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May 2 - 8, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 34

contents CDFL

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

6 Medicine Row Jackson is poised to develop a medical corridor rivaling anything found in bigger cities. EILZABETH WAIBEL

Cover photograph of Nick Wallace and his mom, Susie Marshall, by Virginia Schreiber

10

THIS ISSUE:

Mississippi lawmakers end the regular session with budget haggling. Does a special session loom? PAUL KOLNIK

jayce powell ter panel, ending up with a concussion (he was wearing a helmet) and face lacerations from his glasses. Now, he works to make the area more bicycle friendly. He helps organize the Ride of Silence in Mississippi, an annual event in May to remember bicyclists killed in motorist accidents. “I ride because of the health benefits, but mostly for my sanity,” he says. “Because when I’m on a bike, my mind is freed from life’s problems.” He also offers free clinics to children to teach them the proper mechanics of safely riding a bike—how to negotiate traffic, what to wear, proper hand signals—using games and fun activities to keep the kids interested. “Cycling is a family activity,” he says. Powell was born in Ferriday, La., and moved to the Jackson area with his family in 1987. He graduated from Clinton High School in 1990 and attended Hinds Community College. Before joining Indian Cycle, he worked as a sales associate for a few department stores and as a DJ for many clubs in the metro area, including The Midnight Sun, TJ’s and The Catwalk. He lives in Gluckstadt with his wife, Stephanie, and two children, Marcie, 10, and Clayton, 7. “I came from a very small town, and in Jackson, everything I could want is at my fingertips,” he says. —Richard Coupe

24 Stage Fright Nothing beats the real thing. See “Young Frankenstein” at Thalia Mara, “Colored Girls” at New Stage.

32 NYC to MS Brooklyn-based Revelations bring R&B of the past into the 21st century at Babalooza this weekend.

jacksonfreepress.com

Jayce Powell believes in the power of the bicycle to change lives. He considers himself “a lifestyle consultant” in his job as the store manager of Indian Cycle in Ridgeland. “We are passionate about cycling,” he says. He enjoys helping athletes who are looking for a new activity gentler on the body than many other sports, the overweight person wanting to lose some weight or someone just looking to make a healthy change in their life. Always the athlete, Powell, 40, ran track and played football in high school. He began cycling after injuring his knee in a soccer game in 1992 and realizing he needed something active to do that was a little easier on his knees. Now, he bikes between 30 and 150 miles a week, races mountain bikes, and is a certified bike fitter and instructor. When he first started riding, he shunned those awkward-looking spandex cycling shorts with the cushioned seat. “It will be a cold day in hell before I wear those,” he thought to himself. Then, one day riding to work, he developed a painful saddle sore. “Now I wear them,” he says. “They work.” Powell is acutely aware of the inherent dangers of cycling alongside motorized vehicles. In 2003, while he was riding home for lunch, a car pulled out directly in front of him. He went over the handlebars and smashed head first into the car’s quar-

ZAK SHELBY-SZYSZKO

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 ............................ Talk 13 ........................ Tech 14 ................... Editorial 15 ................. Opinion 16 ............ Cover Story 24 .............. Diversions 28 .................... 8 Days 29 ............. JFP Events 30 ........................ Film 32 ...................... Music 33 ...... Music Festivals 34 ....... Music Listings 36 ..................... Sports 38 ................ Astrology 39 ........... Life & Style 40 .................. Hitched 42 ......... Fly Shopping

Goin’ Home?

3


editor’snote

Tom Ramsey Underground 119 chef and food writer Tom Ramsey is former investment banker, tobacco executive and lobbyist who writes poetry, runs with the bulls and has produced an album or two. He wrote the cover story on King Edward chef Nick Wallace.

Virginia Schreiber Staff photographer Virginia Schreiber is a recent graduate of Millsaps College. When she’s not working, she spends her time watching films of the Peter Pan genre. She took many of the photos in this issue.

Richard Coupe Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote the Jacksonian and an arts story.

Jacob Rowan Jacob Rowan is a writer and artist who lived in nine different places before arriving at Jackson and attending Belhaven University. You can visit his website at: jacobrowanstudios.tumblr.com. He wrote a theater story.

Sonya Lee Sonya Lee hails from Jackson and writes poetry and fiction. She enjoys parasailing, jet skiing and taking long walks on the beach while dreaming. She wrote a theater story.

Elyane Alexander Editorial intern Elyane Alexander is a native of Madison. She is a fourth-grade teacher. Her hobbies include reading, writing and shopping. She helped factcheck and edit many stories in this issue.

Jim PathFinder Ewing Jim PathFinder Ewing is an organic farmer, author and journalist, formerly with The Clarion-Ledger. He has written five books on energy medicine and eco-spirituality. He lives in Lena with his wife, Annette, at their ShooFly Farm.

May 2 - 8, 2012

Andrea Thomas

4

Advertising designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland and ia recent Antonelli College graduate. She loves to sing, dance and write poetry in her free time. She designed many ads for this issue.

by Ronni Mott, Managing Editor

The Lies We Tell

L

ast Friday’s email brought this little gem to my inbox: Super PACs spent $23 million on deceptive or misleading advertising in GOP primary races, more than half of all advertising they purchased through April 3. Now, you might think that the SPACs aimed their big buckets of money at President Barack Obama, but no. Almost all of it was directed at fellow Republicans—Mitt Romney’s PAC lying about Rick Santorum, Santorum’s PAC misrepresenting Newt Gingrich’s record, Gingrich spinning about Romney. Politics is nothing if not a dirty, cutthroat business. I’m not sure about much—a little less, it seems, every year—but I’m fairly certain about this: Everything is connected. The little ditty about our body parts—you know: the head bone’s connected to the neck bone, etc.—illustrated to me at age 6 that connections are everywhere. Some are obvious: Don’t pay the light bill, no light. Some are a little harder to discern: Throw plastic in the trash, and somewhere a sea turtle chokes to death. Lying can have some interesting consequences, not as in: Gee, how fascinating! No, the results of lies are more like this old Confucian curse: “May you live in interesting times.” Lies, once loosed, take on a life of their own that can quickly turn, well, interesting. With an excess of information as close as the nearest Internet connection, it’s as easy to find supporting “evidence” for a lie as it is to find the truth. But for most people, factchecking the hours and column inches of political advertising they see or read in any given year isn’t feasible. It doesn’t help that most mainstream media don’t bother to fact-check politicians statements, much less tell their readers when someone flat-out lies. Most will stretch to ridiculous proportions to present a false equivalency even when there is really only one side to a story— or 18. Not even when the lies are obvious and outrageous—such as Gov. Phil Bryant’s April 25 statement that those on the left have only one purpose in life: to abort as many babies as possible, or when Florida Republican Rep. Allen West declares that “78 to 81” Democratic members of the U.S. Congress are members of the Communist Party—does the media call it. Rather, they leave it up to viewers and readers to figure it out. Unfortunately, most of the public doesn’t bother. After all, how do you know if any source is trustworthy? Maybe we’d rather hear pretty lies than unpleasant truths. Maybe. Former President Jimmy Carter did his best to be truthful about the economy back in the 1970s, and Americans quickly gave him his walking papers. Most of us will believe a lie if it supports our convictions, or if the truth means we must take responsibility for our actions and do the hard work of self-examination, even when we know better. We’ll rail against the truth if it doesn’t fit with our carefully crafted reality. Probably like you, I learned early in life that telling lies is just plain wrong. It took

Congress, however, to stop businesses from lying to consumers about their products. The raft of U.S. truth-in-advertising laws fill law libraries and, I suspect, make a damn good living for a boat-load of lawyers. No such laws exist for politicians or media. The truth can be devilishly difficult to find. Ask organizations such as the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s factcheck.org. Most of us don’t really know what happens behind the doors of power. We might get a glimpse when a sound tech doesn’t turn off a microphone quickly enough, or when a disappointed insider publishes a tell-all book. Any journalist who has attempted to get information out of a public official who doesn’t want him or her to learn the truth can tell you how hard it can be. Freedom of information laws don’t exactly make facts easy to get to. On the contrary, they often seem implicitly to protect politicians and others with power to obfuscate freely. Politics may demonstrate the most egregious example of how acceptable lying has become in America, but it’s certainly not the only one. Much of what we hear on info-tainment programs disguised as “news” has habituated us to accept lies as fact. Rush Limbaugh’s show, for example, should come with a warning label and frequent reminders: “Nothing on this program should be construed as informed opinion, much less the truth.” We don’t get those warnings, and that’s a shame. Certainly, our culture of lying has infected our children for some time. In 2002, a Rutgers Management Education Center survey of 4,500 high-school students showed that 75 percent of them had engaged in “serious” cheating. Ten years later, those kids are adults in the word force. In 2011, a Common Sense Media study showed that 35 percent of teens

use cell phones to cheat. Scratch the surface of many people who loudly declare their religiosity, and you’re likely to find they know little about their own religion, much less about the canons of other faiths they vehemently condemn. In America, atheists and agnostics have more knowledge about world religions than mainline Protestants, according to a 2010 Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life survey. White evangelicals—those mandated by their religion to bring the heathens to the light—only got a little more than half the survey’s multiple-choice questions about the Christian Bible correct, on average, which means many know far less than half the “truth” they mean to tell the world. Unlike wealth, morality—or lack of it— really does trickle down. When our leaders regularly deliver lies, half-truths, exaggerations and misrepresentations, it should surprise no one when more than half of the voting-age population just doesn’t bother to show up. Not being able to rely on the truthfulness of the information they receive, why should they? I’m not much for conspiracy theories, but maybe demoralizing their constituents into apathy is part of many politicians’ plans to retain power. And if everything is connected, where does that leave you and me? For those of us who believe the system can still work, we’re steeling ourselves for the upcoming season of national politics filled with people who knowingly obstruct the truth or just outright lie for personal or party gain. Call me an optimist, but I’m convinced we can hold politicians’ feet to the fire. It will take courage, tenacity and most of all, a belief that we deserve better than convenient spin designed only to get our votes.


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Rep. Bobby Moak says an uncapped

news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, April 26 Jackson Public Schools officials hold a four-hour hearing with the state Commission on School Accreditation to argue against withdrawing JPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; accreditation. â&#x20AC;Ś News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch admits that a phone-hacking scandal at his U.K. newspapers resulted from his failure as head of the company. Friday, April 27 University of Southern Mississippi President Martha Saunders announces her resignation from the school. â&#x20AC;Ś The Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that the U.S. economy grew at a 2.2-percent annual rate in the first quarter of the year. Saturday, April 28 Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker delivers the commencement speech at Jackson State University. â&#x20AC;Ś The Mississippi Senate and House finish going through budget bills, appropriating funds for a wide variety of state services, including higher education and mental health. Sunday, April 29 The Legislature continues going through appropriations, settling on a $2.3-billion expenditure for K-12 education that fails to fully fund the MAEP formula. â&#x20AC;Ś Sudan declares a state of emergency to give the government more power to arrest people amid escalating tensions with newly formed South Sudan.

May 2 - 8, 2012

Monday, April 30 A mother accidentally runs over her 2-year-old daughter in the driveway of their Laurel home. â&#x20AC;Ś More than 100 people die and another 100 are missing when an overcrowded ferry sinks on the Brahmaputra River in Indiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assam state.

6

Tuesday, May 1 A gunman shoots two Pearl police officers who were serving a warrant at an apartment complex, killing one. The suspect is shot and killed. â&#x20AC;Ś Federal officials arrest five men who conspired to blow up a bride in Cleveland, Ohio. For news updates, go to jfpdaily.com.

SOURCE:TIME.COM

Medical Corridor: Almost a Plan

inventory tax credit could cost state taxpayers more than Republicans project. p 10

by Jacob Fuller

T

he steering committee of the Jackson medical corridor, a proposed project that would stretch the length of Woodrow Wilson Avenue between Interstates 55 and 220, will soon have the first draft of the strategic plan for the project. Primus Wheeler, executive director of the Jackson Medical Mall, which is located on the corridor, and a member of the steering committee, said Andrew Jenkins and Associates is finalizing the draft, which has been under way for about a year, delivering it to the steering committee by the second week of May. The committee handles the planning of the project for the more than 40 stakeholders. It originally came together when members realized that several groups, including the Jackson Medical Mall, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center and the municipal airport were working on separate plans for the same area of Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We quickly all figured out that none of us were working as a team; we were working in silos,â&#x20AC;? Wheeler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, we thought the best thing to do was to at least put all the plans on the table and see if we could find some synergy among all the plans.â&#x20AC;? With more than 40 participants, each

CDFL

Wednesday, April 25 Mississippi House Republicans release new legislative district maps that pit white Democrats against one another. â&#x20AC;Ś The U.S. Marine Corps dismisses a sergeant who criticized President Obama with an other-than-honorable discharge.

People in the United States and elsewhere around the world celebrate Mexican heritage with Cinco de Mayo on May 5. In Mexico, the holiday commemorates the Battle of Puebla in 1862, in which Mexican forces defeated the French. It is much less widely celebrated in Mexico than the Mexican Independence Day on Sept. 16.

UMMC will soon begin construction on an eight-story research center, the first piece of a multi-building research park.

with separate ideas for the project, the possibility of coming to any agreements appeared impossible. That is why stakeholders created the steering committee. Wheeler said once Andrew Jenkins and Associates submits the plan, the steering committee will call the stakeholders together again to discuss it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure the strategic plan will go into a whirlwind of emotions and changes at that point,â&#x20AC;? Wheeler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are hoping that we have done enough of the legwork up to this point so folks know kind

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of where we are going, so there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be any issues.â&#x20AC;? State Cuts the Cost The state House and Senate passed a bill, named the Mississippi Health Care Industry Zone Act, that will help fund the project, as well as cut the cost with sales tax exemptions of building the corridor or any similar projects. Under the bill, which the House MEDICAL, see page 7

May What? M a y has more holidays than just Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a non-exhaustive list of some holidays you might be forgetting to celebrate. May 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May Day May 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; World Press Freedom Day May 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bird Day May 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cinco de Mayo May 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; National Nurses Day May 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; No Socks Day May 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; International Nurses Day May 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Frog Jumping Day May 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Peace Officers Memorial Day May 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; International Museum Day May 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Memorial Day May 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Learn about Composting Day May 31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; World No Tobacco Day


talk MEDICAL, from page 6

paying ad valorem taxes. The funds will be divided among the municipality, county and school district. Businesses will receive any awarded tax incentives for a period not to exceed 10 years. To qualify, eligible businesses must create a minimum of 25 full-time jobs. If they fail to do so, they can lose their tax exemptions after a period of five years. Once MDA creates a health-care zone, county boards of supervisors or municipality governments can grant tax exemptions. The bill, which received unanimous approval in both the House and Senate, will take effect July 1 if signed into law. The exemptions will be offered to qualifying businesses that finish construction before July 1, 2017. The act would make the construction of the medical corridor far more feasible and could help draw in new stakeholders to open health-care-related businesses along the corridor. “We started (the bill) off thinking (the Jackson corridor) was going to be it, but (Governor Phil Bryant) got involved and said this could be something that we can use all over the state,” Wheeler said. “There may be other medical corridors or other medical zones created right in the city of Jackson (or) in Hinds County that may even compete with us.

“We think that we have enough momentum and that we started early enough in the process that ... nobody will have a need to create something different here. Most of the main health-care entities already have businesses along the corridor.” UMMC Expands While the corridor plan includes expanding some businesses along Woodrow Wilson Avenue, such as the Jackson Medical Mall, and bringing new health-care businesses to the street, the state’s largest health-care facility, and the corridor’s prime real-estate holder, will expand inside its borders. Woodrow Wilson Avenue delineates the southern border of the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s 164-acre campus, and UMMC has begun internal expansion. Dr. David Powe, associate vice chancellor for administrative affairs and UMMC’s chief administrative officer, said there is no reason for the center to build beyond its property. “We are only at 33-percent capacity here, so we have 66 percent of growth capacity here if we use all the space,” Powe said. “Of course, we don’t want to use all the space, because we want to keep a lot of the green space.” UMMC, the state’s only medical research facility, will soon begin construction of an eight-story facility that will

be the first piece of a research park. The park will eventually extend to the former farmers market area on Woodrow Wilson Avenue, which UMMC recently began renovating. The medical center is also in the process of renovating the former Schimmel’s Restaurant building on North State Street across from the UMMC campus. Once it is ready, the children’s development center and clinic will move there from its current location in the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. No One Pushed Out Wheeler and Powe both said that no one who owns a business or home in the location of the proposed health-care corridor will be pushed out. The purpose of the project, Powe said, is to enhance and beautify the community and to bring in more resources to encourage more people to live in the area. “The communities along this corridor are very important to the building of a medical corridor,” Powe said. “We are looking at enhancements, not moving people, not impacting them in a negative way, but to build a corridor there that is conducive for not only the medical community, but also to the four communities that are located along that drive.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

and Senate adopted, the Mississippi Development Authority can declare areas as “health-care zones” if they are within a five-mile radius of a county that has certificates of need of more than 375 acute-care hospital beds or a hospital with a minimum capital investment of $275 million. Inside these zones, qualified businesses, which include clinics, medical supply manufacturers and retailers and telecommunications companies among others, will be eligible for an accelerated state income-tax depreciation deduction, which will allow businesses to recover the cost of the depreciated value of property such as buildings, machinery, vehicles and other equipment, as well as intangible property such as copyrights and computer software. The accelerated rate will allow a deduction equivalent to a 10-year depreciation instead of the regular one-year rate. Companies inside the health-care zone can also apply for certain sales tax exemptions and a local ad valorem tax exemption on property, except taxes used for school district purposed and taxes on vehicles used on state highways. A qualified private company with a minimum capital investment of $100 million can qualify to pay a fee of no less than one-third of its ad valorem levy in lieu of

news, culture & irreverence

7 JCV7257 National Tourism Week Ad JFPress 9.5x6.167.indd 1

4/27/12 3:13 PM


citytalk

by Jacob Fuller

Mayor Wants Closer JRA-City Ties about what developments we can potentially go forward with.â&#x20AC;? That means the Economic Development Department needs to be involved earlier in the process of evaluating the feasibility of funding projects, Mims said. Under section 21-33-303 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, a municipality can

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we approved the hotel project over here at the Convention Center, and it was all public debt, that would just about wipe out the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to issue bonds,â&#x20AC;? he said. According to state code 43-35-31, which lays out the powers of a municipalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban renewal agency, JRA does not have the power to approve urban-renewal plans or modifications or the power to issue general-obligation bonds. Under a related section of the Mississippi Code, 4335-11, JRA cannot exercise any of its authority until the city adopts a resolution that a slum or blighted area exists in the city and that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;rehabilitation, conservation, redevelopment or a combination thereofâ&#x20AC;? in the area is necessary â&#x20AC;&#x153;in the interest of public health, safety, morals John Reeves, center, told JRA board members, including or welfare of the residents.â&#x20AC;? Beneta Burt (left) and Jason Brookins, that he has studied Because the decision to JRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, and a mayor-driven authority is nothing new. issue bonds or tax incentives and the pre-approval of develonly issue bonds up to a total of 15 percent opment projects ultimately lie with the mayor of the assessed value of the taxable property and Jackson City Council, the mayor is askin the municipality, according to the last as- ing that they be more involved in the process sessment for taxation, or 10 percent of the from the start, Reeves said. assessment upon which taxes were levied in â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;project Xâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; all day long and the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 1984, the City Council can say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nope, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not gowhichever is greater. ing to do it,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; or (the mayor) can say no. He The city already has about $75 million can veto it,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So in the final analysis, in outstanding issued bond debt and has you need them on board anyway.â&#x20AC;? about $100 million left that can be issued, JRA attorney Zach Taylor said at the JRA board member John Reeves said. April 25 JRA meeting that he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be-

JACOB FULLER

I

n todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy, lenders are more cautious about handing out money for development projects. So developers, like Joseph Simpson of the Iron Horse Grill redevelopment, are going to the Jackson Redevelopment Authority to find funding. The influx of proposals going before JRA has Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. re-evaluating how city-funded development projects are getting started and who is starting them. The mayor met with JRA board members April 19 and said he wants the organization to work with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Economic Development Department on any plans that would require city-backed bonds or tax incentives. Traditionally, JRA uses public-private partnerships to help fund projects, but with private institutions limiting the funds they are willing to lend, more developers are approaching the JRA for city-backed funding incentives. In recent years, many developersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as David Watkins, who spearheaded the resuscitation of the King Edward Hotel and currently holds the deeds to the Farish Street redevelopmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;have presented plans to JRA for approval, and then JRA presented them to the mayor and City Council for official approval. Johnson would like to see developers present plans to the Economic Development Department first, or in conjunction with their presentations to JRA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do have a limited bonding capacity,â&#x20AC;? said Chris Mims, Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of communications. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to be smart

JACOB FULLER

Council, Siemens Say Plan Will Reduce Water Costs

LaTrenda Funches protests the possibility of new water meters in Jackson outside City Hall Tuesday.

May 2 - 8, 2012

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lieve the board has done anything illegal in its previous actions, and Johnson is not claiming it has. JRA does have the ability to fund projects itself. For the first time in its history, the authority will have $500,000 per year to use from properties it owns. Up until this year, those funds were used to pay off debt the board accrued building three parking garages: one on the southwest corner of President and Capitol streets, one on the southwest corner of President and Amite streets, and the garage that faces Farish Street between Amite and Capitol streets. JRA built the garages starting in the early 1970s, and bond issues funded the projects. Now that JRA has income of $500,000 a year, it may begin to fund projects that the board favors but the city wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t approve. Since JRA has only just gained this ability, it has not yet funded any such projects. It was unclear to JRA board members and Mims from the meeting if Johnson is planning to implement a new official policy or ordinance to get the Economic Development Department more involved. JRA Chairman Ronnie C. Crudup said JRA should continue working on its long-term goals and planning until the city presents the board with a proposed policy change, because they do not know when that policy change might come. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That could be next month; it could be the end of the year; it could be next year,â&#x20AC;? Crudup said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

by Jacob Fuller 6LPRQVDLG³7KH(3$KDVFRPHGRZQRQXV MXVWDVWKH\KDYHPDQ\RWKHUFLWLHVDURXQGWKH FRXQWU\ZLWKPDQGDWHVZLWKQRIHGHUDOIXQGLQJ DQGQRKHOS)RUXVWRSDVVXSDQRSSRUWXQLW\ WRGD\WREHJLQWKLVHYDOXDWLRQDXGLWZKDWHYHU WHUP\RXSUHIHUWRXVHWKDWFRXOGSURYLGH VDYLQJVWRRXUFXVWRPHUVRXUFLWL]HQVRXUUDWH SD\HUVLVEH\RQGP\FRPSUHKHQVLRQ,IWKHUH LVDSRVVLELOLW\KHUHWKDW 6LHPHQV FDQVKRZXV DZD\WKDWZHFDQORZHUWKHZDWHUUDWHVIRURXU SHRSOH DQG NHHSWKHZDWHUUDWHVIURPULVLQJ LWœVZURQJLIZHSDVVXSWKLVRSSRUWXQLW\´

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educationtalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

JPS Accreditation Still Uncertain cation, explained that JPS is not in compliance with federal standards for how it should treat students with disabilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The heart of IDEA is to ensure that all children with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public education,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. Federal law requires school districts to provide extra help, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;related services,â&#x20AC;? for students with disabilities, even if they are not in special-education classes. For example, students with problems speaking should receive speech therapy, and students with emotional difficulties should receive counseling, said Ken Swindol, a consultant for MDE. Many districts do not have the staff or training to provide the services students need, however. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The capacity is generally not there in the district to provide related services,â&#x20AC;? he said. Several witnesses said that the district has been working hard to train its staff in how to comply with IDEA regulations, but those changes have mostly happened at the top administration levels and have not made it down to the student level, yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The district has done a lot of work to (institute) policies and procedures, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a lot of work to add professional develop-

Under a new rezoning plan for JPS, Bailey Magnet High School will become APAC Middle School next year.

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sion questioned how JPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; noncompliance could affect the state. If the district does not resolve its issues by February of next year, Moore said MDE would have to include that in a report to the U.S. Department of Education, which could impose sanctions on the state. Losing accreditation would mean, in part, that JPS students could not participate in sports, band, choir or other after-school activities. JPS did not get to JPS Board Member Otha Burton, left, and Interim Superintendent Jayne Sargent listen to a hearing about whether or not the state make its case for keepshould revoke the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accreditation. ing its accreditation at this meeting, but will get a chance to do so on Until JPS puts its training into practice May 21. A report from a follow-up visit by in individual schools and classrooms, she said, MDE earlier in April will also likely be availthe district will not be able to address the needs able for the commission to consider at the of all the students, and will therefore remain in May meeting. noncompliance with IDEA. Earlier coverage of this issue is linked to this Several members of the commis- story at www.jfp.ms.

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ELIZABETH WAIBEL

JPS to Reorganize Schools

ment,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The issue is implementing those at every school level.â&#x20AC;? ELIZABETH WAIBEL

J

ackson Public Schools will have to wait a bit longer to find out whether it will lose or retain its accreditation status. After listening to several hours of testimony at an April 26 hearing, the state Commission on School Accreditation decided to call it a day. The commission and legal teams for the Mississippi Department of Education and JPS agreed to adjourn the hearing until May 21. The commission is considering whether JPS should lose its accreditation due to how it has disciplined and served students with disabilities. In September 2010, a complaint by the Mississippi Youth Justice Project, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, alleged that JPS had repeatedly suspended students with behavioral problems or sent them to the Capital City Alternative School rather than getting them help to overcome their problems. MDE investigated and, in November of that year, found that JPS was not in compliance with 10 regulations regarding students with disabilities. Since the district did not resolve its areas of noncompliance, it might lose its accreditation. At the hearing, Ann Moore, associate state superintendent for the Office of Special Edu-

9


Legislature: Week 18

by R.L. Nave

Few Fireworks Over Budget

J

Weekend Warriors Seersucker-clad legislators were on full display this past weekend as lawmakers completed most of the heavy lifting on a $5.6-billion state budget for the fiscal year starting in July. For the most part, legislators remained cool as they approved funding for state agencies most people have never heard of through more than 100 appropriation bills that comprise the spending plan for

the 2013 fiscal year. develop rules to keep companies from doHighlights of the Senate’s Saturday ing so. Smith responded that the tax bill did session included appropriation bills to in- not prevent businesses from being “rascals” crease student financial aid by 10 percent and circumventing the law. over 2012 and to set the Department of As expected, House members also Corrections budget at $311.7 million, which is level with the current budget year. Also, Senators voted to create more jobs in the state’s Department of Revenue, which would receive a $2.5 million increase to hire more auditors, accountants and customer service-agents to step up tax-collection efforts. The Mississippi Department of Mental Health will receive $25 million less than in 2012. This includes $20 million for community mental-health facilities transferred to the Medicaid budget. Rep. Herb Frierson, R-Poplarville, said last week that the state Rep. Bobby Moak, D-Bogue Chitto, said an inventory tax wanted to take money from credit, which is uncapped, could cost state taxpayers more special funds such as mental than the $30 million per year that Republicans project. health and the University of Mississippi Medical Center and put it directly into the Medicaid bud- passed a K-12 education budget that alloget. cated $19 million for the Public Employee Meanwhile, the House went another Retirement System, but still fell $250 milfew rounds over a proposal to increase tax lion short of the Mississippi Adequate Educredits for businesses that pay inventory tax. cation Program funding formula. The credit would allow businesses that pay an inventory tax to local governments to re- Employers’ Compensation coup that money from the state through tax Lawmakers came back Monday morncredits. Rep. Jeff Smith said the tax break ing to take up the controversial workwould cost the state up to $30 million a ers’ compensation bill. Supporters said year once fully implemented. changes were needed to restore parity to a Rep. Bobby Moak, D-Bogue Chitto, system tipped in workers’ favor. The measaid the tax could actually cost a lot more sure makes changes to the state’s system of because the bill doesn’t put a limit on the paying people who are injured at work by tax credit. Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, requiring employees to prove they weren’t said the bill lets large retailers like Walmart working drunk or high on drugs. move inventory to warehouses near their Rep. Bryant Clark, D-Pickens, said the stores to claim a bigger tax credit, and he bill “places burdens on our workers that no asked if the Department of Revenue should other states have.” Some changes were to

FILE PHOTO

ackson Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. spent Monday, April 30, lobbying lawmakers to pass a bill to let the city to levy a small sales tax increase for infrastructure improvements. At first, the mayor’s charm seemed to work on lawmakers. In less than 24 hours, everything had changed. Tuesday morning, the bill died on a procedural move. Last year, the Legislature agreed to let Jackson collect a 1-cent sales tax for infrastructure and public-safety improvements if 60 percent of voters approved it and if the city set up a commission to oversee how the money was spent. The city objected to the makeup of the proposed commission, and no vote ever took place. A heated exchange preceded the vote, however, when Rep. Kelvin Buck, D-Holly Springs, pressed House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Jeff Smith, R-Columbus, on changes in the bill. The original legislation only applied to the city of Jackson, but lawmakers amended it to include Pearl, Brandon, Flowood and Holly Springs. Late Sunday, negotiators stripped Holly Springs from the bill. Buck held Smith’s mustache to the fire, demanding to know why lawmakers targeted the 8,000-person town. Smith took the blame: “It was better to have something than let the whole bill die.” He said no one had the guts to tell Buck to his face that his hometown would be stripped from the final version of the bill. “You are not being treated fairly,” Smith told Buck.

allay concerns of workers’ rights advocates. A previous version of the bill removed the longstanding “found dead presumption” in the state’s workers’ comp law that holds that workers found dead on the job are presumed to have died in the course of doing their jobs. The final version of the bill restored the found dead presumption and requires claimants to simply submit medical records. The bill required workers to provide proof of a direct causal relationship between their work and injury. Redistricting Pits Dem vs. Dem The wait is over, kids. Mississippi House members finally have a new legislative district map to vote on. The map, which adds two districts in rapidly growing DeSoto County, was unveiled at the Capitol last week. Under the plan, several white Democrats could lose their seats either by having to square off with fellow Democrats or by having to compete in mostly GOP districts. One Jackson Democrat who could be in trouble is Rep. Cecil Brown, whose district was moved into the territory now served by Rep. Bill Denny, R-Jackson. Denny also, coincidentally, was in charge of drawing the up the maps for the House. In addition, Robert Huddleston, D-Sumner, would have to square off against Tommy Taylor, R-Boyle; Kevin Horan, D-Grenada, would face Linda Whittington, D-Schlater; Democrats Bennett Malone of Carthage and Jason White of West would go toe-totoe as would Blaine Eaton, D-Taylorsville, and Johnny Stringer, D-Montrose. The plan also increases the number of majority-black districts by one. The Senate released its map Tuesday afternoon as the Jackson Free Press went to print. After the new maps win legislative approval, they could meet challenges in the courts or from the U.S. Department of Justice. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

COMING SOON Green Oak Florist May 2 - 8, 2012

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justicetalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

Women ‘Unite’ for Rights

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ELIZABETH WAIBEL

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Tfbo!Kpiotpo! boe! Xjme!Mpuvt!Cboe Nbz!5ui!}!8;41!qn Bewbodf!ujdlfut!%26!}!%31!bu!uif!epps Former Greenville Mayor Heather McTeer, right, talks with Lori Garrott during a Unite Women rally at the Capitol last weekend. Both women believe there’s a war on women underway.

“In Mississippi, lawmakers took a cue from Virginia and are now pushing the same type of regressive, restrictive legislation,” the release said, likely referring to an anti-abortion “fetal heartbeat bill” that some said could require transvaginal ultrasounds or outlaw most surgical abortions altogether. The bill, introduced by Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, went through several slightly different incarnations, all of which eventually died. Gov. Bryant signed another anti-abortion bill, designed to close the state’s only abortion clinic, into law last month. At the rally in Jackson, women carried ELIZABETH WAIBEL

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Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future. Some people used last weekend’s rally as an opportunity to relax in the shade.

signs with slogans such as, “It’s 2012, not 1912,” and men’s signs said, “My rights are her rights.” McTeer encouraged the women at the march to run for elected office, saying there are too few women at the table when politicians discuss reproductive issues. “There’s more than just politics at stake here. This is life and death. This is an economic issue,” McTeer said. “Last time I checked, there weren’t going to be any jobs created because someone was in my vagina.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org

jacksonfreepress.com

M

ississippi’s Unite Women march last Saturday felt more like a community picnic than a politically charged demonstration, as participants spread blankets under shade trees in front of the state Capitol’s south steps and interspersed motivational speeches with musical interludes. No matter how much fun they must have had coming up with the slogans on their signs, however, the protesters were serious about their message. People around the nation are watching Mississippi to see how its politicians and voting public treat reproductive issues, they said. “We here in Mississippi don’t realize sometimes the role that we play,” former Greenville Mayor Heather McTeer said. “... The war on women is real, and it’s real for us here more than anywhere else.” About 60 people gathered for Saturday’s protest, which was part of a nationwide effort organized by a group called Unite Women, with events in almost every state. In Jackson, people came from as far away as the Gulf Coast to participate. Saturday’s march raised many of the same issues as a protest last month. Protesters opposed state legislators’ attempts to pass anti-abortion bills and other legislation that would limit reproductive rights. Unite Women’s website says while its primary issue is reproductive rights, the group also opposes violence against women and children, and voter registration laws that they say suppress voter turnout among poor women, seniors and minorities. They also support workplace equality, education and equal pay. In a February press release announcing Unite Women’s formation, the group cited attempts to pass personhood legislation in several states and efforts by Virginia legislators to require intrusive transvaginal ultrasounds before abortions as evidence that a “war on women” exists.

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11


MAKE A DIFFERENCE....

... And Good Money! The Jackson Free Press and BOOM Jackson magazine seek TOP PERFORMERS for advertising sales positions. We need client-driven candidates ready to hit the streets to prospect new accounts, listen to client needs and follow up every week with world-class customer service. Bring your love of local business and your willingness to wake up every morning to improve your customers’ bottom line. Young or old, if you have the stuff, we’ll know! Contact publisher Todd Stauffer at

todd@jacksonfreepress.com to make your pitch!

8th Annual

To Help Fund A Rape Crisis Center Items Needed: Original Art, Gift Certificates, Corporate Items Gifts, Big & Small, Monetary Donations, Chick Toys & Decor Sponsorships Available: Imperial Highness $5,000, Diva $2,500, Goddess $1,000, Queen $500, Princess $250, Chick $50

If we receive your donation by July 11, it will be featured in our big Chick Ball Gift Guide on July 25.

Saturday, July 28, 2012 Hal & Mal’s Red Room

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techtalk

by Todd Stauffer

Your Springtime Backup Assessment FILE PHOTO

than a few days old when we hit a snag— and that was on a press day when I was out of town.) If you have no solution at the moment, then you’ll have to spend at least a little bit of money, although the cost can be minimal if you’re mostly worried about your personal machine. Before buying software, though, it’s smart to take an inventory. The fundamental questions you’re asking are (a) how much “near-line” (easily accessible) backup storage do you need and (b) is it time to move some or all of what you’re doing to “the cloud”? Here are some specific things to think about when considering backup options:

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on, Not the uti P ol

ft h he tt Solution, No

With this assessment in place, you can get a better sense of your backup needs, particularly the amount of storage you need. If you’re looking at a lot of gigabytes of data that you need quick access to, then a large external hard disk—one or two terabytes are inexpensive these days—might be the right solution. That same hard disk might be handy if you’re looking to “clone” your current drive so you have the ability to fully restore in the future. W h a t s o f t w a re should you use? If you’re running Windows 7, you’ve got Backup and Restore built right in; Macs have Time Machine. Both can be used Arq for Mac offers great pricing and high volume. with external hard drives to create both “system restores” and incremental backups. For Macs, I also like Carbon if you have a good backup solution in place, a Copy Cloner (bombich.com) which is free little “fault tolerance” goes a long way. That’s software for file-by-file cloning of existing right; two backups, at least on really critical folder or drives without requiring a Time stuff. Sign up for a Google Drive, DropBox Machine setup. or similar online storage drive and drop the If you have fewer mission-critical files files on there that you would need in case to back up—and you’ve got the DVDs on of a 100-year flood or alien invasion—parhand to re-install applications or your OS— ticularly stuff you’re working on right now. then an online solution might be an alter- That way, you can access your critical stuff native. Carbonite (carbonite.com), Mozy from a friend’s computer or public terminal (mozy.com) and iBackup (ibackup.com) of- of some kind if the worst sort of computing fer Windows and Mac support for backing catastrophe strikes. up files online. You can generally set the softJFP and BOOM Jackson Publisher Todd ware and forget it; the software works in the Stauffer has authored or co-authored more than background (in some cases, only kicking in 40 books on technology and computing.

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jacksonfreepress.com

D

id you know that every hard disk made has a specification called “mean time between failures” or MTBF? (“Mean,” if you remember back to grade school, is the same as “average.”) In other words, all hard drives fail eventually; it’s just a matter of time. Backup, therefore, is fundamental to maintaining peace of mind when it comes to computing. If you know your documents (and email and photos and other important items) are safely and securely backed up, then any problem with your computer is considerably less stressful. It’s when you have to wonder, “have I lost that file forever?!” that you completely lose your Zen and go screaming to the nearest electronics store to learn of your fate. With today’s cheap external hard drives and “cloud” solutions for backup, there really isn’t an excuse to avoid backup. (Not that we all need excuses; the JFP has been going through server glitches in the past week, and we got caught with a backup that was more

when you’re idle on your computer) to complete the initial backup of your critical files. Later, scheduled backups are “incremental,” meaning they’re adding just the files that have been added or changed. Those set-and-forget services can get expensive for massive storage. In those cases, Arq for Mac (haystacksoftware.com) can back up directly to Amazon’s S3 service, which offers great pricing and high volume levels (hundreds of gigabytes.) JungleDisk (jungledisk.com) offers Windows or Linux backup to Amazon S3 and similar services for larger installations. Finally, it’s worth considering that even COURTESY HAYSTACK SOFTWARE

All hard drives fail eventually; it’s just a matter of time. So be prepared.

1. What are your email backup needs? If you’ve already got your email in the cloud (with iCloud, Gmail, Yahoo!, or similar programs) then you may get away with backing up less than some other folks need to. If you’re like me and you’ve got 50GB of email stored in Apple Mail from the past 15 years, you might need a more robust hard disk or online solution. 2. What are your document backup needs? Again, if you’re in the cloud mostly with Google Docs, Office 365 or something similar, you may not have all that many documents on your computer’s internal storage that you need to back up. Or you may have old files that need to be archived somewhere as you plow forward into this brave new day of cloud computing with your new docs online. 3. What are your multimedia backup needs? Photos, audio files and video files take up a ton of room. The more you work in those mediums, the more backup storage space you’re going to need. People who use a computer for multimedia will likely need a more sophisticated solution than those who use their computer just for email and spreadsheets. 4. What “special stuff”—games, smartphone sync software, passwords, financial software—do you have that needs to be backed up?

5. Do you have the original disks for applications and operating systems, or would you need to reinstall those from a backup? 6. Do you often create multiple revisions of files that you would like access to, so that you could “restore changes” from an older document, image or similar file?

13


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Voter Shenanigans Could be Costly

A

curious exchange took place between Rep. John Hines, D-Greenville, and Republican Speaker Philip Gunn of Clinton over the weekend, as the Legislature hammered a budget for state agencies. Hines, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d forgotten to vote an earlier bill, asked if he could record a vote after the body had moved on. Gunn asked Hines teasingly if he had his voter ID, to which Hines retorted something to the effect of â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got my voter ID and my poll tax,â&#x20AC;? which brought chuckles from the chamber. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all fun and games until someone subjects your grandma to a literacy test on Election Day. On Tuesday, the Mississippi Senate unveiled its plan to add three majorityblack districts, but pit two white Democrats against each other. In the Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan, released last week, the number of majority-black districts increased by one, to 42, but might also eliminate as many as five white Democrats. On its face, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing nefarious about the plan. Lawmakers have to redraw the lines once a decade and, after all, elections have consequences. Adding a black district also gives redistricting architects cover to claim that no voter dilution â&#x20AC;&#x153;funny businessâ&#x20AC;? is going on. But that logic defies reality: Black folks in Mississippi donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just vote for black legislators, but they overwhelmingly vote Democratic, black and white. So even by possibly adding to the number of African American representatives, the maps that will diminish the voices of black voters in Mississippi. Or at least thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how a court is likely to see it. Federal courts in recent years have shown little patience for anything with the faintest whiff of voter suppression. President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Justice Department blocked Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ill-conceived anti-Mexican laws as well as voter ID in South Carolina. Meanwhile, a federal court rejected a Texas redistricting map that it said diluted African American and Latino voting strength. If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done anything this year, our state lawmakers have been hell bent on rolling back every constitutionally protected right they happen to disagree with. And for what? Republicans may hold electoral majorities for years to come without voter ID, scaring off immigrants or gerrymandering districts. It seems to us that lawyers are going to have a field day with the Magnolia State in the next year or so, all at the expense of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poorest taxpayers. Even at the end of this state legislative session, make your voice heard on the issues that matter to you.

RYAN BROWN

Moving Forward

May 2 - 8, 2012

O

14

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REP. CECIL BROWN

Why Charter Schools Died

I

t appears that all of the charter-school proposals are dead for this legislative session. These bills were defeated by a coalition of Democrats and Republicans in the House with the support of hundreds of school-board members, administrators, teachers, parents and civic leaders across the state. The public is entitled to know why the legislation failed. There were numerous objections to the proposals. Here are a few: â&#x20AC;˘ The legislation set up a new board to run the charter program. The board would hire an executive director to run day-to-day operations. The bill did not specify qualification requirements for the director in the legislation, and unlike every other state agency director in Mississippi, the new director would not be subject to Senate confirmation. The new board would clearly be duplicative and costly. We already have a state Board of Education. We also have a state superintendent of education with statutorily required qualifications who has to be confirmed by the Senate. â&#x20AC;˘ No matter who administers the program, charter schools will cost additional money. The legislation would require the new board to carry out a number of administrative duties, which would require additional staff and funding. The same would be true if the current board of education runs the program. However, because the state Department of Education has experienced staff and systems in place, any charter program can be monitored most efficiently by that agency. â&#x20AC;˘ Under the proposed law, the new board could give charter schools a blanket exemption from virtually all state education laws. Among those are the laws against bullying, prohibitions against nepotism, rules regarding suspension and expulsion of students, the requirement that principals be bonded, the provisions for dual high school and college enrollment, and compulsory school attendance laws to name a few. Lobbyists who do not want charter schools to comply with any state laws are pushing these exemptions.

â&#x20AC;˘ There would be no limit on the number of charters granted. By 2015 they could be located in almost any district in the state, including those labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;successfulâ&#x20AC;? by the state Board of Education. â&#x20AC;˘ Charter schools would have the option to buy or lease surplus public school properties at below fair market value. These charter schools would be nongovernmental, private entities. There should be some limits on how much public property they could take at favorable prices. â&#x20AC;˘ The proposals require no public notice of a charter application, nor would there be an opportunity for public input. Those who live in districts to be affected by charter schools should have an opportunity to comment on charter applications. â&#x20AC;˘ Charter-school board members would be virtually immune from civil lawsuits. Existing school boards do not have such immunity, and there is no good reason to grant it to these new boards. â&#x20AC;˘ All administrators would be exempt from professional certification requirements. Surely someone who is running the school should have some background in school administration. â&#x20AC;˘ Half of the teachers in a charter school would be exempt from teacher-certification requirements. This provision is potentially a violation of No Child Left Behind and could jeopardize federal funds. The bottom line is that the bills before the House were ill conceived and poorly drafted. In my opinion, Mississippi will eventually have charter schools in a few districts, and they can be helpful in achieving our goal of providing quality educational opportunities for all children. But to pass legislation, those who are pushing it will have to listen to those Democrats, Republicans and members of the public who have concerns and learn to compromise. Rep. Cecil Brown D-Jackson

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


Power of the Purse and the Pill Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Elizabeth Waibel Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Lynda Hasberry Contributing Editor Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Larry Morrisey, Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Brittany Kilgore, Whitney Menogan, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Staff Photographer Virginia Schreiber Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers Trip Burns, William Patrick Butler,Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Eric Bennett, Erica Sutton

ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executive Mandy Beach Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Sales Intern Morgan Bares

BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Mik Davis, Clint Dear, Richard Laswell

ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

E

ver since Rick Santorum fired the first shot in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;war on womenâ&#x20AC;? in a campaign speech labeling birth control as â&#x20AC;&#x153;dangerous,â&#x20AC;? the â&#x20AC;&#x153;womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issuesâ&#x20AC;? media narrative of the 2012 presidential campaign season has revolved around the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attempts to attract (and alternately repel) women voters. An April 17 poll by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press bears this out, with women breaking for President Obama over Mitt Romney by about 13 points. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;gender gapâ&#x20AC;? has led to the kind of flip-chart, number-crunching analysis usually not seen until the battleground states come into play. The presidential campaigns have taken notice. In appearances over the last few weeks, Mitt Romney has begun referring questions about womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues to his wife, Ann, who says that women care more about the economy than â&#x20AC;&#x153;womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issuesâ&#x20AC;? like birth control and abortion. The dichotomy such a statement createsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that economic issues and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues are separate, distinct issues, and that one is independent of the otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;ignores the 50 years of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic, political and academic progress made possible by contraception and, in particular, contraception that women control. The birth-control pill became legal in the United States in 1960, revolutionizing contraception. Not only was it a reliable, consistent method of controlling reproduction, but the Pill also put that method in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands. While condoms and other â&#x20AC;&#x153;naturalâ&#x20AC;? techniques of birth control were already in widespread use, those methods rely on the male participation to be effective. According to the National Fertility Study of 1970, the use of the birth-control pill exploded over that decade, particularly within the generation born in the late 1930s and early 1940sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the generation of women who were still young enough to pursue careers and higher education, but old enough that, just a decade earlier, they would already have been conscripted to husbands, children and work within the home. Without such predetermined destinies, these women took to the work force, leveraging their education and experiences for something beyond entertaining their husbandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; business partners. It may seem obvious that the widespread use and acceptance of the birth-control pill led to the emergence of more women in the workplace. After all, control of reproduction allowed women not just to delay children, but also to pursue education and even delay marriage. What is less obvious is the correlation

between an increase in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wages and the Pill. In a 2010 study, University of Michigan economist Martha Bailey tracked the increase in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wages over time and found something revealing. Prior to the 1960s, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wages increased insignificantly over their working lifetimes, if at all. After the introduction of the Pill, however, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wages began to increase, often substantially. Unencumbered access to education and the opportunity to work full time in young adulthood allowed women to pursue careers instead of jobs. According to Bailey, â&#x20AC;&#x153;As the Pill provided younger women the expectation of greater control over childbearing, women invested more in their human capital and careers.â&#x20AC;? It comes down to this: Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal economies have always been tied to their ability to control their reproduction. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true for women who choose to work within the home as well. Contraception allows women to decide the number of children thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right for themâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, significantlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the number of children that they and their partners can afford. Acknowledging the role that birth control has played in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movement into the workplace doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean ignoring its implications for women who choose to work at home. Of course, the word that colors every debate about women and work, or women and the Pill, or women and abortion, is choice. Even Ann Romney, who two decades after a $150 donation to Planned Parenthood describes herself as anti-abortion, uses the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;choiceâ&#x20AC;? when talking about how women decide to raise their families. After a media firestorm arose around her statements regarding her hard work as a stay-at-home mother, Romney said we need to â&#x20AC;&#x153;respect the choices that women makeâ&#x20AC;? in an April 12 interview with Fox News. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true. But without access to affordable birth control, competent and compassionate family planning services, and yes, even abortion, women will no longer be able make the kind of choices that have improved their education, their wages and their lives. If women care about the economyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and we doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then we must care about reproductive freedom as well. Whitney Barkley is a local consumer-protection attorney, teacher and professional hell-raiser. She lives in Belhaven with her boyfriend, an organizer with the ACLU. Their children will probably grow up to be right-wingers.

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal economies have always been tied to their ability to control their reproduction.

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jacksonfreepress.com

WHITNEY BARKLEY

15


Apron Strings to Executive Chef by Tom Ramsey

photos by Virginia Schreiber

N

ick Wallace told me stories as we drove to Edwards in April. There were gardens to see and people to meet, and all of them had a history. Our first stop was at his uncle’s place where tomatoes, peas, green onions, red potatoes and plenty of other produce were getting a good start. We walked the rows and picked the tops from scallions and marveled at the height of the garlic scapes at the tops of the plants. We could have lingered, but more people were waiting on us. We rolled along winding little roads where the early spring foliage seemed to reach to the very edges of the road, as if to try and reclaim the patch of asphalt as the green path it used to be. His grandmother’s house was on one of these little roads. In the front of the house was three-quarter-acre field gone wild with dewberry vines, awaiting the spring plow. Behind the house was a chicken coop with Rhode Island Reds, Domenics and Java White hens, and a dog run with both hunters and mutts. A shed sat off to the side of the house with the implements of gardening in various states of readiness and repair. Nick pointed to a tiller undergoing an overhaul and said: “We don’t take anything to the shop. Everything gets fixed right here.” I didn’t know then how universally that statement could be applied to pretty much everything on this place, from food to farm to family.

May 2 - 8, 2012

Witnessing History When her grandson introduced me to her, Lenell Donald was sitting in her recliner with a large walking stick propped at her side, watching a TV courtroom drama. She greeted me with a big smile and apologized for not getting up, but I could tell that she didn’t want to miss a moment of her show just to give me a tour of her garden. I suspected that her frailty was deceiving and that, at a moment’s notice, the 16 unassuming walking stick could be wielded swiftly and deftly

if I were to get out of line. I didn’t dare. The man in her living room was “well-behaved Tom,” not the “smart-aleck Susie Marshall (above), King Edward Executive Chef Nick Wallace’s mom, instilled a love of Tom” that you, the reader, food and cooking into her son. Nick and his mom are in the bottom photo. have become accustomed to. I was there to pay homage to a great mother, grandmother, gardener, cook and mentor. I was honored to Starting Early meet her. Nick is one of the best chefs we have in Jackson. Our For years I had heard stories about her from my friend, mutual friend, Parlor Market chef Jesse Houston, calls him her grandson and King Edward chef Nick Wallace. (He con- “the master of braising,” mainly because of a pig-cheek dish firmed my suspicions about her stick once we stepped outside that displays more riches than Scrooge McDuck doing the and left the outer range of its possible trajectory). backstroke in a pool of gold doubloons. This type of cookI was there to learn about the bonds of grandmother, ing takes more than knowledge; it takes love and patience. mother, grandson and son, forged in the garden rows and But after meeting his family, it’s not a surprise that he turned the kitchen stove. I was there to see how a love of food and out this way; the surprise would be if he hadn’t. He’s been a love of family transitioned into a chef’s passion and skill. around food all his life. Nick learned his trade long before I was there to witness history and record how tradition be- entering culinary school, at the apron strings of his grandcame legacy. mother and mother who shouldered the responsibility of Nick, his father, Jessie Donald, and I walked feeding a virtual army of hungry men three meals a the field. They pointed out to me where evday, seven days a week. erything would go. Nick’s grandfather was in the pulpTomatoes here on the edges, wood business. For those of you who butterbeans and field peas there, haven’t spent much time outside the peppers and peanuts in the center, city limits, that means bone-crushing squash on the far side where it labor performed by big men with would have plenty of room to big appetites. Mrs. Donald learned run. They invited me to come that if the entire crew was well fed, back in a few weeks and put my they could work the long hours it old back to work. I was promtook to cut, load, haul and unload ised some “picking rights” in 20 trucks a day. As Nick put it, return for my labor, and that’s a “Twenty trucks per day meant that deal I’m not going to miss. all the bills were paid, all the kids were fed and clothed, and she could buy a A bell-pepper seedling grows in the dress on Saturday.” Donald family garden. She knew that if a hauler missed break-


MEATLOAF WITH TOMATO RELISH

Coat a skillet with a twocount of oil and place over medi-

um heat. Sauté the onion, garlic and bay leaves for a few minutes to create a base flavor. Throw in the red peppers and cook them for a couple of minutes to soften. Now add the tomatoes. Adding them at this point lets them hold their shape and prevents them from disintegrating. Stir in the parsley, ketchup and Worcestershire sauce; season with salt and pepper. Simmer the relish for 5 minutes to pull all the flavors together. Remove it from the heat You should have about 4 cups of relish.

MEATLOAF 3 slices white bread, torn into chunks by hands 1/4 cup whole milk 1-1/2 pounds ground beef, 80/20 blend 1 pound ground pork loin 2 eggs Leaves from 2 fresh thyme sprigs Salt Freshly ground black pepper 3 to 4 bacon slices

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the torn white bread in a bowl and add the milk to just barely cover, swish the bread around in the milk, and let it sit while you get the rest of the ingredients for the meat loaf together.

This is where you get your hands dirty! In a large mixing bowl, combine the ground beef and pork with 1-and-1/2 cups of the tomato relish, eggs and thyme; season with salt and pepper. Squeeze the excess milk from the bread and add the soaked bread to the meat mixture. To test, fry a small “hamburger” patty of the meatloaf until cooked; the patty should hold together but still have a soft consistency. Taste the patty for seasoning. Lightly oil a cookie sheet. Transfer the meat mixture to the center of the cookie sheet and form into a log about 9-inches long and

fast, he would tire quickly, or that if a cutter missed lunch, of giving up secrets, like cute pet names he had as a chubbyhe would ease off in the afternoon. The best way she could cheeked boy and the fact that he is fiercely ticklish. ensure productivity was to assume the responsibility of feed“I knew he would be a cook, but I didn’t know he would ing everyone, every meal, every day. This meant breakfast at grow up to be a COOK-cook. But I should have known,” she 5 a.m., lunch at 11 a.m. and supper at 4:30 p.m. for 12 “full- said. “I didn’t realize it, but from the time he could walk and grown” men, Monday through Saturday. talk, he was following me around the kitchen watching evFrom age 6, Nick was at her side, helping her at the erything he could see and asking me about what he couldn’t. helm of her home kitchen and also in her garden. Growing It was like getting to watch me when I was a child. There he produce and raising livestock is far was, standing in a chair, right next more economical than schlepping to me, cooking.” to Kroger three times a week. Nick If Nick hadn’t stopped her, learned efficiency and frugality. He his mother would have divulged learned the cycle of seasons and much more than he wanted me to what that meant in the kitchen. He hear, so he insisted we get a plate learned that you couldn’t get greedy before anything got cold. with fruits in the summer and eat Collard greens, sweet potathem all up. You had to set enough toes, potato salad with boiled eggs, aside for jams and preserves if you mac ‘n’ cheese, fried pork chops, wanted to enjoy that flavor all year. fried chicken, smoked neck bones, plaque was Nick’s Mother’s Day gift to his Nick learned that a messy This smothered chicken and peppers, mom when he was 9 years old. He made it. kitchen was a slow kitchen and that creamed corn, cornbread, yeast in lean times, with ingenuity and rolls, rutabagas and banana pudflavor, you could feed plenty of people with a little meat, a ding all stared up at me, mocking me, daring me to sample bunch of gravy, and plenty of rice or potatoes. He also learned them all. I did. Every morsel was a treat. You could taste the a painful lesson about being in a hurry. care and joy and love in every bite. His earliest memory in the kitchen was when he was I doubt I’ll ever forget this meal. Here I was on an ordibarely tall enough to reach the stove. He got sloppy heating up molasses for pancakes and splashed some of the hot treacle Susie Marshall’s lunch feast onto his arm. It stuck. It burned, but he couldn’t stop. He had was a smorgasbord to work through the pain and play catch-up to help get the 5 of southern a.m. pancakes on the plate. As he put it, “It was my first time favorites. getting in the weeds.” The Epic Lunch Nick’s mother, Susie Marshall, also started cooking early. “I can remember being 8 years old, standing in a chair, frying pork chops,” she said. She obviously practiced this enough to get really good at it. After we visited his grandmother’s garden, we came back to Jackson for lunch with his mother. When we walked in the front door, the aromas hit me like a sock of batteries. My mind raced to sort them out: frying chicken, smoked pork, sweet corn, peppers, onions, browned flour in the gravy. My eyes confirmed the smells, and all I could think about was how difficult my afternoon would be, fighting the urge to nap after what I was about to do to this feast. Susie invited me in to the kitchen where we waxed about the virtues of vintage cast iron and the pleasures of watching people eat and smile with their eyes (because their mouths are too full). She beamed with pride about her son to the point

about 4-inches wide. Coat the top of the meatloaf with another half cup of the tomato relish. Lay the bacon across the top lengthwise. Bake the meatloaf for one to one-and-a-half hours until the bacon is crisp and the meatloaf is firm. Rotate the meat loaf while it’s baking every now and then to insure that the bacon browns evenly. Remove the meatloaf from the oven and let it cool a bit before slicing. Serve with the remaining tomato relish on the side. Unbelievably moist! Serves four. Recipe courtesy of the Wallace and Donald Family

nary spring day, eating some of the best home-cooked food I’ve ever had with a fellow chef and his mother. I wasn’t a food writer, I was a guest, and I just wanted to stay and get a second helping and nap on the sofa. When the conversation turned to Mother’s Day, Susie brought out a little wooden sign that read “Happy Mother’s Day” with the initials “NW” at the bottom. Nick made it for her in a woodworking class when he was 9. “That was sweet, but now that he’s grown, it’s not Mother’s Day until I get a gift-wrapped present with a card,” she said. A Studied Calm This quick trip explained a lot. I’d always noticed a calmness to Nick that seemed too old for 32, and now I could see its origin. Nick has a sense of place and purpose and history that manifests in the ability to show his talents without showing off. His cooking speaks for itself, and what it says is this: “I know where I came from, and I can see where I’m going.” Nick’s grandmother and his mother gave him a gift that few ever receive. They instilled in him every important element of food. I’ve repeated it so many times that people are tired of hearing it from me, but the act of feeding someone CHEF, see page 18

jacksonfreepress.com

TOMATO RELISH Extra-virgin olive oil 1 onion, finely diced 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 bay leaves 2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded and finely diced 2 tomatoes, halved, seeded and finely diced 1/4 cup chopped, fresh flat-leaf parsley 1 (12-ounce) bottle ketchup 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper

17


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them, he learned that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take wealth to show richness. He learned value, economy, generosity and preservation. Instead of taking these lessons and compartmentalizing them as history, Nick took them to heart and expanded on them. When he took his first job in the kitchen at 17, he was years ahead of his Uncle Tommy Donald holds hand-picked fresh blackberries. more senior employees. When he picked up a knife on the first day of is the second most intimate thing two people culinary school, he had two generations of can do. One person makes something with knowledge that no book could ever teach. love. The second puts that thing inside their It is for these reasons that he is where he is body, and it nourishes them both. now. He received unimaginable gifts from his Few people truly get this. Nick is one mother and his grandmother and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why of them. He learned it from two of the most Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day is so important to him. important people in his life, his mother and As executive chef at the King Edward, grandmother. They showed him the dizzy- Nick assured me that his Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day lunch ing levels of complexity that make up feeding would be a madhouse. But he also knows someone. From his grandmother, he learned that when the last pan is put down, his day is that it is both an act of service and self-service. just starting. From his mother, he learned that food can As he put it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take a lot of bring people together, not only at the dinner Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Days to give back even a little of table, but also in the kitchen. From both of what they gave me.â&#x20AC;?

SAGE MEATLOAF

WITH CILANTRO PESTO AND TOMATO JAM SAGE MEATLOAF

May 2 - 8, 2012

1 tablespoon butter 1 teaspoon olive oil 1/2 red onion, diced 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 eggs 1/3 cup whipping cream 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1-1/2 pounds ground pork 1-1/2 pounds ground beef 3 ounces fresh sage, chiffonade, only leaves 3 cups water Kosher salt to taste Coarse black pepper to taste Cilantro pesto (recipe below) Tomato jam (recipe below)

18

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Heat the butter and oil in a sautĂŠ pan. Sweat the onions and garlic over medium heat, approximately 5 minutes. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, cream and Dijon mustard. Add ground beef and pork to the bowl, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add onion mixture, chiffonade sage, paprika and cilantro stems to the bowl. Fold the ingredients together; do not over mix. Place the meatloaf mixture in a 9-inch by 5-inch pan, tap down the pan to remove any air pockets. Place the meatloaf pan into a larger baking dish; pour the water inside the baking dish surrounding the meatloaf pan. Bake in the oven for 1 hour or until the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees. Remove from oven and let the meatloaf rest for 10 minutes. Slice into 6-ounce portions. Spoon 2 ounces of cilantro pesto

over the meatloaf, and then add 2 ounces of tomato jam. Enjoy. Serves four.

CILANTRO PESTO

1 bunch green onions, coarsely chopped 1 bunch fresh cilantro, coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons apple-cider vinegar 1/2 cup olive oil Kosher salt to taste

In a blender place the green onions, cilantro, vinegar and olive oil. Season the mixture with salt and puree. Transfer to a bowl.

TOMATO JAM

1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 red onion, diced 1 clove garlic, minced 1 poblano pepper, split in half 6 plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped Kosher salt to taste 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar 1 tablespoon fresh, chopped cilantro

In a sautĂŠ pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic and pepper, and sautĂŠ until lightly caramelized. Add the chopped tomatoes, and season with salt. Turn the heat to medium high. Add the brown sugar and vinegar. Cook the mixture for 5-10 minutes, or until the liquid has evaporated and tomatoes have cooked down. Garnish with fresh cilantro. Recipes courtesy of Nick Wallace.


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COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. SOUTH OF THE BORDER Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Mexican Foodâ&#x20AC;? 2012. Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Bourbon Street in the Quarter (1855 Lakeland Drive, 601-987-0808) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hot new spot for great New Orleans cuisine, live entertainment and libations. Reed Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Fantastic burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Live music and entertainment! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Hole in the Wall,â&#x20AC;? has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more. Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the fries! Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair, plus weekly lunch specials. Happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Live music. Sportsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Best Sports Bar in 2012 with plenty of sandwiches, seafood baskets, sandwiches and appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Gourmet â&#x20AC;&#x153;pubâ&#x20AC;? cuisine with a full bar and mix of great live music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors. ASIAN Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance, signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi. AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Mimosas, coffees and more! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

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BAKERY Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, breads and pastries, deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings. Paninis, wraps and much more! VEGETARIAN High Noon CafĂŠ (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strict vegetarian spot. BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand;â&#x20AC;?try their Hershey bar pie. PIZZA The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) 2009-2012â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Pizza. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizza, pasta, ice cream and more in Fondren.

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ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine.

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STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crawfish destination. Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino. MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more.


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operationshoestring.org

22

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Martha Martha Alexander Alexander â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Betsy Betsy Bezat Bezat and andKen KenBarton Barton â&#x20AC;˘ Amy Amy and and Cliff Cliff Bates Bates â&#x20AC;˘ Deidra Deidra and and Fred FredBell Bell â&#x20AC;˘ Ruth Ruth and and Carl Carl Black Black Martha and and Dick Dick Blount Blount â&#x20AC;˘ Martha Suzanne and and Bill BillBoone Boone â&#x20AC;˘ Suzanne Crisler and and Doug DougBoone Boone â&#x20AC;˘ Crisler â&#x20AC;˘ Liz Liz and and Bill BillBrister Brister â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Debra Kelly and Thorne Butler â&#x20AC;˘ Brown â&#x20AC;˘ Kelly Sherryand and Tim Byrne â&#x20AC;˘ Thorne Butler â&#x20AC;˘ Sherry Othor and CainTim Byrne â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Nancy and Roy Campbell â&#x20AC;˘ Othor Cain â&#x20AC;˘ Adrienne and Keith Carter â&#x20AC;˘ Nancy and Roy Campbell â&#x20AC;˘ Lynda Ann Costas â&#x20AC;˘ Adrienne and Keith Carter â&#x20AC;˘ Meredith and â&#x20AC;˘ Lynda Ann Costas Jimmy Creekmore â&#x20AC;˘ Meredith and Jimmy Creekmore â&#x20AC;˘ Betsy and Wade Creekmore â&#x20AC;˘ and Wade Creekmore â&#x20AC;˘ Betsy Lynn Crystal â&#x20AC;˘ Crystal â&#x20AC;˘ Lynn Margaret and Brett Cupples â&#x20AC;˘ and Brett Cupples â&#x20AC;˘ Margaret Lesly Murray and Steve Edds â&#x20AC;˘ Murray and Edwards Steve Edds â&#x20AC;˘ Lesly Evelyn and Gary â&#x20AC;˘ andGeorge Gary Edwards â&#x20AC;˘ Evelyn Carol and Evans â&#x20AC;˘ Carol George Evans Oleta and Fitzgerald â&#x20AC;˘ Oleta Fitzgerald David Goodwin â&#x20AC;˘ David Goodwin

501st Legion Stars Wars Costuming Club (Darth Vader, Stormtroopers and other characters)

Local Artists including Shane Henderson will be present.

0 5A44 30H >5 5D= 5>A C74 50<8;H

5352 Hwy 25 | Ste. 1650 Flowood | (601) 992-3100 WWW.HEROESANDDREAMS.COM

START YOUR DAY AT MMA! SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2012

Benefitting the Children and Families of Operation Shoestring

By Teaching Children and Inspiring Families, Operation Shoestring Ensures We All Rise Together.

Saturday, May 5 10 AM - 8PM

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SOUTHERN FARM F BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY P PANY

Parkway Properties, Inc.

Madison Charitable Foundation

Steen, Dalehite & Pace, LLP

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Bettye Bettye and and James James Graves Graves â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Billie Billie and and Al Al Green Green â&#x20AC;˘ Claudia and Robert Robert Hauberg Hauberg â&#x20AC;˘ Leslie Hill Hill â&#x20AC;˘ Mary and Mike Jabaley Jabaley and Jerry Jerry Johnson Johnson â&#x20AC;˘ Louisa Dixon and Jim Johnston Johnston â&#x20AC;˘ Elta and Jim Alan Lange Lange â&#x20AC;˘ Holly and Alan â&#x20AC;˘ Betsy Betsy Bradley Bradley and and â&#x20AC;˘ Robert Robert Langford Langford â&#x20AC;˘ Margie Margie and and Rick Rick Largent Largent â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Davetta and Jonathan Jonathan Lee Lee â&#x20AC;˘ Davetta and â&#x20AC;˘ Maetta Maetta and and Ken Ken Lefoldt Lefoldt â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Julia and T.W. Lewis â&#x20AC;˘ Julia and T.W. Lewis â&#x20AC;˘ Virgi and Chuck Lindsay â&#x20AC;˘ Virgi and Chuck Lindsay â&#x20AC;˘ Donna and Dale Marcum â&#x20AC;˘ Donna and Dale Marcum â&#x20AC;˘ Meredith and J.D. May â&#x20AC;˘ Meredith and J.D. May â&#x20AC;˘ Laurie McRee â&#x20AC;˘ McRee â&#x20AC;˘ Laurie Mary Sue and Don Mitchell â&#x20AC;˘ Sue Dick and Don Mitchell â&#x20AC;˘ Mary Sally and Molpus â&#x20AC;˘ andA. Dick Molpus â&#x20AC;˘ Sally Heather Montgomery â&#x20AC;˘ A. Montgomery â&#x20AC;˘ Heather Sharon Garrison and â&#x20AC;˘ Brad Sharon Garrison and Morris Brad Morris â&#x20AC;˘ Frances and Cooper Morrison â&#x20AC;˘ Wendy Frances and and Chuck CooperMullins Morrison â&#x20AC;˘ Wendy and Chuck Mullins

Donna & Jim Barksdale â&#x20AC;˘ Tonja Tonja Murphy Murphy â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Sheila Sheila and â&#x20AC;˘ and Bill Bill Nicholas Nicholas â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. and Mrs. Howard Nichols Nichols â&#x20AC;˘ Douglas Odom â&#x20AC;˘ Susan and Bill Osborne â&#x20AC;˘ Amanda and Scott Overby â&#x20AC;˘ Wade Overstreet â&#x20AC;˘ Beverly and Bill Painter Painter â&#x20AC;˘ Allen Perry Perry â&#x20AC;˘ Anne Anne and and Allen â&#x20AC;˘ and David David Pharr Pharr â&#x20AC;˘ Michelle Michelle and â&#x20AC;˘ Porter â&#x20AC;˘ Kim Kim and and Trey Trey Porter â&#x20AC;˘ Don Potts Potts â&#x20AC;˘ Becky Becky and and Don â&#x20AC;˘ John Purvis Purvis â&#x20AC;˘ Gayla Gayla and and John â&#x20AC;˘ Mary and Alex Purvis â&#x20AC;˘ Mary and Alex Purvis â&#x20AC;˘ Drs. Ann Myers and â&#x20AC;˘ Drs. Ann Myers and George Schimmel George Schimmel â&#x20AC;˘ Laurel and Josh Schooler â&#x20AC;˘ Laurel and Josh Schooler â&#x20AC;˘Dennis Smith â&#x20AC;˘ Mary Dennis Smith and â&#x20AC;˘ Elizabeth â&#x20AC;˘ George Mary Elizabeth Smith and George Smith â&#x20AC;˘ Charmelia and Adam Spicer â&#x20AC;˘ Maggie Charmelia Adam Spicer â&#x20AC;˘ andand Christian Waddell â&#x20AC;˘ Robin MaggieWalker and Christian Waddell â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Nell Robinand Walker Ed Wall â&#x20AC;˘ Holly Nell and WallWiggs andEdChris â&#x20AC;˘ Holly and Chris Wiggs

Monkeying Around with George at the Museum

9 Breakfast with George in  until The Palette CafÊ by Viking 11 AM Reservations Recommended Call 601­960­1515  to make reservations. $10 Adults / $7 Children

Participate in a few of Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curious â&#x20AC;&#x153;anticsâ&#x20AC;?! l  a foam party in The Art Garden  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss it!!  l a fire truck from                         the Jackson Fire 

Department

l fun in the McRae Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fountains

l l l         photos with George   !

l l l

Activities free for members or with paid admission to the exhibition.

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART 3 8 0 S O U T H L A M A R ST R E E T

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

601-960-1515

WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG


      MAY 22-26      JUNE 9-10   

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8 DAYS p 28 | FILM p 30| MUSIC p 32 | SPORTS p 36

Laughing All Over Again PAUL KOLNIK

by Jacob Rowan

Mel Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stage production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;? is in Jackson May 8 and 9. Warning: Hilarity will ensue.

F

ans of the original Mel Brooks movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;or anyone who is just looking for a good time at the theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;should check out the Broadway musical coming to Thalia Mara Hall May 8 and 9. W. Kessler Ltd. is bringing the musical version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;? to Jackson for what is sure to be an evening full of hilarity, Broadway-caliber performances and great music. Jeff Whiting, the tour director and assistant choreographer of the original production, promises youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see all the iconic scenes from the movie as well as new material Brooks wrote specifically for the stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The musical takes a lot of the lines and moments that were so great from the film and explores them more fully,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. In the musical, many of the movieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best lines are now full-length songs in classic Broadway style. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just

the film on stage,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The audience is going to have some great surprises; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to see the cast dance in ways theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen before and have a wonderful night of entertainment.â&#x20AC;? Averyell Kessler, who is responsible for bring the production to Jackson, says that Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; movie has always been one of her favorites. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just hysterical, and I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resist having it here on stage,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We decide what to bring in based on what our community will enjoy the most. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a fabulous evening of laughter and fun for all of our audience members. It seems right now we could do with a little laughter in our lives.â&#x20AC;? Booking the touring production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;? was no easy task. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a jigsaw puzzle,â&#x20AC;? Kessler explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to match (Thalia Mara Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) available dates with the company on tour all over the country. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit involved.â&#x20AC;? For those who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t familiar with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankenstein,â&#x20AC;? the show is a parody of Mary Shelleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frankenstein,â&#x20AC;? first published anonymously in 1818, and of classic (and kitschy) horror films such as those starring Bela Lugosi. Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fans know that he has a distinct knack for satire. The show, like the film, tells the story of Dr. Victor von Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s descendent, Frederick Frankenstein, who is trying desperately to rise above his grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infamous reputation. He travels to Transylvania after inheriting the original Frankenstein mansion. Discovering the secret laboratory and journals of Dr. Frankenstein, his grandson decides to resume the doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experiments in reanimation. Hilarity ensues when the grandson of another character, Igor, brings Frankenstein an abnormal brain for his experiments, thinking it was the brain of someone named â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abby Normal.â&#x20AC;?

The original Broadway production first appeared in 2007 and was hugely popular. This was due in part to Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; involvement in its production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was there every step of the way,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the production, Mel was there writing new material and perfecting the timing of every joke. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never a dull moment with Mel.â&#x20AC;? The film and the Broadway production were enormously successful, and the producers took the show on the road in 2009. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a lot of excitement about the story,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. Taking a Broadway show on tour creates many challenges for a theater cast as well as some rewarding opportunities. The road troupe had about six weeks of rehearsal to get ready. Today, the production appears in several different theaters each week. The constant moving is the biggest challenge, not just for the cast, but also for the crew. They left only a few of the stage elements from the original show behind, and setting the stage requires elaborate planning. Some of the scenery and set pieces from the first act are loaded onto trucks during the second act. The work is worth it, though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those who have seen the original and the tour version will notice very few differences,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. Being on tour is not all hectic labor. Whiting says that traveling to so many different places can be lots fun, and bringing laughter to so many different people is enormously satisfying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those who know and love the film still have a surprise waiting for them,â&#x20AC;? Whiting says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come relax and have a great night of comedy.â&#x20AC;? See â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;? May 8 and 9 at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St., 601-960-1537). The curtain goes up at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 to $62.50 and are available through Ticketmaster.

"EAUTY 0AINOF7OMANHOOD

May 2 - 8, 2012

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24

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COURTESY NEW STAGE THEATRE

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Getting In Shape Is Within Your Power Exercise professionals and personal trainers at the Baptist Healthplex can create your customized exercise plan, so you can start small and build toward the results you’ve always wanted. JACKSON 601.968.1766

www.mbhs.org

jacksonfreepress.com

CLINTON 601.925.7900

25 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 2012. 9.5” x 6.167”. Commissioned by Robby Channell.


Market Street Festival

SaturdayDowntown Columbus

May 5 Free & Open to the Public 5 entertainment stages with over

It’s ALWAYS FRESH in the Market Street After Dark WEDNESDAY 05/2

Seth Libbey (Blues/Folk)

6030 I-55 North- EXIT 102B (601) 977-9040

Mingo Fishtrap Friday Lukas & The of the Real May 4 PromiseNelson

7:30-9:00 p.m. 9:30-11:00 p.m.

Downtown Columbus 7:30-11 PM $10 tickets

THURSDAY 05/3

Spirits of the House (Bluegrass)

Mingo Fishtrap

FRIDAY 05/4

Shaun Patterson (Alternative Rock)

The Juvenators

Saturdaythe columbus Riverwalk

May 5 Free & Open to the Public

(Blues)

MONDAY 05/7

Karaoke w/ Matt

Deacon Jones & The Late Night 5:00 p.m.

TUESDAY 05/8

Open Mic with Jason Bailey

All for only

$7.98

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia

May 2 - 8, 2012

or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef Thursday : Chicken Diane

26

or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or Chicken & Dumplings

SPONSORED BY

Lounging with the Locals

SATURDAY 05/5

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

Lukas Nelson & The Promise of the Real

$10 Tickets can be purchased in advance at the Market Street Office at 107 5th Street North or at www.marketstreetfestival.com or at the gate. Food & beverages will be available for purchase. Ticket required for admission to gated area.

20 musical acts Children’s Stage and Activities area with 10 acts Over 225 Arts & Crafts Vendors Food Court with over 20 vendors & a pancake breakfast Ice cold beverages Car & Motorcycle Show, Tractor Display & 5K Run Zumba in the Streets with the Y Children’s Activities & Performances, Inflatables, Bungee Trampoline, Walk on Water Balloons, Pony Rides & Characters Junior Fire Fighter Games Ice Cream Eating Contest Tractor Display Video Game Trailer 5K Run WCBI Car Giveaway Hands on Marketplace Giveaways & Much More!!

We brought the great outdoors indoors! Scan QR for more information

Jackson Only Indoor Bouldering Facility! 125 Dyess Road|Ridgeland, MS 39157|601-977-9000

Love the Arts? If you know and love fine arts, books, theater, dance, music or nightlife, you may be the arts writer we’re looking for. Send samples and story ideas to briana@ boomjackson.com.

Jimbo Mathus & Mark “Muleman” Massey Blues Band Eden Brent The Tri State Coalition 10:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m

For complete details contact Main Street Columbus at 662-328-6305 or visit www.marketstreetfestival.com

No Coolers or Pets Please


GET A REWARDS

BOOST Upgrade to a

RUSH Rewards card! Royal Caribbean Cruises* Las Vegas Resort Lodging* Free Drawing Entries Free Slot Play Comp Dollars Free Gifts*

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jacksonfreepress.com

• • • • • •

27


BEST BETS May 2 - 9, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 5/2

At the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Art Garden (380 S. Lamar St.), Adib Sabir performs during Live at Lunch at 11:30 a.m. (free, bring or buy lunch) and Tawanna Shaunte featuring Eclectik Soul performs during the High Note Jam at 5:30 p.m. (free, food for sale). Call 601-960-1515. … MDAH historic preservation director Ken P’Pool speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … The Med Grill hosts the Battle of the Bands at 9 p.m.

THURSDAY 5/3

Fondren After 5 is from 5-8 p.m. Free; call 601-981-9606. … The Spring Art Show featuring Ellen Langford and Ginger Williams-Cook is at 5 p.m. at Lounge Interiors/Lounge Arts

$75 luncheon, free screenings and seminars; call 601-3211209. … Arts Alive! Kicks off at 10 a.m. at Smith Park (Yazoo St.) and runs through May 5. The annual festival includes music, food, and art exhibits. Performers include the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, Legacy and Swing de Paris. Free admission; call 601-326-3450. … The play “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.) and runs through May 6. $7 (cash or check); call 601-948-3533, ext. 222. … See the play “Animal Farm” at 7:30 p.m. at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl); runs through May 6. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-664-0930. … Alison Krauss and Union Station featuring Jerry Douglas perform at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $48.50-$58.50; call 800-7453000. … The Banditos play at Ole Tavern.

COURTESY TAWANNA SHAUNTE

SATURDAY 5/5

Enjoy discounts on train rides during Train Day at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). $9, $8.20 seniors, $6 children ages 2-12, members/babies free; call 601-352-2580. … The Magnet Galaxy of Cars and Bikes Show is at 9 a.m. at Richland Community Center (410 E. Harper St., Richland). Free, vehicle registration: $20 in advance, $25 day of event; call 601-815-4878. … The Pickin’ and Paddlin’ Outdoor Festival is at 10 a.m. at Mayes Lake at LeFleur’s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Performers include the Delta Mountain Boys, Backslash and the Irish Ramblers. Proceeds benefit the Neighborhood Christian Center. $10, children 10 and under free; visit nccjackson.com. … Babalooza: A Festival in Fondren is at noon at Duling Green (Duling Ave. and Old Canton Road). The music lineup includes the Revelations featuring Tre Williams and the Patrick Harkins Band. $10, children 14 and under free; call 601-292-7121 or 601-832-3020. … Mose Allison headlines the Township Jazz Festival at noon at The Township at Colony Park (1111A Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Free admission; call 601-856-6001. … Crossin’ Dixon’s farewell show is at 1 p.m. at Bourbon St. in the Quarter. $15 in advance, $20 day of show. … Jammin’ for Joints is at 7 p.m. at Duling Hall; Liquid Pleasure performs. Benefits the Arthritis Foundation. $65 in advance, $75 at the door, $120 couples; call 601-853-7556. … The Wishmaker’s Bash is at 7 p.m. at

(1491 Canton Mart Road). Free; call 601-206-1788. … Sip, Shop and Savor: The Ultimate Girl’s Night Out Event is at 6 p.m. at Courtyard by Marriott (6280 Ridgewood Court Drive); free gift bags for first 25 shoppers. Free admission; call 601-212-6037. … The Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland) has the gallery open until 8 p.m. for Mother’s Day shopping. Call 601-856-7546. … Big Earl from Pearl performs from 6-9 p.m. at Martin’s. … Spirits of the House is at Fenian’s. … Jason Turner Band performs at Hal & Mal’s. … The Lucky Hand Blues Band is at Que Sera Sera.

FRIDAY 5/4

The American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women

28 Luncheon is at 10 a.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex.

SUNDAY 5/6

The “Animal Secrets” exhibit at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive) closes today. $4-$6, children under 3 and members free; call 601-576-6000. … See the ballet film “The Bright Stream” at 2 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $16; visit msfilm.org. … Eddie Cotton performs at The Med Grill at 6 p.m.

MONDAY 5/7

Take a Tasty Bite Out of Crime is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). The music lineup includes Hunter Gibson and the Gators, Chris Gill and Pam Confer. $50; call 601-212-0016. … Grady Champion’s CD release party is at Underground 119.

TUESDAY 5/8

The musical “Young Frankenstein” is at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall; encore show May 9. $25-$62.50; call 601981-1874 or 800-745-3000. … The “Great Broads of Broadway” Cabaret featuring Lester Senter is at 7:30 p.m. at Underground 119. $15, food for sale; call 601-960-2300.

WEDNESDAY 5/9

Mississippi Arts Commission director Malcolm White speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Hunter Gibson is at Olga’s. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Legacy performs during Arts Alive! at Smith Park May 5 at noon. COURTESY VALERIE PLESTED

May 2 - 8, 2012

Soul-stirring songstress Tawanna Shaunte performs at the High Note Jam at the Mississippi Museum of Art May 2 at 5:30 p.m.

Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). JamHaus performs. Proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Mississippi. $100; call 601-366-9474, ext. 1+305. … The MegaMan Comedy Explosion is at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $20; call 800-745-3000. … The Nameless Open-mic is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640.


 

 

jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enufâ&#x20AC;? May 4-6, 7:30 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.), in the Hewes Room. The play is a series of narratives about the struggles of black women. $7 (cash or check); call 601-948-3533, ext. 222. Jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for Joints May 5, 7 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation. $65 in advance, $75 at the door, $120 couples; call 601-853-7556. Jackson 2000 Dialogue Circles Program May 5-June 9. The program includes dialogue and problem solving to encourage racial harmony. Free; email bevelyn_branch@att.net. Eighth Annual JFP Chick Ball July 28, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention, and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to start a rape crisis center. For ages 18 and up, $5 cover. Seeking sponsors, silent auction donations and volunteers now. More details: jfpchickball.com and follow on Twitter @jfpchickball. Get involved, volunteer, or donate art, money and gifts at chickball@jacksonfreepress. com; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16.

COMMUNITY

I

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Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton). The seminar traces racism to the time of Noah and explores ways to reconcile in the church and beyond. Free; call 601-214-6140 or 601-262-7411.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? May 2, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). MDAH historic preservation director Ken Pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Pool talks about restoration projects on the Gulf Coast. Free; call 601-576-6998.

Cedars Work Day May 5, 9 a.m., at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). Assist in yard maintenance. Bring tools. Call 601-981-9606.

Drop Out Prevention Town Hall Meeting May 3, 6 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), in the Community Room. Dinner and door prizes included. Free; call 601-948-4725.

Train Day May 5, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Enjoy 50 percent off rides. $9, $8.20 seniors, $6 children ages 2-12, members and babies free; call 601-352-2580.

Summer Enhancement Program Registration May 3, 6 p.m., at Metrocenter Mall (3645 Highway 80 W.). For youth ages 6-16. Shot record or birth certificate required. $70; call 601-960-0471.

Babalooza: A Festival in Fondren May 5, noon, at Duling Green (Duling Ave. and Old Canton Road). Enjoy food, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and music. $10, children 14 and under free; call 601-292-7121 or 601-832-3020.

Sip, Shop and Savor: The Ultimate Girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Night Out Event May 3, 6 p.m., at Courtyard by Marriott (6280 Ridgewood Court Drive). The first 25 shoppers receive gift bags. Call 601-212-6037. Precinct 1 COPS Meeting May 3, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 1 (810 Cooper Road). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0001. Arts Alive! May 4-5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Smith Park (Yazoo St.). The festival includes music, food, and art exhibits. Free admission; call 601-326-3450. Slamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Youth Basketball League Registration May 5, 8 a.m., at George Kurts Gymnasium (125 Gymnasium Drive). For youth ages 17 and under. Birth certificate and recent photo required. $10 per player; call 601-960-0471. Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk May 5, 8 a.m., at Mayes Lake at LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Adults must accompany children under 15. Free, $3 car entrance fee; call 601-956-7444. Magnet Galaxy of Cars and Bikes Show May 5, 9 a.m., at Richland Community Center (410 E. Harper St., Richland). See cars and motorcycles, and participate in a health fair and a silent auction. Free, vehicle registration: $20 in advance, $25 day of event; call 601-815-4878. Freedom Camp for Biblical Truth in Racial Reconciliation May 5, 9 a.m., at Baptist Healthplex,

 

 

 

Bathsheba Grand Chapter Golf Tournament May 5, noon, at Brookwood Byram Country Club (5001 Forest Hill Road, Byram). $75 per golfer; call 601-953-8323 or 601-896-3947. Real Girl Magazine Spring Issue Celebration May 5, 2 p.m., at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). The event is for girls ages 12-18 and their mothers. Free; call 601529-7933. Cinco de Mayo Zumba Fiesta, 4 p.m., at Courthouse Racquet and Fitness Club, Brandon (255 Mar-Lyn Drive, Brandon). Costumes welcome. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-209-7566. Burn the Dance Floor May 5, at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Enjoy free classes at 6 p.m. and 9 p.m., ballroom dancing from 7-9 p.m. and a salsa party from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. $10, $5 with college ID; call 601-213-6355. Dog Day Afternoons May 6, noon, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Play with or adopt a dog in the Art Garden. Call 601-960-1515. Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ward 4 Community Meeting May 8, 6 p.m., at St. John Missionary Baptist Church (4895 Medgar Evers Blvd.). Share suggestions and receive information on services. Call 601-960-1084.

more EVENTS, page 31

jacksonfreepress.com

High Note Jam Concert Series May 3, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy music from Tawanna Shaunte of Eclectik Soul and refreshments in the Art Garden. Free, food for sale; call 601-960-1515.

Cinco de Mayo: The Kid Version

FILE PHOTO

Fondren After 5 May 3, 5 p.m. This monthly event showcases neighborhood shops, galleries and restaurants. Free; call 601-981-9606.

29


6A0=3E84F

DIVERSIONS|film COURTESY INTREPID PICTURES

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. May 4- Thurs. May 10 2012 3-D Marvel’s The Avengers PG13

The Lucky One PG13

Marvel’s The Avengers (non 3-D) PG13

Think Like A Man PG13

3-D Pirates: Band Of Misfits PG

R

Pirates: Band Of Misfits (non 3-D) PG

Cabin In The Woods Lockout

John Cusack (left) stars as Edgar Allan Poe in the curious movie mashup, “The Raven.”

PG13

Wrath Of The Titans (non 3-D) PG13

Safe

R

The Raven

R

The Hunger Games PG13

The Five Year Engagement

R

Journey 2 (non 3-D)

Chimpanzee

G

Forgotten Lore by Anita Modak-Truran

PG

“O

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten

May 2 - 8, 2012

Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

30

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS 601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

nce upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, / Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,” begins Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven.” The new movie of the same title opens on Poe (John Cusack) sitting alone on a bench. Poe is wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming of forgotten lore, until so weak and weary, he ponders nothing more. I mean, he’s nevermore, no more; you know, dead. And there’s a raven, never flitting, just sitting, perched above Poe’s head. Perhaps it seeks a crumb of bread, but more than likely, it’s because Poe’s dead. A title card flashes up. It informs us that the last day of Poe’s life was shrouded in mystery. The movie ponders and wanders until you’re weak and teary: O’ where? O’ where did Poe go? So this movie comes a rapping and a tapping with a storyline dumber than Larry, Curly and Moe. Script writers Ben Livingston and Hannah Shakespeare (methinks her surname may be assumed) fictionalize Poe’s last days on the streets of Baltimore, Md., where he was found in a depraved state of delirium, repeating the name “Reynolds” shortly before he died Oct. 7, 1849. Sounds promising, doesn’t it? “The Raven,” directed by James McTeigue (“V for Vendetta”), starts off ominously. Fog and darkness envelope the great city of Baltimore. Horses clip clop along shadowy brick-paved streets. A masked murderer spins Poe’s tales into visceral scenes of death and gore. The police investigation stalls until Detective Emmett Fields (Luke Evans) figures out that the murder scenes are grisly reenactments of Poe’s stories. As death and mayhem ensues, Poe rankles the commoners in the bars. He siphons their ale, he shouts out his poetry, and the rednecks manhandle him out the door. The film depicts Poe as a charming boozer hopelessly in love with a young heiress named Emily (Alice Eve). Cusack emits a puckish spirit, spewing off clever lines as the Baltimore bard of his time, and Eve glows with Victoria pureness of heart. She’s dazzling,

although the pairing seems destined to fail. The raven portentously appears to signal to us that all is not well in the lovers’ paradise, although the telltale sign is when Emily’s father (Brendan Gleeson) pulls out his revolver and threatens to shoot Poe if he does not leave his little princess alone. But then something more grim, ungainly and ghastly occurs. Edgar Allan Poe turns into an action hero! (GASP!) With a billowy black cape draped over his shoulders, Poe comes to the aid of Detective Fields after the madman kidnaps his lovely Emily. Whatever spark of originality the film began with now gets swept into night’s Plutonian shore by a whodunit investigation. Mashing together story lines from “Phantom of the Opera,” “National Treasure,” “Sherlock Holmes” and the Ellery Queen television mysteries into a bloody pulp fiction, Poe and Fields painstakingly follow the clues until the murderer is unmasked—but only to Poe. Poe must deal with the devil to save his true love. (GULP!) The music swells out of control, because the filmmakers are truly mad and cannot restrain themselves any longer. I had hoped that this movie would elevate Poe and his macabre material in the way that “The Hours” took Virginia Wolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway” to soaring heights of imagination. But “The Raven” treats imagination as a felony, and the Hollywood explanation of Poe’s death lacks the cleverness demanded of the subject matter. But this film, in a brilliant, unintended way, does manage to snuff out the genius of the poet and stuff him into cinematic martyrdom. So then there came a rasping on how to kill Poe’s legendary lore. It’s a film called “The Raven,” steeped in red death and gore. Still your expectations, and allow the mystery to explore. But alas, there’s only blandness there, and nothing more. And with your movie soul fizzled to the floor, a black bird croaks, “Never. Nevermore!” The picture fades to black, and you walk out the door.


jfpevents from page 29 STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl). Call 601-664-0930. • “Animal Farm.” Shows are May 4-5 at 7:30 p.m., and May 6 at 2 p.m. through May 6. $15, $10 seniors and students. • “Lend Me A Tenor” Auditions May 5, 10 a.m., and May 8, 6:30 p.m. The play is Aug. 10-19. Events at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Call 800-745-3000. • Mega-Man Comedy Explosion May 5, 8 p.m. Performers include Tony Roberts, Steve Brown, Lav Luv, J.J. Williamson and Swayde. $20. • “Young Frankenstein” May 8-9, 7:30 p.m. Musical based on Mel Brooks’ film. $25-$62.50. Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Ring Kings: Mayweather vs. Cotto Fight Live” May 5, 8 p.m. $17, $16 seniors and students, $15 children. • “Wagner’s Dream” May 7, 6:30 p.m. $11.50, $10.50 seniors/students, $9.50 children. Fondren Theatre Workshop Playwright Night May 8, 7 p.m., at Brent’s Diner (655 Duling Ave.) featuring Brent Hearn. Free; call 601-301-2281. “The Foreigner” May 4-13, at Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg) Friday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. $12, $10 seniors, $7 students, $5 children; call 601-636-0471. Art House Cinema Downtown May 6, 2 p.m., at Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See the ballet film “The Bright Stream.” $16; msfilm.org. Being Belhaven Arts Series through June 22, at Belhaven Park (Poplar Blvd.). Enjoy performances Thursdays around 5 p.m. Free; call 601-352-8850. Nameless Open-mic May 5, 9 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). $5, $3 to perform; call 601720-4640.

MUSIC Live at Lunch May 2, 11:30 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Adib Sabir performs in the Art Garden. Free; call 601-960-1515. Sean Johnson and the Wild Lotus Band May 4, 7:30 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call Butterfly Yoga at 601-594-2313 for details. Alison Krauss and Union Station May 4, 8 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $48.50-$58.50; call 800-745-3000. Township Jazz Festival May 5, noon, at The Township at Colony Park (1111A Highland Colony Parkway). Free admission; call 601-856-6001.

Mingo Fishtrap May 5, 5:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Asleep at the Wheel also performs. $10, children 14 and under free; email chip@mingofishtrap.com. Music in the City May 8, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. John Paul performs. Free, donations welcome; call 601-354-1533. “Great Broads of Broadway” Cabaret May 8, 7:30 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). Lester Senter sings. $15; call 601-960-2300.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • May 5, 2 p.m., Kimberla Lawson Roby signs “The Reverend’s Wife.” $24.99 book. • May 8, 4 p.m., Robin Bridges signs “The Gathering Storm.” $17.99 book.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Call 601-213-6355. • Bachata Class May 3-31. Thursdays at 7 p.m. $10 per class, $40 all classes. • Dance Grooves and Hip-hop Party. Saturdays from 4-5 p.m. $10. Portrait Drawing Class May 9-30, at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119 (119 S. President St.). Jerrod Partridge teaches the class Wednesdays from 5-9 p.m. $150; call 601-668-5408.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Curious George Events May 5, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515. • Breakfast with George 9 a.m., in the Palette Cafe by Viking. Menu items include banana pancakes. Prices vary. • Monkeying Around with George Family Day 10 a.m. Meet Curious George and enjoy activities in the Art Garden. Free with paid admission.

ES - O - TER - I - CA: A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippi’s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens • Pendulums Books • Wands • Moldavite Jewelry & More National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

Spring Art Show May 3, 5 p.m., at Lounge Interiors/Lounge Arts (1491 Canton Mart Road). See works from Ellen Langford and Ginger WilliamsCook. Free; call 601-206-1788. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Go Red for Women Luncheon May 4, 10 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The American Heart Association’s event includes a healthy lunch, screenings, a silent auction, exhibits, testimonials from women affected by heart disease, and a fashion show. $75 luncheon, free screenings and seminars; call 601-321-1209.

Day at the Derby May 5, 4 p.m., at Providence Hill Farm (2600 Carsley Road). Enjoy watching the Kentucky Derby on television, mint juleps, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and live and silent auctions. The Jackson All Star Band performs. Hats and colorful ties encouraged. Proceeds benefit the University Transplant Guild. For adults only. $50; call 601-978-0271. Wishmaker’s Bash May 5, 7 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The annual fundraiser includes live and silent auctions, and music from JamHaus. Proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Mississippi. Sponsorships available. $100; call 601-366-9474, ext. 1+305. Take a Tasty Bite Out of Crime May 7, 7 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy gourmet food, drinks and music from Fingers Taylor and the Soulshine Allstars, Hunter Gibson and the Gators, Chris Gill, Will and Linda, Pam Confer, and Eddie Williams. Proceeds go toward improving communication between local law enforcement agencies. $50; call 601-212-0016.

jacksonfreepress.com

Pickin’ and Paddlin’ Outdoor Festival May 5, 10 a.m., at Mayes Lake at LeFleur’s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Enjoy canoe races, exhibits, children’s activities and a barbecue lunch. Performers include storyteller Diane Williams, the Delta Mountain Boys, Backslash, the Irish Ramblers and the Neighborhood Christian Center Children’s Choir. Proceeds benefit the Neighborhood Christian Center. $10, children 10 and under free; visit nccjackson.com.

31


ZAK SHELBY-SZYSZKO

DIVERSIONS|music

Pushing Forward by Larry Morrisey

T

he Revelations may have a sound that’s rooted in classic soul music, but don’t expect them to show up in jumpsuits. The Brooklyn, N.Y.-based group draws much of its musical inspiration from southern soul of the 1960s and ’70s. While lead vocalist Tre Williams’ expressive voice brings to mind a host of iconic singers from that era, many of their lyrics focus on contemporary life, and the group dresses New York street sharp—no big hair or other ’70s fashion holdovers. Guitarist Wes Mingus reveals that despite their love of the older sounds, the band members are focused on being part of the contemporary soul scene. “We’re trying to have one foot in that past, but still have another one moving forward,” he explains. “We don’t want to be pigeonholed as a throwback act.” The core members of the group (Williams, Mingus and drummer Gintas Janusonis) first came together in 2008 when Williams was recording songs with Bob Perry, now the band’s producer and manager. They brought in Mingus and Janusonis as session musicians on the project. When the first song they recorded (“I Don’t Want to Know,” which has become their most well-known song) came together well, the musicians started thinking that the project might become something bigger.

“A couple of songs into it, we realized that there was something in the chemistry that transcended the session work,” Mingus remembers. Although the band remains based in New York, Mississippi played an important role in The Revelations’ initial success. When they released their first EP in 2008, WKXI (“Kixie 107”) in Jackson was the first radio station in the country to play The Revelations. The first single, “I Don’t Want to Know,” caught on with Mississippi audiences and by early 2009, the group played its first concert in the state. “We started going down to Mississippi and doing shows,” Mingus says. “And still, to this day, we have a much stronger foundation in Mississippi than even here in New York.” The group continues to play in Mississippi and around the Deep South on a regular basis. It recorded its latest CD, “Concrete Blues,” at Royal Studios in Memphis. Royal was the home studio of Willie Mitchell, the late music producer who recorded Al Green’s ’70s-era albums as well as many other albums by giants of soul. Mitchell passed away in 2010, but The Revelations were able to work at Royal with Mitchell’s son, Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell. Some veteran Memphis musicians were part of the sessions, including organist Charles Hodges (who played on Al Green’s classic re-

Natalie’s Notes

May 2 - 8, 2012

or as long as I can remember, I’ve always wanted to be some bad rock ‘n’ roll chick like Joan Jett shredding guitar licks or Bonnie Raitt with her amazing slide guitar playing. For years, I’ve tried to be a guitar player. I’ve bought books and taken the lessons. (Thanks, Steve Deaton, for putting up with me when you were my instructor.) Finally, I decided to focus on singing and asked (begged) others to accompany me on guitar or whatever instrument they could play. It’s been almost a year since my former musical partner, Clinton, moved to California, and I’ve been unsuccessful at finding another “one-man band” to back me up. I even own three guitars: a Yamaha acoustic that was once in a treehouse with a hornet’s nest in the hole, a Peavey bass (I have no clue what I’m doing, but when I put that bass on, I love it), and an electric Squier. But every time I tinker around with any of my axes, my self-doubt rears its ugly head, and I get frustrated easily. For the longest time, I didn’t think I would ever learn how to play and soon just got depressingly acclimated to the idea that I’d never be in a band again. At 35, I figured I was definitely too old to learn how to play an instrument, especially with my busy schedule. Then I found an article about a man named Gary Marcus, a well-known research psychologist and director of the New York University Center for Language and Music. At

age 38, he picked up the guitar and learned how to play. He started by playing the video game Guitar Hero and learning songs from it. In his book “Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning” (Penguin Press, 2012, $25.95), Marcus tells about his past failed attempts at becoming a musician. He overcame his fear to find a guitar You’re never too old to learn something new, such as instructor, for example. playing the guitar. He writes that the human mind, at any age, can learn something new. “Guitar Zero” has received rave reviews from the likes of Dr. Drew Pinsky, host of “Dr. Drew’s Lifechangers,” and national publications. At age 42, Marcus has his own band in New York City called Rush Hour, and he is enjoying playing around the area. For more information on Marcus and his book, as well as his other books he’s penned on human brain development, visit garymarcus.com. Although Jackson has some wonderful instructors if you’re interested in taking proper guitar lessons, if you’re

FILE PHOTO

32

cords) and bassist James Alexander from the Bar-Kays. Mingus recalls that everyone knew it would be a memorable session when they first walked in the door. “Charles was sitting at the organ and warming up on (Al Green’s) ‘Let’s Stay Together,’” he recalls. “Our jaws just dropped. ... It was the guy on that organ who played on all those great songs. We realized we had to bring our A-game to be worthy of this company.” The Revelations are expanding their touring to the national level, but Mingus says the acceptance they’ve received from Mississippi audiences has been an important validation for the group. “To be able to take the music back to

where it came from and to be recognized and appreciated as being authentic, that’s about as good as it gets for us,” he says. The Revelations return to Mississippi as one of the featured groups at the Babalooza Festival on Saturday, May 5, on Duling Green in Fondren, starting at noon. Other performers include Asleep At The Wheel, Mingo Fishtrap, Buddy and the Squids, Patrick Harkins and Daves Highway. Admission is $10. Call 601292-7121 for details or visit the event’s Facebook page or ardenland.net. For more information on the group, visit therevelations.net. The band will also perform in a blues show at the Vicksburg City Auditorium on Friday, May 11. Call 601955-4894 for more information.

Never Too Old

by Natalie Long

F

The Revelations (left to right:Tre Williams, Gintas Janusonis, Rell and Wes Mingus) perform at the Babalooza Festival May 5 at Duling Green in Fondren.

like me and broke like the 10 Commandments, try starting with a book. I recently purchased “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Guitar Exercises” (Alpha; Pap/Com edition, 2010, $21.95) by Hemme Luttjeboer. The book comes with an audio CD. I’ve also pulled out and dusted off my “Hal Leonard Guitar Method” (Hal Leonard Corp., 1995, $10.99) book, which also comes with an audio CD. The Hal Leonard book was helpful when I took formal guitar lessons, so I’m excited that I haven’t lost or misplaced it. Of course, you can visit any of our fine music stores in the Jackson metro area that have great selections of DIY books on learning any instrument. YouTube also has copious amounts of beginning guitar lesson videos to watch and learn from as well. Now, I will advise that if you’re going to learn any instrument on your own, it would be wise to seek out a knowledgeable instructor of whatever instrument you’re learning so that he or she can steer you in the right direction or personally answer questions when you’re not sure about something. Finally, practice, practice and practice as much as you can. Your fingers are going to hurt—mine did, a lot—but it will definitely pay off (from what I’ve been told). It’s kind of like exercise: You hate to do it, but once you do and start to see results, it inspires you to keep at it. I hope you all have a great week, and continue sending me your listings at music@jacksonfreepress.com. I appreciate all of you for your continued support of local music. If you see me out and about, please say hello!


W

hood Christian Center features music from The Delta Mountain Boys, Irish Ramblers, Back\Slash and the Neighborhood Center Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir. The event starts at 10 a.m. The $10 admission fee includes a barbecue lunch. Visit nccjackson.com for updates. COURTESY MICHAEL WILSON

hen I was in college, I was a music festival fanatic. Even though Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m older now, when I see the lineups for all the jam-packed music festivals in Mississippi, I still get giddy. If you feel like you just have to get out of town, head up to Greenwood for the 8th Annual River to the Rails Festival May 4 and 5. Not only will they have art and barbecue, their lineup this year is stellar. On Friday, Delta favorites The Krackerjacks, Blue Mountain, The Plantation Allstars, and Howard Street perform. The music starts up at 5 p.m. For more information, visit rivertotherails.org. Also May 4 and 5, Byram hosts the Swinging Bridge Festival at Southpoint Centre. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lineup includes the Jason Turner Band, Bad Influence and The Hairicanes, starting at 6 p.m. After a full day of family fun, Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music lineup includes local favorites Shadz of Grey, and the Bluz Boys. The lineup also begins at 6 p.m. Friday night is free; $10 admission Saturday night. Visit byramswingingbridgefestival.com for more information. On May 5, Duling Green (corner of Old Canton Road and Duling Avenue) is home to the first ever Babalooza, featuring activities for kids, as well as Mingo Fishtrap, Asleep at the Wheel, Buddy and the Squids, Patrick Harkins Band, Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Highway, and The Revelations with Tre Williams. The event starts at noon and will end around 9 p.m. Tickets are $10. Find out more at finditinfondren.com. Also May 5, the annual Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Paddlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Outdoor Festival is at Mayes Lake at Lefleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff State Park. In addition to fishing demos, face painting and storytelling for the kids, this benefit for the Neighbor-

by Natalie Long

THIS WEEK WENDESDAY 5/2 Howard Jones Jazz (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 5/3 Jason Turner (Restaurant)

FRIDAY 5/4 Mose Allison is the featured performer at the Township Jazz Festival May 5.

If jazz is your thing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;moseyâ&#x20AC;? on over to The Township in Ridgeland for the Township Jazz Festival May 5, featuring singer, pianist and songwriter Mose Allison, who has worked with greats such as Van Morrison, Elvis Costello and Diana Krall. Allison received the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lifetime Achievement Award in February, and the Mississippi Blues Commission issued a marker on the Mississippi Blues Trail in his honor. Also performing at this event will be the Capital City Stage Band, Latinismo, The Vamps, The Andy Hardwick Trio with Lisa Palmer, Southern Komfort Brass Band, Madison Central Jazz Band and Ridgeland High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Band. The free event kicks off at noon on the lawn in front of The Township. Visit townshipjazzfestival.com for more information. If you know of other festivals happening nearby, email music@jacksonfreepress.com.

Swing de Paris (Restaurant)

SATURDAY 5/5 Uncle Sam (RR) Ronnie Dennis (Restaurant)

MONDAY 5/7 Central MS Blues Society presents: Blues Monday (Restaurant)

TUESDAY 5/8 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (restaurant)

Coming Soon THU 5.17: Vagabond Swing (RR) & BAT (DR) FRI 5.18: Corey Smith with special guest Southern Comfort Brass (RR) & Luckenbach (DR) TUE 5.22: The Lumineers (RR)

#ELEBRATING*ERRY#LOWER E\5LFKDUG&RXSH

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MCA NASHVILLE

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Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday,May 2nd

CHALMERS & BABY JAN (Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, May 3rd BOOKER WALKER (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, May 4th

SOFA KINGS

(Americana) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, May 5th

KING EDWARD

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Monday, May 7th

GRADY CHAMPION CD RELEASE PARTY

(Blues) 7-10, $20 Cover Includes Shanachie Days CD Free Hors Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Oeuvres & Cash Bar Tuesday,May 8th

OPERA UNDERGROUND (LESTER SENTER IN â&#x20AC;&#x153;GREAT BROADS OF BROADWAYâ&#x20AC;?) (Jazz) 7:30-11, $15 Cover

Monday - Friday

Wednesday, May 9th BILL & TEMPERANCE

Blue Plate Lunch

Thursday, May 10th

with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

HOWARD JONES JAZZ (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, May 11th

CEDRIC BURNSIDE PROJECT

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, May 12th

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

ZAC HARMON

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

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33


livemusic MAY 2 - WEDNESDAY

Weekly Lunch Specials

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

05/02

LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES

NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM FRIDAY

05/04

Otis Lotus

SATURDAY

$

9.99

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

May 3

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM Friday May 4

Banditos Saturday

May 5

The Bailey Brothers

05/05

Static Ensemble

with

Denton Hatcher Monday

May 7

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

Featuring Members of Iron Feathers and Furrows Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

May 2 - 8, 2012

MID DAY CAFE 34

Serving Lunch 11-2!

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

sponsored by

May 8

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

May 9

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

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5A44 FX5X Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

Join us For Cinco De Mayo

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011

Voted Best Veggie Burger

Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

-Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Drop In For Our

Saturday May 5

M-Th from 5-7

Drink Specials Live Music

Early Bird Special 2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

M editerranean 'JTI(SJMM

$10 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘April 30 - May 4 Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Mon | Shrimp Etouffee or Meatloaf Pie Tue | Peppersteak over Rice or Shrimp Scampi Wed | Roasted Pork Loin or Country Fried Steak Thu | Chicken & Bowtie Pasta or Sausage Poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Boy Fri | Catfish Parmesan or Smoked Brisket

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

QSFTFOUT

Now accepting the JSU Supercard.

%DDIE#OTTON

'SJEBZ4BUVSEBZÂ&#x2026;QN 4VOEBZÂ&#x2026;QN

Fresh Tex Mex

)FBMUIZWFHFUBSJBOEJTIFT WBSJFUJFTPG GJTI TISJNQBOETDBMMPQT

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

M 12:23(1

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ¡V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG

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0ANTROUT'YROS &ISH3PECIALSIDES -ONDAY &RIDAYUNTIL

Full Bar Now Available!

0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4 NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ&#x2026;

Happy Hour â&#x20AC;˘ M-F â&#x20AC;˘ 4-6pm 318 South State Street | Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

Congratulations to Our Staff Award Winners April 11 - May 2

Falcon Award

[Chosen by the Jackson Free Press Staff]

Holly Harlan Graphic Designer

7UHHWRS%OYG)ORZRRG06Â&#x2021; %HKLQGWKH$SSOHEHH¡VRQ/DNHODQG

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Kick Ass Award

[Chosen by the Publisher and Editor-In-Chief]

Kimberly Griffin

Try The

(a very high-class pig stand)

Sales Director

Most Enterprising Reporter R.L. Nave Reporter

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.8538

jacksonfreepress.com

[Chosen by the Editor-In-Chief]

35


Bryan’s Rant

Drafted, or Not Jesse Gallagher Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman PAUL MITCHELL SIGNATURE SALON NOW CARRYING PAUL MITCHELL AWAPUHI

574 Hwy 51 N (next to Trace Grill) in Ridgeland 601.856.4330 | fax: 601.856.4505

T

he NFL Draft is over. In case you missed where the Mississippi players went, here is a quick analysis of players who were drafted and others who signed as undrafted free agents. NFL teams drafted five players from Mississippi schools. Mississippi State led the way with three players drafted; Southern Miss and Ole Miss each had one player drafted. The Philadelphia Eagles took MSU defensive tackle Fletcher Cox in the first round with the 12th overall pick. Cox is a plug-andplay starter who will make an immediate impact on the Eagles’ defense. Lamar Holmes, offensive tackle from USM, will get a chance to add depth to the Atlanta Falcons’ offensive line as he battles for a starting spot. In my opinion, Holmes is more of a right tackle than a left tackle. The Arizona Cardinals drafted Bobby Massie, offensive tackle from Ole Miss, in the fourth round. Look for him to possibly start this season on their offensive line. Massie could be a left or right tackle, in my opinion. MSU running back Vick Ballard goes to a bad team in the Indianapolis Colts, but he will get a chance to grow with Andrew Luck, the first pick of draft. Ballard should get carries and help out on special teams. Charles Mitchell, MSU safety, heads to Atlanta where he will mainly play special

teams his first year, but you might see him helping the secondary late in the season. Two quarterbacks were signed as undrafted free agents: former Southern Miss quarterback Austin Davis and Jackson State University’s “white tiger,” Casey Therriault. Davis has landed in St. Louis, where he will have the chance to compete against the often-injured Sam Bradford. Davis has a good chance to make this Rams team. Therriault signed with the Atlanta Falcons. This is a good spot for him to learn from Matt Ryan and to get a chance to show what he can do in the preseason. Therriault might get cut late in training camp depending where on the team’s depth chart he is and how many quarterbacks the Falcons are going to carry in the regular season. Other Mississippi players signed as undrafted free agents include: • James Carmon, offensive tackle, MSU, Baltimore Ravens • Ronnie Thornton, linebacker, USM, Chicago Bears • Quinton Saulsberry, center, MSU, Minnesota Vikings • Paul Cox, wide receiver, Mississippi Valley State, San Diego Chargers • Donovan Robinson, defensive end, Jackson State, New York Jets • Kelvin Bolden, wide receiver, Southern Miss, Washington Redskins

by Bryan Flynn

CONGRATULATIONS

Skylar Laine

-TOP 5 AMERICAN IDOL! -

Tune in to FOX, May 2nd & vote for our hometown girl! Results party on May 3rd at 7 p.m.

Snazz | May 4 | 9:00pm Faze 4 | May 5 | 9:00pm

May 2 - 8, 2012

• Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE!

36

• $3 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS • 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

Follow us on Facebook

It’s been 34 years since the last Triple Crown winner. Xxxx On Saturday, 20 horses will begin a journey last won by Affirmed for horseracing’s greatest prize. THURSDAY, MAY 3 NBA Playoffs (8:30-11 p.m. TNT): Oklahoma City travels to the Dallas Mavericks for game three between the upstart Thunder and defending champion Mavericks.

MONDAY, MAY 7 NHL Playoffs (6:30-9:30 p.m.): The Washington Capitals and New York Rangers go at it in game five, if necessary (the Rangers lead the series 1-0 when at this writing).

FRIDAY, MAY 4 NHL Playoffs (6:30-9:30 p.m. NBSN): The Phoenix Coyotes travel to Tennessee to take on the Nashville Predators. Wouldn’t it be strange if a team from Phoenix or Nashville raises the Stanley Cup?

TUESDAY, MAY 8 MLB (7-10 p.m. Sportsouth): The Atlanta Braves are at historic Wrigley Field in the second of a three-game series against the Chicago Cubs.

SATURDAY, MAY 5 Horseracing (3-6 p.m. NBC): The 138th Kentucky Derby “Run for the Roses” at Churchill Downs in Louisville marks the first leg of the 2012 Triple Crown for thoroughbreds. SUNDAY, MAY 6 NASCAR (11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Fox) NASCAR travels to Talladega Superspeedway for the Aaron’s 499 as Jimmy Johnson looks to repeat his win last year.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 MLB (2-5 p.m. SPSO): The Braves and Cubs wrap up their three-game series in an afternoon affair, as Atlanta looks to keep pace with the Washington Nationals in the National League East. It was sad to see the Stanley Cup Playoffs take a back seat to stupid, racist Twitter remarks by some Boston Bruins fans after the Washington Capitals eliminated the Bruins. If you didn’t hear about it, be sure to Google it. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.




  

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LIFE&STYLE

DOMESTICITY, CREATIVITY, & DIY

HITCHED p 40 | FLY GIFTS for MOM p 42

It’s Not Too Late to Plant

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or those who have been thinking “I’d like to start an organic garden this year,” it’s not too late. Lots of folks plant during the first week in May. Traditionally in Mississippi, the old folks advise planting on Good Friday, but that’s not a hard rule, and it mostly applies to seeds, not “starts,” or plants started in pots. Also, we generally experience a frost around Easter in Mississippi, which can kill tender plants. So it’s often wise to wait until the week after Easter to plant. That covers early planting, but what about on the other end? How late can you plant? You can plant just about anytime in spring and summer and grow fresh, wholesome fruits and vegetables. For organic gardens, the operative word is “bugs.” Because we don’t use chemical poisons—where one

can plant late and then spray and spray and spray to control ever more hatches of insects—we want to get started early and allow both beneficial and harmful insects to develop together, in balance. At my little ShooFly farm, anyway, we plant early to harvest before it gets really hot in August. Who wants to be out working in the hot sun when it’s 100 degrees and the humidity is 98 percent? We don’t, for sure! It’s a balancing act; you don’t want to plant too early and endanger the plants via frost or when the soil is so cold that seeds don’t germinate and rot in the ground. Plant too early and your plants may become stunted, but you don’t want to wait so long that the bugs are already established to eat up your plants. To plan a timeline for your garden, just read the seed packet. It will say how many days until maturity. For example, if you plant corn with 90 days maturity, and you plant May 2, you can expect ripe corn August 2 or thereabouts. Jim PathFinder Ewing has a book with Findhorn Press, “Conscious Food: Sustainable Growth, Spiritual Eating,” on organic food, farming and spirit to be published in the fall. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

Making a ‘Jim’s Plot’

I

recommend creating a “Jim’s Plot,” a 4-foot by 8-foot plot, either raised bed or not, to start your garden. If you like, you can always expand it; but that’s a good starting size. Outline a 4-by-8 area and enclose it in nontoxic materials. You can buy synthetic lumber, including stuff made from recycled plastics and rubber, or use materials you have at hand like concrete blocks, tin or other materials. You could also simply mound up the soil as a natural boundary or use cedar or redwood lumber. In the plot, use either bagged soil—Miracle-Gro Organic Choice Garden Soil is widely available at garden stores and is OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute) approved for certified organic use—or dig from areas of your yard where leaves may have accumulated over the years to provide loamy soil. Work the soil with a shovel to loosen it to the depth of the shovel (about 8 inches), or use a garden tiller. Start keeping a compost bin and add compost periodically to build up the soil. It should take you maybe a day to build and plant the plot. Use certified organic seeds (available at local garden supply stores) or heirloom plants. To be all organic, don’t use hybrids or genetically modified (GMO) plants.

COURTESY BALL PUBLISHING

FILE PHOTO

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

“W

omen and Their Gardens” by Catherine Horwood (Ball Publishing, 2012, $26.95) would make a terrific Mother’s Day gift idea. Subtitled “A History from the Elizabethan Era to Today,” it’s a hefty tome at 431 pages, but it’s filled with interesting lore from the 18th-century salons of Mayfair to the women gardeners of World War II. The book’s focus is English gardens; it doesn’t delve into the modern small-agriculture movement in America that is liberally composed of young women. But if she’s into gardening, mom might like it.

W

hen food shopping, how do you know what you’re buying? You may be surprised at the misleading information on labels. For example, The New York Times recently reported a dispute between Fresh Del Monte and Del Monte Foods—two companies created out of what was a single Del Monte in 1989. Fresh Del Monte is supposed to sell “fresh fruit, fresh vegetables and fresh produce” while Del Monte Foods markets canned and preserved fruits, vegetables and produce. That seems clear, right? But Fresh DM is suing DM Food because it is selling processed fruit and fruit products in plastic tubs on refrigerated shelves of grocery and convenience store produce sections. Maybe that’s not fresh produce, huh?

Consumers must be savvy to what’s presented to them and not rely on product positioning in the supermarket or even the labels, which, in this case, carry such appealing names as Fruit Naturals and SunFresh. Labels on processed foods, or food “products,” tell very little. For example, there is a nationwide movement to label foods containing GMO ingredients, which are banned in U.S. organic foods and most of the world. If you want fresh produce, don’t buy it packaged. Then, look at the label affixed to it. All produce (including fruit, veggies, nuts and herbs) will have either a four or five digit number, part of the PLU, or Price Look Up Codes, established in 1949. Four digits means it’s conventionally grown with chemicals. If that

number has a 9 in front (making it five digits long), it’s certified organic; similarly if it starts with an 8, it’s GMO. Every produce variety has a code (see plucodes. com for info). Some labels, such as Fair Trade, are reliable because independent organizations stand behind them to ensure the label is accurate. Some are not. For example, the U.S. Department of Agriculture only regulates Free Range labeling for poultry (not other meat) and only requires that the birds have “access” to the outdoors, which could mean almost anything. The Earthwatch Institute, an international nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research for the good of the planet, has a list of labels it has rated for reliability at bit.ly/uKE4pP.

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What’s in a Label?

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Memorable and Thrifty by Debbie Raddin

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at local consignment stores for beauty at a bargain, and most are successful if they take enough time to find their dream dresses. The same goes for finding clothes for the rest of the wedding party. Pre-wedding bridal parties were once reserved for making rice bags; now, these gatherings can create decorations for the ceremony and reception. My fortune-cookie-loving friends held a pre-wedding party to complete the bridesmaids’ bouquets, floral arrangements for the reception, floral pew markers, and receptiontable decorations at a family-centered party that was both fun and productive. The bride had purchased gorgeous silk flowers (almost real) online as well as battery-lighted cherry blossom branches. To complete the Japanese theme, they filled tall, glass containers with translucent stones, orchids and the lighted branches. At the reception, Japanese lanterns were strategically, yet gracefully, strewn about to create a soft and elegant effect. The couple purchased all the decorations locally at a dollar store or online. The most beautiful floral work was that of the bride’s bouquet. Filled with silk flowers, bought online, the bouquet was exquisitely constructed by a local florist, all at a fraction of the cost of a traditional fresh-flower bouquet. The final goodbye from the bride and groom can long be remembered as classic if the couple rides off into the sunset in a lovely sedan. Borrow or rent a classic car from a friend or an acquaintance. You can make the trade back to your not-soclassic car down the road in the shopping-mall parking lot. What about all the wonderful, inexpensive wedding things you have bought? You don’t need to put it in the attic; just take wonderful pictures of the placement of all of everything at the wedding ceremony and reception, and put it online for sale as a great and complete wedding bundle. Use the money you just earned from your own wedding, and take a trip to a great bed and breakfast for your first wedding anniversary. Don’t forget to take that piece of frozen wedding cake along, and do not feel bad if you throw it out the window; a good burger and fries will taste better.

COURTESY JIM CARRINGTON

ecently, close friends of mine completed two days of or flower garden of family or friends. The choices are limited ceremonial bliss at an unbelievably low cost. They held only by availability, geographical ease and cost. Since the wedboth the rehearsal dinner and the reception at the lo- ding ceremony site logically serves as the rehearsal site, having cation of the wedding. This couple had unforgettable the rehearsal dinner and wedding reception at this same locafun in creating eclectic fare for their reception. The serving tion can prove to be a cost saver, and you can carry your plans tables were draped with linen-like cloths and covered with through with logistical ease. The cost of time and travel is a large tin serving pieces real consideration of their favorite foods in making the day including Zapp’s pobefore and the wedtato chips, which they ding day less stressful ordered by the case at and more enjoyable. an affordable price. The time of day The couple infor the ceremony is vited guests to make a major considertheir own boxes of deation when pricing licious treats including out a wedding and custom-made fortune the reception that cookies complete with follows. If you have fortunes “telling” the a late-morning or news of the couple and high-noon wedding, their special day. They then the reception purchased the cookie expectations will be favors for about $50 that of a “luncheon.” Your special day doesn’t require a lot of money to be memorable. per 300. The creative Lighter fare will not minds also thought of blend well with more engaging the services of their favorite local waiter to serve and formal ceremony times, such as an evening wedding. Aftermanage the reception; his current studies at a culinary institute noon weddings require less at the reception. added a professional flair. Whatever the time of the ceremony, keep in mind that How does a couple turn memorable into manageable— the reception menu is at the discretion of the bride and groom, specifically, financially manageable? Wedding costs can easily with the “helpful” considerations of family and close friends. equal the cost of a new car or a significant down payment on Once the menu is planned, graciously accept the help of fama first home under unrealistic demands, expectations of family ily and friends. Most of the reception food can be made ahead and a social agenda that drives the cost beyond the focus of of time with a little imagination and help. This holds true for what the ceremony is really about: the couple. Is this level of the rehearsal dinner as well. Well-planned menus can be elcost really worth it? Probably not. Just use a bit of creativity to egant and delicious and do not have to include fish flown in make a wedding special. from the East Coast! (Think Zapp’s.) The location holds the key to setting the atmosphere of How do you inexpensively navigate the wedding waters the wedding. You can exchange vows at a church, a chapel, a of bridesmaids’ dresses, flowers and decorations without pushmuseum, a romantic inn, a beach, or the beautiful backyard ing the purse to a popping point? Many brides look online and

May 2 - 8, 2012

Y

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our best friends are supposed to be your biggest supporters, offering constructive guidance and support through the stressful wedding planning period. But oftentimes, even your best support systems buckle under the strain. Dealing with these bridal party members (affectionately termed “M.O.B.” or “Menaces of the Bride”) can be frustrating, hurtful and disappointing for the bride-to-be. Every bride needs to know how to manage certain situations involving members of the M.O.B. to avoid fallouts and, ultimately, ruining your special day. Problem: You want a turquoise and black rock ’n’ roll-themed wedding. Your mother believes this is too over the top and argues that you should save the theme for your reception and have a traditional wedding. You want the wedding to start at 6 p.m., but she believes the wedding should start at 2 p.m. Solution: Dealing with an overbearing

by Kimberly Nailor

mother can be quite difficult. You respect her opinion and appreciate her assistance; however, you must set boundaries early in the wedding planning process. First, write down your wedding plans from the selection of a theme, if desired, to your color scheme preference. Then, stick to your selections! You can delegate certain tasks to your mother that are in conjunction with your plans; for example, she can pick up the turquoise flowers you have ordered. Also, allow your mother to accompany you on your wedding-dress fitting and food tasting, but kindly remind her that the ultimate decision is yours to make. Know that your mother means well, but her desires should not become yours. Problem: You select your best friend as your bridesmaid or maid of honor. However, she has not completed any assigned tasks, makes negative remarks about the wedding and refuses to cooperate.

Solution: Be upfront and honest with next to Cousin Lola at the reception. He just your friend and ask her the wants to show up at the reason she has been distant. wedding and say “I do.” She may have a legitimate You, however, want him reason for her lack of into equally participate in terest. If she continues bethe planning. ing unreasonable (make Solution: Relax! Men sure you are not being too are programmed differdemanding), find ways to ently than women. He involve her in a minimal does not care if you want way. You could ask her to tulips or calla lilies. Delassist with making wedding egate to your guy simple favors, for example. If you tasks such as selecting a are continually met with Sometimes, even your best limousine company or buckle under the strain refusals or lack of coopera- friends the DJ for the reception. of planning a wedding. tion, it may be time to select His apathy is not a sign to another bridesmaid or maid be a runaway bride unless of honor. he seems completely disinterested. Problem: Your knight in shining armor By using these tips you can turn would rather goof off with his friends than your Menaces of the Bride into Friends of help you decide if Aunt Minnie should sit the Bride. FILE PHOTO

Married to the M.O.B.


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Show Mom She’s Special by Meredith W. Sullivan

M

other’s Day (May 13) is coming fast. Are you ready? Although most moms would be satisfied with a hug and an “I love you” on their special day, we suggest you up the ante this year and show her how special she really is with a memorably great gift. Here are a few suggestions from around town.

Handembroidered pillow, The Mississippi Gift Company, $149

Gemma Kahng leather heart shift, Private Collection Consignment, $140

J. J. Winters turquoise clutch, Taylor Collection, $122

“Best of the Best” Mississippi cookbook, The Mississippi Gift Company, $16.95 Nebraska Star cuff, Taylor Collection, $145 Illume Woodfire candle, Wilai, $10

Gold and black earrings, Taylor Collection, $24 Leopard print infinity scarf, Private Collection Consignment, $9

Where2Shop:

May 2 - 8, 2012

The

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Mississippi Gift Company, themississippigiftcompany.com; Private Collection Consignment, 101B Village Blvd., Madison, 601-607-6004; Taylor Collection, 2082 Main St., Madison, 601605-0236; Wilai, 2906 N. State St. #103, 601-366-9955.


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