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July 11 - 17, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 44

contents TRIP BURNS

COURTESY JIM LANDER

8 Cost of Care Hospitals weigh in on the repercussions of declining to expand Medicaid. COURTESY INDIGENOUS

Cover photograph of Justin Schultz’s public art by Allie Jordan

31

THIS ISSUE: Artistry & Sport

Winning the regional competition allowed Gilbert not only to compete in New York, but to explore the Big Apple as well. He toured Manhattan, ate lunch at The Julliard School and took acting workshops at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. “Since it was Shakespeare’s birthday while we were there, we also handed out Shakespeare books at Central Park,” he said. Gilbert says he received true gems from his School of the Arts instructors. Dr. Robert Brooks, theater instructor and Gilbert’s coach for the competition, helped him to dissect the early modern English language. “He really exposed me to a new side of acting and taught me to treat each word like a juicy piece of meat,” Gilbert said. Tammy Stanford-Williams, director of dance and movement specialist for theater and voice, taught Gilbert the importance of motion and how to take movement to texts. “She taught me how to understand my own body movements and then the character’s,” he said. Gilbert anticipates putting the lessons to good use as he embarks on a new journey: college student. The aspiring actor plans to pursue acting at DePaul University in Chicago. But this summer, Gilbert will kick back, spend time with his family and listen to his favorite music—ranging from hip-hop to alternative rock—and master his PlayStation 3. “It feels good to have accomplished one of my goals already,” Gilbert said. — Christianna Jackson

34 Taking Over Storage 24 is winning awards all over Jackson and the South, with no plans to slow down. COURTESY NORTHWEST CHERRIES

This April, a self-assured Jalen Gilbert left New York City as one of 10 finalists at the 29th annual English-Speaking Union National Shakespeare Competition out of 60 competitors from across the country. He enthralled judges with a Shylock monologue from “The Merchant of Venice” and Sonnet 121. “Since my junior year, I knew I wanted to compete, and to make it to New York was definitely a goal,” he said. It was Gilbert’s first year competing and making to the top 10 in New York was quite an achievement. Gilbert, 18, graduated from the Mississippi School of the Arts in Brookhaven in May. He moved with his family to Jackson from Florida when he was in the third grade, and he attended Murrah High School during his freshman and sophomore years where he ran track and cross-country. One of three siblings, Gilbert dreamed of being an actor. “I always wanted to be the next Denzel,” he said. When he was in the fifth grade, he won a place in the Academic and Performing Arts Complex at Murrah with a monologue from the movie “Remember the Titans.” He earned a place at the Brookhaven school in 10th grade by auditioning with a piece from “A Soldier’s Play.” The ESU National Shakespeare Competition aims to assist students to develop analytical skills and a greater appreciation for literature through Shakespeare. Students first compete at their schools, then at the local branch and finally in New York City.

41 Summer Sweets Walker’s Drive-In is participating in national Rainier Cherry Day with a new cherry dessert.

jacksonfreepress.com

jalen gilbert

The annual Choctaw Indian Fair has an abundance of color, pageantry and athleticism. COURTESY STORAGE 24

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 .................... Sorensen 6 ............................ Talk 10 ........................ Tech 12 ................... Editorial 12 ................... My Turn 13 ................. Opinion 14 ............ Cover Story 30 .............. Diversions 32 .................... 8 Days 33 ........................ Film 34 ...................... Music 35 ....... Music Listings 36 ............. JFP Events 39 ........... Life & Style 40 ..................... Sports 41 ....................... Food 45 ................ Astrology 45 .................... Puzzles 46 ......... Fly Shopping

3


editor’snote

Kristin Brenemen Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dystopianism. Rufflebutts unite! Fairy Kei fever has struck this designer in the heart. She designed many pages in this issue.

Piko Ewoodzie Editorial intern Piko Ewoodzie is an out-of-towner from a bunch of different places (New York, Wisconsin, Ohio, Ghana, West Africa) who is thoroughly enjoying his time in Jackson. He wrote for GOOD.

Allie Jordan Editorial intern Allie Jordan is a senior at Millsaps College who loves Wilco, photography and Mexico. She denies her brick city hometown and strictly identifies herself as a Jacksonian. She photographed for GOOD.

Deirdre Danahar Deirdre Danahar helps busy professionals go from chaos to calm, so they can live extraordinary lives. She owns InMotion Consulting and Coaching, LLC. Reach her at deirdre@ inmotioncc.com or at inmotioncc. com. She wrote for GOOD.

Casey Purvis Casey Purvis is a Fondrenite who loves planting flowers and watching birds in her backyard. She is owned by Phoebe, a 9year-old Lhasa apso. She works as a nurse in her spare time. She wrote for GOOD.

Christianna Jackson Editorial intern Christianna Jackson is a Jackson native. She loves finding new ways to utilize her English degree. She’s an active mom and a fashion blog addict. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Latasha Willis Events editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a freelance designer, and the mother of one cat. She shamelessly promotes her design skills at latashawillis. com.

July 11 - 17, 2012

Dylan Irby

4

Editorial intern Dylan Irby is a college student from Colorado who occasionally stays in Jackson with his father. He aspires to be a game developer someday. He wrote a theater piece.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Signs of Creative Life

R

ecently, Todd and I happened to be driving throughout downtown Jackson on a Saturday afternoon. Suddenly, we drove by one of the new art boxes. “Oooh,” I squealed. “Pull over!” He whipped the Insight to the curb, and I started snapping Instagram photos in all sorts of fun angles. We then drove around looking for more colorful boxes. Suddenly, I’d see one. “There!” I instructed, and he slid over to the curb. I hopped out and took another photo. This little impromptu artist date probably didn’t last half an hour, but it was delightful. It was like a creative treasure hunt in the heart of the city we’ve grown to know and love so much over the last decade. The exercise fit the exact definition of being in creative flow: We were driven by a goal (to find as many boxes as possible); we were fully present; and we really enjoyed what we were doing. We both realized the creative-class coup the mayor and the Greater Jackson Arts Council had pulled off with these boxes. As fun as the catfish were a few years back, turning something necessary and dull into exciting pieces of art is so much cooler. Engaged people will notice. It will help draw more people here to invest their time and resources into our future. In a creativeclass world (to borrow a good idea from Carnegie Mellon professor Richard Florida), little things can actually matter a whole lot more than big, expensive concepts. Colorful art boxes peppering downtown sends a clear message that Jackson has decided to invest in its own creativity and wants to involve our artists in the process. This will help us create the sense of place that today’s young(-at-heart) creatives and professionals want around them. It is very 21st century to DIY, to make something out of nothing. As the JFP approaches our 10th birthday in Jackson, we’re going to be talking a lot about how far the city has come in a decade and how far we still have to go. Certainly, there is amazing progress, and the city as a whole (thanks in no small part to the late Frank Melton’s disastrous term as mayor) seems to have matured past our previous obsession with crime into a city with a greater awareness that if we want it, we all have to build it, not wait for some hero to come along and do it for us. And those of us living and working amid Jackson’s renaissance know at least anecdotally that what we’re all doing here, and the city’s creative maturation, is showing signs of working. We all know many young people who crave living in Jackson now; a decade ago, it was the exact opposite. And how many do you know who left and can’t wait to move back? Governing magazine last week reported news that, if it sustains, could be very good for our city. After years of population loss (averaging about 1,100 people a year), the city may have grown by more than 2,000 people

in 2011. If this is true, it wouldn’t really be a surprise. Across the United States, a suburban backlash is occurring with a reverse migration back into cities. People aren’t enjoying commuting as much these days, and big-box outlets are losing their appeal for creative people (and creativity is a buzz word these days). As for people under 30, and increasingly 40 or so, they want to live in dense communities where they can walk and bike to work and to friends’ houses. They want sidewalks. They want to be near fun, locally owned businesses. When we started the paper in 2002, Todd wrote the first cover story, “Creative Class Rising.” In it, he reported that Richard Florida’s research showed Jackson’s immense creative-class potential and even ranked us higher than Memphis or New Orleans on his scale. The city hasn’t been immune to the recession, and we still have challenges, but there is so much more of a cohesive creative spirit than existed 10 years ago. We encourage the city’s leaders, residents, business owners and developers to feed this innovative funnel as much as possible. We’ve always said that Jackson has a tendency to count on heroes and big, expensive projects to save us some day rather than digging in and making it happen here and now. A lot of the empty spaces downtown, with exorbitant rents attached, have long been a testimony to this problem. Somehow, the people who can make even more creativity happen don’t always put aside their collective egos long enough to sit around a table and figure out how to, say, fill empty storefronts downtown with colorful art displays or information on local groups and events. Or to turn empty retail space into an arts and

crafts vendor collective as we see when we visit Austin, Texas, or Asheville, N.C. No doubt, Jackson has come a long way, but we still have some hurdles. Too often, we see people not supporting a great idea because it comes from a particular public official or developer or political nemesis. And as we get closer to election season, this problem is always amplified. We need to choose a better way to work together to remake our city. Just as spouting empty crime rhetoric is no way to run for office, neither is refusing to get on board with great ideas because someone around the table might put it on a campaign brochure one day. Jackson, there is no savior who is going to come in and make it all better for us. If we want to reduce crime, we all have to figure out ways to help do it. (see jfp.ms/crime for lots of ideas in a package that won us a national award recently). If we want a creative-class city that attracts and keeps our brightest young people here, so they can in turn take their turn at the wheel, we have to dig deep and search wide for ideas that don’t require a TIF or GO-Zone funds to make happen. And the last thing we have to do is ask permission to make exciting things happen; we didn’t get the mayor, any mayor, or city council “on board” to do this paper. We pooled our meager resources; got people excited; encouraged creativity, and here we are still growing and raising hell 10 years later. Put another way, Jacksonians need to believe we can be great, and then look for ways to make greatness happen. That kind of creative spirit can move mountains,not to mention build great cities.


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July 14, 2012

5


news, culture & irreverence

Wednesday, July 4 Scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Switzerland report preliminary studies that may prove the existence of the Higgs boson, also known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;God particle.â&#x20AC;?

Friday, July 6 George Zimmerman is released from an Orlando, Fla., jail on $1M bond. Out on bond for the second time, Zimmerman awaits his second-degree murder trial for fatally shooting Trayvon Martin earlier this year. Saturday, July 7 Dr. Mary Currier of the Mississippi Health Department approves five projects including $7 million for Magee General Hospital to buy interest in the ownership of a medical office building. Sunday, July 8 A plane breaks apart in the air near Tupelo, killing Caroline Bartley, a 20year-old Ole Miss student, her parents and one other passenger. ... Roger Federer wins his seventh Wimbledon Championship, tying tennis legend Pete Sampras for most Wimbledon wins all-time.

July 11 - 17, 2012

Monday, July 9 Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th signs on with the city of Pearl to build a 325,000square-foot Outlets at Bloomfield, which would be the largest outlet shopping mall in the state.

6

Tuesday, July 10 Jackson City Council members elect Tony Yarber, Ward 6, as its new council president and Charles Tillman, Ward 5, the new vice president. ... Egyptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Higher Constitutional Court halts newly elected President Mohamed Morsyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to call the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parliament back into session. The court confirmed its ruling to dissolve the parliament. Get daily news at jfpdaily.com.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates purchased 18 sheets of Leonardo Da Vinciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7,000 inspirational notebook pagesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Codex Leicesterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for $30.8 million in 1994. You can flip through the notebook with Turning the Pages 2.0 software.

Council Targeting Paraphernalia by Jacob Fuller

Y

ouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve likely noticed display cases in some convenience stores around the city stocked with glass and metal pipes, digital scales and â&#x20AC;&#x153;cocaine spoons.â&#x20AC;? Some members of the Jackson City Council are now trying to get those items out of city stores. The city Planning Committee, chaired by Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber, passed an amendment to the city ordinance on drug paraphernalia July 9 to impose the same penalty on store owners who sell such items, deemed â&#x20AC;&#x153;drug paraphernaliaâ&#x20AC;? under section 41-29-105 of the Mississippi Code, as those imposed on anyone charged with possession of paraphernalia. Under state law, the penalty is a fine of up to $500 and up to 90 days in jail, Deputy City Attorney James Anderson said. The Council does not have the authority to add to or change that penalty. State law sets a wide definition of drug paraphernalia. It defines it as â&#x20AC;&#x153;all equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use, or designed for use, in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of theâ&#x20AC;? law.

The current Jackson ordinance only imposes the penalty on individuals found with paraphernalia in their possession, not on store owners who sell it. If the new ordinance JACOB FULLER

Thursday, July 5 Jackson Fire Department officials say they are looking into local rapper Hollywood Luckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music video, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pole in my Pants,â&#x20AC;? that is circulating on YouTube and appears to feature a Jackson Fire Department truck and someone wearing JFD gear. ... Officials from Franceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bureau of Investigation and Analysis report a series of pilot errors led to the crash of Air France Flight 447, which plunged into the Atlantic Ocean June 1, killing 228 people.

Christopher Brown wants a half million from Jackson for the Capital City Classic. p9

The City Council will soon vote on an ordinance to impose state paraphernalia penalties on store owners who sell glass pipes, such as these.

passes at the next regular council meeting, those owners will be subject to the fines and sentences as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Typically, in the history of this country, is that any law that has been created, especially

as it relates to drugsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the selling of drugs, the usage of drugsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has never dealt with the folks who are higher on the totem poll,â&#x20AC;? Yarber said after the meeting in City Hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has never dealt with the folks who fly the planes. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deal with the people who organize it. It deals with the man who uses the drugs. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not putting a dent in crime and in drugs when you put a crackhead in jail. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not helping nothing. So if you want to put a dent in it, you go to the people who are helping to propagate (it). Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I intend to do with this.â&#x20AC;? The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problem arises with the definition of drug paraphernalia. State law states that courts should use common sense when determining if something is drug paraphernalia. It also lists 14 factors that the court should consider when determining paraphernalia. The determining factor that will likely give the city its best case at cracking down on pipe and scale sellers reads: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Direct or circumstantial evidence of the intent of an owner, or of anyone in control of the object, to deliver it to persons whom he knows, or should reasonably know, intend to use the object to facilitate a violation of the Uniform Controlled Substances Law; the innocence of an owner, or of anyone in control of the object, as to a direct violation of the Uniform Controlled Substances Law shall not prevent a finding COUNCIL, see page 7

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT ALL ABOUT ART Âą)FYOUCOMETOTHETABLEWITH CASHAND EXPENSESTHENWE´LLHAVETOBEGINOURCONVERSATION 4HAT´SFORBOTHSCHOOLS² ²$OFRUQ 6WDWH 8QLYHUVLW\ 3UHVLGHQW &KULVWRSKHU %URZQRQFRQWLQXLQJWKHDPQXDO&DSLWDO&LW\&ODV VLFIRRWEDOOJDPH Âą7E SHOULD DO WHAT WE NEED TO DO TO BRING THIS INVESTMENTINTOTHESTATE)T´SGOINGTOPUTTHEIN FRASTRUCTUREINTOPLACESOTHATWECANIMPROVEOUR HEALTH OUTCOMES WHILE GENERATING ADDITIONAL ECO NOMICACTIVITYWHICHCREATESJOBS² ²0LVVLVVLSSL(FRQRPLF3ROLF\&HQWHU'LUHFWRU(G 6LYDNRQWKHQHHGWRH[SDQG0HGLFDLGXQGHUWKH $IIRUGDEOH&DUH$FW Âą7E UNDERSTAND THAT WE HAVE TO HAVE EDUCATION ANDHIGHWAYS SOITDOESBECOMEAREALQUESTIONOF WHETHER-ISSISSIPPICANAFFORDA-EDICAIDEXPAN SION/NTHEOTHERHAND CANWEAFFORDNOTTO² ²0LVVLVVLSSL+RVSLWDO$VVRFLDWLRQ9LFH3UHVLGHQW *ZHQ &RPEV RQ WRXJK FKRLFHV RI DGGUHVVLQJ KHDOWKFDUHQHHGV Âą4HEY´REONACOLLISIONCOURSEINANUMBEROFWAYS 4HEYNEEDTOPULLTHEPLUGONTHISPROJECT² ²0LVVLVVLSSL 6LHUUD &OXE 3UHVLGHQW /RXLH 0LOOHU RQ0LVVLVVLSSL3RZHU&RPSDQ\ÂśV.HPSHU&RXQW\ FRDOSODQW

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o you believe youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a creative person? You may want to rethink that. Creativity takes many forms; it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily about being able to create a work of art or compose a symphony. Here are a few questions to ask yourself to determine whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re creative. Yes answers put you into the creative camp with most of humanity. â&#x20AC;˘ Are you a problem solver? â&#x20AC;˘ Do you enjoy playing strategy games? â&#x20AC;˘ Can you teach what you know? â&#x20AC;˘ Do you plant flowers to decorate your yard and home? â&#x20AC;˘ Does your home dĂŠcor invite people in? â&#x20AC;˘ Can you cook without a cookbook? â&#x20AC;˘ Are you willing to try new things? â&#x20AC;˘ Can music (or poetry or a sunset) move you? â&#x20AC;˘ Do you find new ways to stretch your budget? â&#x20AC;˘ Can you keep a small child entertained longer than 10 minutes?


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COUNCIL, from page 6

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Yarber, Ward 6, the new council president tothat the object is intended for use, or designed day. Charles Tillman, Ward 5, replaced Yarber for use as paraphernalia.â&#x20AC;? as vice president. It is much easier under state law to prosChokwe Lumumba, Ward 2, nominated ecute someone who has bought and used the both of the new officers. Tillman nominated paraphernalia for drug cultivation, distribu- former president Frank Bluntson, Ward 4, to tion or use, because residue from the drugs can remain in his seat. Yarber beat out Bluntson by usually be found in or on the paraphernalia. a vote of 4-2. When the pipes, scales or spoons are It was no surprise that Lumumba quickly brand new, though, store owners can claim spoke up to nominate someone to replace they are not for drug Bluntson. Both Luuse, making them mumba and Bluntson harder to define as have announced they paraphernalia under will run for mayor of state law. Jackson in 2013. Some While proscouncil members have ecutors will find it accused Bluntson of difficult to prove a campaigning from the store ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actual presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chair in reknowledge of the cent weeks. eventual use of the Tillman was products he or she the only memsells, they may be ber nominated for able to prove sellers vice president. â&#x20AC;&#x153;should reasonably The Jackson City Council elected knowâ&#x20AC;? that digi- Councilman Tony Yarber, Ward 6, as its Council Rejects tal scales and glass new president.Yarber, 34, is the youngest Iron Horse, pipes, sold side-by- council member. Then Approves side, will likely be Tillman had a used in the ingestion change of heart conor distribution of illegal drugs. cerning the Iron Horse Grill during Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jackson Police Department Chief Re- regular council meeting. becca Coleman said her officers are not able to He, along with Cooper-Stokes and Luenforce the state law on store owners because mumba, voted against an order to approve currently, neither city ordinance nor state law backing a $2.5 million loan from the Jackson explicitly defines the products as paraphernalia Redevelopment Authority to Capitol Hotel when they are in a store. Associates, resulting in a 3-3 split. The majorâ&#x20AC;&#x153;There would have to be some language ity had to vote for the order for it to pass. put in the ordinance to say that if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a certain A few minutes later, Tillman asked for a type of pipe or papers, which could be used motion to reconsider the vote. After the mofor drugs, then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s illegal to sell this in a conve- tion passed, the council held a revote on the nient store,â&#x20AC;? Coleman said. order, resulting in a 4-2 approval. Coleman said JPD will enforce the proAt the July 2 special council meeting, posed ordinance if it has instructions that tell Tillman said JRA should make CHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presenher officers what, exactly, is illegal to sell. Until tation a model for future developers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is then, she said, JPD does not have authority to one of the better presentations Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen in a stop store owners from selling the items Yarber long time,â&#x20AC;? Tillman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like what I see.â&#x20AC;? wishes to make illegal. Apparently, he momentarily forgot what he saw Tuesday. Council Elects Yarber President Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob The Jackson City Council elected Tony Fuller at Jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

7


healthtalk

by R.L. Nave and Ronni Mott

Medicaid: A Job Creator?

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July 11 - 17, 2012

SOURCE: MISSISSIPPI CENTER FOR JUSTICE

8

lic Broadcasting in recent interview that the state should look â&#x20AC;&#x153;to reduce the welfare cost to Mississippians,â&#x20AC;? referring to social safety net programs like Medicaid and that increasing the Medicaid rolls by 400,000 would irreparably damage the already stressed state budget.

The figure Bryant cites comes from an analysis his predecessor, Gov. Haley Barbour, commissioned to study how much the state would have to spend to comply with the ACA. The report, conducted by Brookfield, Wisc.-based Milliman Inc., found that adding nearly a half-million more people to Medicaid would cost $1.7 billion over the next ten years. Millimanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actuaries show that health reform would cost the state nothing until fiscal-year 2017 when the state would pay $57 million more into Medicaid, which would draw $2.2 billion in federal funds. By 2020, the analysis states, the state would be spending $598 million on Medicaid and getting $14.6 billion from the U.S. government. The thinking behind ACA was that if states expanded Medicaid, hospitals would see their share of uncompensated costs go down because the government or private insurer would be on the hook for the bills.

donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t qualify for private insurance, said Gwen Combs, vice president for policy with the Mississippi Hospital Association.

53(EALTH#ARE 0AYING-OREFOR,ESS

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you do the math, those are things that leave hospitals in a vulnerable financial position,â&#x20AC;? Combs said. Hospitals argue that adding people to Medicaid will spur greater demand for

TRIP BURNS

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hen Congress created Medicaid in 1965 as part of the same legislation that established the Medicare program for senior citizens, fears abounded that the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new health-care giveaways would lead to a crippling run on the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hospitals. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. In fact, Medicaidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a statefederal partnership designed for extended health-care coverage to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;medically indigentâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;worked so well that in 1966 an assistant secretary of health, education and welfare under President Johnson predicted that Medicaid would render charity hospitals no longer necessary within a decade. More than 40 years later, Medicaid has neither driven hospitals out of business nor ended their practice of providing charity careâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least not yet. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, including the ballyhooed requirement that every American get insurance or be fined, Medicaid will undergo its most significant changes in more than four decades. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s if the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state lawmaking bodies, which would have to legislate any adjustments to a stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eligibility requirements, choose to let those changes take place. Because the court rule that the federal government couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t coerce states into loosening Medicaid eligibility, many Republican-led states, including Mississippi, that opposed the health-care law that is the legislative hallmark of President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first term are poised to balk. Gov. Phil Bryant told Mississippi Pub-

Medicaid recipients will be about $11.4 billion with the federal government paying 97 percent of those costs,â&#x20AC;? states a Center for Mississippi Health Policy report â&#x20AC;&#x153;How will health care reform affect Mississippi?â&#x20AC;? Based on that figure, the cost to Mississippi will be about $34.2 million over five years, or $6.84 million a year. To put that into perspective, the state Department of Corrections budget request for 2013 was $339,194,667. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With that much federal money coming into the state, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be jobs associated with that in addition to expanding health outcomes in the state,â&#x20AC;? Sivak said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably the biggest economic opportunity that (the federal government) has had for us in a long timeâ&#x20AC;ŚItâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to put the infrastructure into place so that we can improve our health outcomes while generating additional economic activity which creates jobs.â&#x20AC;? Researchers in New Mexico discovered Medicaid had a similar multiplier effect in a survey conducted in October 2008. The New Mexico Fiscal Policy Project study â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medicaid: An Integral Part of New Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Economy,â&#x20AC;?

3TIMULUS-ULTIPLIED

A Mississippi hospitals worry about the rising cost of uncompensated care if the state declines to expand Medicaid to individuals who currently lack insurance.

Behind insurance companies, hospitals would be the biggest industry benefitting from the health-care overhaul, because the Medicaid expansion serves as a built-in mechanism to wipe away much of the debt hospitals say they eat every year. In 2009, the American Hospital Association estimated this uncompensated care represented 6 percent of hospitalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; total expenses, around $40 billion. Compare this to $21.6 billion in 2000 and $12.1 billion in 1990. Until now, hospitals got some of the money back through federal Medicaid disproportionate share hospital, or DSH, reimbursements, but ACA phases out DSH payments in exchange for getting more people enrolled in Medicaid. There is another important tradeoff in the expansion: Medicare funding to hospitals would decrease to help offset the cost of broader Medicaid coverage. Mississippi hospitals could see $5 billion in DSH money go away and another 200,000 people fall into a â&#x20AC;&#x153;gapâ&#x20AC;? where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not covered by Medicaid but they

health-care services. Namely, more need for health-care professionals necessitating more tongue depressors, Band-Aids, syringes, and MRI machines (to say nothing of the jobs created by constructing new facilities.) Even spending on what Bryant derides as â&#x20AC;&#x153;welfareâ&#x20AC;? spurs economic grow, even more so than corporate tax cuts, according to a 2009 analysis from the Jackson-based Mississippi Economic Policy Center. MEPCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report examines the multiplier effects of various government stimulus programs and found that for every $1 increase in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits real Gross Domestic Product increases by $1.73. In other words, for every dollar the government spends on food stamps, it gets that dollar plus 73 cents in economic activity in return, almost doubling its investment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point, the story thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not being told is the federal share of money coming into the state,â&#x20AC;? said Ed Sivak, MEPCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the period from 2014 to 2019, state expenditures for the newly eligible

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concluded that state spending on Medicaid had a multiplier effect of $4.90 (it includes the federal governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s match). MHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Combs agrees that Medicaid spending could benefit the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. Statewide, Medicaid revenue is 16 percent of hospitalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; revenue base, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you fan that out into salaries, and you turn around and fan that out into supplies and construction, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fairly large economic impact, particularly on small communities,â&#x20AC;? Combs said. She added that the hospital association would work on educating lawmakers who would have to pass legislation to expand Medicaid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We understand that we have to have education, and we have to have highways, so it does become a real question of whether Mississippi can afford a Medicaid expansion,â&#x20AC;? Combs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the other hand, can we afford not to?â&#x20AC;? Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.


citytalk

by Jacob Fuller

$500K, and Classic Might Stay in Jackson from the match, he said both universities should get a larger portion of the profits. “There is no way they would invite any SEC school or ACC school into this city and offer them what they offered these two SWAC schools,” Brown said.

city reaps most of the rewards. “If you come to the table with $500,000 cash and expenses, then we’ll have to begin our conversation. That’s for both schools,” Brown said to Wilson about negotiating in future years. The announcement of the end of the Capital City Classic comes as a blow to Jackson. The average announced attendance at the annual event has been more than 32,600 since 2002, making it the city’s single most-attended annual sporting event. The average yearly economic impact on the city in recent years is upward of $2.5 million. The attendance numbers differ quite a bit, though, depending on who you ask, Brown said. The city claimed more 31,500 people attended the game last year. Meanwhile, Alcorn State University President Christopher Brown the state Department of Finance said the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau will need and Administration’s numbers to offer $500,000 cash, plus expenses, to get the university showed 28,762 in paid parking to consider playing home games against Jackson State in and about 22,300 people actuJackson. ally walked through the turnWanda Wilson, president and CEO of stiles at Veterans Memorial Stadium. the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bu“The reason why (Finance and Adreau, said at Friday Forum that she thought ministration) know is because you have the $160,000 proposal was only the start- to pay entertainment taxes on (tickets),” ing point of a negotiation. Brown said. “So if it is true that there were Brown said he would consider playing (31,500), then the city of Jackson owes the in Jackson every year if the city offered Al- state of Mississippi 7 percent on (almost) corn State a deal similar to the one it has 10,000 people.” with Shreveport, La., for its annual game Stadium capacity could be a concern against Grambling State, known as the Port for fans, especially if actual attendance is City Classic. The city of Shreveport takes closer to the city’s numbers than the state’s. care of all parking, concessions and security Alcorn State’s Jack Spinks Stadium has a personnel, pays the universities’ expenses maximum capacity of 22,500, compared to and pays the schools a cash bonus just to Veterans Memorial Stadium’s 60,492. show up and play the game. No matter who is counting, the CapiIn Jackson, Brown said Alcorn State tal City Classic hasn’t come close to filling has to take care of game-day personnel, in- Veterans Memorial. Brown said a lot of cluding parking and security, and then the people like to bring up “the great Alcorn

JACOB FULLER

State game” in Jackson in 1984. That game attracted 63,808 fans, the largest crowd ever at a football game in the state. But that game was against Mississippi Valley State, not JSU, and it featured wide receiver and future NFL Hall of Famer Jerry Rice. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said in a press release that the city and JCVB worked with both universities in an attempt to keep the Alcorn-JSU game in Jackson. “The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau, like I, recognize the substantial economic impact the Classic has on the City of Jackson,” Johnson wrote in the press release. “Just last year, according to the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau some 31,500 people attended the Classic, and it had a $2.5 million economic impact.” Brown said if everything went wrong in Lorman, compared to every aspect going right in Jackson, Alcorn State could make between $30,000 and $40,000 less at home. He expects things to go well, though, and ultimately bring more money to the university and the surrounding communities. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Economic Impact of Capital City Classic: • Average Attendance since 2002 (according to city): 32,600 • Estimated Economic Impact on Jackson in 2011: $2.5 million • Estimated Economic Impact on Jackson in 2010: $3.4 million • Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau’ offer to ASU: $160,000 • Offer Requested from ASU Pres. Christopher Brown: $500,000 • ASU’s estimated maximum loss playing game in Lorman: $30,000$40,000

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sk Alcorn State President Christopher Brown why the Alcorn State University Braves will play arch-rival Jackson State University in Lorman this year for the first time since 1992, and he’ll tell you: profit. He’s not just talking about cash, though. “There’s quantity of profit, and there’s quality of profit,” Brown said at a community forum at Koinonia Coffee House July 6. Brown and Alcorn State interim Athletics Director Dwayne White announced this week that the school will exercise its right to hold the football game against JSU in its home stadium this coming Nov. 17. Brown said his commitment is to Alcorn State and Lorman, where he lives and works. But while money for the university and community was the biggest contributing factor to the decision, it wasn’t the only one. Brown said it is not fair for him to rob Alcorn State’s 4,000 students of the oncampus rivalry experience other students get to enjoy. For the past 19 seasons, Alcorn State students have not known that experience. In that time, Alcorn has played the annual game against JSU, known since 1994 as the Capital City Classic, in Jackson every year. During that span, JSU holds a 13-6 advantage in the matchup, including a 51-7 trouncing of the Braves in 2011. The Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau offered to pay Alcorn State for transportation, lodging and meals for the football team, athletic staff, cheerleaders, band and student representatives. They also offered to pay for the university’s pep rally, the coaches’ media luncheon, Classic Golf Tournament, university president’s reception and a step show. Altogether, JCVB committed approximately $160,000 to Alcorn to keep the game in the capital city. Brown said the JCVB would have to offer much more than that to get Alcorn State to hold their games in Jackson. With Jackson making $2.5 million to $3 million

9


techtalk

by Todd Stauffer

What’s the Deal with Google+?

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allow you to be more granular about who you’re interacting with. Friends, Family, Acquaintances and Following are the defaults, but you can add anything you want like Castle Watch Friends or Football Buddies

that work with Google+ photos as well. Here’s one particularly cool feature: On an iPhone or Android phone, you can get Google+ to upload any photo you take with the regular camera app to a private al-

TODD STAUFFER

o you feel comfortable on Facebook, you’re Tweeting on a fairly regular basis, and you’ve dabbled on LinkedIn. Or you’re like me, and you like LinkedIn more for its professional content and groups, Twitter for fun and Facebook when you’re dragged screaming to the site. Or you’re a Twitter-holic, a Foursquare fiend, and you could take or leave Facebook. After all, it takes all kinds. What most of us probably didn’t see coming—and might still not be sure if we care—is yet another social-media site cropping up, trying to win over our time and effort by making us fit yet another network into our ecosystem. For Google+, the question on many people’s minds—if they think of Google+ at all—is “Why should I spend time on Google+?” And for many people, they haven’t gotten a good enough answer. Google+ is somewhat distinct from Facebook and LinkedIn (but similar to Twitter or Tumblr) in that it’s an “open” social network; you don’t have to sign into a service to see people’s public profiles. This is one reason why it’s important to pay at least some attention to it, particularly for business managers or professionals—it’s free marketing for you and another opportunity to take a little ownership of your online image. The second reason builds on the first—this is Google’s social network. Which means your profile is extremely discoverable (and is given special weight) by the world’s most popular search engine. So if you’re not there—and you want to be “discoverable” in Google’s universe—you may be missing out. Judged purely as a social network, Google+ has pluses and minuses. Google+ is built on the idea that you can easily place your “friends” into different Circles, which

Bonjour!

July 11 - 17, 2012

First Friday of Each Month Free Spanish Class

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With tools based on Picasa, Google+ is great for managing uploaded photos.

or Frat Brothers. You can then send items just to those groups, if you like, including updates and photo galleries, so that you’re sharing your personal stuff with the right people and not the world at large. Google+ also has some pretty strong photo management features, in part because its photo tools are based on Picasa, Google’s photo sharing service that’s been around for a while (and is now being rolled into Google+). With Picasa, you get Mac and PC applications for managing and editing photos on your machine, which you can then sync to the Google+ service; there’s also Chrome, iOS and Android apps

bum on the Google+ service, making it easy to add some of those photos to updates in Google+; it also makes it a little easier to share those photos with other services, because they’re already online. They are also backed up in case you lose the phone, a big bonus these days. Of course, Circles are central to the experience on Google+; for instance, you can quickly change the view in your Stream of posts by clicking one of the buttons at the top of the stream to filter it to just one of your Circles—family, friends or a custom circle. That can be nice if you’re trying to drill down and see what’s going

on with a certain group of folks. You may already be hearing about Hangouts, where you can get one of your circles together for a video chat, including the ability to view slides and share documents. If you need that, then Google+ is a good option. (In fact, Google+ circles are a nice alternative for managing interactions with a group of people that uses the service for private conversations, instead of relying on Google Groups or the groups tools I’ve discussed in previous columns.) In my opinion, the Stream doesn’t offer enough customization—posts are just too big in the stream, reminding you that Twitter is a whole lot easier to use as a “public” social network where you can see what’s on a lot of people’s minds quickly. (Suddenly the 140 characters make a lot of sense.) The other problem with Google+ is that a lot of people you know aren’t on the service, so updates can be a little few and far between. Is it worth it? If you already live in a Google world (you already use Gmail or Picasa or Blogger or Google Groups) then it makes total sense to flip over to Google+ and set up your profile. Likewise, if you run a business, you should check out Google+ for Businesses (google.com/+/business/) and get your page up and running; it’ll be good for search engine optimization, particularly in Google’s search. For the rest of us? If you think of Google+ as yet another social network, you’ll probably want to pass, at least for now. It’s still not that social—some call it a ghost town. But, if you think of it as your social profile on Google, then it might make more sense if you want to be “searchable and discoverable.” If that’s the case, check Google+ out. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Todd Stauffer at todd@jacksonfreepress.com.

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7/3/12 9:45 AM


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Lies, Damn Lies and Elections

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e can always tell when election season has slunk into Jackson here at the JFP. For one thing, lots of folks using fake names start to complain about us because we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love their candidates or hate their opponents enough. So the nastygrams start appearing about the paper and our staff, down to intelligent analysis of our various body parts. The second sign is that we start seeing a lot of ridiculous and probably unconstitutional legislation clearly designed to get candidates elected or re-elected. You know the kind we mean: baggy-pants ordinances, as if the government has the right to tell people, even kids, what they can wear in public. Wink-wink efforts to crack down on immigrants or to eliminate abortion. (We cynically believe that most politicians attack abortion rights with a forked tongue because they know the courts will turn them backâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;after expensive legal battles). Then, last week, City Councilman Quentin Whitwell brought up the perennial Ward 1 anti-homeless assaultâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;targeting beggars outside his ward. He would like to see people asking for money to go to jail for 30 days and pay fines. Beyond the sheer mean-spiritedness of such an ordinance, how does this make sense? They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have money; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re begging. And jail someone for walking up to someone to ask for money? We shudder to think about it. Now, if those beggars are, in fact, physically â&#x20AC;&#x153;accostingâ&#x20AC;? people downtown as Whitwell claimed, then there are existing laws against assaults that should be enforced. We suspect that Whitwell wants to be able to say that he fought the vagrants during his upcoming re-election, but this attempt is as silly, and shortsighted, as Kenneth Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; continual effort to outlaw baggy pants. Or, call them frivolous laws. This also brings to mind state Republicansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; passion for two state laws, both of which seem clearly unconstitutional. Their effort to shut down the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abortion clinic may backfire precisely because lawmakers didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother to hide their zeal for â&#x20AC;&#x153;eliminating abortionâ&#x20AC;? in our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which means the motive is to violate Mississippianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitutional right to choose abortion. The other is the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ridiculous voter ID law, which we expect to be shot down by the U.S. Department of Justice, considering our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disenfranchisement history and the fact that supporters cannot show evidence that is actually needed. Regardless, though, expect Republicans statewide to campaign on how they tried to clean up all the so-called voter fraud that they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to prove. Of course, all this posturing over bad laws takes time and resources away from our actual problems and needs in the state. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic. We call for a higher level of campaigning going forward, especially on the local level. Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all can do better, and we expect you to.

MY TURN

BY RIMS BARBER

Medicaid Expansion Pays

July 11 - 17, 2012

T

12

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MY TURN

BY KEN STRACHAN

Rubio and Ryan Leading GOP VP Picks

I

n 2008, the Mississippi ballot offered seven presidential candidates and their running mates. Along with the Republican and Democratic nominees, we had third-party candidates ranging from the Green Party to Reform Party, independents and Libertarian candidates. I am a firm believer that everyone has the right to run for whatever office they choose and to let the voters decide. But as far as this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidential election is concerned, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a quote I heard from an old movie: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ideas and reality are a long way apart.â&#x20AC;? What I mean is that the election will come down to the Democratic nominee and the Republican nominee. The only time in recent memory that a third-party candidate made a significant showing was 1992, with Ross Perot capturing 19 percent of the vote. With the Democratic ticket being Obama and Biden, the question is: Who will the presumptive Republican nominee, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, choose as his running mate? In my opinion, it could well be either Florida Sen. Marco Rubio or Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan. Aside from the fact that these two states have large electoral votes to put Romney closer to the magic number of 270 required to win the presidency, they both bring a great deal to the ticket. Rubio, 41, has been a rising star in the Republican Party since his election to the U.S. Senate in 2010, following his tenure as speaker of the Florida House of Representatives. Watching Rubio

on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hannityâ&#x20AC;? the other night, I could see that he handles himself well with the national press. Ryan, 42, has been a congressman since 1999 and is chairman of the House Committee on the Budget. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a rising star in the GOP ranks. It has been a long time since the GOP carried Wisconsin; putting Ryan on the ticket could tip that state into the Romney column. Both Rubio and Ryan bring a relatively young age along with experience in public service. Anything can happen in the next several weeks, and Romney could deliver a surprise. In 2000, George W. Bush chose Dick Cheney, who was leading Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice-presidential selection process. In 1992, then-Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton chose then-Tennessee Sen. Al Gore as his running mate, two men from adjoining southern states. In the last election, Sen. John McCain chose thenAlaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who was virtually unknown in the other 49 states. One thing is sure: Republicans will thoroughly vet the candidates for vice president. No presidential candidate of any party wants an unexpected developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an â&#x20AC;&#x153;October surpriseâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;to come from their choice of a running mate. In other words, like the folks say out in the country, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They need to be as clean as a houndâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tooth.â&#x20AC;? At this juncture, both Rubio and Ryan fit that bill. Ken Strachan is a former mayor of North Carrollton and serves as Carroll County coroner.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


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Our Creative Signatures

I’

m standing at a wall of iPhone covers in Best Buy somewhat dazed by the sheer number of choices—colors, styles, textures and graphic prints of every description. Which one represents me? And what do I want the cover of my phone to say about me? Do I even need a cover to start with? The phone itself is a brilliant enough device that it needs no special decoration—camouflage, cartoon character or otherwise. Who am I kidding? “I’ll take this one,” I think, as I make my selection. As humans, we just can’t help it: We have to add our creative signature to just about everything we touch. Even items that require no adornment whatsoever become a canvas for our whims. The myriad of styles for car tags (or license plates, for those who are not from here) comes to mind. But that is a good thing, right? A quick web search for creativity tells me that it is an underpinning element of optimism, balance, resilience, perspective and discipline. Those sound like important strengths to me. It seems obvious that seeking out and exhibiting creativity in our daily lives is an innate characteristic of human nature. And yet, academia, which is ever aware of both accountability concerns and funding cuts, has begun to neglect it. Perhaps it’s not by choice. No Child Left Behind, which became law 10 years ago, didn’t do creativity any favors. Sure, schools need to effectively perform well in reading, math and science scores, but do they need to kill the students’ creative natures in the process? I was not an exceptional student in my early school years. I got paddled several times in first grade for spending my time daydreaming rather than keeping up with classwork. As the years went by, the paddling stopped, but the daydreaming never did. I believe it’s natural to want to excel at something. I showed up for peewee football and elementary basketball practice only to realize that athletic ability would not be the something at which I would excel. Some of us are natural born athletes; others are not as innately gifted but will dedicate endless hours of practice to hone what skills they have. Then there are those who must accept that athletics simply aren’t in the cards for them. I am in the last category. It wasn’t until high school that I realized that I was actually good at something—really good at something. In fact, I was best in my class at something. This

was huge for me. I had never been above average at anything that I had tried. Just what was this new dominion of which I found myself master? Mechanical drawing. Mechanical drawing, a precursor to CAD, or computer-aided design, is basically drafting plans to illustrate how something has to be constructed or how it will function. It’s the artsy side of engineering, a right-brain function in a left-brain field of study. But just how much do we value creativity? We don’t celebrate it at pep rallies, and creative types are not likely to have their picture taken for the yearbook just for being good at it (though they may end up actually doing the yearbook). For me, finding my creativity was an introduction to my own world of self-worth (aka optimism, balance, resilience, perspective and discipline). Creativity shows up in many forms. Whether you’re admiring one of Wyatt Waters’ impressionist interpretations of a capital-city scene or enjoying a drink with friends at a Fingers Taylor performance, you will eventually realize that creative energy animates Jackson. Even our dull, utilitarian traffic boxes around the downtown area have come alive with vibrant artistic expression (see pages 22 and 23). Creativity is a great asset that we should be proud to highlight. Personally, I love the “Mississippi, Believe It!” campaign that the Cirlot Agency produced a few years ago. It showcased the accomplishments of creative Mississippians of the past and present. These days, a full 20 years post-high school graduation, I still crave creative exercise. As an IT systems administrator, I don’t always get the satisfaction of stepping back and admiring the visual progress of a particular task. But, the thing I have learned through the years is that finding your inspiration in any particular task is the key to a successful outcome. Encourage creativity in young people. In a world where anything that can be outsourced will be outsourced, hold tight to creative inspiration and clever thought. Perhaps the assembly of my iPhone was outsourced, but not the brilliant creativity that designed it. Scott Dennis is a Morton native who lives in Pearl. Dennis earned a computer science degree from Mississippi College and works as an IT specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey. He is blessed with a wonderful wife and a small but growing family.

Finding your inspiration in any particular task is the key to a successful outcome.

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SCOTT DENNIS

13


You, the Masterpiece ³(YHU\FKLOGLVDQDUWLVW7KH SUREOHPLVKRZWRUHPDLQ DQDUWLVWRQFHKHJURZVXS´ ²3DEOR3LFDVVR

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by Donna Ladd

O

nce they reach adulthood, people tend to think that they are either creative or not, leftbrain or right-brain, and never shall the twain meet. Those who think they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t creative often lock themselves into strict, dull routines; those who think they are artistic often donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually get much creative work or thought done because they think that planning time to actually do it is for uptight people, like all those boring left-brainers. It is those who embrace creativityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as well as the routines and activities that bring it out of themâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who get great things done. Even if they do technical work during the day, they might paint pictures, write screenplays, play in a band or just make a beautiful meal every night. Those who really get in touch with their creative sides are the ones who change the world. They get together and build parks for kids to play in; they become social entrepreneurs to help society while making money; they excite kids in the classroom; they run fun workplaces that do incredible, meaningful work. True creatives donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mindlessly follow one or another political party; they make decisions based on the issue and the person and deep thought, not because someone on cable TV told them who to support. They dig in to help their community and believe it can be better than itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever beenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that the glory days are aheadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by tapping into diversity of people and ideas. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to try new things, and not just talk about them. They take action, and then do it again, and again. More than anything else, creative people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask permission to think differently. They think out of the box by design. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accept the status quoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on face value. They question. They wonder. They invent. They lead. They inspire. This GOOD Ideas issue is dedicated to the notion that every person can be a creative. You just have to decide to, make time for it and take actions that make it happen. Puccini said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Madame Butterflyâ&#x20AC;? was â&#x20AC;&#x153;dictated to me by God.â&#x20AC;? Will you make the space to listen and respond?

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lmost to a person, creatives advise wannabes to do two things every single day: (a) spend quality time alone thinking, reading, wandering and (b) participate in the larger world. Connect with new people, do things youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always wanted to do, wonder about things, open your mind. Once you master the big two, the rest will be gravy.

Brain Games: Elbie or Arbie?

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July 11 - 17, 2012

ften, people either think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re creative or theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not. And it is true that people tend to be more â&#x20AC;&#x153;left-brainâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;right-brain.â&#x20AC;? Put very simplistically, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a left-brainer, you tend to be more organized, conservative, even a tad rigid. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a right-brainer, you might consider yourself creative because you like arty stuff, you reject systems and schedules, and you also might come across a bit harebrained and never actually get around to creating the masterpieces you so desperately want to produce. What to do? Well, you can change your left-brain ratio, drawing on your weaker side to help out your stronger side. That is, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more right-brain, beef up your left-brain organizing skills and time management to schedule time to actually write or paint. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more left-brain, learn from your creative friends to let your hair down and throw paint at the canvas or just write whatever comes to mind. Your left-brain side can edit it later, if needed. Where do you fall? The book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organizing for the Creative Personâ&#x20AC;? (Three Rivers Press, 1993, $14.95) says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elbiesâ&#x20AC;? (lefties) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arbiesâ&#x20AC;? (righties) tend to have the following 14 characteristics.

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e live in a world where kids who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sit still in class are labeled troublemakers or low-performers or even ADD. But maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just kinesthetic learners: that is, they need to move around in order to soak up the information. Or, maybe they make a game out of different colored pens and markers and stickies; what the notebook looks like might really matter to a visual learner. What about you? How do you actually get work done the best? When is it easiest to completely focus, to get in the zone or that magical â&#x20AC;&#x153;flowâ&#x20AC;? that Mihaly Csik-

szentmihalyi advises us all to aspire for? Do you write best in a big chair instead of at your desk? Do you snack when you work? When are your most productive times of the day or night? The bottom line is that people learn and create differently. In her, well, brilliant book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brilliance by Design: Creating Learning Experiences That Connect, Inspire and Engageâ&#x20AC;? (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2011, $18.95), Vicki Halsey of Ken Blanchard Companies offers a packed toolbox of ways to inspire yourself, your staff, your kids and your students to higher levels of creativity and success.

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reative businesses are more innovative, and employees are more engaged and loyal. Work can feel like play, and it should to get employees happy and engaged. Edward Hallowell, a Harvard psychiatrist and ADD expert, includes play in a list of vital management steps in his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your Peopleâ&#x20AC;? (Harvard Business Review Press, 2011, $26.95). That is, good managers must engage employees in â&#x20AC;&#x153;any activity that engages the mind.â&#x20AC;? Yes, that can mean having a dart board or Nerf ball hoop; it also means holding interactive workshops where employees brainstorm creative ways to be make more money or market better. His tips include: $VNRSHQHQGHGTXHVWLRQVRIHPSOR\HHV 0RGHODTXHVWLRQLQJDWWLWXGHDQGPDNHLWVDIHWR GLVDJUHH +DYHJRRI\GD\VDWZRUN :HÂśUHSODQQLQJDZHDUDEOH DUWGD\DWWKH-)36RPHDOUHDG\ZHDULW VHHSKRWR  &UHDWHLPDJLQDWLYHZRUNVSDFHVIRUÂłWHDPLQJ´ +DYHWKHPGRDXWRPDWLFZULWLQJZLWKRXWVWRSSLQJ 6HQGHPSOR\HHVRXWRIWKHRIÂżFHWRWKLQN2QO\UXOH QRHPDLORUWH[WLQJ +DYHFKLOG DQG SHW IULHQGO\RIÂżFHV +DYHWKHPVHW JRDOVWKHQZRUN EDFNZDUGWRÂżJXUH RXWDFWLRQVWRJHWWR PDNHJRDOVKDSSHQ 5HZDUGFUHDWLYLW\ DQGQHZLGHDV

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%XPLORER !RTIST *UDGE 7ARRIOR !CTIONSYOUMUSTTAKE 1. Take a whack at it. 2. Have a passionate lion in your heart. 3. Get support. 4. Get rid of excuses. 5. Flex your â&#x20AC;&#x153;risk muscle.â&#x20AC;? 6. Have something at stake. 7. Be dissatisfied. 8. Have a thick skin. Some people wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like it. So what? 9. Sell, sell, sell. Put it into the world. 2%-%-"%2

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Intrapersonal: Have participants journal or freewrite their thoughts. Interpersonal: Be sure to include lots of social activity and sharing among participants. Verbal: Have fun with words and explore their origins and meanings. Naturalist: Have plants, rocks, shells or nature scenes in the room. Or meet outside. Visual/Spatial: Use lots of images and color. Have art on the walls and baskets of markers and stickies. Use mind maps (see page 21). Logical/mathematical: Use graphs; play logic games; do mathematical puzzles. Kinesthetic: Invite participants to touch and manipulate items, move around, put stickers on flow charts; shift from pairs to larger groups. Musical/Rhythmic: Play or teach to music; have them make up songs, raps, poems. Existential: Use Socratic questioning to make them think and consider different solutions.

I read this book last year and, for the first time, fully understood that I am largely a visual learner and creator; I also figured out that at this point in my life, I am the most focused early in the day (a shocker for this long-time night person). Take an online test to figure out your learning preferences (learningstyles.net). More importantly, have your staff take the quiz, and be sure to include options for as many learning styles as you can in classes you teach and meetings you run. I was already using a lot of these tricks in my writing/creativity classes; now I use them even more. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun.

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jacksonfreepress.com

by Donna Ladd

COURTESY BUSINESS PLUS

Learn to Be Inspired

n his fabulous book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Whack on the Side of the Head: How You Can Be More Creativeâ&#x20AC;? (25th Anniversary Edition, Business Plus, 2008, $16.99), Roger von Oech says every successful creative must play four major roles with your creative efforts:

15


A World-Class City If â&#x20AC;Ś

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reative Classâ&#x20AC;? maven Richard Florida has ranked Jackson 75th on the creative-class scale (higher than Memphis and New Orleans!) as the JFP told you in our very first cover story back in 2002. That means we have potential as a regional hub for education, health care and government; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already a hotbed of knowledge workers, students and teachers, not to mention artists, musicians and actors. But while reopening the King Edward Hotel and painting art boxes downtown is an amazing step (see pp. 24-25), thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to be done, particularly to foster the inbound migration that a strong creative class city can encourage.

2

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Creativity: A Secret to Getting Ahead by Deirdre Danahar

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creativity comes from trust. Trust your instincts.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Rita Mae Brown

I

July 11 - 17, 2012

nventive thinking is prized now more than almost any other time in history. The creative class is on the rise and is an important emerging driver in the economy. Richard Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rise of the Creative Classâ&#x20AC;? (Basic Books, 2002), now celebrating its 10th anniversary, notes the creative class makes up at least 30 percent of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce. To solve the increasingly complex problems of the world, as well as think through how to reinvent current products, approaches and processes, creativity is required. It is vital to use both your right brain and left brain. But what if you are not a â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative type?â&#x20AC;? Can you learn to be creative? Yes. All people are creative. It comes naturally to kids. Children make up stories to tellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;remember playing make believe? Coloring, drawingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a kid can make a rocket ship out of a cardboard box and yarn. Even kids in desperate situations are intuitively creative. It is what drives us to learn, to explore and to grow. Necessity may be the mother of invention, but creativity is the spark that lights the way to invention. Creativity is what keeps organizations and individuals innovating and improving. As adults though, 16 many of us do not use our creativity. Cre-

ativity is not lost; it goes dormant until you are ready to use it. Like a muscle, it can be flexed and strengthened. Using both sides of your brain taps into your creative and your analytical abilities. The right side of your brain is the source of your dreams, inspirations and insights. The

left side is the process center and can either accept or reject them. Learning to use both explodes your ability to think, to grow, to find solutions and take action in the face of challengesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even when you think you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Not using both your creative and strategic sides can lead to taking on projects that

(OWTO"ECOME-ORE#REATIVE "E#URIOUS Ask questions such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;What would make this simpler? How could we do this differently? Then play with the puzzle pieces until you figure out answers. -AKE3TRUCTURE9OUR-USE Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for inspiration to strike. Schedule regular nonmeeting time with the sole purpose of reviewing a project or a trend and consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;what if?â&#x20AC;? The time can be a short as 15 minutes each day or one hour once a week. 4REATEVERYPROJECTLIKEANEXPERIMENTANDEVERYFAILUREASAJUMPINGPOINT Not everything is going to work. Something not working is a signal there is more to learn or something else to try. 0ERSEVERECreative people hone their craft over time. When you have a dry spell, keep pecking away at the keyboard or adding more compost to the proverbial soil of your work. %MBRACEAMBIGUITY Part of being creative is not knowing exactly what is going to happen. Ambiguity offers the opportunity to be flexible and inventive, to build a new skill or discover a novel way to apply existing skills. Not one of these five elements is reserved for special creative types. Fast Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual list of the 100 most creative people in business has a wide variety of examples to inspire you. The only challenge there is for you to invite creativity into your regular routine. What are you curious enough about to explore? Will you set aside time to honor and explore this curiosity?

deplete you or getting stuck in a rut. Using your creativity keeps you open to new possibilities or perspectives. You can decide if a new approach to a project will help you get it done or if the project is worth your time. Some of the most creative people I know are not artists. They are business owners: bankers, attorneys and an electrical engineer. They have two important traits in common. One, all regularly to flex their â&#x20AC;&#x153;what if?â&#x20AC;? muscles and, second, each embodies the three core values Richard Florida identified within the creative class: )NDIVIDUALITY They endeavor to create identities that reflect their creativity. This can entail a mixing of multiple creative identities. -ERIT Each favors hard work challenge and stimulation. They have a propensity for goal-setting and achievement because they are good at what they do. $IVERSITYAND/PENNESS They strongly favor organizations and environments in which they feel that anyone can fit in and can get ahead. Each in their own way brings their creativity energy into their work, by cultivating a flexible open approach. This affords them the ability to see beyond conventions and be inventive.


8th Annual

[To Help Fund A Rape Crisis Center] Hurry! You still have time to get your donation items featured in the Chick Ball Gift Guide on July 25! For more details, call Erica at 601-362-6121 Ext. 16

•Imperial Highness $5,000 •Diva $2,500 •Goddess $1,000 •Queen $500 •Princess $250 •Chick $50

Saturday, July 28, 2012 Hal & Mal’s Red Room Cover $5 | 18+ | 6pm - Midnight To donate or volunteer: 601-362-6121 ext 16 or chickball@jacksonfreepress.com

For more information: jfpchickball.com Follow us on twitter @jfpchickball

Sponsors Include: Natalie Maynor • Kira Cummings • Nola Gibson • Dorothy Triplett • Larue Owen • Delta Sigma Theta Sorortity Inmotion Consulting and Coaching • Planned Parenthood • Davetta and Jonathan Lee • Dorsey Carson

jacksonfreepress.com

Items Needed: •Original Art •Gift Certificates • Corporate Items •Gifts (big & small) •Monetary Donations •Chick Toys & Decor Sponsorships Available:

17


50 STATES = $50 To celebrate Independence Day, the Baptist Healthplex invites you to show your allegiance to good health. In honor of our 50 states, you can join for $50 from July 1–31, 2012. Two convenient locations: JACKSON — 601-968-1766 CLINTON — 601-925-7900 www.mbhs.org

*Amount applies to the primary member for the month of July, 2012.

July 11 - 17, 2012

The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 2012. 9.5” x 6.167”. Commissioned by Robby Channell. (eMac/Users/mbhs/Documents/PROJECTS/Ads/Healthplex/HP July Special ad)

18


Channeling

Your Creativity by Casey Purvis  ,I DQ\RQH FDQ EULQJ RXW \RXU FUHDWLYLW\ LWÂśV -XOLD &DPHURQ+HUWKUHHPDLQWRROV 'R ORQJKDQG morning pages HYHU\ GD\ 7KUHH SDJHVQRPRUHRUOHVV0RYHWKHJDUEDJHRXWRI \RXUKHDGVR\RXJHWPRYHIRUZDUG 6FKHGXOH DQ artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s date DORQH HDFK ZHHN IRU DWOHDVWKDOIDQKRXU'RDQ\WKLQJIURPEURZVLQJD PXVHXPWRWDNLQJPL[HGPDUWLDODUWVFODVVHVMXVW VRPHWKLQJ\RXGRQÂśWQRUPDOO\GR *R IRU meditative walks DQG UHDOO\ QRWLFH \RXUVXUURXQGLQJV%UHDWKHGHHSO\DV\RXJR

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1. Downsize your inner critic. We all have an inner critic who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to point out what we got wrong. Our inner critic has his place at weddings, funerals, family reunions and in the office. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good at censoring us. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll censor you before you even sign up for that painting class. Kick him out of your head for an hour or so and just do what seems like a good idea. 2. Take a walk and really observe your surroundings. Note the architectural features of the buildings you pass. Let your eyes drift. Notice the different plants and birds along your path. Be distracted. 3. Get to class. Ever longed to make pottery of your own, or paint a colorful picture on canvas, or write a short story? Surf

the web for classes in your area. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be surprised at the classes available. Some may be at a local college, at a craft guild, or even in the back of a local business. 4. Get what I call some aesthetic exercise. Yoga, dance, adult tumbling classes all use movement to produce something that generates some visual appeal and gives you a new perspective on what your body is capable of doing. Of course, check with your physician prior to engaging in an exercise regimen. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found that yoga gets me in â&#x20AC;&#x153;the zoneâ&#x20AC;? for thinking out of the box and coming up with alternative scenarios for solving problems. 5. Draw inspiration from creative people. Cruise the galleries in your area. Pick the owner or docentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brain over the works that catch your eye. Ask about the artist. Are they local? Where do they get their ideas from? Go to flea markets and guild and art shows and strike up a conversation with the people showing their works. 6. Switch up your routine. Take an alternative route home. Shop at a different store once in a while. Varying your routine will give you a new perspective. Routines can be good for organizing our time and running our lives efficiently, but we need a break from efficiency now and then in order to recharge our sense of spontaneity. 7. Find a project. Those Adirondack chairs in your back yardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the ones with the peeling paintâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;could use some sprucing up. Get brave and paint them in a color you love. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be married to the neutral color palette. Who cares if your neighbor

doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like your new flamingo pink chairs? She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to sit in them! 8. When the weather allows, plant something colorful. We need plants, and they need us. If your back patio or porch is overlooking nothing but green grass, give yourself something to look at. I love climbing plants, like climbing roses and jasmine. They produce beautiful flowers, add interest to architectural structures, and give me a space to think and contemplate. 9. Have a TV sabbath. Set aside a day to hide that remote. TV can be a distraction. Find other things to do. There are other things to do. I promise. 10. Get an instruction manual. Nobodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lost cause. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativityâ&#x20AC;? by Julia Cameron (Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, member Penguin Putnam, Inc., 1992, $16.95) is a great teaching tool for those of us who lost touch with their creative side when life happened. 11. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to screw up on your first endeavor. An important component of learning is making mistakes. In our society, we frown on mistakes. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten that wrong. Some of my best learning experiences were born out of the mistakes Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made. So, go screw something up and give yourself space to learn. We have to give ourselves room to act on that inspiration without harshly judging the product of that inspiration. Returning to our creative selves is a process. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about reaching the summit. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the ascent.

jacksonfreepress.com

I

canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say exactly when I stopped painting, drawing and attempting to write poetry. Somewhere between elementary school and college, life happened, and landing a job that paid the bills quietly snuck in and became priority over any and all creative endeavors. More than a decade after graduating from college, as I was trolling the art galleries on Royal Street in New Orleans and maxing out my credit card on prints I loved, I realized that by giving up my creativity I had cheated myself out of a vital part of my life. So, I vowed to reclaim the joy of the creative process. My journey is ongoing. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve since done some interesting things in the name of feeding my creativity, and had fun in the process. Here are some ideas for those of you who long to recapture the spontaneity that creativity brings:

19


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Map It Out by Latasha Willis

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s a creative person, I know what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to thrive on flying by the seat of my pants and completing tasks without a structured plan to carry it out. I always felt spontaneous and unhindered with this approach, but this chaotic way of taking care of business has bitten me in the butt frequently. For the typical left-brained person, making a list is the usual way to plan a project. List? Ick, you say? Well, who says right-brained folks have to use plain old numbers or bullets to

make a list? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hip and more exciting way to make a list: a mind map. Before you say that a mind map sounds like a boring science project, hear me out. A mind map is like a circular flow chart with the goal in the center and the steps to reach that goal branching out from the goal. For each step, you can add branches to it to break the task down even further. As the late artist Bob Ross may have said, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a happy little tree. So, how do you make a mind map? Well, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mind map that explains how to make one. Clever, huh?

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by Donna Ladd

&IRST4HINGS&IRST4HE-ATRIX

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Time to Create

21


100% Agave SAIL AWAY WITH

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Are you feeling hot, hot, hot?? Every hour, one scorching somebody will get three spins to make the temperature rise and collect a prize! The sizzling sum of three spins will determine their prize category. At Midnight on August 31, all previous winners will be entered into the grand prize drawing for a new Chrysler 200 S! Earn entries now. Get 10X entries on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

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Kick Up Your

a t i r a g Mar (Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly


23

jacksonfreepress.com


Art All Around by Piko Ewoodzie photos by Virginia Schreiber and Allie Jordan

I

July 11 - 17, 2012

f the red light on the corner of Pascagoula and State streets catches you while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re When Tony Davenport first heard the idea, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need much convincing to take driving northbound on State Street, look to your left. You will see that the traffic light part. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As an artist, it was a good opportunity to give back and contribute to the landscape of box, what used to be a dull steel box that you probably never the city,â&#x20AC;? Davenport says. To get involved, he and noticed, now displays Tony Davenportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colorful rendition of a other artists who were interested had to submit a jazz band playing in the shadows of the King Edward Hotel. proposal with their design idea to a deciding comAt the corner of Pearl and Congress, you see another one of mittee. His was among 100 or so applicants. Âł,PD\VSHQGGD\VRUZHHNVPXOOLQJRYHUDQLPDJHLQP\KHDG these light box art works. Tom Harmon has turned this box into Davenportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box features themes that he EHIRUH,JHWWRWKHSRLQW,ÂśPUHDG\WRVNHWFKLW,QUHODWLRQWRWKH a bookshelf that displays the works of some of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most deals with in his other paintings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The theme of WUDIÂżFVLJQDOER[DUWWKHWKHPHZDVFHQWHUHGDURXQG-DFNVRQÂśV celebrated authors. music, culture, peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those things are some of FXOWXUH 7KH ÂżUVW WKRXJKW ZDV PXVLF WKHQ UHFUHDWLRQ JUHDW These art worksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;18 of them have been completed and are the things that you see in growing cities, cities that ODQGVFDSHVDQGÂżQDOO\XQLTXHQHVV0\LGHDZDVWRPHUJHWKH sprinkled throughout downtown Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are part of Mayor are progressing, cities that are embracing the creLQGLYLGXDO HOHPHQWV DQG FRQFHSWV WRJHWKHU DEVWUDFWO\ LQ UHOD WLRQWRXQLTXHQHVV+LOOVDUHLQWKHVKDSHRIDJXLWDU7KHEHOO Harvey Johnson Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Public Art Initiative. Johnson got the idea ative class. So I felt like my themes work in concert RIDWUXPSHWDQGVD[RSKRQHDUHRQH$OORIWKLVZDVGUDZQYHU\ when he visited Clayton, Mo., and saw light boxes being put to with what (Jackson) is trying to do,â&#x20AC;? he says. URXJKO\DWÂżUVW$IWHUDEHWWHUVNHWFKRIWKHLPDJHDQGDFRXSOH a productive, creative use. Janet Scott, executive director of the On Thursday, June 21, the Public Art IniRI DGMXVWPHQWV WR PDNH LW ZRUN RQ D WKUHHGLPHQVLRQDO RE Greater Jackson Arts Council, says 30 traffic-light boxes, which tiative held a walk around downtown Jackson to MHFW ,ZDVUHDG\WRDGGFRORUZLWKSDLQW,XVHGEROGDQGEULJKW control the signals at each intersection, will be turned into art â&#x20AC;&#x153;unveilâ&#x20AC;? the new traffic-box art. It began at the corFRORUVIRUIXUWKHULQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI-DFNVRQ7KHDUWHYHQWXDOO\ displays by the end of the summer. ner of Lamar Street and Pascagoula Street. If you EHFDPHZKDW,YLVXDOL]HGLQP\PLQG<RXDUHÂżQLVKHGZKHQ \RXWKHDUWLVWDFFHSWLW´ ².DWLH/:KLWH %R[1R

Over the next three to five years, all 300 traffic boxes in the missed it, no need to worryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;use our map to host 24 city will become public-art works. an art walk of your own.

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Map Key

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Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

CONTACT

®

What greater gift can you offer than the time to listen to a troubled person?

VOLUNTEER! Train With Us! Training Begins Tuesday, September 18, 2012 6:45 - 9:45 PM (Total of 14 Tuesday Evenings)

Ascension Lutheran Church ELCA 6481 Old Canton Road (corner of Old Canton and County Line Roads)

Jackson, Mississippi

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he America ReadsMississippi (ARM) AmeriCorps Program is dedicated to improving the reading skills of students, encouraging public awareness and support of literacy, and helping to increase the number of certified teachers in Mississippi. Each year, 350 dedicated TUTORS WITH A MISSION give a year of service, GETTING THINGS DONE as full-time reading tutors, assisting an average of 3,500 1st – 3rd grade students. ARM AmeriCorps members also engage students in community service through national service days like Read Across America Day. Viewing SERVICE AS A SOLUTION, ARM provides support services to schools and communities through oneon-one and small group tutoring, which frees the classroom teacher to continue class instruction, knowing that students are not being left behind. ARM members bring communities together and encourage volunteerism. Eighty-three percent (83%) of ARM members this year desire to become certified teachers. Through the example of their own lives, ARM members teach students the value of education and service. ARM members successfully complete 1,700 hours of service to earn the AmeriCorps education award, valued at $5,550 that is used to pursue higher education. For ARM, partnerships are the key. Current partners include 74 schools representing all 4 congressional districts and 6 universities that support AmeriCorps member development and training. The program is funded through a grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service and is governed by the Mississippi Commission for Volunteer Service and the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning. For more information, visit us on the web or call 601-432-6380.

www.americareadsms.org

VOL U N T E E R OPPORTUNITIES AT THE

Do you have a great  IMAGINATION? Are you fun, CREATIVE  and  interested in making a big difference in a child’s life? If you answered Y ES  to these questions and are at least 13 years old, then you should volunteer  at the Mississippi Children’s Museum! For more information in becoming a 

PRICELESS museum volunteer, contact MCM’s Volunteer Coordinator at  volunteer@mcm.ms or scan the QR Code.

For more information, call CONTACT the Crisis Line training office:

VOLUNTEERS ARE PRICELESS!

(601) 982-9888 or (601) 713-4099

July 11 - 17, 2012

or register online at: www.contactthecrisisline.org

26

24-7 Crisis Line:

(601) 713-HELP (4357)!

1.877.793.KIDS (5437) | mschildrensmuseum.com A signature project of the Junior League of Jackson.

JFP VolunteerMCM 4.667x5.9136.indd 1

7/9/12 5:00 PM


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

THIS IS MY MUSEUM.

MAKE IT YOURS.

Save A Life Today. We have a critical need for blood and platelets.

Please Donate Today 601-981-3232 Become a member today.

WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 601-960-1515

CONTACT the Crisis Line ®

We Listen in More Ways than One

CONTACT

Reassurance CONTACT

(601) 713-HELP (4357) been answering the crisis line 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It is an interfaith ministry of LISTENING and AVAILABILITY – nonjudgmental, confidential, anonymous. We help callers who are in crisis (any kind of crisis) by first listening, and then helping them to explore options, providing information and referrals when needed, and showing compassion.

If you’re in crisis and aren’t comfortable talking on the phone, visit www.CrisisChat.org for a live, real-time chat with a trained Chat Specialist. It offers the same service as the traditional crisis line – only it’s ONLINE emotional support. We offer visitors a safe place to find support for any issue they may be facing – relationship problems, suicidal thoughts, domestic violence, job loss, grief, depression, loneliness or ??. It’s confidential, secure, and anonymous – a way of reaching out for help when you don’t know where else to turn.

Trained volunteers make daily calls to elderly or disabled persons who live alone. The Reassurance calls: • Check on the client’s well-being. • Affirm that someone cares about them, by sharing a few minutes of friendly conversation. • Provide emergency follow-up if needed.

All Services Are Free Of Charge! For more information call the Crisis Line office: 601-713-4099 or go to www.contactthecrisisline.org

24-7 Crisis Line: 601- 713-HELP (4357)

jacksonfreepress.com

Since 1971, CONTACT volunteers have

27


Outside the Political Box by Donna Ladd

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July 11 - 17, 2012

Mitchell Earrey, Sommelier at Bravo will offer a private wine & cheese pairing for five.

28

July 28, 6 p.m. - 1 a.m. For more info visit jfpchickball.com or follow us on Twitter @jfpchickball. Email Mitchell at mitchelle@bravobuzz.com

1. Respecting nature and taking care of the earth. 2. Being the change you want to see in the world. 3. Being willing to help pay for needs of the greater community (if wisely spent). 4. Development of relationships and connections between diverse people. 5. Equality and voice for women on all fronts. 6. Questioning the effects of corporate practices and big business. 7. Staying out of massive debt or spending beyond your means. 8. Spiritual and psychological development. 9. Development of individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; special gifts. 10. Volunteering for the greater good. 11. Thinking globally, especially about poverty and climate change. 12. Transcending the left and right in politics. 13. Thinking outside the political box.

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e sat down with local artists Tony Davenport and Anthony DiFatta, who promptly made our heads spin as they discussed their perspectives on creativity, chaos and life. Tony Davenport described the concept of â&#x20AC;&#x153;art being an extension of who you are,â&#x20AC;? and Anthony DiFatta explained

Tony Davenport

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.EW0ROGRESSIVISMPROMOTES

Anthony DiFatta

Epic Change

by Sam Suttle

/LEHUDO /HIW

rustrated that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a fiscal conservative without being lumped in with crazy people screaming about gay marriage? That kind of limited political framing is what our two-party system has wrought todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;helped along by dumb cultural wars and media hungry for either-or sensationalism. Is it this, or is it this? If you think the answer is â&#x20AC;&#x153;neitherâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;both,â&#x20AC;? keep reading. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural creativesâ&#x20AC;? movement is one attempt to reject the binary division in favor of a new, more enlightened political climate. The brainchild of Paul H. Ray, the movement follows a political compass with four sides rather than two extremes on a spectrum. That is, you can be a business conservative with more liberal social ideas, and you still have a place to exist in the political world. Ray pushes the idea of a space for New Progressives that brings together all but the most extreme, including people who routinely feel lost in the middle between the two parties. Sure, you have to think outside the box to believe you can like or dislike a candidate without regard for his or her party, but that is what creativity is all about.

Between Two Tonys

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that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most important part (of art) is when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening.â&#x20AC;? Check out the video interview at jfp. ms/twotonys to see what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like when two Tonys get together and discuss art from the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective. Prepare to be inspired.


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WANT TO MAKE A

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Stewpots Daily Work On a typical day Stewpot will directly touch the lives of over 700 individuals who are in-need or homeless

Sims Transitional Shelter for Women and Children

Nightly, provides an average of 6 women and 12 children shelter and supper and breakfast. The Shelter also purchases school clothes and provides transportation to school and after-school programs

Matt’s Emergency Shelter for Women

Provides an average of 15-20 women a night with shelter, supper and breakfast

Food Pantry

OPEN YOUR HEART. LEND YOUR MUSCLE.

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Provides a daily after-school program to approximately 105 inner-city youth Much More

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Serves 25-30 people weekdays providing groceries for families and individuals

29


8 DAYS p 32 | FILM p 33 | MUSIC p 34

Writers’ Showcase by Dylan Irby SHAWN ROSSI

Inside those bright pink walls, Steve Sutton speaks with a gentle, eloquent voice and a huge smile on his face. You can see the passion for the work the Black Rose is doing in his whole body. At a rehearsal for the show, Sutton pointed to the actors on stage and asked, “How old do you think they are?” They couldn’t have been older than their mid20s. He explained that the group of young actors was there volunteering their time and talent, because nobody gets paid at the Black Rose. “They’re doing it because it’s fun,” Sutton said, gleefully. All productions are done out of genuine love of theater, with the common goal of getting the community involved. The audience may find some of the Dayton Douglass, Michael Kinslow, Nina Dawson and Tonya Blough rehearse for “The Kindness of Strangers,” a one-act play Jacksonian one-act stories familiar, but with original Shawn Rossi wrote for the Black Rose Theatre. elements shaking things up. Shawn Rossi is bringing “The Kindness of Strangers,” a one-act retelling of the classic “A Streetcar he Black Rose Theater is tucked away on the narrow Named Desire.” This version is set in a real-life bar in New Black Street in Brandon. You might not even notice it Orleans that refused to evacuate in the aftermath of Hurricane if you’re just driving through, but when you get close, Katrina. Rossi called it her love letter to both “Streetcar” and the bright pink walls really draw attention. From New Orleans. July 12 to 15, Black Rose is showcasing four works from playAnother group of familiar characters will be taking the wrights in the Jackson area in “A Night of One Acts.” The the- stage in Ray Dailey’s “The Wrath of Frankenstein.” Dailey ater’s president, Nina Dawson, hopes to bring the community grew up loving “Frankenstein,” both the book and the many together around the theater. film adaptations, and hopes to bring a little bit of everything to

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this production. Dailey says he wanted to “bring out the best of all the characters” that he loves. He includes characters not only from the novel, but also the Universal and Hammer films versions of the story, while still telling much the same story. In a sense, it’s a Frankenstein’s monster of the many versions of “Frankenstein.” On the lighter side, “The Sterling Candelabra Social Club” by C.C. Henley, is an adaptation of a scene from a larger play titled “Southern Belles Do Tell.” It’s a comedy piece about a club selection meeting at a junior college in a fictitious town in Mississippi, performed entirely by one actress playing all of the characters. The fourth of these one-act plays is “Love at Last Sight” by Sutton and his wife, Virginia, a comedy about love in a retirement home. Sutton said jokingly that his wife “bleeds all over” his work, and it’s really his writing with her additions and edits. He wrote his play, he said, just to make people laugh, with “no redeeming qualities” or deep meaning—just something fun to enjoy. The goal of this particular show is to give people with less experience, who might not be able to stage something they’ve written at a larger theater, a chance to get their work out in the open, and get the recognition they deserve. It’s hard for budding writers to get a larger theater to take a gamble on their work. Dawson hopes that “A Night of One Acts” can become a yearly tradition, showcasing writers from Jackson who might not ever get a chance otherwise. “A Night of One Acts” is July 12-14 at 7:30 p.m. and July 15 at 2 p.m. at the Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon, 601-825-1293). Non-season tickets are $5.

Screaming For Ice Cream

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July 11 - 17, 2012

ummer can be a brutal time of year for Mississippians, leaving many looking for ways to cool off. Sometimes, the sweetest relief is ice cream. Luckily, the Jackson Zoo will have plenty of the sweet treat, along with other ways to beat the heat at their 18th annual Trustmark Ice Cream Safari July 14. Each of the 18 stations will feature a different flavor of ice cream served by some of your favorite local media personalities, ranging from radio to print journalism (including the Jackson Free Press). The event is also a contest, as visitors vote for their favorite scooper. “It is up to the scooper to sell their personality and their ice cream,” zoo events coordinator Carol Woodson said. Details about voting will be given at the event. Each flavor, donated by Blue Bell Ice Cream, is named after an animal in the zoo, 30 such as the JFP’s flavor, Cougars and Cream,

COURTESY JACKSON ZOO

by Vergie Redmond

Come enjoy ice cream served by your favorite media celebrities at the Jackson Zoo’s 18th annual Ice Cream Safari.

as well as Hippo Crunch and Turtle Fudge. On July 2, the Zoo opened a zoothemed splash pad, giving kids another way to cool down. It can hold up to 180 children at one time, and the price to use it is included in the admission fee. The splash pad will be

open during the Ice Cream Safari. For 12 years, WLBT news anchor Howard Ballou dominated the best ice cream scooper award, but that changed a few years ago. “In recent history (2009-2011) Y101 DJs Nate and Murphy have won,” Woodson said. That same year news Fox 40 in Jackson won best Ice Cream for their Blue Bell Gator Crunch. Last year the scoopers served up a record 8,800 ice-cream cones to patrons at the zoo. Will Ballou regain his title as best scooper, or will Nate and Murphy continue to hold the spot—or will the JFP take them all down? Cast your vote at the Jackson Zoo Ice Cream Safari. The Ice Cream Safari is Saturday, July 14, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Normal admission prices apply: $10 for adults and $6.75 for children ages 12 and under, plus a $2 ice cream tasting fee. Friends of the Zoo will only be required to pay the tasting fee. Due to a new policy initiated by the zoo, parking is free.

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his year when you attend the Safari, be sure to stop by the Jackson Free Press booth and vote for Team JFP: Kathleen Mitchell, Jacob Fuller and R.L. Nave serving Cougars and Cream ice cream (it’s remarkably similar to Cookies and Cream, and no cougars were harmed in creating it).


Choctaw Pageantry and Culture by Adria Walker and Christianna Jackson

COURTESY INDIGENOUS

ball is a really big event where eight different Choctaw communities compete,” Farve said. The sport is so popular, the tournament starts a week in advance, and only the top teams make it to play during the fair. In the past, stickball games could involve as few as 20 players or as many as 300, and the goals could be miles apart. Stickball today consists of two 12-foot-high wooden posts, about 4 inches wide, one at each end of the field. Players earn points by hitting the opposing team’s post with a special ball called a towa, using handmade sticks called kabocca. Choctaw craftsmen make the towas by wrapping cloth tightly around a small stone or piece of wood. Once it reaches the desired size, crafters weave a leather thong or deer hide over the cloth. RezRun 2012 is new to the fair this year. Including a one-mile run, 5k and 10k races, RezRun adds a modern activity to the fair’s roster. All runners and visitors are welcome. The race will award medals to the first 300 participants to cross the finish line. The male and female winner of the 10K race will receive $300 each, and the male and female winners of the 5K race will receive $200. Online registration for the race ends Thursday. Nashville-style country music has been a part of the fair since the 1960s and ’70s, and country musicians now headline the activities. Several famous singers, including Chet Atkins, Connie Smith, Lester Flatt, Mac Wisemen, Jerry Reed, Johnny Gimble, Pig Robbins and Merle Travis have performed at the fair. This year, country music stars Steve Azar, Chris Cage, Jo Dee Messina, Clint Black, country music band The Lost Trailers and blues-rock group Indigenous will perform. Particularly this year, the Choctaw Fair is a melding of past and present, of heritage and modernity. For Watkins, it will be special to pass on her crown and to see a woman greet fairgoers as chief. “As a female, it’s great to see a lot of modern females taking on positions (in the council),” she says. “Our chief, Chief Phyliss J. Anderson, she started out where I am. She was once princess of the tribe.” Watkins enjoys the opportunity to show off her culture with the fair. “It’s not every day that we get to show who we are and where we come from,” she says. “Arts and crafts, beadwork, the traditional game of stickball. … It’s something that you really need to participate in and see in person.” The fair opens July 11 and runs through July 14 at the Choctaw Indian Reservation (Highway 16 W.) in Choctaw. Tickets are $10 for adult day passes and $15 for adult season passes. Student passes are $5 for the day or $10 for the season. Children 5 and under get in free. For more information, call 601-656-5251, or visit choctawindianfair.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

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n Wednesday, July 11, Chief Phyliss J. Anderson parts of my dress, so it really was the community that made will make history as she addresses the crowd on it, no one person,” she says. Preparations take a long time, opening night of the Choctaw Indian Fair as the first Farve says, because the dresses and jewelry are often handfemale chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw In- made, and the beadwork elaborate. To celebrate that, Watkins dians. “The chief will hold court every night at 6 (p.m.) to performed a monologue on the beauty of Choctaw beadwork welcome the visitors and to recognize dignitaries from other for her talent. tribes,” Melford Farve, communications officer, said. Being chosen as the Choctaw Princess is very prestiEvery year since gious—the winner 1949, the Mississippi will have many reBand of Choctaw sponsibilities over the Indians has hosted next year, including the fair during the traveling around the second week of July. country, frequently The 63rd Missiswith the Tribal Miko, sippi Choctaw Fair, or Chief, to promote held this year from awareness of the July 11-14 in ChocMississippi Band of taw, mixes music, Choctaws. “I can get sport and more. “The sent anywhere, from fair is an opportunity around the commuto showcase Choctaw nity to outside the culture, jewelry, dancstate,” Watkins says. ing and language,” “From singing the Farve said. national anthem in For the 57th our language to takyear, young Chocing pictures at schools taw women will or signing autographs, compete for the title (the duties) can vary.” of Choctaw Indian After the pageant Princess. The pageant ends, things turn a kicks off Wednesday. little rougher with Contestants compete the Men’s World Sein interviews on topics ries of Stickball game. ranging from current Stickball, or Ishtabevents to Choctaw oli, is a physical, anculture, a talent porcient game with few tion, traditional dress rules. In recent years, and formal dress. In women began playing the traditional dress competitively in their component, each own stickball chamcontestant will wear pionship. Known by Blues-rock group Indigenous is one of the headliners topping off several an ornate beadwork the Choctaws as “the days of artistry and sport at the Choctaw Indian Fair. dress while carrylittle brother of war,” ing a hand-woven stickball is one of the Choctaw basket. oldest field sports in Last year’s princess, 19-year-old Kursten Watkins, says America. Instead of warring against one another, Choctaws the fair, and especially the pageant, is a way for the commu- played stickball because it was the “civilized” way to settle disnity to come together. “I had different people make different putes. The game is very fast, and tackling is allowed. “Stick-

31


BEST BETS July 11-18, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 7/11

JERRICK SMITH

The Choctaw Indian Fair kicks off today at the Choctaw Reservation (Highway 16 W., Choctaw) and runs through July 14. Call 601-650-7450 for ticket info. … The Jackson 2000 luncheon featuring Hank Holmes, director of the Mississippi Department of Archives, is at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $12, $10; email bevelyn_branch@att.net to RSVP. … See the opera film “Les Contes d’Hoffman” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $13 children; call 601-936-5856. … The MAC All-Star Basketball Games are at 7 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) in A.E. Wood Coliseum. $5; call 601-924-3020. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers & Blues. … B Social is at 7 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe. … Tom Bertram is at Fenian’s.

and runs through July 15. $10, $7 children 12 and under; call 601-948-3233, ext. 222. … Truth & Salvage Co. and Kevin Gordon perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 800-745-3000; ardenland.net. … Tommy Burton performs at Mediterranean Fish and Grill. … Vagabond Swing and Mama’s Love perform at Hal & Mal’s.

FRIDAY 7/13

The Grassroots Blues Festival kicks off at 6 p.m. at Elliott Field (Interstate 55 N. at Exit 195, Duck Hill). Continues July 14 at 5 p.m. grassrootsblues.com. … Robert King performs at 6 p.m. at Jaco’s Tacos. … The Friends of Terry present the dinner theater “The Sound of Plaid” at 7 p.m. at Terry Depot (Railroad and Cunningham avenues, Terry). Encore show July 13. $20; call 601-540-2728. … The play “Gold in the Hills” is at 7:30 p.m. at Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Encore show July 14. $10, $5 children; call 601-636-0471. … The Smooth Funk Band plays at 8 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe. … Goldylocks is at Club Magoo’s.

SATURDAY 7/14

The annual Ice Cream Safari is at 9 a.m. at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Advance tickets available. $12, $8.75 children, $2 tasting fee for members; call 601-352-2580. Come vote for the JFP team. … Beer & Bones is from noon-4 a.m. at F. Jones Corner and includes a backyard grilling competition, a domino tournament, and an arts and music festival. $10; call 601-983-1148; facebook.com/fjonescorner. … The Bastille Day Dinner is at 5 p.m. at Anjou Restaurant (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). $55; call 601-707-0587 to RSVP. … The International Ballet Competition Reunion Gala is at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. The after-party is at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) $20-$65, $55 after-party; call 601-973-9249 or 601-355-9853; usaibc.com. … Gary Morris and Shannon McNally perform at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 800-745-3000; ardenland.net. … Ron Sennett performs at 6 p.m. at Cerami’s. … JAG and Sun Hotel play at Martin’s. $5 cover. … Yellow Scarf hosts “A Night of Poetry” from 8-10 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at door; call 347-754-0668. … Remedy Krewe plays at Ole Tavern. J. Lee Productions (Jimmie Lee is above) presents a screening of stage plays and documentaries July 16-21 at Russell C. Davis Planetarium.

July 11-17, 2012

32

Brice Media (6712 Old Canton Road, Suite 6, Ridgeland) hosts a ribbon cutting and grand opening from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Enjoy viewing artwork, food and music from DJ Young Venom. Free; call 601-790-0259. … The MAC All-Star Tennis Tournament is at 1 p.m. at Parham Bridges Park (5055 Old Canton Road), at the Tennis Center. Free; call 601-924-3020. … The 60th anniversary screening of “Singin’ in the Rain” is at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. … “A Night of One Acts” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon) and runs through July 15. $5; call 601-825-1293. … The play “Disney’s The Little Mermaid Jr.” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.)

Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the films “Goodbye First Love” at 2 p.m. and “The Raid: Redemption” at 5 p.m. $7 per film; msfilm.org. … The second annual Independence Battle of the Bands is from 5-9 p.m. at Newell Field (Riverside Drive). $10; email maaband@gmail.com. … The Generation NXT Indie Concert Series is at 6 p.m. at Dreamz JXN. … DoubleShotz plays at Pelican Cove.

MONDAY 7/16

The True South Classic kicks off today at Annandale Golf Club (419 Annandale Parkway, Madison) and runs through July 22. Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. $20 per day, $5 parking per day, $10-$50 parking permit, $100 package; call 601-898-4653; truesouthclassic. com. … J. Lee Productions’ Fourth Anniversary Screenings kick off at 7 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) and runs through July 21. Options include “Why Am I Single” and the “Black Love” documentaries. $5 per film; call 601-960-1550; jleeplays.com.

TUESDAY 7/17

Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “The Bachelor Prince” at 7 p.m. at Wasabi Sushi & Bar (100 E. Capital St. Suite 105). $42.50 plus tax and tip; call 601-856-9696 to RSVP. … See the film “As Seen Through These Eyes” at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the Yates Community Room. Free; call 601-960-1515.

WEDNESDAY 7/18

Historian Timothy B. Smith speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Truth & Salvage Co. performs July 12 at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall DOUBLE DOWN PRODUCTIONS

THURSDAY 7/12

SUNDAY 7/15


6A0=3E84F

DIVERSIONS|film

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

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To Rome With Love

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Magic Mike

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Ted

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People Like Us PG13 3-D Brave

3-D The Amazing Spiderman PG13

T

Madea’s Witness Protection PG13

The Amazing Spiderman (non 3-D) PG13

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Brave (non 3-D) PG Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (non 3-D) R Madagscar 3 (non 3-D)

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3-D Katy Perry: Part Of Me PG

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more intimate because Peter’s parents are involved with Connors’ past. When Connors’ alter ego The Lizard finally appears, he emerges as an intimidating creature that will probably creep out plenty of viewers. The filmmakers portray The Lizard faithfully, and in a way that makes this lesser-known member of the Spider’s rogues gallery shine. Andrew Garfield brings a personality to Spider-Man that In general, the charmakes the newest version worth catching. acter relationships are truly beautiful in “Amazing Spihis summer, legendary web-slinger der-Man.” Peter and Gwen have a genuine Spider-Man is hitting movie theaters love, less forced and contrived as the relationin a star-studded blockbuster. Sound ship of the old Peter Parker and Mary Jane familiar? It hasn’t been long since Sam Watson. There are still some awkward love Raimi brought us his version of the comic- scenes, but they never drag on, and some are book hero in (an increasingly ridiculous) tril- quite entertaining. Aunt May (Sally Field) is ogy of films—all three premiered in the last no longer oblivious or useless as a character; decade. Fans loved the first two films, but she’s fully taken on the role of Peter’s mother. “Spider-Man 3” left viewers flat. It seems odd Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen), too, is a real fathat we’d be revisiting the Spider’s origins on ther figure to Peter, who even calls him “dad” the big screen so soon, and yet, here we are: at one point. Peter Parker is once again slinging webs and Gwen’s father (Denis Leary) is a wonthrowing punches in “The Amazing Spider- derful character who comes off as harsh, but Man,” and this time, he is at his best. human. Some of the best moments in the An all-new cast playing familiar charac- film take place between him and Peter, in ters is a bit jarring and unwelcome at first, and out of the spider suit. but their solid performances are part of what The humanity of these relationships makes this retreading of an old path worth speak to what made Spider-Man so popular watching. Andrew Garfield brings emotional to begin with—we all feel like we could be realism to Peter Parker, and the film does a Spider-Man, like we want to be Spider-Man, fantastic job of highlighting his loss—first of because he’s not so different from us. his parents, and then the fateful death of his Still, it’s not a perfect film. Glaringly abuncle Ben Parker. sent from this version are two characters that Raimi’s “Spider-Man” basically played made the older films great. J. Jonah Jamesout as, “My uncle is dead, so I am heroic on, editor-in-chief of The Daily Bugle, is now.” But the reboot, directed by Marc never so much as mentioned in “Amazing,” Webb, handles the transformation in a much though several issues of the newspaper do more realistic light. Peter Parker doesn’t be- appear. More eerie is the off-screen presence come Spider-Man right away, but when he of Norman Osborne. The audience glimpses does, he’s fantastic. Tobey McGuire never his silhouette, though the face is indiscernbrought humor and lightheartedness to the ible, and the main characters mention him wall-crawler. His cocky attitude and not a number of times. But the man makes no only bravery in the face of, but readiness to appearance in the film. Without saying anyopenly mock, death are defining characteris- thing, the film fairly heavily implies Osborne tics of Garfield’s Spider-Man. Not to say he’s is in the running for a future installment, and a court jester, but this Spider-Man seems to it would not be surprising to see him in the know he’s strong, and he has fun with it. next movie. The new story sticks more closely to One can only hope (as I do) that if these the comic book origins of Spider-Man. For two return, the actors from Raimi’s trilogy are example, he doesn’t make his own webs bio- allowed to reprise their roles. Willem Dafoe logically, and Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone) is as Norman, aka the Green Goblin, and J. K. his girlfriend right from the get-go. But new Simmons as Jameson were the absolute best facets add complexity to the tale. In a twist casting decisions ever made in the history of more typically reserved for Batman’s canon, film, in my opinion. They owned those charSpider-Man has conflicts with the NYPD acters, so let’s hope they’re up for at least one repeatedly in this film and, for once, the more web-slinging adventure. cops have a decent justification for not trustWhile some of the best parts of the olding the super-hero (though I don’t want to er films are left out, there’s more than enough spoil why). new content in “The Amazing Spider-Man” Equally as well done is the villain rela- to please the audience, bringing moviegoers a tionship. Dr. Connors (Rhys Ifans) and Pete’s better Spider-Man than they’ve been treated relationship echoes the one between Norman to before. He’s amazing, he’s spectacular—he’s Osborne and Peter in the earlier films, but is your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!

Listings for Fri. July 13 - Thurs. July 19 2012

33


COURTESY STORAGE 24

DIVERSIONS|music

Hot as Cayenne by Ceili Hale

S

torage 24 has won JFP’s Best of Jackson’s Best Rock twice and Best Original Band twice already, but such labels do the band’s unique and distinctive sound little justice. At first listen, Storage 24, fronted by singer Baby Phred, sounds like a typical rock band, but listen closer, and the R&B sound they infuse into their music becomes apparent. “It’s a flavor of rock, it’s a flavor of R&B, and it’s a flavor of metal. I think it’s just a big fusion of all the genres of music,” Phred says. Phred has been making this kind of music (influenced by bands like Linkin Park) for 10 years. Three years ago, Storage 24 matured into what it is today, joined by rapper Brad “Kamikaze” Franklin, lead guitarist Daniel Warren, bassist Blake Thomas and drummer Adam Williams. Storage 24 has won national awards, including Band of the Year in Dothan, Ala., and Band of the Year at Club La Vela in Panama City Beach, Fla., the largest club in the country. Phred attributes their success to their talents. “I think we were the best band in that moment,” he says. “I just have confidence in Storage 24.” Currently, Storage 24 is working on a new album. It’s gonna be hot as cayenne pepper,” Phred says. Storage 24 LLC, their own record label, recorded the untitled album, which has 12 songs. The album’s lyrics are all about experiences the band

Natalie’s Notes

members have been through. “I write everything that’s real, whether it’s bad dreams or love or hate; everything that comes out of my brain is real ... everything I write is a story of my life,” Phred says. This realness is evident in “No Surrender,” a journey through a haunting dream. The song has a two-part music video to accompany Storage 24 says it is “taking over the world of music.” it that shows a man chasing after his love, who turns into a monster. Storage 24 makes relatable and personal music, and that’s song they perform seems just as intense at that moment as it exactly what Phred says he wants people to take away. was when they wrote and recorded it. “Whatever song we’re singing or performing at that Phred emphasizes the need for up-and-coming musicians time, I want you to have the same feeling I had when I to “stay focused and always appreciate your God-given talents. wrote it,” he says. And never, ever, ever forget your fans. Fans are everything. I Storage 24, with its blend of rock and R&B, brings love my fans.” something unique to the Jackson scene in both recorded In the future, Phred says Storage 24 will take over the music and live shows, which Phred says are “explosive. It’s a world of music. But for now, you can catch them live with wild moment.” Storage 24 exudes pure energy on stage—they Louisiana band Nottaway at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce jump around and demand the audience’s attention, and every St., 601-948-0888) on July 14 around 9 p.m.

The Power of Mix Tapes

by Natalie Long

July 11 - 17, 2012

34

we’d never be apart—I’ve got some if y’all • "Going Up the Country" — Canned Heat • "Hook" — Blues Traveler (my best guy ever want a good laugh.) And let’s not for- • "Shove" — L7 friend from junior college and I wore get the “we broke up and I can’t live without • "Ballad of Jayne" — LA Guns this song out in the summer of ’96.) you” mix tape you’d make for your ex with • "Somebody’s Crying" and "San Francisco • "Keep On Smilin’" — Wet Willie (a great enough sad songs on there that would either Days" — Chris Isaak song to ride the backroads blaring.) make them take you back or date your • "El Camino" — Buffalo Nickel (evbest friend … which would only cause eryone tells me how much they love you to create yet MORE mix tapes, one this song) for the ex with all of “our” songs, then • "Shannon" — Let The Music Play one for the new girlfriend with songs • "Temple of the Dog" — Say Hello like, LL Cool J’s “Mama Said Knock You to Heaven Out” or Scandal’s “The Warrior.” • "Summertime" — Janis Joplin The other day, I came across a huge • "Willin’" — Little Feat crate of mix tapes I made while I was in • "Dinosaur" — Hank Williams Jr. high school and college. I sat there and (a must-have for making a country played those tapes on my stereo and block.) couldn’t help but laugh hysterically at There’s nothing quite as nostalgic as a mix tape. • "Head Over Heels" — The Go-Go’s how my musical tastes have changed • "The Joker" — Steve Miller Band over the years. I even found a (gasp!) • "Eye in the Sky" — Alan Parsons New Kids on the Block mix tape. (Hey, • "Blue Canoe" — Blue Mountain (what’s Project gimme a break. I was 14.) But I was quite better than enjoying summer with Mis• "You’re Only Lonely" — J.D. Souther impressed that I had some pretty notable artsissippi’s most well-respected band?) • "Tangerine" — Led Zeppelin ists on these tapes for a teenager growing up • "Slow Ride" — Foghat • "It Was a Good Day" — Ice Cube (this with limited exposure to music: Janis Joplin, • "California Love" — Tupac Shakur reminds me of basketball camp) Linda Ronstadt, Joni Mitchell, Rush, Fleet- • "Surrender" — Cheap Trick • "I Won’t Forget You" — Poison wood Mac, The Rolling Stones, etc. • "The Sun in California" — The Autumn • "Fishin' in the Dark" — Nitty Gritty I have compiled of list of songs for Defense (Wilco’s Pat Sansone and John Dirt Band your summer enjoyment (that I hope you’ll Stirratt’s side project that rules.) Have a great week, and please keep nicely and legally purchase on iTunes) so • "California (All the Way)" — Luna supporting live local homegrown muyou can have a playlist to enjoy for the rest • "Come On" — Lucinda Williams (best sic. If you see me out and about, please of this summer. break-up song) say hello! TRIP BURNS

A

h, mix tapes. I know it’s illegal now, but back in my day, you brought your pack of Memorex tapes to all the carport dances or slumber parties we had in Bogue Chitto, and you would sit there for hours making copies of your favorite songs. (Does anyone remember getting a tape you hated, putting paper in the top of the little boxes, and rerecording over it if you were low on mix tapes? Yes, I’m guilty of this. I did it to my Rico Suave tape someone gave me for my 13th birthday. Sorry, Julie.) Years ago, my first “real” boyfriend came along while I was in junior high at Bogue Chitto and made me my first mix tape. While I’m sure his big brother had a hand in helping him make the tape, the songs he put on there changed my music style forever. As a girl who grew up on two radio stations in south Mississippi (country and western), his eclectic tape of Led Zeppelin, Gorky Park, Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, and many others lit a musical fire in me that has stayed with me for over 20 years, and for that I thank him for it. I cannot tell you how many countless mix tapes I made for boyfriends growing up in junior high and high school (some even had me speaking into my “jambox” to give them a commentary on how much their 14-year-old love meant to me and how


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Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name

Weekly Lunch Specials ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

07/11

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LADIES

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July 12

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SATURDAY

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LADIES DRINK FREE Friday

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Adam Doleac Band Saturday

July 14

Remedy Krewe

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MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

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September 22, 2012

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July 16

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

July 17

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday

July 18

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214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712 -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;¢ 2006 â&#x20AC;¢ 2008 â&#x20AC;¢ 2009 â&#x20AC;¢ 2010 â&#x20AC;¢ 2011 â&#x20AC;¢ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson â&#x20AC;¢ 601.956.7079

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jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 7/11 Restaurant Open As Usual

THURSDAY 7/12 Vagabond Swing with Mama’s Love

FRIDAY 7/13 Storage 24

SATURDAY 7/14 Kevin Costner & Modern West with Sarah Jarosz

MONDAY 7/16 Central MS Blues Society “Blue Monday”

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, July 11th

CHALMERS & BABY JAN (Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, July 12th

BARRY LEACH

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, July 13th

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

(Jazz/Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, July 14th

FEARLESS FOUR

(Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday,July 17th

JESSE ROBINSON

TUESDAY 7/17

(Blues) 6-10, $5 Cover

PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Restaurant)

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT!

NOW SERVING Soft Shell Crab Po-Boys!

-Tuesdays Only-

Wednesday, July 18th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, July 19th

CHRIS GILL & SOUL SHAKERS (Blues) 7-10, No Cover

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Friday, July 20th

with corn bread and tea or coffee

(Piano Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Blue Plate Lunch

$8

25

EDEN BRENT

Saturday, July 21st

THE VAMPS

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! July 11 - 17, 2012

36

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

Eighth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 28, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this year’s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. Get involved, volunteer, and donate art, money and gifts at chickball@jacksonfreepress.com. More details at jfpchickball.com. Follow on Twitter @ jfpchickball. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16. Beer & Bones July 14, noon-4 a.m., at F. Jones Corner (303 N. Farish St.). The event includes a backyard grilling competition, a domino tournament, and an arts and music festival. Art vendors and cooking teams must register. $10, $50 grilling entry fee, $25 art vendor fee (includes two admission passes); call 601-983-1148. Top of the Hops Beer Festival July 28, 4-8 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The annual event includes more than 150 beer samples, seminars, games and live music. VIP guests receive entry at 3 p.m. with free food and an exclusive beer selection. After-party at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., $5 cover). $35, $75 VIP, $15-$25 designated driver; call 800-745-3000. Currently Showing at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $6.50, $5.50 seniors, $4 children ages 4-12; call 601-960-1552. • “Mummies: Secrets of the Pharaohs.” Learn about Egypt and its mysterious mummies. Shows are weekdays at noon and Saturdays at 4 p.m. • “Wild Ocean.” The film shows the migration of marine animals and their encounters with humans. Shows are Monday-Saturday at 2 p.m.

COMMUNITY “History Is Lunch” July 11, noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Watch historical films of Ruleville from the 1940s-1950s from the MDAH collection. Bring popcorn. Free; call 601-576-6998. MAC Mississippi Sports Medicine All-Star Basketball Games July 11, at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in A.E. Wood Coliseum. The girls’ game is at 7 p.m., and the boys’ game is at 8:30 p.m. $5; call 601-924-3020. Teacher Workshop July 12-13, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Participants earn .6 CEU credits. Pre-registration required. Lunch included. $40 per day, $35 members; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. Brice Media Ribbon Cutting and Grand Opening July 12, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Brice Media (6712 Old Canton Road, Suite 6, Ridgeland). Enjoy viewing artwork, food and music from DJ Young Venom at the firm’s new location. Receive discounts on photography or design work. Free; call 601-790-0259; brice-media.com.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

Jackson 2000 Luncheon July 11, 11:45 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Hank Holmes, director of the Mississippi Department of Archives, presents: “Plans for the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum.” RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org.

(Jazz/Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

MAC All-Star Tennis Tournament July 12, 1 p.m. at Parham Bridges Park (5055 Old Canton Road), at the Tennis Center. The Mississippi Association of Coaches hosts the annual event. Free; call 601924-3020. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting July 13, 6 p.m. at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol Street). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0002. Bastille Day Dinner July 14, 5 p.m., at Anjou Restaurant (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). Enjoy a

four-course meal and accordion music. RSVP. $55; call 601-707-0587. Dog Day Afternoons July 15, noon at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Bring your dog to the Art Garden for an afternoon of play Sundays at noon through Sept. 30. Shelter dogs available for adoption. Free; call 601-960-1515. Weekly Summer Activities for Teens July 15, 6-9 p.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). Sundays through Aug. 4, teens are welcome to enjoy socializing, basketball games, card games, music and more. Security provided. Free; call 601-960-1084. Mississippi Places and Faces July 16-20, 8:30 a.m.-noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The camp for children in grades 4-6 includes viewing artifacts, making crafts and touring historic buildings in Jackson. Pre-registration required. $50; call 601-576-6800. Zoo Connections Teacher Workshop July 17, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Teachers for grades K-2 learn how to incorporate a visit to the zoo into a curriculum. Bring lunch. $15; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241. Nature Nuts Preschool Program July 18, 10-11 a.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton), in Price Hall. The nature discovery program is for children ages 2-5. Registration required. $5, $3 members, $1 additional child; call 601-926-1104. “This Is My Vote” Campaign. The Mississippi State Conference NAACP seeks to boost voter registration among African-Americans. Call 601-353-8452.

FAMILY Choctaw Indian Fair July 11-14, at Choctaw Reservation (Highway 16, Choctaw). The 63rd annual event includes the Choctaw Indian Princess Pageant, stickball games, guest speakers and music. Performers include Steve Azar, Chris Cagle, Indigenous, Jo Dee Messina, The Lost Trailers and Clint Black. $10 one day, $15 four days, $5-$10 students, children 5 and under free; call 601650-7450; choctawindianfair.com. Ice Cream Safari July 14, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Sample more than a dozen ice cream flavors scooped by local television, radio and print media celebrities, and vote for your favorite flavor as well as favorite celebrity scooper. Advance tickets available. $12, $8.75 children, $2 tasting fee for members; call 601-352-2580.

WELLNESS Poker Run July 11, 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Participants receive five playing cards during the three-mile run/walk, and the people with the best hand and worst hand win prizes. After-party at Cazadores (500 Highway 51, Suite R, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-899-9696. “Fuel the New Year” Nutrition Workshop July 12, 7 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). The topic is making lasting health changes. $10; call 601-899-9696.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Les Contes d’Hoffmann” July 11, 6:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera’s film is about the life of German writer E.T.A. Hoffmann $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children. • “Singin’ in the Rain” 60th Anniversary Event July 12, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. The showing includes behind-the-scenes extras. $11.50, $10.50 seniors, $9.50 children.


jfpevents Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the Shadows? July 11, 10:30 a.m. at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison). The Madison County Library System Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Specialists perform the story of Little Red Riding Hood as a shadow puppet play. 601-856-4536; call 601-856-4536.

COURTESY INDIA RAMEY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Night of One Actsâ&#x20AC;? July 12-15, at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Enjoy one-act plays from local playwrights. Shows are July 12-14 at 7:30 p.m. and July 15 at 2 p.m. $5; call 601-825-1293.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gold in the Hillsâ&#x20AC;? July 13-14, 7:30 p.m., at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Set in the 1890s, it features a relentless hero, a winsome heroine, a ruthless villain, and the wilder side of city life in the infamous New York Bowery. $10, $5 ages 12 and under; call 601636-0471; vicksburgtheatreguild.com. International Ballet Competition Reunion Gala July 14, 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Performers include Brooklyn Mack, Joseph Gatti, Alys Shee and the Trey McIntyre Project Dancers. A party follows the performance. Visit usaibc.com or call for information on master classes. After-party at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) $20-$65, $55 after-party; call 601973-9249 or 601-355-9853; usaibc.com.

Goldylocks Fri. & Sat. â&#x20AC;˘ July 13 & 14

Art House Cinema Downtown July 15, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goodbye First Loveâ&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m. and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Raid: Redemptionâ&#x20AC;? at 5 p.m. Refreshments sold. $7 per film; msfilm.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Junkyardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Songstress

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Little Mermaid Jr.â&#x20AC;? July 12-15, at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). Students from the Broadway Jr. Summer Camp present the musical July 12-14 at 7 p.m. and July 15 at 2 p.m. $10, $7 children 12 and under; call 601-948-3233, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sound of Plaidâ&#x20AC;? July 13-14, 7 p.m. at Terry Depot (Railroad and Cunningham avenues, Terry). The Friends of Terry present the dinner theater about a singing group that returns from the dead to perform. Advance tickets only. Dinner served at 6 p.m. $20; call 601-540-2728.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bachelor Princeâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater July 17, 7 p.m. at Wasabi Sushi & Bar (100 E. Capital St. Suite 105). Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the medieval â&#x20AC;&#x153;whodunnitâ&#x20AC;? about a princeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reluctant search for a bride. Cash bar at 6 p.m.; seating at 6:30 p.m. RSVP. Tax and tip not included. $42.50; call 601-856-9696. Collectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Movie Screening July 17, 7 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the Yates Community Room. The film â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Seen Through These Eyesâ&#x20AC;? is about Holocaust survivors who used creativity to resist oppression. Cash bar at 6:30 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1515.

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Thu - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

MUSIC Events at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Call 800745-3000; ardenland.net. â&#x20AC;˘ Truth & Salvage Co. with Kevin Gordon July 12, 7:30 p.m. Truth & Salvage Co. plays music with country and rock influences. Kevin Gordon is a songwriter and guitarist from Nashville. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. $8 in advance, $10 at the door. â&#x20AC;˘ Gary Morris July 14, 8 p.m. The country music artist is known for the 1983 ballad â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wind Beneath My Wings.â&#x20AC;? Shannon McNally also performs. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Grassroots Blues Festival July 13-14, at Elliott Field (Interstate 55 N. at Exit 195, Duck Hill). Performers include the Kattawar Brothers, Homemade Jamz and Louis â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gearshifterâ&#x20AC;? Youngblood. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate, $5 high-school students, $1 ages 13 and under; grassrootsblues.com. Second Annual Independence Battle of the Bands July 15, 5-9 p.m. at Newell Field (Riverside Drive). Performers include the Dancing Dolls and the Mississippi Alumni Allstar Band. $10; email maaband@ gmail.com.

Wednesday - July 11

Thursday - July 12 Open Mic w/ Eric Robinson 7-11 Ladies Night

Friday - July 13

Back Roads Saturday - July 14

Point Blank July 14 | 9:00pm â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE!

SouthBound Sunday - July 15 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

more EVENTS, page 38

July 13 | 9:00pm

NEW KARAOKE SHOW 9:00pm - 2:00 am

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. â&#x20AC;˘ July 11, 5 p.m. at Jeff Crook signs â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sleeping and the Dead.â&#x20AC;? Reading at 5:30 p.m. $24.99 book. $24.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ July 13, 5 p.m., Karen White signs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sea Change.â&#x20AC;? Reading at 5:30 p.m. $15 book.

Monkey Bone

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

â&#x20AC;˘ $3 Bloody Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

Follow us on Facebook

jacksonfreepress.com

Singer India Ramey brings an altcountry vibe to Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s July 13.

J. Lee Productionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fourth Anniversary Screenings July 16-21, 7-9 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Enjoy a stage play recording or short film nightly. Options include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Am I Singleâ&#x20AC;? and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Loveâ&#x20AC;? documentaries. $5 per film; call 960-1550; jleeplays.com.

37


jfpevents from page 37 BE THE CHANGE Mississippi Blood Services Blood Drive July 15, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., at Anderson United Methodist Church (6205 Hanging Moss Road), in the fellowship hall. Donors receive a T-shirt and an entry into a drawing for a 2012 Dodge Ram 1500 truck. Must be 17 (16 with signed parental consent) and have ID. Call 800-817-7449. True South Classic July 16-22, at Annandale Golf Club (419 Annandale Parkway, Madison). Part of the PGA Tour, golfers compete for the FedEx Cup. Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. $20 per day, $5 parking per day, $10-$50 parking permit, $100 package; call 601-898-4653; truesouthclassic.com. • July 14, 11 a.m., Noraine Moree and Dave Berry sign “White Shirts.” $25 book. • July 14, 1 p.m., R. Scott Anderson signs “The Uncommon Thread.” $29.95 book. • July 16, 5 p.m., editor Wendy Reed signs “Circling Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality.” Reading at 5:30 p.m. $19.95 book. Pages of Promise Summer Reading Book Club Program, at local Jackson libraries. United Way hosts the program to encourage youth in grades K-12 to read during the summer break. Book club sites include Charles Tisdale Library, Eudora Welty Library and Richard Wright Library; call for dates and times. Registration required. Free; call 601948-4725; myunitedway.com.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Call 601-898-8345. • Celebration Brunch Class July 14, 9 a.m.-noon. Topics include making custard, cooking eggs, working with puff pastry, and making and glazing a fresh fruit tart. For ages 16 and up. $79. • Cookies for Canines Class July 15, 1-3:30 p.m. Learn to make dog treats from human-grade ingredients. A portion of the tuition will be donated to a local animal shelter. $59. • Kids Camp: Hot Cooking Trends July 16-20, 9-11 a.m. Learn about international cuisine and making educated ingredient choices. $325. Super Duper Mini Chefs Event July 14, 2-4 p.m., at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland). Children ages 3-8 enjoy culinary demonstrations and interactive games such as “iCarly: Groovy Foodie!” Bring a non-perishable item to donate to Stewpot. Visit simon.com/kidgits. “Puppets and Plays” Puppetry Camp July 16-20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). The camp is for children in grades 4-6. $295; call 601-974-1130. Kids Fun and Healthy Cooking Workshop July 17, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). William Furlong teaches the class in the Academy Building. For ages 8-12. $35; call 601-631-2997. Oil Painting Classes, at 153 E. Fulton St., Canton. Pat Walker teaches the class on Tuesdays. Day and evening classes available. Call 601-855-0107 for price. Shut Up and Write! Classes at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for one of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd’s popular nonfiction and creative writing classes. Fall classes forming now. Six-week sessions held every other Saturday. $150 ($75 deposit required); call 601362-6121, ext. 16; get on mailing list at class@ jacksonfreepress.com.

July 11 - 17, 2012

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS July Art Exhibit, at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place). See Vicksburg native Andrew Bucci’s landscapes of the Mississippi Delta. Open weekdays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Free; call 601-982-4844; brownsfineart.com.

38

Paul Buford Art Exhibit, at Fitness Lady North (331 Sunnybrook Road, Ridgeland). See the Mis-

sissippi architect’s watercolor paintings in the gallery through Aug. 8. Open Monday-Thursday from 5 a.m.-9 p.m., Friday from 5 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-5 p.m. Free; call 601-354-0066 or 601-856-0535; email lauren@ celiabarrettdesign.net. “Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites,” at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The interactive exhibit for ages 8 and younger is derived from seven children’s picture books. Open Tuesday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-6 p.m. through Aug. 26. $8, children under 12 and members free; call 601981-5469 or 877-793-5437. “Add Art ... To Table, Walls and More,” at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See Roger Long’s portraits and Jenny Thomas’ glasswork through Aug. 30. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-432-4111. Doodle 4 Google Mississippi Exhibition, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. See drawings from students in grades K-12 through Aug. 12. Free; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart.org. Fun Fridays July 13, 10 a.m.-noon at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Children participate in interactive, hands-on activities. Parents must accompany children. $6, $5 seniors, $4 ages 3-18, members and babies free; call 601-576-6000; msnaturalscience.org. Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Festival Commemorative Poster Contest, at Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art (386 Beach Blvd., Biloxi). Submissions must reflect the life and artwork of George Ohr. Submit by July 31. The winner receives $300, and reproductions of the poster will be sold at Art Fair ExtraOHRdinaire Sept. 15-16. For ages 18 and up. Free; call 228-374-5547; email museumstore@ georgeohr.org; georgeohr.org. Hobbs Freeman Arts and Nature Visual Art Competition, at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). The competition involves seven different mediums with a limit of three entries per person per category. Entries accepted through July 16. The exhibit and judging takes place July 19 at 6:30 p.m. Free; call 601-631-6997; email info@southernculture.org. Inaugural Cedars Juried Art Exhibition Call for Artists, at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road)). The Fondren Renaissance Foundation seeks artwork to feature in their annual exhibit Sept. 4-28. Artist William Dunlap is the juror; awards given. Artists may submit up to three pieces, and all work must be for sale. The deadline is July 14. $20; call 601-981-9606. Conserved Mississippi Flags Exhibit, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). See historic flags from the museum’s collection along with photographs of how they looked before restoration. Open from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-576-6850. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


LIFE&STYLE

DOMESTICITY, CREATIVITY, & DIY

SPORTS p 40 | FOOD p 41 | FLY/SHOPPING p 46

Water, Water Everywhere by Jim PathFinder Ewing

If you use a sprinkler in your garden, it’s best to use it in the morning and leave it running long enough so that the water soaks in. The garden will then have all day in the sun. Water on the leaves, plant stems and the ground surface will dry out as the day goes on, leaving the water where it belongs, at the roots. You will find that morning watering in this way can be a great delight. Birds use the puddles to splash in and wash themselves, pollinators will flitter in and out, drinking the precious liquid, and your plants will seem to

grow and blossom before your very eyes as they absorb the moisture and turn their leafy faces toward the sun. It can be a spiritual experience. The key is to not overwater. Once a week is plenty, and you may need to water less. To test whether your garden needs watering, stick your finger in the soil. If your finger goes in easily with a slight feeling of moisture, it’s fine. If it’s muddy, it’s too wet. It’s a careful balance. Plant roots need to be able to breathe in the soil. That requires air pockets as well as moisture. You want your soil to be light and fluffy (have good “tilth”) with lots of organic matter, but damp enough so that earthworms can happy slither through, and beneficial bacteria and fungi can thrive. In organic gardening, your soil is alive. It needs to thrive for your plants to thrive. Professional gardeners, of course, have found more efficient (and often expensive) ways to water their crops. Some use garden or lawn sprinklers on tripods with timers so that they can soak a large area in a small amount of time. By moving the tripods, they’re able to cover several acres. If your garden is the small, backyard variety, timers and tripods probably aren’t necessary. Drip and soaker systems are additional watering options for larger gardens. Drip irrigation sends an even supply of water directly

Urban Homesteading by Jim PathFinder Ewing

Y

ou don’t have to have a large garden spread to grow your own organic food. In fact, you can grow plenty of food to supplement your diet in a small space. While growing enough grain for bread might be a challenge in, say, a small apartment or tiny yard, you can grow nutritious grain sprouts anywhere to add to your sandwiches. Start with one to four tablespoons of food-grade organic seeds. Put them in a wide mouth jar, and cover the jar opening with nylon mesh or tulle cloth from a fabric store and affix it with a rubber band. Add water, swirl it around and drain. Repeat the water, swirl and drain cycle twice a day for three to six days, and you will have sprouts ready to eat. A word of warning for growing sprouts: Use only food-grade organic seeds, as some seeds are poisonous. Also, non-organic seeds could be contaminated with food-poi-

soning bacteria. Several online companies offer food-grade organic seeds specifically for sprouting, including Johnny’s Selected Seeds (johnnyseeds.com) and Peaceful Valley (groworganic.com). Good sprouts to grow are lentils, garbonzo beans, mung beans, red clover, sunflowers, radish, rye, winter wheat, alfalfa, arugula, broccoli, buckwheat, canola (non-GMO) and adzuki beans. For those who are more ambitious—and have more room or access to a community garden plot—you can grow your own sandwich. With 100 square feet (a 10-foot by 10-foot plot), you can grow enough amaranth, barley or rye to bake bread twice a month for a year. You will have to buy (or rent) a grain mill, or find someone who grind grains in small quantities. Peaceful Valley (groworganic.com), offers a hand-cranking grain mill for $149. A bread maker would be nice, too.

"READFROM9OUR'ARDEN by Jim PathFinder Ewing

I

f you’re interested in growing grain in your garden, a good book on the subject is “Homegrown Whole Grains” by Sara Pitzer (Storey Publishing, 2009, $14.95).

COURTESY STOREY PUBLISHING

'ROW9OUR/WN3ANDWICH

to the root zone. It uses less water because it doesn’t run off on the surface (carrying precious top soil with it) or evaporate as readily as water mist sprayed into the air. It almost eradicates mold or fungal concerns because the drip tape or soaker hose is in contact with the soil. In established crop systems, gardeners often will bury the hoses so they stay put, about 4 inches deep, so they water only the roots. Burying your soaker hoses to keep them from freezing and splitting is a good idea if you plan to leave them out during the winter. Unburied hoses will give you the advantage of using them where they’re needed most and removing them otherwise. But whether you bury your soakers or leave them above ground, you’ll need to be careful when you mow around the garden, or till within it. With buried hoses, be sure to remember (or mark) where you buried them! Soaker hoses are available at most garden supply stores and online. Because you want the water pressure to be low throughout your garden, keep your hose sections to no longer than 100 feet. If you need additional length, connect 100-foot sections using garden hose splitters with adjustable valves. That way, you can adjust the flow in each section—open the valves for highest flow at the end, lowest at the beginning.

As Pitzer notes, in a 10-footsquare plot, backyard farmers can grow enough wheat to harvest 50 pounds in a single afternoon—and that can be baked into 50 loaves of fresh bread.

Jim PathFinder Ewing is the author of five books on energy medicine and eco-spirituality published by Findhorn Press. His next book, to be published in the fall, is “Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating.” Find Jim on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

FILE PHOTO

P

eople who jump into organic gardening without any preparation often start off on the wrong foot by overwatering or not watering properly. They may have stereotypes in their minds that are hard to erase. One is the image of lawn sprinklers casting long arcs of water into the air, as is often seen in photos of golf courses. While watering with a sprinkler like that can work, it’s not the best way and, if done in the heat of the day or in the evening is an example of how not to water your garden and can even be self-defeating. While it may give the gardener the impression that he or she has “done some work in the garden,” it can be harmful for two reasons: First, during a hot, sunny day, the water mostly evaporates before it can soak in to the plants’ roots where it can actually do some good. Second, sprinkling raises humidity in the garden, which can create ideal conditions for harmful fungal and bacterial growth, and rejuvenate viruses in the soil that can stunt or kill plants. The effect is worse if you use sprinkling techniques in the late evening; it allows fungi and bacteria to grow overnight and really “set in.”

39


DIVERSIONS|jfp sports

Slamming It Home

S

erena Williams won the Wimbledon Ladies Singles final on Saturday, July 7. The win gave Williams her fifth Wimbledon title (tying her sister Venus) and her 14th Grand Slam title overall. While she also plays doubles, fans will remember Williams as a singles player. After Williams’ win, I tweeted on @jfpsports that this win puts her in the discussion of who reigns as the greatest Americanborn tennis players ever, male or female. This discussion has to be limited to just U.S. players because the greatest overall tennis player is the seemingly ageless Swiss Roger Federer, while German player Steffi Graf is the greatest women’s player ever, in my opinion. By winning her 14th Grand Slam title, Williams tied the great Pete Sampras. But Williams’ record has something Sampras’ doesn’t have—she has won a title at all four Grand Slams: the Austrian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. Williams is four titles away from catching Chris Evert, who won 18 titles in the 1970s and ’80s, and five away from matching Helen Wills Moody’s 19 titles in the 1920s and ’30s. Catching Evert would be big for Williams because women’s tennis became harder to dominate since the 1970s with influx of more good women’s players. Women’s tennis has gotten even stronger as a field since 2000. Williams burst on to the title scene by winning the U.S. Open in 1999, but she dominated the 2000s with 10 titles.

Bryan’s Rant Since 2000, 16 women have won a Grand Slam title, showing just how crowded the field is for top women players. On the men’s side since 2000, 13 men have won a Grand Slam title but, since 2004, only three men not named Federer, Rafael Nadal or Novak Djokovic have won a title, meaning only six men have dominated men’s tennis over the last eight years. Over that same time period (2004-2012), 12 women have won titles, not including the Williams’ sisters. Williams, and to an extent her sister, Venus, ha had the pressure of carrying American tennis. Since 2002, the only other American woman to win a Grand Slam is Jennifer Capriati. Only one American man, Andy Roddick, has won a Grand Slam title since 2003. Over the last decade, Williams has been the bright spot of U.S. tennis in major tournaments. She might have won even more major competitions if she had not been so often injured. Williams came from a nontraditional tennis background and has had to face her sister to win tournaments. Both those factors have to bump her up the list for the title of best U.S.born tennis player. At 30 years old, Williams is closer to the end of her career than the beginning, but in my opinion, she has a place at the table when we talk about the best American tennis players. The final chapters have yet to be written but, so far, Serena Williams has a really strong story.

by Bryan Flynn

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We’re days away from the start of football. The NFL Hall Xxxx of Fame game is Aug. 5. I can already smell in the air that football is coming. THURSDAY, JULY 12 Basketball (8-10 p.m. ESPN): Exhibition game between the Dominican Republic and the United States team live from Las Vegas. Team USA is tuning up for London.

MONDAY, JULY 16 Basketball (4:30-6:30 p.m. ESPN 2): The U.S. Women’s basketball team gets ready for London with a match against Brazil. The U.S. Men play Brazil’s men following the women’s game.

FRIDAY, JULY 13 WNBA (7-9 p.m. Sports South): The Atlanta Dream hit the road to face the San Antonio Silver Stars on a night that’s light on sports.

TUESDAY, JULY 17 NFL (8-9 p.m. ESPN): “2011 Denver Broncos Yearbook” takes a look back at the 2011 Broncos’ season as Tim Tebow saved Denver and upset the Pittsburgh Steelers in the playoffs.

SATURDAY, JULY 14 Cycling (7-10 a.m. NBC Sports Network): The Tour de France hits stage 13 on Bastille Day in a 217-kilometer ride (a little under 134 miles) from Saint-Paul-Toris-Chateaux to Le Cap d’Agde. SUNDAY, JULY 15 NASCAR (noon-3:30 p.m. TNT): Sprint Cup travels to the New Hampshire Motor Speedway for the Lenox Industrial Tools 301. Ryan Newman won this race last year.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18 Soccer (8:30-10:30 p.m. ESPN): Champions League winner Chelsea faces the Seattle Sounders in the 2012 ESPN Summer Soccer Series. The New Orleans Saints and the Arizona Cardinals play in the 2012 Hall of Fame game in Canton, Ohio, Aug. 5. Hopefully the days will pass quickly, so we can all get back to football. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


LIFE&STYLE|dining

Love, and Picnics

National Rainier Cherry Day

by Kelly Bryan Smith WILLAMART

your sanity, whether you are planning a romantic evening or just need some fresh air, a picnic is the perfect solution. Even on the hottest summer days, the early evenings are usually quite nice for getting outside, especially when you remember to bring your favorite bug spray. Whether you are new to al fresco dining or After a crazy day, a picnic with loved onesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or by yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; is the perfect way to relax. you are an old picnicking pro, here are a few ideas for you to take along on t was one of those #$&@ days at your next outdoor adventure. workâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all been there. I was so For a truly fresh outdoor dining expeupset, I could hardly breathe or imag- rience, pack your bread separate from your ine how I could possibly show up at fillings to create a less soggy dining experiwork the next day. ence. I highly recommend a versatile pita Clearly, the only way to salvage the pocket that you can fill with a wide variety evening was to get out of the house. of stuffings to suit your taste buds: I grabbed my baby, a picnic blanket and my keys, and I stopped at a grocery â&#x20AC;˘ egg salad and sliced pickles to pick out a carton of raspberries, a mul- â&#x20AC;˘ cream cheese and raspberries tigrain boule, some spinach and artichoke â&#x20AC;˘ tabouli with farmer's market tomatoes dip, a cold Orangina and a chocolate ha- â&#x20AC;˘ grated carrots with blueberries zelnut bar. After a short drive up the Trace, â&#x20AC;˘ lettuce, tomatoes, cheddar and fresh my son and I stretched out in the soothing avocado September sunshine and began to relax. â&#x20AC;˘ three-bean salad Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a bad day at work â&#x20AC;˘ pesto, buffalo mozzarella, and heirloom or your kids are driving you to the limits of tomatoes

I

â&#x20AC;˘ tuna salad and cucumber slices â&#x20AC;˘ peanut butter and jelly â&#x20AC;˘ havarti cheese and Granny Smith apple slices

COURTESY NORTHWEST CHERRIES

by Christianna Jackson

If sandwiches are not really your thing, another one of my favorite picnic themes involves various foods that are vehicles for a variety of dips. Some of my favorite delicious picnic dips include:

Celebrate National Ranier Cherry Day July 11 with Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-Inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limitedtime-only cherry dessert.

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ubagel chips and roasted red pepper hummus umixed veggie sticks and ranch dressing usesame blue corn tortilla chips and fresh guacamole uapple slices and caramel dip uhunks of pumpernickel bread and spinach dip upretzel sticks and Nutella Whatever delicious flavor combinations you come up with, don't forget to pack a picnic blanket, napkins, hand sanitizer, dishes and cutlery, bug spray and sunscreen, depending on where you decide to go as well as the time of day. You may find yourself along the Reservoir, near a playground, at a state park or in the middle of a soccer field. Wherever you are, turn off the cell phone, breathe in the fresh air, and enjoy the moment with your family, your friends or yourself.

Float On

A

t the crazy popular inaugural PM Burger, one beverage nearly eclipsed the meat, as surprising as it sounds. The Irish

Car Bomb Float isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t on the regular Parlor Market menu, but might pop up again at future PM Burger events. In the meantime, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sharing our se-

GUINNESS ICE CREAM Ingredients:

4 egg yolks 1/2 cup sugar 1 cup Guinness Draught beer (or your favorite beer) 1 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons molasses

Thick, creamy and filled with Irish alcohol, the Irish Car Bomb Float from PM Burger is an irresistable summer milkshake.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar until they are a pale yellow. Bring the beer and the cream to a simmer in a heavy-bottom saucepan, then slowly pour over the egg and sugar mixture, whisking constantly to temper the yolks. Return the mixture to the pan and cook over low heat, stirring frequently, until it thickens. Pour through a strainer into a mixing bowl set over ice and stir until cool. Whisk in the molasses. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directions.

crets so you can make your own at home. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect summer drink to pair with backyard-grilled burgers or flame-broiled hot dogs.

BAILEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WHIPPED CREAM Ingredients:

1 cup heavy whipping cream 3 tablespoons Baileys Irish Cream Liqueur 1/4 cup powdered sugar

Place all ingredients into the bowl of a stand mixer and turn on low. Gradually turn the speed up as the mixture thickents, until the whipped cream has stiff peaks.

For the Float:

3 large scoops of Guinness ice cream 1 oz. shot of Jameson Irish Whiskey 1/2 cup of heavy cream

Blend all ingredients together in a mixer until smooth. Pour into a glass and top with Baileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whipped cream.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY JESSE HOUSTON

by Jesse Houston

41


%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street Historic District offering a savory haven for home-style eaters with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

TA KE A D VA N T A G E O F O UR P A T I O D U R I N G . . .

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

BARBEQUE

6 2 2 D U L I N G AV ENUE

J ACKS ON, M S 39216

601­366­5757

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, poboys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

www.thepizzashackjackson.com

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends.

ITALIAN

Best Pizza 2009-2012

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Awardwinning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily

July 11 - 17, 2012

NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

42

(in the former FabraCare Building, between Kat’s & Fenian’s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jackson’s crawfish destination. You’ll also want to try their delicious gumbo while enjoying Friday night karaoke! Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout.


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Paid advertising section.

%*/&+BDLTPO

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends.

Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Reed Pierce’s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

-Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Saturday July 14, 2012

Otis Lotis 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

NEW MENU Happy Hour

Wed - Fri • 4 - 6pm July 13 • Robert King Blues Band 7:00pm

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music july 11 - 17

wed | july 11 Jessie “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | july 12 Closed For Private Party fri | july 13 Double Shotz 6:30-10:30p sat | july 14 Hairicane 6:30-10:30p

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

Voted Best Veggie Burger

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA

sun | july 15 Lucky Hand Trio 4:00 - 8:00p mon | july 16 Karaoke

-Food & Wine Magazine-

tue | july 17 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

jacksonfreepress.com

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

43


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45


Fresh-Squeezed Style by Meredith W. Sullivan

K

eeping with the theme of the GOOD issue, I thought to go on the hunt for goods and pieces made by local artists and designers. Turns out, I didn’t have to search very hard. The Jackson metro is filled with creative people and brilliant artists—a few of whom I call friends, yet never knew they were so talented!

Glass bird by Elizabeth Robinson of Glass House, The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $24-$38

Fused Glass Bowl by Rachel Misenar, circa. URBAN ARTISAN LIVING, $100

Clutch, Kae La’Shae, $25

Mississippi notecards by Peru Paper, The Paper Place, $5 each Mississippi shaped serving platter by JR Webb Pottery, The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $45

I Know You Are but What Am I? t-shirt, Avery Nejam, $25

Custom floral transformation ring, b. Fine Art Jewelry, price by request

July 11 - 17, 2012

Authentic Chanel button on hand cut leather cuff by MADE in the deep south, special order by Taylor Collection, $230

46

Print of Parlor Market by Lisette Otero-Lewis, circa. URBAN ARTISAN LIVING, $40

Bib necklace with 1920s rhinestone brooch by MADE in the deep south, special order by Taylor Collection, $196

Where2Shop:

circa. URBAN ARTISAN LIVING, 2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484; Kae La’Shae, 601-460-0611; Taylor Collection, 2082 Main St., Madison, 601605-0236; The Paper Place, 2941 Old Canton Rd, 601-366-3675; The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, 380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515; b. fine art jewelry, 215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-607-7741; Avery Nejam,

averynejam.com


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the 6030 I-55 North- EXIT 102B (601) 977-9040

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;¢ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;¢ www.villagebeads.com

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

$INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

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Now Serving Lunch Tuesday-Fridayâ&#x20AC;¢11:00am-2:00pm

jacksonfreepress.com

2947 Old Canton Rd Suite G â&#x20AC;¢ Fondren Village Jackson, MS 39216 â&#x20AC;¢ 601.983.4450

47


CLASSIFIEDS, PAGE 11

DUI? Minimize Your Damage. Know Your Rights.

'DLO\/XQFK6SHFLDOV



Drew Hassin Attorney At Law

XJUI5FBBOE4JEFT 0RQGD\3FE'JTIÂ&#x2026;7XHVGD\$SBC$BLF :HGQHVGD\$IJDLFO(ZSPÂ&#x2026;7KXUVGD\5BMBQJBPS4BMNPO )ULGD\)BNCVSHFSÂ&#x2026;6DWXUGD\%JOFS´T4QFDJBM 7BMJE6OUJM

601-260-0153 Background information available upon request.

0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4Â&#x2026;NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ&#x2026;

Try Our New Catering Menu

New Boutique

Grand Opening 2460 Terry Road Square Promenade South Jackson off of Terry Road

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coffee â&#x20AC;˘ culture â&#x20AC;˘ community

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Bring A Friend! Bring a new customer 20% with you and say the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;atmosphereâ&#x20AC;?

Off

We are located within Spelbound The Day Spa in The Quarter on Lakeland Drive. Come experience Ambiance, a way of Escape to an extraordinary experience in nail care.

1855 Lakeland Dr. Suite B11, Jackson

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ambiancenailgallery.com

Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi

601-960-3008

koinoniacoffee.com 1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) M-F 8am-9pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sat & Sun 7am-7pm CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Adams & Metro Pkwy between Downtown & JSU)

GREEK & MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE

Keep it Real

We Honor Any Mediterranean Restaurant Discounts

hot talk, local singles

Custom Furniture

made from recycled materials Come see the showroom at Hoarding Stopper Consignment Store. Homelitejohns.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.955.3304

Hoarding Stopper Consignment Shop â&#x20AC;˘ 898 Centre St. Ridgeland, MS www.hoardingstopper.com â&#x20AC;˘ Mon. - Sat. 10:00am - 5:00pm

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Romantic Adventures +BDLTPOTWFSZOJDF OBVHIUZTIPQ )XZ&BTU

v10n44 - Good Ideas: Creativity: Mind Games, Rebuilding A City, Art Goes Public, A New Politics  

Good Ideas: Creativity: Mind Games, Rebuilding A City, Art Goes Public, A New Politics Regulating Bongs Organics: Sweet Water FLY: Local Art...

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