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June 13 - 19, 2012


June 13 - 19, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 40

contents ELIZABETH WAIBEL

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

9 Whose Rights? Is the contraceptive mandate a violation of religious rights or protection for women’s rights? COURTESY RAY NIELSEN

Cover Photo of DeSean Dyson and son, Christian Dyson, by Virginia Schreiber

20

THIS ISSUE:

Fans of old TV westerns meet up in Memphis, Tenn., to reminisce and have a good time.

23 The Haunting of … Two books offer readers ghostly tales in Mississippi and the Natchez Trace.

32 Farmer Dad Is your daddy drooling over the latest garden gadget catalog? It’s not what you think.

jacksonfreepress.com

what’s the responsibility? Is there a minimum standard of living that people should have?” he asks, challenging his students to weigh reducing the deficit against caring for families who have lost jobs in the recession. “The economy affects (my students), because they see the job market shrinking,” he says. “We study about the Depression, and they say, ‘Hey, could this happen again?’” Next year, Dyson will turn from teaching to administration, his long-term goal. He is the new assistant principal of Carver Middle School and Raymond Freshman Academy. A native of Jackson, Dyson attended Clinton High School and has lived in the area his entire life, except for two years at Mississippi Delta Community College. He received his bachelor’s degree from Belhaven University in 2006 and his master’s in educational leadership from Mississippi College in 2011. He now lives in Jackson with his wife, Alycia, and their son, Christian, who is 3. They are also expecting a daughter, Avery. As a father, Dyson says he wants to teach his son the responsibility that will serve him well when he is an adult. Because of his Christian faith, he tries to focus on the “eternal things” that will matter a long time from now. “In 50 years, I’m not going to remember what kind of car I had or how nice my clothes are, ’cause they’re not, but I’ll remember that my son would just see me and smile, or he would laugh,” he says. “That kind of stuff stays with you.” —Elizabeth Waibel

FILE PHOTO

DeSean Dyson planned on being a lawyer. Less than a year before he graduated from college, however, Hurricane Katrina struck. His TV screen filled with negative images of young black men in New Orleans. “As I saw those images, it kind of made me question, ‘Man, is this how people see me?’ And I imagined if I felt that way as a 22-yearold honors student, that a 15-year-old who saw the same thing had the same struggles,” Dyson says. He wanted to contribute a positive selfimage to young people and set their expectations for themselves higher. Dyson says a lot of young people of all races have a false image of what it’s like to be an adult—some see tough guys who get rich selling drugs, but who aren’t beneficial to society. “I think we have to rewire that thought process in young people—this isn’t what it means to be a productive citizen,” he says. After his post-Katrina revelation, Dyson, now 28, turned to education—teaching U.S. history and government and coaching football at Clinton High School. He starts his lessons on the economy with a story about another flood—a river in 1870 that overran its banks. “The president doesn’t send any help,” he tells his students. “How does that make you feel?” After their initial outrage, Dyson talks about how the government’s responsibilities have changed over the years, and how different philosophies of government play out in today’s political debates. “As times have changed,

COURTESY PELICAN PUBLISHING

desean dyson

COURTESY THE HISTORY PRESS

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 .................... Sorensen 6 ............................ Talk 10 .................. Business 12 ................... Editorial 12 .................. Kamikaze 12 ........................... Day 13 ................. Opinion 14 ............ Cover Story 19 .............. Diversions 22 ........................ Film 24 .................... 8 Days 26 ............. JFP Events 29 ...................... Music 31 ....... Music Listings 32 ..................... Sports 34 .............. Body/Soul 35 ................. Wellness 38 ....................... Food 41 ................ Astrology 41 .................... Puzzles 42 ... Girl About Town

Howdy, Pard

3


editor’snote

Elizabeth Waibel News Editor Elizabeth Waibel grew up in Clinton. She received her journalism degree from Union University in Jackson, Tenn. She likes coffee and trying new cake recipes. She wrote the Jacksonian and a Talk.

Joe Atkins Joe Atkins is author of “Covering for the Bosses: Labor and the Southern Press” and winner of the Mississippi Association for Justice’s 2011 Consumer Advocate Award. His blog is laborsouth.blogspot.com. He wrote an Arts feature.

Andrew Spiehler Andrew Spiehler, originally from Slidell, La., is a graduate of the University of New Orleans and Mississippi College. He spent four years in California before moving back to the South, where he now enjoys the culture and craft beer. He wrote a beer feature.

Piko Ewoodzie Editorial intern Piko Ewoodzie is an out-of-towner from a bunch of different places—New York, Wisconsin, Ohio, Ghana, West Africa—who is thoroughly enjoying his time in Jackson. He wrote Guys We Love profiles.

Sara Sacks Editorial intern Sara Sacks studies English and communications at Millsaps College. She runs for the Millsaps cross-country and track and field teams. She wrote Guys We Love profiles.

Darnell Jackson Editorial intern Darnell “Chris” Jackson is a writer, photographer, graphic designer and so much more. He is a Jackson native and Jackson State University graduate. He owns J. Carter Studios. He wrote a Guys We Love profile.

Ceili Hale Editorial intern Ceili Hale, a senior at Germantown High School, can often be found shopping, eating or scouting out bearded guys on Facebook. She wrote a Guys We Love profile.

June 13 - 19, 2012

Mike Day

4

At the “Hindsonian” at Hinds Community College, cartoonist Mike Day won top awards from the Mississippi Press Association and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association in New York. He was also a cartoonist for the Hattiesburg American.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Inherit the Flame

I

haven’t written much over the years about the man I like to think of as my “real father.” Maybe it’s too painful. When I think of the first man I called Daddy—my stepfather Willie Hoyt Smith came later—I think mostly of pain. I think of late nights when he would come in after a night of drinking. I remember one night when he was covered with blood, thanks to a knife fight. I remember my mama trying to put him in Whitfield to get him help. I also remember my Mama crying a lot, sometimes from the pain he caused her, but as much as anything out of frustration because she didn’t know what to do and how to help him through his alcoholism and his “problems,” as she liked to put it. Sadly, even though my heart fills with love and longing when I think about him, I only knew him for about eight years, until a heart attack took him away from us. He was 50, my age now. I didn’t know the younger, balls-to-thewall version of my father, the one who drove a cab and made friends black, white and Choctaw, and the one who was Dad to my much-older brothers, who knew a different man in a different era. I missed the man who married my mother when she was only 14, giving her deep love and pain. I missed the man with such humor and passion for life that his funeral drew multitudes of people we didn’t know, whose cars trailed far behind us up the town hill in Philadelphia as we drove to the cemetery on Fork Road. Clifton “Cotton” Ladd hailed from the Dixon area of Neshoba County, not too far from the infamous fairgrounds. He was born into families with a long heritage of scrapping for themselves and little education. Daddy went to the third grade at Dixon, a country school in one of those barn-like buildings dotting the county before they all consolidated into Neshoba Central (my alma mater) in the 1960s. Unlike my mother, who never attended school, he could read and write a little bit. He was the oldest boy of a large family—his mother gave birth more than dozen times, although they didn’t all make it past childbirth. Like many of his brothers, he worked in construction some, especially later after one of my uncles started a successful construction company. When I was growing up, Daddy was officially a house painter, although I remember him home more often than not and was often with him when he had one of his early heart attacks. I was there when the big one came, holding his hand. His most legendary job, though, was as a taxi driver in Philadelphia, back when more people there actually needed cabs to get to town, since they couldn’t afford cars. He was popular, funny and reckless. He loved to play cards and take chances he shouldn’t. In fact, when I was growing up after he was long gone, I liked to brag to friends that my father was a gambler. I wasn’t lying. As a toddler, I adored him. I would

stand in his car seat with my hand around his neck, playing with his graying-dishwaterblond hair as he drove, I think, our turquoise Chevrolet around town. He would pull into a gas station at the west end, where his buddy would wink at me and give me a pack of peanuts to put in my Coke. And I loved when we came to Jackson. I was too young to understand that it was something more than a grand adventure when he’d tell my mama and our relatives that he was taking me to the store for a Coke. We’d then pull up behind some joint somewhere near the railroad track, and someone would hand him a paper bag out the back window. He’d take a swig from the bottle inside, and we’d drive through the lights of downtown—awakening my love of the grit and urgency of city living. To this day, when I hear the train whistle here, I see Daddy’s face. It’s like a ghost passes over me. My favorite Christmas item is a Santa doll he bought me at one of the shopping centers here. It was cheap, but it’s the only thing I have that I know he chose for me. As an adult, it surprised me to learn that some people think I’m a lot like him. He had a certain fire inside him, one of my brothers told me in recent years; he emitted a fierce intensity. It got him into trouble, but it also made him unique and, well, fun—at least until it wasn’t fun any longer. In my earlier years, I too had a fierceness that drove me to throw care to the wind and live on the edge, sometimes barely hanging on. I don’t regret living like Daddy for a while—I believe regret is useless—but I am glad I’m still here to tell, and write, about it. Recently, my brother talked to me about the years when my mother and father “es-

caped Mississippi” (her word choice) and went to live in Hollywood, Fla., about the time I was conceived. There, they had the chance to make more money in a factory that made aluminum chairs and to have a new and better life than they left behind in Neshoba County. He coached a baseball team, and my brothers lived it up. Daddy’s employers there saw my father’s potential: He was a smart man. He was a people person. And he was driven. They put him on a manager’s track. But Daddy’s lack of education and confidence in his abilities sabotaged him. He didn’t believe he could do what the boss there believed he could. The pressure was too much, and they ended up moving back to Mississippi, leaving behind the paradise that all of them enjoyed so much. The difference between Daddy and me, I think, is one of timing, and certainly of education, which he and my mother taught me to crave. His internal fire was very hot and burned out far too early. He didn’t have anywhere to direct that flame, the education to figure out how to redirect it, or the confidence that he could change his life and his destiny. He lived and died amid the tragic limitations of his circumstances. My daddy’s life and death is one reason I ran from Mississippi the first chance I got. But what I know now, and work and breathe for everyday, is that we can all be better than the sum of our upbringing. And we can do it right here in the state that lit our flame in the first place. Rest in peace, dear daddy. And thank you for everything you gave me. Comment at www.jfp.ms or by writing to ladd@jacksonfreepress.com.


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4/25/12 3:06 PM


Attorney Robert McDuff says private

A Congressman introduced a bill to establish Father’s Day in 1913, but it did not become a national holiday for almost 60 years. President Richard Nixon signed law designating the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day in 1972.

prisons have a great motive tempting them to cut costs—profit.

news, culture & irreverence

Wednesday, June 6 Mississippi death-row inmate Jan Michael Brawner requests a stay of execution from the state supreme court. . ... The Dow Jones Industrial Average had its best day of the year, surging 286 points— 2.4 percent—to close at 12,415.

Friday, June 8 A jury throws out the results of the February 2012 Ward 3 runoff, in which LaRita Cooper-Stokes defeated Joyce Jackson, calling for a new election. ... Police arrest Atlanta-based televangelist Creflo A. Dollar for allegedly assaulting his teenage daughter. Saturday, June 9 Hundreds of people celebrate at the annual Medgar Evers Homecoming Parade in Jackson. ... European finance ministers agree to offer Spain financial aid to boost the country’s ailing banking system. Sunday, June 10 The 33rd Annual Mississippi Picnic takes place in New York City’s Central Park, providing a venue for Big Apple Mississippians to reconnect with their Southern roots. ... Spain’s Rafael Nadal wins his record seventh French Open tennis title over Novak Djokovic.

6

Tuesday, June 12 After the Mississippi Supreme Court denies his request for reprieve, the state moves forward with the execution of Jan Michael Brawner, making him the fifth person the state put to death this year. ... One of ex-Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky’s alleged teenage abuse victims takes the witness stand in Sandusky’s criminal trial. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com

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he defense called it “the case of the sore loser.� The plaintiff called it “the case of the stolen election.� The jury agreed with the latter. The jury listened to testimonies and closing arguments for nearly four days in the Ward 3 election hearing last week, as plaintiff Joyce Jackson challenged LaRita CooperStokes’ narrow victory in the Feb. 28 run-off election for the ward’s city council seat. After a short deliberation Friday, June 8, the jury came back with a unanimous verdict: The election results from the Feb. 28 race will be set aside due to unlawful activity at the polls. Now, Ward 3 will hold another election to determine their city councilwoman. The plaintiff brought numerous witnesses to the stand during the hearing. They claimed election-law violations, from workers campaigning within 150 feet of the polling location and a radio playing CooperStokes’ ads in one polling precinct, to poll workers telling voters to “vote for Stokes.� One Jackson supporter testified she heard poll manager Linda Anderson call Jackson, who is of mixed heritage, a “half-white n*gger� within earshot of voters. Cooper-Stokes’ attorneys, lead counsel Imhotep Alkebu-Ian and Bruce Burton, spent much of the week trying to discredit Jackson and her witnesses, three of whom were her sisters. The defense seemed under-prepared

for the trial in comparison to Jackson and her attorney John Reeves, who has tried similar cases, including Straughter vs. Collins in Yazoo County. In that case, McArthur Straughter, now mayor of Yazoo City, challenged an

Attorney John Reeves and Joyce Jackson embrace after they hear the jury’s unanimous verdict in their favor Friday.

election for county supervisor that he lost to Cobie Collins by 36 votes in 1999. The defense’s lack of preparation seemed most apparent when the plaintiff rested, and time came for Alkebu-Ian to call witnesses to the stand. Reeves said he did not receive the defense’s list of potential witnesses, some 15 of them, until June 4, the morning the hearing began. Attorneys were supposed to turn in lists of witnesses and evidence to the judge

by Jacob Fuller and to each other in April. Cooper-Stokes’ attorneys did not claim any witnesses at that time, so they were only allowed to recall witnesses Reeves listed as well as three witnesses in direct response to allegations that arose during the trial. Just before concluding his argument, Reeves called City Clerk Brenda Pree to the stand with a new piece of evidence. The defense quickly objected to the evidence, a list of the city’s paid poll workers, because it was not named in any documents by the April deadline. Reeves expected them to object. In fact, he asked Pree to bring the document specifically so the defense would object. “We’re just setting them up, because they didn’t give us their stuff until Sunday,� Reeves whispered to Jackson after getting Pree to present the list. “We’re just setting them up for a fall.� After the judge agreed with the objection, Reeves asked that he remember that once the defense was ready to present their argument. Sure enough, as soon as the defense began their argument, Reeves objected to their 15 witnesses, and the judge again sustained. The defense called poll manager Anderson, one of their three witnesses, to dispute the claim Jackson’s witness made. Anderson denied she ever called Jackson, or anyone else, a WARD 3, see page 7

Sh*t My Dad Might Say

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election.�

“I am 100 percent in agreement with Kenny Stokes’ sagging pants ordinance.� “I am 100 percent in agreement that Ward 3 needs to hold a new

“I don’t know why some Republican legislators are trying to get rid of the Hispanics. They’ll just have to go back to

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should privatize executions, too.�

JERRY AVENAIM

June 13 - 19, 2012

Monday, June 11 Mississippi death row inmate Gary Carl Simmons files for a stay of execution. ... Linda Steadman becomes the first confirmed fatality in a massive ongoing Colorado wildlife near Fort Collins.

Jury Orders New Ward 3 Election JACOB FULLER

Thursday, June 7 James Hopkins, who had escaped from the Hinds County Detention Center earlier in the week, is captured in Brookhaven. ... Following the news of a security breach at LinkedIn in which millions of user passwords were stolen, web companies Last.fm and eHarmony also announced their sites had been hacked.

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news, culture & irreverence

WARD 3, from page 6

“half-white n*gger.” She also said that as soon as someone brought it to her attention that it was a violation of the law for a radio to play campaign ads inside the precinct, she turned the radio down during the commercials. In the closing arguments, Reeves told the jury they had to take his witnesses’ testimony as evidence of unlawful behavior and, therefore, set aside the election. He tried to discredit Cooper-Stokes’ witnesses by pointing out that they would, of course, deny breaking the law. In response, Alkebu-Ian spent most of his closing argument trying to discredit Jackson and her witnesses. He pointed out that only Jackson’s family members testified that they witnessed several of the alleged violations. He repeatedly called Jackson a “sore loser.” “He just was a big bully,” Jackson said after the hearing Friday. “That’s bullying when you call somebody a sore loser. He called me out (by) my name. That’s the same as calling me a half-white n*gger. It’s a bully word.” Jackson said the hearing was not about her, but about the people of Jackson and Ward 3 getting a fair election. “The people who were here, they’ve seen the same kind of irregularities throughout these years,” Jackson said. “It has happened within the last 20 years. No one would have had a fair chance to ever be elected if we had let this go on. So, it has to stop and I am the

person to stop it. It has to be exposed. (The people) had to know the truth.” Cooper-Stokes said she is still the Ward 3 councilwoman, and she took her council seat at the regular meeting Tuesday. Her husband, Hinds County Supervisor Kenneth Stokes, said the verdict is not final and their attorneys will look into the appeals process. “We can’t allow the majority of people to vote for a candidate in Jackson, Mississippi, and the majority vote be overturned on bullsh*t,” Stokes said. Reeves said Monday that it is CooperStokes legal right to remain on the council until the new election. An appeal would take about a year, he said, and the state Supreme Court would have to stop the new election for it to not happen. He also said that he sent letters Monday to Sheriff Tyrone Lewis, Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann and the U.S. Department of Justice Voting Rights Division to request help to make sure the election is run correctly this time. Because of an automatic 10-day stay on any judgment issued to the council, City Clerk Brenda Pree must wait until June 18 to put a resolution on the council’s agenda to set a date for the new election. The city council will likely set a date for the election at its June 26 regular meeting, which must be between 20 and 30 days later. Comment at www.jfp.ms, or email Jacob@ jacksonfreepress.com.

JFP BUZZ: Awards Season by Donna Ladd

T

he Jackson Free Press got amazing news from Detroit Friday afternoon when we learned the Association of Alternative Newsmedia was presenting us a coveted first-place public-service award for our team coverage of the personhood effort last fall. The team members were Valerie Wells, Elizabeth Waibel, Lacey McLaughlin, Donna Ladd and columns by several anti-personhood “mamas”: Lori Garrott, Stacey Spiehler, Funmi Franklin and Shannon Barbour. The JFP also won second place for Tom Head’s political columns and second place in innovation for the GOOD Ideas issue on crime (flip through it at www.jfp.ms/crime). These awards marked 25 from AAN, an association of papers in the United States and Canada, since 2004. Our syndicated cartoonist Jen Sorensen (page 4) won first place for cartoons.

The JFP has won three previous public-service awards from AAN: 1st place for our investigation that helped put Klansman James Ford Seale in prison; second place for our Two Lakes investigation; and honorable mention for our domesticviolence reporting. This year, the JFP is also winning three Society of Professional Journalists Green Eyeshades Awards, including another publicservice award for Personhood coverage (which also includes work by R.L. Nave and Adam Lynch), a feature-writing award for Valerie Wells and a serious commentary award for Donna Ladd. We find out final placement Friday, June 15. SPJ has awarded the JFP nine awards in the last three years, including a public-service award for Two Lakes coverage. Congratulations to the staff and our guest columnists!

8th Annual

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jacksonfreepress.com

talk

7


onairtalk

by Jacob Fuller

WJXN: Pirate Radio? JACOB FULLER

media

June 13 - 19, 2012

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perplexing, though, and the mystery proved harder to solve than this reporter expected. The station broadcasts from a tower that stands far above the churches, farms and woods that surround it on Midway Road in

gives a phone number. No one has responded to multiple messages the JFP left on the voicemail since June 6. The place was empty when the JFP visited the address listed for the station, 1985 Lakeland Drive, Suite 212, mid-afternoon June 8. At the end of the back hallway on the first floor of the office building, someone had posted a sign on a door. The door was locked this past Friday afternoon. The sign read: â&#x20AC;&#x153;WJXN-FM/ WWJX-DT. 1985 Lakeland Drive, Suite 212 Jackson, MS 39216. For Public File Inspection during business hours go to Suite 106. *After hours/ The broadcast station of WJXN, currently a commercial-free station, sits empty behind a padlocked gate on Midway Road in Terry. emergency* contact Stan Carter,â&#x20AC;? folTerry. A padlocked gate guards the overgrown lowed by Carterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number. gravel road that leads to the small, empty white Bob Buchanan, manager of the Lakeland building next to the tower. Drive office building, said Flinn Broadcasting, The phone number listed for WJXN in of Memphis, Tenn., has rented office space in the phone book goes to a digital voice record- the building for eight to 10 years and indicated ing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome to the WJXN electric (unintel- that if anything has changed about the station, ligible). Please enter voltage,â&#x20AC;? the voice says. he is unaware of it. Another number listed online goes to a Carter is an independent contractor who different voicemail recording for the station. takes care of engineering emergencies for the The voice on the recording said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If this is station. He said that Flinn Broadcasting owns regarding an off-air emergency or other emer- the station, and anyone with questions about gency, you can call our engineer at,â&#x20AC;? and then the station should call the office in Memphis.

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At Flinn Broadcasting, the employee who answered the phone declined to give her name or position with the company. She confirmed that the company owns the radio station and the FCC license for the frequency, but that an independent lessee determines its broadcast content. She said she did not know who was leasing the station; she only had a phone numberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the same phone number that leads to the voicemail providing Carterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number. During a follow-up call, Carter said he could not give anyone the name of the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new lessee, either, because there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one. He said that the station playing the rare tracks, live recordings, b-sides and hits, uninterrupted by DJs or advertisements isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t here to stay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The format that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hearing on there right now is a temporary format that Flinn Broadcasting has put on until the lease has gone through,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. Flinn Broadcasting and the anonymous phone answerer confirmed Monday that, in fact, there is no current lessee of the station. The company is playing the music-only format until they find a new lessee to take over. So the answer to how someone can afford to keep a radio station on without commercials is: they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. While Flinn Broadcasting, which owns 32 radio stations in 13 states, is searching for a new lessee, they are broadcasting the current format simply to keep the station on air. When something seems to good to be true, it usually is. In the case of the advertising-free radio station, that old piece of advice holds trueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unless, of course, you pay for a subscription to satellite radio. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

by Valerie Wells

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J

acksonians have been talking about the radio station with no DJs, no commercials and a music lineup like none theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever heard. If you have scanned radio waves in the last few months, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good chance youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve run across tunes you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heard in years, and mostly likely, plenty youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never heard at all. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no surprise to hear Bob Dylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Along the Watchtowerâ&#x20AC;? on the radio. When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vocal cords squawking through the verses at an MTV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unpluggedâ&#x20AC;? session in 1994 coming through the speakers, though, and not the classic 1968 Jimi Hendrix recording, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reason enough to stop and listen to what else will play on that radio station. If Tracy Chapman â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bout a Revolution,â&#x20AC;? a 20-minute Grateful Dead jam or an obscure track from an album you bought a couple of decades ago stopped your radio dial lately, it was probably on 100.9 FM. The only thing listeners have heard on the station in months is an eclectic variety of popular music and, occasionally, this identifier: â&#x20AC;&#x153;WJXN, Utica, Jackson. Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s widest variety of music.â&#x20AC;? Listeners havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heard a commercial or a disc jockey on the station since it stopped broadcasting K-Love this spring. The Christian-pop station broadcasts out of Omaha, Neb., through hundreds of stations in 46 states, including seven in Mississippi. Many people around Jackson have said they love the station. How someone can afford to run a station without advertising is


ELIZABETH WAIBEL

prisontalk

by R.L. Nave

MDOC Sticks with Private Prisons

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

are correctional facilities and incidents do happen in both public and private facilities. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the nature of the corrections industry,â&#x20AC;? said MTC spokesman Issa Arnita. Arnita said MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff is well trained; they undergo the same corrections training as public corrections personnel. However, when events do occur, he said the company â&#x20AC;&#x153;takes responsibility, makes corrections and moves forward.â&#x20AC;? Further, Arnita argues that private prison critic like Smith use isolated events

The Walnut Grove Youth prison, the subject of a federal abuse and neglect lawsuit, is switching hands from one private operator to another.

Eventually, marshals caught up with all three menâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but not before McCluskey, Province and a female accomplice, Casslyn Welch carjacked and a killed a couple in New Mexico. On Aug. 12, ADC presented Management and Training Corporation, the Centreville, Utah-based firm that manages the prison, with a draft security-assessment report stating that human error on the part of MTC staff contributed to the escape. MTC took full responsibility for the incident. Frank Smith, a consultant with Private Corrections Working Group which runs a private-prison monitoring website, points to the Kingman escape as just one example in MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long track record of shoddy security and staff training. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These guys are amateurs,â&#x20AC;? Smith said of MTC. This summer, MTC will take over running three Mississippi Department of Corrections facilities from The GEO Group, headquartered in Boca Raton, Fla. Under the contract, announced last week, MTC will manage East Mississippi Correctional Facility in Meridian, the Marshall County Correctional Facility in Holly Springs and the troubled Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility in Leake County. The 10-year deal is worth $430 million, the Salt Lake Tribune reported June 7. MTC is well aware that incidents like the Kingman escape fuels the perception that contract prisons are run poorly compared to government facilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We respond (to critics) by saying these

to make companies look bad, and that no government agency has tracked incidents at privately run prison versus public ones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anybody can set up a blog and start saying what they want, picking and choosing certain numbers,â&#x20AC;? Arnita said. Founded in 1981 as an administrator of the federal Job Corps program, MTC expanded into the corrections industry 25 years ago as a way to expand its successful educational programming to prisons (one of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mantras is â&#x20AC;&#x153;rehabilitation through educationâ&#x20AC;?), Arnita said. With the Mississippi additions, MTC runs 22 state and federal prisons in Arizona, California, Florida, Idaho, New Mexico, Ohio, Texas and, now, Mississippi. It is also the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest contractor with the federal Labor Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Job Corps program, operating 25 Job Corps sites across 16 states. MTC is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third largest forprofit prison company and is responsible for 25,760 inmates. Unlike its larger, publicly held competitors, Corrections Corporation of America and GEO, MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances are not open to public scrutiny. However, just like CCA and GEO, MTC has a political action committee that contributes to politiciansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; election coffers, although no federal elected officials in Mississippi have received MTC donations. Gail Tyree, a Soros Justice Fellow and an organizer against private prisons across the South, said she was disappointed to hear the news that a different private firm would be getting the contracts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking at their history, private pris-

ons are giving Mississippi a black eye,â&#x20AC;? Tyree told the Jackson Free Press last week. As evidence, Tyree points to the beleaguered Walnut Grove Youth prison. Opened in 2000, Walnut Grove housed youth between the ages of 13 and 22 who were tried and convicted as adults. In November 2010, civil-rights attorney Robert B. McDuff and lawyers from the Southern Poverty Law Center and American Civil Liberties Union sued MDOC Commissioner Christopher Epps, other state officials and the prisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boca Raton, Fla.-based operator, The GEO Group, on behalf of incarcerated young men who alleged ongoing negligence and abuse. In February 2012, the parties reached a settlement. Under the federal court decree, MDOC agreed to move the young men from Walnut Grove to a facility that would operate on principles of juvenile justice rather than standards of the adult prison system. The decree required Mississippi to offer an array of educational and rehabilitation programs and prohibited the state from putting children in its custody in solitary confinement. McDuff said he hopes MTC manages the prisons better than GEO, but that he generally thinks private prisons are a bad idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have a private company with a profit motive, there is a great temptation to cut costs,â&#x20AC;? McDuff said. A few months earlier, GEO and MDOC agreed to terminate all the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contracts with the state. In November 2011, MDOC and Corrections Corporation of America agreed to end CCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract to manage the Delta Correctional Center in Greenwood. CCA, which ran three state prisons and one federal facility in Mississippi, said it could no longer manage the prison more efficiently than the state could. When contacted, MDOC referred to Eppsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; statement in an MTC press release. The statement read: â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a need for different types of prisons, including state and regional as well as private facilities in Mississippi. Mississippi state statute 47-5-1211 requires private prisons to operate at a cost of 10 percent less than the cost for the state, which provides for valuable cost savings for the taxpayers in Mississippi. MTC will be held to the same high standards as set by MDOC, and I feel extremely confident that MTC will do a great job.â&#x20AC;? Given Eppsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; history of saving the state money through efficiency at MDOC prisons, which helped earn him the Association of State Correctional Administratorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; honor of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top corrections commissioner in December 2011, Tyree believes MDOC should take back management at the GEOrun prisons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel that Commissioner Epps is more than competent to run these prison,â&#x20AC;? she said. Comment at www.jfp.ms or email rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

A group of people in Jackson gathered Friday to protest a rule under the Affordable Care Act that requires most insurance plans to cover contraceptives.

Rally Protests Contraceptive Rule by Elizabeth Waibel

A

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jacksonfreepress.com

S

ometime between the 8:45 p.m. and the 9:15 p.m. staff shift change on July 30, 2010, Tracy Alan Province, John Charles McCluskey and Daniel Kelly Renwick escaped from Arizona State Prison-Kingman. Just after 10 p.m., perimeter-patrol officers discovered a 30-by22-inch hole in the fence. Two hours after the prison determined the inmates had escaped, Arizona Department of Corrections assumed command and the U.S. Marshals Service launched a manhunt.

9


techtalk

by Todd Stauffer

Working in Groups

M Want to learn to learn a new language for business of pleasure? We have you covered. Free English and Spanish Demos Open House: June 1 - 6:30 • Spanish, English, French, Portuguese & Italian • Private lessons • Small groups • Classes for adults, children & businesses •Fiesta & Spanish Parties for kids

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I O T N C U ! R E T -EN/F#HARAC

June 13 - 19, 2012

King Edward Chef Nick Wallace will prepare dinner for 10 in your kitchen.

10

July 28, 6 p.m. - 1 a.m. For more info visit jfpchickball.com or follow us on Twitter @jfpchickball. Email Nick at reflectionchef@gmail.com

COURTESY WIGGIO.COM

Bonjour!

y problem is a simple one that may Discussions (discussions.zoho.com), which be familiar: In the nonprofit I’m groups can use as simple discussion forums part of, too much “group stuff” with email notification options. Zoho Dishappens in long email exchanges. cussions also integrates with Google Docs Like a lot of volunteer organizations, we get or Zoho Docs, so that you can, for instance, a bunch of work done in committee, depart- link to a shared spreadsheet you’re using to ment and board meetings, when everyone is manage a project or a group document you’re on the same page and focused. But outside collaborating on to create a press release. Outthose meetings, real life often gets in the way. side the Discussions tool, Zoho.com also ofThings don’t happen between meetings—or people just can’t connect to get things done—with the result that some projects take longer than you’d hope. Plus, in between those meetings, it’s nice to be able to communicate progress and problems to your whole group, and let them chime in with praise, encouragement and solutions on their own time. Being the nerd that I am, Wiggio.com offers a “mission control” for group discussions and I figure the right software collaboration that breaks up email logjams. can even be used to create camaraderie and friendships, if they allow for off-topic discussions, brainstorming and fers group calendars, wikis and tons of other other possibilities. online office tools, but you’ll need to do some So, my search began for a tool that allows of the integration yourself. this sort of collaboration—and is still simple Wiggio (wiggio.com)—which sorta enough that it’s not a crazy-complicated proj- stands for “Working In Groups”—offers ect management tool that no one will use. similar conversation tools, but in a more One obvious place to start are the name- complete package that features a file rebrand “Groups” tools. Both Google Groups pository and a group calendar for sched(groups.google.com) and Yahoo! Groups uling group-wide activities. Wiggio also (groups.yahoo.com) offer the ability for you offers tools for creating documents and to create a private group where your discus- spreadsheets, polls or surveys, to-do lists sions can occur via email or in an online bul- for the group, and you can use the service letin board for “forum” formats. Users send to pull together an online chat or a confertheir messages to the group’s address (e.g. ence call if you’re not able to get together ourcoolgroup@googlegroups.com), and the for a committee or board meeting. (In fact, email is broadcast to other members accord- Wiggio supports subgroups within your ing to their preferences; some may see each main group, perfect for functional areas of message, some see a daily digest, some will a business or committees in a nonprofit.) only visit the group on the Web to post and There’s even an iPhone app. reply. It’s a great way to offer an archive of Wiggio is the most complete group discussions where decisions are made and to “destination” tool I explored for this roundinclude members of the group at their own up, but its complexity could be a weaklevel of interest. ness—in our testing, we tried the Virtual Google Groups focus mainly on dis- Meeting service, but it was offline; a note cussions; Yahoo! Groups go further, offering from their Support team said it’s a known the ability to create polls, gather Web links, bug, and they’re working on it. and store documents for the group. You can The interface is a little clunky for acupload Word files, PDFs, spreadsheets and cessing and returning to discussion topics. I other items that you need to share; you can would have preferred something more like also create and edit basic text files within the an online forum with topic listings, and not interface that everyone can access. One nice a Facebook-like “feed.” But you can’t argue advanced touch: Yahoo! Groups enable you with the feature set and potential of the tool, to create flexible databases within the group and I’m hoping it or something similar will for contact lists, FAQs, donor lists, inven- become “mission control” for our team’s coltory databases, etc. laboration between meetings. Zoho.com (which I like to think of as Comment at www.jfp.ms, or email Todd@ Google’s eager younger cousin) offers Zoho jacksonfreepress.com.


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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Employers Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Dictate Birth Control

D

r. Beverly McMillan is against birth control. Or at least any kind of hormonal birth control, from the regular pill to the morning-after pill, all of which she considers to be a form of abortion. The head of Pro-Life Mississippi, McMillan wants your employer to be able to tell you what kind of birth control your health insurance can pay for. Never mind that you pay for your insurance with your own labor, and often partly with your money. She, and other opponents of the federal â&#x20AC;&#x153;contraceptive rule,â&#x20AC;? are claiming that the government trying to force employers to offer birth control that leads to abortion for their employees. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d think the president was telling business owners to drive women to abortion clinics themselves in order to keep their jobs. What the Obama administration has actually said is that health insurers cannot deny their insured access to preventive contraception or charge them a co-pay or deductible for it (affirming what a majority of states already do). That is, neither employer, the government, a priest or a Jackson OB-GYN herself has the right to tell individuals and families what birth-control choices we can make for ourselvesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or to pressure insurance companies into denying access or making it too expensive for many women. These political and religious institutions do not belong in our bedroom, or in our pharmacies. These are personal choices. The contraceptive rule says nothing about what most people consider to be abortion, although the very important morning-after pillâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;imagine a condom breaking or your teen being rapedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is included in the birth-control options that insurance companies, or employers (except for exempt religious organizations) cannot deny employees because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe a woman should make her own reproductive decisions, even down to whether or not to take the pill. While her husband, Roy McMillan, spends much of his time dragging huge fetus blowups across North State Street to his perch in front of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abortion clinic, Dr. McMillan crusades on the meme that birth-control pills causeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and areâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;abortions, rather than acknowledging the very basic truth that birth control prevents abortion, not to mention poverty and other problems. Meantime, many of her followers blame single mothers for all of societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ills, as well as â&#x20AC;&#x153;broken homes,â&#x20AC;? even as many of the fathers never lived in those homes in the first place. She preaches this in one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poorest states where women have a minimal voice and rights. Dr. McMillan is as welcome to those views as her husband is to sit in front of a clinic when he could be out helping children that are already born, hungry and unwanted. But it is not her place to tell hard-working American women that their health insurance should not pay for their health-care needs because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d prefer that they get pregnant. Whether Dr. McMillan also prefers them barefoot is still an open question.

CHATTER Join the conversation at www.jfp.ms.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;County-level Dems Switch to GOPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waggoner should remember that his first allegiance as a public office holder is to the Constitution and to his constituents. In any case, only theocrats believe that legalizing gay marriage somehow infringes on religious freedom, as no church will ever be required to recognize gay marriage. But Waggoner seems muddled on just about everything, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave the poor fool alone. The Democrats already lost nearly all the racists to the Republicans. If bigots and homophobes want to sign on as Republicans, the Democrats will ultimately be better off without them. What do we lose when we lose Waggoner? Nothing worth keeping.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Brian C. Johnson

June 13 - 19, 2012

â&#x20AC;&#x153;1. I think that elected officials that represent their constituents should not change political parties. If they feel that strongly about an issue, they should resign. 2. What does (being) Democrat or GOP have anything to do with gay marriage? Conservative GOP judges just ruled that DOMA is unconstitutional. 3. How do any of those men equate that the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remarks will *not* preserve families? How does the preservation of family preserve the country for those that are being discriminated against? Also, do any of the men that changed their political affiliation to preserve their family have divorce? Any children that went to rehab? Are they and their families completely above reproach? It saddens me that they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just be honest. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like gay people, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK with me. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for everyone, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cover that bigotry and homophobia with lies about families, marriage sanctity, and make blanket political statements that are maliciously misleading at worst, and a reach of the imagina12 tion at best.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Michael Kennedy

MY TURN

BY DERRICK JOHNSON

Students Deserve Better Than a Quick Fix

I

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Fathers and Daughters

I

sat at my father’s knee the day he shared with the family news that would change our lives forever. We were moving from our family home in Clinton to a place that might as well have been another world: New York City. He’d been diagnosed with lung cancer and had made the decision to conclude his work as an activist and school administrator in Jackson to offer what was left of his earthly life to the creator. He was finally going to study theology at Union Theological Seminary. He was a man of great will and was determined to do this before he transitioned. I’m certain that he knew he’d never come back except to visit. I remember being disappointed and hurt that I had to leave my friends and my comfort zone and move to a city about which I’d only heard horrible things. I thought he was being selfish and inconsiderate. And what was Mama feeling? Did she want this? Was she cool with this? We were raised in a household where adults made the decisions, and the children fell in line. We were not permitted to question directives or even discuss them in front of adults. Adults were in full control of everything, and we simply had to respect that. To some degree, I think my father expected my mother to just respect his decisions as well, so I’m not sure she had much to say about the move. But I never once heard her complain, and I never once saw a tear. I never witnessed either disappointment or elation when it came to this move. My father’s strong will kept him going for about two years after his diagnosis. But one day, I came home from school to find that I couldn’t get in the building. My sister usually came down and opened the locked door so I could get in. This day, she wasn’t there, and I was pissed. I had to walk all the way around the building, which equaled about two blocks. When I walked in the house, it was empty. My sister may have been there, but I can’t recall her presence. All I remember was the blood on the walls and in the bathroom. My father had gotten sick and was regurgitating blood. Shortly after, my mother came home and told us Daddy was in the hospital, and that it didn’t look good. At that moment, I felt my soul leave my body. We spent a couple of days of going back and forth to the hospital with my mother before my daddy’s family came from Atlanta. They came to say goodbye. He was

conscious the entire time. My mother still hadn’t shed a tear, and because Mama wasn’t crying, I took that to mean that Daddy would be OK. Others cried, but my mother was strong. I walked up to my mother as she sat at my father’s hospital bedside. “Mama, I want to hug him,” I said. “Baby, go hug him,” she told me. As I approached my daddy, he reached for me. I fell into his arms with all my weight, and he held me so tight that I may have stopped breathing for a while, but I didn’t want it to stop. I wanted to stay there, in my daddy’s arms, forever. I told him that I loved him, and I ran out of the room down the hall to cry. I never saw him again. My mother coming behind me shouting: “Oh Lord, Howard’s gone. He’s gone. He’s gone.” The pain in her voice was so clear. It sealed my fate. From that moment, I knew I would be different; changed forever. My father had three memorial services: one each in New York and Jackson and the third in Eupora, where we laid him to rest. A part of me died each time I had to sit through one of those services. I became angry, my spirit tainted. I often watch my husband with our little girl, and I pray that he has the kind of emotional, spiritual connection with her that I had with my father. I have not been the same since he crossed over nearly 25 years ago. It wasn’t until my mother transitioned that I began to heal from his death and, unfortunately, it’s because I cannot mourn for both of them. I had to put my grief for Daddy aside so that I can heal from losing my mother. I know that there is a plan and an order for all things. The creator gave my father 13 years to make an impact on my life that would stand through his absence, and Daddy accomplished that. Boys need their fathers to show them how to be men; however, the connection between a daughter and her father is immeasurable. Fathers will show their daughters how to love and how to be loved in return. They are the first figure of strength daughters will ever know. Fathers, take advantage of the time you have with your daughter as often as you possibly can. Never underestimate the significance you carry. It will last a lifetime. Funmi “Queen” Franklin is a word lover, poet and advocate for sisterhood. She has a weakness for reality shows and her new puppy, Shaka.

Fathers will show their daughters how to love and how to be loved in return. They are the first figure of strength daughters will ever know.

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FUNMI “QUEEN” FRANKLIN

13


GUYS WE

Horace McMillan

June 13 - 19, 2012

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orace McMillan is an enthusiastic parent, mattress salesman and pastor. Originally from Omaha, Neb., McMillan moved from Illinois to Jackson in July 2005 to be a pastor at Open Doors Church, but he found himself wondering how he could get more involved in the Casey Elementary school system. “We loved the art integration at Casey, and we thought it was a really special place,” says 44-year-old McMillan, who has been a Casey parent for seven years. “I just wanted to be more involved and see if there was a way that I could help out.” McMillan found a way. He became Parent Teacher Association president and served as the vice president of fundraising for two years. Last year, McMillan helped the school raise more than $20,000 to purchase interactive white boards for the fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms. Providing students with helpful technology is a big part of McMillan’s agenda as PTA president, but he also finds value in art. “Some things that people think are superfluous––like music, art, drama, sports––those are all an important part of a well-rounded education,” he says. McMillan hopes that despite budget cuts, these aspects of learning will flourish. “There are some kids that learn better through other mediums,” McMillan says. “When kids look forward to going to school they try harder, and they work harder. School should be something that is enjoyable and fun.” Improving Jackson education programs takes a village, McMillan says. “I think people really have a sense of purpose here,” he says. “The difference between good schools and great schools is in terms of having community involvement.” Last year’s raffle fundraiser for Casey’s 50th anniversary exemplifies his point. “One thing that’s really beautiful is that the parents who won the $1,000 prize ended up donating it back to the school,” he says with pride. This fall Casey Elementary will hold another raffle for its 51st anniversary in hopes of supplying the remaining classrooms with interactive technology. ––Sara Sacks

COURTESY DAVID DENNEY

COURTESY HORACE MCMILLAN

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Every year at this time, people reflect on their dads, their granddads, their uncles—all the men in their lives. We at the JFP want to shine a spotlight on a few men who make Jackson a little cleaner, brighter, smarter or a little more delicious. Some of them are dads, some aren’t. But they all inspire, teach and share their talents with our community, raising Jackson up to achieve its potential.

Cucho Gonzalez

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ucho Gonzalez grew up in Rio Piedras, a district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The oldest of five brothers, Gonzalez started playing drums when he was 8 years old. In the Gonzalez family, musical ability was expected. “There were eight (children) in my grandmother’s family,” Gonzalez, now 51, says. “They all played sports, and they all did an instrument.” The love of music was passed down to Gonzalez and his four brothers. “When we were growing up, we had a band. We were like the Puerto Rican Osmonds,” Gonzalez says. “We played in Puerto Rico on national TV back when we were kids. Some of (my brothers) were in grade school, and I (was in) junior high or high school.” Gonzalez and his brothers also found a love of sports. After high school, Gonzalez attended Penn State. Three of his brothers soon followed and competed on the university’s gymnastics team. After college, Gonzalez joined two of them in coaching gymnastics, which he did for 17 years across four states. Now living in Brandon, Gonzalez plays percussion and drums for several bands around Jackson, including Meet the Press, Break of Dawn and Dreamer. “I found out when I moved to Mississippi, drummers were a dime a dozen—very good drummers,” Gonzalez says. But percussionists with skills beyond a drum set––musicians familiar with bongos, cowbell, timbales and more––are less common. “They found out that I played percussion and were like, ‘Oh, we can use you.’” Now he plays percussion in two bands: Latinismo, a multi-piece Latin band, and Los Papis, a band that plays popular American music with a Latin flavor. Gonzalez says music, just like Latin food, is best with a lot of spices added. His percussion, he said, is the spice. “Take a song like ‘Mustang Sally.’ Every musician hates to play it, but everybody wants to hear it,” Gonzalez says. “You add a little bit of cowbell and other types of percussion, and people are like, ‘Oh, this is different.’” ––Jacob Fuller

David Denney

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avid Denney’s mission is to dismantle the school-toprison pipeline. As the youth advocacy coordinator of the American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi, Denney travels the state aiding students at disciplinary hearings, working to give them a chance at a fair outcome. The 31-year-old San Diego, Calif., native and University of California, Berkeley graduate is clearly passionate about his past two-plus years advocating for minors throughout Mississippi. “I am an advocate for smart discipline, not harsh discipline,” Denney says. “Through overreliance, overuse and the abuse of zero-tolerance policies, schools are pushing youth into the criminal-justice system.” Denney also organizes programs such as the Mississippi Youth Justice Movement that hosts “Know Your Rights” workshops across the state to inform kids and parents about their constitutional rights and various other social-justice issues. The organizer enjoys working with young people directly and at events, such as the annual Mississippi Youth Hip Hop Summit and concurrent Parent/Advocate Conference or quarterly youth-leadership meetings. “There is a chance to help youth become leaders and make change to better themselves and the community,” he says. “No matter what background a person may come from, education is the great equalizer in society.” Denney also works with the Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl, where he is a facilitator for the Batterer’s InterventionProgram.Heteachesacourt-ordereddiversionprogramfor first-time domestic-violence abusers in Clinton. The classes, Denney says, are meant to give those convicted of domestic violence an opportunity to learn from their mistakes and to “change their behavior, treatment and views toward women.” This year’s Hip Hop Summit is July 21 and 22 at Millsaps College. The event is free and open to anyone aged 10 to 18. For more information, find the event on Facebook. For more information on the ACLU, visit aclu-ms.org. For more information on the Center for Violence Prevention and the Batterer’s Intervention Program, visit mscvp.org or call 601-932-4198. ––Darnell Jackson


PIKO EWOODZIE

Curtis Coats

arryl Dampeer recalls growing up in north Jackson struggling to choose the right path. At age 15, Dampeer found solace and contentment in the restaurant business. The 52-year-old has worked in the restaurant industry for the larger portion of his life, 14 years as an employee at Hal and Mal’s. There, Dampeer is “The Big Room Man.” The Big Room is just that—big—with a large stage and well-used tables and chairs silently awaiting their next guests. If you’ve ever wondered who did all the setup for a show, it was probably Dampeer. In The Big Room, he is in his element—and always with a smile. “I been around the block two to three times,” Dampeer says, laughing, “If they have me around, things go a lot smoother. I basically know how to do everything.” Dampeer has lived in Jackson his entire life. Though he has visited cities like New Orleans and Detroit, he has never wanted to leave Jackson. He finds that living in Jackson is an easy life. “Jackson is a good life. You know?” he asks, leaning forward in the heavy iron chair. “It’s a slow life. It ain’t like a big city, but it’s good to me.” And Jackson is glad to have him. Dampeer is a lively spirit around the restaurant. He also coordinates events with Millsaps College and various other organizations, including the JFP’s annual Chick Ball—which he has assisted with now for eight years. Meeting people is his favorite part about his job, and busing tables isn’t so bad, either. “I clean up the mess, but I call that job security,” he says with a laugh. “As long as they make a mess, I got a job! ––Sara Sacks

r. Curtis Coats, professor of communication studies at Millsaps College, urges his students to think about how media influences the ways we think about ourselves, others, gender, race and sexuality: “We all engage in media and don’t really think about what its effects are, what its influences are, how it’s produced, or why it’s produced.” This past May, 39-year-old Coats taught a class on media and tourism while traveling through various cities in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, which I attended. “People don’t think about studying tourism much at all, really,” he says. “It’s something we do for recreation, but I wanted to introduce students to a more critical perspective about what tourism is, what it does and what its potentials are.” Millsaps College operates a satellite school in the Yucatan and has worked to expand its study abroad program in Mexico over the past several years. Many disciplines, from anthropology to business to English, take advantage of the chance to hold classes there. The possibility of teaching a class in Mexico is one of the reasons Coats decided to begin his professorial career at Millsaps three years ago. “Mexico is a great place to experience a different culture and to think about media and tourism critically,” he says. Coats graduated from the University of Arkansas with a bachelor’s degree in print journalism; but after a short career in the journalism field, he decided to pursue higher degrees that would allow him to teach. After receiving a master’s degree in journalism and then soon after, a doctorate in communication with a specialization in media and religion, at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Curtis, and his wife, Heather, moved to Jackson. When Coats isn’t teaching, he likes to ride bikes on the Natchez Trace, roast coffee, travel or hang out with his dog, Ceadie. —Allie Jordan

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

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Michael Potts

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or Michael Potts, store manager of Buffalo Peak Outfitters, retail is all about the customers. “It’s truly the people that I love most about retail,” he says. Born in Kansas City, Mo., he has spent his entire life in Jackson. “My parents moved to Jackson, when I was 1 year old, so Jackson is my home,” Potts says. He attended school at The Education Center School in Jackson and St. Joseph Catholic School when it was still located in Jackson (the school has since moved to Madison). The 54-year-old has several years of retail experience. Potts worked for The Rogue for 17 years and Great Scott for 20 years.

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hen Yoseph Ali talks about his new restaurant, Abeba, he gets giddy. A moment after mentioning it, he pulls out his phone to show me a picture, like a proud father showing off his newborn. “It’s my heart,” he says. “Look at that thing ... I’m telling you. ...” He trails off, at a loss for words. “I mean, this is the food I grew up eating. I love it. I love it.” Ali got into the restaurant business in 2004, during his last year in graduate school at Jackson State. Abeba, which might be the first Ethiopian restaurant in Mississippi, is not exactly thriving––at least not in comparison to Aladdin Mediterranean Grill, Ali’s first restaurant, which he co-owns with Ahmed Kayed and Dr. Khalid Mukhtar. He’s not terribly worried, though, because he’s done all this before. He’s beaten the odds––that 60 percent of all new restaurants fail within their first year. He’s gone through the difficult task of introducing the city of Jackson to a new style of food. In fact, he’s convinced that Abeba is going to be more successful because the stakes are much higher. With Abeba, it is about changing the perception of his home country. “What they know about Ethiopia is what they saw on TV: starving kids with big bellies, and flies everywhere,” he says. He’s excited to take up the challenge, the “beautiful challenge,” he calls it, of showing people the flavors of his home country. “I grew up in a poor country where we use anything––lentils or chick peas––to make five or six kinds of dishes out of one thing, you know what I mean, with different flavors,” he says. That’s what he wants to add to the restaurant world in Jackson. ––Piko Ewoodzie

Potts admits that retail has been good to him. “I just couldn’t be the guy behind the computer or the cubicle,” he says. His people-loving attitude attracted him to the job, which has allowed him to meet people from all walks of life and to hear their stories. As an outdoorsman himself, he loves hearing about the travels and adventures of the customers who shop at the Peak. “People come here because they are hiking, biking or going on an African safari,” Potts says. “Their stories make you want to do and go with them.” Potts loves biking yearround, and snow skiing in the winter. Potts says he gives back to the community whenever he can. “When I worked for Great Scott, I would help with the feeding

at Billy Brumfield’s house (a local men’s shelter),” he says. Stewpot Community Services is one of the local organizations Potts is particularly passionate about. He and his family always attend Taste of Mississippi, an annual spring event that raises money for Stewpot, and he regularly donates clothes to the organization. Potts also supports community projects sponsored by his church, St. Peter’s Catholic Church. He and his wife Kathy have three children: 15-year-old Michael, 18-year-old Laura and 22-year-old Sarah. ––Christianna Jackson

see page 17

jacksonfreepress.com

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Yoseph Ali

Darryl Dampeer

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PIKO EWOODZIE

from page 15

Mark G. Henderson

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Barry Leach

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hen he was around 10 years old, Barry Leach picked up his older brother’s guitar and tried to play. He didn’t really get into it, however, until he was 15. Now 51, Leach has won several awards as a jazz guitarist. In 2011, readers chose him as the Jackson Free Press’s Best Jazz Artist and this year he is up for the Jackson Music Awards’ esteemed Musician of the Year award. Leach was born in Kentucky, but grew up in Brandon. He attended the University of Southern Mississippi, where he earned a degree in music. After college, Leach went on the road with a band and moved to Nashville for a while. He then went to Los Angeles and lived there for about 10 years before moving back to the Jackson area in 1991. While in Los Angeles, he performed with a band called Scratch. Here in Jackson, Leach does solo performances as well as gigs with The Vamps and The Fearless Four. The Vamps just celebrated their 14th anniversary; the Jackson Music Awards named the group Jazz Group of the Year in 1999. “I do all kinds of stuff,” he says. “I might even bust out with some Johnny Cash.” His solo gigs are a mixture of instrumentals, jazz classics and original work. “It just felt right to try to learn everything,” Leach says. Musicians such as John McLaughlin and Al Di Meola influence Leach’s music. Along with performing at various venues around town each week, Leach has also taught guitar lessons for the past 15 years. He lives in Brandon with his wife, Deb, whom he met in Los Angeles. “She’s not only my life partner, but (also) a musical partner,” he says. For private lessons, contact Morrison Brothers or email Leach at barry@barryleach.com. Look for his music on iTunes. ––Briana Robinson

see page 18

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY BARRY LEACH

r. Mark Henderson says performance changed his life. When he began acting as a student at Jackson State University, it expanded his scope of what he could be in life. Being on stage allowed him to learn about himself, and it sharpened his ability to communicate, a skill that is transferable to most other careers. “It opened up parts of me that I never knew existed,” he says. Two graduate degrees later (a master’s from Michigan State and a doctorate from University of Southern Mississippi), he is back at JSU. He teaches and serves as the interim chairman of the Department of Speech Communication and Theater. And, as the founder and an adviser for the student-run performance troupe MADDRAMA, he provides an opportunity for students to learn about themselves and engage with social issues through theater. He is especially interested in recruiting young black males to act. “I tend to guiltily embrace it when I have a lot of masculine straight guys in the organization,” he says. He believes it challenges the restrictive boundaries of black masculinity. Having young men in MADDRAMA allows him to do something else that he loves perhaps even more than performing: mentoring. “I just see so much suffering in men, it grieves me ... especially our black men, and somewhere along the way, somebody has to help our men to be stronger men,” he says. Henderson hopes to be that somebody. He draws inspiration from his own upbringing. A single mother, whose praises he never ceases to sing, raised him, but he still feels like there could have been something more. “She was awesome, but I missed out on so much because I needed that man figure there for me,” he says. “I just hated that my momma (raised me alone). She just didn’t deserve to work like she did to provide. She should have had a man to ease that for her.” ––Piko Ewoodzie

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CHRISTINA CANON

from page 17

Alan Huffman TA KE A D VA N T A G E O F O UR P A T I O D U R I N G . . .

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601­366­5757

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lan Huffman’s fondest memory of co-author Michael Rejebian involves a clerk’s office mistaking Rejebian for a homeless man while he was requesting documents. “There’s just always interesting situations when you’re out there digging up dirt. We get followed, and we get threatening phone calls and all that sort of stuff,” Huffman says. Huffman, a north Jackson native and former Clarion-Ledger reporter, is a political opposition researcher, someone who is hired by a candidate during an election to gather information about the candidate and his or her opponent. Huffman, who graduated from the University of Mississippi, has been investigating politicians for 18 years. He and Rejebian chronicled their experiences traveling around the United States as political opposition researchers in the 2012 book “We’re With Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal the Dark Side of American Politics” (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2012, $15.99). The book offers a humorous insight to the downfalls of political candidates. “Although it is illuminating about politics, it’s also this sort of crazy road-trip story,” Huffman says. “We’re With Nobody” has garnered national attention from a wide audience, which Huffman attributes to the book’s humorous tone and readability, even for those uninterested in politics. While “We’re With Nobody” is Huffman’s most famous work so far, it is not his first. He has been writing since he was in high school, and has authored several books, including “Mississippi in Africa” (Gotham Books, 2004, $25) the story of 250 Mississippi slaves who sailed to freedom in Liberia, and “Sultana: Surviving the Civil War, Prison, and the Worst Maritime Disaster in American History” (Harper Paperbacks, 2010, $14.99). Huffman will soon travel to Libya to begin work on his next book about a war photographer who lost his life in a 2011 attack. Although he spends a lot of time traveling across the world writing and researching, Huffman always returns to Jackson. “It’s home,” he says. “Mississippi is one of those places where things are happening in a big way that aren’t happening on the same scale anywhere else.” ––Ceili Hale

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ARTS p 21 | BOOKS p 23 | 8 DAYS p 24 | MUSIC p 28 |SPORTS p 30

Not So Young Guns COURTESY RAY NIELSEN

of working with Marilyn Monroe, John Wayne, Barbara Stanwyck, directors Sam Peckinpah and Samuel Fuller. This is “A Gathering of Guns,” a TV Western “reunion” presented by Western Clippings publication and the Memphis Film Festival, and some 900 fans from as far away as Australia have come. Many are dressed in cowboy and cowgirl garb themselves, looking like an army of aging walk-ons on the set of a major Warner Brothers production. Ellen Diiorio could have just stepped out of a Conestoga wagon. In her bonnet and calico dress, she’s anything but new millennium. Western TV stars of yesteryear, such as James Drury, aka “The Virginian,” relive their glory days annually at “A Gathering of Guns” in Olive Branch. “I represent the fortitude of the prairie women who helped forge this LIVE BRANCH, Miss.—I’m staring into the face country,” she tells me. “I know we had a lot of heroes in the of Marshal Wyatt Earp. It’s not exactly as I remem- Old West like Wyatt Earp, but there were women, too, who ber him back when I was a 10-year-old would-be had the strength and fortitude to carry the day.” cowboy and Wyatt was on television every Tuesday Of course, she’s not a prairie woman. She’s a 60-yearnight. He’s in a motorized wheelchair now, his once-jet black old 4-H Club secretary and elementary education teacher hair is gray, and he’s sporting a beard. from Westfield, N.J. She’s also such a big fan of the late acBut it’s him, the same black tie, starched white shirt, tor Dan Blocker, who played Hoss on “Bonanza,” that her long black coat, purple vest. All around him are photographs email address even carries his name. of the Wyatt I remember. “The first adult Western,” he says Charles Gunn’s black Stetson, string tie and brown vest proudly of “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp,” which tell me he’s a fan of a different sort. “I like the singing cowfirst aired in September 1955. “Look at the wardrobe. The boys, like Johnny Western and Rex Allen Jr.,” he says. In first thing you wanted was to be authentic.” No fancy se- fact, he adds, “I’m a singer, too.” quins, no scarves with polka dots. “Wyatt was marshal, and And indeed he is. The 63-year-old Warrenton, Ga., he wore what business owners wore.” resident hands me his card: “Charles W. Gunn – Southeast’s He’s not really Wyatt Earp, of course. He’s Hugh Singing Cowboy – Clean Family Entertainment.” O’Brian, the 87-year-old actor who played him on television Western and Allen are themselves somewhere in the for seven years and still speaks of him like he’s a close friend. hotel, but Gunn is now enjoying L.Q. Jones’ tales from They’re on a first-name basis. his 114 movies and 500 TV credits. “Barbara Stanwyck O’Brian is one of a couple dozen TV Western stars was one of the toughest ladies God ever made,” Jones says. of yesteryear working the banquet rooms of the Whis- “Didn’t weigh 90 pounds, but this woman could make a pering Woods Hotel and Conference Center. Clint sailor blush. You could do nothing to make her mad but “Cheyenne” Walker is signing autographs. James “The screw up.” Virginian” Drury is telling jokes. Great character acFan Lynne Mercer, 47, came all the way from Canbertors, their faces better known than their names—peo- ra, Australia. Too young to have watched many of the origiple like L.Q. Jones, Ed Faulkner, Henry Darrow and nal shows, she’s mainly seen reruns. Still, “when I saw ‘The Roberta Shore—are regaling fans with Hollywood tales Virginian’ it blew my mind,” she says. “The Western style of

June 13 - 19, 2012

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by Joe Atkins life, a simple life, not complicated, outdoors. Of course, it wasn’t an easy life.” This is a Hollywood version of an old-timers’ baseball game, only much more demanding. The festival works its all-star cast hard. They tell stories, perform in short plays and comedy stints, shake innumerable hands, sign endless photographs. “I’m so busy I only had a chance to eat two bites of my birthday cake,” says Clint Walker, who just turned 85. He’s not as big as he was when he starred in “Cheyenne,” a time when he stood 6 feet, 6 inches with a 54inch chest and 38-inch waist. He’s still big, though, and a big man gets hungry. He glances down the growing line of autograph seekers. It’s 4 in the afternoon. “I haven’t had lunch, yet,” he says. But then the gentle giant dutifully signs every photograph, and he takes his time doing it, too. The average age of the stars here is 75, and many of them are well into their 80s, says Ray Nielsen, codirector of the event. Several of those invited—Robert Horton, James Stacy, Will Hutchins, Ty Hardin—were unable to come because of illness. Most of the fans are in middle to late-middle age. The Western “doesn’t resonate with the younger generation,” Nielsen says. “It’s too tame for them, not enough pyrotechnics.” Look at 2011’s “Cowboys and Aliens,” he says. Hollywood figured it had to mix in science fiction to make a Western successful today. “We’re a dying breed, but that’s OK.” The Western’s faded appeal to modern audiences is a reason why some stars are reluctant to come to festivals. “It is hard for them to believe that people still remember and care,” Nielsen says. An example is famed character actor Clu Gulager, whose refusal to come to this year’s festival prompted fans to chant “We Want Clu!” at one panel session. “When they come for the first time, they are overwhelmed,” Nielsen says. “They find out that not only do the fans know them, they know more about them than (the actors) themselves. They are bowled over by it.” As for the fans, he says, the festival brings back what it was like so long ago to sit in front of the screen and watch your heroes under the Western sky. “When you spend three or four days in the ‘reel’ world versus the ‘real’ world, you tend to block everything else out––the problems, the concerns, the economy. It’s all out the window. You are living in the moment. When the festival ends, and you go back to the ‘real’ world, it is a real downer.” You know what? I’m feeling that way myself. “A Gathering of Guns” took place May 31 to June 2 in Olive Branch. Visit westernclippings.com or memphisfilm festival.com to learn more or find out how to get involved in next year’s reunion.


DIVERSIONS|arts

By Kelly Bryan Smith

COURTESY LAURA BITTNER

Under the Big Top

The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus features acts to appeal to all ages.

Brett Carden, Brazilian dancers the Ringlettes, husband-and-wife hand balancing team Duo Fusion, aerial foot looper Francleib Rodrigues, 360-degree motorcyclists the Urias family, clown Dean Kelley, and many more. I am still not quite sure about the clowns. But what little boy can resist the motorcyclists and the animals?

Circus Tips for Parents Â&#x2021; ,I\RXGHFLGHWRJRWRRQHRIWKHSP VKRZVZLWK\RXU\RXQJFKLOGUHQEHVXUHWKH\ WDNHDJRRGQDSWKDWDIWHUQRRQVRWKH\GRQÂśW JHWRYHUWLUHGEHIRUHWKHFLUFXVHQGV<RXPD\ DOVRZLVKWREULQJSDMDPDVWRFKDQJH\RXU NLGVLQWREHIRUH\RXGULYHKRPHLQFDVHWKH\ IDOODVOHHSLQWKHFDUDQGQHHGWREHFDUULHG VWUDLJKWWREHG Â&#x2021; $VZLWKVRPDQ\HYHQWVZLWKH[SHQVLYH FRQFHVVLRQV\RXPLJKWZDQWWRHDWEHIRUH \RXJRRUZDUQ\RXUNLGVDERXW\RXUVQDFN EXGJHWLQDGYDQFHVR\RXGRQÂśWSXW\RXU FKLOGUHQ VFROOHJHWXLWLRQVLQMHRSDUG\ Â&#x2021; %HIRUH\RXJHWWRWKHFLUFXVWDONWR \RXUNLGVDERXW\RXUH[SHFWDWLRQVIRUWKHLU EHKDYLRUDWWKH&ROLVHXP,I\RXHVWDEOLVKWKH UXOHVLQDGYDQFH\RXDUHDOOOLNHO\WRKDYH PXFKPRUHIXQWRJHWKHUZLWKRXWWKHZKLQLQJ EHJJLQJRUPLVEHKDYLQJWKDWFRXOGRFFXU Â&#x2021; 9LVLWWKHFLUFXVZHEVLWH ULQJOLQJFRP  EHIRUHDQGDIWHUWKHVKRZIRUDYDULHW\RIIXQ DQGHGXFDWLRQDOFLUFXVUHODWHGJDPHVDQG DFWLYLWLHVWRVXSSOHPHQW\RXUFKLOGÂśVLQSHUVRQ FLUFXVH[SHULHQFH Â&#x2021; ,I\RXUNLGVFDQVLW UHODWLYHO\ VWLOOIRUORQ JHUSHULRGVRIWLPHJRWRWKHFLUFXVDQKRXU HDUO\IRUWKHIUHHSUHVKRZSDUW\WKDWLQFOXGHV EDFNVWDJHYLVLWVSKRWRVZLWKWKHSHUIRUPHUV GDQFLQJDQGPXFKPRUH

The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will be in Jackson June 14 to 17 at the Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St., 601-961-4000). Tickets are $14 to $45. If you visit ringling.com in advance, you can request a free ticket for your baby younger than 12 months. And if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough of the greatest show on earth this time around, you can catch the circus again in Biloxi July 5 to 8.

jacksonfreepress.com

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t was a muggy July evening in Mississippi. I had packed a picnic for my 1-year-old son, my then-husband and myself in a cooler in the red wagonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; watermelon cubes, egg-salad sandwiches on pumpernickel bread, cucumber slices, corn on the cob, Fig Newtons and lots of ice-cold lemonade. We made our way to a family-friendly Fourth of July picnic in downtown Hattiesburg. We lounged on the picnic blanket eating our dinner, with a few baby toys and books scattered about. My son sat up and ate his corn on the cob, fascinated by the music playing, the people walking around with their dogs, and all the kids running and playing. It was an idyllic summer night. Then, all of a sudden, he appeared. A tall clown with bright orange hair and a big red nose came over the horizon, with children flocking to him like the Pied Piper. He got closer and closer. The kids swarmed thicker and thicker. He sat on our picnic blanket with my family, and the kids scattered. My cheerful, easygoing, happy son was curious. He wanted a closer look. But as soon as Mama was no longer between him and the clown, he turned into a wailing banshee. I can still hear his screams echoing in my head today, and I wonder â&#x20AC;Ś two years later, is he still afraid of clowns? The circus is coming to Jackson, and for those of you with serious cases of coulrophobia (or those who have perhaps simply seen Stephen Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;ITâ&#x20AC;? one too many times), you will be relieved to know that the greatest show on earth is about much more than clowns. I have magically fuzzy circus memories from my childhood, staying up late, sipping on Sprite and being amazed by a flying trapeze artist in a pink costume, twirling in the air over the tigers. This summer, you can expect to see such professional circus performers as husband-and-wife animal trainers Cathy and

21


DIVERSIONS|arts

Fresh Tex Mex Come Enjoy our Patio

2 for 1 Margaritas Every Wednesday WEDNESDAY 6/13

Sean Mullady (Folk/Hop)

Take Home a Fresh Pepper Souvenir From Our Patio Garden

Enjoy Our Full Bar

THURSDAY 6/14

Legacy

(Traditional Irish) FRIDAY 6/15

Mike & Marty (Classic Rock)

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

Getting Messy at the Museum

SATURDAY 6/16

The Juvenators (Blues)

MONDAY 6/18

Karaoke w/ Matt

by Genevieve Legacy 318 South State Street | Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

The Players: Two adults sitting in child-sized chairs, a variety of hand-held dog puppets

TUESDAY 6/19

Open Mic with A Guy Named George

The Audience: A receptive, enthusiastic crew of 4- and 5-year-old children

T

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

$7.98

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef

Thursday : Chicken Diane

June 13 - 19, 2012

or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or

22

Chicken & Dumplings

The Setting: A bright, welcoming room with a colorful mosaic mural lining the wall

Get free dessert on your birthday & anniversary. Plus, get special offers and updates on music, events and new menu items.

his scene doesn’t describe most people’s expectations of a morning at the art museum. The potential for disaster seems too high when allowing kid-friendly fun within the hallowed walls of a building that houses “Art.” Nevertheless, art-centered education and fun are what you can expect during the Mississippi Museum of Art’s “Look and Learn with Hoot” series. Elizabeth Williams, MMA curator of education, says the series is the result of MMA’s educational strategic plan. The goal is to make the art museum experience more kid- and family-friendly through a series of free, 45-minute educational sessions for pre-kindergarten- and kindergarten-aged children and their parents. Each Look-and-Learn session includes story time and a hands-on art activity. Who is Hoot? “Hoot is an owl with exceptionally big eyes,” Williams says. The museum has adopted Hoot as its educational mascot. The Hoot character first appeared in the museum’s awardwinning children’s book, “The Four Dog Blues Band” (University Press of Mississippi/Mississippi Museum of Art, 2010, $15.95). While at the museum, parents are encouraged to look for Hoot. A picture of the owl means a learning opportunity is at hand. At this time, the museum’s family corners and “closer-look galleries,” where children can experience

art on an age-appropriate level, are places designated by Hoot. Each session in the Look and Learn series begins with a storybook reading in the MMA’s education corner. After the story, kids and parents move to the in-house art studio for the day’s hands-on activity led by one of museum’s teaching artists. The art activities are loosely related to the story, or a piece of artwork on display in the gallery. Williams described last month’s art project as “an investigation of texture.” The kids spent time working with textiles, matching pictures from the Curious George exhibit with an assortment of highly tactile fabrics and other materials. The educational program is designed to appeal to all the senses and to build skills through a variety of engaging activities. MMA welcomes and encourages parents to get involved in the art activity in the studio––just remember to “dress for mess.” Williams says the hands-on activities are the kids’ favorites. “The messier, the better!” she says. The next session in the Look and Learn with Hoot series is scheduled for Friday, June 15 at 10:30 a.m. This month’s story is Curious George Flies a Kite. The series continues monthly through December 2012. For more information and upcoming dates, call the Mississippi Museum of Art at 601-960-1515 or visit msmuseumart.org.


DIVERSIONS|books

Ghostly Tales

by Adria Walker

COURTESY PELICAN PUBLISHING

COURTESY THE HISTORY PRESS

quotes the wife who’s had trouble sleeping. ‘No, it wasn’t the mattress. I woke up because there were people in the room—two men, a woman, and two children standing at the foot of my bed.’” I have to give the woman kudos; if I had seen five people standing at my bed, I would have checked out immediately. Because the tales are supposedly true, and they touch close to home, “The Haunting of Mississippi” does double duty: It will scare you and teach a little of Mississippi’s haunted history. Some of the ghosts and haunted places included in “The Haunting of Mississippi” are also covered in “The Haunted Natchez Trace” (The History Press, 2012, $16.99) by Bud Steed. The King’s Tavern’s ghost is one example. After reading both books, it’s easier to believe in the ghostly Madeline because they tell the same story. I concluded that either the authors interviewed the same person—and the interviewee was good at keeping their story straight—or the ghosts at King’s Tavern are real. Because the Trace meanders into Alabama and Tennessee, “The Haunted Natchez Trace” includes ghost stories from those states as well as several in Mississippi. Steed’s book doesn’t have the same scare factor that “The Haunting of Mississippi” has. It is considerably shorter, and the writing is more factual than story telling. My personal favorite in “The Haunted Natchez Trace” is the story of Louise the Unfortunate. Louise’s tale is a sad one but, in a way, it is uplifting. No one knows Louise’s last name. The legend is that she originally went to Natchez to be married. She couldn’t find her fiancé, and she didn’t have the funds to leave, so she started working “respectable” jobs for women such as teaching, nursing, being an office assistant and housekeeping. Eventually, she drifted to a less respected part of Natchez, taking jobs as a waitress before becoming a prostitute. Louise’s tombstone in Natchez is not one of a destitute person, and no one knows who paid for it. Both “The Haunting of Mississippi” and “The Haunted Natchez Trace” are full of photos of the ghostly places the authors take you to, making it easy to visualize the stories’ settings. If you don’t mind a few chills, they are both easy reads and will give you plenty of spooky stories to tell. Meet Bud Steed, author of “The Haunted Natchez Trace,” on Tuesday, June 19, at 1 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-7619).

Father’s Day June 17!

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Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Drive | 601-366-8486 Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren | 601-366-5273 English Village 904 E. Fortification Street | Belhaven | 601-355-9668 Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Road | 601-353-0089

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jacksonfreepress.com

“T

he Haunting of Mississippi” by Barbara Sillery (Pelican Publishing, 2011, $17.95) sucked me right in to Mississippi’s rich, haunted history. Sillery eloquently describes the settings of her stories, so I could easily visualize each of the places she writes about. I felt like the ghosts at McRaven were hitting me, like I was the one who had to be moved from my table at the King’s Tavern because Madeline was swinging the chain harder and harder at me. The multiple stories of the Klein family in “Cedar Grove Inn & Restaurant” are particularly captivating. You’ll find out about Mr. Klein, the cigar smoker who, even after death, can’t kick his smoking habit. At Cedar Grove, you’ll meet young Willie, who was shot in the chest, and the Bonnie Blue room where little ghosts play. The best part about Cedar Grove’s tale, though, is when Phyllis, the Inn’s owner, states the similarities between her daughter, Colleen, and the Kleins. At some points, I was scared out of my bones while reading “The Haunting of Mississippi.” Because I was miles away, I knew that it was ludicrous that I felt as if the ghosts were watching me or touching me, but because Sillery described everything so well, I could see, feel and hear the ghosts. I often travel through Vicksburg, Natchez and Greenville, the settings of some of Sillery’s ghosts. What if one day the ghosts decide to drift away from the places they’re haunting, and they find their way to Highway 61? Some of the stories are more believable than others. The ghost in “The Indian Chief at King’s Tavern in Natchez,” for instance, wears a feather headdress, but the story’s postscript states, “Natchez Indians did not wear the full feather headdress often associated with Plains Indians. … If guests at King’s Tavern do see a vision of an Indian chief in full headdress peering in the window, he must have traveled very far indeed from his ancestral homelands.” I just can’t fathom someone traveling in full dress just to see a tavern—no matter how nice—in Mississippi. For the most part, Sillery writes the stories they way they were told to her, and they are fairly straightforward. When she suddenly cut from the story in “Linden,” however, it was confusing. “Jeanette interrupts her own tale,” she writes. “‘Someone has to tell me something is wrong, so that I can go and get a new mattress; I can’t go around and test all of them.’ I nod in agreement once more, hoping we’ll get back to the story. No problem. “My hostess returns to the scene and now

23


BEST BETS June 13 - 20, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 6/13

CAMILLE MOENKHAUS

Historian Jim Barnett talks about and signs copies of his book “Mississippi’s American Indians” during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free, $40 book; call 601-576-6998. … Last Call has karaoke. … See the opera film “Anna Bolena” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. … The play “The Marvelous Wonderettes” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.) and runs through June 17. $25, $22 seniors and students; call 601948-3533, ext. 222. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday. … Hal & Mal’s hosts Singer-songwriter Night at 7 p.m. Performers include Wyatt Waters and Caroline Crawford. … Sean Mullady performs at Fenian’s. … Bill and Temperance are at Underground 119. … Hunter Gibson is at Olga’s.

Blvd., Madison). $9, $7 Crossroads members; email info@ crossroadsfilmfestival.com. … Dreamz JXN hosts Centric Thursday. … Martin’s hosts Ladies Night.

FRIDAY 6/15

The Priced to Move Pop-Up Art Gallery opens at 5 p.m. at the former Eastland Federal Courthouse (245 E. Capitol St.) and runs through June 17. Free; find Priced to Move on Facebook. … Fred Hammond, Byron Cage and Canton Jones perform at the Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour at 7 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. Free tickets; visit mcdonaldsgospeltour.com. … The play “Behind the Pulpit” is at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall, and features Bernadette Stanis (“Good Times”), Keith “Wonderboy” Johnson and Calvin Richardson. Encore show June 16. $25-$32; call 800-745-3000. … Passenger Jones performs at Ole Tavern. … Renegade is at Olga’s. … Stevie J and the Blues Eruption play at F. Jones Corner. … Larry Brewer is at Georgia Blue.

SATURDAY 6/16

The Father-and-Child Fishing Tournament is at 8 a.m. at Old Trace Park (Post Road, Ridgeland). Prizes given. Free; call 601-853-2011. … Author Shirley Hall-Williams signs “No Place for a Woman” at 9 a.m. at Cups in Clinton (101 W. Main St., Clinton). $11.76 book; call 888-361-9473. … The 40th annual Bentonia Blues Festival kicks off at 9 a.m. at Holmes Farm (313 Wilson-Holmes Road, Bentonia). $10, $5 parking; call 662-528-1900. … Celebrate Juneteenth at 10 a.m. at Tougaloo Community Center (318 Vine St.; call 601-979-1413) or Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.; call 601979-1530). Free. … The Hollingsworth Gospel Concert is at 6 p.m. at Hinds Community College, Raymond (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Cain-Cochran Hall’s Hogg Auditorium. Proceeds benefit the Robert Wallace Hollingsworth Family Law Enforcement Scholarship Fund. Donations welcome; call 800-446-3722. … The Go’Diva Under the Stars Fashion Show is at 8 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.), at center court. $25 in advance, $30 at the door, $40 VIP; call 601-291-9946 or 769-218-8862. … The Nameless Open-mic is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640. … The Weeks, Asheral and Kingston Springs Jazz Beautiful with Pan Confer (above) performs at the Jackson 2000 Spring Social at Smith Robertson Museum June 14 at 5 p.m.

June 13 - 19, 2012

The Jackson 2000 Spring Social is at 5 p.m. at Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center (528 Bloom St.). Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer performs. Free; email bevelyn_ branch@att.net. … The opening reception for Dr. Wilma Mosley Clopton’s exhibit “Preserving The Legacy” is from 6-8 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.); hangs through June 30. Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. … The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.); preshow party at 6 p.m. More shows through June 17. $14-$45, children under 2 free; call 800-745-3000. … The Crossroads Film Society hosts the screening of the documentary “Marley” 24 at 7:30 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview

SUNDAY 6/17

Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the opera “I Vespri Siciliani” at 2 p.m. ($16) and the independent film “4:44 Last Day On Earth” at 5 p.m. ($7). Refreshments sold. Visit msfilm.org. … The Juneteenth Arts and Music Festival kicks off at 3 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; email jbentertainmentgroup@gmail.com or savvyincpr@gmail.com. … Eclectic Sundays debuts at The Med Grill at 8 p.m. with music from DJ Phingaprint, drink specials and more. Call 601-956-0082.

MONDAY 6/18

Amos Brewer performs at The Penguin from 6-9 p.m. … Open Space is at 7 p.m. at The Commons. Free; call 601497-7454. … Burgers and Blues has karaoke.

TUESDAY 6/19

Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the dinner theater “The Bachelor Prince” at 7 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Cash bar at 6 p.m. RSVP. $42.50 plus tax and tip; call 601-856-9696.

WEDNESDAY 6/20

Southern studies scholar Noel Polk speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Mingle @ the Med debuts at 8 p.m. at The Med Grill and is held weekly. Call 601-956-0082. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Mandy Kate Myers, Kelly Karcher,Taylor Gavlin and Brittney Morello (left to right) star in the play “The Marvelous Wonderettes” at New Stage Theatre through June 17. COURTESY MELISSA TILLMAN

THURSDAY 6/14

perform at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $10; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … The Gills, Spacewolf and JAG play at Martin’s. … Time to Move performs at Hal & Mal’s. … John Causey and Company are at Ole Tavern.


jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

Juneteenth Celebration June 16, 10 a.m., at Tougaloo Community Center (318 Vine St.). The program includes music, honoring community elders, games, poetry, spoken word and door prizes for answering black history trivia questions. Lawn chairs and blankets welcome. Free; call 601-979-1413. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emancipation Through Educationâ&#x20AC;? Juneteenth Celebration June 16, 10 a.m., at Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.). The program includes health screenings, a space jump, face painting and more. Lunch served. Free; call 601-979-1530. Father and Child Fishing Tournament June 16, 8 a.m., at Old Trace Park (Post Road, Ridgeland). Prizes awarded for biggest fish, smallest fish and most fish caught. Free; call 601-853-2011. Hair, Harleys and Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll June 16, 11 a.m., at Fantastic Sams (4935 Pepperchase Drive, Suite 30, Southaven) in the parking lot. The Mississippi Music Foundation hosts the Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day event that includes $11 haircuts for men, hot dogs, motorcycle displays and live music. Email msmusicfoundation@gmail.com. Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Appreciation Day June 17, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Fathers receive half off admission for Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with a paying childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s admission. $9, $8.20 seniors, $6 children ages 2-12, members and babies free; call 601-352-2500. Juneteenth Arts and Music Festival June 17, 3 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy live music, storytelling, food, arts and crafts, and more. Free; email jbentertainmentgroup@gmail.com or savvyincpr@ gmail.com.

COMMUNITY â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? June 13, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Historian Jim Barnett talks about his new book in the Heritage of Mississippi Series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s American Indians,â&#x20AC;? and signs copies. Bring lunch; coffee and water provided. Free, $40 book; call 601-576-6998. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting June 14, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol St.). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0002. New Vibrations Network Gathering June 14, 6:30 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The mixer is held every second Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. Bring business cards and brochures to share with others. Email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. Mississippi Black Leadership Summit Regional Conference June 15, 10 a.m., at Columbus Arts Council (501 Main St., Columbus). The goal is to ensure fair representation in the area of leadership throughout the state. Lunch served. RSVP; limited seating. Free; call 601-353-8452. Livingston Park Lake Youth Fishing Camp June 16, 8:30 a.m., at Livingston Park (150 Livingston Park Drive), next to the Jackson Zoo. Youth ages 15 and under are welcome to fish until 11 a.m. and must be with an adult. Poles, tackle and bait included. Space limited. Free; call 601-352-2500.

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Jackson 2000 supports local organizations, such as Students with a Goal at Northwest Rankin High.

Engaging Dialogue

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Bold Beer Run June 16, 4 p.m., in downtown Be?1A<X[[Ta7XVW[XUTQ^cc[Tb Jackson. Lucky Town Brewing Company and the Home Brewers Association of Middle Mississippi are the sponsors. Registration is at 4 p.m., and the run/walk is at 4:30 p.m. The race includes stops at designated restaurants for drinks. Free, drink prices vary; call 262-391-9265.

National Conference on Civil Rights June 17-19, at Pearl River Resort (Highway 16, Choctaw). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rise, Advocate, Educate and Cooperate: The Unfinished Business of the Civil Rights Movement.â&#x20AC;? Speakers include Freedom Rider Fred Clark, U.S. Congressman Gregg Harper, Phyliss Anderson, tribal chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and Philadelphia, Miss. Mayor James A. Young. $200, $125 June 18 or June 19 only, highschool students free; call 706-614-8593. Nature Day Camp, Grades 4-5 June 18-22, at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). The camp includes a variety of outdoor and indoor activities. Sessions are 9 a.m.-noon daily. Space limited; full and partial scholarships available. $100, $75 members; call 601-926-1104. Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ward 3 Community Meeting June 19, 6 p.m., at Morning Star Baptist Church (3420 Albermarle Road). Share suggestions, address concerns, and receive information on city services and job opportunities. Call 601-960-1084. more EVENTS, page 26

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HOLIDAY

COURTESY JACKSON 2000

Eighth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 28, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. Get involved, volunteer, and donate art, money and gifts at chickball@jacksonfreepress.com. More details at jfpchickball.com. Follow on Twitter @jfpchickball. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16.

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

25


A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. June 15 - Thurs. June 21 2012 Rock Of Ages

PG13

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s My Boy

R

3-D Prometheus R Prometheus (non 3-D)

R

Men In Black 3 (non 3-D) PG13 Best Exotic Marigold Hotel PG13 Battleship

PG13

3-D Madagascar 3 PG

What To Expect When Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Expecting PG13

Madagscar 3 (non 3-D)

PG

3-D Marvelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Avengers PG13

Snow White And The Huntsmans PG13

Marvelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Avengers (non 3-D) PG13

Bernie

The Hunger Games PG13

PG13

3-D Men In Black 3 PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jfpevents from page 25 WELLNESS Poker Run June 13, 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Participants receive five playing cards during the three-mile run/walk, and the people with the best hand and worst hand win prizes. After-party at Cazadores (500 Highway 51, Suite R, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-899-9696. Zumba Fitness Classes, at Dance Unlimited Studio, Byram (6787 S. Siwell Road, Suite A, Byram). The Latin-inspired aerobics classes are held weekly. Visit peurefun.com for class schedule information and directions. $5; call 601-209-7566. NAMI Connection Support Group Meetings. The alliance of individuals with mental illnesses meets Tuesdays at 2 p.m. to share experiences and learn new ways to cope. Trained facilitators lead the meetings. Call for location information. Free; call 601-899-9058.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Call 601-825-1293. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Townâ&#x20AC;? June 7-17, at The Thornton Wilder play is about the everyday lives of two neighboring families. Shows are Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Reservations recommended. $15, $10 seniors and students (cash or check). â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Night of One Actsâ&#x20AC;? Auditions June 18-19, 7 p.m. Production dates are July 12-15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anna Bolenaâ&#x20AC;? June 13, 6:30 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The encore showing of the Metropolitan Operaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simulcast is of the Donzinetti opera about Anne Boleyn, King Henry VIIIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second wife. $14, $13 seniors, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. Nameless Open-mic June 16, 9 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). Poets, singers, actors and comedians are welcome. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Marvelous Wonderettes,â&#x20AC;? at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The Roger Bean musical is about a 1950s singing group at a high school prom. Shows are June 13-16 at 7:30 p.m., and June 17 at 2 p.m. $25, $22 seniors and students; call 601948-3533, ext. 222. Magic with Tommy Terrific June 14, 4:30 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). The magician from Little Rock, Ark., incorporates balloon animals and puppets into his act. Free; call 601-856-4536. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus June 14-17, at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barnum Bash.â&#x20AC;? Show times vary. Enjoy a pre-show party one hour before each performance. $14-$45, children under 2 free; call 800-745-3000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marleyâ&#x20AC;? Documentary Screening June 14, 7:30 p.m., at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). Crossroads Film Society presents Kevin Macdonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film about the life of singer-songwriter Bob Marley. $9, $7 Crossroads members; email info@crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

June 13- 19, 2012

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behind the Pulpitâ&#x20AC;? June 15-16, 8 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The inspirational stage play features Bernadette Stanis (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Timesâ&#x20AC;?), Keith â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonderboyâ&#x20AC;? Johnson and Calvin Richardson. $25-$32; call 800-745-3000.

26

Oxford Shakespeare Festival June 15-July 8, at Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts (100 University Ave., Oxford). Visit shakespeare. olemiss.edu for a schedule. The Gertrude Ford Symposium is June 26 at 2 p.m. at the Robert C Khayat Law Center (481 Coliseum Drive, Oxford). $14-$18, $12-$14 seniors, students and youth, free symposium; call 662-915-7411.

BILL JOHNSON

6A0=3E84F

Ron Myers hopes for Juneteenth to become a national holiday.

Jazz of Juneteenth

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Art House Cinema Downtown June 17, 2 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include the opera â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Vespri Sicilianiâ&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m. ($16) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;4:44 Last Day On Earthâ&#x20AC;? at 5 p.m. ($7). Refreshments sold. Visit msfilm.org. Nighttime Tales June 19, 10:30 a.m., at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison), and 4:30 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). The Madison County Library System Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Specialists perform with puppets, and present skits and songs. Free; call 601856-4536. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bachelor Princeâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater June 19, 7 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the medieval â&#x20AC;&#x153;whodunnitâ&#x20AC;? about a princeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reluctant search for a bride. Cash bar at 6 p.m.; seating at 6:30 p.m. RSVP. $42.50 plus tax and tip; call 601-856-9696. Being Belhaven Arts Series through June 22, at Belhaven Park (Poplar Blvd.). Enjoy music, movies and stage performances Thursday evenings. Most events start at 5 p.m. or dusk; call for details. Free; call 601-352-8850.

MUSIC Events at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Call 601-956-0082.\


jfpevents

Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour June 15, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Fred Hammond, Byron Cage and Canton Jones perform. Free tickets; visit mcdonaldsgospeltour.com. The Weeks June 16, 9 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Asheral and Kingston Springs also perform. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. $10; call 601292-7121 or 800-745-3000. 40th Annual Bentonia Blues Festival June 16, 9 a.m., at Holmes Farm (313 Wilson-Holmes Road, Bentonia). The event features gospel and blues music, food, and arts and crafts vendors. Enjoy open-mic June 14-15 at the Blue Front Cafe (107 E. Railroad Ave., Bentonia); must pre-register to perform. $10, $5 parking; call 662-528-1900.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • “The Lost Ones” June 13, 5 p.m., Ace Atkins signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. • “Istanbul Passage” June 14, 5 p.m. Joseph Kanon signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. • Lemuria Story Time June 16, 11 a.m. Enjoy a reading of “When Dads Don’t Grow Up” and make Father’s Day cards. Free. • “The Haunted Natchez Trace” June 16. Bud Steed signs books. $16.99 book. • “Dust to Dust: A Memoir” June 19, 5 p.m. Benjamin Busch signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26.99 book. “No Place for a Woman” June 16, 9 a.m., at Cups in Clinton (101 W. Main St., Clinton). Shirley Hall-Williams signs books. $11.76 book; call 888361-9473.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Call 601-898-8345. • Gluten-Free Gourmet June 16, 9 a.m. Topics include working with gluten-free ingredients, preparing homemade pasta, baking bread, making compound butter and baking cupcakes. $89. • Macaroons and Whoopie Pies Class June 17, 5 p.m. Topics include making almond meringue and preparing butter cream. $89. • Teens Camp: Summer Lovin’ From the Oven June 18-22. Teens learn to prepare classic dishes and basic kitchen skills. Sessions are from 1:303 p.m. $350. Discover Series - Real Men Craft Class June 14, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Choose from blacksmithing or arrow making. $25; call 601-856-7546. Broadway Jr. Summer Camp Intensive June 18July 15, at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). Children entering grades 6-12 attend weekdays

from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. The program ends with four Broadway performances. Registration required; space limited. $450; call 601-948-3533, ext. 232. Farmers Market Finds Workshop June 19, 5:30 p.m., at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). William Furlong is the instructor. Learn to make dishes with local produce. $35, $30 members; call 601-631-2997. Shut Up and Write! Classes at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for one of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd’s popular nonfiction and creative writing classes. Fall classes forming now. Six-week sessions held every other Saturday. $150 ($75 deposit required); call 601362-6121, ext. 16; get on mailing list at class@ jacksonfreepress.com.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. • Look and Learn with Hoot June 15, 10 a.m. This educational opportunity for 4-5 year olds and their parents features a hands-on art activity and story time. This month’s story is “Curious George Flies a Kite.” Please dress for mess. • Still Curious? Lecture Series June 19, 6 p.m., in Trustmark Grand Hall. Cash bar at 5:30 p.m. Ellen Ruffin and Dee Jones explain how the Curious George drawings and the Reys’ archives became part of the University of Southern Mississippi’s de Grummond Children’s Literature Collection. Storytellers Ball Juried Exhibition Call for Art, at Greater Jackson Arts Council (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The council seeks artwork in preparation for the Aug. 9 Storytellers Ball. This year’s theme is “Blame It On the Blues.” The entry deadline is June 14. The exhibition is July 17-Aug. 31. $25 entry fee; call 601-960-1557.

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Open Space June 18, 7 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). The Mississippi Improv Alliance hosts the event on third Mondays. Local creatives are welcome to express themselves through their art forms. Free; call 601-497-7454. Summer Solstice Pajama Party June 20, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Come in your pajamas, learn about the sun and solar system, and celebrate the longest day of the year. For members only. Free for members; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-5437. Pet Photo Contest, at Fondren Art Gallery (601 Duling Ave.). Submit a photo by June 23 for a chance to win a pet portrait from Richard McKey. Winner announced July 5. Call 601-981-9222. “Preserving The Legacy” through June 30, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Dr. Wilma Mosley Clopton’s multimedia exhibit includes documentary films (screenings TBA) and historical photographs. The reception is June 14 from 6-8 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Hollingsworth Gospel Concert June 16, 6 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Cain-Cochran Hall’s Hogg Auditorium. Performers include One Voice, Joy Bethea and the New Genesis Quartet. Proceeds benefit the Robert Wallace Hollingsworth Family Law Enforcement Scholarship Fund. Donations welcome; call 800-446-3722. Go’Diva Under the Stars Fashion Show June 16, 8 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). At Center Court. House of Panache hosts the fashion show to raise breast cancer awareness. $25 in advance, $30 at the door, $40 VIP; call 601-291-9946 or 769-218-8862.

jacksonfreepress.com

• Eclectic Sundays starting June 17. Enjoy music from DJ Phingaprint, food and drink specials, and local artwork on second and fourth Sundays. • Mingle @ The Med starting June 20. Wednesdays at 8 p.m., enjoy music, food and networking.

27


DIVERSIONS|music

The Band that Moves COURTESY TIME TO MOVE

by Greg Pigott

80 to 100 songs, but unlike other groups, Time To Move rarely, if ever, has a set list for a particular show. “We feed off the audience, and we can play anything. We can adapt to any crowd,” Bradley says. “You never know where a show can take you.” Parker says some of his musical influences include old-school soul and funk bands like Earth, Wind and Fire; Con Funk Shun; The Temptations; and Parliament; as well as rock acts like the Doobie Brothers. However, he’s also open to new artists. “(I had) never heard of Adele until we got some requests for her music, and now I’ve fallen in love with her,” Parker says. The other band members also bring their influences from past musical experiences, ranging from Prince to Jill Scott, making the band even more diverse. Parker says that the professionalism and skill of the band is an unusual luxury in the music scene, and notes that every member of the band also has a full-time job, yet still makes commitments to the band and to the shows. The Jackson community is important to the band. Time to Move Band has inspired Jacksonians to hit the dance floor at community events such as the Jackson Zoo Brew, the Blondes vs. Brunettes Alzheimer’s

Time to Move Band has a diverse set list designed to make its audience get up and dance.

W

hen John Parker started a band in 2004, he had to think of a name. “It was one of those things where I asked myself what I want people to do when I play, and Time to Move Band was what I came up with,” he says. Eight years later, Time to Move Band is still making people in the Jackson area move, dance and sing along to their high-

energy sets and soulful arrangements with covers of songs from many music genres. Time to Move Band’s current lineup consists of Parker, 56, who plays bass; drummer Eric Cager, 37; keyboardist Benjamin Bradley, 45; guitarist Martin Ingram, 46; and vocalists Tim Jackson, 38, and “Lady Mary” Henderson, 40. The band has a repertoire of about

Natalie’s Notes

Benefit and the Jackson Free Press Chick Ball. “You will get a high-energy, up-tempo show,” Parker says. “We are a dance band, and that’s what you’ll do.” Time to Move Band performs at 8 p.m. June 16 at Hal and Mal’s Red Room (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888) and 8 pm. June 23 at Last Call Sports Bar and Grill (1428 Old Canton Road, 601-713-2700). The band is available for private parties and functions for all ages. For more information, visit myspace.com/timetomoveband or find the band on Facebook.

Five Most Requested Songs “Mustang Sally,” by Wilson Pickett “Let’s Get it On,” by Marvin Gaye “Purple Rain,” by Prince “Forget You,” by Cee Lo Green “Superstition,” by Stevie Wonder

The Future of Jackson’s Music Scene

by Natalie Long

June 13 - 19, 2012

28

Besides the usual venues, local restaurants are also starting to host live music. Abeba Ethiopian Restaurant (3716 Interstate 55 N., Frontage Road, 601-7131500) has blues music on Friday nights. One of Jackson’s newest eateries, Jaco’s Tacos (318 S. State St.), not only has great tacos, but also features a live band most weekends. Even Morningbell Records (Duling Hall, 622 Duling Ave., Suite 212, 769-233-7468) is bringing in national acts and giving Jacksonians yet another venue to hear music we wouldn’t normally be exposed to. I am also excited that Sal and Mookie’s (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919) has redone the Pi(e) Lounge patio and is featuring live music there this summer. The Cedars in Fondren (4145 Old Canton Road, 601-366-5552) will host the C Spire Summer Music Series. The series of events is free and kid-friendly (for more information, visit fondren.org). Please check the JFP music listings (jfp. ms/music/listings) for more information on where you can hear great music this summer.

The month of June is packed tight with amazing music. Chapel Hill, N.C.-

and I’m telling you, this funk-soul brother is amazing. You will shake your tail feathers all night long to his catchy songs. One of my favorite groups growing up, New Edition, performs June 30 at the Mississippi Coliseum. I am so excited about getting to see this group perform live in Jackson (and yes, I’ll be front row screaming for “Candy Girl” and “Cool It Now”). Space Capone is just one of the exciting bands making space So far my sumfor Jackson in their tour schedule. mer rocks, and I hope yours is going great as well. Please based Lost in the Trees along with At- continue to support local music, and send lanta rapper Daytona play at Duling Hall me your listings by Monday at noon. If on Thursday, June 21. Nashville’s Space you see me out and about, please say helCapone performs at Martin’s on June 23, lo. Thanks for all your support!

COURTESY JAMEN BERK

J

ust the other day, I couldn’t help but brag about how musically awesome Jackson has been in the last year. From the Allman Brothers (Dusty and Buck) doing their part in getting national acts to the City with Soul, to the impressive bars, restaurants and venues we have here that support live, local music, to Ardenland bringing in a wide variety of musical acts, I’d say Jackson is looking up. For years, the joke was that big-name musicians and bands stopped in Jackson for bathroom breaks on their way to and from New Orleans and Memphis. Our music scene always seemed to be lagging––but I agree with friend and Jackson music fan Ian Williams who says, “There is no reason why Jackson can’t be the next Athens or Austin.” We are on the right path to making Jackson one of the top places for music in the South, so please continue to support our wonderful musicians, as well as the venues where they perform.


JUNE 13 - WEDNESDAY

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Weekly Lunch Specials ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

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June 14

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06/15

Round House

Groove SATURDAY

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June 15

Passenger

Jones

06/16

The Gills

Saturday

June 16

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with Space Capone â&#x20AC;¢ Sat. June 23   7ILL4UCKER±%%.LQJ¶V%OXHV&OXE    $AUGHTRY±7XVFDORRVD$PSKLWKHDWHU7XVFDORRVD    ::4OP $OORS$OWN 'RETCHEN7ILSON±6QRZGHQ*URYH$PSKLWKHDWHU6RXWKDYHQ

9.99

LADIES NIGHT NIGHT w/ DJ Stache

JUNE 20 - WEDNESDAY 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP 0HG*ULOO-INGLEAT4HE-ED SP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 8QGHUJURXQG"EN0AYTON .DWKU\Q¶V2ENEGADE 2OJD¶V(UNTER'IBSON

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

Monday

June 18

2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

June 19

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday

June 20

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

29


DIVERSIONS|jfp sports

Boxing’s Final Hit? THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 6/13 Natalie Long - Singer/Songwriter Night

THURSDAY 6/14

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, June 13th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

Restaurant Open As Usual

FRIDAY 6/15 M.O.T.O. (Red Room) Double Shots (Restaurant)

SATURDAY 6/16 Time To Move (Red Room) Clay Parker & Friends (Restaurant)

MONDAY 6/18 Blues Monday (Red Room)

TUESDAY 6/19 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (Restaurant)

Coming Soon WED 6.20: New Bourbon St. Jazz Band (Restaurant) THU 6.21: Charles Jackson Comedy Night (Red Room) Joey Plunkett (Rest.) FRI 6.22: Lucky Hand Blues Band (Rest.)

NOW SERVING Soft Shell Crab Po-Boys! MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

June 13 - 19, 2012

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

30

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, June 14th

BARRY LEACH

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, June 15th

TERRY EVANS

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

I

t seemed unreal. Were we back in 1997, in Montreal? Yep, it was real. But instead of Canada, the scene of the crime was now Las Vegas. Instead of the World Wrestling Federation’s Montreal Screwjob, a purportedly fixed fight that changed everything about the way the WWF did business, this was boxing. It was supposed to be a legitimate match-up. Saturday night’s big welterweight fight between Timothy Bradley and Manny Pacquiao started as a boxing match but ended more like a WWF swerve. It was a strange night to begin with: Pacquiao was late getting ready. (Was he watching the Celtics play the Heat, or was he really on a treadmill, as he claimed?) When the fight finally got going, Pacquiao wasted little time showing Bradley he was the superior boxer. Pacquiao got in 253 punches to Bradley’s 159, according to the website CompuBox. Pacquiao also landed more power punches than Bradley, 190 to 108. But you really didn’t need the stats from CompuBox to deduce who was winning the bout; it was plain to see. Late in the fight, Pacquiao seemed to coast, but the decision appeared well within his grasp. The final bell rang, and it was time for the judges’ scorecards. And that’s where everything went to pot. Two of the judges scored the fight 115-113 for Bradley, and the third judge scored the fight 115-113 for Pacquiao.

Bryan’s Rant Somehow, as the whole world watched Pacquiao win the fight, two out of the three men ringside were apparently watching something entirely different. All that was missing was WWF owner Vince McMahon making sure the judges scored the fight for Bradley and telling Pacquiao that Vince didn’t screw Manny, that Manny screwed Manny. Just like that 1997 night in Montreal, the crowd was stunned. No one was sure what they saw and heard had actually happened. But (even before the fighters left the ring) chatter was increasing about the rematch, already was scheduled for Nov. 10 of this year. Top-ranked promoter Bob Arum might have tried to pull his best McMahon impression by having Pacquiao lose this fight to build an even bigger Pay Per View pot for the next fight. Rumors flew all night long that a lot of late bets came in right before the books closed for Bradley to win the fight. Boxing may have taken its final credibility hit. Whereas people might know the WWF (now WWE) for fixed endings, boxing claims to offer fair fights. In a sport with phantom punches, whispers of mob control, multiple titles and a lack of interest in viewership and participation, this fight might have been the death knell. One thing is for sure: to paraphrase McMahon, boxing screwed boxing.

Saturday, June 16th

KING EDWARD

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday,June 19th

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 6-10, $5 Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT!

by Bryan Flynn

The storybook journey for Stony Brook University’s Seawolves continues. The little university from New Xxxx York state upset LSU this weekend to reach the College World Series.

-only on Tuesday Nights-

Wednesday, June 20th

BEN PAYTON

(Blues) 7-10, No Cover

Thursday, June 21st

DOUBLE SHOTZ

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, June 22nd

BLUE MOUNTAIN

(Americana) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, June 23rd

CHRIS GILL & THE SOLE SHAKERS

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 14 NBA Finals (8-11 p.m. ABC): The young guns of the Oklahoma City Thunder face the Miami Heat, who return to the finals for a second year in a row. Game two of the best-of-seven tournament is tonight. FRIDAY, JUNE 15 Baseball (4-7 p.m. ESPN 2): Game one of the College World Series, live from Omaha, Neb., kicks off the doubleelimination tournament. SATURDAY, JUNE 16 MLS (6:30-8:30 p.m. ESPN 2): The Houston Dynamo play FC Dallas. Both teams need valuable points in the early soccer season. SUNDAY, JUNE 17 NBA Finals (7-10 p.m. ABC): The series shifts to South Beach in Florida for game three as Oklahoma City attempts to defeat Miami at home and beat the evil empire.

MONDAY, JUNE 18 Soccer (1:30-4 p.m. ESPN and ESPN 2): It’s a Euro 2012 Soccer double header with Spain against Croatia and Italy versus Ireland, the last match-ups of group play for these four teams. TUESDAY, JUNE 19 NBA Finals (8-11 p.m. ABC): If either team is up 3-0 in the series between the Heat and Thunder, that team could take the title with a win tonight. Otherwise, it is on to game five. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 Baseball (7-10 p.m. ESPN): The College World Series continues in the battle for the 2012 NCAA Division I Baseball Championship. Sunday is Father’s Day, and I would like to give a shout-out to all the dads out there who make a difference in their kids’ lives. Happy Father’s Day, Dad! Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


June 14 | 9:00pm

One Less Reason Friday, June 15

Fade 2 Blue June 15 | 9:00pm â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE! â&#x20AC;˘ $3 Bloody Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

Follow us on Facebook

Spank The Monkey Saturday, June 16

Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill Now Open

10:30-1:00 M-F Delivery available Sandwiches, Salads and more see full menu: www.clubmagoos.com

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Thu - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music june 13 - 19

wed | june 13 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | june 14 Shaun Patterson 5:30-9:30p fri | june 15 Triple Threat 6:30-10:30p sat | june 16 Liz Stroud 6:30-10:30p

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SERVERS WED JUNE 13

LADIES NIGHT

& KARAOKE

FRI - SUN JUNE 15 - 17

sun | june 17 Jason Turner 4:00 - 8:00p

MON JUNE 18

mon | june 18 Karaoke

IN-DA-BIZ 2FOR1 DRINK SPECIALS

tue | june 19 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

THUR JUNE 14 BUD LIGHT GAME NIGHT

SUPER REGIONAL BEER SPECIALS

TUE JUNE 19

JACKPOT TRIVIA 7:30PM

Scan this code or text EATWITHUS to 601-707-9733 for the deal of the week

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

For Every

KING

Wednesday - June 13 NEW KARAOKE SHOW 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - June 14 Open Mic w/ Eric Robinson 7-11 Ladies Night & Free Crawfish

Friday & Saturday June 15 & 16

Rowdy South

Sunday - June 17 9 Ball Tournament 7pm

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

FX]TP]SB_XaXcb 4949 Old Canton Road | 601-956-5108

www.briarwoodwineandspirits.com NATHAN S. M C HARDY & LESLEY M C HARDY OWNERS & SOMMELIERS

jacksonfreepress.com

STELLAR

31


LIFE&STYLE

DOMESTICITY, CREATIVITY, & DIY

FOOD p 33 | GIFTS FOR DAD p 38

How Many Green Beans for That? FILE PHOTO

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

I use my personal calculus to price new gardening stuff.

F

atherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day often presents a problem: What to get Dad? If heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s into gardening, the answers are easy. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a dad, and I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fairly typical. I love to look through garden magazines, especially the sec-

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Buy Dirty

P

tions on tools and gadgets. (My wife believes the annual Northern Tool + Equipment catalog that comes out each winter must be menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret porn, because it seems so many of us covet it!) Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Select Seeds catalog features all manner of cool rakes, broadforks and cultivators (some designed by legendary organic grower Eliot Coleman) that just make my heart sing. My problem is the cost. I measure purchases for gardening on a rather personal calculus based on how much physical labor it takes to pick a dollarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of produce. A $349 cultivator, for example, costs about 110 pounds of green beans, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of green beans! Besides, I already have a hoe. I bought it at a local garden store for, I think, less than $25. (Eight pounds of green beansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;still a lot of picking.) The reason dads, some of us anyway, stare at those cool catalogs isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily that we actually want to buy those things, only that we think if we happened to have one or two, it would be pretty cool. It usually goes something like this: Staring at a new tractor, I think, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I had that, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to have more land. ... Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to move somewhere else. ... Wonder if the growing is good in, say, the Bahamas?â&#x20AC;? In other words, Dad probably doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the $30,000

FILE PHOTO

4HE#LEAN

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

eople canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always buy organic for a variticide residuesâ&#x20AC;&#x161; followed by imported nectarines ety of reasons: The local store may have (90.8 percent) and peaches (85.6 percent). limited supplies, they lack variety or cost â&#x20AC;˘ Some 96 percent of all celery samples tested posiis a consideration. But whatever the reative for pesticides, followed by cilantro (92.9 personâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or excuseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;shoppers should be aware that cent) and potatoes (91.4 percent). some produce at the groâ&#x20AC;˘ Nearly 90 percent of celery cery store is more pesticidesamples contained mulladen than others. tiple pesticides, followed Every year, the nonby cilantro (70.1 percent) profit Environmental Workand sweet bell peppers ing Group tests all manner (69.4 percent). of produce for pesticides â&#x20AC;˘ Hot peppers had been treatand chemicals to compile ed with as many as 97 pesits list of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dozen,â&#x20AC;? ticides, followed by cucumand â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean 15â&#x20AC;? foods. By bers (68) and greens (66). using the list to choose the If that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t underit comes to produce, buying foods to buy organically, When score the need to â&#x20AC;&#x153;buy organorganic means not buying chemicals EWG says consumers can and pesticides with your food. ic,â&#x20AC;? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what does. substantially lower their You might want to clip this pesticide intake. out and keep it with you for You would be surprised at the level of pesti- handy reference when you go shopping. cide contamination found in common, convenAccording to EWG, if you choose five servtionally grown food. According to EWG: ings a day from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean 15â&#x20AC;? instead of the â&#x20AC;˘ Every sample of imported nectarines tested posi- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dozen,â&#x20AC;? you can lower the volume of tive for pesticides, followed by apples (97.8 per- pesticide you consume daily by 92 percent. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll cent) and imported plums (97.2 percent). also eat fewer types of pesticides. Picking five 32 â&#x20AC;˘ 92 percent of apples contained two or more pes- from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dozenâ&#x20AC;? would cause you to conJune 13 - 19, 2012

four-wheel drive, air-conditioned, enclosed-cab tractor with the satellite-guided, laser-row projectors so much as he wants a sunny beach where the living is easyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;before he gets back to hoeing, anyway. Which brings me to the point: You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to spend a lot of green beans to make Dad happy on Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. During a recent tour of local garden stores, just to see what they had, I found all kinds of stuff. Some of it, while really cheap, are still things that a dad might like, such as a rain gauge. I saw one for $3 (and bought two). Or how about a straw hat? Why not tell Dad he looks like Indiana Jones with it on (instead of Goober from Mayberry)? Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find all manner of tools that maybe arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t designed by organic farmer and author Eliot Coleman but will do good, long useful service: rakes, hoes, hammers, trowelsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you name it. They will probably last a lifetime, giving Dad a warm, fuzzy feeling knowing you picked it out for him. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget stuff that he needs. Maybe Dad just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like forking out the cash for some things, or itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something he might not buy it on his own, like certified organic fertilizers or pricey containers that hold, carry or store stuff. Why not just ask him, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dad, would you like a wheelbarrow for Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day?â&#x20AC;? He might surprise you. Will it work in the Bahamas?

sume an average of 14 different pesticides a day, the EWG states. If you choose five servings from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean 15,â&#x20AC;? youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll consume fewer than two pesticides per day. Additionally, because genetically modified, or GMO, seeds are more often used in conventionally raised corn, and the United States (unlike other countries) does not require GMO labeling, EWG recommends consumers only buy organic sweet corn; GMO seeds are banned in organic growing. For more information, including a printable â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean 15/Dirty Dozenâ&#x20AC;? wallet card, visit ewg.org/foodnews. Jim PathFinder Ewingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book with Findhorn Press on organic food, farming and spirit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating,â&#x20AC;? comes out this fall. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

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LIFE&STYLE|drink

The Layman’s Guide to Craft Beer Styles by Andrew Spiehler COURTESY ADAM FAGEN

B

Pilsners Medium to light gold in color with a medium to medium-heavy body, the hallmark of these beers of Czechoslovakian origin is a light flavor with a crisp, bitter finish and floral notes from the hops varieties in them. These could be the blueprint for mass-produced American beers. Examples in Jackson: Pilsner Urquell, Samuel Adams Noble Pils and Covington Brewhouse Pontchartrain Pilsner.

Pale Ales Light colored and hopped to favor floral, fruity aromas, this style usually features a clean, straightforward malt flavor, allowing the brewer to show off creativity in hop selection. Almost every craft brewery makes a pale ale; in Jackson try pale ales from Sierra Nevada and Yazoo Brewing Company, or Mississippi’s own Lazy Magnolia’s Deep South Pale Ale.

American Light Lagers Light lagers are the style that most Americans associate with beer. They’re lighter bodied and more lightly hopped than true Pilsners but retain some of the characteristic crispness. Some cheaper brands use rice or corn in place of malted barley to lower production costs. When someone says “lawn-mower beer,” this is what they mean. If you haven’t already guessed, examples include Budweiser, Heineken and Pabst Blue Ribbon.

India Pale Ales The pale ale turned up to 11, IPAs are highly hopped, favoring citrus and piney varieties for a big nose and high bitterness. More malt to help balance the hops means they tend to have a little more alcohol than pale ales. Look for Tallgrass IPA and Rogue Yellow Snow IPA.

German Bocks This style and its derivatives (doppelbock, maibock and Oktoberfest to name a few) originated in medieval Germany. Compared to pilsners they tend to have darker colorings and maltier flavors. To sample some in Jackson, look for Shiner Bock or Rogue Dead Guy (ale). In Louisiana, try Abita Andygator.

Hefeweizen/Witbier These straw-colored, sometimes golden ales stand out for including large amounts of wheat in addition to the typical barley. Special yeasts impart the aroma of bananas and cloves, and citrus and yeast flavors. Hefeweizen is the German style of this beer. Witbiers, developed in Belgium, add herbs and citrus peel (lemon or orange) to the brew. Yazoo Hefeweizen and Hoegaarden Belgian Wit are good examples of these styles.

Vienna Lager Maltier and a little darker than pilsners but lighter than bocks, many Americans’ first taste of something outside of the lawn-mower beer rut is a Samuel Adams Boston Lager. Abita Amber is a more local example.

Brown Ales Dark amber and light- to medium-brown in color, these ales have their origin in English breweries. They are typically maltier and sweeter than pale ales, with nutty and caramel flavors. Hopping tends to focus on bitterness without floral flavors or aromas. Local examples include Lazy Magnolia Southern Pecan, Samuel Smith’s Nut Brown Ale, Sierra Nevada Tumbler and Newcastle Brown Ale.

Stouts These are the darkest beers, from deep brown to black, with dark roasted malt flavors and aromas emphasizing chocolate, coffee and sometimes even molasses. Sweetness ranges from extremely dry (Irish dry stouts) to sweet (English milk stouts). Guinness draught is probably the most recognizable brand, but Samuel Smith’s Oatmeal Stout, Samuel Adams Cream Stout and Rogue Chocolate Stout are all worth tasting.

jacksonfreepress.com

ALES

LAGERS

eer drinkers get a bad rap. Winos might be stereotyped as the classier drinkers, but the world of well-made craft beers is as varied as that of fine wines––if not more so––and it behooves any beer drinker to learn about the myriad styles available. Despite the many beer styles on the market today, nearly all beer can be classified as either an ale or a lager. It all comes down to the yeast. Lagers are made with yeasts that prefer to stay around 50 degrees Fahrenheit. They tend to congregate at the bottom of the fermentation vessel and are called “bottom-fermenting yeasts” because of this. Lagers tend to be smoother and mellower than ales. Ales, in contrast, are made using top-fermenting yeasts that prefer the 60- to 75-degree range, which gives them the opportunity to impart more of their flavor to the beer. In terms of number of varieties, ales beat lagers two to one. (Refer to beeradvocate.com/beer/style for an exhaustive list of lager and ale styles.)

33


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Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist



Saturday June 16, 2012 Rodney Moore and Timmy Avalon 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

XJUI5FBBOE4JEFT 0RQGD\3FE'JTI 7XHVGD\$SBC$BLF :HGQHVGD\$IJDLFO(ZSP 7KXUVGD\5BMBQJBPS4BMNPO )ULGD\)BNCVSHFS 6DWXUGD\%JOFS´T4QFDJBM

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lo Trio

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0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4 NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ&#x2026;

Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

5A44 FX5X

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinoniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. Parker House (104 S. East Madison Dr. Ridgeland 601-856-0043) Charming English-style cottage nestled in the Jackson Street Historic District offering a savory haven for home-style eaters with a menu of aged steaks and simple Southern comfort food.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

Drop In For Our

Voted Best Veggie Burger

Early Bird Special

-Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, poboys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

Now Offering

LIVE MUSIC

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

Friday and Saturday Nights

In Town & in the USA

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011

-Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

-Food & Wine Magazine-

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

June 13 - 19, 2012

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name

34

Raul Sierra Manager Since 1989

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Awardwinning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crawfish destination. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also want to try their delicious gumbo while enjoying Friday night karaoke! Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout. -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 â&#x20AC;˘ 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079


Paid advertising section.

%*/&+BDLTPO

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

ES - O - TER - I - CA: A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippi’s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens • Pendulums Books • Wands • Moldavite Jewelry & More

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Reed Pierce’s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

Editor’s Kickbutt Award:

Ceili Hale

Interns’ Choice Award:

Piko Ewoodzie

Interns’ Choice Award:

Vergie Redmond

Watch for the new intern blog at www.jfp.ms!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

jacksonfreepress.com

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

35


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(in the former FabraCare Building, between Kat’s & Fenian’s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

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37


Dear, Deserving Dad by Meredith W. Sullivan

s Adida , n3 o t Bos

J

une 17 is fast approaching, and there’s no better time to make Dad feel special. Make your pop proud on Father’s Day with any of these great gifts from local shops around town.

Vintage 1979 Gibson ES-335,

eet Fleet F 110 $ Sports,

Wooden Money Clip, circa. URBAN

Fondren Guitars, $2,500 New Gate Bubble clock, Brent’s Drugs,

ARTISAN LIVING, $25

$37.50

Glow in the Dark Toilet Roll, Brent’s

Drugs, $9.49

ABC of M en Fash ion b ’s y

Hardy Amies , $14.9 Brent’s Dru 5 gs,

Thou Shalt Love Bacon, Swell-O-

od Wo , Red hing e W tch lot wa re C

Phonic, $20

a 9 Squ ., $11 o C

circa. Soothing After Shave Lotion, circa.

URBAN ARTISAN LIVING, $5

circa. Aloe Vera Shave Gel, circa. URBAN

ARTISAN LIVING, $8

Bocote Shaving Brush, circa. URBAN

ARTISAN LIVING, $90

Original Penguin Cologne, Red Square

Clothing Co., $65 Pe n Mu cil T s Dr tach hin ugs , $ es, B June 13 - 19, 2012

3.9 9

38

ren t’s

Where2Shop:

Fondren Guitars, 607 Fondren Place, 601-362-0313; Fleet Feet Sports, 500 Highway 51, Suite Z, Ridgeland, 601-899-9696; Brent’s Drugs, 655 Duling Ave., 601-366-3427; Red Square Clothing Co., 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 9004, Ridgeland, 601-853-8960; circa. URBAN ARTISAN LIVING, 2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484; Swell-OPhonic, 2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601-366-9955


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39


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