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June 27 - July 3, 2012

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June 27 - July 3, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 42

contents COURTESY JPS

ALLIE JORDAN

6 School Daze Jackson Public Schools schedules a public forum and a vote on the budget, and installs new officers. COURTESY STRANGE MUSIC

Cover photograph by Virginia Schreiber

30

THIS ISSUE:

Derived from his rapid-fire delivery, some say rapper Tech N9ne spits like a machine gun.

graham downey

35 Waking Up An adaptation of a 19th-century German play is still appropriate today for coming-of-age youth.

43 Don’t Bug Me When it comes to garden pests and organics, it’s wise to keep in mind that some bugs are lovable.

jacksonfreepress.com

the kids and teaching them about even ordinary gardening tasks. He fondly recalls a recent day with the second graders at G.N. Smith. “I was just weeding with them, talking with them about their lives (and about) why we were doing what we were doing,” he says. He told the kids: “You have to get the whole root. You can’t just take the top off, even though it’s easier.” Recently at G.N. Smith, Downey participated in the school-wide field day where the students played games, listened to music and ate lunch outside. Downey made salsa with foods from the school garden and served up with his home-cooked collard greens. He says the kids called the food “awesome.” Most early mornings, Downey goes to the schools to help student and parent volunteers tend the gardens. In return for their work, volunteers can take produce home. He sees the gardens as places “where kids have real opportunity to make healthy choices,” Downey says. By teaching the children how to plant and care for their own produce, they can have access to healthy food right in their back yards, he says, something that’s especially important for people who may not have transportation to grocery stores. Ultimately, though, Downey wants the kids to remember just one thing: “Eat more vegetables,” he says. —Vergie Redmond

FILE PHOTO

Graham Downey came to Jackson with a mission: to make healthy options for kids in Mississippi more accessible. “It’s one thing to say, ‘Eat healthy,’” Downey says. “It’s another thing to provide kids with healthy options.” After graduating in May 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in political science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, or Virginia Tech, Downey joined FoodCorps. The New York City-based non-profit assigns service members to work at sites in one of 10 states for one- to four-year stints. The members engage the community, and provide access to and knowledge about healthy food. Downey, 22, asked to work with the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity in Jackson. He wanted to explore the cultural and social differences between our state and his hometown of Falls Church, Va. More importantly, Downey wanted to get a closer look at the underlying problems of obesity in Mississippi. To help combat the problem, he works closely with students, faculty and staff at three Jackson elementary schools: G.N. Smith, Watkins and Green. Downey spends one day a week at each school teaching staff and students about healthy eating. He helped them create gardens to grow produce such as onions, collards and cilantro. The students are responsible for maintaining the crops they plant. Downey says he enjoys interacting with

COURTESY ACTOR’S PLAYHOUSE

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 .................... Sorensen 6 ............................ Talk 10 ........................ Tech 12 ................... Editorial 12 ........................... Day 13 ................. Opinion 14 ............ Cover Story 28 .............. Diversions 30 ...................... Music 31 ....... Music Listings 34 ........................ Film 35 ......................... Arts 36 .................... 8 Days 37 ............. JFP Events 40 ..................... Sports 42 ................ Astrology 42 .................... Puzzles 43 ................. Organics 45 .................. Hitched 46 ......... Fly Shopping

Rapid Rap

3


editor’snote

Tom Ramsey Underground 119 chef and food writer Tom Ramsey is a former investment banker, tobacco executive and lobbyist who writes poetry, runs with the bulls and has produced an album or two. He wrote the cover story.

Genevieve Legacy Genevieve Legacy is an artist and writer who relocated from New York last August. She lives in Brandon with her husband, and son and one of Mississippi’s laziest dogs, a piebald hound named Dawa. She wrote a theater piece.

Tam Curley Tam Curley loves telling about her move from liberal California to begin a new life with her hubby and daughter in conservative Mississippi. She is an Arkansas native and enjoys time with her two lab puppies. She wrote a food feature.

Ben-cuda Stowers Editorial intern Ben-cuda Stowers is a recent high-school graduate who plans to attend Jackson State University to major in business and marketing. Stowers enjoys long runs at midnight on the west side of Jackson. He wrote a theater feature.

Vergie Redmond JFP editorial intern Vergie Redmond studies Journalism at Belhaven University. She plays video games and watches anime in her spare time. She was sad when Harry Potter ended. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Casey Purvis Casey Purvis is a Fondrenite who loves planting flowers and watching birds in her backyard. She is owned by Phoebe, a 9year-old Lhasa apso. She works as a nurse in one of the local hospitals in her spare time. She wrote a book review.

Richard Coupe Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote a Hitched feature.

June 27 - July 3, 2012

Kimberly Griffin

4

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.

by Kathleen Mitchell, Features Editor

Beer Me, Mississippi

I

love beer. I like the good stuff—Guinness, Sierra Nevada, Abita and even certain intense IPAs—but I have half a case of Coors Light in my fridge as I write this, and I’m not ashamed of that. Different beers for different occasions. I’ve tried a lot of beers over the past halfdozen years. When my family or my husband and I go on vacation, local breweries are a must, where we can sample more distinctive, creative, flavorful brews. You know, the ones illegal in Mississippi. At least, until now. To celebrate the efforts of those who managed to convince the Mississippi Legislature to up the legal alcohol content in beer, the Jackson Free Press invited the Raise Your Pints crew to a craft beer tasteoff with some of our staff. It was a great reminder of how people can become fast friends over a pint or two. After the brew was consumed and the empty bottles cleaned up, I started thinking about Mississippi’s issues with booze. When I was a senior at Corinth High School, our county, Alcorn, put liquor up to a vote once again. It was (and—spoiler alert—remains currently) a dry county for liquor; beer is available, just not on Sundays. A petition went around prior to the official vote to gauge interest; if it got enough signatures, the vote would go on. The required number of signatures was reached, the vote occurred, and it failed. This is no surprise for the state of Mississippi. What did shock me, however, was the local megachurch whose officials somehow got their hands on the petition. One Sunday in church, they read out every member of their congregation who had signed the list to publicly shame them. If only those church officials and parents knew what their teenage sons and daughters were up to on the weekends. It was the hypocrisy of that situation that made me realize that Mississippi has the unhealthiest relationship with alcohol of any state I’ve encountered—and I lived in Utah for 14 years of my life. You can find all the dirty details in our cover story, but the gist of it seems to be that Mississippi lawmakers and heads of society want alcohol limited and banned—until, of course, they or their children are caught with it. I had my first taste of alcohol when I was in the second grade, while preparing for First Communion. My parents gave me a tiny sip of wine at dinner one night, to prepare me for what the wine at Mass would taste like. I found it bitter and disgusting, and during my First Communion ceremony, I only pretended to drink from the cup (sorry, Monsignor Bob). Fast-forward eight or nine years, and I had my first legitimate experience with booze (sorry, Mom and Dad). At the cast party for a community theater play I was in, I got tipsy after an older cast member shared her drinks with me (I’m sure they were Smirnoff

Ice or something equally terrible—sorry, taste buds). Like many high schoolers, I experimented with alcohol off and on from there on out. Unlike the parents of many high schoolers I knew, my parents faced the fact that I drank head-on. One morning, after I came home from a dance the night before with vodka on my breath, my mother sat me down at the kitchen table and asked me point-blank if I had started drinking. She told me two things. One, that she trusted me. And two, if I ever drank and drove, or got in a car with someone drunk,

Thinking the law is going to teach your children for you is just lazy parenting. she would kick my ass and then ground me for, essentially, the rest of my life. My parents kept their heads out of the sand. They treated me like an adult. Now, I was still young and stupid, and I’m sure I toed that line a little more closely than I should have from time to time, but I valued their trust and respect, and I drank more responsibly because of it. With Corinth in a dry county, many parents felt their children were safe from the demon brew of alcohol simply because it was illegal and inaccessible. (Because no teenager has ever had a fake ID or carried beer across county lines, right?) I cannot begin to tell you how false that was. It was those parents—the ones who

stood up in church and condemned their fellow parishioners for signing a petition, the ones who believed their children would never get drunk or party on the weekends—it was those parents whose kids were often the most irresponsible. Thinking that the law is going to teach your children for you is just lazy parenting. Moreover, it’s an attitude that is keeping Mississippi from its potential, economically and beyond. The new higher-alcohol beer law, and another, less-talked-about bill that allows municipalities to vote on allowing alcohol in restaurants independent of the dry counties they are located in, are a step in the right direction. It’s a step toward boosting tourism in our state. It’s a step toward people spending their money in Mississippi, rather than driving across the borders to Louisiana or Tennessee. Whew, where was I? Oh yes, beer. All June we have been celebrating Beer Month here at the JFP, leading up to this, the first ever summer food and beer issue. It’s been a hard week, between the craft beer taste-off and a summer food cookout for the cover shoot, but someone had to do it. So my message to each of you reading this: If you are a teenager or a 20-something, don’t be an idiot; plan for a designated driver. If you are a parent, don’t be oblivious; don’t pretend that teens aren’t going to drink if they want to. Don’t hide behind archaic laws—talk to your kids. If you are a craft-beer virgin, try one! And if you are anyone looking to enjoy a cold brew with a new friend, meet me downtown or in Fondren this July. And cheers! Follow Kathleen @JxnKathleen on Twitter and email her feature ideas at kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.


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news, culture & irreverence

Friday, June 22 The Mississippi Center for Legal Services Corporation and Hinds County Human Resources Agency host a legal services workshop to inform Jacksonians about acquiring social security benefits and dealing with wills and trusts. â&#x20AC;Ś A jury finds retired Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky guilty on 45 counts of sexual assault. The 68 year old awaits sentencing. Saturday, June 23 The 2012 edition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Who in Black Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? introduced at a reception in Jackson, celebrates the achievements of more than 950 influential African Americans in the state. Sunday, June 24 James Stern, former cellmate of convicted klansman Edgar Ray Killen, says he will turn over the land Killen gave to him to the government can look for human remains. â&#x20AC;Ś Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood becomes Egyptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first democratically elected president.

June 27 - July 3, 2012

Monday June 25 Hinds County authorities arrest David â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatheadâ&#x20AC;? Wilson, allegedly a major drug distributor, in Edwards. â&#x20AC;Ś The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immigration laws overturned three of four provisions of the law. They deferred a ruling on the controversial â&#x20AC;&#x153;show me your papersâ&#x20AC;? law.

6

Tuesday, June 26 The Jackson Public Schools board holds a public hearing regarding its upcoming multi-million dollar budget plan. â&#x20AC;Ś NBC makes public specific allegations of sexual abuse from Matt Sandusky, Jerry Sanduskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adopted son. Get daily news updates at jfpdaily.com.

JPS Budget Hearing; New Officers

by Jacob Fuller

J

ackson Public School Board held a the city for next year, down from the $87.3 A few days earlier, JPS Board members public hearing Tuesday to discuss the million they received for the 2011-2012 followed tradition by promoting officers to proposed budget for the upcoming school year. the next ranking office. They selected formerschool year Tuesday in the schoolThe district will lower operation costs vice president Monica Gilmore-Love as new board meeting room at 621 South State St. from $72.5 million to a little over $69 mil- board president. They also picked Linda Rush Prior to the meeting, the agenda lion to help offset the $2.3 million it needs as vice president and Tim Collins as secretary. showed that the Gilmore-Love, board will vote mother of three JPS on the budget students, represents during their regWard 1 on the board. ularly scheduled She said it has been meeting, immethe boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition to diately following promote the previous the public hearyearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s officers to the ing. JPS plans next-highest office. to use just over â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was serving $206 million as vice president,â&#x20AC;? during the upGilmore-Love said â&#x20AC;&#x153;It coming year. was suggested by one The Jackson Public Schools board selected three new officers last week: (left to right) By law, JPS board member that we Monica Gilmore-Love, president; Linda Rush, vice president; and Tim Collins, secretary. must submit a just simply allow the budget proposal vice president to move to the city council for approval by July 1. to pay on a pair of bond issues they received into the next role. I anticipate (that) will be The city then has until September to set the in 2006 and 2008. the case with the next vice president when my tax rate as needed to fit the budget. To cut costs, JPS has eliminated 80 term is up, unless another proposal comes up The budget plan includes JPS cutting non-instructional jobs in the district. Miller for a president or another office.â&#x20AC;? operation costs so the district can put more said JPS has streamlined its administrative Board member Dr. George Schimmel money toward paying off debt, including office, reconfigured its curriculum and cam- said moving officers up in rank each year was $150 million in bond issue debt. pus enforcement offices and re-bid multi- a tradition â&#x20AC;&#x153;for a long time.â&#x20AC;? He said he has no Sharolyn Miller, JPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chief financial year contracts, such as site care and waste problem with the system and said the focus of officer, said June 14 that the school board management. The plan does not include plans to request about $86.1 million from laying off any teachers. JPS, see page 7 COURTESY JPS

Thursday, June 21 Bello Nock walks a 360-foot high by 360-foot long tight wire suspended near the Beau Rivage Resort and Casino in Biloxi. â&#x20AC;Ś The U.S. Senate passes a farm bill that reduces premium subsidies for farmers with adjusted income greater than $750,000 and cuts $4.5 billon of food stamp spending, cutting a total of $23.6 million from current federal spending.

Mississippi re-legalized beer after the Prohibition in 1934, but liquor remained illegal until 1966. That year, the Hinds County sheriff busted up a Mardi Gras party at the Jackson Country Club, where liquor was being served. As a result of the high-profile raid, state lawmakers let individual counties craft their own liquor laws, which results in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mish-mash of wet and dry counties.

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Wednesday, June 20 Mississippi executes Gary Carl Simmons Jr. for the murder and dismemberment of Jeffery Wolfe. Simmons is the sixth inmate executed in the state this year, the highest number since 1956.

Central Mississippi Tea Party President Janis Lane questions giving women the right to vote. p 9

he Mississippi Legislature recently passed a bill that places heavy restrictions on abortion clinics and may cause the only abortion clinic in the state to close. What are your thoughts on the clinicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential closing and why?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Totally for it. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be any more for it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Varner Stewart, 66, Jackson â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally, (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m) pro-life, (but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) not necessarily one of my biggest issues.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jim Cunningham, 28, Jackson â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women should have the right to choose. Attacking a clinic on one thing that it offers isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t right.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Lindsay Parsens, 22, Columbia, Mo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m) not particularly for abortion, so I think that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Chrishawna Griffin, 18, Jackson


talk

news, culture & irreverence

JPS, from page 6

the board needs to be moving every JPS student to their highest level. A 20-year veteran of the environmental consulting business, Gilmore-Love attended Alcorn State University and earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Mississippi State University. As a volunteer, Gilmore-Love served on the Parent Teacher Student Association at McWillie and Power APAC elementary schools and Chastain Middle School. She said it is the desire of the school board to move JPS forward in a positive way, including improving the academic performance of all students. To do so, officials, administration and teachers need to reach out to parents.

“We need to be more considerate of how we can communicate with those parents when needed, whether that be by email, text or through visiting their homes, if they will allow,” Gilmore-Love said. “It is worthwhile and beneficial to both the parents and the child to be an engaged and an involved parent in your school. ” The School Board, along with new Superintendent Cedrick Gray, wants to see the school district move forward technologically and take advantage of new ways of communication, such as Skype, Gilmore-Love said. The goal for the board, Gilmore-Love said, is to help JPS become a district that our community and state look up to as a leader in education. Vice President Rush represents Ward 6.

She is married to Dr. Timothy Rush and has two children. She has served as an advocate of PTSA for 20 years and currently serves on the association at Siwell Middle School. JPS Executive Director of Media Relations Peggy Hampton said Rush and Collins declined a request for an interview. Hampton said they both prefer to defer any questions to Gilmore-Love, the board president. Rush represents Ward 6 on the board. She is a 20-year advocate for the Parent Teacher Student Association and a member of the Jackson State University Alumni Association. She is a member of the Siwell Middle School PTSA. Rush is also the youth director at College Hill Baptist Church. She is married to

Timothy W. Rush and has two children, Tim II and Isaiah. Secretary Collins, executive director of the Mississippi Housing Partnership, represents Ward 5 on the school board. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mass communications and master of public policy and administration from Jackson State. He serves on the Jackson diocese of the Governance Council of Catholic Charities, Inc., the board of directors for Partners to End Homelessness and the Coalition for a Prosperous Mississippi. A 2000 graduate of Leadership Jackson, Collins is a member of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity and the North Jackson Rotary Club. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Hinds EDA Says No to Garage by Jacob Fuller

“It’s very strange to me that (Wallace) would send the recommendation after we met (his) deadline with the documents, then (he sent his) letter to Robert Graham,” Shepherd said. “Then, after the fact, (he) called me to say

COURTESY FULL SPECTRUM NY

ment with Full Spectrum South. The JFP has submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to Hinds County for a copy of Wallace’s letter to the board of supervisors. The parking garage, if built, will be the city’s first automated, robot-controlled parking garage. Patrons would be able to drop their automobile off in the lobby of the garage, where a laser-guided robotic platform would take their vehicle to a parking space inside the garage. Shepherd said this type of garage saves money by not requiring energy to power lights and air conditioning. It also reduces crime, because no one would actually enter the garage. Full Spectrum reduced the size of their original plans for 1822 Square earlier this year, after investors expressed concerns with the feasibility of such a large project. The original plan for the parking garage included more than 800 spaces. The plans for 1822 Square include Terre Verte, a 169,500-square-foot building with 129 residential units and more than 20,000 square feet of retail space; The Legacy, a 128,000-square-foot office building that will include another 37,350 square feet of retail space; and the parking garage. The funds for the buildings’ construction are already in hand, Shepherd said, so if the county approves the bond issue, construction will quickly commence. With Wallace, Graham and Fisher opposed to funding the garage, though, approval does not seem likely. Construction crews will build the underground parking garage first, which should take about 12 months. Full Spectrum estimates the Terre Verte residential building will take between nine and 12 months to complete, and The Legacy office building will take between 14 and 16 months. If construction begins in August, as planned, 1822 Square should be a reality by summer 2014. Comment on this story at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Old Capitol Green hit a major roadblock last week.

the board wants to meet with me. Well, (they) should have met with me before (they) made that decision.” Shepherd said he and other Full Spectrum South representatives will meet with the Hinds County Economic Development Authority at its monthly meeting July 25. He said if the Board of Supervisors sides with Wallace’s recommendation, Full Spectrum will talk with its investors, who have funded parking garages for the company in the past. In March, Full Spectrum’s Chief Operating Officer Carlton Brown said tenants had signed letters of intent to fill about 80 percent of the development’s office building 70 percent of the proposed retail space. It appeared the project only needed garage funding to get started. Full Spectrum representatives seemed confident they would get the funding until the latest development with the county. Wallace couldn’t further divulge his reasons for not recommending the project because of a confidentiality agree-

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he Hinds County Economic Development Authority soured the previously ecstatic attitude of developers at Full Spectrum South last week with news that it will not recommend the county move forward with helping fund the Old Capitol Green project. Full Spectrum South asked the Hinds County Board of Supervisors in May to request a $17 million bond from the Mississippi Development Authority to fund a 480-space parking garage. Full Spectrum South plans for the parking garage to be the first phase of an $83.7-million mixed-used development called 1822 Square on the Old Capitol Green on Commerce Street. Blake Wallace, HCEDA executive director, said June 22 that he sent a letter to the Board of Supervisors in which he recommended that the county not request the funds for the garage because the project lacks financial strength. A day earlier, District 1 Supervisor Robert Graham said he had not received a recommendation from Wallace, but that he planned to go along with Wallace’s recommendation when it came. Graham said he didn’t think Full Spectrum South had provided the financial information the county requested. While that was the case at one point in May, Wallace said the county has now received the requested information. “I think we got more than enough to make the determination that we made,” Wallace said. District 4 Supervisor Phil Fisher said he will side with Wallace’s recommendation. He said he is not happy with how long it took Full Spectrum South to respond to the board’s requests for information. “I’ve been having doubts about this project for months,” Fisher said. “(We’ve) given them what I thought was every opportunity, what I hope will be opportunity to do the things that they needed to do. To date, (I) haven’t been pleased with their lack of response, and I haven’t been pleased with the information that they’re providing. “This is a huge project. For us to have this much trouble getting the very basic of information from them is not a good sign.” Malcolm Shepherd, development director for Full Spectrum South, said Monday that he had heard that Wallace recommended the county not go forward, but had not seen a copy of the letter.

7


energytalk

Is Mississippi in ‘Play’? KRISTIN BRENEMAN

Coming

Soon

will have to find ways to tamp down drilling costs before they start making real profit. Major players in other oil-shale plays all have substantial acreage positions in southwest Mississippi, including Encanca, Devon Energy, Goodrich, EOG Resources and Indigo Minerals. These companies have been busy Hydraulic fracturing—”fracking” or “fracing”—is a process in getting leases for minwhich water, sand and toxic chemicals are injected into dense eral rights from Misunderground geological formations to release gas or oil. In sissippi residents in response to critics from environmental and citizen groups, the U.S. EPA recently imposed regulations on frackers. Amite and Wilkinson counties. But sorting through n August 1987, Louisiana State University Mississippi’s complex mineral-leasing laws has geologists reported that a rock formation proved a challenge for many landowners. An called Tuscaloosa Marine Shale could online forum for mineral-rights owners in contain as much as 7 billion barrels of oil. Amite County is full of people who are conWriting in LSU’s Basin Research Institute Bul- fused, at best, and at worst, highly skeptical of letin, researchers reported the shale play could the oil companies. contain “a potentially significant commercial “We need to get a group together and oil reservoir” underneath the Mississippi- hire a lawyer,” writes one woman on the Amite Louisiana boundary including southwestern County Oil and Gas Discussion forum. “This counties in Mississippi westward through cen- is far too complicated for us.” tral Louisiana to the Texas border. Another man, who describes himself as At the time, the fact that so much pre- 80 years old and in poor health, said mineralcious crude was locked away in dense shale rights owners are “being jerked around” by seemed moot. There was no practical method landmen. In the parlance of the minerals busito go about getting it out of the ground. But ness, landmen are intermediaries the oil comfast forward to the present day, and the com- panies hire by the day to track down people bination of an oil-friendly political climate who hold mineral rights and negotiate a deal and new extraction technologies—namely, to lease the rights for the companies. horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or Typically, the companies pay an upfront “fracking”—might put the TMS in play. “bonus payment” to lease minerals for three “I categorize this play as an emerging years, and most agreements include the option play,” said Kirk Barrell, president of Amelia to extend the lease for two years. In addition, Resources, a The Woodlands, Texas-based ex- mineral owners receive a royalty for the oil ploration and production company. “It’s still or gas pumped out of their property, usually economically unproven.” about 20 percent of revenues from the well. Fracking has spurred booms in other Barrell suggests that landowners consult parts of the country while also generating an attorney before they sign a deal with anycontroversy. The process involves injecting one for their mineral rights. Walking people high-pressure water, sand and toxic chemicals through the process, he said, is not the oil deep into the group to break apart dense rock company’s job. formations to release gas and oil trapped be“They’re making an offer for a financial tween the layers. Environmental and public transaction, so it’s not really their obligation to health concerns that fracking raised prompted educate the landowner,” he said. the U.S. Environmental protection agency to Dan Turner, spokesman for the Missisrelease rules in April that limit air pollution sippi Development Authority, said the agency emitted during the drilling process. held an informational meeting with officials in Despite the concerns, Marcellus Shale Liberty about what the oil boom could mean has brought thousands of jobs to the eastern for development in the county in direct and U.S. and millions of dollars in investment. ancillary investments. North Dakota and areas of Montana had sim“People who come in work in the oil and ilar experiences with the Bakken formation’s gas industry have to find some place to eat estimated 18 billion barrels of reserves. and stay,” Turner said. “If this turns out to be Because TMS is a relatively new play, oil everything we hope it is … it could be a real companies need to conduct more testing be- economic jolt.” fore they can really assess its full potential. Early Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. signs are encouraging, Barrell said, but drillers Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

I

Coming Soon June 27 - July 3, 2012

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8

by R.L. Nave


politicaldish

by R.L. Nave

‘Christian Rednecks and Patriots’: A Tea Party Chat

Janis Lane, president of the Central Mississippi Tea Party, said conservatives want America to return to its roots of “limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility.”

E

ver heard the expression “Where you have three rabbis, you have three opinions”? It’s kind of the same thing with members of the Tea Party. Some people who align themselves with the movement that congealed in 2009 and 2010 profess to be political middle-of-the-roaders with allegiances to no party, while others are dyed-in-the-wool cultural conservatives. Nationally, the Tea Party takes credit for giving Republicans control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Closer to home, the Mississippi Tea Party claimed victory when Phil Bryant became the state’s first “Tea Party governor” last fall. Given the party’s influence, we recently met with Central Mississippi Tea Party president Janis Lane, a retired marketing manager who resides in Byram, along with Mark Mayfield, a real estate attorney who lives in Ridgeland, and Kim Wade, a Nation of Islam member-turned conservative radio talk host, to talk about Mississippi politics, 2012 presidential race and America’s wrong turns. Are Tea Partiers still outraged? Kim Wade: When you say you saw this (outrage) at the beginning, are you sure you saw it or did you just read reports? So much of that stuff, we believe if there were any indications of (in on) posters and flyers and banners, they were brought in by instigators. I remember those early town-hall meetings on the Affordable Care Act. People were pretty fired up. Janis Lane: At the time, we were facing the people making these laws that we did not support, and when we were in those town-hall meetings, we’re speaking to our representatives. … We may be members of a Tea Party outside, but we’re there as individuals to confront that lawmaker with the very poor deci-

sions he is making or she is making and that is our right as citizens of this country. … We have taken the wrong path, and it’s been on the wrong path for many years now. This is not something new. Mark Mayfield: It’s not political, either. It’s not Republican or Democrat(ic). It’s a wrong turn. Our righteous indignation is against both parties. So is the Central Mississippi Tea Party primarily interested in state politics? Lane: Last year we were interested in state politics because that was the focus. This year, we have a national election, and we are interested in who the next president will be, who the next president will choose as his running mate, who the next president will choose as his cabinet members. How would you like federal candidates to engage the Central Mississippi Tea Party? Mayfield: We think conservative constitutional principles have worked for the last 200-plus years in America, and they have provided the most opportunity for hope, growth and success for the most Americans as opposed to any other form of government. Lane: That has always been America’s draw—hope. When you come to America, you leave other countries where there is no hope, and you come here because there is hope. And like Mark said, we’re getting to the point where we’re getting ready to step off, and we’re going to be come a hopeless nation. And we don’t believe in pork-barrel politics, either. We don’t want to send people to D.C. to bring money back to Mississippi. Isn’t that Congress’ job? Mayfield: They sure think it is. We’ve got a senator up there right now—Thad Co-

Isn’t hard for people to be engaged in Mississippi with it being so conservative? Mayfield: I think if you’re willing to get off the bench and get in the game, it’s not hard. I was never involved in politics until I saw the direction we started taking with the bailouts, the stimulus, TARP, Obamacare—you name it—this endless, mindless overspending and over-borrowing. You all had some harsh words for Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves after the last session. I’m interested in your assessment of the rest of the session. Mayfield: We applaud (Reeves’) stand on fiscal responsibility. He’s right in line with the Tea Party on that. Tate Reeves drew a line in the sand on any more state borrowing this year. But we’ve got a problem with him on immigration. We have reason to believe he blocked the immigration enforcement bill. Wasn’t it because the Mississippi Sheriff’s Association, the Farm Bureau and other groups came out against it? Lane: Associations do not elect him; individuals go to the polls. But they’re associations of job creators. Wade: We will come together with Tate on issues we’re in agreement on. He did not come out with a blanket endorsement of the Tea Party’s position on illegal immigration. At the same time, that doesn’t remove our responsibility to fight vigorously for things we believe in. You’re doing outreach with groups that haven’t traditionally supported the Tea Party—African Americans, minorities. What parts of the Tea Party platform do you think resonate with those groups? Mayfield: Jobs and economic development. Things like giving voters a choice on where to send their kids to school. They don’t have to keep sending them to a failing public school. We want to give them the option of sending them to a successful charter school or perhaps look at vouchers where they can send them to a successful private school. Wade: Our position on charter schools is incoherent as black people. We’re sitting up

here watching our kids be destroyed because our leadership says we’re supposed to dislike private schools because they were born out of segregation. Well, what wasn’t? Everything was segregated 40 years ago. Sorry to shut the men out of the conversation, but I wanted to ask Janis about the role of women in conservative politics and reproductive rights. Lane: I do not agree with the federal government supporting killing a preborn human. A child is a child from the moment of conception. The argument is: They’ve done it before, they’ll always do it. That’s probably true. My point is a nation should not support or condone the killing of anybody. Then you’ll come around with what about capital punishment. Well, you know what, if you’re on death row, you’re an adult and you made a choice to be there. An innocent child in the womb does not have a right to make a decision because they haven’t been born, yet. We’re taking that right away from that child. But do you think there are too many male politicians telling women what to do with their bodies? Wade: This is about right and wrong. How is it that they find a cell on Mars, then there’s evidence of life on Mars, but if there’s a cell in a womb, it’s not a baby? ... You don’t have the right to kill. If that was the case, then they had a right to kill us as blacks. If it’s just a matter of having enough votes in the Legislature to kill someone, then there’s nothing wrong with it. Lane: I’m really going to set you back here. Probably the biggest turn we ever made was when the women got the right to vote. What do you mean? Lane: Our country might have been better off if it was still just men voting. There is nothing worse than a bunch of mean, hateful women. They are diabolical in how than can skewer a person. I do not see that in men. The whole time I worked, I’d much rather have a male boss than a female boss. Double-minded, you never can trust them. Because women have the right to vote, I am active, because I want to make sure there is some sanity for women in the political world. It is up to the Christian rednecks and patriots to stand up for our country. Everyone has the right to vote now that’s 18 or over (who is) a legal citizen, and every person that’s 18 and over and a legal citizen should be active in local politics so they can make a change locally, make a change on the state level and make a change in Washington, D.C. God bless America. Tell us what you think of this interview at www.jfp.ms where you can see video of parts of this interview. You can also email R.L. Nave directly at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

chran—who’s just as guilty as anybody. He’s probably the worst one up there in terms of pork-barrel legislation. Wade: As it relates to fiscal responsibility, you made the note that it’s the purpose of Congress to bring money back. It is to do it in a responsible way. We’re not against government for being against government’s sake. We’re in it for the purpose of providing the most good for the most people.

9


techtalk

by Todd Stauffer

Managing Projects, Tasks and Info

T

TEAMLAB.COM

he recent wholesale upgrade to the the project management tool from 37 Sig- and ToDo items. (Yes, seriously.) Jackson Free Press website (www.jfp. nals that is very popular in “silicon” circles. For me, one great feature in Basecamp ms) was quite an undertaking. For the Basecamp is attractively designed, gives you is the way it handles discussions—if you’re first time since 2002, we have com- a way to offer a repository for information part of a message thread, then you’re alerted pletely changed not just to a new design, (like links to documentation, FAQs, etc.) when someone says something new on that but to an entire new “backend” as well, switching to a different Content Management System, or CMS, for our stories, events, restaurant listings and so on. Upgrades in the past had all been in the same family of products, from one company (pMachine, later Expression Engine, by EllisLabs), with a defined upgrade path. Now, everything has changed, in an effort to bring a fully modern newspaper website to our readers. Already the site is better at presenting content such as photos, videos, related stories, documents and other items we think are important for our readers (and fun for us); over the next few weeks we’ll roll out new tools, including improvements to the mobileenabled site, more options for Teamlab offers some clear advantages for work groups with multiple projects. online discussions and, well, a couple of very cool surprises. This process, believe it or not, has taken about six months, from learning the basics of the tool we’re and has support for ToDos, milestones, and thread. Replying above their reply (in email) using to getting the import script to work even whiteboards for sharing documents and places your response on the Basecamp site, (a huge one), figuring out how to bring brainstorming sessions among one another. where you can later return to that discusalong a decade’s worth of our all-imporBasecamp is a great way to manage a sion to see what was said. That combinatant reader comments (and discussions) project, and probably gave us everything tion of email and web-based message board from our earlier sites, and building out the we needed for managing this website is great for keeping discussions from getting new design. (Hats off, by the way, to Matt transition—we just didn’t use it much, too wound up in “reply all” purgatory, plus Heindl, our primary architect of this tran- at least on our end. As I’ve mentioned in they’re easier to browse and search. sition, who has had help from the whole previous columns, I’m a little addicted to Milestones and to-do lists are easy team including Kristin Brenemen, Latasha Workflowy (www.workflowy.com), and enough to use, although if I have one minor Willis and Dustin Cardon.) Matt and I would primarily use it to note gripe it’s that they seem to assume projects And having been through this process, bugs, design ideas, feature implementation take relatively few steps. For quickly listing I now fully realize the value of having a good questions and so on. That gets a bit messy lots of bugs or quick fixes or fast notes, I project management tool—and using it! though—sort of the virtual version of the like a tool like Workflowy more. (Of course, When the project started, our vendor eight different used envelopes I have sitting you could link a shared Workflowy to your set us up in Basecamp (basecamp.com), on my desk right now covered with notes project if desired.)

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If I have a major dig for Basecamp, it’s that they charge based on the number of projects you want to manage—which means it’s impractical for something like managing a weekly newspaper with a new project for each issue. That’s one reason I’ve been looking closely at TeamLab (teamlab.com) these past few weeks. While I feel like Basecamp is really nice for managing a group of freelancers or far-flung project participants, TeamLab is nicely geared for managing a lot of the interaction for a small to medium-sized business. With CRM and a community dashboard built in, you’ve got an “intranet” solution with all of the potential of a shared address book, customer tracker, and the ability to share a lot of info with your co-workers using forums, blogs, live chat and wikis. Having the project management tools built into this overall intranet is nice; I’d say the Basecamp experience is a bit slicker, but TeamLab offers some clear advantages, such as the option to store editable documents directly within the project itself (you can create documents, spreadsheets, presentations and drawings) and edit them as a group. TeamLab also has a time-tracking tool built in, which is nice if you’re billing clients by the hour. TeamLab is free for initial use, and then they charge based on the amount of storage space you use—$49 per month for an extra 50 GB of storage (you get 1 GB for free). A built-in email client is planned for a future upgrade, which could really set TeamLab up as a tool your employees spend most of their day in, hopefully making them more organized and productive along the way. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Todd Stauffer at todd@jacksonfreepress.com.


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6/21/12 10:34 AM


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Get Your Brew On

G

one are the days when choice in beer meant something â&#x20AC;&#x153;exoticâ&#x20AC;? such as an Amstel Light. The craft-brewing industry has grown tremendously in the United States over the past two decades, with local brewers all over the country undertaking the simple, ancient ritual of adding yeast to a mixture of malt, water and hopsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and sometimes spices and fruitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to brew, sell and serve high-quality beer. As of July 1, 2012, thanks to a change in the state law that allows for higher alcohol content in beer sold here, Mississippi beer consumers will have more choices, and regional brewersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including Mississippi-based Lazy Magnoliaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are stepping up with more options. Our favorite grocery stores will be adding new varieties to their shelves, and our favorite watering holes will have some creative new stuff on tap. As triumphant as this day is, the law still needs more changes come 2013. According to the Brewers Association (brewersassociation.org), in both 2010 and 2011, dollar growth in the craft-brewing industry was 15 percent; in 2011, the retail value of the industry was estimated at $8.7 billion. (By comparison, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about three times greater than the smartphone â&#x20AC;&#x153;appâ&#x20AC;? economy.) And little about the July 1 law enables Mississippi to get a piece of that action. For the next legislative session, a few things need to be added. One, we need to legalize home brewing (legal federally and in 47 other states) in Mississippi, and encourage brewing competitions statewide. These â&#x20AC;&#x153;culinary tourismâ&#x20AC;? opportunities are moneymakers that more than fit with Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burgeoning foodie image, and home brewing is how many local and regional micro-breweries get their starts, leading to jobs and tax revenue. Two, we need authorities to support brewpubs and allow for on-site sale of beer at breweries. Again, the culinary tourism or brewery tours and samplings are strong traditions in other parts of the country and the world, and Mississippi could establish similar traditions. And local brews encourage allegiances and pride that add to quality of life for beer-drinking residents. One other note: In appreciation of the current law changes, we all need to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? by being responsible drinkers. As these heavier beers roll out, we encourage you to seriously consider the differences in alcohol content compared to what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to drinking. Go slow, enjoy the taste and aroma of great beerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but designate a sober driver, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get behind the wheel if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been enjoying good brew. Congrats, Mississippi, on a step down the right road. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to this stepâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the next one. Cheers!

LETTERS

Congress, Support Mississippi Students

U

June 27 - July 3, 2012

nder the budget approved by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Phil Bryant, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institutions of Higher Learning will receive $2,400 less per student for fiscal year 2013 than they received a decade ago. In addition, Republican leadership, rather than independently accounting for Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portion of the Ayers v. Fordice settlement, is requiring several of our universities and colleges to give up more than $6 million to pay for the settlement. As a direct result of the Republican budget, the state college board passed a tuition increase that will cost Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college students an average of $450 this fall and approximately $350 next year. This is an unacceptable result for a state that was ranked 48 out of 50 in percentage of people over 25 years old with college degrees according to the latest census data. Now, as Mississippi students prepare to pay more for their education, they face a new threat. This month, Congress must agree to extend the 3.4 percent interest rate on federal student loans or that rate will double. This gathering storm provides Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s congressional delegation with an opportunity to soften the blow dealt to our college students by our governor and Legislature. To help ensure that our delegation keeps faith with Mississippi students, please contact your congressman through the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121 and ask them to extend the current interest rate on federal college loans. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tyrone Hendrix, President, Young Democrats of Mississippi 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Brandon Jones, Executive Director, Mississippi Democratic Trust

MY TURN

BY INGRID CRUZ

One Life-Changing Day

I

n Mississippi, the movement to organize undocumented immigrant youth is a fairly recent one. It formally began after five youth attended the national United We DREAM conference in Dallas, Texas, in November 2011. A month later, they decided to form Youth Organizers United in Jackson. The constant fear that the state Legislature will pass an anti-immigrant law similar to Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HB 56 and HB 658â&#x20AC;&#x201D;two of the most Draconian antiimmigrant laws in the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hangs over immigrants in Mississippi. These laws criminalize every aspect of an immigrantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life: It forbids documented people from giving transportation to undocumented immigrants and tells schools to ask students for their status; it makes giving an undocumented person a job into a crime and, among the worst of their provisions, these laws legalize racial profiling. They empower police to stop anyone they â&#x20AC;&#x153;reasonably suspectâ&#x20AC;? to be undocumented. The closeness of Alabama to Mississippi means there are many similar economic, personal, ideological and political demographics between the two states. During the 2012 legislative session, the Mississippi legislature attempted to pass HB 488, a law that was an exact replica of Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HB 56, but the law did not pass. For many years, undocumented youth in Mississippi have been confused about their right to attend institutions of higher education after high school. This is why there are so few undocumented students enrolled in Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colleges and universities. Furthermore, Mississippi has been using E-Verify, an online system meant to verify a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal status, since 2008. The system makes it difficult for undocumented students to apply for employment regardless of professional degrees. Mississippi law isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear about a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to attend public schools or receive state financial aid. On June 15, President Barack Obama made an announcement that could possibly change the lives of up to 1 million undocumented youth for the better. Janet Napolitano, director of Department of Home Security, released a memo stipulating that some undocumented young people would be able to apply for a deferred action that would later grant them a permit for up to two years. To be eligible, the person must have arrived in the United States before age 16, be younger than age 30, graduated from high school or

university, served in the military or attained a GED certificate. The language of the memo closely mirrors much of what immigrant youths have been fighting for in the DREAMâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Act. Although this memo will not pave a path to citizenship or residency, up to one million youth will finally be able to work legally and apply for a driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license without fearing deportation. The general mood in the immigrant community is that this is not immigration reform, but it is a step in the right direction. Up to 64 percent of voters approve of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immigration announcement, according to a Bloomberg poll. How does this announcement affect Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s undocumented youth? Alex Ortiz, a member of Youth Organizers United, came to this country from Honduras when he was 11 years old. He is a straight-A student at Tougaloo College; despite his undocumented status, he received a scholarship due to his grades and credentials. He has this to say about Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proclamation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;As an undocumented youth, this is life changing, historic. This referendum means I will no longer live in fear of deportation. As a college student this means that I will now have an opportunity to use my future profession in order to give back to this country, I will no longer live a life filled with uncertainty!â&#x20AC;? We are sure that, just like in other parts of the country, many talented undocumented youth in Mississippi echo Alexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sentiments. I am personally proud of their patience, but this is not the end. As Alex says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that this will show others that the efforts that have been made have not been in vain, and that our strength as dreamers continues to grow, and we will not stop until we reach a permanent solution to our immigration problem, which is the DREAM Act.â&#x20AC;? I agree with Alex. Still, I will remember June 15, 2012, as a day when tireless undocumented immigrant youth reshaped this country. Ingrid Cruz is an activist for immigrantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights and against private prisons. She was born in El Salvador, raised in California and moved to Mississippi in September 2010. She participated in 2012â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recreation of James Meredithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walk Against Fear and writes about what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to be a Latina on her blog, comomaquinita.tumblr.com.

LETTERS

Circus Abuses Animals

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The Good Fight

A

few months ago, after watching one of the Republican debates, I placed a call to my sweet little momma. She lives in what I call a FOX News bubble: She doesn’t have access to the Internet or pay much attention to opposing views. I’d been curious about her thoughts on the Republican hopefuls running for the presidential nomination. This campaign year has been a bit like a circus, and I couldn’t help but wonder. She had decided. “I like Santorum for president,” she told me. “Mother,” I said, cautiously, “the statements the man makes ... I’m just baffled by it all.” I was talking about his comments that deal directly with me and my “lifestyle”—the one that’s apparently detrimental to civilization. I then explained how disheartening it is to listen to these men argue to keep me a second-class citizen. My mother, a conservative Southern Baptist, thinks I should be able to marry my partner of almost 10 years. When I worked up the courage to ask, she said thoughtfully, “It’s my understanding that the only thing that condemns a soul to hell is not accepting Christ as your savior, not being gay.” She, like our president, wrestled with the issue at hand, and her thoughts eventually evolved—to a point. “Oh, son,” she said, explaining her views on gay marriage. “I believe it should be put to a vote. The people should decide.” So, there it was: the old flag conservatives wave when pressed for an opinion— “Vote on Civil Rights.” It should go without saying that blacks would probably still be on the back of the bus had it been left to the people’s vote back in the ’60s. “Well, I’m glad you’re open to the idea” was all I could muster, and I left it at that. Then, months later, our president publicly stated he believes gays should have the right to a marriage recognized by our state and the federal government. Of course, he says it should be left up to the states to decide, kicking the can even further down the street, so to speak. Six states and the District of Columbia now allow same-sex marriage, so we’ve seen progress. But several states amended their constitutions to ban gay marriage and even to refuse to recognize those legal unions from other states. Mississippi did so in 2004 with a majority of voters defining marriage as a union between one man and one woman. End of story, so sayeth the Lo-ward! There have been some rumblings about the unconstitutionality of such amendments—as well as the Defense of Marriage Act, which restricts legal unions to “one man and one woman”—as it works its way through the judicial system. I, like so many, sit and watch while others weigh in on the subject; it’s like I’m the elderly woman across the table from my adult children who are debating among themselves whether I should be allowed to drive.

I cling to this one thing: Polls are now showing that an increasing majority of Americans are in favor of marriage equality because of their proximity to gays and lesbians. As the social climate warms to the idea that gays and lesbians are an acceptable and important part of our society, more and more of “my kind” feel comfortable stepping out of the closet. The more we show ourselves, the more society will understand that everyone knows one, works with one, or is related to one. Back in 1978, Harvey Milk knew this very thing to be true: “Gay brothers and sisters, you must come out. Come out to your parents. I know that it is hard and will hurt them but think about how they will hurt you in the voting booth! Come out to your relatives; come out to your friends, if indeed they are your friends. Come out to your neighbors, to your fellow workers, to the people who work where you eat and shop; come out only to the people you know, and who know you. Not to anyone else. But once and for all, break down the myths, destroy the lies and distortions.” Proximity, coupled with the fact that equality is nearly a non-issue for many voters under age 30, will eventually lead to marriage equality. If the federal government keeps kicking the can and the states continue to be divided on the issue, I know at least the up-and-coming voters will vote in favor of an amendment to allow gay marriage or will overwhelmingly repeal existing amendments against it. You see, while our president encouraged a “respectful debate” on the subject, the opponents are encouraging anything but. We see some of the most passionate and frightening opposition coming directly from the pulpit. This sort of fanatical preaching is nothing new, but now, as these snippets of hate go viral, light shines on the black heart of a big segment of our population. Not surprisingly, these “men of God” run for cover when called out on their bigotry. Without much fuss, these people drive younger voters away from the church and the increasingly ultraconservative Republican Party. Here we are, fighting in what is being called “the new civil-rights movement,” and more and more Americans are on our side. As our president said while addressing the attendees of a Human Rights Campaign banquet in 2009: “That’s the story of America: of ordinary citizens organizing, agitating and advocating for change ... of Americans fighting to build for themselves and their families a nation in which no one is a second-class citizen ... (is) free to live and love as we see fit.” The story of America—indeed. Eddie Outlaw is co-owner of the William Wallace Salon in Fondren, a resident of the King Edward, and spends most of his time trying not to embarrass his sweet Delta mother on eddieoutlaw.com”

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EDDIE OUTLAW

13


Sweet, Sweet Beer by Tom Ramsey

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d kill everyone in this room for one drop of sweet, sweet beer.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Homer Simpson

M

ississippi was the last state in the United States to fully allow the sale of alcohol. The state repealed prohibition in 1966, 46 years after the U.S. nullified it, and then only in a confusing patchwork of â&#x20AC;&#x153;wetâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;dryâ&#x20AC;? counties and cities. But â&#x20AC;&#x153;intoxicating liquorsâ&#x20AC;? had been illegal in Mississippi since 1907, 13 years before the Volstead Act was fully ratified. Because of this and other factors, including the enormous influence of teetotaling church communities, Mississippi never really developed a beer-brewing history. A few local breweries operated along the river and on the Coast, but for the most part, the beers consumed in Mississippi came into the state by truck, rail and barge. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;golden ageâ&#x20AC;? of American breweries lasted from the 1880s to 1910. During the first part of this gilded time, Mississippi was still in shambles, putting itself back together after the Civil War and Reconstruction. By the end of the brewery boom, Mississippi was officially dry. So, when Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company sold its first keg a century after the golden age, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t signify the resurgence of brewing in Mississippi as much as the birth of the industry here. What Mississippi missed out on during the golden

age was a time when the number of American breweries peaked at more than 3,000, brought on by the huge influx of European immigrants setting up local breweries and making small-batch beers in the style of their homelands. Over the next few decades, with the advent of refrigeration and the proliferation of railroad lines, the largest breweries either purchased the smaller ones to meet demand or simply outperformed them in such a way that made it difficult or impossible for the little guys to compete with the monsters that became Anheuser-Bush, Miller, Schlitz and Coors. The nail in the small brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffin came in January of 1919 with the passage of prohibition. Only the biggest survived by turning their breweries into factories and making â&#x20AC;&#x153;near beer,â&#x20AC;? or beer with low to no alcohol. However, craft beer has experienced a resurgence in recent decades, and many say we are now in our second golden age with more than 1,500 breweries operating in the United States. Sure, the brewing behemoths still have the bulk of the business, but all of the growth in the industry is coming from the little guys making impressive beer. Now, at last, Mississippi gets to play along with the rest of the yard. The brewers at Lazy Magnolia, founded in 2005, feared that the Mississippi customers might not appreciate the more intense â&#x20AC;&#x153;craftâ&#x20AC;? beers that they wanted to

make. With this in mind, they produced Reb Ale (now known as Deep South Pale Ale), a beer that was as close to a traditional American lager as they could brew, and planned on it being their bread-and-butter productâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the one that would allow them to sell a little bit of the more complex and intense â&#x20AC;&#x153;good stuff.â&#x20AC;? When the â&#x20AC;&#x153;good stuff â&#x20AC;? started outselling the â&#x20AC;&#x153;light stuff,â&#x20AC;? they were pleasantly surprised and became cautiously optimistic that change was on the wind. Fast forward seven years, and those seeds of change sown by a couple who started brewing as a kitchen-counter hobby grew and blossomed into a full-blown craft-beer movement that swept through bars and restaurants and, of all places, the Mississippi State Capitol. A handful of self-proclaimed â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer geeksâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;hop heads,â&#x20AC;? operating under the banner of Raise Your Pints, took on the political whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who in the shining buckle of the Bible Belt and accomplished the unthinkable. In just a couple of sessions, they convinced the old lions of the Mississippi legislature to pass a law increasing the alcohol content of beer and allowing for the sale of more beer. Hang around any local bar that pours craft beer, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll hear the buzz. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an electric anticipation in the air, and the magic date of July 1 on everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lips. That is the day when Mississippi will finally be free from the Draconian cap of 5 percent alcohol by weight, or ABW, and higher-gravity beers will be on the store shelves. Everyone has favorites theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping to see on tapâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; my two are Andygator by Abita Brewing and De Koninck Triple dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Anvers. Hop heads are hoarding â&#x20AC;&#x153;big beersâ&#x20AC;? and holding parties that will commence at the stroke of midnight with the synchronized bottle-top-popping of their favorite elixirs. Beer tastings are scheduled and full-blown celebrations, like our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Underground USAâ&#x20AC;? at Underground 119, are set to go. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be like a hipster New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve right in the middle of our long hot summer.

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June 27 - July 3, 2012

14

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Top 20 Beer-consuming states in the USA

by Kathleen Mitchell; photos by Virginia Schreiber

A

ll summer long, beer geeks and hopheads have been buzzing about craft beer. But for those who have never ventured outside the standard varietals, the pool of higher-alcohol beers can be an intimidating one to cannonball into. Luckily, we’ve put together a cheat sheet for you. We invited some of the members of Raise Your Pints to a Craft Beer Taste-Off to see how our palates compared with the local experts. Team JFP and Team RYP sat down with six of the higher-alcohol beers (plus Bud Light as a “control” beer) that will hit Mississippi sometime in July. We tasted from the lightest to the most intensely flavored India pale ales, and judged each brew using five criteria. To read the full response cards and see a gallery of photos, visit jfp.ms/beermonth.

#1 Budweiser Bud Light

34!4%

#2 Spaten Optimator

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more TASTE OFF, see page 16

44 43.4 41.7 41.5 39 38.2 37.8 37.4 37.1 37 36.8 36.6 36.4 36.4 35.4

MISSISSIPPI

35.1

Iowa Florida Ohio Colorado

34.4 33.8 33.5 33.4 SOURCE: BEERINFO.COM

Craft Beer stats u 2YHUDOO EHHU VDOHV LQ WKH 86 IHOO E\  SHUFHQWIURPWRZKLOHFUDIWEHHU VDOHVLQWKH86LQFUHDVHGE\SHUFHQWLQ WKHVDPHWLPHSHULRG u&UDIWEUHZHUVVROGDQHVWLPDWHG EDUUHOV EDUUHO 86JDOORQV RIEHHULQ XSIURPLQ u &UDIW EUHZHUV FXUUHQWO\ SURYLGH DQ HVWL PDWHGMREVLQWKH86LQFOXGLQJ VHUYLQJVWDIILQEUHZSXEV u&UDIWEHHUVDOHVKDYHJURZQIURPOHVVWKDQ SHUFHQWRIWKHPDUNHWLQWRRYHU SHUFHQWLQDQGDUHH[SHFWHGWRH[FHHG SHUFHQWE\ SOURCE: THE U.S. BREWERS ASSOCIATION

How old is beer?

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jacksonfreepress.com

Taste-Off at the JFP

15


Taste-Off from page 15

#4 Samuel Adams Imperial Stout

#5 Rogue Dead Guy

#6 Abita Jockamo

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June 27 - July 3, 2012

more TASTE-OFF, see page 18

16

Get real fresh. Try our brand new smoothies, blending real fruit with yogurt or soy milk. &OUR"ERRYs0EACH0EAR!PRICOTs/RANGE4ANGERINE


17

jacksonfreepress.com


TASTE OFF, from page 16 Wednesday - June 27 NEW KARAOKE SHOW 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - June 28 Open Mic w/ Eric Robinson 7-11 Ladies Night

The tasters raise their favorites of the day

Friday - June 29

Ghost Town Saturday - June 30

Exit 111

Sunday - June 24 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

The Colonels June 29 | 9:00pm

Appetizer Wine:

Wine:

Ghost Town June 30 | 9:00pm

Wine:

â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE!

Wine:

See more photos of the RYP v. JFP Taste-Off at jfp.ms/beermonth.

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Entree

June 27 - July 3, 2012

18

From left: Kristin Breneman, Andrea Thomas, Jacob Fuller and Todd Stauffer. (Not pictured: Monique Davis)

Team Raise Your Pints )LQDO5DQNLQJ $ELWD-RFNDPR,3$ 6LHUUD1HYDGD7RUSHGR,3$ 5RJXH'HDG*X\ 6DPXHO$GDPV,PSHULDO6WRXW 6SDWHQ2SWLPDWRU $ELWD$QG\JDWRU %XGZHLVHU%XG/LJKW

Let us fill in the blank with Sommeliers on staff and our extensive wine selection.

6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

Follow us on Facebook

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â&#x20AC;˘ $3 Bloody Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm

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Team Jackson Free Press

2nd Entree Dessert

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From left: Mike Smith, Craig Hendry, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thile,â&#x20AC;? Todd Parkman and Katie Parkman.


Saturday June 30, 2012

New Blue Plate Special

#2 with Me and Hugh

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lo Trio

Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

Big Richard

$8.99

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

live music june 27 - july 3

wed | june 27 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p

Friday & Saturday June 29 & 30

thu | june 28 Evans Geno 5:30-9:30p fri | june 29 Shaun, Richard & Kenny 6:30-10:30p

'DLO\/XQFK6SHFLDOV



XJUI5FBBOE4JEFT 0RQGD\3FE'JTI 7XHVGD\$SBC$BLF :HGQHVGD\$IJDLFO(ZSP 7KXUVGD\5BMBQJBPS4BMNPO )ULGD\)BNCVSHFS 6DWXUGD\%JOFS´T4QFDJBM 7BMJE6OUJM

0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4 NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ&#x2026;

Now Offering

LIVE MUSIC Friday and Saturday Nights

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

In Town & in the USA

Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill Now Open

sat | june 30 Around The Bend 6:30-10:30p

10:30-1:00 M-F Delivery available Sandwiches, Salads and more see full menu: www.clubmagoos.com

sun | july 1 Chris Gill 4:00 - 8:00p

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Thu - Sat)

mon | july 2 Karaoke tue | july 3 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 â&#x20AC;˘ 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079

ES-O-TER-I-CA:

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens â&#x20AC;˘ Pendulums Books â&#x20AC;˘ Wands â&#x20AC;˘ Moldavite Jewelry & More National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

jacksonfreepress.com

A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

19


100 RIDGE WAY FLOWOOD, MS 601-420-4202

June 27 - July 3, 2012

622 DULING AVE JACKSON, MS

20

601-366-5757


%*/&+BDLTPO Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant.r

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jackson’s crawfish destination. You’ll also want to try their delicious gumbo while enjoying Friday night karaoke! Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout. Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Reed Pierce’s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and buildyour-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and veryvegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

jacksonfreepress.com

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street Historic District offering a savory haven for homestyle eaters with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

21


Match Made in (Mouthwatering) Heaven O by Tom Ramsey

Beer Style

Description

Wheat beers such as hefeweizen, wheat ale and witbier.

Lighter in color, low bitterness and mild flavors.

Porters and stouts. Pale ales, India pale ales, double IPAs and Imperial IPAs. Americanstyle light lagers.

Using wines as an example, lagers are more like white wines and ales are akin to reds when it comes to the foods they pair with. This is not a hard-and-fast rule, but more of a starting point. What you’re looking for is balance—which sometimes comes from the wine complementing the food and sometimes from providing a contrast. Dishes that are very one-sided (very spicy, sweet, fatty

Pair With

Why

Seafood, shellfish, salads, sushi, chicken, white sausages.

Dark in color, rich malty flavors and moderate flavor intensity.

BBQ, dark sausages, smoked meats, roasts, stews.

Intense flavors, high bitterness and hoppiness.

Spicy foods, Creole/Cajun dishes, curries, desserts.

Light flavor, low bitterness, low intensity.

After mowing the lawn or roofing construction.

The mild flavors of the beer don’t stomp all over the subtle notes of lighter dishes.

The rich heartiness of the beer reflects and enhances the complex and layered flavors of slow-cooked foods.

The bitterness of the beer helps to cleanse the palate of intense spices and sweets.

Like Gatorade, they are thirst quenchers.

or rich) work better with beers that contrast them and provide balance. Dishes that are already well-balanced and elegant work better with brews that complement their flavors and continue the flavor path of the “middle way.” This may sound confusing, but that only means you have to experiment more—which simply means you should try more beer! And what’s wrong with that?

COURTESY JESSICA SPENGLER

ne great thing about high-gravity beer is that (much like its higher-alcohol cousin, wine) it pairs wonderfully with food. And as with pairing food and wine, there are some general rules of thumb. The more intense the beer, the more hearty the food should be, as a way to balance the flavors. Conversely, delicate foods with subtle flavors should be paired with lighter and less intense beer.

FRENCH-FRIED POTATOES

3 large russet potatoes 2 cups of canola oil 3-4 teaspoons of seasoned salt Optional: 2 teaspoons of plain, white sugar

French-fried potatoes are the perfect quickand-hot pair for ice-cold beer.

A Classic Combo I by Tam Curley

am not a big beer drinker, or really a drinker at all. However, I will occasionally crave an ice-cold bottled beer— sometimes a beer is just the right touch to a summer cookout, even for folks like me. When the craving hits, I’ve got the ultimate 20-minute recipe to whip up skin-on Frenchfried potatoes. French fries and beer, what more could you want in the summer?

In a deep fryer on medium-high, heat oil for about five minutes. While the oil is heating, cut the potatoes in sections with the skin on (with large russet potatoes, its best to cut the potatoes across, then lengthwise and then cut finger-sized pieces). After all your potatoes are cut into pieces, place them in a large colander and rinse thoroughly. Let the remaining water drain from the potatoes, then place the potatoes in the hot oil, making sure to cover the potatoes completely so that they all cook properly and at the same time. Move the potatoes around in the oil to ensure all pieces cook evenly. After the potatoes are fried, use a large slotted spoon to remove them. Let most of the oil drain off, then move to a plate covered with several paper towels to finish drying. Sprinkle seasoned salt evenly over the hot potatoes. If you like sweet fries, top them with a couple pinches of plain white sugar. Serves: 4

The Jackson Free Press

Menu Guide

22

2-for-1 Draft Beer

Monday - Friday 5 - 7 pm

FRESH

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100 E. Capital St. Suite 105 • Jackson MS • www.wasabims.com • wasabijackson@gmail.com

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CELEBRATE 4TH OF JULY

- Everything you need for the BBQ grill - USDA Choice & Prime Beef - Party trays, baked goods, chips & dips - Jackson’s best beer selection

KEGS AVAILABLE! Call Ahead!

Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-8486 Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren 601-366-5273 English Village 904 E. Fortification Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Drive | 601-366-8486 601-355-9668 Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren | 601-366-5273 Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089 English Village 904 E. Fortification Street | Belhaven | 601-355-9668

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New Summer Menu With Local Produce • Now Accepting Dinner Reservations • 9 Craft Beers On Tap

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23


5A44 FX5X

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Rub WEDNESDAY 6/27

David Piggot (Piano Man)

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Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia

1 24-ounce can of beer (any type) 6-8 cuts of spare rib ½ cup dry sausage mix ½ cup pure honey

s funny as it seems to advocate beer as a non-drinker, I often cook with wines and cooking sherryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;why not beer? I lived in Montgomery, Ala., for a few years and was very active in my church. We wanted to raise money for our churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual fundraising drive. So, we decided to have a barbecue at one of the local grocery stores. We had the usual: ribs, cole slaw, baked beans, tea, lemonade, bread, hot dogs, etc. â&#x20AC;Ś I also bought some local honey. Of course the honey was the number one seller, but the ribs were a close second. After I ordered my plate, I began to see why they were so popular. These were the best ribs I had ever tasted. A friend of a friend cooked the ribs for us. He had the charisma and obviously the right ingredients to sell. I asked him what he did to get these ribs to taste so good and he became silent. He would not give me a clue. Later on, though, my friend shared the secret. He told me that this guy marinated

Wash the ribs and place in a bowl. Pour the beer over the ribs and cover. Place in refrigerator over night. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees. Remove the ribs from refrigerator and pour off all the beer mixture. Pat the ribs dry with paper towels and place in a shallow pan, bone side down. Sparingly rub on the sausage seasoning mix, and pour the honey over the ribs evenly (you do not have to rub in the honey). Place ribs in a shallow aluminum pan and cover with aluminum foil and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove the foil and cook uncovered for another 30 minutes. Serve and enjoy! You can also grill the ribs on open flames using the dry rub or your favorite barbeque sauce. Serves: 2

his meat in beer and was afraid to tell me since this was a church-sanctioned fundraiser. Well, I was pleased with the sales, and no one got drunk, so the beer served its function, I suspect.

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Thursday : Chicken Diane June 27 - July 3, 2012

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BEER AND HONEY RIBS

Come Try Our New Menu

or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef

24

COURTESY JESSICA SPENGLER

by Alonzo Lewis

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318 South State Street | Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

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25

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Best Pizza 2009-2011 The Only Metro Area Restaurant Serving Allen Brothers Steak

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(in the former FabraCare Building, between Katâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 45000 I-55 North Highland Village Jackson, MS 39211 601-956-9562 www.charrestaurant.com

2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975




 

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27


BEN RAYNER

MUSIC p 30 | FILM p 34 | ARTS p 35 |8 DAYS p 36 | SPORTS p 40

For the Sheer Joy of It by Briana Robinson

Although fairly new on the scene, Neon Indian, fronted by Alan Palomo, is already a top-10 chillwave band.

Junye 27 - July 3, 2012

and Todd Rungren’s “Izzat Love” on “Deadbeat Summer.” Pitchfork music reviewer Marc Hogan describes the album as “synth-based, homemade-sounding, ’80s-referencing, cassette-oriented, sun-baked, laid-back, warped, hazy, emotionally distant, slightly out of focus.” Neon Indian’s second album, “Era Extraña,” released in 2011, uses no sampling. “It’s just what makes sense in my mind,” Palomo says about why he makes the type of music that he does. “I really don’t try to think of it as some genre or something I’m trying to tap into. It’s just when I listen to music those are the qualities that I look for.” “All these sounds were selected not with some cratedigging mentality of trying to find some obscurity that I could reinvent, but from the idea that I just wanted to celebrate the song and take it somewhere else,” Palomo says. Since his laptop was recently stolen, Palomo is not sure when he will be releasing new music for Neon Indian or his other moniker, VEGA. “I kind of came home to a blank canvas and have been treating it as such,” he says. He doesn’t like to focus on when he is due for a new record. “The premise behind Neon Indian to begin with was just to support the mentality of writing music for the sheer joy of it, and really to only do it when I feel inspired to,” he says. On June 28, Neon Indian will perform with the Flaming Lips as part of the record-breaking, 24-hour tour. This isn’t the first time that Neon Indian has worked with the Flaming Lips. Frontman Wayne Coyne went to a Neon In-

dian show in Portland a few years ago, approached Palomo and asked if they could collaborate. “He introduced himself after the show and was like ‘Hey, we should do something together.’ We didn’t really know what it would be, but we knew we would do something,” Palomo says. Palomo and Coyne ended up releasing an EP together, called “The Flaming Lips with Neon Indian.” “We didn’t want it to be really formal or do a lot of planning for it,” Palomo says. “We just wanted it to feel like a very natural gesture. … I couldn’t have asked for a greater collaboration.” COURTESY LEFSE RECORDS

A

lan Palomo wrote the song “Should’ve Taken Acid with You” for an ex-girlfriend after missing a date with her during holiday break in 2008. “At the time I felt a little guilty about it, and the impulse was to write a tongue-in-cheek apology,” he says. The song ended up being part of a creative project that Palomo was working on called Neon Indian. He was also working on other dancemusic projects and wanted to go in a new direction. “The ethos behind it is that I got fed up with the more tedious elements of dance-music production and really losing a lot of songwriting in the process,” 23-year-old Palomo says. “Should’ve Taken Acid with You” became wildly popular as a chillwave and lo-fi hit. Chillwave, or glo-fi, is a genre of music characterized by the extensive use of synthesizers and filtered vocals. Although the group only came out with its debut album, “Psychic Chasms,” in 2010, The Pitch, an alternative weekly in Kansas City, has already put Neon Indian seventh on its list of top-10 chillwave artists. “The catalyst behind the first record was that it sort of presented itself as a scrapbook,” Palomo says. “It wasn’t necessarily wanting to write sample-based music with a certain genre in mind; it was making interesting music that was relevant to my life.” Neon Indian is frontman Palomo and Jason Faries, Leanne Macomber, Ed Priesner and Josh McWhirter on instruments and synthesizers. “Psychic Chasms” samples his father, Mexican pop 28 singer Jorge Palomo, on “6669” and “7000 (Reprise)”

Palomo and Neon Indian join the Flaming Lips for part of their record-breaking concert tour this week.


.EW,UNCH$INNER-ENU

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Vibrant Art Show And Concert

corner of Duling and North State 3030 North State Street, Jackson, MS | 601-981-9222 FondrenArtGallery.com

jacksonfreepress.com

July 5, 2012 5:00-8:00 PM

29


DIVERSIONS|music

Rebel Rap

by Briana Robinson

Natalie’s Notes

“I like the power of rap. I like rap that moves people. I like those words that move people,” N9ne says. Some of his influences include hardcore rappers such as Ice Cube, N.W.A and Public Enemy. “I like people that speak loud and hard,” he says. When Public Enemy came out in the 1980s with its politically charged lyrics, the young Tech N9ne had never heard anything like it. “I guess that’s just something that’s been with me since I was a youngster—to go against the grain, to do what’s not P.C.,” he says. N9ne also writes personal narratives. “I paint beautiful stories with rhymes,” he says, Rapper Tech N9ne performs at Commerce Street (formerly emphasizing that his music is all about life. Whiskey River and Club Fire) June 30 as part of a record-breaking His latest EP, “Klusterfuk,” opens with him tour this summer. slowly singing “I was born in November, eighth day, 1971st year” on the title track. “I want people to know how I grew up,” Tech N9ne write a song called ‘Nonsense’ and see how it goes.” says for why he writes such personal lyrics. “I want my fans “As I get older, my stories change,” N9ne says. “That’s to connect and know who I am. … I like my life. I don’t just what life is, though—ups and downs.” Tech N9ne has 12 write stupid freestyle songs with no substance.” albums, with the next one set to release late in October. Lots of his music is about his search for a higher power N9ne’s live performances are loud, rowdy and energetbecause his mom is sick. “If I knew that there is truly some- ic. “The crazier I can get it, the better,” he says. His favorite thing that I’m praying to every day, then I would feel a lot part of performing is looking into the crowd and seeing so more at ease about where she may go if she happens to die,” many happy faces. he says. Many of his shows on this concert have sold out. It’s not all serious, though. “There’s a lot of love—can’t hate on that,” he says. “I like to write a stupid song every now and then,” Tech N9ne performs June 30 at Commerce Street (209 N9ne jokes, “because I make too much sense. I think I’ll Commerce St.) at 8:30 p.m.

COURTESY STRANGE MUSIC

W

ith a total of 90 shows between March 24 and July 6, Aaron Yates, aka Tech N9ne, is embarking on the longest tour in rap history. On June 30, the tour comes to Jackson with Machine Gun Kelly; MayDay; Prozak and Krizz Kaliko at Commerce Street, formerly known as the Whiskey River Saloon, before that, Club Fire. N9ne, who used to be a breakdancer, has been rapping since he was in seventh grade in 1985. “With rhythm came rhyme,” he says. At the time, he was looking for a way to express the movement that he felt with words. A few years later, hardcore rapper Walter Jefferson gave him his moniker. According to Jefferson, N9ne’s fast-paced style of rapping sounded like a gun going off. In later years, N9ne became interested in numerology, the study of the power of numbers. He discovered that nine is the number of completion. He changed the spelling from Tec to Tech to be short for technique. “The complete technique of rhyme” is what he calls it. N9ne’s complete technique includes writing about life experiences in a straightforward way with no sugarcoating. He says that he has always had an infatuation with rebel music. He wanted to be the biggest rebel possible. In 1999, he helped start the indie hip-hop label Strange Music, and in 2002, he had a campaign called “F*ck the Industry.” “F*ck the major labels,” N9ne says. “I’m going to start my own label and sell millions. F*ck the way they do it. I’m gonna do it with face paint on and with red, spiked hair—I don’t look like anyone else in my community.”

Happy Birthday, America

by Natalie Long

June 27 - July 3, 2012

30

Mountain Boys (one of my favorite bands in Jackson) will perform. The event is $5 and will be from 5-10 p.m. Also on Monday, Hal & Mal’s will host the Brooklyn punk band The Men in the Red Room with local Jackson band Los Buddies as the opener. The doors open at 8 p.m., and the show is for 18 and over. Both events Monday will be awesome, and the venues are in walking distance of each other. Come out to the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601960-1515) July 3 for Music in the City starting at 5 p.m. for a pre-4th of July celebration, and listen to up-and-coming singers and songwriters at open mic nights at Fenian’s (901 E. Fortification St., 601948-0055), Time Out (6270 Old Canton Road, 601-978-1839) or Ole Tavern (416 George St., 601-960-2700). On Wednesday, July 4, please head over to Fenian’s, where they’ll be having a 4th of July celebration featuring one of Jackson’s newest bands, Tightrope Escapade. Members Brad Gilbert, Clay Keith and Jacquelynn Pilcher began performing at Fenian’s Open Mic Night, and manage-

ment liked them so much they decided to book them for the 4th. Visit their website at COURTESY DELTA MOUNTAIN BOYS

I

love Independence Day. Usually, I spend it with my awesome family in McCall Creek, riding-four wheelers, swimming, grilling and catching up with cousins, aunts and uncles, as well as local residents who are like family to me. But with all the wonderful events going on in Jackson the week of July 4, I may have to keep my visit short so that I won’t miss anything here in the City with Soul. To help us celebrate our craft beer law going into effect July 1, Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St., 601-948-0888) will host a Craft Beer Garden starting at 3 p.m. that day. Live music, great food, and lots of beer will be on hand for you to enjoy. For more information, please visit the restaurant’s website, halandmals.com. On Monday, July 2, Underground 119 (119 S. President St., 601-352-2322) will host Underground USA, also celebrating our new craft-beer law. Along with dishes from local restaurants such as Lumpkin’s Barbecue, The Big Apple Inn, King Edward Grill, Parlor Market, Fenian’s and Tucker Dukes, they will also have a “Dunk the Chef” booth, where you get to dunk your favorite local chef for charity. The Delta

Celebrate the new beer law with The Delta Mountain Boys on Monday, July 2, at Underground 119.

tightropeescapade.com to learn more about this dynamic trio. One of my favorite new traditions on Independence Day is to attend the Old House Depot (639 Monroe St., 601592-6200) for their annual 4th of July party. With free food, sodas, kid-friendly

activities and The Southern Komfort Brass Band performing, I’m sure this year will be just as stellar as the first few. The party kicks off at 5 p.m. and will go until 8. I’m excited that my favorite DJ in Jackson, DJ Phingaprint, will perform every Wednesday night at The Med Grill (6550 Old Canton Road, 601-956-0082), as well as on Eclectic Sundays the first and third Sundays of each month. Jackson’s hip venue in the Millsaps Arts District, Soul Wired Café (111 Millsaps Ave., 601-398-3268) has something on the books every night. Starting July 2, Soul Wired will host Mayhem Mondays; Erotic Poetry Night is Tuesday night; B Social on Wednesdays; DJs and live bands will be on Thursday and Friday nights; reggae and salsa music on Saturday nights; and open mic on Sundays. Please feel free to call the listed venues for more information regarding times and acts, and check out holiday music listings at jfp.ms/music. Thank you, Jackson, for all your support. I hope to see everyone out and about this week, and please be careful over the holidays.


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ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

06/27

LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES

,ADY!NTEBELLUM $ARIUS2UCKER 4HOMPSON3QUARE±6QRZGHQ*URYH$PSKLWKHDWUH 6RXWKDYHQ 2OMANCEONTHE2OOFTOP0ARTYFEAT2OBIN4HICKE±3HDERG\+RWHO0HPSKLV ,IQUID0EACE2EVOLUTION #APTAIN'REEN %NHARMONIC3OULS±+RXVHRI%OXHV12 2INGO3TARRANDTHE!LL3TARR"AND±7XVFDORRVD$PSKLWKHDWHU7XVFDORRVD

9.99

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

June 28

LADIES NIGHT NIGHT w/ DJ Stache GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM FRIDAY

06/29

Blender Series

Furrows

LADIES DRINK FREE Friday

June 29

5th Child Light Beam Rider with special guest

Saturday

Monday

June 30

July 2

2-for-1 Drafts That Scoundrel

James Crow

Gravy SATURDAY

06/30

Tuesday

July 3

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday

July 4

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

FREE WiFi

Serving Lunch 11-2!

Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

MID DAY CAFE       

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

31


What is a Clinical Research Study? A clinical research study is carefully designed to test the safety and effectiveness of investigational medication in a group of volunteers.

You could help

yourself & others

by Participating!

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews information from clinical studies to determine whether or not a drug is considered safe and effictive before doctors prescribe them to their patients. Before a clinical study begins, it is reviewed by members in a group called an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or an Ethics Committee (EC). the IRB/EC is comprised of healthcare professionals and members of the community who help ensure research is done ethically and the rights of study participants are protected.

Who Qualifies? - Male or Female at least 18 years of age. - Currently depressed for at least 4 weeks. - Tried no more than two antidepressants with no success.

What to Expect:

June 27 - July 3, 2012

Dr. Kwentus and his highly trained staff will explain the purpose of the study and what is expected from participants and what will be provided prior to enrollment.

32

Visit

precise-research.com/depressed/

or Call (601)420-5810 right now!


DIVERSIONS|books

A Seductive Antidote

COURTESY ANCHOR BOOKS

tale of suspense and a searing indictment of the misogyny that dominated the treatment of women during that era. Essex casts Dracula not as a treacherous defiler, but as the hero in situations where Mina faces imminent harm. He is the loving presence who accepts Mina unconditionally, even as the mortal men in her life turn on her at the slightest hint that she may not be the chaste, meek and obedient creature society demands. Sadly, outrage at a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s normal sexual urges was prominent in Victorian times. Women who pursued an education, exhibited sexual desires or remained unmarried risked institutionalization. Under these conditions, women did well to suppress their more sensual and intellectual urges. I perceived the real monsters to be the mortal men in Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. In the introduction, Essex describes Stokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original story as â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś falsified documents, based on the lies of a cabal of murderers desperate to conceal their dark deeds.â&#x20AC;? Essex elegantly chronicles the heroineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey from helplessness to empowerment. Every unappreciated and underestimated woman can identify with Mina. Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warning to us, and the central theme of this wondrous read, is this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The truth is, we must fear monsters less and be warier of our own kind.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dracula in Loveâ&#x20AC;? is a sublime read, worth the evening youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll spend getting nothing else done.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on My Nightstand? by Casey Purvis

I

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THIS WEEK

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

WEDNESDAY 6/27

BILL & TEMPERANCE

Wednesday, June 27th

Pre-Flaming Lips Drink Specials

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover

(Kitchen Open until 11:00)

Thursday, June 28th

THURSDAY 6/28 Restaurant open as usual

FRIDAY 6/29 Bill and Temperance (Restaurant)

BOOKER WALKER

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

Friday, June 29th

JAREKUS SINGLETON

Akami Graham (Red Room)

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

SATURDAY 6/30

Saturday, June 30th

Peter Simon (Restaurant) Evans Geno (Red Room)

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

SUNDAY 7/1 Craft Beer Garden 3-8-Brewpub (Patio)

MONDAY 7/2 Central MS Blues Society â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Mondayâ&#x20AC;? The Men w/ Los Buddies (Red Room)

TUESDAY 7/3 Pub Quiz w/ Erin & Friends

NOW SERVING Soft Shell Crab Po-Boys! MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Monday, July 2nd

UNDERGROUND USA

5-10 pm, $5 Cover Great Food from local restaurants. Music outside by Bailey Bro & Delta Mountain Boys

Tuesday,July 3rd

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 6-10, $5 Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -only on Tuesday Nights-

Wednesday, July 4th

CLOSED

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

ADIB SABIR & PINK GARLAND

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

Friday, July 6th

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

(Jazz/Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND

601.948.0888

Thursday, July 5th

(Jazz) 7-10, No Cover

LOS PAPIS

Saturday, July 7th

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;T

here is nothing for you here, Mina. Come with me.â&#x20AC;? The immortal count beckons the unhappily married Mina Murray Harker in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dracula in Loveâ&#x20AC;? by Karen Essex (Anchor Books, 2010, $14.95). Vampire-enthusiasts who have longed for a story of Dracula from Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective, rejoice. Essex delivers an absorbing and sensual narrative, as told by Bram Stokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heroine. In this book, Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story starkly contrasts with Stokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original tale of a demonic, blood-drinking entity, devoid of mercy and human emotion. Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words paint a decidedly human picture of the immortal count, frustrated by enduring centuries of watching his eternally evasive soulmate repeat the cycles of birth and death that he himself has transcended. The reader will find a dutiful bride trapped in an unsatisfying union with weakwilled and prudish Jonathan Harker, grappling against her longing for the enigmatic immortal who haunts her. The count incites a desire in Mina to shed the dull mantle of mortality and its accompanying drudgery, to transcend the mediocrity that surrounds her in exchange for a place in the realm of a more ethereal dimension. Essex takes many liberties with her portrayal of Stokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original characters. The result is a richly woven tapestry of scenes that underscore the plight of women in Victorian society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dracula in Loveâ&#x20AC;? is both a supernatural

by Casey Purvis

33


6A0=3E84F

DIVERSIONS|film

Don’t Fool with Vampires

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Madea’s Witness Protection PG13 Magic Mike

R

Ted

R

People Like Us PG13 3-D Brave

PG

Brave (non 3-D)

PG

Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World R 3-D Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter R Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (non 3-D)

R

Rock Of Ages

PG13

That’s My Boy

R

Madagscar 3 (non 3-D)

PG

Snow White And The Huntsman PG13 3-D Men In Black 3 PG13 Men In Black 3 (non 3-D) PG13 3-D Marvel’s The Avengers PG13 Marvel’s The Avengers (non 3-D) PG13 Midnite Monday 7/2 Opens Tuesday 7/3 The Amazing Spiderman PG13 Opens Thursday 7/5 Katy Perry: Part Of Me PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

June 27 - July 3, 2012

Movieline: 355-9311

34

“A

3-D Madagascar 3 PG

CARF Accredited In-Patient Residential Treatment Programs 601-371-7335 • www.hhjackson.org Building A Bridge Of Hope Since 1973

braham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,” a rare cinematic original based on the book of the same name by Seth GrahameSmith, exposes the eternal struggle between men and the living dead. Abraham Lincoln admitted as much in the October 15, 1858, debate against Stephen A. Douglas. “It is the eternal struggle between these two principles—right and wrong—throughout the world. They are the two principles that have stood face to face from the beginning of time; and will ever continue to struggle. The one is the common right of humanity (the living) and the other the other the divine right of kings (the bloodsuckers of society).” Who better to stop the blood suckers than a silver-tongued politician named Abraham, destined to be a leader of nations based on his moniker alone? For those few who may not be familiar with the ways of the living dead, silver kills vampires. Any type of silver accouterment can work, from silver tongues to bullets, knives, coins, axe tips, forks, tiny toy-soldier swords, chains and pocket watches. In the film, Lincoln implements all types of silver from the sublime to the ridiculous. The vengeful Lincoln beheads a vampire with a silver-tipped axe which has a silver bayonet in a secret compartment and can cough out a few silver bullets in a pinch providing added assurance that the job is done right. Sounds like overkill, doesn’t it? But you can’t take any chances when it comes to killing those eternally damned living-dead creatures. The movie, directed by Russian filmmaker Timur Bekmambetov, opens in sumptuous sepia. The hazy glaze of the scenery reels us back in time to when Abe was a boy and his best friend was a young African American. Little Abe’s outspokenness leads to his dad having words with the boss, Jack Barts (Marton Csokas). Barts threatens to collect on debt owed by the Lincoln family. Under stealth of night, Bart sneaks into the Lincoln cabin and sucks the life out of Abe’s mama. Poor little Abe eyes the whole thing from a crack in the attic floor. Bart gives him the stink-eye in return. If you learn one thing from “Vampire Hunter,” it’s this: Don’t go fooling with vampires unless they suck the life out of your mama. Then and only then do you have the requisite rage to chop off their heads. Vampires have frightful tempers. Even the slightest whiff of a threat provokes pools of drool from their long-fanged mouths and the emission of killer pheromones that ultimately leads to brawling and bloodshed. When they lost their souls, vampires lost their sense of humor as well. Young Abe avows himself to the depletion of the American vampire population. As a young man, Abe (Benjamin Walker)

COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

by Anita Modak-Truran

Listings for Fri. June 29 - Thurs. July 5 2012

A new side of Honest Abe, played by Benjamin Walker, comes out in “Abraham Lincoln:Vampire Hunter.”

learns from his mistakes, and he is saved his folly from vampire hunter Henry Sturges (Dominic Cooper). The actors in this film fully commit to the absurdity of the plot. Many critics fail to recognize the Herculean accomplishment of Benjamin Walker, a Julliard grad who played young Kinsey in “Kinsey” and Harlon Block in “Flags of Our Fathers. Walker can recite the lines of Gettysburg address in a profoundly moving way and then wield his killer axe like Liam Neeson in “Gangs of New York.” Walker, who resembles Neeson at the start of his career, communicates the right amount of gravitas to portray Lincoln. He joins the ranks of Daniel Day-Lewis, who portrays the 16th president in Steven Spielberg’s upcoming film “Lincoln,” Stephen Lang in the mini-series “To Appomattox,” and Will Ferrell in Jeremy Konner’s “Drunk History: Douglass & Lincoln.” The sinister Adam (Rufus Sewell) heads the clan of vampires, who populated the South first and then slowly spread to all parts of United States. The film explains—through visual pedagogical tools—that vampires created slavery so that they had a fresh food supply. Lincoln’s trusted companions Will Johnson (Anthony Mackie), Joshua Speed (Jimmi Simpson) and his beloved Mary Todd (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) bring dimension to the story. Sometimes, you will feel like you have fallen into the third dimension. At other times, you will feel hints of brilliance when the story artfully combines a bit of history with yellow-dog sensationalism. But then, some overwrought notion of spectacle (the train scene comes to mind) splashes a dose of cold water on the slightest germination of anything remotely exceptional. The movie reminds us that “(h)istory prefers legends to men. It prefers nobility to brutality, soaring speeches to wild deeds. History remembers the battle, but forgets the blood. However history remembers me before I was President, it shall only remember a fraction of the truth ...” There isn’t even a fraction of truth in this film, but then what did you expect from the title?


DIVERSIONS|arts

Taboo No More COURTESY ACTOR’S PLAYHOUSE

by Ben-cuda Stowers

H

omosexuality, abortion, rape, child abuse, teen pregnancy and suicide can all initiate a controversial conversation. In yesteryear, however, they were all topics so taboo they were suppressed, ignored and left to fester. “Spring Awakening,” originally a German play written in 1892, faces these issues head-on. It centers on a group of adolescents in 19th century Germany who deal with the turmoils of school, family and, especially, puberty and sexual awakening. Michael Mayer adapted it to a rock musical of the same name in 2006, and it went to Broadway, where it received 11 Tony Award nominations, and won eight categories including best musical, direction, book, score and featured actor. The plan also won four Drama Desk awards, and the London production won four Oliver Awards. Now, the musical is making its debut in Mississippi under the direction of Lavonne Bruckner, founder and owner of the Actor’s Playhouse. Bruckner studied acting and directing at New York and Yale Universities. She says she started as an actress in church and continued acting through high school. Zach Lovett,Tyler Wade and “I love working with youth. As a direcLindsey Miller tackle intense tor, I like to introduce children to theater,” subjects in “Spring Awakening” Bruckner says. She has produced and directat the Actor’s Playhouse.

ed musicals like “Annie” and “The Wizard of Oz” at the Actor’s Playhouse to train and entertain young people, but says she had always loved more serious acting and wanted to do more critical plays. “In previous years, I’d never thought of doing something cutting edge, but when ‘Rent’ became available, I thought, ‘this will be a test,’” she says. Nervous about putting on a play as controversial as “Spring Awakening” in Mississippi, Bruckner finds comfort in the fact that she presented the musical “Rent,” about young artists and musicians struggling to survive and create in New York under the shadows of HIV/AIDS, to the tri-city area in December of 2008. Although some people were negative about the content, she had a pretty good turnout. She says she expects some negative feedback from people who don’t understand the purpose of the plays, which is to inform young people of preventable situations that plague their generations every day. “Mississippi is daunting just because of the content,” she says. She does warn that people should be careful about children seeing the play. “Spring Awakening” opens June 28 and run through July 1 at the Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl). Tickets are $10 for students and $15 for adults. On-stage seating is available for all showings. For more information, please call 601-664-0930.

FILE PHOTO

Up Where the Air is Clear by Victoria Sherwood

about flying. “But when you get out there to do the flight, everything you planned for could be different.” The weekend-long event includes three competition flights, designed to show the pilots’ skill in flying. One competition involves pilots dropping a beanbag on a large cloth “X” on the ground. The pilot who throws the bag closest wins. Another competition requires capturing a ring while flying. In 2006, the Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest and Canton Parks and Recreations collaborated with The Good Samaritan Center to revitalize the event. Kathy Clem, the executive director of Good Sam, sees the balloon event as a great public relations event and fundraiser for the non-profit organization. Good Sam provides social services to those in need. “We help hundreds of people a month with free clothing, and we do a lot of food assistance,” Clem says. “Up to six to seven thousand meals a month.” All funds raised go into Good Sam’s direct services. “We try to make sure our food is healthy but a complete meal. A lot of times we have to actually go and buy

The skies in Canton will fill with vivid hot air balloons this holiday weekend.

food to supplement the free food and the very-low-cost food that we get,” Clem says. “You might have ground beef, you might have spaghetti noodles, but you need the sauce to put it together.” The Golf Ball Drop is a major component to the fundraising at the Mississippi Championship Balloon Fest. Good Sam sells golf balls—last year they sold 700— that drop from hot air balloons at the fes-

tival. Whoever bought the ball that falls closest to a designated mark wins a prize. The 26th annual Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest is Thursday, June 28, through Sunday, July 1, at the Canton Multi-Purpose Complex (501 Solider Colony Road, Canton). For more information and the schedule of specific events, call 800-844-3369 or 601-859-4358 or visit ballooncanton.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

U

p early, the last thing the fisherman expected to see was a large balloon floating over the lake—just low enough for him to hold a conversation with the pilot. This experience is just one that Ken Johnston recalls from his 18 years of being a balloon pilot. “You have a view that most folks have never seen,” Johnston says. “You can really absorb it and take in what’s in front of you.” All it took for Johnston was a single experience assisting a pilot at a show in Greenwood in 1989. Since then, the journey toward owning a balloon began. “You’re either going to love it or hate it,” Johnston says of flying in hot air balloons. He and his wife, Leigh, now own two hot air balloons. Together as pilot and “crew queen,” they form the team behind the balloon HiLEIGH Kentagious. The Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest started in 1986. Then known as the Canton Balloon Fest, it has been an integral part of the July 4 celebration in Canton since it began. Johnston and his wife have participated in the Mississippi Hot Air Balloon Fest for many years. “You can do a lot of preparation,” Johnston says

35


BEST BETS June 27 - July 4, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 6/27

BEN ROSE/PR NEWSWIRE/NEWSCOM

Bill Patrick talks about the history of Casey Jones during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … David Pigott performs at Fenian’s. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday. … See the opera film “Don Giovanni” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. … Bill and Temperance perform at Underground 119. … Morningbell Records (622 Duling Ave.) hosts a Pre-Flaming Lips Extravaganza with Guantanamo Baywatch at 8 p.m. and the Wild Nothings at 10 p.m. … Electric Hamhock plays at Brent’s (655 Duling Ave.) at 9:30 p.m. … Hal & Mal’s hosts a PreFlaming Lips Concert. … Slicks Bar & Grille hosts Karaoke Wednesdays. … Club Magoo’s has Open Mic Night.

and runs through July 1. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-664-0930. … Evans Geno is at Burgers & Blues.

FRIDAY 6/29

JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd speaks during Friday Forum at 10 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St.). Free, email nmcnamee@greaterjacksonpartnership.com. … The ACLU of Mississippi (753 N. Congress St.) hosts the Gay-Straight Potluck and Movie at 5:30 p.m. Free; call 601354-3408, ext. 227. … The Jackson Bike Advocates’ monthly Community Bike Ride is at 6 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; visit tinyurl. com/JXN-bike. … The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents “Fed Up” at 6 p.m. at Jaco’s Tacos (318 S. State St.). $49; call 601-937-1752 to RSVP. … Chad Wesley performs at 8 p.m. at Fatsumo. The Furrows, 5th Child, That Scoundrel and James Crow play at Martin’s. … Akami Graham and the Key of G perform at 9 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s Red Room. $10.

SATURDAY 6/30

Gov. Phil Bryant’s 5K Run for Health begins at 8 a.m. at the Governor’s Mansion (300 E. Capitol St.). Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. $25 in advance, $30 day of event; visit governorbryant.com/5k. … The Mississippi Public Broadcasting Summer Reading Party featuring Shock from “The Electric Company” starts at 10 a.m. at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Free; call 601-432-6434. … Make It Rain Sports hosts the MIRS Steak Championship at 10 a.m. at Burgers & Blues. $50 team entry fee; email makeitrainsports@gmail.com. … New Edition, El DeBarge and After 7 perform at the Mississippi Coliseum at 7 p.m. $36-$56; call 601-353-0603 or 800-745-3000. … The play “It’s Time to Take Out the Trash” is at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. 2010 “Sunday Best” winner Le’Andria Johnson performs. $25; call 800-745-3000. … Tech N9ne, Machine Gun Kelly, Krizz Kaliko and more perform at 8:30 p.m. at Commerce Street (formerly Fire). … Soul Wired Cafe has reggae and salsa music with DJ C-Lecta at 10 p.m. Gospel singer and 2010 “Sunday Best” winner Le’Andria Johnson makes her mark in two upcoming shows this weekend.

June 27 - July 3, 2012

36

The Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest kicks off at 6 p.m. at Historic Canton Square and runs through July 1. The festival also has events at Northpark Mall (E. County Line Road, Ridgeland) June 29 and Canton Multipurpose Complex (501 Soldier Colony Road, Canton) June 30-July 1. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. Free admission; call 601-859-4358 or 800-844-3369. … The Jackson Technology and Startup Meetup is at 6 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) in the HAC Athletic Center. Free; call 601-919-5265. … Dreamz JXN hosts “The Reception” WFOY Welcoming Party with DJ Phingaprint at 6 p.m. For ages 25 and up. … The play “Spring Awakening” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl)

Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the films “Otter 501” at 2 p.m. and “Damsels in Distress” at 5 p.m. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org. … Hal & Mal’s Craft Beer Garden is from 3-8 p.m. … Le’Andria Johnson also performs at the Mississippi Gospel Choir Invitational Showcase at 6 p.m. at Jackson State University’s Athletic and Assembly Center (1400 John R. Lynch St.). $15; call 601-896-8871 or 800745-3000. … Soul Wired Cafe hosts Sugar Water Purple Sunday and Open Mic with Nickel G and DJ Spre.

MONDAY 7/2

Andrew Bucci’s art exhibit at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place) hangs through July 31. Free; call 601-982-4844. … Underground 119 hosts Underground USA: Celebrating Craft Beer Freedom from 5-10 p.m. The Bailey Brothers and the Delta Mountain Boys give an outdoor concert. $5.

TUESDAY 7/3

The “Add Art … to Table, Walls and More” exhibit at the Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive) debuts at 8 a.m. and hangs through Aug. 30. Free; call 601432-4111. … Erotic Open Mic is 8 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe.

WEDNESDAY 7/4

The annual Watermelon Classic is at 7:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). Register by July 3. Fees vary; call 601-982-8264. … The 4th of July Celebration at the Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland) is from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; call 601-856-7546. … The Broadmeadow 4th of July Parade is at 11 a.m. at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Free; call 601-951-7419. More at jfpevents.com and jacksonfreepress.com/places

The annual Watermelon Classic kicks off July 4 at 7:30 a.m. at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. COURTESY MISSISSIPPI SPORTS HALL OF FAME

THURSDAY 6/28

SUNDAY 7/1


jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Jackson 2000 Luncheon July 11, 11:45 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Jackson 2000 is a nonprofit that promotes racial harmony. Speaker is Hank Holmes of the Mississippi Department of Archives to talk about the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net. Beer & Bones July 14, noon, at F. Jones Corner (303 N. Farish St.). The event includes a backyard grilling competition, a domino tournament, and an arts and music festival. Performers include Norman Clark and Smokestack Lightning, the Bailey Brothers, the Dillonaires, Jesse Robinson and the 500-lb Blues Band, and the Legendary House Rockers. Art vendors and cooking teams must register; fee includes two passes. Admission TBA, $25 art vendor fee, $50 grilling entry fee; call 601-983-1148.

COURTESY MADEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LYN PRODUCTIONS

Eighth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 28, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors,

auction donations and volunteers now. Get involved, volunteer, and donate art, money and gifts at chickball@jacksonfreepress.com. More details at jfpchickball.com. Follow on Twitter @ jfpchickball. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16. Currently Showing at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $6.50, $5.50 seniors, $4 children ages 4-12; call 601-960-1552. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mummies: Secrets of the Pharaohs.â&#x20AC;? The film is about Egypt and its mysterious mummies. Shows are weekdays at noon and Saturdays at 4 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Ocean.â&#x20AC;? The film shows the migration of marine animals and their encounters with humans. Shows are Monday-Saturday at 2 p.m.

HOLIDAY Red, White and Jackson June 28. Enjoy childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, food, music and fireworks at Smith Park downtown from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and in front of the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.) from 7-9 p.m. The Old Capitol Museum remains open until 8 p.m. Free; call 601-948-7575.

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Mississippi State Hospital Independence Day Celebration June 28, 7 p.m., at Mississippi State Hospital (3550 Highway 468 W.), at the park. The party includes food vendors, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, music from DJ Phillip Cothern and a fireworks show at 9 p.m. No pets allowed. Free; call 601351-8421. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red, White and Bluesâ&#x20AC;? Independence Weekend June 29-July 4, in downtown Vicksburg. The Vicksburg Blues Society hosts tribute performances and activities at several venues in honor of late bluesman Willie Dixon. Email shirleywaring@ vicksburgheritage.com.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org

Watermelon Classic July 4, 7:30 a.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The annual race includes a 5K run/walk, a one-mile wellness run and a Tot Trot for children ages 3 and under. Watermelon served after the race. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Register by July 3. Registration fees vary; call 601-982-8264.

6

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Broadmeadow Fourth of July Parade July 4, 11 a.m., at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Broadmeadow Neighborhood Association hosts the annual event, and the theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red, White and Broadmeadow.â&#x20AC;? Patriotic costumes encouraged. A potluck picnic lunch follows; covered dishes welcome. Refreshments such as hot dogs and ice cream also served. Call 601-951-7419.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), in the Community Room. â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi Youth Hip Hop Summit Volunteer Kick-off and Training June 28, 5:30 p.m. Attendees discuss roles, responsibilities, and expectations for event volunteers. Dinner and drinks provided. RSVP. Free; call 601-354-3408, ext. 227. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting on Easy Streetâ&#x20AC;? Finance Seminar July 2, 6 p.m. The topic is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Perfect Time to Purchase a Home!â&#x20AC;? Registration required; limited seating. Free; call 601-982-8467. â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? June 27, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Jacksonian Bill Patrick presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Truth about Casey Jones.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. more EVENTS, page 38

jacksonfreepress.com

There Comes a Time

Fourth of July Celebration July 4, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy a picnic, music from Chris Gill, craft demonstrations and food for sale. Free admission; call 601-856-7546.

37


Miss Mississippi Pageant June 27-30, at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St.). The program begins at 7 p.m. nightly, and the crowning is June 30. Tickets come in set of four to cover each night of the pageant. $125; call 601-638-6746. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting June 28, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0004. Jackson Technology and Startup Meetup June 28, 6 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.), in the skybox of the HAC Athletic Center. Those who work in or are interested in technology, business or marketing are encouraged to attend. The goal is to build a local technology and entrepreneurship network. Free; call 601-919-5265. ACLU of Mississippi Gay-Straight Potluck and Movie June 29, 5:30 p.m., at ACLU of Mississippi (753 N. Congress St.). The event in honor of Gay Pride Month. Bring food and drinks to share, and watch the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Town Gay Bar,â&#x20AC;? which is about two gay bars in Mississippi. Lawn chairs recommended. RSVP. Free; call 601-354-3408, ext. 227. Community Bike Ride June 29, 6 p.m., at Rainbow Whole Foods Co-operative Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road). Jackson Bike Advocates is the sponsor. Destination to be announced. Visit facebook.com/jacksonbikeadvocates. Homebuyer Education Class June 30, 9 a.m., at Jackson Housing Authority (2747 Livingston Road). Topics include personal finances, home inspections and the role of lenders and real estate agents. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Registration required. Free; call 601-362-0885, ext. 115. Philanthropic Fundraising Workshop June 30, 9 a.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.), in the conference room. The We Make It Better Foundation hosts the program to share ways to raise funds for philanthropy and activism. RSVP. Free; call 601-371-1427. Free Money Workshops June 30, 9:30 a.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). The workshop on getting funding for housing, tutoring programs, churches and daycare centers is at 9:30 a.m., and the workshop on getting money from government sources and special programs is at 1 p.m. $39.99 per workshop, $69.99 for both; call 601-965-0372. MIRS Steak Championship June 30, 10 a.m., at Burgers & Blues (1060 E. County Line Road). Make It Rain Sports hosts the cook-off. The top three teams receive cash and prizes. Judges include WLBT meteorologist Barbie Bassett and Jay White from Mississippi Sports This Morning (620 AM). Teams must register. $50 entry fee; email makeitrainsports@gmail.com.

June 27 - July 3, 2012

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stepping Out Against Drugs & Violenceâ&#x20AC;? Blue & White Day June 30, noon, in Magee. Zeta Phi Beta Sororityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rho Iota Zeta Chapter hosts a picnic at noon at Magee City Park (Main Avenue), a step show at 5 p.m. at Magee High School (501 Choctaw St. E.), and an after-party at 8:30 p.m. at National Guard Armory (1111 Guard Ave.). Free picnic; $8 advance, $10 at the door for step show and party; call 601-506-8863.

38

Story Time Tuesday July 3, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). A zookeeper reads an animal story, and the kids get to do a related craft project or have an animal encounter. Free with paid admission; call 601-352-2580. Stop the Violence Essay Contest through July 7. Students in the Jackson Public Schools system are welcome to write on the topic â&#x20AC;&#x153;How is the violence in the city of Jackson affecting your future?â&#x20AC;? Submit essays by July 7. Three winners receive $100 and a trophy, and will read their essays at the annual Stop the Violence Rally. Email stvcampaign@gmail.com.

COURTESY OF ZECHARIAH LLOYD

jfpevents from page 37

Zechariah Lloyd performs at Cork Wine and Martini in Hattiesburg June 30 at 8 p.m.

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Weekly Summer Activities for Teens through Aug. 4, at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). Sundays from 6-9 p.m., teens are welcome to enjoy socializing, basketball games, card games, music and more. Security provided. Free; call 601-960-1084. Dog Day Afternoons through Sept. 30, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Bring your dog to the Art Garden for an afternoon of play Sundays at noon. Shelter dogs available for adoption. Free; call 601-960-1515.

WELLNESS Lifted Seat Intensive June 30, 11 a.m., at Pure Barre, Ridgeland (201 Northlake Ave., Ridgeland). The 75-minute fitness class includes bun-tightening exercises. Space limited; reservation and pre-payment required. $25; call 769-251-0486. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children every first Friday of the month. Appointment required. Free; call 601707-7355.

more EVENTS, page 39


jfpevents “Don Giovanni: Summer Encore” June 27, 6:30 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The Metropolitan Opera presents the film. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. “Spring Awakening” June 28-July 1, at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl). The musical is an adaptation of a controversial 1892 German play. For mature audiences. Shows are June 28-30 at 7:30 p.m. and July 1 at 2 p.m. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-664-0930. “Fed Up” Dinner Theater June 29, 6 p.m., at Jaco’s Tacos (318 S. State St.). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the play about havoc during a restaurant’s grand opening. RSVP. Tax and tip not included. $49; call 601-937-1752. “It’s Time to Take Out the Trash” June 30, 8 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Felicia Tillman’s stage play deals with topic such as heartbreak and renewal. 2010 “Sunday Best” winner Le’Andria Johnson performs. $25; call 800-745-3000. Art House Cinema Downtown July 1, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include “Otter 501” at 2 p.m. and “Damsels in Distress” at 5 p.m. Refreshments sold. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org. Fondren Theatre Workshop Playwright Nights, at Brent’s Diner and Soda Fountain (655 Duling Ave.). Local playwrights read their new works on first Tuesdays. Dinner is at 6 p.m., and the reading is at 7 p.m. Free admission, food prices vary; call 601-301-2281.

Canton Gospel Fest Homecoming July 4, 4 p.m., at Historic Canton Square, Canton. The annual event features local and regional acts. Free; call 601859-1307 or 601-859-2373.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • “The Green Shore” June 27, 5 p.m., Natalie Bakopoulos signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25 book. • “The One: The Life and Music of James Brown” June 29, 5 p.m. R.J. Smith signs books; reading at 5:30 p.m. $27.50 book. • Lemuria Story Time June 30, 11 a.m. Enjoy a reading of “You Will Be My Friend” and draw pictures of your best friends. Free. “No Place for a Woman” June 30, 9 a.m., at Cups Crossgates (1450 W. Government St., Suite D, Brandon). Shirley Hall-Williams signs books. $11.76 book; call 601-922-2675 or 601-572-9899. Mississippi Public Broadcasting Summer Reading Party June 30, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Enjoy activities that promote summer reading and literacy. Shock from “The Electric Company” performs. Free; call 601-432-6434. Conversations Summer Book Fair June 30, 1 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Featured authors include E.V. Adams, Darlene Collier, Roszalia Ellen, Glenda L. Hunter, Garry Goldwater Jones, Omegia Keeys, Meredith McGee and Vikki Hankins. Free admission; visit conversationsbookclub.com.

MUSIC

CREATIVE CLASSES

How Sweet the Sound Choir Competition. Gospel choirs compete for more than $50,000 in cash and prizes. Choirs do not have to be affiliated with a church or religious organization to participate. Choirs must have 12-75 members 18 and older performing, and choir representatives must be 21 or older. The entry deadline is June 30. Visit howsweetthesound.com for rules.

“Camp Stars” Theatre Summer Camp Registration, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The camp is for children in grades 6-12 and is from July 5-29. Register by July 1. $400; call 601-979-4309 or 601-979-2872.

New Edition June 30, 7 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). The legendary R&B group performs on their 30th anniversary reunion tour. After 7 also performs. $36-$56; call 601353-0603 or 800-745-3000. Mississippi Gospel Choir Invitational Showcase July 1, 6 p.m., at Jackson State University, Williams Athletics and Assembly Center (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at Lee E. Williams Athletic and Assembly Center. Several choirs perform, including the JSU Interfaith Choir, and Benjamin Cone III and Worship. 2010 “Sunday’s Best” winner Le’Andria Johnson also performs. $15; call 601-896-8871 or 800-745-3000. Music in the City July 3, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. In partnership with St. Andrew’s Cathedral, the museum brings a series of free concerts one Tuesday a month. Hors d’oeuvres will be served first, and Lynn Raley performs at 5:45 p.m. Free, donations welcome; call 601-354-1533.

Shut Up and Write! Classes at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for one of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd’s popular nonfiction and creative writing classes. Fall classes forming now. Six-week sessions held every other Saturday. $150 ($75 deposit required); call 601362-6121, ext. 16; get on mailing list at class@ jacksonfreepress.com.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Art Exhibit July 2-31, at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place). See Vicksburg native Andrew Bucci’s landscapes of the Mississippi Delta. Open weekdays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; call 601-982-4844. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest June 28-July 1. Events held at Historic Canton Square June 28, Northpark Mall (E. County Line Road, Ridgeland) June 29 and Canton Multipurpose Complex (501 Soldier Colony Road, Canton) June 30-July 1. The event includes balloon races, a special shape fiesta, balloon glows, fireworks displays, children’s activities, food and entertainment. Performers include Jason Fratesi and Neil McCoy. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. Visit ballooncanton.com for a schedule of events. Free admission; call 601-859-4358 or 800-844-3369. Governor Phil Bryant’s 5K Run for Health June 30, 8 a.m., at Governor’s Mansion (300 E. Capitol St.). The purpose of the event is to promote a healthy lifestyle. Prizes given. Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. $25 in advance, $30 day of race; visit governorbryant.com/5k.

8th Annual

To Help Fund A Rape Crisis Center Items Needed: Original Art, Gift Certificates, Corporate Items Gifts (big & small), Monetary Donations, Chick Toys & Decor Sponsorships Available: Imperial Highness $5,000, Diva $2,500, Goddess $1,000, Queen $500, Princess $250, Chick $50

If we receive your donation by July 11, it will be featured in our big Chick Ball Gift Guide on July 25.

Saturday, July 28, 2012 Hal & Mal’s Red Room Cover $5 | 18+ To donate or volunteer: 601-362-6121 ext 16 chickball@jacksonfreepress.com For more information: jfpchickball.com • follow us on twitter @jfpchickball

jacksonfreepress.com

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DIVERSIONS|jfp sports

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riday night produced no real winners. If you were on Twitter or Facebook or read any columns that sprouted up late Friday night, you might be fooled into thinking someone won when the news broke about the verdict for Jerry Sandusky. The jury found Sandusky guilty on 45 of 48 counts for abusing and sexually assaulting 10 children over 15 years. He will spend the rest of his life behind prison walls serving a sentence that will be a minimum of 60 years and a maximum of 442 years. It seems that jury members did a good job at looking at the evidence, rehashing it and then reaching a verdict. They took their charge seriously, deliberating for 20 hours over two days, and didn’t just vote quickly to follow the mob mentality. Their guilty verdict means Sandusky will not be allowed to hurt any more kids, but the verdict didn’t produce a winner. It can’t magically restore those victims’ childhood innocence or heal their mental and physical scars. This verdict doesn’t mean the families of Sandusky’s victims are made whole again. And it doesn’t erase the biggest mistake in Joe Paterno’s life, a mistake which may forever tarnish the good he did. Finding Sandusky guilty does not absolve those at Penn State or those at the Sec-

Bryan’s Rant ond Mile, Sandusky’s charity, who knew about Sandusky’s predilections but didn’t act to stop him. A guilty verdict won’t ease the guilt of Penn State athletes who thought they were giving back to their community when they volunteered to work with kids at the Second Mile but may have unknowingly helped a child predator find his victims. Only one way exists for this verdict to be a victory for any party, and that way is if we learn from this tragic tale and then take action. Instead of running away when we see a child being abused, we need to fight, yell, scream and do everything in our power to make the abuse stop, right then and there. Instead of covering up abuse and hiding it in the dark, we need to shed light on abuse and take the accusations seriously—no matter how powerful or popular the person being accused may be. Instead of blaming victims and making them feel that their abuse is their fault, we need to give them the strength and support to have them come forward and tell their stories. In the verdict of Jerry Sandusky, right now there are no winners. With any luck, Sandusky’s victims may find some sense of closure and have a chance to begin their healing. No, this guilty verdict is just another step in a long and tragic tale.

by Bryan Flynn

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LeBron James and the Miami Heat defeated the Oklahoma City Thunder 4-1 in the NBA finals. The Xxxx king finally has a ring. THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Soccer (1:30-4 p.m. ESPN): The last semifinal bout of Euro 2012 is between Germany and Italy. The winner faces either Spain or Portugal in the final. … NBA (6:30-11 p.m. ESPN): Catch the NBA Draft live from Newark, N.J. featuring Kentucky’s Anthony Davis. FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Olympic Trials (7-10 p.m. NBC): U.S. Olympic trials feature swimming competitions and the first day of the women’s gymnastics competition. SATURDAY, JUNE 30 NASCAR (6:30-10 p.m. TNT): NASCAR heads to Kentucky for the Quaker State 400. Last year’s winner, Kyle Busch, looks to repeat his win this year. SUNDAY, JULY 1 Soccer (1:30-4 p.m. ESPN): The Euro 2012 Final will feature the winners of two earlier contests—Spain versus Portugal and Italy versus Germany—for the apex of European soccer’s bragging rights for the next four years.

MONDAY, JULY 2 Tennis (7 a.m.-2 p.m. ESPN/ESPN 2): The oldest tennis tournament in the world, Wimbledon, begins its final week of championship competition. Venus Williams won’t be there. TUESDAY, JULY 3 Poker (7-9 p.m. ESPN): ESPN begins its coverage of the World Series of Poker from Las Vegas, Nev. With a $1 million buy-in, the prize money is more than $12 million. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Competitive Eating (2-3 p.m. ESPN): What better way to celebrate the 4th of July than watching the 2012 Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest? American Joey Chestnut won last year by eating 62 hotdogs in 10 minutes. LeBron James is now just four championship rings behind Kobe Bryant, five rings behind Michael Jordan and 10 rings behind Bill Russell. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


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LIFE&STYLE

DOMESTICITY, CREATIVITY, & DIY

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HITCHED p 45 | FLY/SHOPPING p 46

Good Bugs, Bad Bugs

Praying mantids eat a variety of garden pests, including aphids, beetles, flies, mosquitoes, moths, caterpillars and wasps.

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dient to invite spirit elementals to the garden. Placing beneficial plants in your garden isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t difficult and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to follow a specific plan; plant them here and there, wherever the mood strikes you, in and around the garden or along a ditch. They should all grow quickly. To provide a little help for the humans in your garden, plant something that will help naturally ward off mosquitoes. Mother Earth News tested a number of plants and these were the top natural repellents: lantana, rosescented monarda, lime basil, catnip, sacred basil and thyme (see tinyurl.com/74gwysm). Again, these plants have other uses as wellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; including happy cats! Planting them in pots or other containers allows you to place them on your porch or patio, as well. Find heirloom or organic seeds for all of these plants at your local garden storeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or, at this time of year, look for full-grown plants on sale at a discount. In addition to attracting beneficial insects with plants, you can simply purchase them. Those little red beetles with black dots, affectionately called ladybugs, are popular. Ladybugs are capable of consuming up to 50 or 60

FILE PHOTO

ow that summer is in full swing, gardeners have to deal with pests. While industrial agriculture uses chemicals to control insects, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a scorch-the-earth policy that kills both good and bad bugs indiscriminately. In organic growing, we strive to live in harmony with the plant and animal nations.

As such, we want to grow plants that repel unwanted insects and invite beneficial insects to take care of those that might want to feast on our plants. Several plants can be useful in controlling unwanted pests, such as alyssum, buckwheat, coriander, dill, fennel, Queen Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lace, sunflowers and common yarrow. Not only do these plants look great, they attract the kinds of insects that will help protect your garden. Some, like sunflowers, act as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;trap crop,â&#x20AC;? luring pests to them and away from the rest of your garden. Others, like dill, fennel and coriander, are herbs that you can use in your food. Buckwheat is incredibly appealing to pollinators such as honeybees and butterflies. American Indian tribes have traditionally considered yarrow to have mystical and magical propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from love charms to warding off negativity. The Latin name for the plant (also known as millfoil) is Achillae, named for the Greek warrior Achilles. Legend has it that Achilles gave the plant to his troops to stop bleeding. The Chinese have used dried yarrow stems for I Ching divination for centuries. And gardeners who use the principles of biodynamic farming use yarrow as a basic ingre-

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

f you are going to be outdoors a lot, remember to wear sunscreen. Ultraviolet radiation may promote skin cancer. Consumer Reports tested 18 sunscreen products, but rated none â&#x20AC;&#x153;excellentâ&#x20AC;? for all conditions. In its tests, All Terrain Aqua Sport lotion rated best, scoring 88 of 100 possible points. Thirteen products scored 70 or higher. It gave â&#x20AC;&#x153;best buyâ&#x20AC;? kudos to No-Ad with Aloe & Vitamin E SPF 45 and Walgreens Continuous Spray Sport SPF 50. For more information, visit consumerreports.org/cro/sunscreens/buying-guide.

aphids per day, and one ladybug can consume many as 5,000 aphids in its lifetime, according to Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply (groworganic.com), which sells the little critters online. Ladybugs also eat a variety of other harmful insects and larvae including scales, mealy bugs, leafhoppers, mites and various types of soft-bodied insects. Next year, you might consider the praying mantid (or mantis). These big green bugs eat aphids, beetles, flies, mosquitoes, moths, caterpillars, waspsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;generally, any insect it can catch. A praying mantidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s egg sac can contain up to 40,000 eggs, which usually hatch in spring. Find them for sale online and from stores such as Costco. Finally, if you are finding strange plant symptoms or pest invaders, check out this handy online resource for finding safe, non-toxic pesticide solutions that are Organic Materials Review Institute, or OMRI, approved: The Ecological Pest Management Database (bit. ly/g6Eqgu). It covers solutions for everything from diseases to weeds to mollusks. The database is maintained by the Butte, Mont.-based National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service. Call them at 1-800-346-9140.

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Let’s Play House COURTESY SAMANTHA YANCEY

by Richard Coupe

I

groaned as my wife asked, “Will you go to a wedding with me?” Usually, weddings are my favorite rite to attend. They bring out the best in people, and the air is magical with promise and beauty—the emotional lift from attending one can continue for many days. People still tell us that our wedding, some 28 years ago in Virginia, was the most enjoyable wedding that they have ever attended. But since moving to Mississippi, I have attended some weddings that have left me emotionally drained and despairing for the future of the bride and groom. Mississippi has one of the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in the country, and most of these weddings were young people, pregnant and much too immature to get married. “Who is getting married?” I asked. “The son of one of my coworkers,” she said. The bride is 35 weeks pregnant. It is this Friday night at a small country church, and they are serving pizza at the reception.” “Who gets married on a Friday night, serves pizza at the reception, and who gets married 35 weeks pregnant?” I asked, thinking, “There goes Friday night.” The church was one of those nondescript metal buildings on a lonely country road that you find so often in Mississippi. It was fairly small, and the congregation was dressed casually. Many looked as if they had come straight from work, as did I. The mothers of the groom and bride both wore pantsuits. Just before the wedding began, there was a slideshow of the bride and groom that depicted their lives—transitioning from newborn to adult and then their lives together, finishing with stills from a sonogram of the couple’s little girl in utero. I thought to myself, “Well, I suppose you can’t hide being 35 weeks pregnant. Why not celebrate the issue?” It gave me hope. The mother of the bride entered on the arm of a skinny teenage boy with long blonde hair covering half his face

and wearing a florescent blue shirt untucked in the back, with no jacket or tie. He escorted the mother of the bride to her seat, left with obvious relief and beat a hasty retreat to the other end of the front row. The pastor, dressed in a black cassock, and the groom, wearing a tuxedo and chewing gum like he was creating electricity, walked in from the front without groomsmen. Huh, I thought, “they are doing this their way—good.” Preceding the bride was a beautiful young woman wearing a knee-length peach-colored spaghetti-strap dress, which would not be out of place at any high-school homecoming dance. She was chewing gum, too, and dropping flower petals as she sashayed in, obviously unused to heels. Following her, escorted by another teenage boy in a tuxedo, the very-pregnant bride entered in a sleeveless white gown that reminded me of the outfits worn by Cleopatra in the movies. Uncharitably, I thought to myself that no wonder this pastor was in some forsaken country church, as he spoke rather haltingly with a voice pitched a little too high. After the usual pleasantries and prayers, the pastor spoke to the congregation and told us that he knew that the bride and groom had wanted to get married in Las Vegas, and that he had a surprise for them. He then exited the dais saying that he would return in a moment. “That was pretty weird,” I thought. I had never seen a pastor/priest/minister leave during the ceremony. And the reference to Las Vegas was odd for a religious ceremony. It was a long few moments with us looking at each other in the silence wondering what was going on. My wife and I were on the right side of the sanctuary, and he had exited on the left through a door that we could not see from where we were sitting. After a few minutes, there was a collective gasp from the congregation as Elvis’ “Hound

Dog” started to play. The mother of the bride reflexively put her hand to her mouth, and yes, believe it or not, there was the pastor, walking up to the bride and groom in a one-piece jumpsuit bedecked as Elvis, complete with a dark wig and sunglasses. I was stunned. The pastor, still dressed as Elvis, continued with the service, explaining that he would have to lift his sunglasses occasionally to read from the book as the lighting wasn’t that good. He delivered his homily and pronounced the vows. As I watched the ceremony, I found myself listening to the pastor/Elvis and it occurred to me that the pastor’s dignity and earnestness was carrying the day. Who would have thought that a middle-aged man wearing an Elvis costume could perform one of the most important rites of passage in a person’s life? This had not turned into a spectacle—it was a teaching moment for all of us. This man connected with these young people (and the congregation), making himself vulnerable to derision as he did so. No one in that church that night will ever forget it. At this point the newly minted couple walked over to a unity candle to the right of the dais. Plucking two candles (that had been lit by their parents) from their holders, they jointly lit the unity candle. Then the groom picked up a wireless microphone and, as Rascal Flatts’ “Bless the Broken Road” began playing, he took out his gum, placed it on the pedestal holding the unity candle and began to sing along with Rascal Flatts. He could hardly be heard. The atmosphere was electrifying and magical, and no one dared breathe. Here was this swaggering, gum popping, grinning young man trying to express his devotion to his bride in front of his friends and in a very public and personal way. It almost seemed wrong that we were there to watch. As he sang the chorus with Rascal Flatts, the bride’s left arm was propped on her very pregnant belly. She reached out unsteadily with her right hand as if she were reaching for air. Their hands met and clasped together, fingers intertwined, as the tears ran down her face and he finished the song. It was the most touching thing I have ever seen. The young woman in front of me wiped her eyes, and I had to do the same (several times). It was as real as it gets. As we left the church that night (skipping the pizza), it occurred to me that Mississippi had surprised me again. An evening I had dreaded turned into pure magic, in a way not possible elsewhere, and it allowed me the pleasure of being part of the sweetest thing that I had ever witnessed.

jacksonfreepress.com

Pure wedding magic can emerge in the most unlikely of circumstances.

45


A Few of My Favorite Summer Things by Meredith W. Sullivan

S

ummer is here, which means it’s time to switch out our wardrobes—we trade our sneakers and boots for sandals and wedges, our black leather handbags for oversized totes, and we retire our cardis and bare our arms. We change up our nail color and refresh our skin-care regimen—and hopefully, take some time to read a book! These are a few of my favorite things for this summer.

Lowell Necklace with Dagger, Blithe & Vine, $162.

Antik Batik Vanilla Bangles in Aqua, Blithe & Vine, $97.

Neutrogena MoistureShine Lip Soother, Beemon Drugs, $7.19.

“Skinnydipping” by Bethenny Frankel, Lemuria Bookstore, $24.99.

Dr. Bronner’s Peppermint Liquid Soap, Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative, $7.99.

Nars Monoi Body Glow II body oil, Coattails, $59.

Danielle Nicole ‘Mia’ tote, Arco Avenue, $108.

OPI Call Me Gwen-ever, AQUA the Day Spa, $9.

Naughty Monkey Urban Traveler wedges, Libby Story, $68.

June 27 - July 3, 2012

Where2Shop:

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Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen, Beemon Drugs, $13.95.

Free People Reversible Bandeau, Libby Story, $38.

Blithe and Vine, 2906 N. State St., Suite 103B, 601-427-3322; Arco Avenue, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 107, Ridgeland, 601-790-9662; AQUA the Day Spa, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 201, 601-362-9550; Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative, 2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602; Coattails, 111 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-853-1313; Lemuria Bookstore, Banner Hall,

4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202, 601-366-7619; Libby Story, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5003, 601-717-3300; Beemon Drugs, 1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 315, 601-366-9431


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jacksonfreepress.com

Full Service Catering For

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CLASSIFIEDS, PAGE 11

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v10n42 - Eat, Drink, Chill: The Summer Food + Beer Issue  

Eat, Drink, Chill: The Summer Food + Beer Issue Christians, Rednecks & Patriots Chillin' with Neon Indian Hitched: It's Better With Elvis