi was the only state in the country that limited alcohol by weight (ABW) for beer to 5 percent—a limit that excluded approximately one-third of the world’s beer styles. With this new law in effect, Mississippians will be formally introduced to a wider variety and new styles of beer including the Belgium-style Abbey Ale. Beer aficionados and novices alike will have the opportunity to sample more than 150 craft beers at the third annual Abita Beer-sponsored Top of the Hops Beer Festival on July 28. The Top of the Hops Festival, which the Jackson Free Press is co-sponsoring, looks to showcase the ever-growing popularity of craft beers from around the world. The concept is simple: For the price of a ticket, beer fans can sample craft beers in a commemorative sampling mug. The 2-ounce pour gives the consumer just over a sip, much like at a wine tasting. Thanks to the efforts of the grassroots organization Raise Your Pints, this year’s Top of the Hops Beer Fest will feature Belgium-

Top of the Hops 2012 is July 28 at the Jackson Convention Complex downtown.

Bayou Teche, Rogue and others. “Raise Your Pints is extremely excited about this brew fest,” President of the organization Butch Bailey says. “It’s the first chance many Mississippians are going to have to taste a lot of these gourmet beers that we’ve just spent the past few years telling everyone about.” Higher-gravity brews aren’t the only new attraction at this year’s festival; for the first time a cask beer garden will be open for all ticket

holders. Filled with “firkins” or mini-kegs, the Back 40 Cask Beer Garden will feature specialty, limited-edition beers from brewers such as Back 40, Lazy Magnolia and Diamond Bear. Abita Brewery has developed two special casks especially for this event. While the cask beer garden is open to all ticketholders, those lucky enough to score the sold-out VIP tickets will gain entrance to the event an hour early and have access to the VIP area. This year’s VIP area will host special beer-tasting selections and food from Underground 119 and Parlor Market that is not available to the general admission ticket holders. While you can’t bring food to the event, concessions will be available. You can, however, bring the ever-popular pretzel necklace, which is a bunch of pretzels strung together. They help cleanse your palate between tastings and give you something to nibble on. In addition to sampling craft beers, the festival features the Samuel Adams Brewery University Education Area. This is an opportunity for patrons to attend seminars on topics such as home brewing, a beer pairing class

with Chef Tom Ramsey of Underground 119, and a dialogue with Raise Your Pints and other lobbyists behind the passage of the beer law. Crooked Letter Brewery from the Mississippi Gulf Coast will host a discussion about the basics of starting a new brewery. Live music by Otis Lotus and games like corn-hole and ping-pong will round out the event. This four-hour event provides a nice benefit to the local economy as well. Last year the festival brought in about $150,000 in estimated economic impact. With the new additions to the festival, this year could easily surpass last year’s figures. The Top of the Hops festival caps off the 2012 Mississippi Craft Beer Week, which features events all around the metro area in support of the new beer laws and in celebration of Mississippi’s burgeoning craft beer culture. Be sure to join the after-party at Hal & Mal’s and drop into the JFP Chick Ball to support funding for a new rape crisis center. The King Edward Hotel is offering special rates for ticketholders to encourage an overnight stay downtown. Tickets for the event on July 28 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex are $35 in advance through Ticketmaster. A listing of Mississippi Craft Beer events can be found at raiseyourpints.com/mcbw.


5A44 FX5X Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine Friday, July 27, 2012 • 8pm • $5 Cover

Acoustic Crossroads

Saturday, July 28, 2012

The Church Keys Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

NEW MENU Happy Hour

Wed - Fri • 4 - 6pm July 27 • The Red Hots

Voted Best Veggie Burger -Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA

8:00pm | $5.00 Cover D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

xxxxxgenre • 7:00pm

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

Splendid Chaos Friday, July 27 and Saturday, July 28

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music july 25 - 31

wed | july 25 Jessie “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | july 26 Aaron Coker 5:30-9:30p fri | july 27 Shaun, Kenny & Richard 6:30-10:30p sat | july 28 Jason Turner 6:30-10:30p

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Fri) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

mon | july 30 Karaoke tue | july 31 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

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sun | july 29 Richard Lee Davis 4:00 - 8:00p

41


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A Southern Walima one. But Abdullah said not to worry, that Jillian would leaned in conspiratorially and said, “I thought we were be welcome, and there would be no problems with supposed to take our shoes off.” It turns out that you do offending anyone. take off your shoes when you enter the Prayer Hall porThe mosque is located in tion of the mosque, but not a quiet street off the Cotton necessarily elsewhere. District in Starkville with little The ceremony began to distinguish it from the other with little fanfare. Suddenly houses around it. It looks like a the table at the front of the duplex, symmetrical down the room was occupied, and we center with doors on either side. were called to order. Sitting We followed an elderly black at the table, from left to woman in through the right-hand right was Abdullah’s father, door and down a set of steep stairs Abdullah, the man who leading to what turned out to be conducted the service, the a walk-out basement. We could bride’s father and the bride. hear a good deal of noise coming Abdullah and his father were from below. We passed the elderly wearing white cassock-lookwoman making her painful way ing robes, the officiate was down the stairs one step at a time, wearing slacks and a buttonand I asked if she wanted an arm down blue shirt open at the to lean on. To my surprise, she said collar, and the bride’s father that would be a great help. was wearing a different sort As we made our slow way of cassock and also a turban. down the stairs, I heard my The bride, Janna Aziz, was Abdullah Dakhlalla and Janna Aziz had a daughter walk into the room and beautifully adorned in white traditional Muslim wedding in Starkville. say “Hi” in a loud voice with the from head to toe with only high pitch and long “i” so many her face and hands showing. woman raised in the South have. Just as we reached the bot- Not a traditional western dress but one with a Mideast tom landing, a young girl stuck her head out the door. flair, cinched at the waist so there was some form to her “You do know you are coming in the wrong door don’t figure. Her smile, which she could not contain, shown you? This one is for girls,” she said. as white as her dress. After hastily beating a retreat back up the stairs The ceremony was brief. The officiant gave a brief and down a set of identical stairs on the other side of monologue on marriage, and then there was an exthe house, I walked into a room full of men. The entire change of statements, first in English and then in Arabasement was one room with a curtain that divided the bic, between Abdullah and the bride’s father. Then it room unevenly with about two-thirds of the room on was over. this side of the curtain and the other third on the other The bride and groom stood up and shook hands side, which I assumed, held the women. (yep, shook hands), and then Abdullah kissed her on the Jillian texted, “Where r u?”; “other side of curtain” I re- forehead. She headed to the women’s side of the room, and that was the last I saw of her. We lined up to hug and congratulate Abdullah and then went outside for a meal of lamb and rice and some curry dish that was to die for along with mint tea. Jillian again texted “where r u?”; “in the backyard eating dinner where r u”; “in the mosque eating dinner can I come out?”; “sorry, no other women here, just men.” Eventually, it was time to leave. Abdullah told me that he too had to leave soon to join his study group as he had a huge statistics test the next morning. I just looked at him, and he said, “Yeah, I know, poor planning.” Abdullah’s father had insisted that I take some leftover food with me, and I caught up with Jillian at the front of the house. As we walked back to her apartment, I considered Abdullah’s wedding, comparing it with a Islam Aziz (right) presents his daughter to be wed. modern American wedding, which can be more like a coronation than a wedding, and the contrast was striking. plied. The room had a number of rows of chairs and at the Abdullah’s simple words surrounded by friends and famfront was a table gaily decorated with what looked like red- ily and his pledge to the bride’s father to take care of her checkered tablecloth. resonated with me. I liked the unpretentiousness of the My professor friend joined me, and with my heart ceremony (Abdullah told me that the reason he and his in my throat, I realized he didn’t have his shoes on. “Oh father wore the robes was because they didn’t want to pay my God,” I thought. “I have unknowingly offended my the money to rent tuxedos). My heart was full. friends for the second time tonight.” But then I noticed Watching two young people launch their lives tothat everyone else had his or her shoes on. I pointed at gether is a special gift from them, and it just didn’t seem his stocking-covered feet and raised an eyebrow, and he to matter whether they were Christian or Muslim.

A

s I entered the basement of the mosque, the other guests, obviously primed for the appearance of a Christian, closed in and welcomed me like I was some sort of superstar. They led me to the front of the room and would have had me sit in the front row, but I thought that was a little much and managed to beg off and grab the second row. The email had come without warning: “I know that this late notice, but I wanted to invite you to my wedding next Sunday at 6:30 p.m.” Out of the blue for sure. I didn’t know the young man all that well, and the wedding was only a little more than a week away on a Sunday evening. But then I remembered that Abdullah Dakhlalla was a Muslim, and Saturday was their holy day. Abdullah had worked in my office this past summer, not directly for me, but in one of the other sections. He came to my notice as he was just about the first Mississippi State University engineering student that we’ve had who didn’t drive a truck or wear a cap so low on his head that you can’t see his eyes. He had an open countenance, curly black hair that sort of stuck out in all directions, an easy smile, and he made a mean batch of baklava. After he went back to MSU, he contacted me a few times about writing some proposals for his graduate work, and I helped him. He lived in the same neighborhood as my daughter in Starkville, and they saw each other once in a while, so he would occasionally send home a batch of baklava with her. I called my daughter, Jillian, and asked her to go with me, and she was quite excited. We were both a little nervous about attending the wedding as we were not sure of the customs and did not wish to offend any-

jacksonfreepress.com

Abdullah Dakhlalla and Janna Aziz wed April 1.

TARA BURKIETT

TARA BURKIETT

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by R.H. Coupe

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All Dressed Up—With a Plan by Meredith W. Sullivan

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ave you ever found yourself all dressed up with no place to go? Well, that is not the case for you this weekend. Saturday night, find your way to Hal & Mal’s for the JFP Chick Ball. This annual event is one of the best parties in town with great food, a silent auction, local music and even a man auction (ahem, a “men of character” auction!), and it raises money for the Center for Violence Prevention. So get dressed up because you have plans!

White snake clutch, Incense

Salon and Boutique, $29.50

Tractr Skinny Jeans in Tropical Punch, Red

Square Clothing Co., $78

Vintage polka dot blouse, The Green

Bond No. 9 The Scent of Peace,

Room, $15

Maison Weiss, $175 (50 mL)

OPI “Metallic4Life” nail polish, Incense Salon and

Boutique, $7.99 fresh SUGAR in Coral lip balm, Maison

Weiss, $22.50

BCBGeneration black tribal wedges, High

Cotton, $116 Ivory Collar necklace,

July 25 - 31, 2012

Incense Salon and Boutique, $29.50

46

Where2Shop: Beaded teardrop earrings,

High Cotton, $60

The Green Room, 3026 N. State St., 601-981-9320; High Cotton, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 188, 601-982-3280; Incense Salon & Boutique, 2475 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-933-0074; Maison Weiss, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 109, 601.981.4621; Red Square Clothing Co., 1000 Highland Colony

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v10n46 - Chick Issue 2012