Issuu on Google+


Renaissance at Colony Park.

Your Dining Destination.

Whether you’re in the mood for fine dining, something casual or even something delectable to prepare at home…

R   F Y’ L F.

WORLD CLASS SHOPPING, DINING AND ENTERTAINMENT.

Nothing Else Comes Close.

April 11 - 17, 2012

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

2

I-55 at Old Agency Road, Ridgeland, Mississippi For leasing information, contact The Mattiace Company at 601.352.1818.

See all our retail stores and restaurants online at www.RenaissanceAtColonyPark.com


April 11-17, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 31

contents JACOB FULLER

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

6 Force of More The Jackson Police Department adds new recruits. How does our force compare with others? AMILE WILSON

Cover photograph by Virginia Schreiber

10

THIS ISSUE:

Mississippi lawmakers pass a bill making it more difficult than ever to get disability benefits. COURTESY ARDENLAND

rochelle culp “I wanted to make a difference and work directly with the community. A lot of people didn’t think it was a smart move,” Culp says. “Wellness is my passion and my ministry. I am very fortunate to have a job I love so much.” Today, Culp works for The Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi and is the project director of the Mississippi Tobacco-Free Coalition. She has worked with the coalition for 12 years. On the job, she manages a variety of grants to help people stop smoking and works with children and communities to prevent their using tobacco. With projects aimed at students, such as R.A.T (Reject All Tobacco) and Generation Free, Culp hopes to keep others from facing the same fate as her father, a smoker, who died at a young age due to smoking- and obesityrelated health problems. Culp is also a fitness and personal trainer and wellness coach at Fitness Lady Health Clubs. She has been an instructor for 19 years and is certified to teach classes such as spin, kickboxing and “boot camp” workouts that combine cardio, strength training and calisthenics. She is also a motivational speaker and workshop facilitator who travels and speaks on obesity prevention and wellness. Culp teaches her students that consistency is the key. “Society tends to start and stop. Each time you stop, it’s harder to start.” LaShanda Phillips

37 Old Made New The Hackensaw Boys take traditional blue-grass music and adds new-age energy and instruments.

45 Healthy Eats Portable and healthy lunches; just say “no” to “pink slime”; salad days are here again.

jacksonfreepress.com

When Rochelle Culp couldn’t walk a few miles in a walk for charity in her 20s, she felt it was time for a change. “I struggled to do the walk, but it should have been easy,” she says. “I wanted to live a life of joy and be active. I knew if I didn’t make a change, my health may affect that.” Initially, Culp decided to change her life through portion control and by walking, her favorite exercise. Eventually, she incorporated healthy, fresh foods into her diet. The Durant native is now celebrating her 20th year since losing 100-plus pounds. Culp says losing weight and becoming healthy is a bit easier now. “All the low-fat options weren’t available at that time,” she says. “Most restaurants didn’t have calorie guides.” She suggests cooking at home, a hobby of hers, as a great way to eat healthy as well as build relationships within the family. “So many meals you can prepare in a few minutes,” Culp says. “Having family night once a week … keeps families together.” Not only does she strive to have a healthy lifestyle, Culp encourages people to become healthy in other ways. After 18 successful years at Allstate Insurance Company, Culp decided to change careers from doing something she liked to something that fulfilled her. She began managing grants for nonprofit organizations, especially those that contributed to keeping people healthy.

CLIPART

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 ............................ Talk 10 .................. Business 12 ................... Editorial 12 .... Editorial Cartoon 12 .................. Kamikaze 13 ................. Opinion 14 ....................... Food 26 ..... Crossroads Film 32 .................... 8 Days 33 ................... Theater 33 ............. JFP Events 35 ... Girl About Town 37 ...................... Music 40 ..................... Sports 42 ................ Astrology 45 .............. Body/Soul 46 ................ Prom Fly

Stripping Rights

3


editor’snote

Tom Ramsey Tom Ramsey is a former investment banker, lobbyist, and tobacco executive who currently works as a chef at Underground 119. He writes poetry, runs with the bulls and produced an album or two. He interviewed Andrew Zimmern for this issue.

Virginia Schreiber Staff photographer Virginia Schreiber is a recent graduate of Millsaps College. When she’s not working, she spends her time watching films of the Peter Pan genre. She took the cover photo and many others in this issue.

Adriane Louie Adriane Louie is a Jackson native who graduated from Millsaps College. She loves watching the Food Network and learning about food. Her favorite times of the year are Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. She wrote a food piece.

Whitney Menogan Editorial intern Whitney Menogan is from Madison and holds bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College. She enjoys reading and writing. She hopes to be able to travel around the world one country at a time. She wrote film reviews.

Richard Coupe Freelance writer Richard Coupe, an avid fan of the beautiful game, is a husband, brother, father of four and still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote film reviews.

Nicole Sheriff Nicole Sheriff is from Madison but has lived everywhere from Colorado to Michigan since she graduated from college. Her life experiences have inspired most of her writing, and she shows no signs of slowing down. She wrote a music feature.

Mike Day At the “Hindsonian” at Hinds Community College, Mike Day won top cartoonist awards from the Mississippi Press Association and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association in New York. He was also a cartoonist for the Hattiesburg American.

April 11 - 17, 2012

Kimberly Griffin

4

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Dinner and a Movie

L

ast Saturday night, Todd and I sat at a small table next to the open kitchen at Parlor Market and were dazzled by the chefs’ performance. Our newest food columnist, Jesse Houston, happens to be the chef de cuisine at PM, a position he took over after the tragic death of his friend and the founding chef, Craig Noone. Craig brought Jesse back from Texas to a state he knew little about; now Jesse is leading the creative team at one of the hottest businesses to come along in Jackson in a long time. Jesse invited us to the restaurant Saturday night, wanting to show off some vegetarian delicacies he’s worked up recently, including a dish of charred brussel sprouts with sous vide baby carrots and sauerkraut with a pastrami spiced crème fraiche that’s now on the menu. What’s delightful to us vegetarians is that there is no actual meat, or pastrami, in this dish. He somehow figured out how to make it taste a bit like pastrami. And the hint of kraut pleased the German in Mr. Stauffer no end. As I sipped my Satan’s Whiskers (a Prohibition-era cocktail with Beefeater gin, dry and sweet vermouth, orange curacao, orange and orange bitters), I was struck by the creative intensity in which not only Jesse worked on his creations, but which his assistants reflected. When they’re weren’t doing anything, they stood and watched. He was creating art, and they seemed to be studying his technique. This was serious creativity at work. And as Jesse writes in his “secrets” piece on pages 16-17, creative magic happens in other kitchens around the city as well. If you haven’t noticed, we’re in the middle of a serious foodies movement in Jackson, and it’s led by the rockin’ crop of chefs, long-time and new, at locally owned restaurants in the Jackson metro. Make no mistake: These guys (and gals) have the ability to change our city and state— and to help bring the renaissance that a wide coalition of folks (including the dynamic Hal and Malcolm White duo) have worked to bring to fruition for many years. Great restaurants with food-loving groupies help separate cities people love to flock to from those we could not care less about. Strong local restaurants are the bedrock of a city’s local economy. They not only keep their revenues locally—especially now during the local-food movement Jesse and others believe so strongly in—but they hire and train locally as often as possible, often bringing the culinary arts to young people working in the kitchen who might not have had the chance otherwise. And they provide the kinds of culinary experiences that make smart, engaged people want to move and stay here. This matters, folks. As we explained last week in our local-business issue, locally owned companies can help us stop the brain drain of our best and brightest and our tax base. But it won’t work if we don’t support them and, in this case, eat locally every chance we get. If we want to live in a world-class city, we must support our world-class restaurants. Consider

it an investment in our city’s economy. The same goes for cultural events. Even as Craig and now Jesse are young urban warriors on behalf of our city, so are many others who could live, work and create anywhere they want, but choose to do it right here in Jackson. This weekend, the Crossroads Film Society brings its annual festival to the Jackson area again. This year, you can enjoy a record number of Mississippi-made and/or Mississippi-focused films, a good number of them set right here in Jackson. Because we’re lucky enough to get a lot of the films to review in advance, I took the chance to watch a number of them over the last week. Some weren’t completely finished, yet, causing me to smile at the thought of these filmmakers scrambling to get their projects done in time for Crossroads. I understand how deadline pressure feels. Watching the films, it almost seems like Jackson’s recent historical arc is wound up in the types of movies and documentaries the festival features and their content, which is often edgy and not what people expect from Mississippi (where we’re stereotyped about as often as the worst of our citizenry stereotypes “the other.”) One of my favorites this year is the “Mississippi I Am” documentary, which looks at the challenge and at least marginal progress of being GLBT in Mississippi. I recognized several of the faces in it (and not just Lance Bass): good people who are working to make our state a more loving place for all of our people, including a former sales rep here who helped start a group to help gay youth. I loved that it featured the Safe Harbor Family Church, a place of worship where GLBTs can feel safe and accepted. I also appreciate that local filmmaker

(and Crossroads celeb) Philip Scarborough and Tom Beck are making a film, “Growing Our Own,” about the youth institute that the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation facilitates. (Disclosure: I work with the institute’s youth projects, although not directly with this one). I met Philip and Tom years back, and I remember great conversations at Hal and Mal’s with them about the challenges of race in our state and that our youth face. I just love that these guys are helping us tell Mississippi’s own story now. They care. That’s really what it comes down to: having the gumption and the energy to do it for ourselves. I’ve watched so many documentary makers come to Mississippi from other places to document our tough journey (making me wonder about the journeys in their own states and countries they leave undocumented). I crave seeing us tell these stories ourselves in whatever way we can: in print, online, in films or even in the catfish cracklins that Jesse Houston impressed Andrew Zimmern with. I’ve also been thinking about that urban warrior Herman Snell, our previous music editor whom we all lost way too soon to a sudden death. Herman was a long-time player in the Crossroads scene and, when I met him back in 2001, was doing online music listings just because someone needed to. This is the kind of spirit that makes me believe in our city, our state and our future. It is in the hands of our young creatives, our local businesses, and those who bother to show up and tell our stories. Please support them every way you can. This issue is dedicated to the memory of Craig Noone and Herman Snell, both of whom gave new meaning to the words “dinner and a movie.” We will put your memory to good use. Watch for my Crossroads picks at www.jfp.ms.


Kale and collards have been around at least 2,000 years. The Greeks grew both of the greens, as did the Romans. European writers described both as “coles� in the first, third, fourth and 13th centuries.

Sorry, Reesy. Espy apologizes. p. 8

Food historians guess they ended up in France and Britain thanks to

news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, April 5 Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, kills his own House amendment that could have revived the push against undocumented immigrant workers in the state. ‌ The Coast Guard sinks an abandoned ship in the Gulf of Alaska. The ship had been drifting in the Pacific Ocean since a tsunami dislodged it in Japan more than a year ago. Friday, April 6 The Jackson Police Department graduates 24 new officers from its police academy, moving the department closer to its goal of a force of 500. ‌ A U.S. Navy F-18 jet crashes into an apartment complex in Virginia. Saturday, April 7 The Walk Against Fear from Memphis to Jackson, to protest social injustice in Mississippi and across the South, concludes with a rally at the Capitol. ‌ Veteran “60 Minutesâ€? journalist Mike Wallace dies at age 93. Sunday, April 8 A walker finds the body of a man near Butts Park in Jackson. ‌ Tulsa police arrest Jake England and Alvin Watts, both white, for shooting five people and killing three of them. Officials are investigating the shooting as a hate crime.

April 11 - 17, 2012

Monday, April 9 Gov. Bryant signs a craft beer bill that will allow retailers to sell higher gravity beers, up to 8 percent alcohol by weight, in Mississippi. ‌ AOL sells more than 800 patents to Microsoft for $1 billion.

6

Tuesday, April 10 The Mississippi Senate passes a bill to implement the controversial voter ID law that voters approved last fall. ‌ The Donald Trump-owned Miss Universe pageant announces it will allow transgendered participants to compete. Get breaking news at jfpdaily.com.

in America was in 1669.

SOURCE: AGGIE-HORTICULTURE.TAMU.EDU

JPD Adds 24 New Officers

by Jacob Fuller

T

he 49th basic recruit class of the Jackson Police Department graduated Friday from the Jackson Police Training Academy. The class of 24 recruits moves the department closer to Chief Rebecca Coleman’s goals for patrol size and overtime reduction. JPD’s current goal is to reach 500 active officers, although the city has the budget for 525, Coleman said. With many officers who can retire at any time and others who will leave for other law enforcement jobs, Coleman said JPD will not stop hiring new recruits if they reach 500. With Friday’s graduation, the force has 483 officers. “That’s a goal that we would like to achieve, but at the same time, I still stress to those individuals who are doing our recruiting that we want good, qualified officers,� Coleman said. “We want to make sure that (those) 500 officers are officers that are deserving of being in a Jackson Police Department uniform.� The 2010 census showed that Jackson has a population of 173,514. That means there is one Jackson police officer for every 359 residents of the city. If the department reaches its goal of 500 officers, it will mean one for every 347 residents. Coleman said more officers means more visibility of law enforcement in the community, which deters criminals and ultimately means less crime.

JACOB FULLER

Wednesday, April 4 The Mississippi Senate votes to send a bill that could shutter Mississippi’s only abortion clinic to Gov. Phil Bryant’s desk to become law. ‌ Five ex-New Orleans police officers receive sentences for their parts in shootings of unarmed citizens in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

the Romans or Celts. The first known mention of kale (called coleworts)

A class of 24 recruits of the Jackson Police Department marches from their seats after taking the oath of office at their graduation on Friday.

“These 24 additional officers will be assigned to the precincts, but they will be in two-man cars, because they have to go through the training process,� Coleman said. “This past week, we had 33 officers from the last class who were cut loose from training. They were initially in two-man cars. Those officers now are riding solo in the precincts. That means you have more beat cars in the precincts. And it’s been proven, anytime you have more visibility of

officers, the less likely crime is to occur.� At 483 officers, the size of JPD sits about in the middle of similar-sized state capitals. The Little Rock Police Department in Arkansas, which services a city population of 193,524, has a force of 550 officers, or one officer for every 351 residents. The department will add another 15 officers with their upcoming graduating class. On the other side, Tallahassee, Fla., JPD, see page 7

The First Thing I Learned to Cook ¹) DON´T CARE HOW YOU DRESS IT UP PUT CLEANCLOTHESONIT)T´S*IM#ROW² ²6HQ'DYLG-RUGDQ'*UHHQZRRGVSHDN LQJ DJDLQVW OHJLVODWLRQ HQDEOLQJ WKH YRWHU ,'DPHQGPHQWWRWDNHHIIHFW

¹7E´REGOINGTOTAKEANICKELANDTURNIT INTOAQUARTER² ²0LVVLVVLSSL $UWV &RPPLVVLRQ GLUHF WRU0DOFROP:KLWHRQVXUYLYLQJVWDWHEXG JHWFXWV

¹7EAREVERYCLOSETOENDINGABORTIONIN THESTATEOF-ISSISSIPPI)AM PERCENT PRO LIFE AND ) AM FOCUSED ON PASSING (OUSE "ILL  THAT WOULD EFFECTIVELY ENDABORTIONINOURSTATE² ²/W*RY7DWH5HHYHVLQDQHPDLOWRVXS SRUWHUVEHIRUHWKH6HQDWHSDVVHGDELOOWR SODFHDGGLWLRQDOUHVWULFWLRQVRQWKHVWDWHœV RQO\DERUWLRQFOLQLF

We asked staffers at the Jackson Free Press to tell us about their first cooking experience. Here’s what they said: • Jacob Fuller: Scrambled eggs. You beat eggs with a fork, then put them over heat. Add salt and pepper. Yet, people still manage to screw it up. Amazing. I learned later in life to add a little milk and get more loft in the fork while beating to allow air into the mix—and to turn the heat down. • Andrea Thomas: Fried chicken. It was all pretty golden on the outside, but when I cut into it, it was super bloody. But I’m a beast at breakfast. • Donna Ladd: Tiny little biscuits and brownies in my Easy Bake oven. • Kimberly Griffin: Bacon. I would have crispy bacon and mayo sandwiches almost every day. I don’t eat like that anymore, and I miss it. • Latasha Willis: Fried bologna sandwiches. I thought it was weird to see the bologna puff up in the middle as it cooked, and I did burn it on purpose for extra flavor.


news, culture & irreverence

JPD, from page 6

population 181,376, has a police force of only 355 officers, or one for every 511 residents, and currently has a recruiting class of six scheduled to graduate in early June. Coleman said JPD leaders attend national and international police conventions and keep in touch with other, similarly sized cities throughout the year. “We’re not operating in a vacuum,� Coleman said. “We have a network with other law enforcement agencies. When things come up that are affecting the city of Jackson, we contact them to see if they have similar problems, and we draw on that.� Crime has gone down in most of Jackson since this time last year, despite little to no increase in the number of officers. JPD officers expect the increase in patrols to further reduce crime in the city. At this time last year, JPD had a force between 455 and 460 officers, according to Assistant Chief Lee Vance. With 459 officers on duty last week, reported crimes were down from this time last year in all precincts except Precinct 1, which covers most of south Jackson. “We’re putting some strategies in to attack that,� Vance said. “The commander has assured me that in the second quarter of this year, we’re going to be in the negative as far as crime production in (Precinct 1). “One of the things we’ve found effective as a crime-fighting tactic is high visibility. That’s why you hear us talking so much about numbers. “The more officers you have on the street, the more visible force you can put out there. And that’s an automatic deter-

rent to crime. While you do have some bold criminals in society, very few of them are going to commit crime in the presence of a police officer.� Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. gave an introduction speech at the graduation ceremony. He pointed out that there is more to police duty that preventing crime. “Police officers do much more than catching criminals,� Johnson said. “They teach people how to prevent crimes. They help people who are in difficult or dangerous situations. They offer understanding and empathy in times of tragedy and need. “They are often in perilous situations caused by agents other than crime—working accident scenes, or when they are called on to help in rescue situations.� The city of Jackson has recently had problems with JPD, as well as the fire and public works departments, logging too many overtime hours. In February, when the numbers from the first quarter of the fiscal year were announced, the city had used 38 percent of the year’s budget for overtime hours. While most of JPD’s overtime hours have come from officers’ time in court and working at special events, much of the overtime logging has come from having too few officers to cover patrol beats. “This will make a tremendous dent in the issue of overtime, simply because these officers will be assigned to two-man cars and we just finished putting the additional officers on the street,� Coleman said. The next JPD training class, made up of 23 officers, will start April 15, and another will start in October. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

CITYBEAT: On the Road Again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³7KHUHœVEHHQVRPHGLI¿FXOW\LQFRRUGLQDWLQJ WKDWZLWKWKHSXEOLF,EHOLHYHDORWRIWKDWLVVWHPPLQJ IURPWKHODFNRILQIRUPDWLRQWKDWLVJLYHQRXWWRWKH SXEOLF¿UVWRIDOODQGVHFRQGRIDOOWKHPLVHVWLPD WLRQRIWKHGHPDQGRIWKHVHUYLFH´%XUQVVDLG  %XUQVUHTXHVWHGWKDWWKHFRPPLWWHHFKDQJHWKH EXVURXWHWRLQFOXGHWKHWULSHDVWRQ/DNHODQG'ULYH WKURXJKRXWWKHGD\  ³7KDWZD\\RXGRQœWKDYHDOOWKLVFRQIXVLRQ EHFDXVHWKHUHDUHWRRPDQ\WKLQJVKDSSHQLQJ´%XUQV VDLG³ 7KHFXUUHQWV\VWHPUHTXLUHV FRPPXQLFDWLRQ EHWZHHQGLVSDWFKFRPPXQLFDWLRQEHWZHHQULGHUVKLS FRPPXQLFDWLRQEHWZHHQWKHGULYHUVFRPPXQLFDWLRQ EHWZHHQWKHVXSHUYLVRUV$OOWKDWLVQRQVHQVH7KDWœV ZK\\RX VKRXOGQœW KDYHRQGHPDQGVHUYLFHLQWKLV NLQGRIPHWURDUHDZLWKWKLVSRSXODWLRQ´ 

4AXIS'ET(OSPITALITY4RAINING 

7D[LGULYHUVLQ-DFNVRQZRXOGKDYHWRDWWHQGKRV

JACOB FULLER

*!42!.2OUTE#HANGES!HEAD

E\-DFRE)XOOHU

A JATRAN bus heads south on North State Street after turning off of Lakeland Drive on Route 4A. SLWDOLW\FODVVHVDVSDUWRIDSURSRVDOWRLQFUHDVHFDE IDUHVE\SHUPLOHXQGHUDQDPHQGPHQWWKH-DFNVRQ &LW\&RXQFLODGRSWHGODVWZHHN7KH-DFNVRQ&RQYHQ WLRQDQG9LVLWRUVœ%XUHDXZRXOGOHDGWKHFODVVHVWR WHDFKWKHGULYHUVQRWWREDVKWKHFLW\WRULGHUV  :DUG&RXQFLOPDQ&KRNZH/XPXPEDZKR YRWHGDJDLQVWWKHDPHQGPHQWVDLG7XHVGD\WKDW DQ\RQHLQYROYHGLQWKH¿HOGRIWUDQVSRUWDWLRQFDQJLYH VXJJHVWLRQVIRUKRVSLWDOLW\FODVVFXUULFXODWRKLP  ³:HFDQPDNHUHFRPPHQGDWLRQVWRWKHSHRSOH ZKRDUHFRQGXFWLQJWKHKRVSLWDOLW\WUDLQLQJZLWKWKH &RQYHQWLRQDQG9LVLWRUV%XUHDXVRZHFDQPDNHVXUH WKDWHYHU\WKLQJWKDWQHHGVWREHLQWKDWWUDLQLQJLVLQ WKDWWUDLQLQJ´KHVDLG  *HWEUHDNLQJFLW\QHZVDWZZZMISPV

jacksonfreepress.com

talk

7


statetalk

by R.L. Nave

The Surprising Politics of Education Reform dation,� she said. Sen. Kenneth Wayne Jones, interim chairman of the Legislative Black Caucus, also put out a statement in which he called for an investigation “into this hateful act.� BRIAN JOHNSON

Rep. Chuck Espy, D-Clarksdale, a charterschools supporter, apologized to a fellow lawmaker who was allegedly attacked after a committee hearing last week.

“Not only are acts of hostility and intimidation toward public officials illegal, they are detrimental to the very function of a democratic society,� the Canton Democrat wrote. House Education Committee Chairman Rep. John Moore, R-Brandon, said the incident was the result of both sides being fired

up over the debate. “It’s sad it happened, but I understand the passion on both sides of the issue,� Moore told the Jackson Free Press Friday. “As many (charter-schools opponents) as there were, if that bill had passed, you would have seen some aggression the other way.� As for the apparent momentary defeat of the bill, Moore describes it as a mere hiccup. “We will have a good charter-school law eventually,� he said. Gov. Phil Bryant has threatened to extend the legislative calendar and call a special session to force lawmakers to give him what he wants on the issue. In the meantime, everyone awaits attempts to insert the failed measure’s language into an existing education bill to keep it alive. That the Legislature would pass a charter-schools bill this session seemed like a slam dunk when each of the state’s top Republican leaders expressed a desire to see it passed. When the bill that flew through the Senate met a roadblock, surprisingly, of Republicans, most observers assumed the holdouts would fall into place and tow the party line. So what went wrong? The conventional thinking was that a lot of it had to do with Milton Kuykendall, the Republican elected superintendent of the DeSoto County School District, who made no secret of his hostility to the charter schools bill. The DeSoto school district is the largest in the state and the county’s largest employer. In a phone interview, Kuykendall said he would support a charter schools bill that prohibited for-profit companies and virtual

/HJLVODWXUH:HHN !RTS )$SAND!,%#

April 11 - 17, 2012

M

8

alcom WKLWHH[HFXWLYHGLUHFWRURIWKH0LVVLVVLSSL$UWV&RPPLVVLRQ FRQVWDQWO\EDWWOHVWKHSHUFHSWLRQWKDWKLVDQGWKHVWDWHÂśVRWKHU ÂłFXOWXUDODJHQFLHV´DUHQRWFRUHJRYHUQPHQWIXQFWLRQV  Âł:HÂśUHWKHIXWXUH´:KLWHVD\VRIWKH0$&ZKLFKVXSSRUWV DUWLVWVRUJDQL]DWLRQVDQGVFKRROVZLWKJUDQWVEXWDOVRSDUWQHUVZLWKWKH0LV VLVVLSSL'HYHORSPHQW$XWKRULW\WRERRVWWKHVWDWHÂśVFUHDWLYHHFRQRP\  ,QRWKHUZRUGV0$&FRXOGKHOSFUHDWHWKHQH[W-LP%DUNVGDOH²WKHFXUUHQW DOEHLWWHPSRUDU\0'$GLUHFWRUDQGDSLRQHHULQWKHWHFKQRORJ\ÂżHOG²E\ KHOSLQJD\RXQJDUWVEDVHGWHFKFRPSDQ\GHYHORSDEXVLQHVVSODQRUSURYLG LQJDVWDUWXSJUDQW  %XWLQ0LVVLVVLSSLDQGDFURVVWKHQDWLRQIXQGLQJIRUDJHQFLHVOLNHWKH0$& DUHGLVSURSRUWLRQDWHO\RQWKHFKRSSLQJEORFN'HVSLWHDUHFRPPHQGDWLRQ IURPWKH/HJLVODWLYH%XGJHW&RPPLWWHHWKDWWKH0$&UHFHLYHSHUFHQWOHVVLQ ÂżVFDO\HDU*RY3KLO%U\DQWÂśVEXGJHWIRUQH[W\HDUFDOOVIRUDSHUFHQW UHGXFWLRQWRWKHDUWVDJHQF\ WKH0$&ÂśVOLQHLWHPLVXQGHUWKHFDWHJRU\ ODEHOHGÂłPLVFHOODQHRXV´   7KH0$&ÂśVDSSURSULDWLRQELOOSDVVHGWKH+RXVHDQGDZDLWVFRQVLGHUDWLRQ LQWKH6HQDWH,WUHĂ€HFWVFXWVWRWDOLQJLQJHQHUDOIXQGV WKHFRPPLV VLRQJHWVPLOOLRQLQDOO :KLWHGRHVQÂśWVSHQGPXFKWLPHZRUU\LQJDERXW ZKDWFRXOGKDSSHQLQ0LVVLVVLSSLKRZHYHU7KH1DWLRQDO(QGRZPHQWIRUWKH $UWVDIHGHUDOJRYHUQPHQWDJHQF\KDVDOUHDG\VODVKHGLWVDSSURSULDWLRQWR WKH0$&E\  6LQFHZKHQ:KLWHMRLQHGWKH0$&KHKDVVHHQWKHEXGJHWGHFUHDVH \HDUDIWHU\HDU$VDUHVXOWWKH0$&QRZJLYHVIHZHUGLUHFWJUDQWVDQGQRZ VWUHWFKHVWKH0$&ÂśVGROODUZLWKPRUHJURXSRXWUHDFKVXFKWRZQKDOOVSURIHV VLRQDOGHYHORSPHQWZRUNVKRSVDQGZHELQDUV6D\V:KLWHÂł:HÂśUHJRLQJWR WDNHDQLFNHODQGWXUQLWLQWRDTXDUWHU´ 

6OTER)$0ASSES

 0LVVLVVLSSLÂśVFRQVWLWXWLRQDODPHQGPHQWWRUHTXLUHZRXOGEHYRWHUVWR SURYHWKH\DUHZKRWKH\VD\WKH\DUHLQFKHGFORVHUWRUHDOL]DWLRQ0RUHRU OHVVDWHFKQLFDOLW\EHFDXVHYRWHUVJDYHLWWKHWKXPEVXSLQDVWDWHZLGHEDOORW TXHVWLRQODVWIDOO+%LVWKHOHJLVODWLYHYHKLFOHWRLPSOHPHQWWKHFRQWUR

schools from entering the state, sets up pilot programs in poorly performing areas, and establishes the Mississippi State Board of Education as sole authorizing body new charters. He also wants entities setting up the new charter schools to have an established track record of success. “For something that’s so unproven, baby steps should be taken,� Kuykendall said. Rankin County’s Dr. Lynn Weathersby, who was unavailable to comment as of press time on Tuesday, is also rumored to have wanted to see the charter-schools bill fail. Weathersby’s brother, Tom, sits on the House Education Committee and voted no on charter schools. Moore believes many superintendents don’t want the competition. “It does them no good at all to help the low-performing districts to move up,� Moore said. Moore said lawmakers who voted against the bill, which exempts high academic-achieving schools, represent areas that would have been off-limits to charter schools anyway. “I can’t find an argument that sounds logical to me. They’re not motivated to help those at the bottom,� Moore said. Rachel Canter, executive director of procharter schools nonprofit Mississippi First, said the debate just goes to show that there is no political ideology of education reform. “The letter behind your name isn’t as important as who has power and sway in your own community,� she said. “Ed reform makes very strange bedfellows sometimes.�

E\5/1DYH

YHUVLDOODZ7KHPHDVXUHDOUHDG\DSSURYHGLQWKH+RXVHSDVVHGWKH6HQDWH !,%#3MARTING DQGQRZKHDGVWRDFRQIHUHQFHFRPPLWWHH  ,I\RXUVWDWH/HJLVODWXUHVXGGHQO\GRHVVRPHWKLQJWKDWVHHPVOLNHWKH  6HQ'DYLG-RUGDQ'*UHHQZRRGFDOOHGWKHHIIRUW³HYLO´DQGTXHVWLRQHG SURJHQ\RIDFRQVHUYDWLYH¶VZHWGUHDPWKHUH¶VDJRRGFKDQFHWKDWWKH WKH&KULVWLDQYDOXHVRILWVOHJLVODWLYHEDFNHUV³,W¶V $PHULFDQ/HJLVODWLYH([FKDQJH&RXQFLOKDG ZURQJ´-RUGDQVDLG³,GRQ¶WFDUHKRZ\RXGUHVV VRPHWKLQJWRGRZLWKLW$/(&DVLW¶VNQRZQ LWXSSXWFOHDQFORWKHVRQLW,W¶V-LP&URZ´ VHUYHVDVDFOHDULQJKRXVHIRUFRQVHUYDWLYH  7KH86'HSDUWPHQWRI-XVWLFHKDVWRVLJQ LGHDVDQGOHJLVODWLRQDWWKHVWDWHOHYHO RIIRQFKDQJHVWR0LVVLVVLSSL¶VYRWLQJODZVDQG $/(&¶VWDVNIRUFHVGHYHORSH[DPSOHELOOVRQ LWUHPDLQVXQFOHDUKRZWKH'2-ZLOOHYDOXDWH LVVXHVUDQJLQJIURPWRUWUHIRUPWRYLUWXDO 0LVVLVVLSSL¶VODZ5HSXEOLFDQ3UHVLGHQW*HRUJH VFKRROVWKDWVWDWHODZPDNHUVFDQXVHWR :%XVK¶VDGPLQLVWUDWLRQOHW,QGLDQD¶VYRWHU FUDIWSLHFHVRIOHJLVODWLRQ ,'ODZVWDQGDQGWKH866XSUHPH&RXUWXSKHOG  $/(&KDVEHHQDIRUFHEHKLQGHIIRUWV LWLQ LQ0LVVLVVLSSLWRH[SDQGYLUWXDOVFKRROV  8QGHUWKH'HPRFUDWLFDGPLQLVWUDWLRQRI LQWURGXFHWRUWUHIRUPDQGLPSOHPHQWYRWHU 3UHVLGHQW%DUDFN2EDPDKRZHYHUWKH'2- LGHQWL¿FDWLRQUHTXLUHPHQWV'XULQJWKH EORFNHG6RXWK&DUROLQD¶VDWWHPSWWRSDVVDYHU FXUUHQWOHJLVODWLYHVHVVLRQ$/(&N\ELOOV Greenwood Democrat David Jordan VLRQRIYRWHU,'2EDPD¶VMXVWLFHGHSDUWPHQWDOVR questioned why professed Christians in the LQFOXGHWKHUHYLYHGDQWLXQGRFXPHQWHG EORFNHG7H[DV¶5HSXEOLFDQGUDZQUHGLVWULFWLQJ LPPLJUDQWELOOWKDWIRUQRZKDVPHWGHIHDW Legislature would support a law that might PDSDUJXLQJWKHSODQLVXQIDLUWR/DWLQRV %XWDIWHUUHPDLQLQJXQGHUWKHUDGDUIRU hinder some citizens from voting.  6HQ&KULV0F'DQLHO5(OOLVYLOOHGHIHQGHG GHFDGHV$/(&¶VSUR¿OHKDVULVHQDVKDV WKHELOOVD\LQJWKDWLWZDVQRW³VRPHNLQGRI RSSRVLWLRQWRWKHJURXS PLVFKLHI´WRWXUQEDFNWKHFORFNRQFLYLOULJKWV  'XHWRJURZLQJSURWHVWV$/(& JDLQVIRUEODFNV+HQRWHGWKDWWKH0LVVLVVLSSL6HQDWHLVPRUHGLYHUVHWKDQLW¶V UHFHQWO\ORVWVHYHUDOPDMRUFRUSRUDWHPHPEHUVLQFOXGLQJ3HSVL&R&RFD&ROD HYHUEHHQ KHGLGQRWKRZHYHUDFNQRZOHGJHWKHLURQ\WKDWWKH/HJLVODWXUH¶V .UDIW)RRGVDQG,QWXLWODUJHO\LQUHVSRQVHWRLWVDSSDUHQWDXWKRUVKLSRI UDFLDOPDNHXSUHVXOWHGIURPUHVLVWDQFHWR-LP&URZ¶VYRWHUVXSSUHVVLRQHIIRUW  SURJXQODZVVXFKDVWKH6WDQG<RXU*URXQGODZJHWWLQJQDWLRQDODWWHQWLRQ  6HQ-RH\)LOOLQJDQH56XPUDOOZKRGUDIWHGWKHIDOOYRWHU,'LQLWLDWLYH VLQFH*HRUJH=LPPHUPDQNLOOHG7UD\YRQ0DUWLQEXWZDVQRWFKDUJHGE\ODZ VDLGYRWHU,'LVQHHGHGVLQFHHYLGHQFHRIYRWHUIUDXGH[LVWVIURPDVUHFHQWO\ HQIRUFHPHQWWKDWFLWHGWKHODZDVDUHDVRQ DVEXWKHGLGQ¶WSURYLGHPRUHGHWDLOV2SSRQHQWVSRLQWWRDODFNRI  7KH:DVKLQJWRQ([DPLQHUDIUHHGDLO\QHZVSDSHULQWKH$UOLQJWRQ9D HYLGHQFHRIZLGHVSUHDGYRWHUIUDXGRUWKHNLQGWKDWYRWHU,'ZRXOGDFWXDOO\¿[ SRVWHGDVWDWHPHQWIURP&RNHRQLWVZHEVLWHH[SODLQLQJWKHFRPSDQ\¶VGHFL DVDSULPDU\UHDVRQWRUHMHFWXQQHFHVVDU\YRWHU,'OHJLVODWLRQ VLRQWROHDYH$/(&  6HQ.HQQHWK:D\QH-RQHV'&DQWRQRIIHUHGDZRUGRIFDXWLRQIRUVXS  ³2XULQYROYHPHQWZLWK$/(&ZDVIRFXVHGRQHIIRUWVWRRSSRVHGLVFULPLQD SRUWHUVRILQLWLDWLYHVWKDWOLPLWYRWLQJULJKWV³:HEHDW\RXHYHU\WLPH:H¶UH WRU\IRRGDQGEHYHUDJHWD[HV:HKDYHDORQJVWDQGLQJSROLF\RIRQO\ JRLQJWREHDW\RXWKLVWLPH´-RQHVVDLG WDNLQJSRVLWLRQVRQLVVXHVWKDWLPSDFWRXU&RPSDQ\DQGLQGXVWU\´ AMILE WILSON

R

ep. Chuck Espyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice cracked as he jabbed his left index finger into the podium so forcefully that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a miracle he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break the appendage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have watched this great body rise to some of its greatest points, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen tensions flare and rise to levels Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen. But when a member is touched in any way, it is unacceptable,â&#x20AC;? railed Espy, a Democrat from Clarksdale. Espy took the point of personal privilege after the House Education Committee refused to pass along the charter-schools bill, which the Republican leadershipâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Espyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wanted to be the hallmark achievement of the legislative session, to the full House. After the 15-16 vote against the charterschools bill, SB 2401, members emerged from the second-floor committee room to charter-school opponentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cheers. Amidst the applause, a female Central Mississippi Tea Party supporter of the bill shoved Rep. Reecy Dickson, D-Macon, who voted against the bill, according to The Clarion-Ledger, which did not name the woman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cannot sit here and watch a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially a black femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;be disrespected in this body,â&#x20AC;? Espy said powerfully to an uncomfortably and uncharacteristically hushed House chamber. Dickson declined to press charges with the Capitol police or talk publicly about the incident, but did release a statement through a spokesperson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can have disagreements without being disagreeable; but, we should never let our disagreements turn into intimi-


statetalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

F

in the past, local hospitals would not give the clinicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctors admitting privileges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just because we do abortions,â&#x20AC;? she told the Jackson Free Press in March. State law requires physicians to file a written report with the Mississippi Department of Health each time a patient receives treatment or dies due to complications from an abortion.

3CHOOL$ISTRICTS'ET-ORE3EX%D/PTIONSE\(OL]DEHWK:DLEHO

A task force recently approved Reducing the Risk for abstinence-plus sexeducation classes in Mississippi schools.

A

WDVNIRUFHZLWKWKHVWDWH'HSDUWPHQWRI (GXFDWLRQUHFHQWO\DSSURYHGWZRPRUH SURJUDPVIRUWHDFKLQJDEVWLQHQFHSOXV VH[HGXFDWLRQLQ0LVVLVVLSSLVFKRROV1RZ VFKRROGLVWULFWV¿QDOO\KDYHRSWLRQVIRUDEVWL QHQFHSOXVFXUULFXODWKDWDUHGLIIHUHQWIURP WKRVHDSSURYHGIRUDEVWLQHQFHRQO\FODVVHV DQGWKHVHFRPHZLWKIHGHUDOJUDQWPRQH\  ³:HœUHYHU\H[FLWHGDERXWWKDW´VDLG6DQ IRUG-RKQVRQGHSXW\GLUHFWRURIWKHHGXFD WLRQDGYRFDF\RUJDQL]DWLRQ0LVVLVVLSSL)LUVW ³7KRVHDUHWZRHYLGHQFHEDVHGFXUULFXODWKDW KDYHEHHQSURYHQWRUHGXFHWHHQELUWKDQG 67'UDWHV´  5HFHQWO\WKH6WDWH'HSDUWPHQWRI(GXFD WLRQœV2I¿FHRI+HDOWK\6FKRROVRYHUVDZD WDVNIRUFHWKDWDSSURYHGWZRDEVWLQHQFHSOXV VH[HGXFDWLRQSURJUDPVIRUVFKRROGLVWULFWVWR FKRRVHIURP'UDZWKH/LQH5HVSHFWWKH/LQH LVDSURJUDPIRUJUDGHVDQG5HGXFLQJWKH 5LVNLVDSURJUDPIRUKLJKVFKRROVWXGHQWV  %HIRUH5HGXFLQJWKH5LVNDQG'UDZWKH

â&#x20AC;?It Is Writtenâ&#x20AC;? presents exciting and instructional plays and skits, as well as a very helpful vacation Bible school guide. The lessons included in this volume teach Scriptures to both young children and adults, as they portray the biblical characters in skits and plays. Performing popular Bible stories can bring the true meaning of the words to life and provides the performers with a unique learning experience.

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ÂżFHRI+HDOWK\6FKRROV ZHUHWKHVDPHSURJUDPVDSSURYHGIRUDEVWL QHQFHRQO\VH[HGXFDWLRQ  8QGHUWKHODZWKHUHTXLUHPHQWVIRUDE VWLQHQFHRQO\DQGDEVWLQHQFHSOXVSURJUDPV

DUHDOPRVWH[DFWO\WKHVDPH1HLWKHUSROLF\ DOORZVVFKRROVWRVKRZVWXGHQWVKRZWRXVH FRQGRPV²VRPHWKLQJWKDWPRVWFRPSUHKHQ VLYHVH[HGXFDWLRQSURJUDPVLQFOXGH  7RJHW5HGXFLQJWKH5LVNDSSURYHG -RKQVRQVDLGWKHYHQGRUVUHSODFHGDFRQGRP GHPRQVWUDWLRQZLWKDOHFWXUH+HKRSHVWR PDNHVLPLODUPRGL¿FDWLRQVWRRWKHUVH[ HGXFDWLRQFXUULFXODDQGJHWPRUHSURJUDPV DXWKRUL]HG  ³,WJRHVEDFNWRWKDWEDODQFHWKDWZHœYH EHHQWU\LQJWRGHDOZLWKIRUWKHSDVWFRXSOH RIPRQWKV²PDNLQJVXUHZHFDQPDNH DGDSWDWLRQVWKDWZLOODOORZWKHPWRJR WKURXJKZKLOHPDLQWDLQLQJWKH¿GHOLW\RI WKHSURJUDPV´KHVDLG  7KH-DFNVRQ3XEOLF6FKRROVKDYHQRW\HW DQQRXQFHGZKLFKVH[HGXFDWLRQSROLF\WKH\ ZLOODGRSW  )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQRQ+RXVH%LOO DQGDIXOOOLVWRIDSSURYHGUHVRXUFHVYLVLW KHDOWK\VFKRROVPVRUJ

OPENING IN MAY Green Oak Florist OUR SECOND LOCATION AT THE TOWNSHIP

The vacation Bible school activities included in this volume will teach students how to understand Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Word so that they can discover His truths for themselves. The excitement, history, adventure, and spiritual truths of the Bible are presented in an easy-to-follow format.

Available for purchase at Books & Beignets Bookstore in Northpark Mall and Christian Books and More in Vicksburg. Also available to order online at www.trafford.com or call 1-888-232-4444.

GREENOAKFLORIST.COM

5009 Old Canton Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson | 1067 Highland Colony â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland

601.956.5017 | 601.707.9440

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY ETR ASSOCIATES

T

he stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abortion clinic may close soon under a bill poised to become law after both houses of the Legislature approved it last week. Last week, the Senate passed HB 1390 to put more restrictions on doctors who perform abortions in abortion clinics. Supporters of the bill, including Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, have said it will effectively close the clinic and end abortion in the state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are very close to ending abortion in the state of Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? Reeves said in an email to supporters last week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am 100 percent pro-life, and I am focused on passing House Bill 1390 that would effectively end abortion in our state.â&#x20AC;? The bill now goes to Gov. Phil Bryant, who was co-chairman of the state effort to pass the Personhood Initiative while he was running for governor last fall. Bryant has said he wants Mississippi to be abortion free. HB 1390 would require all physicians associated with abortion facilities to have admitting privileges at a local hospital. The bill would also require those physicians to be board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, and a staff member trained in CPR would have to be at the facility at all times. Shannon Brewer is the director of the Jackson Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Organization, the beleaguered clinic in Fondren. She said that

From 2006 to 2010, physicians treated 11 patients for conditions resulting from abortions. No deaths were reported. During that same five-year period, 13,388 abortions were performed in Mississippi. The reports do not differentiate between abortions done to protect the womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health and elective abortions. Diane Derzis owns the Jackson Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Organization, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only remaining abortion clinic. She told Mississippi Public Broadcasting last week that she plans to challenge the bill if it becomes law, but she could not be reached for comment for this article. She also owns clinics in Birmingham and elsewhere in the southeast. Another bill designed to end abortion, HB 1196 or the â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartbeat bill,â&#x20AC;? died in committee, but Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, successfully added similar language onto a bill to revise jail terms for child homicide. That bill, SB 2771, would allow people to be sent to prison for up to 30 years if convicted of intentional manslaughter of a child under 18 years old. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

RUWKRVHZKRKDYHORQJHQGXUHG0LVVLV VLSSLÂśVOLPLWHGVHOHFWLRQRIEHHUĂ&#x20AC;DYRUV UHOLHIFDPHWKLVZHHNLQWKHIRUPRI*RY 3KLO%U\DQWÂśVDSSURYDORIWKHVRFDOOHGFUDIW EHHUELOO7KHQHZODZSHUPLWVEHHUPDNHUV WRVHOOEUHZVDVVWURQJDVSHUFHQWDOFRKRO E\ZHLJKWRUSHUFHQWE\YROXPH&XU UHQWO\EHHUVVWURQJHUWKDQSHUFHQW$%: DUHLOOHJDOLQ0LVVLVVLSSL  Âł,WÂśVDELJGD\´VDLG)UDQN'UHQQDQSUHVL GHQWRI&DSLWDO&LW\%HYHUDJHVD-DFNVRQEDVHG GLVWULEXWRUWKDWKHOSHGOREE\IRUWKHQHZODZ  'UHQQDQVDLGWKHODZVZRXOGSXW0LVVLVVLSSL PRUHLQOLQHZLWKRWKHUVWDWHVDQGFRXOGEHQHÂżW WKHWRXULVPUHOLDQW0LVVLVVLSSLFRDVW7XQLFD FDVLQRVDQGVPDOOHUUHJLRQDOEUHZHULHVOLNH .LOQEDVHG/D]\0DJQROLD7KHODZWDNHVHIIHFW -XO\7KH0LVVLVVLSSL'HSDUWPHQWRI5HYHQXH PXVWDSSURYHDOOQHZEHHUEUDQGVORRNLQJWR HQWHUWKHVWDWH  %ULDQ'UHQQDQ&DSLWDO&LW\%HYHUDJHVÂś VDOHVGLUHFWRUVDLGJRRGEHHUKDVORQJEHHQ DYDLODEOHLQWKHVWDWHEXWWKHODZFKDQJHZLOO ERRVWWKHQXP EHURIVW\OHV DQGĂ&#x20AC;DYRUV  Âł:LWKWKH W\SHVRIEHHUV \RXÂśOOEHDEOH WREULQJLQQRZ WKHEHHUFXOWXUH ZLOOLPSURYH HYHQPRUH´KH VDLG ²5/1DYH

FILE PHOTO

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

State May Shutter Abortion Clinic

The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only abortion clinic could close soon, thanks to the Legislature.

'UV3IGNS"EER"ILL

9


biztalk

by R.L. Nave

Workers’ Rights Under Fire

on, Not the uti P ol

to Par

eP robl em

m ble ro

Part of th eS

Biggest Vote Since Tort Reform Efforts currently underway in the Legislature seek to give companies even more power over their work forces. SB 2576, which recently skated through the House by a scant one vote, makes injured workers prove they were not under the influence of drugs or alcohol when they were hurt and would let employers consider pre-existing conditions when

April 11 - 17, 2012

ft h he tt Solution, No

10

making hiring decisions. Speaking in support for SB 2576, Rep. Gary Chism, R-Columbus, suggested the system is out of whack, unfairly tipped in favor of workers. “This is the biggest vote for business since tort reform,” Chism said in urging his colleagues to support the bill. National and state data seem to refute arguments that out-of-control costs for emAMILE WILSON

I

magine you’re a Sumerian servant in 2050 B.C., carving tiny jewels for King UrNammu’s scepter and—oops—you accidentally slice off your finger. Under the king’s law, written on stone tablets, you would receive a monetary award depending on which body part you hurt. Ur’s payment schedule for worker injuries is the earliest known workers’ compensation system, which pays employees who get hurt while doing their jobs. Other ancient civilizations, such as China, Greece and Rome, also had systems in place. Orthopedic surgeon Gregory P. Guyton’s “A Brief History of Workers’ Compensation,” published in a 1999 University of Iowa medical journal, shows that ancient Arab law, for example, dictated that a the loss of a penis was compensated according to the length lost, while an ear’s value depended on the appendage’s surface area. Sometime between ancient Sumeria and the early 20th century, the system was turned on its ear, making it nearly impossible for workers to be made whole after getting hurt on the job. In modern times, Wisconsin became the first state to establish a state workers’ compensation commission in 1911. Mississippi was the last state to enact workers’ comp, in 1948. Here, as in other states, worker’s comp, which has remained largely unchanged in the past 60 years, is the exclusive remedy when construction workers injure themselves. Taking into account our state’s legacy of hostility to labor unions and the tort-reform movement of recent years, many people believe that Mississippi’s labor laws make it among the least worker-friendly states in the union.

that they weren’t drunk, on drugs or suffering from a pre-existing condition, characterizing it as a dismantling of worker protections. Rep. Trey Lamar, R-Senatobia, said the “bad” in the legislation outweighed its good provisions, and he urged his colleagues to vote the measure down and craft a better bill at a later time. During the floor debate, Rep. Willie Bailey, D-Greenville, described our workers’ comp laws as the worst in the nation and characterized the bill as an attempt to “punish poor people because they can’t do any better.” “What they’re asking you to do is take the little rights the workers have away from them,” Bailey said.

Workers Relieved Public employees, threatened with losing their due-proHouse Appropriations Committee Chairman Herb Frierson, R-Poplarville, amended a bill to restore state cess rights under a legislative workers’ due-process rights. initiative the Senate passed, might be able to breathe a temporary sigh of relief thanks to a ployers necessitate an overhaul of the system. House amendment. Nationwide, information from the National Under SB 2380, which the Senate passed Academy of Social Insurance show that costs in mid-March, state agencies would have been to employers fell by 7.6 percent in 2009 to exempt from complying with state Personnel $73.9 billion, the largest decline in employer Board rules for two years. The bill’s backers, costs since 1987. including Gov. Phil Bryant, argued that the “Measured as a percentage of the wages change was necessary to streamline state govof covered workers, benefits paid to workers ernment. increased whereas employer costs fell in 2009. Worker advocates and lawmakers who As a share of covered wages, employers’ costs in opposed the Senate version maintained that 2009 were lower than in any year since 1980,” removing the protections of the Personnel NASI’s 2009 annual report states. Board would open the door to politically moThe downward trend is mirrored in the tivated firings and intimidation. Magnolia State, where workers’ compensation When the bill arrived in the House Apcovered 1 million workers in 2009, a decrease propriations Committee, Chairman Herb of 4.7 percent from 2008. The wages of Mis- Frierson, R-Poplarville, amended it to restore sissippi workers covered by workers’ comp due-process rights and direct the Personnel totaled 33.3 million, a 3.9-percent drop from Board to give job performance ratings more the year before. weight than tenure in reviewing its work-force Detractors say the bill will burden em- reduction policy. ployees who are injured on the job to prove Brenda Scott, president of the Mississippi

Magnolia Data Solutions Environmental Services and Information Destruction Specialists

We are Mississippi’s ONLY R2 CERTIFIED electronic recycler! We Handle: • electronic recycling • information destruction • excess inventory re-marketing • waste identification needs for individuals and organizations of all sizes. For more information on how we can help your business,

please call 601-919-0062 EPA, HIPA, GLBA & FACTA Compliant

160 Fairbanks St. • Jackson, Ms 39202 • www.MagnoliaDataSolutions.com

Alliance of State Employees/Communications Workers of America, called Frierson’s version of the bill a “heck of an improvement” over what the Senate passed—even though she would like to see the entire measure defeated. “If workers have been on the job for some amount of time, I would assume that their job performance would be up to par. Otherwise, they would have been dismissed some while ago,” Scott said in a phone interview. Floyd Doolittle, a Jackson attorney, believes the workers’ comp proposal penalizes higher-wage workers. As of January 2012, an injured worker would receive two-thirds of the state’s average weekly wage or the statutory maximum benefit for disability or death of $435.68 per week, or $196,506 for a lifetime. “If you’re working for minimum wage and you get injured, you’re in pretty good shape. But if you’re making a good wage, not so much,” Doolittle said. If Gov. Bryant signs the workers’ comp bill, Doolittle believes that could open employers up to lawsuits that may be more costly than what would have been paid out in workers’ compensation. SB 2576 says “no compensation shall be payable if the use of drugs illegally, the use of prescription drugs improperly or intoxication due to the use of alcohol of the employee was the proximate cause of the injury.” Doolittle paints a scenario under which an employee smokes a small marijuana joint over the weekend, comes in to work on Monday and is mowed down by a negligent forklift operator. The Workers’ Compensation Commission could determine the drugs slowed the worker’s reaction time causing his failure to avoid the accident. If workers’ compensation does not pay the worker, Doolittle believes they could sue in court under the principle of general torts, or civil wrongs. If that happens, a jury award could be significantly higher than what would have been paid under the state’s workers’ comp code. “I might be wrong, but it’s going to take some lawsuits to find out,” he said.


JACKSON MISSISSIPPI

FILMS

WORKSHOPS

MUSIC

jacksonfreepress.com

CROSSROADSFILMFESTIVAL.COM

11 JCV7221-2 Tourism in JAX JFPress 9.5x6.167.indd 1

4/9/12 11:14 AM


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Save ‘Violence Against Women Act’

N

ext on conservatives’ list of things to drown in the bathtub of “big government extravagance” is the Violence Against Women Act. Bill Clinton signed VAWA into law in 1994, providing just over $1.5 billion to help investigate and prosecute perpetrators of violence against women, to provide grants for education about domestic violence and to help shelter women from abusers. Congress reauthorized the act in 2000 and 2005. In 2005, the ACLU characterized VAWA as “one of the most effective pieces of legislation enacted to end domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. It has dramatically improved the law enforcement response to violence against women and has provided critical services necessary to support women in their struggle to overcome abusive situations.” In 2012, conservative Republicans and Tea Partiers are actively seeking to dismantle the act in the name of “fiscal responsibility.” From where we sit, it’s just more of the same hyperbolic right-wing nuttiness that heaps favors on those with quite a lot while those who struggle get the raggedy end of the big green congressional stick. Add to that an ever-more-apparent animosity against anything having to do with gender issues, and VAWA is squarely in conservative gun sights. Never mind that domestic violence is a crime that crosses all economic lines. Let’s not mention that violence against women knows no skin color, no age and no religious affiliation. And for heaven’s sake, let’s not talk about the children who exhibit post-traumatic stress disorders after watching daddy play whoop-ass on mommy’s face for a few years. No. Let’s not talk about any of that. Apparently, if you’re a conservative, what’s more important is that government shrink and private businesses funded by taxpayer dollars grow in direct proportion. If a few million women get caught in the middle, well, too bad—nothing we can do about it. VAWA saves lives. Laws have put teeth into assault legislation, meaning more violent abusers are getting harsher punishments. Outreach programs are educating women on their rights and resources. Other programs train police and judges to better deal with abusive situations. Batterer-intervention programs are changing entrenched mindsets to break the cycle of violence in families. Even the corporate world now provides employee programs targeting domestic violence. The world understands that domestic violence is a serious threat to any person in an intimate relationship with someone who wants to control and dominate them. Everyone, it seems, but conservative Republicans. If you love a woman or have a woman in your life, contact your U.S. senator and congressman and make your voice heard for women’s safety.

KEN STIGGERS

Love and Joblessness

April 11 - 17, 2012

M

12

o’tel Williams: “This is your super producer, announcement, entrepreneur and part-time Herbal Viagra salesperson here to promote my new dating service for the jobless called ‘Unemployed Singles.’ It’s an opportunity for that special unemployed male to connect and look for a job with that special unemployed female. It’s a great time to have someone to help you practice your job interview skills and critique your resume and cover letter. It’s a chance to find a job and fall in love or vice versa. Just don’t end up like my client, the unemployed emcee.” Unemployed Emcee: “Man, I thought my silky smooth rap would convince this beautiful woman, who works at a thriving marketing firm, to go out on a date with me. She answered my request by singing lyrics by Gwen Guthrie: ‘Bill collectors at my door; what can you do for me? You got to have a J-O-B if you wanna be with me. Ain’t nothin’ goin’ on but the rent.’ “Thanks to Mo’tel Williams’ ‘Unemployed Singles’ dating service, I made a rebound after a working woman turned me down. Tomorrow, I have a date with Claire, an unemployed single woman, at Brother Hustle’s Mobile Wi-Fi and Juicy Juice on Ice Café.” Mo’tel Williams: “Although men make up 70 percent of those who have lost their jobs since the recession began, it is ‘Unemployed Singles’ duty to help the unemployed get a job and make a love connection during this dreaded recession at loveandjoblessness.org or 1-800-Job-Date.”

Still Racial

S

KAMIKAZE

o, you’re tired of hearing folks talk about race, right? Tired of reading about it? Sick of seeing all the articles and all the pieces on CNN? You could do without another rally, without another Facebook or Twitter campaign, correct? Tough. As much as I’d like to believe in this “postracial” America that folks thought President Obama would usher in, we’re constantly reminded that not everyone is prepared to join the rest of us in this century. Ironically, through some sheer force of ignorance, some pundits believe that if we only would stop talking about race so much, the issue would just disappear. You know, it’s just those “race baiters” like the Jackson Free Press and Jerry Mitchell who keep bringing up those atrocities. There’s no more racism in America, let alone Mississippi, and those darn agitators are just distracting us from the real issues (sarcasm off). Funniest thing, though: Those who say we should stop pointing out injustice are usually the ones who still vicariously benefit from the vestiges of said racism. How dare we make you uncomfortable by pointing out how society devalues black life (sarcasm off). Fact is, remaining silent on race matters would not have prevented Trayvon Martin from being shot. It would not have stopped Deryl Dedmon and his accomplices from killing

James Craig Anderson. Remaining silent won’t prevent the next hate crime, either. It won’t stop police such as Oscar Grant from harassing or gunning down the next young black male. Silence won’t stop the next retail clerk from following around the next black person in a store. All silence accomplishes is to make some white folks comfortable because they don’t have to face reality. It allows those same folks an opportunity to abandon political correctness and say things like, “You plant corn, you get corn,” as Frank Taaffe told Soledad O’Brien on CNN. Yes, we are just as angry about black-onblack crime. And yes, hundreds of groups and organizations are already dedicated to stomping out violence in black communities. Try another excuse. When blacks kill blacks, it isn’t because of the color of their skin, making those crimes decidedly different from hate crimes. You post statistics and numbers on blogs trying to “prove” to everyone that “black people really are bad,” and that we somehow “deserve” the treatment that we get. Nope—no numbers you can roll out justify George Zimmerman’s actions, or Dedmon’s, or the cops who killed Sean Bell. I could go on. In actuality, the excuses I’ve heard for each of the aforementioned cases only proves that we aren’t past racism and that we won’t ever be—unless we keep talking about it. And if it makes you uncomfortable, so what? And that’s the truth ... shonuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


EDDIE OUTLAW

Cooking Like Mother EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Elizabeth Waibel Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Contributing Editors Tam Curley,Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Brittany Kilgore, Whitney Menogan, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Staff Photographer Virginia Schreiber Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers Trip Burns, William Patrick Butler,Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Eric Bennett, Erica Sutton

ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executives Mandy Beach, Adam Perry Sales Intern Morgan Bares

BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Mik Davis, Clint Dear, Richard Laswell

ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

L

ately, and not without a good measure of whining, I’ve been keeping an eye on my diet. My “Fitness Jesus,” Terry Sullivan of liveRIGHTnow, has me on the high-protein, low-carb side of the menu these days. I get to enjoy lots of wholesome chicken and fish, while avoiding processed foods and refined sugars. Now that the days have gotten longer, and I’ve acquired a fancy new grill, the monotony of baked chicken has been kicked up a notch. Evenings spent tossing together a fresh salad and searing tuna on the grill validate the necessity for such an enormous deck. Now, I don’t mind telling you that I’ve had more than my share of fast food, and I have a love for chili cheese Coney dogs that borders on obsession, but what I crave right now might surprise you. The other day, I was pushing my steamed chicken and vegetables around my Tupperware when I was blindsided by memories of mother’s summer garden and the bounty of nearly meatless meals we’d enjoy. These days, “farm to table” is all the rage. We dine in fancy restaurants and marvel at the freshness of the zipper peas or Ripley tomatoes, seemingly willing to forget that this is how we used to do things. In cinema, it’s called willing suspension of disbelief. “... and, as a side, we have fresh squash, tomato and Vidalia onion succotash,” the server tells us, and we all swoon as if we thought veggies came from the freezer section at the supermarket. Ole Frank, my grandmother’s gardener had a rule: “Plant butter beans on Good Friday,” he’d say, so we always did. The week before Easter, I’d step off the bus to discover my father had plowed up two acres in the cotton field next to the big house. There, all summer long, I’d help tend to mother’s beans, squash, tomatoes and peas. I also ran across more snakes than I care to remember. You’ve not seen a barefoot Delta boy run down a gravel road like I could. As I recall, we didn’t eat out much during the summer months. A typical weeknight would include big pots of butter beans, snap peas and okra, boiled potatoes, and fresh sliced tomatoes and yellow onions. Of course, the old cast-iron skillet would render mother’s cornbread—moist on the inside, crunchy on the outside and never made with sugar. I recently was successful at seasoning a “pre-seasoned” skillet, and I make my cornbread mother’s way. On the weekend, we might enjoy barbecued chicken from the grill with our vegetables, and on Sunday, we had the usual roast. Of course, we ate catfish—lots of catfish—but the produce from our garden always held more importance. I suppose it

was the hours I spent weeding or tilling the soil. I put in even more time dedicated to the harvest, and that was all before the tedious job of hulling beans and peas. I can recall, on several occasions, my father sliding our big square coffee table to the corner of the den, rolling up the hunter-green area rug, then hauling in bushels of purple hull peas and butter beans with a wheel barrow. We’d all work until our thumbs were sore, while watching the big television set. Many a Saturday evening was spent watching “Fantasy Island” and “The Love Boat” while we slowly worked our way through the mounds of peas or butter beans. The next morning, all lined up on a church pew, we’d fumble through the hymnals, our thumbs purple from hulling. I think it gave us all a greater appreciation for the dinners we ate at Greenville’s How Joy Restaurant or Lusco’s in Greenwood. Mother would beam as Mr. Wong, owner of that long-closed Chinese restaurant, would dote on us kids, telling her that he’d never seen such well-behaved children. On the subject of our manners, Mother would say, “Honey, I could take you to the White House to eat—all of you, at one time, all by myself.” I admit that it gave me great pleasure to make my parents proud by “sitting up straight” and quietly stirring the lemon into my sweet tea. I fell asleep in the back of our Thunderbird more times than I can recall on the drive back from Greenville, my belly full of shrimp curry and fried wontons. These memories, as precious as they are to me, don’t inspire a garden of my own, though. Sure, I could carve out a small garden in the back yard. I could also wear a wide brimmed straw hat while tying butter bean vines to the trailing wire, but one bad tomato or puny squash would ruin it all for me, and let’s be honest, I’m really not the gardening type. My time is better spent at the cutting board or in front of the stove, not out back with my hands in the dirt. These days, a trip to a farmers market makes it easy to cook like Mother, while avoiding any snakes that might wander up from Eubanks Creek. You see, if I happened upon a snake in my garden, let alone my backyard, I’d never step foot in it again. For the rest of my life there would be no end to the re-telling of how I managed to survive an anaconda attack while attempting to harvest my heirloom tomatoes. Eddie Outlaw is co-owner of the William Wallace Salon in Fondren and spends most of his time trying not to embarrass his sweet Delta mother on eddieoutlaw.com.

I’d help tend to mother’s beans, squash, tomatoes, peas.

Transportation Engineer (Jackson, MS)

Analyze and develop statewide travel demand forecast models, small urban and MPO models, including traffic patterns & transportation design plans, simulation, signal timing & optimization. Req.: BS in Transportation Eng./Civil Eng., 1 yrs of exp. in transportation engineering/ planning. EIT. Strong GIS skills. Familiar with modeling/simulation software HCS, REMI, CORSIM, VISSIM, TransCAD & SYNCHRO. Send resume to Mississippi Department of Transportation, Human Resources 401 North West Street, Suite 9083 Jackson, MS 39201

NEEDED

Marketing and Sales Support Ninja

Do you live and breathe customer service? The JFP/BOOM Jackson advertising department needs your help keeping our advertisers and partners happy and prosperous! Your key duties will include planning and hosting marketing events, so flexibility for evenings and some weekends is ideal. Other duties including covering phones, generating reports, shooting product photos, running ad copy, helping with logistics. Part-time and hourly to start, but the right person can expand this position.

Send cover letter and resume to todd@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


COURTESY JACKSON CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

Optimist Foodie: Andrew Zimmern’s Culinary Take on Jackson by Tom Ramsey

T

April 11 - 17, 2012

he Friday before PM Soul, a popup food event last fall at Peaches Café on Farish Street, I got a call from a number I didn’t recognize. I was in the middle of dinner service at Underground 119 and didn’t have the time for a chat, so I ignored the call and kept at it on the hot line. When the same number called a second time in 10 minutes, I figured I should answer and stepped out to a quiet spot behind the restaurant. The caller identified himself as Dean Carpentier, a producer with Andrew Zimmern’s “Appetite for Life,” the James Beard Foundation award-winning food writer’s online food-travel series. I was glad I took the call. Dean said he had read an article that I wrote for the Jackson Free Press about Craig Noone and PM Soul and asked if we would allow them to come to Jackson and shoot an episode of Zimmern’s show at the event. My response was, “Sure, but you do know that it’s on Monday, right?” Indeed, they didn’t know when it was, and Monday was way too soon for them to prepare. Not wanting to let this opportunity slip away, I volunteered: “We can always do another event for you. Just tell me when you want to come to Jackson.” Six weeks after that conversation, the Appetite for Jackson event took shape, and with the help of a great team (lead by Dominic DeLeo and Marika Cackett) we welcomed Zimmern and his crew to a great downtown event with 4,500 people listening to local bands while eating local food and drinking craft beer on a perfect Saturday in January. Over the course of the shooting and the weeks following (including a return visit to Jackson for yet another shooting), I got to know Zimmern a little better and convinced him to do a short interview about his experiences in Jackson. First of all, thank you for all you’ve done for Jackson here in the past few months. Your presence has energized our food community knowing that the No. 1 fan of durian (fruit) made it to Jackson, Mississippi.

Ahh, durian. Seriously, it’s going to be good for the city when the show airs. I’ve seen it with communities all over the world with our show, and it’s just a wonderful thing for 14 people who live around the area to say, “Oh

my gosh look what’s going on; look how cool our own hometown is.” It’s nice. Did you have any preconceived notions about Mississippi?

Well, I’ve been before, but I will say we talk about the preconceived notions all the time … from a shooting standpoint. You know: people with no shirts in overalls standing around on the side of the road with big straw hats on and pieces of straw coming out of their mouth is something that a lot of people think of when they think of the South in general. Yeah, and they’re clearly thinking of Arkansas.

Clearly. When we were looking at census data—you know, the sort of mundane numbers crunching when we’re looking at researching a show—we found some interesting facts. Mississippi is one of the states in the union with the highest number of people born there who still live there. And someone at one of our meetings said, “Well, that’s because not a lot of people are moving there.” And I said, “Well, maybe the way to think about it is that there’s so much great stuff there people don’t want to leave.” I’ve not been to Mississippi in August, so I just need to be honest, you know? But Minnesota (where Zimmern now lives) in January is no walk in the park. All that I saw when I was down there (in Mississippi) was fantastic people, great communities, great food, good times. It was wonderful to see. It was also wonderful to see neighborhoods in transition. When we go into a neighborhood like where the Big Apple Inn is (on Farish Street), and where some people see what is not so pretty and anything that looks a little down on its luck, I see opportunity. I was sitting outside with the security guys and just watching the neighborhood kind of go by. I was probably only standing outside for 15, 20 minutes, but all you see on the people walking around are smiles. All you get from everyone is a happy “hello,” and they look you in the eye. I’m sort of an eternal optimist. I just see Mississippi as a really wonderful place to visit. You know? I can’t wait to go back. Speaking of which, are you going to come back for the next Appetite for Jackson?

We sure are. As a matter of fact, as soon

Culinary personality Andrew Zimmern says he is determined to spread the gospel about what’s going on in Mississippi’s exciting foodies movement. And he really, really digs our long growing season.

as you know a date for anything, we want to know and stick it on our calendar and make that something we can follow through on. What did you think when you stepped out of the car and saw the size of Appetite for Jackson?

Oh my gosh, it was fantastic! I loved, loved the energy there. And I also like something about cities your size where an entire community really can gather in one place. I mean, you don’t have that in a city like New York. It’s impossible. It’s a different mechanism. But to see so many people so revved up all in one spot, I think that says a lot about community. And it was wonderful to have the shoot for “Bizarre Foods,” hot on the heels of Appetite for Jackson. … We bumped into a couple of people who weren’t at the one we were at last January, and every single one of them was like, “Yeah, we can’t wait to be there for the next one.” I thought to myself, “That’s really, really cool,” because it shows that whatever it is that was going on when I was down there the first time, it worked, and they want more of that. And it had very little to do with me; it was more about the energy of the community to

see all of their other friends represented there. It was really slick. We were really proud of the turnout.

And the food was really good. That was my next question. Mississippi food: Everybody thinks of it as soul food smothered in gravy and fried.

Yep. What was your biggest surprise eating in Mississippi?

The biggest surprise eating in Mississippi was how wholesome the food was everywhere. Second biggest surprise was growing seasons. Anytime that I’ve been there, we’ve had local produce, even if it’s from all the way down in the southern part of the state. (I also liked) the fun regional influences. I mean, the whole tamale trail is just deliciously hysterical. Interestingly, I always draw parallels here to Minnesota. Everyone always thinks of Minnesota as fly-over country until all of a sudden things like home preserving and pie making and kitchen arts became just as highly regarded as fancy, multi-star, molecular gastronomy was. I think it’s the same thing with Mississippi. … I just love it. And clearly,


COURTESY JACKSON CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

clearly thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a market for all kinds of foods there. What we saw in Oxford, what we saw in Jackson, what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen in Biloxi, what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen all over the state has just been fantastic. Did you feel that sense of family with all of the different chefs when you were here?

Now, speaking of fun, you were livetweeting like crazy during the dinner that Jesse Houston (Parlor Market chef) did for youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both times. Was that something else that surprised you coming out of Jackson?

The first time, yes. When we went to Parlor Market, and I had my birthday dinner there, you kept telling me about this food and this guy doing some great stuff, so my radar was up. I was very, very impressed. And I was very impressed the second time around

At last fallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Appetite Jackson, the excitement over Andrew Zimmernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit to Jackson brought out crowds to hear local musical performances and to, well, eat. Zimmern was impressed by the turnout.

as well. I was even impressed the third time when I showed up the next morning, and he did a couple of dishes with me on the showâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; some catfish dishesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and he debuted his catfish cracklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concept. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a chance to taste it, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s genius. I said to myself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know, this is a very, very interesting young man,â&#x20AC;? because when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 30 years old, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got that kind of talent, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really easy to want to do everything yourself, but the new generation of chefs, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so collaborative, and everything he was doing involved his whole team. We stuck around for lunch afterwards; he had his in-laws, did a crawfish boil, and he had his whole crew there. It was a great example to me of how inclusive this generation of chefs are. Thirty years ago, when I was cooking in New York City as a young line cook, you never would have had thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;never. Never would have happened. It was not a team concept. It was just the chef and sous chef as the developmental team. Everyone else just executed,

E\/DQFH/RPD[

A

VDIRRGORYHU,ÂżUPO\EHOLHYHRQHRIWKHEHVWSDWKZD\VWRSOHDVXUH LVWKURXJKRXUWDVWHEXGV)RRGLVDIWHUDOODEDFNGURSIRUVRFLDO LQWHUDFWLRQ)RUP\IULHQGVDQGPHLWLVDOVRVRPHWKLQJWREHWDNHQ VHULRXVO\  )HZWKLQJVFRPSDUHWRUHOD[LQJRXWVLGHGXULQJWKHHYHQLQJVXUURXQGHG E\WKHVZHHWVPHOORIVSULQJĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVDQGIUHVKO\PRZHGODZQV  7KHZHHNHQGEDUEHFXHKRZHYHULVRQHWKLQJWKDWWDNHVWKLVUHOD[DWLRQ WRWKHQH[WOHYHO,WLQIXVHVWKHDOUHDG\VZHHWVPHOORIVSULQJZLWKWKHVPRNH IURPFKDUFRDOJULOOVDVIULHQGVJDWKHULQEDFN\DUGVWRVKDUHFRQYHUVDWLRQDQG ZLQGGRZQIURPWKHZRUNZHHN  :KHQKRVWLQJDEDUEHFXH\RXKDYHSOHQW\FKRLFHVIRU\RXUIDUH:KLOH ULEVSRUNEXWWVDQGÂłGUXQNHQ´FKLFNHQDUHFHUWDLQO\GHOLFLRXVRSWLRQV,KDYH DUHFLSHIRUDXQLTXHFURZGSOHDVLQJFRPELQDWLRQWKDWLVLQH[SHQVLYHHDV\ WRPDNHDQGHYHQHDVLHUWRHDW  0\IULHQG-DVRQ%XWOHUDQG,GHYHORSHGWKHVH6SLF\+DZDLLDQ6OLGHUV GXULQJWKHÂł%HHUDQG%RQHV%DUEHFXH&RPSHWLWLRQ´ODVWVXPPHUDW)-RQHV &RUQHU:HSODFHGWKLUGRYHUDOO  7KRXJKZHFDOOWKHVHPLQLGHOLFDFLHVÂł6SLF\+DZDLLDQ6OLGHUV´WKH\ KDYHDGHÂżQLWH0H[LFDQWZLVWWRWKHPDQGJRZHOOZLWKKRPHPDGHJXDFD PROHDQGWRUWLOODFKLSV  7KLVUHFLSHSDLUVQLFHO\ZLWKJRRGPXVLFDQG$ELWDÂśV6WUDZEHUU\+DUYHVW /DJHURUDQ\JRRGZKHDWRU0H[LFDQEHHUIRUWKDWPDWWHU$VIRUWKHPXVLF, OHDYHWKDWLQ\RXUKDQGV

Thank you for your time. We really look forward to seeing you again soon in Jackson.

And I look forward to coming back. Underground 119 chef and food writer Tom Ramsey is a lobbyist, former investment banker and tobacco executive who teaches private cooking lessons, writes poetry, runs with the bulls and produced an album or two.

SPICY HAWAIIAN SLIDERS AND HOMEMADE GUACAMOLE Guacamole: 3 medium jalapeno peppers 1 small yellow onion 1 tomato 1 bundle of cilantro 8 avocados 1 lime salt and pepper Sliders: 1 pack of bacon (cooked crispy) 2 pounds ground chuck 1/2 pound ground pork 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar 1 cup barbecue sauce Ground cayenne pepper 1/3 cup teriyaki sauce 1 egg 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs Fresh pineapple (sliced) Buns Tortilla chips, to serve

COURTESY LANCE LOMAX

!#LASSY"ARBECUE&ARE 3URETO0LEASE

which was fine for me. Personally, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a lot to contribute back then. I was learning. It was a different environment, and you certainly wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have had the type of camaraderie that you see both in the individual restaurant and outside of it in the community, in the restaurant community at large. I will say, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of really great food thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on down in Mississippi, and I think guys like you and Jesse are just great examples. We see the exact same thing happening here in Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;chefs who see an opportunity to have a life, build a restaurant and establish something. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be in Chicago, L.A., San Francisco, New York or Boston; you can do it anywhere that you want to raise a family. I just think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a beautiful, beautiful story. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited about the food, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about the food scene in Mississippi in general that way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s developing; (it) reminds me of what was going on here in Minnesota seven, eight, 10 years ago.

I sure have. â&#x20AC;Ś Nobody ever plans a menu and says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remind people that our fish is fresh, not frozen.â&#x20AC;? I think these days itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost expected that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sourcing locally, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using the best ingredients you can. Customers are starting to expect, and even demand, that what you serve is fresh, local and sustainable. To me, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what the hospitality industry has become. If you want to rise above the corporate-chain world, you have to demonstrate your sense of place and exploit what grows around you. That being said, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great about Mississippi is youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a part of the world where your growing seasons are extended, and what you can produce throughout the fall is just insane. All over the South, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve discovered treats and tidbits and vegetables and fruits that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen before or experienced. And youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to find a hustling, young, ambitious chef making, you know, cracklins out of catfish skin in South Dakota. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not going to happen. You have to be somewhere where the DNA of the catfish is in everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifeblood. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to see what comes next out of the South and Jackson in particular. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on a great path.

Lance Lomax and friend Jason Butler placed third in the Beer and Bones Barbecue Competition last summer with this recipe.

 'LFHWKHMDODSHQRVRQLRQDQGWRPDWRVHSDUDWHO\DQGVHWDVLGH %HVXUHWRGHVHHGWKHSHSSHUVEHIRUHGLFLQJWKHP0LQFHFLODQWURDQG VHWWRWKHVLGH3HHODYRFDGRVDQGUHPRYHVHHGV&RPELQHIUXLWIURP

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Ă&#x20AC;LSSLQJWKHSDWWLHVDGGSLQHDSSOHVOLFHVWRWKHJULOOĂ&#x20AC;LSSLQJ RQFHZKLOH\RXUPHDWÂżQLVKHV*OD]HHDFKSDWW\ZLWKEDUEHFXHVDXFH PL[WXUHWRSZLWKDSLQHDSSOHVOLFHDQGVSULQNOHZLWKDJHQHURXVSLQFK RIFLODQWUREHIRUHSODFLQJRQWREXQV*DUQLVKVHUYLQJSODWWHUZLWKDQ\ OHIWRYHUSLQHDSSOHVOLFHVDQGFLODQWUR

jacksonfreepress.com

Oh, gosh, yes. It has everything to do with the food world at large. Mississippi is just reflecting whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on everywhere else, which is that the food community has realized that competition is the best possible thing that could happen, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to happen no matter what, so you might as well accept the fact that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re competing for dollars with the guy down the street. However, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best interest to promote the hospitality business in your own community because you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want people who are just going out for Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and birthday. You want people to embrace the concept of dining out as a lifestyle issue, and if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not regular restaurant goers, you want them to be regular restaurant goers. That means you want them to have fun at your friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to come to you three nights later. The rising tide floats all boats, and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extremely evident in the restaurant community. Guests having fun makes that tide rise.

You touched on local produce earlier. Have you been down here when tomatoes are at their peak in the summertime?

15


CWTBd\\Ta5^^S8bbdT

My Secret Weapons Parlor Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Star Chef Tells All

I

lor Market spin on it? Sometimes the dish will materialize in front of me with little influence. Other times I draw a blank, so I consult my vast array of cookbooks. Cookbooks are extremely important to me. I own well over a hundred in my personal library, and since I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had the opportunity to travel and eat at as many restaurants as I would like, I often bury my nose in them looking for COURTESY JESSE HOUSTON

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a foodie through and through. I eat, breath and sleep food. When Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not cooking at Parlor Market, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m usually cooking with friends or for friends; working in the garden; watching my favorite shows, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iron Chef Americaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Chef;â&#x20AC;? or collecting and reading cookbooks. All these things fuel my passion for food. A question Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m typically asked is â&#x20AC;&#x153;how do you come up with this stuff?â&#x20AC;? Well, here is where I find inspiration, my â&#x20AC;&#x153;secret weapons,â&#x20AC;? if you will. Any one of these tips will help you to become a bigger food nerd, too. First and foremost, I draw my inspiration for creative specials and menu items from the farmers market. Just about every Saturday, you can find me at the Mississippi Farmers Market on High Street around 9 a.m. where I seek out locally grown and seasonal produce to serve at Parlor Market. You never know exactly what is going to be there, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s half the fun of it. I may show up expecting to purchase beets for a dish I have in mind, and instead I find salsify. Never used salsify? Even heard of it? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an interesting ingredient that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve only used a few times and never expected to find at the Jackson farmers market, but there it was! Some say it has an oyster flavor; in fact, another name for it is oyster root. Of course, you can find more typical ingredients like green tomatoes, carrots, cabbage, onions and sweet potatoes on a usual basis from great farmers like Tim Cooper of Cooper Farms and Vineyards. But there are a few people like Jonathan Picarsic of Amorphous Gardens who are trying to bring something new to Jackson. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the guy who had the salsify, and he always has beautiful heirloom carrots. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planted lemongrass, bitter melon, kiwano melon, interesting varieties of cucumber, and lots of different types of organic greens, flowers and herbs. He definitely keeps me on my toes and welcomes my suggestions of new seeds for vegetables Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to serve at the restaurant. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve started keeping a digital journal of what I find in season at the farmers market so I can plan ahead for the next year. When I get back to the restaurant with boxes full of fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local milk from Progress Milk Barn and honey from Mississippi Bees, I have to figure out what to do with it all. Sometimes I have an idea in mind, but mostly, I have to come up with a dish to feature the ingredients after itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all back at Parlor Market. First, I draw on southern tradition. How are these ingredients typically used in the South? What dishes do they star in? How can I make that dish my own and put a Par-

Parlor Market Chef de Cuisine (and new JFP cooking columnist) Jesse Houston (left) dazzled food writer Andrew Zimmern (right) recently in Jackson. Zimmern tweeted Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s praise throughout the meal.

new recipes and techniques Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never tried before. One of the most important cookbooks I own is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flavor Bible: The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity, Based on the Wisdom of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Imaginative Chefsâ&#x20AC;? (Little Brown & Co., 2008, $35). I really think that every chef and foodie in the country should own one of these. It has won a James Beard Foundation award, with good reason. Essentially, the authors list almost every ingredient you can imagine, include other ingredients that pair well, and give you examples of where these ingredients have shown

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ¡V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG

April 11 - 17, 2012

12:23(1

16

by Jesse Houston

up on famous chefsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; menus, tips on how to cook them and methods to use to best highlight the flavors of the ingredient. I consult this book religiously when coming up with dishes that will have a place on the regular menu. One of my favorite new cookbooks is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eleven Madison Park: The Cookbook (Little Brown & Co., 2011, $50). The food, techniques, recipes and pictures are absolutely stunning. This book is food porn at its highest. I simply feel insignificant as a chef when browsing the pages of this incredible tome. I would also highly recommend â&#x20AC;&#x153;Momofukuâ&#x20AC;? (Clarkson Potter, 2009, $40). I have cooked more recipes and used more techniques from this cookbook than all my other cookbooks combined. Another huge source of inspiration for me is the Internet. Where were we before blogs and Google? I usually find that if I have an idea for something new, someone has beaten me to it. A quick Internet search will yield results and recipes in a flash. My favorite blog to check out is blog. ideasinfood.com. The husband and wife team at â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ideas In Foodâ&#x20AC;? are always asking questions about what food can be, how it can be prepared, what happens if we do this, or burn that, or manipulate an ingredient a certain way? Then they blog about it, take photos of just about every step of the way, and share both their successes and failures. They use their work to inspire others, to push boundaries and as a learning tool for everyone, including themselves. I visit this site just about every day. Recently I discovered Twitter. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always ignored it because I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel the need to be part of more than one social-media site until Andrew Zimmern came to town (see page 14). I got the incredible chance to cook for him and his crew, and he tweeted about the meal at Parlor Market the entire time. So I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x153;OK, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll look into it.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve started following about 75 different chefs, restaurants and food personalities. It makes me feel included in a world of truly talented and experienced chefs, and I get to see the ingredients they work with, the dishes they create, the road trips they go on and the food they eat along the way. All these things inspire me to work even harder on ,OCALCHEFS JESSEHOUSTONPMFOLLOWS 7RP5DPVH\ #HEF4OM2AMSEY 'DQ%OXPHQWKDO "RAVO"UZZ 1LFN:DOODFH REžECTIONCHEF 5H\QROGV%R\NLQ -EAT-AN?0- 'HUHN(PHUVRQ DEREKYEMERSON

Try The

$QG\&RRN #HEF!NDY#OOK -HUHP\(QÂżQJHU STEAKCHEF %DEDOX BABALU-3 7DEOH 4ABLE?

!a very high"class pig stand#

+DEDFKL/XQFK6SHFLDOV 0RQGD\)ULGD\



7UHHWRS%OYG)ORZRRG06Â&#x2021; %HKLQGWKH$SSOHEHH¡VRQ/DNHODQG

_ZZZIXVLRQMDSDQHVHWKDLFXLVLQHFRP

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.8538


CWTBd\\Ta5^^S8bbdT COURTESY JESSE HOUSTON

SOFT SHELL CRAB â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TOM KHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;WITH RAMPS For the Coconut Lemongrass Broth:

14-ounce can coconut milk 2 cups chicken or seafood stock 6 quarter-size slices fresh ginger 1 stalk fresh lemongrass, cut in 1-inch pieces 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon Thai chili paste Salt to taste

In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk, broth, ginger, and lemongrass and bring to boil over high heat. Add lime juice, fish sauce, sugar and chili paste. Reduce heat and simmer 5 to 10 minutes. Strain and season with salt to taste.

You can enjoy Jesse Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soft Shell Crab â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom Khaâ&#x20AC;? With Ramps at home. Just do what Jesse does. If you dare.

For the Soft Shell Crabs:

Dust the cleaned soft shell crabs with cornstarch, cov-

The Pot

I

For the Ramps:

1/4 pound of fresh ramps, washed thoroughly Oil Salt and pepper

Lightly coat your ramps with oil, and then season with salt and pepper. Place over a hot grill and char slightly, making sure the whites of the ramps become soft and tender. If you do not have ramps, you can substitute green onions. To assemble: On the bottom of a serving bowl, place the charred and wilted ramps. Gently pour enough coconut lemongrass broth to cover the bottom of the bowl. Place the crispy soft shell crabs on top of the wilted ramps and garnish with cilantro, basil, grilled limes, chopped peanuts, pickled mushrooms or any combination of these traditional garnishes.

by Lynette Hanson

still remember the January day more than a year ago when I walked out of the Goodwill store carrying a medium-sized stainless-steel pot. My mama waited in the car and gave me the look. You know the one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are you doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; with another pot? Where are we going to keep it? I knew Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d get the look, so I was ready for her. Opening the door and getting into the car, handing her the pot, I grinned and said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey, Mama. Look what I got! I can make us some fresh vegetable soup in this pot. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too big, so we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to eat leftovers for days and days!â&#x20AC;? She grinned then, satisfied with my purchase. I figured weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d enjoy meals cooked in that pot for years to come. Turns out that we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to share any meals cooked in that pot because Mama got her long-held wish the next afternoon when she lay

down for a nap and went on home. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d lived a good life and was ready. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until March and the opening of the farmers market that I was able to LYNETTE HANSON

my own food. The chefs also seem to have this strong connection to one another, whether they are from the South, New York City, San Francisco or Chicago. It suddenly makes a big world seem a lot smaller and more accessible. You can follow me @jessehoustonPM or @parlormarket to see what we are up to. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not forget our roots! Inspiration is all around us in local restaurants. We are fortunate in Jackson to have many talented chefs like Derek Emerson (Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive In, Local 463), Dan Blumenthal (BRAVO!, Sal & Mookies, Broad Street Bakery), Nick Wallace (King Edward Hotel), Tom Ramsey (Underground 119), Steven Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Angelo (Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s), David Ferris (Babalu), Mike Roemhild (Table 100) and Andy Cook (Parker House). Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very fortunate: All of these incredible chefs have fed me, keep me on my toes and inspire me to work hard. The best thing about this group of talent is that these chefs work well together as a team and treat one another like family. You can follow most of these guys on Twitter or Facebook, too, to find out what they are up to, what their daily specials are and more. Visit and support their restaurants often! Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it, there has never been a better time to be a foodie in Jackson. There is always so much going on from pop-up restaurants (PM Tiki is April 23 at my restaurant: shameless plug) to crawfish boils, backyard barbecues, pint nights, dinner parties and supper clubs. There is always something new to discover, and Jackson features plenty of great ethnic cuisine as well if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re up to trying new things. But then again, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what being a foodie is all about.

4 cleaned soft shell crabs (faces, gills and tails removed) Cornstarch Vegetable oil for frying Salt

ering completely. Shake any excess cornstarch off. Place the crabs gently into 375-degree oil and fry until completely crispy, about 3 minutes. Remove from oil and season generously with salt.

get that pot out and cook in it. That glorious early Saturday morning, as I walked from booth to booth at the market, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resist the chard, spinach, onions, carrots and turnips. On my way home, I stopped by the meat department at a nearby grocery store and bought two boneless, skinless chicken breasts. I planned to bake the chicken

breasts, drizzled with olive oil, sprinkled with salt and pepper, and cook everything else in the pot along with some Swansonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chicken stock. Before long, the chicken was done and sitting on the stove in a covered glass baking dish. As I stirred the rough chopped chard and spinach into the nearly done mixture of onion, carrot and turnip, I had an epiphany. Why not cube or shred the chicken into the pot, too? Why wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that work? So, I did just that. My son, Lamont, a former sous chef, said the idea sounded French. Huh? Me cooking French style? I put down the phone and savored another bite of my vegetable chicken soup and smiled. Mama would have loved it. Lamont came over the next day and ate leftovers with me. He agreedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;his Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ma wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve loved what I had concocted in that pot.

5A44 FX5X Now Offering

Good Paper 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover -Best Of Jackson 20121st: Best Hangover Food in Jackson

2nd: Best Place to Shoot Pool & Best Place to Drink Cheap 3rd: Best Dive Bar â&#x20AC;˘ Good Showing: Best Plate Lunch, Best Red Beans & Rice, & Best Jukebox

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

Friday and Saturday Nights

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Voted Best Veggie Burger -Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

jacksonfreepress.com

April 14

LIVE MUSIC

17


CWTBd\\Ta5^^S8bbdT

Favorite Meals by ShaWanda Jacome

J

My Little Green Friend

$)$9/5+./7

by ShaWanda Jacome ackson has a diverse selection of restaurants to choose from. Try some of these meals at my favorite places.

Lobster Crab Bisque at Newkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Express CafĂŠ (Township, 1065 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite A, Ridgeland, 601-7072863, newkscafe.com) Soy Chai Tea Latte at Fusion Coffeehouse (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite A, Ridgeland, 601-856-6001, fusioncoffeehouse.com) and Seattle Drip Coffee Company (377 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-898-9647, seattledrip.com) General Tsoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chicken at Mr. Chenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Authentic Chinese Cooking (5465 Interstate 55 N., 601-978-1865)

â&#x20AC;˘ Persians or Tahitians are the limes you are most likely to find in the produce section of your local grocery store. â&#x20AC;˘ Mexican or Key limes are smaller with a pale, yellowish-green skin and are more acidic. â&#x20AC;˘ Kaffirs produce very little juice and have a pebbly texture. The leaves and zest are often used in Thai cuisine. â&#x20AC;˘ Kalamansi or Calamondin limes, used in Philippine cuisine, are small and orange in color. â&#x20AC;˘ Rangpurs, a hybrid of a lemon and mandarin orange, are used in pickling, candying and for marmalades. P.GINET-DRIN

Tilapia plate with a side of sautĂŠed vegetables and baklava fingers for dessert at Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive, 601-366-6033, aladdininjackson.com)

L

imes may be small, but they pack a large, flavorful punch. Both tart and sweet, limes complement an assortment of dishes and beverages. Limes are in the citrus family (related to lemons, oranges and grapefruits) and a good source of vitamin C. There several different varieties of limes:

Chicken salad on a toasted Asiago cheese bagel with a slice of caramel cake for dessert at Beagle Bagel (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 145, 769-251-1892, beaglebagelcafe.net)

Â&#x2021;7KH-HOO\%HOO\&DQG\&RPSDQ\VWDUWHG E\*HUPDQFDQG\PDNHUV*XVWDYDQG $OEHUW*RHOLW]KDVOLPH6XQNLVWOLPHDQG PRMLWRĂ&#x20AC;DYRUHGMHOO\EHDQV Â&#x2021;6SULWHOHPRQOLPHĂ&#x20AC;DYRUHGVRGDLVVROG LQDERXWFRXQWULHV7KHEHYHUDJH ZDVLQWURGXFHGLQE\&RFD&RODDQG LVRIWHQVLSSHGWRKHOSFDOPDTXHDV\ VWRPDFK Â&#x2021;7KHVODQJWHUPÂłOLPH\´RULJLQDOO\UHIHU ULQJWR%ULWLVKVDLORUVVWDUWHGLQWKHWK FHQWXU\ZKHQ1DY\VKLSVNHSWDPSOH VXSSOLHVRIOLPHMXLFHWRFRPEDWVFXUY\ 7RGD\WKHZRUGLVDGHURJDWRU\WHUPIRU (QJOLVKSHRSOH

BASMATI RICE WITH CILANTRO PESTO 3 to 4 cups of basmati rice, cooked (is it 3-4 cups before you cook it or after itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cooked?) 1/2 cup of chopped cilantro leaves, stems removed 1 garlic clove 2 tablespoons of fresh limejuice 2 tablespoons of olive oil 1 tablespoon of butter Salt and ground pepper, to taste

Prepare rice according to the package directions. While the rice is cooking, combine the cilantro, garlic and lime juice in a food processor. Pulse on and off until mixture has a consistent, but still chunky, texture. Add salt and pepper to taste; pulse once or twice more time to combine. Spoon mixture into a small bowl and whisk in olive oil. Set the pesto aside. When the rice is done, drain and rinse with hot water. Transfer to a large bowl and fluff with a fork. While the rice is still hot, add the butter and the cilantro pesto. Stir gently to combine. For more flavorful rice, boil the rice in chicken or vegetable broth instead of water. (serves how many?)

GREEN SUN TEA WITH LIME 1 gallon of water 16 green tea bags 1/2 to 3/4 cup of honey 4 limes, juiced or sliced

Wash a 1-gallon sized jar and add the tea bags. Fill with water and screw on the lid securely. Place the glass jar outside in a sunny area where it will receive direct sunlight. Allow the jar to steep in the sun for three hours. After bringing the jar inside, fish out the tea bags with a slotted spoon. Add the limejuice, or lime slices, and honey; stir to combine. Chill tea in the refrigerator. (serves how many?)

April 11 - 17, 2012

Crab cakes at Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack (6954 Old Canton Road, Suite A, Ridgeland, 601956-5040, www.crabsseafoodshack.com)

18

Shrimp and grits and Jennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fried green tomatoes with crawfish sauce at Georgia Blue (111 Colony Crossing, Madison, 601898-3330, georgiablue.net)

7HATISYOURFAVORITEDISHATA*ACKSON AREARESTAURANT

Barbacoa tacos on flour tortillas at Taqueria La Guadalupe (6537 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-206-7776)

*ESSICA,YNN.HLIHUÂśV ZRQGHUIXO%/7ZLWKSLWD EUHDGDQGIHWDFKHHVHRQ WKHVLGH

Steak fajitas at Sombra Mexican Kitchen (140 Township Ave., Suite 100, Ridgeland, 601-707-7950, sombramexicankitchen. com)

"RYANT3HAWEURLOHG Ă&#x20AC;RXQGHUDW&UHFKDOHÂśV

&ROM&ACEBOOK

#ARI4AYLOR9LHWQDPHVH VSULQJUROOVIURP3DQ$VLD

-ATT*OHNSON&DWÂżVKZLWK FRPHEDFNVDXFHDW3HOLFDQ &RYHRXWRQWKHGHFN *ULIA7EEMS5DEELWPHDW EDOOVDW3DUORU0DUNHW +ATHLEEN#ONNER6WULFNODQG 7RZHULQJ9HJHWDEOH1DSR OHRQDW%UDYR$QGDYHJJLH ZUDSZLWKPXVKURRPVDW .HLIHUÂśV,PLVV-DFNVRQ

(EATHER)VERY7KHQHZ EETSL]]DDWNRLQRQLD7KH FKLFNHQSHVWRSDQQLQLLV SUHWW\JRRGWRR 'ARRAD,EE&DUDPHOL]HG RQLRQ%/7DW&UD]\&DW 7KHUHLVEHWWHUDQGQLFHU EXWWKDWLVDQDPD]LQJ VDQGZLFK$QG-RKQDQG .LOJRUHUXOH

&ROM4WITTER

žIPžOPS)ULHGFKLFNHQ DW-XOHS&DUQLWDVWDFRVDW %DEDOX

½JIWRITER4XH6HUDUHG EHDQV¾QœULFH

3UPER3HAR&UDZÂżVK HJJUROOVIURP-XOHSDUHD PXVWKDYH

KAYRANJ&KLFNHQVWULSVDW 0LOOHUVGRZQWRZQSD QLQLDW%DVLOV&KLFNHQ*\UR DW.HLIHUV&KLOLDW6WHYHÂśV 'HOLGRZQWRZQ

,ADY16PDOOWXUNH\ EXUJHUZLWKHYHU\WKLQJIUP 6WDPSV

BRYANZžYNM+RW5ROO DW2VDNDLQ)ORZRRG%HVW VXVKL,KDYHHYHUKDG


CWTBd\\Ta5^^S8bbdT COURTESY BABALU

Unfurling Kale COURTESY KRISTEL HAYES

by Valerie Wells

A

super food packed with antioxidants and vitamins thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s low in calories can sound boring and pious. Kale, much like many super foods, is not so arrogant, though. Its deep green leaves just need washing before chopping up into a salad or a wrap. Some people find the strong flavor too much and prefer to juice it with lemons and drink it as a daily tonic. Others cook kale in soups or casseroles. Recently, I became alarmed at news that some folks were baking kale chips. At first, I suspected this was chopped kale mixed into a dough of some kind. I lost interest. Then I came across a recipe that

sounded too simple: It was just kale, a little olive oil and a little salt. Since I had a bunch of kale in the fridge that I needed to use soon, I preheated the oven to 350 degrees, spread clean kale leaves on some foil, sprayed some olive oil on and placed the experiment in the oven. It failed miserably. I had a mess of wilted, sad greens. To get rid of the evidence, I cut the droopy, sad greens into tiny bits and added them to a summer squash casserole evolving in the slow cooker. I figured out immediately what I did wrong with the kale chips. The oven should have been at a lower temperature. I needed to dry the kale and spread much smaller pieces so they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overlap. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure I wanted to risk kale chips again. There are only so many ways to hide wilted greens. A couple of days later, though, I tried again. Like stiff lace on a ruffled Elizabethan collar, the curvy edges of kale covered a lot of space when smoothed out. After drying the rinsed leaves, I tore them into 2-inch strips. A little olive oil, a little salt

KALE CHIPS 1 bunch of kale 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt or other seasoning to taste Babalu guacamole is prepared tableside.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Rinse and dry the kale leaves. Tear the kale into bite-size pieces. Do not use the stalks. (Save these for a soup or take them to the compost heap.) Sprinkle oil on the pieces and put them on a cookie sheet. Season to taste. Bake for 20 minutes. Makes six standard servings, or a huge, guilt-free snack for one. and a little patience paid off. This time, the chips were crispy. The tissue sensation reminded me of super thin potato chips. The kale flavor is there, reminiscent of broccoli or cabbage, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind. I got my snack fix. Comment at jfp.ms.

Hold the Meat by Kelly Bryan Smith

I

DP\HDUVROGDQG,DPVWLOOVHDUFKLQJIRU P\SHUIHFWFRRNERRN1RZDVDEXV\PRP RIDEXV\\HDUROGPRVWQLJKWV,FRRNHDV\ KHDOWK\IRRGVRIIWKHWRSRIP\KHDG²VSD JKHWWLZLWKPDULQDUDVDXFHDQGDVLGHRIJUHHQ SHDVULFHDQGVWLUIU\YHJHWDEOHVVZHHWSRWDWR DQGNLGQH\EHDQTXHVDGLOODVZLWKJXDFDPROH %XWZKHQ,QHHGDFRRNERRNWKHVHDUHWKHRQHV ,UHDFKIRUPRVWRIWHQ ±(OWTO#OOK%VERY THING6EGETARIAN 3IMPLE-EATLESS 2ECIPESFOR'REAT &OOD²E\0DUN%LWWPDQ :LOH\

,WLVKDUGWREHDW 0DUN%LWWPDQÂśV FRRNERRNVDQGKLV IUHTXHQWUHFLSHVLQ7KH1HZ<RUN7LPHV,I,FRXOG

RQO\NHHSRQHFRRNERRNRQP\VKHOILWZRXOGEH WKLVRQHEHFDXVHLWLVVRVLPSOHDQGYHUVDWLOH %LWWPDQLQWURGXFHVHYHU\NLQGRIIUXLWYHJHWDEOH JUDLQDQGOHJXPH\RXFDQWKLQNRIDQGKH GHVFULEHVKRZWRSUHSDUHWKHIRRGLQDYDULHW\RI EDVLFZD\V7KHQKHLQFOXGHVOLVWVRIRWKHUZD\V WRSHUVRQDOL]HHDFKGLVK7DNHWKHSRWDWRIRU H[DPSOH<RXFDQEDNHLW<RXFDQIU\LW<RXFDQ PDVKLW%LWWPDQVKDUHVWRSSLQJVIRUEDNHG SRWDWRHVÂżOOLQJVIRUWZLFHEDNHGSRWDWRHVLQQR YDWLYHĂ&#x20AC;DYRUFRPELQDWLRQVIRUPDVKHGSRWDWRHV ZD\VWREUDLVHDSRWDWRDQGWKHOLVWJRHVRQ :LWK%LWWPDQÂśVFRRNERRN,FDQFUHDWHDPHDO WKDWLVDVVLPSOHRUHODERUDWHDV,OLNHDQG,DP FHUWDLQWROHDUQVRPHWKLQJLQWKHSURFHVV Âą6EGANWITHA6ENGEANCE/VER$ELICIOUS #HEAP !NIMAL &REE2ECIPESTHAT2OCK²E\ ,VD&KDQGUD0RVNRZLW] 'D&DSR3UHVV 

 &RRNLQJIRUD\RXQJ FKLOGZLWKDGDLU\DOOHUJ\ FDQEHDFKDOOHQJHEXW 0RVNRZLW]œVERRNLV DKHOSIXOWRROLQP\ DGYHQWXUHVLQFRRNLQJ HYHU\WKLQJIURPVFUDWFK EHFDXVH\RXNQRZ HYHU\WKLQJKDVPLONLQLW  0RVNRZLW]WDNHVIDPLOLDU UHFLSHVDQGJLYHVWKHPDGHOLFLRXVDQGLQQRYD WLYHWZLVWWKDWWKHZKROHIDPLO\FDQDSSUHFL DWH²VXFKDVDEHDQFKLOLZLWKFRFRDSRZGHUDQG EODFNVWUDSPRODVVHVDVWKHVHFUHWLQJUHGLHQWVRU EDNHGDSSOHVDXFHZLWKJUDWHGOHPRQ]HVW%HVW RIDOO0RVNRZLW]LQFOXGHVUHFLSHVIRUGHFDGHQW GHVVHUWVWKDW\RXZRXOGQHYHUNQRZZHUHGDLU\ IUHHIURPFKRFRODWHUXPSXGGLQJFDNHWRWKH PRUHNLGIULHQGO\KRPHPDGH)LJ1HZWRQV

Must-Try Jackson Dishes by Kelly Bryan Smith Red Lentil Soup at Aladdin Mediterranean Grill 730 Lakeland Drive, 601-366-6033 Soup is one of my favorite comfort foods. In my humble opinion, the best soup in town is the red lentil soup at Aladdin. It tastes completely different from any homemade lentil soup in my kitchen or any canned lentil soup I have ever found. It is tangy, filling and all too easy to inhale a bowl even in the midst of great dinnertime conversations. Field Greens Salad at Bravo! Italian Restaurant and Bar 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 244601-982-8111 As a vegetarian in Mississippi, I have grown accustomed to restaurants where my only options are French fries, a salad and the entire dessert menu. As a result, I really appreciate a good salad. Bravo has several delicious vegetarian meal options, but whatever I pick, I always choose to start with the field greens salad topped with the citrus vinaigrette. Hits the spot every time. Pitatilla at Keiferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 705 Poplar Blvd., 601-355-6825; 120 N. Congress St., 601353-4976 Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell my doctor, who cautioned me against eating feta cheese when I was pregnant, but even when I was carrying my son, I could not resist the spicy feta goodness of the pitatilla, some hummus or cottage fries, and a glass of water on the porch at Keiferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Guacamole Made Tableside at Babalu Tacos & Tapas 622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757 There is something especially decadent about eating out when the food is prepared right in front of me, perhaps because I so often find myself on my feet and waiting on others in my daily life. The server mixes fresh ingredients right at the table and even personalizes the ratio of cilantro, lime juice and red onions to fit your individual taste. Heavenly.

Create Your Very Own Jewelry! or aiser f A fundr ritan Center od Sama The Go

"ROWN4AGS/FF 0INK4AGS/FF

Bulk Clothing NOW Available! 114!Millsaps!Ave.!â&#x20AC;˘!Jackson,!MS!39202!â&#x20AC;˘!(601)!355-7458! Friday!9:30!-!5:30!&!Saturday!10:00!-!4:00

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS www.villagebeads.com 601.853.3299

jacksonfreepress.com

April Tag Sale:

19


â&#x20AC;¢ Voted Best Steak in Jackson

â&#x20AC;¢ Plate Lunches â&#x20AC;¢ Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;¢ Salads â&#x20AC;¢ Home-Made Desserts â&#x20AC;¢ Cosmo Burger On Fridays â&#x20AC;¢ Take-Home Casseroles

-2011 & 2012 Clarion-Ledger Metromix-

â&#x20AC;¢ Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE! â&#x20AC;¢ $3 Bloody Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS â&#x20AC;¢ 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com Follow Us On Facebook

2947 Old Canton Rd Suite G â&#x20AC;¢ Fondren Village Jackson, MS 39216 â&#x20AC;¢ 601.983.4450

Now Serving Lunch Tuesday-Fridayâ&#x20AC;¢11:00am-2:00pm

#RABS,EGS SERVED7ED 4HURS

*96

H7M:7: @=6

Try Our Lunch Specials Starting At $8.95 Teriyaki, Hibachi and Sushi! Served Monday-Friday 11-2:30

OPEN WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SUNDAY

!H?:7OsFH?B ;L7DI=;DE

sushi, steak, martini and more! 601.948.8808

100 E. Capital St. Suite 105 â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson MS â&#x20AC;¢ www.wasabims.com â&#x20AC;¢ wasabijackson@gmail.com

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

$INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

6ISITALADDININJACKSONCOM

7%$%,)6%2

)RQGUHQ%HOKDYHQ80&DUHD

,AKELAND$R *ACKSON -3 7HORU )D[

#RAW»SHÂ&#x201E;3HRIMPÂ&#x201E;#RAB,EGSÂ&#x201E;#ORNÂ&#x201E;4ATERSÂ&#x201E;3AUSAGE

,AKELAND$R\Â&#x201E;Â&#x201E;

"9/"0LEASE .O'LASS"OTTLES

6ISIT OUR'R OCE 3TOREN RY EXT DOOR

2IDGE7AY 3TE% &LOWOOD -3 7HO )D[

HOLY COW! THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A GOOD DEAL! Now featuring the Holy Cow Burger Special every Monday from 5-9.

Lunch Specials are listed daily at April 11 - 17, 2012

www.stevestown.com

20

200 South Lamar St. T: 601.714.5683

2-4-1 DRAFT DOMESTICS WITH THE PURCHASE OF YOUR HOLY COW BURGER

904 B E AST F ORTIFICATION â&#x20AC;¢ J ACKSON , M S 601.352.2002 â&#x20AC;¢ WWW . GLENNFOODS . COM

BELHAVEN


%*/&+BDLTPO

advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant.r Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x1 toPaid list your restaurant.r

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix extremely well with their “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Bourbon Street in the Quarter (1855 Lakeland Drive, 601-987-0808) Jackson’s hot new spot for great New Orleans cuisine, live entertainment and libations from the bar featuring daily lunch specials and happy hour in the landmark Poet’s location. Reed Pierce’s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes,

pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups. They also a serve a full breakfast menu and you can still get their famous coffee all night long.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, poboys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. All new location in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart mall. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Frequent Best of Jackson finalist. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jackson’s crawfish destination. You’ll also want to try their delicious gumbo while enjoying Friday night karaoke! Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout. Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends.

jacksonfreepress.com

COFFEE HOUSES

21


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

# $ % & '( # ' ) & * + $ $ ,

!"#$% & ' ('

!"#

)!*

+,,(-./(& &$+'-(0 ,$&1 2(334

56789":;<=>?;89"8@8":;6A@?BC6<D"8::?EC>F69<G8":8DH8

2$.3(0 ,(+I%- ! #$#$I%- '$%, >J6A89"565@"FKFKGC=?;89"FC;;@?F<D6G=;K

#&+.LM' #$N(2+#1 '+3+0

:;<DD89";KE6<G8?>EK7@"FKE856F7?JKC>8";<FK==6?>EK789"O8O<=6>

(I-&(( L&.33(0 P+IL(& '-(+1

E6>J89"OK=6=K"F6>>8;KD8?QKK9"R<;89">J<<=678"EC>J;KKE>"S"A<96D<6"KG<KG>?:KD98G";6<><G"TC>

,+(33+

98D=6";<F8?EC>>8D>?FD6E>?:CDR">J;<EO"S"R<>J?>6RR;KG"5C55D8>?K;6G:8"FJ<O>

3$#+3 U(L(-+23('

FJ6;;89"5;C>>8D>">O;KC=>?>KC>"A<98"F6;;K=>?O6>=;6E<">O<F89"F;VE8"R;6<FJ8?>6C8;7;6C=

0(''(&'-&+W2(&&4 #+1(

5D6F7"O8OO8;"F;86E"FJ88>8"<F<G:?5C==8;E<D7"<F8"F;86E

0(U.3M' X$$0 #+1(

>86">6D=?FJKFKD6=8"EKC>>8?"O86GC="5C==8;"<F8"F;86E

!"#$% & ' ('

!"#

)YZ

+,,(-./(& &+#P(3M' ,.N(I-$ #P(('(

JKC>8"56FKG?>EK789"FJ8996;?:;88G"KG<KG>?F;K>=<G<

0(U.3(0 (LL'

>EK7@"FKE856F7?O<F7D89";89"KG<KG>

,N P$%'( '+3+0

(I-&(( &(4I$30 M ' N(+-3$+X

QJ<OO89"OK=6=K8>?=J<G"586G>?>O<F@"=KE6=K":D6[8

#$%I-&4 #+,-+.I #P.#1(I

98D=6":;<G9":;<=>?:KD98G";6<><G>?FC;;@"5;K=J

U(LL.( \%('+0.33+

0(''(&'-&+W2(&&4 #+1(

5D6F7"O8OO8;"F;86E"FJ88>8"<F<G:?5C==8;E<D7"<F8"F;86E

0(U.3M' X$$0 #+1(

>86">6D=?FJKFKD6=8"EKC>>8?"O86GC="5C==8;"<F8"F;86E

jacksonrestaurantweek.com

F6;6E8D<[89"KG<KG>"S"O8OO8;>?EC>J;KKE>?>EK789"FJ8996;?O<FK"

M23


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

45000 I-55 North Highland Village Jackson, MS 39211 601-956-9562 www.charrestaurant.com

RESTAURANT RESTAURANT RESTAURANT WEEK WEEK WEEK PRIXE PRIXE PRIXE FIX FIX FIX MENU MENU MENU

Restaurant Prixe Fix Menu

Lunch Lunch Lunch $11 $11 $11 Choice Choice Choice ofof of CAESAR CAESAR CAESAR SALAD SALAD SALAD

SPAGHETTI SPAGHETTI SPAGHETTI

Lunch $15

FETTUCCINE FETTUCCINE FETTUCCINE ALFREDO ALFREDO ALFREDO WITH WITH WITH CHICKEN CHICKEN CHICKEN

Salad Choices:

Traditional Traditional Traditional tomato tomato tomato sauce sauce sauce with with with jumbo jumbo jumbo meatball meatball meatball

Traditional Traditional Traditional Caesar Caesar Caesar with with with Parmesan Parmesan Parmesan cheese cheese cheese

SPRING SPRING SPRING MIX MIX MIX

With With With roasted roasted roasted bell bell peppers bell peppers peppers and and red and red onions red onions onions

Fettuccine Fettuccine Fettuccine pasta pasta pasta tossed tossed tossed inin a in Parmesan a Parmesan a Parmesan cream cream cream sauce sauce sauce served served served with with with flamed flamed flamed grilled grilled grilled chicken chicken chicken

Choice Choice Choice ofof of ROASTED ROASTED ROASTED VEGETABLE VEGETABLE VEGETABLE AND AND AND PENNE PENNE PENNE

DAILY DAILY DAILY SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL

Ask Ask your Ask your your server server server about about about ourour daily our daily daily special special special

Sun-dried Sun-dried Sun-dried tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes, peppers, peppers, peppers, squash, squash, squash, asparagus asparagus asparagus and and garlic and garlic garlic inin a in light a light a light herb herb herb && pesto & pesto pesto vegetable vegetable vegetable broth broth broth

Dessert Dessert Dessert TIRAMISU TIRAMISU TIRAMISU

Vanilla Vanilla Vanilla cream cream cream and and Kahlua and Kahlua Kahlua chocolate chocolate chocolate

LASAGNA LASAGNA LASAGNA

SHRIMP SHRIMP SHRIMP SCAMPI SCAMPI SCAMPI

Over Over Over angel angel angel hair, hair, hair, white white white wine wine wine garlic garlic garlic butter, butter, butter, scalscalscallions lions lions and and tomatoes and tomatoes tomatoes

Traditional Traditional Traditional Caesar Caesar Caesar with with with Parmesan Parmesan Parmesan cheese cheese cheese

CHICKEN CHICKEN CHICKEN PICATTA PICATTA PICATTA

SPRING SPRING SPRING MIX MIX MIX

Finished Finished Finished with with with white white white wine wine wine lemon lemon lemon butter, butter, butter, mushmushmushrooms rooms rooms and and capers and capers capers served served served over over over angel angel angel hair hair hair

With With With roasted roasted roasted bell bell peppers bell peppers peppers and and red and red onions red onions onions

Choice Choice Choice ofof of CHICKEN CHICKEN CHICKEN ACUTO ACUTO ACUTO

FLAMED FLAMED FLAMED GRILLED GRILLED GRILLED SALMON SALMON SALMON FILET FILET FILET

Flame Flame Flame grilled grilled grilled chicken chicken chicken topped topped topped with with with a spicy a spicy a spicy sauce sauce sauce of of of olive olive olive oil,oil, cilantro oil, cilantro cilantro lemon lemon lemon juice juice juice and and seasoning and seasoning seasoning server server server over over over black black black bean bean bean salsa salsa salsa

Greens, bacon, egg, cheddar and tomato with your choice of dressing

CEASAR SALAD

Crisp romaine with Parmesan, croutons and roasted garlic dressing

EntrĂŠe Choices:

Topped Topped Topped w/w/ sun-dried w/ sun-dried sun-dried tomato tomato tomato butter butter butter over over over black black black bean bean bean salsa salsa salsa and and green and green green beans beans beans

Dessert Dessert Dessert TIRAMISU TIRAMISU TIRAMISU

Vanilla Vanilla Vanilla cream cream cream and and Kahlua and Kahlua Kahlua chocolate chocolate chocolate

601-977-0563 601-977-0563 601-977-0563 6592 6592 6592 Old Old Old Canton Canton Canton Rd. Rd. Rd. | Ridgeland | Ridgeland | Ridgeland MS MS MS 39157 39157 39157

CHAR SALAD

Greens, bacon, egg, cheddar and tomato with your choice of dressing

CEASAR SALAD

Crisp romaine with Parmesan, croutons and roasted garlic dressing

EntrĂŠe Choices: PICCATA

CHOPPED STEAK

Ricotta, Ricotta, Ricotta, mozzarella, mozzarella, mozzarella, sautĂŠed sautĂŠed sautĂŠed ground ground ground beef beef layered beef layered layered between between between fresh fresh fresh pasta pasta pasta

Choice Choice Choice ofof of CAESAR CAESAR CAESAR SALAD SALAD SALAD

Salad Choices:

CHAR SALAD

CHICKEN TENDERLOINS

Dinner Dinner Dinner $25 $25 $25 Appetizer Appetizer Appetizer CHEESE CHEESE CHEESE FRITTER FRITTER FRITTER

Crisp flour tortilla with spinach, bacon & mozzarella with baby greens and tomato basil relish

Lightly breaded pan-roasted chicken breat or veal with sautĂŠed spinach over garlic smashed potatoes, finished with a classic lemon caper butter sauce

DAILY SPECIAL SALMON

Seared and served over couscous with sautĂŠed shiitake mushrooms, arugula and lemon and tarragon butter sauce

CHI-TOWN SIRLOIN

Dessert Choices:

PORK CHOP

14 ounce prime sirloin pepper crusted with maitre dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; butter and a loaded baked potato 14 ounce bone-in herb marinated pork chop with braised local greens, whipped sweet potatoes and sweet and sour apple compote

DOUBLE CUT FUDGE BROWNIE PECAN CARAMEL BUTTER CRUNCH

SALMON

Dinner $35 Appetizer Choices:

Seared and served over couscous with sautĂŠed shiitake mushrooms, arugula and lemon and tarragon butter sauce

BBQ SHRIMP

Dessert Choices:

Over grits with mushrooms and spicy creole garlic butter sauce

SPINACH CRISP

DOUBLE CUT FUDGE BROWNIE PECAN CARAMEL BUTTER CRUNCH

-$&.6215(67$85$17:((. &2856(35,;),;(',11(50(18 -ONDAY !PRIL 3ATURDAY !PRIL

R ESTAURANT W EEK M ENU LUNCH $10 Choice of: Entree: Tacos De Cazuelas: Choice of Corn or Flour Tacos, Choice of Pulled Chicken, Ground Beef or

#OURSE

:BN1BL7FHFUBSJBO4BMBE )UXLWDQG9HJHWDEOH6DODGZLWKKLQWVRI0LQW%DVLO DQG/HPRQJUDVVVHUYHGZLWKWDQJ\7DPDULQG'UHVVLQJ

Pulled Pork, Salsa Taqueria.

Layered Bowl: Pulled Chicken, Refried Beans, Mexican Peppers and Onions, Melted Cheeses, Pico De Gallo, Black Olives, Guacamole, Sour Cream.

Chile: Award winning chile , Cheddar Cheese, Pico de Gallo, Jalapeno Wheel. Served with fresh Guacamole Dessert Warm Butter Crunch Cake: French Vanilla Ice Cream, Tequila Caramel Sauce. Baja Brownie: Brownie, Cinnamon Ice Cream, Cajeta Sauce. DINNER $18 Choice of: Served with Refried Beans and Mexican Rice

Appetizers: Cheese Dip: White American Cheese with Hatch Green Chiles Guacamole: Made fresh to order EntrĂŠe: Tacos Al Carbon: Grilled Marinated Skirt Steak or Marinated Chicken wrapped in flour tortillas, Poblano

#OURSE

8JME$IJMFBO4FB#BTT1PBDIFEJOB.JTP $PDPOVU .JML -FNPOHSBTTSFEVDUJPOXJUI4IJUBLF3JTPUUP BOE#SBJTFE#BCZ#PL$IPZ #OURSE

'SJFE#BOBOB'SJUUFSTXJUI$PDPOVU*DF$SFBNBOE #VSOU)POFZ

Peppers, Green Peppers, Onions, Grape Tomatoes, Lettuce, Sour Cream, Guacamole, Pico de Gallo.

Burrito: Flour Tortilla, Choice of Pulled Chicken, Ground Beef, .Choice of Red Chile, Green Chile,

April 11 - 17, 2012

Christmas Sauce or Cheese Sauce

M24

Fish Tacos: Corn or Flour Tortilla, Beer Battered Catfish, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Tomatillo Avocado Salsa. Dessert Warm Butter Crunch Cake: French Vanilla Ice Cream, Tequila Caramel Sauce. Baja Brownie: Brownie, Cinnamon Ice Cream, Cajeta Sauce.

Join Us For Fiesta Hour All Week. $4 for $4 from 4pm to 6pm $4 margaritas $4 draft craft beers $4 layer dip $4 guacamole 140 Township Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Highland Colony Parkway â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 39157 601.707.7950 â&#x20AC;˘ sombramexicankitchen.com â&#x20AC;˘ Follow Us On Facebook & Twitter Private dining / catering and to go / fiesta hours / live music Sunday lunch / patio seating

SHUSHUVRQ

)RNS]MXEPPMRSYVPSYRKIKSRKFEVSVSRXLITEXMS

%HVW$VLDQ5HVWDXUDQW%HVWRI-DFNVRQ² 0RQGD\6DWXUGD\SPÂ&#x2021;6XQGD\SP +DUERXU3W&URVVLQJÂ&#x2021;5LGJHODQG06 Â&#x2021;ZZZSDQDVLDFRPÂ&#x2021;


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

1RZIRUL3KRQH$QGURLG:LQGRZV 0RELOH%ODFNEHUU\DQG0RUH

KWWSZZZMISPV 9LVLWIURP\RXUVPDUWSKRQHEURZVHUIRURXU QHZRSWLRQDO:HEDSSQHZVPXVLFOLVWLQJV VRFLDOIHHGVDQGWKH-)30HQX*XLGH

Appetizer Queso Frito: Our cheese blend mixed with fresh tomatoes, and chillies deep fried and served with a dipping sauce.

Entree Pollo Relleno: Premium breaded chicken breast, stuff with cheese, mushrooms, and spinach topped with a creamy wine sauce. 318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

/RFDOUHVWDXUDQWV,I\RXÂľGOLNH\RXUPHQXRQRXUDSS :HEVLWHDQGLQ%220-DFNVRQ &DOOQRZWROHDUQPRUHDERXWWKH5HVWDXUDQW3DFNDJH

[

Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille

Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

topped with creamy crab meat sauce, shrimp, and scallops. Available Thur-Sat during dinner

Danilo Eslava Caceres | Executive Chef & General Manager 2481 Lakeland Drive | Flowood, MS 39232 | 601-932-4070 tel | 601-933-1077 fax

jacksonrestaurantweek.com

Choice of 8oz Filet ($34.95) or 14oz Ribeye ($30.95)

M25


2012 CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL Home-Grown Talent by Anita Modak-Truran

COURTESY CROSSROADS

April 11 - 17, 2012

T

26

KHWK$QQXDO&URVVURDGV)LOP)HVWLYDOUXQVIURP7KXUVGD\$SULO WKURXJK6XQGD\$SULO7KHIHVWLYDOIHDWXUHVPRUHWKDQ ¿OPVRIZKLFKPRUHWKDQDUHPDGHLQ0LVVLVVLSSLSURGXFHGRU GLUHFWHGE\0LVVLVVLSSLDQVIHDWXUH0LVVLVVLSSLDFWRUVRUKDYHVRPH RWKHU0LVVLVVLSSLFRQQHFWLRQ  $QDOOHYHQWVSDVVJHWV\RXLQWRHYHU\¿OPDQGHYHQW\RXZDQW WRJRWR,W¶VIRU&URVVURDGV)LOP6RFLHW\PHPEHUVIRU HYHU\RQHHOVH,QGLYLGXDO¿OPEORFNV JHQHUDOO\DUHODWHGVKRUWDQG DIHDWXUHRUDJURXSRIVKRUW¿OPV DQGZRUNVKRSVDUHIRUPHP EHUVIRUQRQPHPEHUV$RQHGD\SDVVIRU¿OPVDQGZRUNVKRSV LVIRUPHPEHUVDQGIRUQRQPHPEHUV  )RUDFRPSOHWHVFKHGXOHRIHYHQWV²¿OPVPXVLFZRUNVKRSV NLGV¶HYHQWVUHFHSWLRQVDQGPRUH²DQGWREX\WLFNHWVYLVLW FURVVURDGV¿OPIHVWLYDOFRP(PDLO\RXUTXHVWLRQVWR LQIR#FURVVURDGV¿OPIHVWLYDOFRP

Celebrating 10 Years of Education Through Preservation,â&#x20AC;? directed by Lida Gibson and produced by Gibson and Don Warren, takes a journey with Bey and his students at Millsapsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kaxil Kiuic Bicultural Reserve. Crossroads features six documentaries by the Mississippi State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School of Architecture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All these films have to do with local sustainable food and renewable energy,â&#x20AC;? Parikh says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How do people survive in this economy and world? It comes down to the local level.â&#x20AC;? More traditional southern documentaries on race are plentiful and include: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yazoo Revisitedâ&#x20AC;? by David Rae Morris, who recounts the racial history of Yazoo City during his father, Willie Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, lifetime; Ben Guestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The South Will Rise Againâ&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing Our Ownâ&#x20AC;? by Tom Beck and Phil Scarborough; Candace Harralsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wayâ&#x20AC;?; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;B.R.E.A.T.H.E.â&#x20AC;? by Yvetta â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kaiâ&#x20AC;? Williams. Other Mississippi short docs include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savage Talesâ&#x20AC;? and a wonderful, well-rounded selection from the Barefoot Workshops in Clarksdale. Mississippi was ground zero for civil rights, but what about gay rights? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi: I Am,â&#x20AC;? featuring â&#x20AC;&#x2122;N Syncâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lance Bass, addresses the issue of homosexuality. When Bass announced that he was gay in 2006, many in Mississippi rejected him, he says in the film. He feared that Mississippi could never change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then last year, after the story on Constance McMillen and her request to take her girlfriend to prom, Lance saw a positive change happening here,â&#x20AC;? Parikh says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Skinny,â&#x20AC;? directed by Hattiesburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Patrik-Ian Polk, the award-winning writer and director of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Punks,â&#x20AC;? covers three action-packed days of sex, drama, secrets, lies and laughter. In the feature-length documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fifty-Nine Team,â&#x20AC;? director Micah Ginn explores the personalities and stories behind one of the greatest college football teams ever assembled: the 1959 Ole Miss Rebels. Narrative short films come in all shapes, forms and genres, such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Oak,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Almost Perfectâ&#x20AC;? by Jackson native Natalie Irby, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illumination,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going Toward Love,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fall of Henry,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bitter Shoes,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moon Pie,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tupelove,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Humble Circumstances,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gypsy Heartâ&#x20AC;? and Alex Warrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Bros,â&#x20AC;? a coming-of-age film. It wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a film festival without Mississippi actor Johnny McPhail. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the comedy feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;25K.â&#x20AC;? Also, look for some wonderful locally produced animated films and music videos. A new wave of Mississippi filmmaking begins at home. For more festival information, including venues, prices and tickets, visit crossroadfilmfestival.com. Anita Modak-Truran helped found Crossroads. COURTESY CROSSROADS

4HE.ITTY 'RITTY

Professorâ&#x20AC;? and other Eddie Murphy vehicles, and actress and screenwriter Joey Lauren Adams, who now lives in Oxford, lead a discussion afterward. The creepy thriller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rites of Springâ&#x20AC;? headlines Friday at COURTESY CROSSROADS

T

he Crossroads Film Festival, a four-day event beginning Thursday night, April 12, shines the spotlight on producers, screenwriters, directors, cinematographers, actors and musicians from Mississippi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a record number of 70 films with connections to Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? says Nina Parikh, cofounder of the Crossroads Film Society and co-director of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crazy. The first Crossroads screened 70 films, and this year we have that many films with Mississippi ties.â&#x20AC;? Now in its 13th year, Crossroads has been an important vehicle for emerging film talent to build up festival notches and develop industry credibility. For instance, in 2003, Crossroads screened a short Tate Taylor and Brunson Green film called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicken Party,â&#x20AC;? which starred a then-unknown Octavia Spencer. Nine years later, Spencer won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in Best Picture-nominated â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Help,â&#x20AC;? set in Jackson, which Taylor directed and adapted for the screen and Green produced. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival reflects growth in the Mississippi film industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippians are telling their own stories, instead of having other people come here and tell them,â&#x20AC;? Parikh says. The list of Mississippi talent participating in films and workshops crosses the entire landscape of the state, so we have a lot of ground to cover. Thursday evening kicks off with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Table Readings of Scripts by Mississippiansâ&#x20AC;? at New Stage Theatre. Professional actors read from John Gibsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memphis Legâ&#x20AC;? and John Stenmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;River of Destiny.â&#x20AC;? Mississippi native David Sheffield, screenwriter of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming to America,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nutty

Clockwise from top: scenes from â&#x20AC;&#x153; Yazoo Revisited,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rites of Springâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Oak,â&#x20AC;? all films with Mississippi connections.

Malco Grandview Theatre. The film has Mississippi connections galore from producer Wes Benton (whose film credits include visual effects for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Legendâ&#x20AC;?) to cast members Katherine Randolph, Marco St. John, Hanna Bryan, Amile Wilson and Andrew Breland. The short film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Best Day,â&#x20AC;? by Clarksdale native Coop Cooper, tingles the audienceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nerves before â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rites of Spring.â&#x20AC;? The festival also has a slate of workshops and seminars. Well-known actor Gary Grubbs (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will and Graceâ&#x20AC;?), a Prentiss native, leads an interactive film- and television-acting seminar Saturday. Filmmaker Cindy Meehl, originally from Jackson, holds a workshop on translating a good idea into an awardwinning film. Meehlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buckâ&#x20AC;? won the Audience Award at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and was on the short list for Oscar nominations. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be participating in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s filmmaker legal clinic sponsored by the Intellectual Property Section of the Mississippi Bar. On Sunday, National Geographicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Quest for the Lost Mayaâ&#x20AC;? stars Millsaps professor and archaeologist George Bey. Hattiesburg native Jeremy Zipple produced and directed the documentary. The companion piece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millsaps in Yucatan:


It’s ALWAYS FRESH in the 6030 I-55 North- EXIT 102B (601) 977-9040

WEDNESDAY 4/11

Jason Bailey (Blues)

THURSDAY 4/12

Legacy

1000’s of batteries for everything in the world… For All Your Battery Needs!

BE PREPARED Midland Portable Weather Radio

$39.95 Mention this ad for

10% off on any cell phone or camera battery. expires 4/18

601.932.2250

4220 Lakeland Dr. Flowood, MS 39232 located at the intersection of Airport Rd. & Lakeland Dr. www.batteryworldonline.com

(Traditional Irish) FRIDAY 4/13

Mike & Marty

(Classic & Southern Rock) SATURDAY 4/14

Southern Aristocrats (Funk)

SUNDAY 4/15

Ceili 2pm - 5pm

(Jackson Irish Dancers) MONDAY 4/16

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 4/17

Open Mic

with Jason Bailey

Try our new

HAPPY HOUR MENU

Registration for Summer and Fall begins April 16 1.800.HINDSCC

www.hindscc.edu !"#$%&'(((((() (((*"'$)'(((((()((((((*"+,&'-((((((()(((((./)#"

)

0)#$%1.*2

Hinds Community College offers equal education and employment opportunities and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability or veteran status in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Dr. George Barnes, Vice President for Administrative and Student Services, 34175 Hwy. 18, Utica, MS 39175, 601.885.7001.

• Drink Specials • Limited Time Food Menu Available Monday - Friday 4pm - 7pm

jacksonfreepress.com

HIGH ACHIEVER, HINDS STUDENT.

27


2012 CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL

“A

OPRVW3HUIHFW´LVDVKRUW¿OP PLQXWHV WKDW WHOOVWKHVWRU\RID\RXQJZRPDQSODQQLQJKHU SHUIHFWZHGGLQJZLWKKHUDOOWRRH[FLWHGPRWKHU $OWKRXJK6DOO\¶VOLIHVHHPVWREHZRQGHUIXOZLWKDMXVW ULJKW¿DQFpVKHKLGHVKHUQHZUHDOL]DWLRQWKDWVKHLV SUHJQDQW(YHQWXDOO\6DOO\VHFUHWO\FDXVHVKHUVHOIWR KDYHDPLVFDUULDJHOHDYLQJKHU¿DQFpDQGPRWKHU DQG WKLVYLHZHU LQWKHGDUN  /DWHUZLWK6DOO\¶VSUHYLRXVDFWLRQVXQEHNQRZQVWWRKLPKHU¿DQFp³-´UHDVVXUHVKHUWKDWWKHLUGD\WR EHFRPHSDUHQWVZLOOVRRQFRPH  ³$OPRVW3HUIHFW´KDGPHTXHVWLRQWKHUHDVRQIRUKHUDFWLRQVDQGOHIWPHZDQWLQJWRNQRZPRUH,FRXOGQ¶W XQGHUVWDQGZK\VKHWRRNWKHDFWLRQVVKHGLGRUZK\VKHQHYHUWROGDQ\RQHVKHZDVSUHJQDQWWREHJLQZLWK 6HH´$OPRVW3HUIHFWµGXULQJWKH´6KRUWV0LVVLVVLSSL0DGHµEORFN$SULOVWDUWLQJDWSPRQVFUHHQ$

E\:KLWQH\0HQRJDQ

“B

5($7+(´ %XLOG5DFLDO(TXDOLW\DQG7RSSOH +DWH(IIHFWLYHO\ JLYHVYLHZHUVDFORVHORRN LQWRWKHOLYHVRILPPLJUDQWVDQGWKHLUIDPLOLHV LQ0LVVLVVLSSLDQGLQWRWKHUDFLVPWKDWSHRSOHRI FRORUIDFHHYHU\GD\,WVKRZVWKHIHDUFRQIXVLRQDQG LQHTXDOLW\WKDWLPPLJUDQWVIDFH  7KH¿OPGRFXPHQWVFRUSRUDWHPDQLSXODWLRQ WULFNLQJWKRVHOLYLQJRYHUVHDVWRFRPHWR$PHULFDIRU EHWWHURSSRUWXQLWLHVZKHQWKHJRDOLVWRXVHWKHPIRU H[WUHPHO\FKHDSODERU<RXZLOOKHDUYRLFHVRIFKLOGUHQ ZKRVHIDWKHUVKDYHEHHQGHSRUWHGDQGWKHGHYDVWD WLRQDQGKHDUWEUHDNRIQRWNQRZLQJZKHWKHUWKH\ZLOO VHHWKHLUORYHGRQHVDJDLQ  ³%5($7+(´DOVRVKRZVWKHULVNVWKDWLP PLJUDQWVWDNHE\ZRUNLQJDVPDQXDOODERUHUVLQMREV VXFKDVFRQVWUXFWLRQ$IWHUEHLQJFULWLFDOO\LQMXUHGRQD FRQVWUXFWLRQVLWHRQHPDQ¶VFRZRUNHUVEHOLHYHKLPWR EHDOLDUDERXWKLVLQMXU\DOWKRXJKKHKDVORVWQHDUO\ HYHU\WKLQJ+LVVXSHUYLVRUFRQVLGHUHGKLPDVXSHUE

ZRUNHUEHIRUHQRZKHFDQ·WVOHHSZRUU\LQJDERXW KRZWRPDNHHQGVPHHW  :KDW,UHDOL]HGIURPWKLVGRFXPHQWDU\LVMXVWKRZ WKRVHLQSRZHUWUHDWSHRSOHRIFRORU³DVLIWKH\·UH VHFRQGFODVVFLWL]HQV,Q$PHULFDULJKWVHTXDOLW\DQG MXVWLFHDUHQRWHTXDODQGIDLUIRUHYHU\RQH(TXDOULJKWV VKRXOGEHH[WHQGHGWRDOOLPPLJUDQWVRQWKHSDWKWR FLWL]HQVKLS 6HH´%5($7+(µLQWKH´6KRUWV0LVVLVVLSSL 'RFVµEORFN$SULOEHJLQQLQJDWDPRQ VFUHHQ%

E\(ULFD&UXQNLOWRQ

E\:KLWQH\0HQRJDQ

April 11 - 17, 2012

T

28

KHGRFXPHQWDU\³(FKRWRQH´WDNHVYLHZHUVLQWR WKHKHDUWRIDQ$PHULFDQPXVLFFLW\$XVWLQ 7H[DV7KH¿OPLQYLWHVXVLQWRWKHSHUVRQDOOLYHV DQGMRXUQH\VRIVRPHRI$XVWLQ¶VPXVLFLDQVZKR KDYHGUHDPVRIPDNLQJLWELJ  0DQ\DUWLVWVPLJUDWHWR$XVWLQWRJHWDXGLHQFHV ZLWKPXVLFSURGXFHUVDQGPDQDJHUV,Q³(FKRWRQH´ WKHPXVLFLDQVVWULYHWRVWD\UHDO²QRWRQO\WR WKHPVHOYHVEXWDOVRWRWKHLUDUW7KH\¶UHQRWLQLW MXVWIRUIDPHDQGJORU\7KH¿OPLQFOXGHVPXVLFLDQV IURPGLIIHUHQWJHQUHVDOOWU\LQJWR¿JXUHWKLQJVRXW DVWKH\JR(YHU\DUWLVWDQGEDQGVWUXJJOHVWRPDNH HQGVPHHWZKLOHDWWKHVDPHWLPHZRUNVKDUGWR EHNQRZQ  7KH¿OPGHOYHVLQWRDOODVSHFWVRIWKLVPXVLF FLW\²QRWMXVWIURPWKHDUWLVWEXWDOVRIURPDPDQ DJHU·VSRLQWRIYLHZ7KHPDQDJHU'DQLHOVSHQGV PRVWRIKLVWLPHWU\LQJWRPDUNHWWKHVHDUWLVWV JHWWLQJWKHLUQDPHVDQGPXVLFRXWWRWKHSXEOLF

 7KLVPXVLF¿OOHGGRFXPHQWDU\DOVRVKRZVXV WKDWDOWKRXJK$XVWLQPD\EHWKHOLYHPXVLFFDSLWDORI WKHZRUOGDSOHWKRUDRIORFDOVZLVKWKHVFHQHZRXOG ZLQGGRZQVRPH³(FKRWRQH´JLYHVDSULYDWHDQG H[FOXVLYHORRNLQWRWKHJHDUVGULYLQJWKHFLW\¶VPXVLF PDNHUVDQGIHDWXUHVSHUIRUPDQFHVIURP$XVWLQID YRULWHVVXFKDV%ODFN-RH/HZLVDQGWKH+RQH\EHDUV %HODLUH6XQVHWDQG7KH2FWRSXV3URMHFW  6HH´(FKRWRQHµ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ $)RUPRUHPRYLHGHVFULSWLRQVDQGDIXOOVFKHGXOH RIHYHQWVYLVLWFURVVURDGVÀOPIHVWLYDOFRP

%UDQFKZKRLVLQPRVWHYHU\VFHQHPRGHOLQJKLJK HQGOLQJHULHFHUWDLQO\KDVWKHERG\IRULWVKHLVHDV\ WRORRNDW ,WWRRNPHDZKLOHWR¿JXUHRXWZKHUH, NQHZKHUIURP%UDQFKZDVWKHRULJLQDO2UELW*XP VSRNHVZRPDQ   $OWKRXJKWKHVFULSWSOD\VLWVHOIRXWSUHGLFWDEO\ ZLWK7\OHUDOLHQDWLQJHYHU\RQHFORVHWRKLPDQGIDOOLQJ LQWRDGHHSIXQN,IRXQGWKHPRYLHIXQQ\DQGHQJDJ LQJ,MXVWDERXWKXUWP\VHOIODXJKLQJDWDIHZSDUWV 7KHHQGLVELWWHUVZHHWDQGXQH[SHFWHG  6HH´0RQWK5XOHµ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ%

4HE"EST4EAM E\%U\DQ)O\QQ

T

KHGRFXPHQWDU\³7KH)LIW\1LQH7HDP´UHFDSVWKH2OH0LVV )RRWEDOOWHDP7KH8QLYHUVLW\RI0LVVLVVLSSLDWKOHWLFVGHSDUWPHQW DQGLWV0HGLDDQG'RFXPHQWDU\3URMHFWSURGXFHGWKH¿OPDQG 0LFDK*LQQGLUHFWVLW  :LGHO\FRQVLGHUHGRQHRIWKHEHVWWHDPVLQFROOHJHIRRWEDOO KLVWRU\WKH2OH0LVV¶5HEHOVRQO\JDYHXSSRLQWVRQGHIHQVHDOO VHDVRQDQGWKHWHDP¿QLVKHGZLWKDUHFRUG1RWHDPVFRUHGPRUH WKDQVHYHQSRLQWVDJDLQVWWKHVWRXW2OH0LVVGHIHQVHWKDWVHDVRQ  8VLQJKLVWRULFYLGHRDQGSOD\HULQWHUYLHZVWKHGRFXPHQWDU\UHYLHZVWKH¶VHDVRQJDPHE\JDPH7KHRQO\ JDPHWKDWLVGLVFXVVHGLQOHQJWKLVWKH/68JDPHSOD\HGRQ+DOORZHHQQLJKWLQ%DWRQ5RXJH  2OH0LVVORVWWR/68LQDGHIHQVLYHVWUXJJOHDQGWKHJDPHIHDWXUHG%LOO\&DQQRQ¶V\DUGSXQWUHWXUQIRU WKHRQO\WRXFKGRZQ7KH5HEHOVJRWUHYHQJHRQWKH7LJHUVLQWKH6XJDU%RZODQGVHYHUDOPHGLDRXWOHWVQDPHG WKHWHDPQDWLRQDOFKDPSLRQV  :DWFKLQJWKHYLGHRVDQGKHDULQJWKHSOD\HU¶VVWRULHVRIWKHVHJDPHVLVHQWHUWDLQLQJ6RPHRIWKHWDFNOHVDQG SOD\VPDGHZRXOGQRWEHDOORZHGLQWRGD\¶VIRRWEDOO7KHSOD\HUVSURYLGHLQVLJKWLQWRDQHUDRIFROOHJHIRRWEDOO ORQJSDVW7KH\VWLOOVKRZDJUHDWVHQVHRISULGHDQGHPRWLRQWDONLQJDERXWWKH¶VHDVRQ  $Q\2OH0LVVIRRWEDOOIDQZLOOHQMR\ZDWFKLQJWKLV¿OPEXWHYHQLI\RXDUHQRWDIDQ\RXVKRXOGVHHWKH¿OPLI\RX ORYHVSRUWV  6HH´7KH)LIW\1LQH7HDPµ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ%

%LVISAND,OVE E\5LFKDUG&RXSH

“T

XSHORYH$0\VWLFDO7DOHRI(OYLV¶7XSHOR´ LVDZRQGHUIXOO\FUDIWHGVWRU\RIDP\VWLFDO HQFRXQWHUE\DPDQWUDYHOLQJWR7XSHORRQ EXVLQHVVDQGDEHDXWLIXOZRPDQZKRGULYHVD &KHYUROHW%HO$LU7KHPDQSOD\HGE\&RUH\3DUNHU EUHDNVGRZQLQIURQWRIWKH9HURQD7RZQ+DOODQG PHHWV9HHSOD\HGE\VLQJHUVRQJZULWHUDQGEDVV SOD\HU$P\/D9HUH6KHJLYHVKLPDULGHLQWR7XSHOR DQGDORQJWKHZD\WKH\YLVLW(OYLVUHODWHGVLWHVDQG H[SORUHKLVFKLOGKRRG  7KH7XSHOR&RQYHQWLRQDQG9LVLWRU¶V%XUHDXSUR GXFHGWKLVXQLTXHDQGHQWHUWDLQLQJ¿OPRQWKH(OYLV¶ H[SHULHQFHLQ7XSHOR  -DPHV$OH[DQGHU:DUUHQKDVSURGXFHGDVZHHW ¿OPDERXWSUHSXEHVFHQWIULHQGVKLSDQGHDUO\VFXIÀHV ZLWKWKHRSSRVLWHVH[ZLWK³<RXQJ%URV´$Q\RQHZKR KDVEHHQWKURXJKJUDGHVFKRROLVJRLQJWRUHOLYHWKH

DFKLQJDQGHPEDUUDVVPHQWDVWKH\UHFRJQL]HSDUWVRI WKHLURZQHDUO\KLVWRU\7KH¿OPZLOOWDNH\RXEDFNWR ZKHQ\RXKDGPRUHLPSRUWDQWWKLQJVLQ\RXUOLIHWKDQ PDNLQJDOLYLQJZRUU\LQJDERXWZDUVRUWKHHFRQRP\ ,WZLOOPDNH\RXODXJKDQGWHOO\RXUVWRULHVRIDFKLOG KRRGORQJDJR  6HH´7XSHORYHµDQG´<RXQJ%URVµ$SULOLQWKH ´6KRUWV0LVVLVVLSSL0DGHµEORFNVWDUWLQJDWSP RQVFUHHQ$2WKHUÀOPVLQWKHEORFNLQFOXGH´+XPEOH &LUFXPVWDQFHVµ´2OG2DNµ´$OPRVW3HUIHFWµDQG ´*\SV\+HDUWµ

3OUTHERN#HEMISTRY E\5LFKDUG&RXSH

B

iOO\&KDVH*RIRUWKGLUHFWVDQG+RXVWRQ1XWW,,,VWDUVLQWKHIHDWXUH ¿OP³.´<RXJXHVVHGLW1XWWLVWKHIRUPHU2OH0LVV)RRWEDOO FRDFK¶VVRQDQGGDGHYHQPDNHVDFDPHRDSSHDUDQFH )RUFKXFN OHVVHHZKDWKHLVUHDGLQJLQWKH¿OP

 ,I\RXDUHDWWHQGLQJWKH&URVVURDGV)LOP)HVWLYDOORRNLQJIRUDQDYDQW JDUGH¿OP²RQHZLWKDQHGJ\VFULSWDQGJUHDWFLQHPDWRJUDSK\²WKLV LVQ¶WWKH¿OPIRU\RX,I\RXZDQWD¿OPWKDWGHOLFDWHO\KDQGOHVUHODWLRQ VKLSVEHWZHHQPHQDQGZRPHQRURQHWKDWZLOOEULQJ\RXWRWHDUVRYHU WKHYLFLVVLWXGHVRIOLIHDQGRXUDELOLW\WRRYHUFRPHWKLVLVQ¶WWKH¿OPIRU \RX+RZHYHULI\RXDUHORRNLQJWREHHQWHUWDLQHGLI\RXOLNHWKDWJULWW\ VRXWKHUQIHHOFURVVLQJWKHOLQHVRXWKHUQKXPRUDQGFRFN\VZDVKEXFN OLQJKHURHVWKLVMXVWPLJKWEHWKH¿OP\RX¶UHORRNLQJIRU  ³.´UHYROYHVDURXQGWZR0LVVLVVLSSLERXQW\KXQWHUVZKRJHWPL[HGXSZLWKGUXJWUDI¿FNHUVDEHDXWLIXO ZRPDQDQGDWUHDVXUHPDSGUDZQRQWKHPXGG\VLGHRIDSLFNXSWUXFNE\DGHDGPDQ:KDWEHWWHUYHKLFOHIRU IXQFDQ\RXKDYH"  7KH¿OP¶VVFUDWFK\ORRN RQSXUSRVH VWLOWHGGLDORJXH QRWRQSXUSRVH DQGWRQJXHLQFKHHNZLVHFUDFNV EHWZHHQWKHWZRSURWDJRQLVWVLVVREDGLW¶VJRRG<RX¶OOVHHUHDOFKHPLVWU\EHWZHHQ%LOO\&KDVH*RIRUWKDQG +RXVWRQ1XWW²ZKRSOD\ORQJWLPHIULHQGVDQGSDUWQHUVLQERXQW\KXQWLQJ²WKDWZLOOKDYH\RXURRWLQJIRUWKHP  6HH´.µ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ&

COURTESY BILLY CHASE GOFORTH

COURTESY CROSSROADS

7ATCHINGTHE'EARS-ESH

7

KHIHDWXUH³0RQWK5XOH´LVDURPDQWLFFRPHG\ ZULWWHQDQGGLUHFWHGE\%OD\QH:HDYHUZKRDOVR KDVWKHOHDGUROHDV7\OHU:DWWV  7KHIRUPDWLVSUHWW\IDPLOLDU:DWWVLVDGLVDIIHFWHG DUWLVWDSKRWRJUDSKHUZKRKDVEHHQUHGXFHGWRSKR WRJUDSKLQJIRRGIRUWKHPHQXRIDORFDOKDPEXUJHU FKDLQ+HWUHDWVZRPHQDVREMHFWVWREHFRQTXHUHG EXWRQFHFRQTXHUHGKHORVHVLQWHUHVW  :DWWVLVWKHHQY\RIKLVIULHQGVEXWVHFUHWO\ KH¶VGHVSHUDWHO\XQKDSS\7KHQKHFRPHVDFURVV ³WKHRQH´SOD\HGE\WKHEHDXWLIXO1DWDOLH0RUDOHV 6KHVHHVWKURXJKKLPLPPHGLDWHO\DQGUHMHFWVKLV DGYDQFHV7KHKXQWLVRQ  7KH¿OPFRQWDLQVDQXPEHURIFDPHRDSSHDU DQFHVE\DFWRUV\RXZLOOUHFRJQL]HDQGHQMR\-DLPH 3UHVVO\LVLQRQO\RQHVFHQHEXWVKHVWHDOVLW'DYLG )ROH\SOD\VWKHZLVHFUDFNLQJ²ZKDWHOVH²DUWKRXVH RZQHUDQGKDVVRPHRIWKHEHVWOLQHV9DQHVVD

MIKE MCCARTHY

“T

KH)ORUHVWLQH&ROOHFWLRQ´EHJLQVRQHUDLQ\0DUGL*UDV PRUQLQJZKHQDFROOHFWLRQRIWKURZQDZD\KDQGPDGH GUHVVHVSLTXHVDQLPDWRUDQG¿OPPDNHU+HOHQ+LOO¶V LQWHUHVW7KHSLOHRIPROG\\HWFDUHIXOO\FRQVWUXFWHGFORWKLQJ LPPHGLDWHO\LQWULJXHVDQGLQVSLUHVKHUWR¿QGWKHGUHVVPDNHUDQG WHOOKHUVWRU\  7KLVVKRUW¿OPLVXQLTXHLQVW\OHDQGPRYLQJLQSUHVHQWD WLRQ,WQHDWO\LQWHUWZLQHVWKHVWRU\RIWKHGHFHDVHGVHDPVWUHVV )ORUHVWLQHZLWKWKDWRI+LOODQGKHUGHHSORYHIRUKHUIDPLO\DQGFRPPXQLW\7KURXJKWKH¿OP¶VTXLUN\DQG FUHDWLYHVWRU\WHOOLQJ\RX¶OOJHWDQKRQHVWDQGFRPSHOOLQJORRNDWD\RXQJ1HZ2UOHDQVIDPLO\¶VORVVIROORZLQJWKH GHYDVWDWLRQRI+XUULFDQH.DWULQDLQ  1DUUDWHGE\+LOO¶VKXVEDQG3DXO*DLOLXQDVWKH¿OPEOHQGVDQLPDWLRQDQGÀRRGGDPDJHGYLGHRIRRWDJHDQG IHDWXUHVVHYHUDORIWKHFRXSOH¶VFDWFK\RULJLQDOVRQJV7KHSDLULQJUHVXOWVLQDQLQWLPDWHIHHOWKDWSHUPHDWHVWKH ¿OPDQGVXFFHVVIXOO\FRQQHFWVYLHZHUVZLWKWKH¿OP¶VVXEMHFWV  :KLOHPRVWRIWKHPRYLHLVDVWRU\DERXWD\RXQJIDPLO\¶VORYHIRU1HZ2UOHDQVDQGLWVFUHDWLYHFODVVWKH HQGLQJLVDSRLJQDQWORRNDWKRZDIDPLO\VWUXJJOHV²QRWRQO\ZLWKWKHORVVRIDORYHGRQHEXWZLWKDSODFHWKH\ RQFHFDOOHGKRPH  6HH´7KH)ORUHVWLQH&ROOHFWLRQµLQWKH´6KRUWV'RFVZLWK0R[LHµEORFN$SULOVWDUWLQJDWSPRQ VFUHHQ$

COURTESY CROSSROADS

.EW/RLEANS3TORY

E\5LFKDUG&RXSH

MIKE MCCARTHY

COURTESY CROSSROADS

*UST"REATHE

4HE(UNT

COURTESY SECRET IDENTITY PRODUCTIONS

E\:KLWQH\0HQRJDQ

COURTESY CROSSROADS

0ICTURE0ERFECT


JUST ARRIVED

From South Of The Border

Handcrafted with 100% pure Blue Agave, Espolón premium tequila celebrates real Mexico and its stored culture through classic 19th century artistry and the iconic rooster, a symbol of national pride.

GET READY FOR A

MAJOR

REWARDS

BOOST BOO BO OST

COMING

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly

P)+%L'HHID !"#$%&'(()*+,*%-,'.%/%0123456(78%9:%;<!="% !>=$$>$!?><!@?%/%(1A)(B'C3A123456(7D2,E F :65G)2+%+,%E1*1E6E%HC'I%()J61()E)*+4D%KL)4)%*)B%()B'(.4%'()%4,%H,B)(M6C8%I,6NCC%M))C%C13)%'%*)B%H)(4,*D% O,+%+L'+%+L)()N4%'*I+L1*7%B(,*7%B1+L%+L)%B'I%I,6%'()%*,BD%964+%5)%@!%,(%,C.)(%+,%)*+)(%2'41*,D%9'*'7)E)*+%()4)(A)4%'CC% (17L+4%+,%'C+)(%,(%2'*2)C%H(,E,+1,*%'+%'*I%+1E)%B1+L,6+%*,+12)D%P'E5C1*7%H(,5C)EQ%R'CC%!>===>SSS><$<$D%% T@"!@%-1A)(B'C3%R'41*,%/%U,+)CD%VCC%(17L+4%()4)(A).D

jacksonfreepress.com

REAL MEXICO. TRUE STORY.

SOON! 29


SWELLOPHONIC

! """#$%& """""""'()*+,( """"""""""-./'*)0

Celebrate Earth Day at the Petrified Forest

!"#$%&'()"%*+','-"./"-0%(#10%2"3'##'##'$$'"(0-'/(&-# -+0.14+"!$0')"56"(-"-+%"7)2"8($'-.)"31#%19

April 11 - 17, 2012

1'$'2"1')22'"$'"3$4.'*%""5""6788 *%9:$4.'*%;+/2+;<:*;""5""=>?@AB=@=CD>

30

a museum of the mississippi department of archives & history

National Natural Landmark

Earth Day April 22, 2012

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com


2012 CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL !-ISSFOR³3ONNY´

E\-DFRE)XOOHU

COURTESY CROSSROADS

WKDWDIIHFWPDQ\IDPLOLHVLQWKHSRYHUW\VWULFNHQ ZDUG  )LQDOO\WKHDUFKLWHFWXUHVWXGHQWVVKRZWKHLU VNLOOVE\GUDIWLQJDSURSRVHGPDSRIWKHZDUGZLWK QHZJUHHQVSDFHVEXVLQHVVHVDQGQHLJKERUKRRGV 7KH\WUDFHDVWUHHWLQWKHZDUGDGGLQJQHZEXVL QHVVHVWUHHVFDUVDQGSHGHVWULDQV  6HH´:DUG&RPPXQLW\LQ1HHGRI5HQHZDOµ GXULQJWKH´'RFVZLWK0R[LHµEORFN$SULO VWDUWLQJDWSPRQVFUHHQ$2WKHUVKRUWÀOPV ÀYHWRPLQXWHV LQWKHEORFNDUH´.XG]X9LQHµ *XDxDSH6XUµ´6DYDJH7DOHVµ´7KH'LYLGHµDQG ´7KH)ORUHVWLQH&ROOHFWLRQµ

E\$GULD:DONHU

COURTESY GREY HAWK PRODUCTIONS

"EAUTIFUL0EOPLE E\*OHQ*UHJRU\

T

'AYIN-ISSISSIPPI E\*OHQ*UHJRU\

COURTESY CROSSROADS

M

KHIHDWXUH¿OP³7KH6NLQQ\´VWDUWVRQD1HZ<RUN &LW\FRUQHUZLWKWKHPDLQFKDUDFWHU0DJQXVDQG KLVER\IULHQG5\DQWDONLQJDQGZDLWLQJIRU0DJ QXV¶IULHQGVWRDUULYH5\DQKDVWKHVWUHHWWRXJK1HZ <RUN&LW\DLUDERXWKLP%XWQRW0DJQXV²KHDQGWKH DUULYLQJIULHQGVDUHDOO,Y\/HDJXHUHFHQWO\RXWRI%URZQ 8QLYHUVLW\DQGDOOMXVWEHJLQQLQJWKHLUDGXOWOLYHV7KLV LVWKHLU¿UVWUHXQLRQVLQFHOHDYLQJVFKRRODQGWKH\DUH JHWWLQJWRJHWKHUIRU+DUOHP3ULGH  :KHQWKHIULHQGVDUULYHZHPHHW.\OH6HEDVWLDQ-RH\DQGDORQHOHVELDQ/DQJVWRQ%R\IULHQG5\DQLVRII RQKLVRZQWROHDYHWKHIULHQGVWRWKHLUZHHNHQGDQGFDWFKLQJXS$QGZHDUHOHIWWRJRWKURXJKWKHZHHNHQG ZLWKWKHPOHDUQLQJPRUHDERXWWKHPDQGWKHYDULRXVVWRU\OLQHVWKDWGHYHORSDORQJWKHZD\  ,WLVDZHOOVKRW¿OPZLWKVRPHEHDXWLIXOSHRSOHEXW,GLGQRWPDNHDFRQQHFWLRQZLWKWKHFKDUDFWHUV3HU KDSVWKH,Y\/HDJXHSXWWLQJJUHHQDQGDFFHQWVVHHPHGDELWPXFKWRPH$WWKHHQGRIWKH¿OP,HYHQUHDOL]HG, GLGQ¶WHYHQNQRZRQHRIWKHFKDUDFWHU¶VQDPHV,IHDUWKDWPDQ\KHUHPD\KDYHWKHVDPHODFNRIFRQQHFWLRQ7KDW LVDVKDPHWRREHFDXVHWKH¿OPKDVVRPHJRRGPHVVDJHVIRUWKH*/%7FRPPXQLW\DERXWVDIHVH[+,9WHVWLQJ DQGUHODWLRQVKLSV  6HH´7KH6NLQQ\µ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ%

E\*OHQ*UHJRU\

B

DQMRVDOZD\VPDNHIRUJRRGPRYLHV³%HDXW\,V (PEDUUDVVLQJ´LVWKHVWRU\RI:D\QH:KLWHDUWLVW VFXOSWRUDQGSXSSHWHHU7KURXJKWKH¿OPZHDUH WDNHQRQDZRQGHUIXOZDFN\MRXUQH\WKURXJK:D\QH¶V OLIHWROGZLWKKLV$SSDODFKLDQIRXUF\OLQGHUDFFHQW  $IWHUFROOHJH:KLWHPDGHKLVZD\WR1HZ <RUN&LW\DQGEHJDQZKDWPD\EHKLVEHVWNQRZQ ZRUN²´7KH3HH:HH+HUPDQ6KRZ´  $IWHUWKH¿UVWVHDVRQDQGJUHDWVXFFHVVWKHVKRZ DQG:D\QHSDFNHGXSDQGKHDGHGWR/RV$QJHOHV 7KH¿OPIROORZVWKHULVHDQGHYHQWXDOLQIDPRXVIDOO RI³7KH3HH:HH+HUPDQ6KRZ´DQG:D\QH¶VYDULRXV SXUVXLWVODWHU:HHYHQJHWWRYHQWXUHEDFNZLWKKLPWR KLVKRPHOLIHJURZLQJXSLQ&KDWWDQRRJDDQGFROOHJH DW0LGGOH7HQQHVVHH8QLYHUVLW\

COURTESY CROSSROADS

7ATCH9OUR&ACE DQGDGXOWV IDFHLQ0LVVLVVLSSL*RGDQGFKXUFK DUHYHU\PXFKDSDUWRIWKHVWUXJJOHVIRUPDQ\ EXWWKHVWUXJJOHVDUHEULQJLQJFKDQJHVDQGSHRSOH KDYHMR\RXVVWRULHVWRWHOODQGVKDUH$QGWKHVWR ULHVVSHDNYROXPHVDERXWWKHVHLVVXHV7KLV¿OPLV ZRQGHUIXOO\VKRWVKRZLQJWKHJUHDWEHDXW\WKDWLV LQ0LVVLVVLSSL  ,I\RXDUHDPHPEHURIWKH*/%7FRPPXQLW\RU KDYHIULHQGVRUIDPLO\ZKRDUH\RXUHDOO\KDYHWR VHHWKLV¿OP7KXVHYHU\RQHUHDOO\QHHGVWRVHH LW²EHFDXVHZKHWKHURUQRW\RXNQRZLW\RXGR KDYHIULHQGVRUIDPLO\LQWKH*/%7FRPPXQLW\  6HH´0LVVLVVLSSL,$Pµ$SULODWSP RQVFUHHQ$

IURPWRXFKLQJKLVJLUO   $OWKRXJKLWLVH[WUHPHO\IXQQ\³7KH4XHHQVRI &RXQWU\´LVGH¿QLWHO\QRWIRUDOODXGLHQFHV0DQ\RI WKHMRNHVZLOOEHZDVWHGRQWKH\RXQJ,WKDVVRPH VWURQJDGXOWODQJXDJHDKDQGIXORIVH[VFHQHVDQG ORWVRIVH[XDOLQQXHQGR  6HH´7KH4XHHQVRI&RXQWU\µ$SULODWSP 7KHÀOPLVWKLV\HDU·V´+HUPDQ·V3LFNµLQKRQRURI +HUPDQ6QHOOIRUPHU&URVVURDGVIHVWLYDOGLUHFWRUDQG -DFNVRQ)UHH3UHVVPXVLFHGLWRU

COURTESY CROSSROADS

KHGRFXPHQWDU\³$6LVWHU¶V&DOO´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¶VGLVDSSRLQWPHQWLQKLVGHFLVLRQQRWWRFRQWLQXHKLVFROOHJHFDUHHU7KDWHYHQW EURXJKWKLPWRDGHHSVWDWHRIGHSUHVVLRQZKHUHKLVVFKL]RSKUHQLD¿UVWVXUIDFHG  7KLVGRFXPHQWDU\VKRZVWKHKDUGVKLSRIRQHVRXWKHUQIDPLO\WKDWSUHVHQWVDIDFDGHRI³QRUPDO´,Q UHDOLW\WKHIDPLO\FDUULHVDEXQGOHRIVHFUHWV7KH¿OPVKRZVDVLVWHU¶VXQG\LQJORYHIRUKHUIDPLO\DQGKHU DWWHPSWVWR¿QGWKHEDODQFHVWUHQJWKDQGFRXUDJHWRKHOSWKRVHPRVWLPSRUWDQWWRKHU  7KHGRFXPHQWDU\LVDOVRDJOLPSVHDWWKHGLVHDVHRIVFKL]RSKUHQLDVKRZLQJ&DOO¶VMRXUQH\DVKHJHWV FRDFKHGDQGJXLGHGWRZDUGEHFRPLQJDIXQFWLRQDODGXOW  6HH´$6LVWHU·V&DOOµ$SULODWSPRQ6FUHHQ%

KH4XHHQVRI&RXQWU\´LVDKLODULRXVTXLUN\ PRYLHWKDWFRQWLQXHGWRDPXVHPHORQJDIWHU WKHHQGLQJFUHGLWVKDG¿QLVKHGUROOLQJ7KH ¿OPWHOOVWKHVWRU\RIEHDXW\TXHHQDQGOLQHGDQFLQJ FKDPSLRQ-ROHQH*LOOLV /L]]\&DSODQRI³0HDQ*LUOV´ DQG³7UXH%ORRG´   -ROHQH¿QGVDQL3RG¿OOHGZLWKKHUIDYRULWH FRXQWU\VLQJLQJTXHHQVVXFKDV/RUHWWD/\QQ7DPP\ :\QHWWHDQG'ROO\3DUWRQ²WKHWUXH4XHHQVRI &RXQWU\²LQD¿OWK\ORFDOWUXFNVWRSEDWKURRP-ROHQH LVSRVLWLYHWKDWWKHRZQHURIWKHL3RGLVKHUVRXOPDWH VRVKHDQGKHUFORVHWUDQVJHQGHUIULHQG3HQQ\ -RH/R 7UXJOLRRI³6XSHUEDG´DQG³5ROH0RGHOV´ WXUQWKHLU OLYHVXSVLGHGRZQORRNLQJIRU-ROHQH¶VRWKHUKDOI  $ORQJWKHZD\-ROHQHGURSVKHUGHDGEHDWFKHDW LQJOLQHGDQFLQJSDUWQHUDQG¿DQFp 5RQ/LYLQJVWRQ RI³%DQGRI%URWKHUV´DQG³6H[DQGWKH&LW\´ DQG HQFRXQWHUV%REE\ 0D\QDUG-DPHV.HHQDQOHDG VLQJHURI$3HUIHFW&LUFOH -ROHQH¶V¿DQFpKLUHV%REE\ WRSRVHDVWKHRZQHURIWKHL3RGWRNHHS-ROHQHIURP ¿QGLQJKHUWUXHVRXOPDWH DQGWRNHHSDQRWKHUPDQ

COURTESY SEMI-REBELLIOUS FILMS

“T

E\:KLWQH\0RQHJDQ

LVVLVVLSSL,DPLQVSLUHG0LVVLV VLSSL,DPSURXG0LVVLVVLSSL, DPVRPHZKDWDVKDPHG/DQFH %DVVRI¶16\QFIDPHSURGXFHGWKH GRFXPHQWDU\³0LVVLVVLSSL,$P´ ZKLFKEHJLQVZLWKQDUUDWLRQRI%DVV JURZLQJXSLQ/DXUHOKLVULVHWRIDPH EHLQJDIDYRULWHVRQDQGHYHQWXDOO\ EHLQJVKXQQHGE\0LVVLVVLSSLDIWHU KHFDPHRXWDVJD\%XWLVQ¶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

I

Q³6HDUFKLQJIRU6RQQ\´-DVRQ'RKULQJSOD\V(OOLRW .QLJKWD\HDUROGSL]]DGHOLYHU\PDQIDFLQJKLV \HDUKLJKVFKRROUHXQLRQ:KHQKHUHFHLYHVD SRVWFDUGIURPKLVIRUPHUEHVWIULHQGWKHP\VWHULRXV 6RQQ\%RVFR SOD\HGE\WKHZLOGO\SRSXODU0DVL2ND IURP³+HUR´ (OOLRWGHFLGHVWRSXOOKLPVHOIWRJHWKHU DQGUHWXUQKRPHWRIDFHKLVSDVW  8SRQKLVDUULYDOKHGLVFRYHUVWKDW6RQQ\LVPLVVLQJDQGEHJLQVDVHDUFK+LVIUDWHUQDOWZLQEURWKHU&DOYLQ 1LFN.RFKHU DQGIHOORZIRUPHUFLW\FRXQFLOPHPEHU*DU\1REOH %ULDQ0F(OKDQH\ MRLQKLP.QLJKWTXLFNO\ ¿QGVKLPVHOIHQWDQJOHGLQDFRQYROXWHGPXUGHUSORWWKDWQHYHUTXLWHPDNHVVHQVH  'RKULQJZKRSOD\HG/RJDQ(FKROVRQ³9HURQLFD0DUV´GRHVKLVEHVWZLWKDFRQIXVLQJSORWEXWFDQQRW RYHUFRPHWKHODFNRIFKDUDFWHUGHYHORSPHQWPXQGDQHGLDORJXHDQGXQHYHQQHVVHYLGHQWWKURXJKRXWWKH¿OP  ³6HDUFKLQJIRU6RQQ\´LVZULWHUDQGGLUHFWRU$QGUHZ'LVQH\¶V¿UVWIRUD\LQWRIHDWXUHOHQJWK¿OPPDNLQJDQG LWVKRZV3XUSRUWLQJWREHDEXGG\PRYLHFXPPXUGHUP\VWHU\VODVKURPDQFH³6RQQ\´SXWVIRUWKDYDOLDQWHIIRUW EXWQHYHUTXLWHKLWVWKHPDUN$WWLPHVFDPS\6RQQ\KDVDIHZDPXVLQJPRPHQWVPRVWGHOLYHUHGE\WKHHYHU HUUDQW&DOYLQ  $WKLVUHXQLRQ.QLJKWFRPHVDFURVVKLV¿UVWORYH(GHQ0HUFHU$FWUHVV0LQND.HOO\SOD\V0HUFHUSURYLGLQJD EULJKWVSRWLQWKH¿OP.HOO\FXUUHQWO\VWDUULQJLQWKHKRUURU¿OP³7KH5RRPPDWH´LVEHVWNQRZQDV/\OD*DUULW\ LQWKHWHOHYLVLRQYHUVLRQRI³)ULGD\1LJKW/LJKWV´.HOO\¶VVFUHHQSUHVHQFHLVHOHFWULF6KHZLOOGUDZ\RXWRWKH VFUHHQPHVPHUL]HG:DWFKWKH¿OPIRUKHUSHUIRUPDQFH  6HH´6HDUFKLQJIRU6RQQ\µ$SULODWSPRQVFUHHQ&

"EAUTY1UEENSAND3OUL-ATES

*OURNEYOF2ECOVERY

T

E\'HDQQD*UDYHV

 :D\QHLVDWUXO\XQLTXHDQGZRQGHUIXODUWLVWDQG WKLV¿OPFDSWXUHVKLVTXLUNVZHOO6RZHDU\RXUVNL JRJJOHVDQG³ZDWFK\RXUIDFH´²LW¶VJRQQDEHDZLOG ULGH  6HH´%HDXW\,V(PEDUUDVVLQJµ$SULODW SPRQVFUHHQ%

jacksonfreepress.com

T

KUHH0LVVLVVLSSL6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\DUFKLWHF WXUHVWXGHQWVWRRND¿OPFDPHUDLQWRRQHRI -DFNVRQ¶VSRRUHVWDUHDV7KHUHVXOWLQJIRRWDJH EHFDPH³:DUG&RPPXQLW\LQ1HHGRI5HQHZDO´ DVL[PLQXWHGRFXPHQWDU\FKURQLFOLQJWKHDEDQ GRQHGSURSHUWLHVDQGEOLJKWWKDW¿OOWRRPXFKRI WKHZDUG  7KH¿OPIHDWXUHVLQWHUYLHZVZLWK%HQHWD%XUW WKHZDUG¶VUHSUHVHQWDWLYHRQWKH-DFNVRQ5HGH YHORSPHQW$XWKRULW\ERDUGDVZHOODVFLWL]HQVRI :DUG7KHGLUHFWRU¶VXVHRIEODFNDQGZKLWHYLGHR LQWKHEHJLQQLQJDVZHOODVWKHVORZPLQRUNH\ SLDQRPXVLFVHWWKHWRQHIRULPDJHVRIVRPHRI WKHFLW\¶VZRUVWNHSWQHLJKERUKRRGV¿OOHGZLWKWKH ERDUGHGXSZLQGRZVDQGGLODSLGDWHGDEDQGRQHG KRPHVDQGEXVLQHVVHV  7KHLQWHUYLHZHHVWDONDERXWKRZWKHGHWHULR UDWLQJKRXVHVDQGEXVLQHVVHVDUHH\HVRUHVWKDW GHVWUR\WKHSHRSOH¶VVHQVHRIFRPPXQLW\7KH\ DOVRDWWUDFWWKRVHZKRDUHORRNLQJIRUIUHHWHPSR UDU\GZHOOLQJV  2QFHWKH¿OPUHYHDOVWKHSOLJKWRIWKHZDUGLW FKDQJHVJHDUVWRVKRZZKDWWKHFRPPXQLW\FDQGR WRFKDQJHLW7KH¿OP¶VPDLQSURSRVDOLVWRUHPRYH DEDQGRQHGEXLOGLQJVDQGUHSODFHWKHPZLWKJDU GHQVVROYLQJQRWRQO\WKHSUREOHPRIERDUGHGXS KRXVHVEXWDOVRWKHKXQJHUDQGSRRUQXWULWLRQ

COURTESY RED PRODUCTIONS

.EEDSOF7ARD

31


BEST BETS April 11 - 18, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 4/11

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards Exhibit at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) hangs through April 15 in Trustmark Grand Hall. Free; call 601-960-1515. … Israel Martinez of LABA-Link speaks at the Jackson 2000 Luncheon at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@ att.net to RSVP. … Archaeologist Edward Henry speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Lynne Bryant signs copies of her book “Alligator Lake” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.); reading at 5:30 p.m. $15 book; call 601-366-7619. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers and Blues. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday.

Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon) and runs through April 22. $20, $10 seniors and students; call 601-825-1293. … Amazin’ Lazy Boi performs tonight and April 14 at F. Jones Corner. … Dreamz JXN hosts Centric Thursday.

FRIDAY 4/13

The annual Spring Market kicks off at 9 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1207 Mississippi St.) and runs through April 15. $8, $15 three-day pass, children 12 and under free; call 662-890-3359; visit themarketshows.com. … Actor Tonea Stewart is the featured guest at the annual Creative Arts Festival April 13-14 at Jackson State University, College of Liberal Arts (1400 John R. Lynch St.). Free; call 979-3935. … The American Cancer Society hosts the Relay for Life at 6 p.m. at the Richland Community Center’s soccer fields (410 E. Harper St., Richland; call 769-237-6011) and Mississippi College’s Robinson-Hale Stadium (200 Capitol St., Clinton; call 662-549-3729). Registration fees vary; visit relayforlife.org. … The Crossroads Film Festival kicks off at 7 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison) and runs through April 15. $8 film block, $20 one-day pass, $59 all-access pass; call 601-345-5674; visit crossroadsfilmfestival .com for the film lineup and after-party details. …

SATURDAY 4/14

The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is at 9 a.m. at the War Memorial Building (120 S. State St.). Proceeds go toward breast-cancer programs. $30 and up, $20 youth; call 866-475-6636. … The Traffic Jam Walkathon is at 9 a.m. at Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St.); rally and concert at 7 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Hard Places Community’s fight against child sex trafficking. Donations welcome ($100 recommended for fundraisers); call 601-942-0429; visit traffickjamasia. com. … KidFest! kicks off at 9 a.m. at Freedom Ridge Park (235 W. School St., Ridgeland) and runs through April 15. $10, children under 2 free; call 601-853-2011; visit kidfestridgeland .com. … The Sante South Wine Festival at The South (627 E. Silas Brown St.) includes the VIP Tasting at 6:30 p.m. ($125) and the Grand Tasting at 7:30 p.m. ($80). Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. Call 601-987-0020. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents “Chamber IV: Amazin’ Lazy Boi (Andrew Dillon) performs April 12 and 14 at F. Jones Corner.

April 11 - 17, 2012

The Garden Club of Jackson’s Home and Garden Tour 2012 kicks off at 10 a.m. and runs through April 13. Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services and Habitat for Humanity Metro Jackson. $20 tour, $15 lunch, $50 garden party; call 601-946-8455; visit gardenclubofjackson.com for locations. … Downtown at Dusk is at 5 p.m. at Underground 119; the Southern Komfort Brass Band performs. Free admission, $5 plate, $3 beer, $2 water and soda; call 601-3539800. … Local actors read portions of scripts at Table Read Mississippi at 6 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $10, $5 Crossroads members, students and seniors; email tablereadmississippi@gmail.com. … The play “The Ponder 32 Family Heart” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at Black Rose Community

SUNDAY 4/15

Jackson Restaurant Week kicks off today and runs through April 21. Dine at participating restaurants and vote for a charity to receive $10,000. Visit jacksonrestaurantweek.com for locations. … The Jackson Irish Dancers’ Mostly Monthly Ceili is at 2 p.m. at Fenian’s. Free; visit jacksonirishdancers.org. … Art House Cinema Downtown at 5 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the independent film “Perfect Sense.” $7; visit msfilm.org. … Coke Bumaye, PyInfamous, Slimm Pusha and more perform at the GenerationNXT Indie Concert Series at 6 p.m. at Dreamz JXN.

MONDAY 4/16

Music students perform during Best of Belhaven II at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494. … Amos Brewer performs at The Penguin from 6-9 p.m. … Pub Quiz at Ole Tavern.

TUESDAY 4/17

Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “Bedlam in Cabin B” at 7 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St.). $42.50; call 601-856-9696 to RSVP. … The play “All My Sons” debuts at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $25, $22 seniors and students; 601-948-3533, ext. 222.

WEDNESDAY 4/18

Flag expert Clay Moss speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Eilen Jewel and the Hackensack Boys perform at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $10 in advance, $12 at the door; visit ardenland.net. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

The Southern Komfort Brass Band performs during Downtown at Dusk April 12 at 5 p.m. at Underground 119. DANE CARNEY

THURSDAY 4/12

American Elegy” at 7:30 p.m. at Galloway United Methodist Church (305 N. Congress St.). $15; call 601-960-1565. … Dirty Play performs at Bourbon St. in the Quarter. $5 cover.


COURTESY NEW STAGE THEATRE

by Amanda Michaud

Laurie Pascale as Kate Keller, John Maxwell as Joe Keller, Bret Kenyon as Chris Keller and Daniel Dauphin as George Deever in â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sonsâ&#x20AC;? at New Stage Theatre, April 17 to 29.

E

ntering New Stage Theatre for its production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sonsâ&#x20AC;? by Arthur Miller, you are transported back to 1946 and the post-World War II Keller family homestead. The Kellers live in a gorgeous two-story house painted pale blue with cream-colored trim. An inviting porch is attached to the house. To the side of the house is a trellis covered with vines, and luscious trees grow in the background. The production team even managed to â&#x20AC;&#x153;growâ&#x20AC;? grass on the stage to enhance the realism. This extraordinary set will make viewers feel like they are watching their neighbors instead of watching a performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the quality of what you are seeing and the production values here and the talent, I think the audience is really going to see something special,â&#x20AC;? director Russell Blackwell says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can be as solid as the set construction, then we are going to be just fine.â&#x20AC;? After just three weeks of rehearsal, the actors are transforming into an intricately woven community. Blackwell says that the Jackson area has â&#x20AC;&#x153;a fine talent pool of performers â&#x20AC;Ś and we have a bunch of them in this show.â&#x20AC;? The cast includes five Jackson locals: John Maxwell, Bret Kenyon, Joseph Frost, John Howell and Ali Dinkins. Three other members from the cast are from surrounding areas: Courtland Nobles, Daniel Dauphin and Jo Ann Robinson. New Stage not only attracts local actors, but also actors from out of state. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sonsâ&#x20AC;? cast also includes Laurie Pascale from Arkansas and Kristin Patton, from New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arthur Miller created it,â&#x20AC;? Blackwell says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We come out here to try to keep the #ONCERTO+OLNPLAYS7ESLEY"IBLICAL3EMINARY  7KH &RQFHUWR .ROQ IURP &RORJQH *HUPDQ\ ZLOO SOD\PXVLFE\-RKDQQ6HEDVWLDQ%DFK$QWRQLR9LYDOGL *LRYDQQL%DWWLVWD6DPPDUWLQLDQG(YDULVWR'DOOÂś$EDFR DWWKH:HVOH\%LEOLFDO6HPLQDU\6DQFWXDU\RQ7KXUV GD\$SULO  7KHSLHFHRUFKHVWUDZDVIRUPHGLQDQGLV PRVWO\PDGHXSRIUHFHQWJUDGXDWHVIURPFRQVHUYDWR ULHVDFURVV(XURSH8QOLNHPDQ\RUFKHVWUDVWKH&RQ FHUWR.ROQGRHVQRWUHFHLYHDQ\JRYHUQPHQWVXEVLGLHV DQGGRHVQRWKDYHDSHUPDQHQWFRQGXFWRU  7KHVKRZVWDUWVDWSP7LFNHWDUHIRU JHQHUDODGPLVVLRQDQGIRUVWXGHQWV ²-DFRE)XOOHU

magic and be true to what Mr. Miller wrote and tell his story the best we can.â&#x20AC;? Theater goers may know Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work through plays such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death of a Salesmanâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Crucible.â&#x20AC;? Like those plays, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sonsâ&#x20AC;? is an extraordinary piece of art. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an American classic,â&#x20AC;? Blackwell says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to bring our own form of jazz to it. Anyone can play the notes, but it is what is in between the notes. What (actor John Maxwell) sees as Joe Keller, someone else may not have seen.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to live through the moment of the play; through what the character wants and what his objective is,â&#x20AC;? says Maxwell, who plays the father, Joe Keller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not trying to portray anyone; I am trying to live through those moments to make it as real and close to the truth as I can.â&#x20AC;? By using this technique, the performances are more natural. The actors respond to the situation instead of pretending to be something they are not. Many acting companies perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sons,â&#x20AC;? and each one brings something special to it. The New Stage company is trying to bring the audience back to 1946 for a couple of hours to give them the best experience possible. One reason for the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-term success is its universal themes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family,â&#x20AC;? Blackwell says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how one family deals with love, with loss and human nature. And the backdrop is World War II.â&#x20AC;? Even though the show was written about 65 years ago, it still makes an impact. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one thing about Arthur Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most everything he wrote has a timeless quality, a prophetic quality,â&#x20AC;? Blackwell says. Maxwell adds: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes great plays great. No matter when plays are written, an audience is going to be able to identify.â&#x20AC;? Blackwell agrees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want people to leave wanting to come back to the theater,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our art. More art means a better place that we live in.â&#x20AC;? See New Stage Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Sonsâ&#x20AC;? from April 17 through April 29. Curtain is 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $25 with discounts available for students, senior citizens and groups. For more information, call 601-948-3531 or visit newstagetheatre.com. 7ELTYAT"LACK2OSE  6WDUWLQJ$SULOWKH%ODFN5RVH7KHDWUH %ODFN 6W%UDQGRQ ZLOOVWDJHWKHSOD\Âł7KH3RQGHU)DPLO\ +HDUW´IURPWKHQRYHOÂł7KH3RQGHU+HDUW´E\0LVVLV VLSSLZULWHU(XGRUD:HOW\7KLVLVDKHDUWIHOWVWRU\IXOO RIKRSHMR\DQGVRUURZDVZHOODVVRPHKRPHWRZQ VRXWKHUQGLDOHFW  6HH WKH SOD\ 7KXUVGD\V WKURXJK 6XQGD\V $SULO  WKURXJK $SULO  DW  SP &DOO  RU HPDLO EUWUHVHUYDWLRQV#JPDLOFRP IRU UHVHUYDWLRQV /HDYH\RXUQDPHSKRQHQXPEHUWKHGD\DQGGDWHRI WKHVKRZ\RXZDQWWRVHHDQGKRZPDQ\WLFNHWV\RX QHHG0RUHLQIRDWEODFNURVHWKHDWUHFRPSDQ\RUJ ²(O\DQH$OH[DQGHU

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Jackson 2000 Luncheon April 11, 11:45 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Julio deCastillo, president of the Latin American Business Association (LABA-Link), and Israel Martinez, director of LingoFest Language Center, talk about Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hispanic community. RSVP. $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_branch@att.net. Crossroads Film Festival April 13-15, at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). Enjoy dozens of independent films and workshops. Discounts available for members, seniors and students. $8 film block, $20 one-day pass, $59 all-access pass; call 601-345-5674. Sante South Wine Festival April 14, 6:30 p.m., at The South (627 E. Silas Brown St.). Sample dozens of fine wines and gourmet food. The VIP tasting is at 6:30 p.m., and the grand tasting is at 7:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association of Mississippi. $125 VIP tasting, $80 grand tasting; call 601-987-0020. Jackson Restaurant Week April 15-21. Dine at participating restaurants and cast a ballot for one of the following charities to receive $10,000: Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA), Friends of Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital, Jackson Free Clinic, Magnolia Speech School and The Mustard Seed. Visit jacksonrestaurantweek.com.

COMMUNITY Tougaloo Spring Fest 5K Registration, at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). The run/walk is April 14 at 9 a.m. (check-in at 8 a.m.) open to individuals, families and teams. Register by April 11. T-shirt included. Free; call 601-977-6186 or 601-977-7797. â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? April 11, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Archaeologist Edward Henry presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rediscovering Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic Cemetery: A Non-invasive Ground-penetrating Radar Survey to Identify Unknown Burials at Greenwood Cemetery.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. Mississippi Economic Council Annual Meeting April 12, 8:30 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Speakers include Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, Mission Mississippi president Rev. Neddie Winters, author Jack Schultz and Miss Mississippi 2011 Mary Margaret Roark. Mavis Staples performs. $75, $65 members; call 601-969-0022 or 800-748-7626. Downtown at Dusk April 12, 5 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.), in the parking lot. The event includes local food, craft beers and music from the Southern Komfort Brass Band. Free admission, $5 plate, $3 beer, $2 water and soda; call 601-353-9800. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting April 12, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol St.). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0002. New Vibrations Network Gathering April 12, 6:30 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The mixer is held every second Thursday. Bring business cards and brochures to share. Email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. Hinds Community College Annual Plant Sale April 13-14, at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond), at the produce stand next to Gray-Partridge Center. Open April 13 from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. and April 14 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 800-446-6322. Spring Market April 13-15, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). More than 100 merchants sell spring fashions, accessories, jewelry, shoes, handbags, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothes, home dĂŠcor, gourmet foods and more. Open April 13 from 9 a.m.-

Coming Home

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A

lligator Lakeâ&#x20AC;? (NAL Trade, 2002, $15) is another in a string of roughly historic race novels by white people that claims to be another â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Help.â&#x20AC;? I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepared to like Colorado nursing professor Lynne Bryantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel about another white woman coming back home to Mississippi to confront our demons. But the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about race conflicts in the 1980sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;deals with mixed-race love and the response to it in a smart and revealing way. The main character is a white woman who left Mississippi after getting pregnant by the black man she loved. Her daughter, Celi, is a remarkable young woman suffering from sickle-cell anemia, and ultimately is the catalyst that brings a broken family back together. And there is a kick-ass grandmother who has helped her black best friend fight for her rights for years to balance out the racist jerks. Once I got into it (and got past the additional paragraphs at the end of each chapter that told me what she so effectively had just shown me), I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put this book down. I found it much more complex, realistic and educational than â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Help,â&#x20AC;? show-v.-tell issues aside. Bryant signs and reads â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alligator Lakeâ&#x20AC;? Wednesday, April 11, starting at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 601-366-7619). â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Donna Ladd

9 p.m., April 14 from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and April 15 from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Night Out is April 13 from 5-9 p.m. ($15), and Market Madness is April 13 from 9 a.m.-noon, and April 15 from 2-5 p.m. ($10 wristband). Free parking. $8, $15 three-day pass, children 12 and under free; call 662890-3359. Criminal Justice Reform Conference April 13-14, 9 a.m., at Jackson State University, College of Liberal Arts (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Politics and the New Jim Crow: Race, Addiction and Incarceration.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601354-3408. Millsaps Forum April 13, 12:30 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215. Duncan McCullough discusses his experiences as a transgendered man. Free; call 601-974-1305. Creative Arts Festival April 13-14, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 50th Anniversary of the Meredith Crisisâ&#x20AC;? and is an exhibition of visual arts, spoken word, performing arts and creative writing from students. Actor Tonea Stewart is the featured guest. Free; call 601-979-3935.

more EVENTS, page 34

jacksonfreepress.com

An American Classic

jfpevents

COURTESY NAL TRADE

DIVERSIONS|theater

33


FREE TAX FILING! NO FEES • NO LOANS

Friday, April 13th 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Canton WIN Job Center 152 Watford Parkway Dr. Saturday, April 14th & Monday, April 16th 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Jackson Medical Mall Center Stage 350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.

KEEP YOUR ENTIRE TAX REFUND!

from page 33

Prancing J-Settes Auditions April 13-15, at Jackson State University, Williams Athletics and Assembly Center (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The dance team performs at JSU athletic games and special events. Potential team members must be enrolled at JSU. The public may view auditions for $5. $20 registration; call 601-979-7065. Monarch Festival April 14-21, at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). April 14, the butterfly rescue is at 9 a.m. at Choctaw Trails (McRaven Road, Clinton), and the Monarch Walkathon is at 2 p.m. in the Butterfly Garden ($25 donation). April 15, the children’s art reception and open house is from 2-4 p.m. in Price Hall. April 18, Dr. Bill Stark lectures on monarch migration. April 21 is Nature Day and includes a plant sale at 8 a.m., a haiku awards ceremony at 10 a.m. and butterfly adoptions at 10:30 a.m. Call 601-924-5509. Critters and Crawlers, April 14, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). The program is for toddlers ages 2-3 and their caregivers. Discounts for members. Prices vary; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241. NatureFEST! April 14, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Enjoy digging for fossils, viewing specimens, animal exhibits and children’s activities. Meet Leona the Lion, the Cat in the Hat, Smokey the Bear and Inky the Clown. The first 500 visitors receive $2 off admission. $6, $5 seniors, $4 children 3-18, members/children under 3 free; call 601-354-7303. Campsites to Megabytes: Celebrating 100 Years of Girl Scouts April 14, 10 a.m., at Hinds Community College, Rankin Campus (3805 Highway 80 E., Pearl), at the Clyde Muse Center. The event includes games, crafts, a sing-along and exhibitor booths. X-Factor contestant Haley Orrantia performs. $5; call 601-326-5641. KidFest! April 14-15, at Freedom Ridge Park (235 W. School St., Ridgeland). The family event includes big-top acts, a children’s activity tent, music, food, animated characters and rides. $10, children under 2 free; call 601-853-2011. Horses for Handicapped April 16-19, 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). People with disabilities enjoy horseback riding, wagon rides, a petting zoo and more. Free; visit horsesforhandicappedms.com. Habitat Young Professionals Information Meeting April 17, noon, at Julep (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy lunch, learn how to serve through Habitat for Humanity/Metro Jackson and network with other young professionals. Food prices vary; call 601-353-6060.

www.myunitedway.com AIRS •

MISSISSIPPI

April 11 - 17, 2012

ORIGINAL Social Security Cards and Photo ID REQUIRED!!!

34

Dial 2 1 1 to learn how an IRS-certified volunteer tax

preparer can file your taxes for free. You may qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). United Way of the Capital Area in partnership with the IRS and the Jackson Asset Building Coalition

Jackson Symphony League Annual Spring Luncheon April 18, 11 a.m., at The South (627 E. Silas Brown St.). The luncheon includes a fashion show highlighting items from the label Lafayette 148 New York. Tickets sold in advance only. Mail checks to Jackson Symphony League, Attn: Spring Luncheon, 618 Crescent Blvd., Suite 205, Ridgeland, MS 39157. $40; call 601.607.4144.

WELLNESS Mississippi College Endurance Challenge April 14, 7:30 a.m., at Choctaw Trails (McRaven Road). Registration is at 6 a.m. Races include a one-mile fun run, off-road duathlons and a 5K cross-country run. Awards given; refreshments sold. $10-$75; find MC Endurance Challenge 2012 on active.com.

STAGE AND SCREEN Table Read Mississippi April 12, 6 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). Actor Joey Lauren Adams and screenwriter David Sheffield lead a discussion on the scripts “The Memphis Leg” by John Gibson and “River of Destiny” by John Stenmark. Local actors read portions of the scripts. $10, $5

Arts, More Arts

T

his weekend, check out one or both of these arts-related activities.

Friday and Saturday, April 13 and April 14, head to the Sixth Annual Creative Arts Festival in the Jackson State University College of Science, Engineering and Technology Auditorium. Friday, the opening panel is at 2 p.m., and a reception is at 6 p.m. in Ayer Hall. Dr. Tonea Stewart delivers the keynote address Saturday, April 14 at 4:45 p.m. in the JSU Student Center Auditorium. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, including a complete schedule of events, visit jsums. edu/margaretwalker/artsfestival2012.

CLIPART

Don’t miss your chance for

jfpevents

Opening Saturday and on display through April 30, visit the Fourth Annual Ask for More Arts Student Exhibit at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Over the course of this school year, 16 Jackson public elementary and middle-school students have worked with local teaching artists to incorporate art into their school day. Their artwork is “thoughtful, creative and beautiful,” states a release from Parents for Public Schools Jackson, the organization behind the Ask for More Arts program in the city. For more information, visit ppsjackson.org/askformoreart.

Crossroads members, students and seniors; email tablereadmississippi@gmail.com. “The Ponder Family Heart” April 12-22, at Black Rose Community Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). The play is based on Eudora Welty’s classic novella, “The Ponder Heart.” Shows are Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Reservations recommended. $20, $10 seniors and students; call 601-825-1293. Spring Scenes April 13-14, 7 p.m., at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton), in Aven Little Theater. Advanced play-directing students present their final projects as scenes from dramatic works. $3; call 601-925-3453 or 601-925-3454. “La Traviata” April 14, 11:55 a.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The Metropolitan Opera presents the simulcast of Verdi’s opera starring Natalie Dessay. $22, $20 seniors, $15 children; call 601-936-5856. Fairy Tale Theatre Auditions April 14-15, 2-4 p.m., at Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Open to performers ages 7-18. Production dates are June 21-24. $55 registration, $35 members; call 601-636-0471. more EVENTS, page 36


4RANSPORTATION%NGINEER*ACKSON -3

$QDO\]HDQGGHYHORSVWDWHZLGHWUDYHOGHPDQGIRUHFDVW PRGHOVVPDOOXUEDQDQG032PRGHOVLQFOXGLQJWUDIÂżF SDWWHUQV WUDQVSRUWDWLRQGHVLJQSODQVVLPXODWLRQVLJQDO WLPLQJ RSWLPL]DWLRQ5HT%6LQ7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ(QJ &LYLO(QJ\UVRIH[SLQWUDQVSRUWDWLRQHQJLQHHULQJSODQ QLQJ(,76WURQJ*,6VNLOOV)DPLOLDUZLWKPRGHOLQJVLPXOD WLRQVRIWZDUH+&65(0,&256,09,66,07UDQV&$'  6<1&+526HQGUHVXPHWR0LVVLVVLSSL'HSDUWPHQWRI 7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV1RUWK:HVW6WUHHW 6XLWH-DFNVRQ06

by Julie Skipper

Parades and Passion JULIE SKIPPER

tend to adhere to the rule that if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re old enough to have experienced a trend the first time, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear it the second time around. Case in point: This seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colored denim trend sends me straight back memories of fifth grade and an awesome pair of salmoncolored Guess jeans that I loved. While ordinarily I would have bypassed any bright denim this go-round, the good folks at Red Square The crowd enjoyed lounging in the Art Garden at the Clothing (1000 Highland Mississippi Museum of Art before the Crossroads Film Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, Society presented â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gooniesâ&#x20AC;? during the first â&#x20AC;&#x153;Screen 601-853-8960, redsquare on the Green.â&#x20AC;? clothingco.com) persuaded me to break my rule and try it again as an the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. adult. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true: Sometimes reliving some of Pascagoula St., jacksonconventioncomplex. the things that were popular in our youth is com), and since nothing says â&#x20AC;&#x153;date nightâ&#x20AC;? a lot of fun. like watching a bunch of ladies careen around The Mississippi Museum of Art and a rink and knock each other around, that is Crossroads Film Society (crossroadsfilm exactly what I suggested for Saturday night. society.com) presented another perfect op- I had no idea what to expect, but the Vixens portunity to do just that with the first install- exceeded any expectations I might have had. ment of the free â&#x20AC;&#x153;Screen on the Greenâ&#x20AC;? series The bout takes place on the same level as in The Art Garden (380 S. Lamar St., 601- the spectators with no real barrier. The seats 960-1515). What could be better than a per- in the first row are for the more adventurous fect Friday evening in spring, a cash bar and in the crowd; they come with the possibility â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gooniesâ&#x20AC;? on the big screen? that a derby participant might come crashMy friends and I gathered a blanket ing into you. (I was perfectly fine with sitting and some bug spray and were in the garden farther back.) Speaking of adventurous crowd quicker than you could say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goonies never members, apparently some of the bouts have say die!â&#x20AC;? While some in the crowd were, like a theme, which I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize until I noticed us, clearly excited by a movie from their for- a number of spectators in Star Trek costumes. mative years, we were joined by families with Then I noticed a sign reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star Trak.â&#x20AC;? kids who ran around enjoying the great green In my world, a good pun is always apspace of the garden. preciated, and I give these folks points for Maybe it was the wine, or maybe it really owning it. Lots of supporters wore the was happy fullness from the Pizza Shack teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s color, a bright blue. Coincidentally, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d (925 E. Fortification St., 601-352-2001, the just painted my nails that color, so I felt in the pizzashackjackson.com) pizza that consti- spirit of things, too. tuted our â&#x20AC;&#x153;picnic,â&#x20AC;? but eventually my cohorts As a first-timer at the derby, I was glad and I sort of abandoned the movie in favor of when, prior to the bout, the announcer exjust enjoying each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company. We lin- plained the rules and the teams demonstrated gered well after the movie ended to soak up a jam (the two-minute increments that make more of the springtime air. (The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Screen on up a half). And then they were off. the Greenâ&#x20AC;? series continues throughout the Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all, it was kind of amazing: These girls spring months; a full schedule is available at are fast on those skates, and I quickly found msmuseumart.org.) myself pulled into the excitement. The Vixensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; In addition to movies like â&#x20AC;&#x153;The next home bout is April 21, and a complete Goonies,â&#x20AC;? birthday parties at the skating rink schedule is on their website (magnoliarollerwere a big part of my childhood. Recently, I vixens.com). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well worth the price of admistalked to a member of the Magnolia Roller sion. And because, dear readers, you know I Vixens, one of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roller derby teams. care about these things, I feel compelled to I became intrigued and then convinced that add that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find adult beverages available. I must attend a bout. Granted, I knew my So there you have it: Ways to revisit childhood experience skating around the rink some of the good memories of your youth, to Michael Jackson songs would be nothing but with an update (and bars). For my part, like these tough ladies on wheels, but that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be donning any acid-washed only made me want to see it more. jeans or big bangs anytime soon, but the neon The Vixensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home bouts take place at nail polish may stick around for the spring.

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

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Apr. 13- Thurs. Apr. 19 2012 The Three Stooges Cabin In The Woods Lockout The Raid: Redemption

PG R PG13 R

American Reunion R 3-D Titanic

PG13

Mirror Mirror PG The Hunger Games PG13 October Baby

PG13

21 Jump Street R A Thousand Words PG13 Dr. Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Lorax (non 3-D) PG

3-D Wrath Of The Titans PG13

Journey 2 (non 3-D)

Wrath Of The Titans (non 3-D) PG13)

Safe House

PG R

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

I

!DMINISTRATIVE!SSISTANT

35


jfpevents

A Stage Adaptation of the PBS Movie “The Ponder Heart”

April 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21 at 7:30 p.m.

April 15 & 22 at 2:00 p.m

$15 for Adults $10 Seniors & Students Cash and Checks Only Black Rose Theatre 103 Black Street in Historic Downtown Brandon Call 601-825-1293 for Reservations

from page 34

Art House Cinema Downtown April 15, 5 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See the film “Perfect Sense.” Popcorn and beverages sold. $7; visit msfilm.org.

Proceeds go toward scholarships for high-school graduates and nonprofits. Donations welcome, $40 for meal; call 601-982-9987.

Hinds Arts and Humanities Week April 15-20, at Hinds Community College, Utica Campus (34175 Highway 18, Utica), in the Fine Arts Building. Enjoy a week of classical and gospel music, dance, art and poetry. Presenters include pianist Tim Pridgen and Ballet Magnificat. See art from Tony Davenport, Melanie John and Lorenzo Gayden. Call or visit hindscc.edu for a schedule. Free; call 601-885-7079.

CREATIVE CLASSES

“Bedlam in Cabin B” Dinner Theater April 17, 7 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the play about antics on a haunted dinner cruise boat. Cash bar at 6 p.m.; seating at 6:30 p.m. RSVP. $42.50; call 601-856-9696.

MUSIC Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Free; call 601-974-6494. • Choral and Vocal Arts: The Beauty of Bernstein April 14, 7:30 p.m. The Concert Choir and Dance Department perform to composer Leonard Bernstein’s works such as the Chichester Psalms and Broadway favorites. • Best of Belhaven II April 16, 7:30 p.m. The Music Department presents the best student performances of the semester. Mississippi Opry Spring Show April 14, 6 p.m., at Pearl Community Room (2420 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Performers include Harmony and Grits, and Bill and Temperance. Refreshments sold. $10, children under 18 free; call 601-331-6672. Chamber IV: American Elegy April 14, 7:30 p.m., at Galloway United Methodist Church (305 N. Congress St.). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs compositions from Aaron Jay Kernis, Arvo Pärt and Ottorino Respighi. $15; call 601960-1565. Music in the City April 17, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. Hors d’oeuvres are served first, and Sybil Child, Deborah Feldman and John Paul perform at 5:45 p.m. Free, donations welcome; call 601-354-1533.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Literary Luncheon April 14, 11:30 a.m., at Regency Hotel (400 Greymont Ave.). The program features local author E.V. Adams, who gives a presentation and signs copies of her novel “Darling Nikki.”

Shut Up and Write! Sigh up for one of Donna Ladd’s new creative nonfiction series. Only 11 seats a class! Starts at $50 for one-day workshops up to $150 for the six-class series. Email class@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121, ext. 15. Crossroads Film Festival’s Curious Workshops April 14, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the BancorpSouth Classroom. Professional filmmakers and animators present workshops on character development, animation, prop making and more. All ages welcome. $5; call 601-960-1515. Sticks and Strings April 17, 5:30 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Crochet with other hobbyists. Free; call 601-932-2562.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Scholastic Art and Writing Awards Exhibit through April 15, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). See works from students in grades 7-12 in Trustmark Grand Hall. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free; call 601-960-1515. Senior Art Show through April 17, at Millsaps College, Lewis Art Gallery (Ford Academic Complex, 1701 N. State St.). Open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. The gallery talk is April 13 at 2 p.m. Free; call 601974-1762. Tom Harmon Art Exhibit through April 30, at Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). See watercolor and oil paintings. Free; call 601-960-1582. Art in the Library through April 30, at G. Chastaine Flynt Memorial Library (103 Winners Circle, Flowood). See works from John Lemuel Everitt and the late Floyd Shaman. Free; call 601-919-1911. “The Migration of the Negro, 1940-1941” through June 4, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in Johnson Hall Gallery. See 60 reproductions of Jacob Lawrence’s paintings. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601979-2040. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Home and Garden Tour 2012, April 12-13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Garden Club of Jackson is the host. Two homes and four gardens in northeast Jackson are on tour. Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services and Habitat for Humanity Metro Jackson. $20 tour ticket, $15 lunch ticket, $50 garden party; call 601-946-4928 or 601-946-8455; visit gardenclubofjackson.com. Relay for Life April 13, 6 p.m., at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton). At Robinson-Hale Stadium. The all-night charity walk includes food and entertainment. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Registration fees vary; call 662-549-3729.

April 11 - 17, 2012

Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure April 14, 9 a.m., at War Memorial Building (120 S. State St.). The race include a 5K run/walk and a one-mile fun run. Online registration at komencentralms.org available through April 11. Proceeds go toward breast cancer research, education, screening and treatment programs. $30 and up, $20 youth; call 866-475-6636.

36

Traffick Jam Walkathon April 14, 9 a.m., at Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St.). Participants are to ask 10 people for a dollar per mile walked with a goal of 10 miles and $100. The 10 miles can be split up among a team. A post-walk rally and concert follows at 7 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Hard Places Community (HPC) and their work against child sex trafficking in Phnom Phen, Cambodia. Visit traffickjamasia.com for more details. Donations welcome; call 601-942-0429. Zumbathon for Relay for Life April 14, 4 p.m., at The Club at the Township (201 Northlake Circle, Ridgeland). The Zumba event with a 70s theme includes door prizes and refreshments. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. $10; call 601-209-7566.


DIVERSIONS|music

4HE"EATOF#ROSSROADS

Leave Your Troubles

E\'XVWLQ&DUGRQ

T

KHDQQXDO&URVVURDGV)LOP)HVWLYDOIRFXVHVPDLQO\²DVLW VKRXOG²RQ¿OP%XW0LVVLVVLSSLDQVFDQœWOLYHRQPRYLHVDORQH :HKDYHWRKDYHWXQHVDQG&URVVURDGVQHYHUIDLOVWRGHOLYHURQ WKDWVFRUHLI\RXœOOSDUGRQWKHSXQ  7KLV\HDULQDGGLWLRQWRGR]HQVRI¿OPVIRU\RXUYLHZLQJ SOHDVXUHWKHIHVWLYDOIHDWXUHVSLFNLQœDQGEORZLQœDQGVLQJLQœRQDOO WKUHHGD\VE\0LVVLVVLSSLPXVLFLDQVDQGEDQGV+HUHœVZKDW\RXFDQ ORRNIRUZDUGWR

COURTESY ARDENLAND

by Nicole Sheriff

The Hackensaw Boys have toured throughout the United States and Europe. Ferd Moyse is second from right.

M

ississippi native Ferd Moyse returns home April 18 to perform at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as part of the band the Hackensaw Boys. The singer-songwriter band packs a new-age bluegrass sound, combining fiddles, cellos and other string instruments. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2005 album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love What You Do,â&#x20AC;? included the hit singles â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Good Dogsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alabama Shamrock.â&#x20AC;? Moyse got his start with the group performing with the band in North Carolina. The Hackensaw Boys frequented many of the locations where Moyse bartended, and his old-time fiddle seemed to fit right in with the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strings sound. Joining the Hackensaw Boys meant leaving his bartending days behind, Moyse told the Jackson Free Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I figured out a long time ago if I was going to do this for a living like every other eight-hours-a-day job Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had, I should spend eight hours a day on it writing songs, playing and practicing,â&#x20AC;? he said.

The Hackensaw Boys originated in 1999 in Charlottesville, Va., where four men, Robert St. Ours, Tom Peloso, David Sickmen and Rob Bullington, who performed individually on sidewalks and in shopping malls, had the idea of forming a band. Of the four originators, guitarist Sickmen is the only one still with the band. The rest of the lineup is Moyse (fiddle), Ward Harrison (guitar), Ben Jacobs (bass) and Brian Gorby (drums/charismo). As far as vocals go, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody sings a bit of lead, everybody sings a bit of harmony, and most members know when to shut up,â&#x20AC;? according to the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. The band tours all over the United States and Europe, playing music for anyone who will listen and averaging 150 to 200 shows each year. But for Moyse, playing at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s could not hold more significance. Moyse, 35, learned to play the fiddle when he was a teenager, and his influences were some of the musical acts that performed at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when he waited tables there for about two years before he left Jackson in 1999. He watched The Vernon Brothers perform almost every Wednesday night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where I fell in love with the fiddleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;watching Tim Avalon play,â&#x20AC;? Moyse says. Whether performing for listeners hearing their music for the first time or regular fans, Moyse says the Hackensaw Boys put their heart and soul into performing, and it shows in their high-energy sound. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on stage playing the fiddle, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing just that,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kind of lose myself and leave my troubles at the gate.â&#x20AC;? Ardenland, a company that specializes in entertainment for the Jackson area, presents the Hackensaw Boys April 18 at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888). Eilen Jewell opens starting at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance through Ticketmaster and $12 at the door.

&RIDAY !PRIL

SP²*ASON4URNERVWDUWVWKLQJVRIILQWKHPXVLFFDW HJRU\ZLWKDVKRZIRUSDVVKROGHUVRQO\DWWKH)LOPPDNHU5HFHSWLRQ DWWKH&HGDUV 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG  SP²,IVER-OUSSEFRPSULVHGRIWURXEDGRXU&RG\&R[ RI)XUURZVDQGGUXPPHU&DLWOLQ0F1DOO\SHUIRUPVDWWKH0DOFR *UDQGYLHZ7KHDWUH *UDQGYLHZ%OYG0DGLVRQ  SPWRDP²"UDDYTHE3QUIDSDQGWKH3OUTHERN+OMFORT "RASS"ANDSHUIRUPDW+DO 0DO¶V 6&RPPHUFH6W %XGG\  WKH6TXLGVFDOOVLWVHOI³WKHRQO\VXUIURFNFRYHUEDQGLQ0LVVLVVLSSL SHUIRUPLQJWKHFODVVLFVRI7KH9HQWXUHV'LFN'DOHDQG7KH6KDGRZV WRFXUUHQWQXPEHUVIURP7KH0HUPHQ$TXD9HOYHWV0DQRU$VWUR PDQDQGPRUH´7KH6RXWKHUQ.RPIRUW%UDVV%DQGVD\VLWVPHP EHUVDUH³VFKRROWHDFKHUVDQGUHSDLUPHQE\GD\1HZ2UOHDQVVW\OH EUDVVEDQGE\QLJKW´$GPLVVLRQLVIRUVRFLHW\PHPEHUV

3ATURDAY !PRIL

SP²'ENN(ICKSDQG*AY7ADSWORTHSHUIRUPDWWKH 0DOFR*UDQGYLHZ7KHDWUH *UDQGYLHZ%OYG0DGLVRQ  SP²4",EDFORDSOD\VDWWKH+DXWH3LJIRUDVHFRQG¿OPPDN HUVUHFHSWLRQ 0DLQ6W0DGLVRQ 3DVVKROGHUVRQO\ SP²7KH-USIC6IDEO3HOWCASEDW0DOFR*UDQGYLHZ7KHDWUH *UDQGYLHZ%OYG0DGLVRQ IHDWXUHVPXVLFYLGHRVIURP 0LVVLVVLSSLDQGWKH6RXWKVRXWKHUQPXVLFLDQVDQG¿OPPDNHUV )HDWXUHGEDQGVLQFOXGH*UHJJ&DUDZD\1DWKDQ%DQNVWRQ-DNH :RRG7KH*UD\FHVDQGPDQ\PRUH SPWRDP²*IM7HITE RXWHUVSDFHDOWHUQDWLYHFRXQWU\ DQG 'RAYSON#APPS4HE,OST#AUSE-INSTRELS ³VFUXPSWLRXVJRWKLF JXPER´DFFRUGLQJWR$PHULFDQ6RQJZULWHU SHUIRUPDW+DO 0DOœV 6&RPPHUFH6W $GPLVVLRQLVIRUVRFLHW\PHPEHUV

3UNDAY !PRIL

SP3PIRITSOFTHE(OUSE²DWUDGLWLRQDO&HOWLFEDQG IRUPHGLQ²SOD\VDWWKH0DOFR*UDQGYLHZ7KHDWUH  *UDQGYLHZ%OYG0DGLVRQ   )RUDGGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKHIHVWLYDOVHHRXUFRYHUDJH EHJLQQLQJRQSDJH<RXFDQDOVRFDOOHPDLOLQIR# FURVVURDGVĂ&#x20AC;OPIHVWLYDOFRPRUYLVLWFURVVURDGVĂ&#x20AC;OPIHVWLYDOFRP

The Key of G The Art of the Mash-Up of no way and making it up as you go along,â&#x20AC;? ity, such as the Wu Tang Clanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creation of he writes in the introduction. This central the mythical Shaolin out of Staten Island. idea ties the book together, connecting black Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grey Album,â&#x20AC;? like its history, black literature and all forms of black musical predecessor, is successful because of music. For example, he links the in-the-mo- the postmodern approach of putting togethment creation of improvisation in a Louis er whatever pieces are at oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disposal in a Armstrong solo to creating of way that has never been heard. hip-hop out of nothing but Danger Mouse has said of his two turntables and someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people just asparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; record collection. sume I took some Beatles and, This â&#x20AC;&#x153;storying,â&#x20AC;? he aryou know, threw some Jay-Z gues, is employed as a means on top of it or mixed it up or of helping African Americans looped it around, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really throughout history escape the a deconstruction.â&#x20AC;? realities of life in America. He In a very Jacques Dertraces the line back to the days rida way, both Young and of enslavement: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The black Danger Mouse deconstructed imagination conducts its es- â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grey Albumâ&#x20AC;? is a classic topics and works, and cape by way of underground recent book on hip-hop. in the make-something-outrailroads of meaningâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a pracof-nothing ethos of both projtice we could call the black art of escape.â&#x20AC;? ects, put it all back together to show us that Young compares the vision of the fabled there is plenty to be learned by listening to Canaan expressed by the enslaved in spiritu- things in a different way. It reminds me of als, field hollers and animal tales to hip-hopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Simon is doing at Lemuria. creation of spaces as a form of escaping realComment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

L

emuria employee Simon Hamburg has been on a mission. During the first few months of his employment, he noticed that the music-book section in the store looked â&#x20AC;&#x153;untouched.â&#x20AC;? He knew there were some good books, but they were all too high up on the shelf to reach. He moved them down and re-arranged titles to give the area a fresh look. He then realized that a good number of the books were biographies and noticed an absence of books that dealt with the cultural and critical side of music. Because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my friend, Simon asked if I would put together a list of books on hip-hop that I thought the store should carry. Simon put the list to use and supplemented it with a host of other new titles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want to fill the section up with things I am interested in,â&#x20AC;? he told me. Hamburg, 23, wants a section that has something for all music fans. The first book in this new series is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grey Albumâ&#x20AC;? (Graywolf Press, 2012, $25,

paperback) by poet and professor Kevin Young, who offers up his first tome on cultural criticism. The title is homage to producer Danger Mouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2004 album of the same name. The moniker comes from the fact that Danger Mouse created â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grey Albumâ&#x20AC;? by mashing up (or remixing) The Beatles â&#x20AC;&#x153;The White Albumâ&#x20AC;? with Jay-Zâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Black Album.â&#x20AC;? Clever, huh? The result was a classic album that redefined how people viewed remixes, and sampling in general. Young does similar work with his book, which is a mash-up in its own right of literary and music criticism, stream of consciousness, autobiography and opinion. Further, Young mashes up voices from across historical eras and genres (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised to see the words of Langston Hughes interacting with those of Outkast). Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book is dense with layers that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compete with each other, but cooperate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Throughout this book Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m interested in the ways the fabric of black life has often meant its very fabrication, making a way out

COURTESY GRAYWOLF PRESS

by Garrad Lee

37


livemusic APRIL 11 - WEDNESDAY

Weekly Lunch Specials

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

04/11

LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES

NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM FRIDAY

04/13

Cadillac

9.99

Open for dinner Sat. 4!10pm Thursday

April 12

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday

April 13

Blues Regimen

(featuring members of Good Paper and Daybreakdown)

Saturday

April 14

Funk Gunboat

SATURDAY

04/14

Lord T &

Eloise

Monday

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

April 11 - 17, 2012

38

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

sponsored by

April 17

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

April 16

April 18

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi

%HOKDYHQ3DUN0OWER!0!#3TUDENT #ONCERTQRRQ 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH:&DSLWRO 6W7ILD/UT7EDNESDAY #OMEDY3HOWSP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU+ARAOKE &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP +DO 0DO¶V.EW"OURBON3TREET *AZZ"ANDAND#HRIS#ARPENTER UHVW 6IEWINGOF-ANVS&OOD SDWLR SP 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDSSP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 2OJD¶V*OHNNY"ARRANCO 3HOLFDQ&RYH/PEN-IC.IGHT SP 8QGHUJURXQG"ILL4EMPERANCE )HQLDQ¶V*ASON"AILEY EOXHV

&OXE&DQWRQ2OCK3TOCK

APRIL 12 - THURSDAY )-RQHV&RUQHU*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH EOXHVOXQFK

7KH0HG*ULOO/PEN-IC.IGHTW +ENNY$AVISSP 2OH7DYHUQ,ADIES.IGHT 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP &OXE0DJRR¶V,ADIES.IGHTW$6$* 2EIGN %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU-IKE 4HUMBFROM-IKEAND-ARTY W4HE/UTRAGEOUS(APPY(OUR &ARM!NIMAL(OEDOWNSP IUHH,ADIES.IGHT-EN!RE0IGS .IGHTFEAT3NAZZFRYHUIRU JX\V /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE &KHURNHH,QQ$´LO4RIO )-RQHV&RUQHU!MAZIN´,AZY"OI "AND 2OJD¶V(UNTER'IBSON -DFNVRQ&RQYHQWLRQ&HQWHU-3 %CONOMIC#OUNCIL-EETINGFEAT -AVIS3TAPLESSP 3HOLFDQ&RYH4RIVIA.IGHTSP +DO 0DO¶V4HOMAS*ACKSON /RCHESTRA UHVW *OHNNY./ 55

3DUNHU+RXVH2ENEGADE 6RXOVKLQH7RZQVKLS-IKE-ARTY .DWKU\Q¶V,ARRY"REWER 8QGHUJURXQG$OWNTOWNAT $USKFEAT3OUTHERN+OMFORT "RASS"AND SP "OOKER 7ALKER )HQLDQ¶V,EGACY %XUJHUV %OXHV3HAUN0ATTERSON

APRIL 13 - FRIDAY 0DUWLQ¶V$R&AMEUSFEAT!LLEN !UCOINOF$ISCO"ISCUITS  +DO 0DO¶V#ROSSROADS&ILM &ESTIVAL!FTER PARTY 55 4HE !NATOMYOF&RANK UHVW

0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\-ARTINI &RIDAYSSP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 7KH%RDUGZDON+ARAOKE

0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQ SULQWDQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP 7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTONSP 6RXOVKLQH7RZQVKLS,UCKENBACH &OXE0DJRR¶V!LL$ANCE.IGHTW $6$*2EIGN 7DEOH$AVID0IGOTT )-RQHV&RUQHU*AREKUS3INGLETON 7KH3HQJXLQ!MOS"REWER VD[RSKRQLVW DPSP 2OJD¶V$UELING0IANOSW(UNTER 'IBSON2ONNIE-C'EE $EHED4IM!LLEN 3HOLFDQ&RYH4RIPLE4HREATSP )HQLDQ¶V-IKE-ARTYSPIUHH 'LQJ+RZ5LGJHODQG,ARRY"REWER 5HHG3LHUFH¶V4RADEMARK %XUJHUV %OXHV'REENFISH 8QGHUJURXQG#HRIS'ILL4HE 3OLE3HAKERS %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU$RY #OUNTYFRYHU 6RXOVKLQH2OG)DQQLQ-ARK 7HITTINGTON&INGERS4AYLOR 6XLWH"ACKTO"ASICS+/4. %DITIONFEATURING!HMAD2ASHAD AND3ADDI3UNDIATA 3DUNHU+RXVH&ORREST7YNTERS $UOSP 3RS¶V6DORRQ*USTINE"LAZER 'UHDP]-;13EAGRAM´S'IN #ALENDAR-ODEL3EARCHW$* 0HINGAPRINT 2OG7DYHUQ"LUE2EGIMENFEAT MEMBERSOF$AYBREAKDOWN 'OOD0APER &OXE$IESEL +DWWLHVEXUJ6DHQJHU.ORTH-3 !LLSTARS

APRIL 14 - SATURDAY 6KXFNHU¶V#RAWFISH"OILW $OUBLE3HOTZ -IKE-ARTY 0DUWLQ¶V,ORD4%LOISESP +DO 0DO¶V#ROSSROADS&ILM &ESTIVAL*IM7HITEWITH'RAYSON #APPS4HE,OST#AUSE -INSTRELS 55 "EN,EWIS UHVW  3HDUO&RPPXQLW\5RRP-3/PRY FEAT"ILL%LLISON4EMPERANCE "ABCOCK(ARMONY'RITS SP XQGHUIUHH

0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\3OULFUL 3ATURDAYSSP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP &OXE0DJRR¶V$6$*2EIGN 3RS¶V6DORRQ3NAZZ )-RQHV&RUQHU±4HE2OCK²4HE !MAZIN´,AZY"OI"AND 3HOLFDQ&RYH7ELCH-C#ANN SP4HREE´S!#ROWDSP <DFKW&OXE4HE2AINMAKERS 5HHG3LHUFH¶V4RADEMARK %XUJHUV %OXHV3OLAR0ORCH 8QGHUJURXQG#UCHO *ESUS  4HE&UNKY!MIGOS %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU#HAD 7ESLEY"ANDFRYHU 3RS¶V*ENNY*ENNY )HQLDQ¶V3OUTHERN!RISTOCRATS IXQN

3RS¶V6DORRQ3NAZZ 2OJD¶V'LEN'AINES 2OG7DYHUQ'UNBOAT &ODUNVGDOH06*UKE*OINT&ESTIVAL

APRIL 15 - SUNDAY 3HOLFDQ&RYH7ILL,INDAQRRQ SP$OUBLE3HOTZSP +RW6KRWV%\UDP-IKEAND-ARTY´S *AM3ESSION 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ+NIGHT"RUCE DP EUXQFK

)LW]JHUDOG¶V!NDY(ARDWICKDP

%XUJHUV %OXHV4RIPLE4HREAT 7DEOH2APHAEL3EMMES MD]] EUXQFK DPSP 6RPEUD0H[LFDQ.LWFKHQ*OHN-ORA DPSP 7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTONSP )HQLDQ¶V-ONTHLY#EILIW4HE *ACKSON)RISH$ANCERS 'UHDP]-;1'ENERATION.84)NDIE 3ERIESSP +LQGV&RPPXQWL\&ROOHJH8WLFD &DPSXV'OSPEL&ESTSP

APRIL 16 - MONDAY +DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3"LUES 3OCIETYSP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE 2OH7DYHUQ0UB1UIZ %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE 7KH3HQJXLQ!MOS"REWER VD[RSKRQLVW SP )LW]JHUDOG¶V(UNTER2ICK +LQGV&RPPXQWL\&ROOHJH8WLFD &DPSXV3TUDENT0OETRY,YRICS 3HOWCASESP

APRIL 17 - TUESDAY +DO 0DO¶V0UB1UIZ 2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQ¶V/PEN-IC 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT )LUH/PEN-IC#OMEDY.IGHT 0DUJDULWDV*OHN-ORASP 060XVHXPRI$UW-USICINTHE #ITYSP 3L]]D6KDFN2OG&DQWRQ5G4HE 2UMINANTSWDANIELJOHNSON SP )LW]JHUDOG¶V(UNTER2ICK 3HOLFDQ&RYH#HAD0ERRYSP 8QGHUJURXQG*ESSE2OBINSON EOXHV

+LQGV&RPPXQWL\&ROOHJH8WLFD &DPSXV4IM0RIDGEN FRQFHUW SLDQLVW SP %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH

APRIL 18 - WEDNESDAY 3HOLFDQ&RYH/PEN-IC.IGHT SP +DO 0DO¶V%ILEN*EWELLAND4HE (ACKENSAW"OYS ELJ 3INGERS 3ONGWRITERS.IGHT UHVW

2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH:&DSLWRO 6W7ILD/UT7EDNESDAY #OMEDY3HOWSP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU+ARAOKE &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDSSP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE )LW]JHUDOG¶V(UNTER2ICK 8QGHUJURXQG6IRGIL"RAWLEY 3TEVE#HESTER

)RUDOLVWRIDGGUHVVHVDQG SKRQHQXPEHUVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

Open Mon!Sat, Restaurant open Mon!Fri 11 am!10 pm & Sat 4!10 pm

601!960!2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

  %RIC#HURCH±%DQFRUS6RXWK$UHQD7XSHOR   2ED(OT#HILI0EPPERS 3ANTIGOLD±)HG([)RUXP0HPSKLV   .EW%DITION±812/DNHIURQW$UHQD1HZ2UOHDQV


Appetizer Wine:

WEDNESDAY 4/11 New Bourbon St. Jazz Band with Chris Carpenter (DR) Man v. Food Viewing Party 7pm (Patio)

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

THURSDAY 4/12

Wednesday,April 11th

Thomas Jackson Orchestra (DR) Johnny NO (RR)

2nd Entree

Wine:

Dessert

FRIDAY 4/13 Crossroads (red) The Anatomy of Frank (rest)

PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (rest)

Friday, April 13th

MONDAY 4/16

WED 4.18: Eilen Jewell & The Hackensaw Boys (red) Singer/Songwriter Night w/ Natalie Long (rest)

Nztujd!Nbousb!Nvtjd

Tfbo!Kpiotpo! boe! Xjme!Mpuvt!Cboe Nbz!5ui!}!8;41!qn

THU 4.19: Knight Bruce (Hinds CC Rock Concert (red) Elemovements (rest) SAT 4.21: Beth McKee

Monday - Friday Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

Bewbodf!ujdlfut!%26!}!%31!bu!uif!epps Bewbodf!ujdlfut!dbo!cf!qvsdibtfe!bu! xxx/cvuufsà!zzphb/ofu

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

Downtown at Dusk

TUESDAY 4/17

Crossroads (red) Ben Lewis (rest)

Coming Soon

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Thursday, April 12th

Outside 5 - 8 Food from Parlor Market, Lumpkin’s BBQ and the Big Apple Inn Music by Southern Komfort Brass Band Inside 8 - 11 Booker Walker

SATURDAY 4/14

Blues Monday (rest) Let us fill in the blank with Sommeliers on staff and our extensive wine selection.

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 8-11, No Cover

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

CHRIS GILL & THE SOLE SHAKERS

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, April 14th

CUCHO, JESUS & THE FUNKY AMIGOS

(Latin Funk/ Jazz) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday, April 17th

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 6-11, $5 Cover Thursday, April 19th

ANDY HARDWICK TRIO (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, April 20th

JV FUNK

(Funk/Jazz) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, April 21st Ardenland Presents

Marcia Ball Tickets available on Ticketmaster.com

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Entree

Wine:

Wine:

THIS WEEK

39


Bryan’s Rant

Tests and a Failure

T

wo things are on my mind worth writing about this week. Early last week, news leaked that Morris Claiborne scored a four of 50 on the Wonderlic test. As soon as the score leaked, Twitter blew up with comments about how Claiborne must be dumb. For those who do not know, the Wonderlic is 50 questions with a 12-minute time limit. The Wonderlic is not really used to measure intelligence. What the test does, is show how quickly an individual can process information. Claiborne plays cornerback, so the score is not that important. The Wonderlic is mainly important when discussing quarterbacks, linebackers or centers. Those positions have to process a lot of information in a small amount of time. Cornerback is a reaction position. There is very little presnap information to process. As any teacher can tell you, everyone learns at different rates. Even if Claiborne scored poorly, it does not mean he is not intelligent. If anything, teams might worry about Claiborne’s prep. Every agent gives his clients the Wonderlic test before the draft. The main worry is that Claiborne didn’t care enough to come to NFL combine prepared for the test. Also last week, Rick Cleveland was named the new executive director of the

Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame. Congratulations to Cleveland. I can’t think of anyone who would do the job better. Cleveland’s buyout by The ClarionLedger’s owner Gannett is stunning. I grew up looking forward to Cleveland’s columns each day in the paper. His writing style was easy to read, and Cleveland has the ability with his writing to make you feel like your right there with him in each article. Even though I work for the Jackson Free Press, I still seek out Cleveland’s columns. He is an award-winning writer, and I personally would put him up against any national writer today. Cleveland is what I hope to become one day as a writer. It is a sad day in media when a major corporation does not recognize the special talent it has at its disposal. Someone of Cleveland’s talent should be given the right to walk away on their own terms and not be forced out in a cost-cutting measure. I didn’t always agree with everything Cleveland wrote (read my last article), but I have the deepest respect for him. I remember the first time I met him, and it was (for me) like getting to hang out with Michael Jordan. Cleveland’s writing will always have a special place in my heart. Too bad his writing didn’t move the bean counters at Gannett.

by Bryan Flynn

It somehow seemed fitting that a guy named Xxxx Bubba won a golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. Do those green jackets come sleeveless? THURSDAY, APRIL 12 Ole Miss travels to Georgia in an SEC baseball clash in a series the Rebels really need to sweep. (7:3010:30 p.m., ESPN U)

April 11 - 17, 2012

FRIDAY, APRIL 13 Last time there was an NHL playoff game in Vancouver, it ended in riots. Hopefully game two of the Canucks and Los Angeles Kings series features no rioting. (9 p.m.midnight, NBCSN)

40

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 Catch NASCAR racing on a Saturday night in the Samsung Mobile 500 from Texas Motor Speedway with Matt Kenseth as the defending winner. (6:30-10 p.m., Fox) SUNDAY, APRIL 15 Watch a good NBA double header starting with Miami at New York in game one and Dallas taking on the Lakers in Los Angeles to finish up. (noon-5 p.m., ABC)

MONDAY, APRIL 16 Take some aggression out on Tax Day by watching the best Eastern Conference hockey team, the New York Rangers, face the Ottawa Senators in game three of their seven-game series. (6:30-9:30, CNBC) TUESDAY, APRIL 17 Mississippi State and Ole Miss meet at Trustmark Park in Pearl for one baseball game and on TV if you can’t get tickets. (7:30-10:30 p.m., CSS) WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 The Atlanta Braves wrap up a three-game series against the New York Mets at home in Turner Field. (noon3 p.m., SPSO) The NFL draft is fast approaching. Tweet @jfpsports and tell us who your favorite team should pick to take it to the next level. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


M

editerranean

Grab ya beads and come on out!

'JTI(SJMM

QSFTFOUT

%DDIE#OTTON

)FBMUIZWFHFUBSJBOEJTIFT WBSJFUJFTPG GJTI TISJNQBOETDBMMPQT

/FFERING#ATFISH

0ANTROUT'YROS &ISH3PECIALSIDES -ONDAY &RIDAYUNTIL 0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4 NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ&#x2026;

Wednesday - April 11 Karaoke - No Cover Thursday - April 12 Mike Thumb from Mike and Marty with the outrageous happy hour also featuring Perkins & Trent Free from 5 - 7pm | 2-for-1drinks Free admission Ladies Night Ladies - No Cover | Men - $5 Cover Live Dance Music from Snazz

Friday - April 13

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘April 9 -13

Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Mon | Beef Steak or Roasted Chicken Tue | Philly Cheese Steak or PanĂŠed Tilapia & Shrimp Wed | Almond Encrusted Chicken or Molasses Baked Ham Thu | Chicken & Bowtie Pasta or Corned Beef & Cabbage Fri | Fried Swai or Pork Shoulder Steak

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music april 11 - april 17

Saturday - April 14

fri | april 13 Greenfish 6:30-10:30p

Rock | $5 cover | 9pm Monday - April 16 Coors Light Cordless Corner FINALS Last week for original musicians to compete for recording deal $1 cover for charity | 7pm - until Tuesday - April 17 Jason Turner at Happy Hour | Doug Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Invitational Jam Night | Tons of local musicians in the house | Join for the best kept secret in town! $5 cover | 1st drink free | 8pm - until Bourbon St. in the Quarter (Formerly Poets) 1855 Lakeland Drive Jackson, MS 601.987.0808

Dylan Moss

Friday, April 13th

Crossin Dixon Saturday, April 14th

wed | april 11 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | april 12 Shaun Patterson 5:30-9:30p

Chad Wesley

Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

$8.99

Dry County

Country | $5 cover | 9pm

$10 Daily Lunch Specials

New Blue Plate Special

sat | april 14 Solar Porch 6:30-10:30p sun | april 15 Triple Threat 3:00 - 7:00p

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Reign -Karaoke in The Jazz Bar (Thu - Sat)

tue | april 17 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

- Happy Hour in The Jazz Bar Tuesday - Friday 4-7pm 2 -4 -1 Wells, Calls, & Domestics, PLUS $5 appetizers To book a private party please call

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

mon | april 16 Karaoke

601-487-8710

LUNCH SPECIALS EVERY DAY

$7.95

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX!

Wednesday - April 11 KARAOKE

Thursday - April 12 Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free

Friday - April 13

- BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

WED. APRIL 11 LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

THUR. APRIL 12

BUD LIGHT NIGHT

$2 PINTS & LONGNECKS

FRI. APRIL 13 & SAT. APRIL 14

$5 SHOTS AFTER 9PM

MON. APRIL 16 IN-DA-BIZ NITE 2-FOR-1 SPECIAL

TUES. APRIL 17

JACKPOT TRIVIA

Justine Blazer Saturday - April 14

snazz Sunday - April 15 9 Ball Tournament 601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

LETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WATCH SOME BASEBALL 20 FLAT SCREEN TVS Scan this code or text EATWITHUS to 601-707-9733 for the deal of the week

jacksonfreepress.com

'SJEBZ4BUVSEBZÂ&#x2026;QN 4VOEBZÂ&#x2026;QN

41


,)"2!3EPT /CT

!2)%3-ARCH !PRIL

6RPHSHRSOHPLVXQGHUVWDQGWKHGRLWQRZIHUYRURIWKH$ULHVWULEHWKLQNLQJLWPXVW LQHYLWDEO\OHDGWRFDUHOHVVQHVV3OHDVHSURYHWKHPZURQJLQWKHFRPLQJZHHNV /DXQFKLQWRWKHLQWHUHVWLQJQHZSRVVLELOLWLHVZLWKDOO\RXUH[XEHUDQFHXQIXUOHG 5HIXVHWRDOORZWKHQDWXUDOHQHUJ\WRJHWKHPPHGLQE\WKHRULHVDQGFRQFHSWV%XW DOVREHVXUHQRWWRPLVWDNHUDVKLPSDWLHQFHIRULQWXLWLYHJXLGDQFH&RQVLGHUWKH OLNHOLKRRGWKDW\RXURULJLQDOYLVLRQRIWKHIXWXUHPLJKWQHHGWREHWLQNHUHGZLWKDELW DV\RXWUDQVODWHLWLQWRWKHFRQFUHWHGHWDLOV

4!5253!PRIL -AY

7KHUHLVDSRVVLELOLW\WKDWDSRWRIJROGVLWVDWWKHHQG RIWKHUDLQERZ7KHOLNHOLKRRGLVVPDOOWUXHEXWLW¶VQRW ]HUR2QWKHRWKHUKDQGWKHUDLQERZLVGH¿QLWHO\KHUH DQGDYDLODEOHIRU\RXWRHQMR\2IFRXUVH\RXZRXOG KDYHWRGRVRPHPRUHZRUNRQ\RXUVHOIWRJDWKHULQWKH IXOOQHVVRIWKDWHQMR\PHQW+HUH¶VWKHSRWHQWLDOSURE OHP<RXPD\EHXQGHUWKHLPSUHVVLRQWKDWWKHUDLQERZ LVOHVVYDOXDEOHWKDQWKHSRWRIJROG6ROHWPHDVN\RX :KDWLIWKHUDLQERZ¶VWKHUHDOSUL]H"

'%-).)-AY *UNE

³,W¶VHWHUQLW\LQDSHUVRQWKDWWXUQVWKHFUDQNKDQGOH´ )UDQ].DINDVDLG$WOHDVWWKDWVKRXOGEHWKHFDVH, ZRXOGDGG7KHXQIRUWXQDWHIDFWRIWKHPDWWHULVWKDW DORWRISHRSOHOHWRWKHUOHVVHUWKLQJVWXUQWKHFUDQN KDQGOH²OLNHWKHFRPSXOVLYH\HDUQLQJIRUPRQH\SRZHU DQGORYHIRUH[DPSOH,FKDOOHQJH\RXWRFKHFNLQZLWK \RXUVHOIVRPHWLPHVRRQDQGGHWHUPLQHZKDWH[DFWO\ KDVEHHQWXUQLQJ\RXUFUDQNKDQGOH,ILWDLQ¶WHWHUQLW\ RUZKDWHYHUVHUYHVDVHWHUQLW\LQ\RXUZRUOGYLHZJHW \RXUVHOIDGMXVWHG,QWKHFRPLQJPRQWKVLW¶VFUXFLDOWKDW \RX¶UHUXQQLQJRQWKHFOHDQHVWSXUHVWIXHO

#!.#%2*UNE *ULY

)RUDZKLWHJX\IURPWKFHQWXU\(QJODQG'DYLG/LYLQJ VWRQHZDVXQXVXDOO\HJDOLWDULDQ$VKHWUDYHOHGLQ$IULFD KHUHIHUUHGWRZKDWZHUHWKHQFDOOHG³ZLWFKGRFWRUV´ DV³P\SURIHVVLRQDOFROOHDJXHV´,QWKHFRPLQJZHHNV &DQFHULDQ,HQFRXUDJH\RXWREHLQVSLUHGE\/LYLQJVWRQH DV\RXH[SDQG\RXUQRWLRQRIZKR\RXUDOOLHVDUH)RU

H[DPSOHFRQVLGHUSHRSOHWREH\RXUFROOHDJXHVLIWKH\ VLPSO\WU\WRLQÃ&#x20AC;XHQFHWKHZRUOGLQWKHVDPHZD\V\RXGR HYHQLIWKH\ZRUNLQGLIIHUHQWMREVRUVSKHUHV:KDWPLJKW EH\RXUYHUVLRQRI/LYLQJVWRQH¶VZLWFKGRFWRUV"*RRXWVLGH RI\RXUXVXDOQHWZRUNDV\RXVFRXWDURXQGIRUFRQIHGHU DWHVZKRPLJKWFRQQHFW\RXWRH[RWLFQHZSHUVSHFWLYHV DQGUHVRXUFHV\RXQHYHULPDJLQHG\RXFRXOGXVH

,%/*ULY !UG

7KHÃ&#x20AC;DJRI&DOLIRUQLDIHDWXUHVWKHLPDJHRIDJUL]]O\ EHDUDQGWKHKXJHFDUQLYRUHLVWKHVWDWH¶VRI¿FLDO DQLPDO$QG\HWJUL]]O\EHDUVKDYHEHHQH[WLQFWLQ &DOLIRUQLDVLQFHZKHQWKHODVWRQHZDVVKRWDQG NLOOHG,VWKHUHDQ\GLVFUHSDQF\OLNHWKDWLQ\RXURZQOLIH /HR"'R\RXFRQWLQXHWRDFWDVLIDSDUWLFXODUV\PERORU LFRQLVLPSRUWDQWWR\RXHYHQWKRXJKLWKDVQRSUDFWLFDO SUHVHQFHLQ\RXUOLIH",IVRWKLVZRXOGEHDJRRGWLPHWR XSGDWH\RXUDWWLWXGH

6)2'/!UG 3EPT

7KHFDUWRRQFKDUDFWHU)HOL[WKH&DWPDGHKLVGHEXW LQ+HZDVDPRYLHVWDULQWKHHUDRIVLOHQW¿OPV DQGHYHQWXDOO\DSSHDUHGLQKLVRZQFRPLFVWULSDQG79 VKRZ%XWLWZDVQ¶WXQWLOZKHQKHZDV\HDUV ROGWKDWKH¿UVWJRWKLV0DJLF%DJRI7ULFNVZKLFK DOORZHGKLPWRGRPDQ\WKLQJVKHZDVQ¶WDEOHWRGR EHIRUH,EULQJWKLVXS9LUJREHFDXVH,EHOLHYH\RX¶UH FORVHWRDFTXLULQJDPDJLFEDJRIWULFNVWKDWZDVQ¶WRQ \RXUUDGDUXQWLO\RXKDGPDWXUHGWRWKHSRLQWZKHUH\RX DUHQRZ7RHQVXUHWKDW\RXJHWWKDWEDJWKRXJK\RX ZLOOKDYHWRULSHQHYHQDELWPRUH

,KDYHRQHFKLOGDGDXJKWHUDQGUDLVLQJKHUFRQVFLHQ WLRXVO\KDVEHHQRQHRIWKHJUHDWSULYLOHJHVDQGMR\V RIP\OLIH%RQXV6KHKDVWXUQHGRXWWREHDVWHOODU KXPDQEHLQJ(YHU\QRZDQGWKHQWKRXJK,JHWDELW HQYLRXVRISDUHQWVZKR¶YHFUHDWHGELJJHUIDPLOLHV,I EULQJLQJXSRQHNLGLVVRUHZDUGLQJPD\EHPRUHZRXOG EHHYHQEHWWHU,DVNHGDQDFTXDLQWDQFHRIPLQHDPDQ ZLWKVL[NLGVKRZKHKDGPDQDJHGWRSXOORIIWKDWGLI ¿FXOWIHDW+HWROGPHTXLWHFDQGLGO\³0\VHFUHWLVWKDW ,¶PQRWDJRRGIDWKHU,¶PYHU\QHJOHFWIXO´,RIIHUXSWKLV VWRU\DVDZD\WRHQFRXUDJH\RXDWWKLVMXQFWXUHLQ\RXU GHYHORSPHQWWRIDYRUTXDOLW\RYHUTXDQWLW\

3#/20)//CT .OV

,H[SHFWWKHUH¶OOEHVRPHFXULRXVJRLQJVRQWKLVZHHN $VHHPLQJO\XQLQVSLUHGLGHDFRXOGVDYH\RXIURPD GXPEGHFLVLRQIRUH[DPSOH$QREYLRXVVHFUHWPD\EH WKHNH\WRGHIHDWLQJDFRYHUWHQHP\$QGDPHVV\LQFRQ YHQLHQFHPLJKWVKRZXSMXVWLQWLPHWRKHOS\RXGRWKH VOLJKWO\XQFRROEXWHPLQHQWO\ULJKWWKLQJ&DQ\RXGHDO ZLWKWKLVPXFKLURQ\6FRUSLR"&DQ\RXKDQGOHVXFKELJ GRVHVRIWKHROGÃ&#x20AC;LSSHW\Ã&#x20AC;RSDQGRRSVLHORRSVLH")RU H[WUDFUHGLWKHUHDUHWZRDGGLWLRQDORGGEOHVVLQJV\RX FRXOGFDSLWDOL]HRQDKXPEOHWHDFKLQJIURPDQXQOLNHO\ H[SHUWDQGDVXUJHRIPRWLYDWLRQIURPDQHPEDUUDVVLQJ H[FLWHPHQW

3!')44!2)53.OV $EC

6RPHRIRXUSDJDQIRUEHDUVLPDJLQHGWKH\KDGDGXW\ WRDVVLVWZLWKQDWXUH¶VUHYLYDOHYHU\VSULQJE\SHUIRUP LQJIHUWLOLW\ULWXDOV$QGZRXOGQ¶WLWEHIXQLILWZHUHHYHQ VOLJKWO\WUXHWKDW\RXFRXOGKHOSWKHFURSVJHUPLQDWH DQGEORRPE\PDNLQJVZHHWORYHLQWKH¿HOGV"$W WKHYHU\OHDVWFDUU\LQJRXWVXFKDFHUHPRQ\PLJKW VWLPXODWH\RXURZQSHUVRQDOFUHDWLYLW\,QDFFRUGDQFH ZLWKWKHDVWURORJLFDORPHQV,LQYLWH\RXWRVOLSDZD\ WRDVHFOXGHGRXWGRRUVSRWHLWKHUE\\RXUVHOIRUZLWKD URPDQWLFFRPSDQLRQ2QDSLHFHRISDSHUZULWHGRZQD SURMHFW\RX¶GOLNHWRPDNHWKULYHLQWKHFRPLQJPRQWKV %XU\WKHQRWHLQWKHJRRGHDUWKDQGWKHQHQMR\DQDFWRI ORYHULJKWRQWRSRILW

#!02)#/2.$EC *AN

2QFHXSRQDWLPH,IHOOLQORYHZLWKDEULOOLDQWEXVLQHVV ZRPDQQDPHG/RUHHQ,SXUVXHGKHUZLWKDOOP\ZLOHV KRSLQJWRZLQKHUDPRURXVDIIHFWLRQ$IWHUSOD\LQJKDUG WRJHWIRUWZRPRQWKVVKHVKRFNHGPHZLWKDEUD]HQ LQYLWDWLRQ:RXOG,OLNHWRDFFRPSDQ\KHURQDZKLUOZLQG YDFDWLRQWR3DULV"³,WKLQN,FDQVZLQJLW´,WROGKHU %XWWKHUHZDVDSUREOHP,ZDVÃ&#x20AC;DWEURNH:KDWWRGR" ,GHFLGHGWRUDLVHWKHIXQGVE\VHOOLQJRIIDSUHFLRXV KHLUORRPIURPFKLOGKRRGP\FROOHFWLRQRIYLQWDJH EDVHEDOOFDUGV0D\EHWKLVVWRU\ZLOOLQVSLUH\RXWR GRVRPHWKLQJFRPSDUDEOH&DSULFRUQ6DFUL¿FHDQ RXWPRGHGDWWDFKPHQWRUMXYHQLOHWUHDVXUHRU\RXWKIXO IDQWDV\VRDVWRHPSRZHUWKHIXWXUHRIORYH

!15!2)53*AN &EB

:HDOONQRZWKDWVSLGHUVDUHWDOHQWHGOLWWOHFUHDWXUHV 6SLGHUV¶VLONLVDVVWURQJDVVWHHODQGWKHLUSUHFLVHO\ JHRPHWULFZHEVDUHHQJLQHHULQJPDUYHOV%XWHYHQWKRXJK WKH\KDYHDGPLUDEOHTXDOLWLHV,DGPLUH,GRQ¶WH[SHFWWR KDYHDQLQWLPDWHFRQQHFWLRQZLWKDVSLGHUDQ\WLPHVRRQ $VLPLODUVLWXDWLRQLVDWZRUNLQWKHKXPDQUHDOP,NQRZ FHUWDLQSHRSOHZKRDUHDPD]LQJFUHDWRUVDQGOHDGHUVEXW GRQ¶WKDYHWKHSHUVRQDOLQWHJULW\RUUHODWLRQVKLSVNLOOVWKDW ZRXOGPDNHWKHPWUXVWZRUWK\HQRXJKWRVHHNRXWDVFORVH DOOLHV7KHLUEHDXW\LVEHVWDSSUHFLDWHGIURPDIDU&RQVLGHU WKHSRVVLELOLW\WKDWWKHLGHDV,¶PDUWLFXODWLQJKHUHZRXOGEH JRRGIRU\RXWRPHGLWDWHRQULJKWQRZ$TXDULXV

0)3#%3&EB -ARCH

+DYH\RXHYHUKDGWKHZLQGNQRFNHGRXWRI\RX",WIHHOV ZHLUGIRUDVKRUWWLPHEXWOHDYHVQRODVWLQJGDPDJH ,¶PH[SHFWLQJWKDW\RXZLOOH[SHULHQFHDIRUPRIWKDW SKHQRPHQRQVRPHWLPHVRRQ0HWDSKRULFDOO\VSHDNLQJ WKHZLQGZLOOJHWNQRFNHGRXWRI\RX%XWZDLW²EHIRUH \RXMXPSWRFRQFOXVLRQVDQGFXUVHPHRXWIRUSUHGLFWLQJ WKLVOLVWHQWRWKHUHVWRIP\PHVVDJH7KHZLQGWKDWZLOO JHWNQRFNHGRXWRI\RXZLOOEHDZLQGWKDWQHHGHGWR EHNQRFNHGRXW²DZLQGWKDWZDVFDXVLQJFRQIXVLRQLQ \RXUJXWOHYHOLQWXLWLRQ,QRWKHUZRUGV\RX¶OOEHOXFN\ WRJHWWKDWZLQGNQRFNHGRXWRI\RX<RX¶OOIHHOPXFK EHWWHUDIWHUZDUGVDQG\RXZLOOVHHWKLQJVPRUHFOHDUO\

+RPHZRUN:K\LVWKLVDSHUIHFWPRPHQW"7HOOPHDW7UXWKURRVWHU#JPDLOFRP7RKHDUP\UHDVRQVZK\WXQHLQWRP\ SRGFDVWKWWSELWO\3HUIHFWLRQ1RZ

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

%<0$77-21(6 BBB/LQJXV ,ULVKDLUOLQH

<HDUWR<YHWWH VPRGHO&KHU\O :X7DQJ&ODQPHPEHU 6XI¿[DIWHU%URRNO\Q /DWDQG/LWKRQFH 'URSVLQD¿HOG

&]HFKSOD\ZKHUHWKHZRUG³URERW´ FDPHIURP ,WOHIW%URDGZD\RQ6HSW +DVGLQQHU 'LDPRQGEDFNVWDWV +RVW.HQRI079¶V³5HPRWH &RQWURO´ 5XVVLDQ¿JKWHUMHWV

/LNHVRPHVXJDU Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU# MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOO FHQWVSHUPLQXWH 0XVWEH2UWRELOOWR\RXU FUHGLWFDUGFDOO 5HIHUHQFHSX]]OH

$OWN

±'OING.EGATIVE²WRWDOO\LQGHQLDO

April 11 - 17, 2012

!CROSS

42

6WDWLRQVLQVRPHODEV ³0DPD¶V*XQ´VLQJHU(U\NDK 866XUJHRQ*HQHUDOXQGHU5HDJDQ ³3OD\VRPHWKLQJEHWWHU´ 3UL]HGFDUGVWRFROOHFWRUV 3ROLWHUHIXVDO 7LSFROOHFWRU 6SRLOHULQDIDPLOLDUVD\LQJ ³2KZK\¶G\RXKDYHWRJRDQG HDW"$QGGLG\RXKHOSRXWRI IHDU",¶PVKRFNHG´ 6ZDPSEHDVW 1DWLRQDOFKDLQRI³EDNHU\FDIHV´ &DSULFH %LJFKHHVHLQ+ROODQG %RGLO\VDF

³,FDQVHH\RXRQDFROGGD\DQG \RX¶UHOLNHDFORXG,¶PLPSUHVVHG´ 7ZLVWHGOLNHDVPLOH )DOOVRQPDQ\KRQH\PRRQWULSV 5XPBBB7XJJHU GRZQ FKDUDFWHU

³+PPP,¶PVWXPSHGDVWRKRZ \RXODQGHGDUROHRQµ7KH$GGDPV )DPLO\¶´ :LWKRXWOHDYHV 7KRVHODGLHVLQ7LMXDQD 5DGLRFKRLFHV *0VHUYLFH &KD]¶VPRWKHU ³2K\HDKOLNH,¶GHYHUVHHDJX\ ZLWKDUXIÃ&#x20AC;HGVKLUWDQGKHDYLQJFKHVW LQUHDOOLIH´ $GOLQHVSRNHQZKLOHJUDEELQJD ER[RIFHUHDOEDFN

6LPSOHVDPPLFK 2QHRIDSDLURIQHZVFDVWHUV *URXSRIVLVWHUV BBBPL 9LHWQDPHVHVDQGZLFK

9LFLQLW\ 5HGLQN 0LOEUDQFKDW/DFNODQG ,W¶OOÃ&#x20AC;RRU\D +DZNUHODWLYH &DQDGLDQ1+/WHDP 7HVWLQ+6 &DPSXVUHFUXLWLQJRUJ 6HUSHQWGHLW\JURXSLQ+LQGXLVP LQ581$*$,167

4XLFNVZLP *UDYHPDUNHU 'LURSSRVLWH(6( 'RVRPHYLGHRSURGXFWLRQ (DUO\LQIRVRUWLQJSURJUDP 0\WKLFDOJLDQWZLWKH\HV %HQ6WLOOHU¶VPRP$QQHBBB ³:RXOG<RX/LNHWR%X\BBB"´ ³6HVDPH6WUHHW´VRQJ

*UHHNZDUJRG %RG\DUWIRUVKRUW ,W¶VVZLSHGWRFKHFNLQ &RPPDQGLQVRPHJDPHVRIWDJ ³1RUWKE\1RUWKZHVW´¿OPVWXGLR 6WLQJLQJKHUEV 0D\RURI/RV$QJHOHV 0HWLFXORXVO\WULPPHGWUHH 1DPH 7KH\¶UHJLYHQLQWKH³:KHHORI )RUWXQH´ERQXVURXQG ³(OOHQ´DFWRUBBB*URVV

10 5 14 8 22

19

14

3

5

14 14

2

14

26

26

18 18

10

2

15

14

14 26

14

9 26

26 5

10

5

8

24 23

11

±+AIDOKU²

5

26

12

14

7

14

5

1

13

4

9

5

26

21

5

21

3

7

5 7

26

12

14

10

11 8

14

2

14

10

3

5

3

26

14

8

6

5

7

11

9

9 24

24

3

%<0$77-21(6

14 1

1 3

16

20 3

22

7 22

25 7

22

14

14

16

9

4

19 14

3

1

9

11

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

10 5

5

14 1

22

26 21

17

14 14

(DFKRIWKHOHWWHUVRIWKHDOSKDEHWLVUHSUHVHQWHGLQWKLVJULGE\DQXPEHUEHWZHHQDQG8VLQJOHWWHU IUHTXHQF\ZRUGSDWWHUQUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKHQXPEHUVDV\RXUJXLGHV¿OOLQWKHJULGZLWKZHOONQRZQ(QJOLVK ZRUGV +,17VLQFHD4LVDOZD\VIROORZHGE\D8WU\KXQWLQJGRZQWKH4¿UVW 2QO\ORZHUFDVHXQK\SKHQ DWHGZRUGVDUHDOORZHGLQNDLGRNXVR\RXZRQtWVHHDQ\WKLQJOLNH672&.+2/0RU/21*/267LQKHUH EXW \RXPLJKWVHH$)*+$1VLQFHLWKDVDQXQFDSLWDOL]HGPHDQLQJWRR 1RZVWRSZDVWLQJP\SUHFLRXVWLPHDQG 62/9(SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP


ST0LACE

7INGSIN*ACKSON

www.thepizzashackjackson.com

Best Pizza 2009-2012

Our Customers Are the Best!

 ?1A<X[[Ta7XVW[XUTQ^cc[Tb



 

(HG=:R/N>L=:R   ;HG>E>LLPBG@GB@AM

Thanks For Voting Us:

-Best of Jackson 2012-

NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

(in the former FabraCare Building, between Katâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

(1TTab>]CP_ PcbT[TRc[^RPcX^]b K =>KRHN +K> *KE:MM>KL?HK +:KMR+ > MA>@:F

+AHG>A>:= % %$$#

% (!#!#!"

"('7XVWfPh$ =  7P\_bcTPS1[eS AXSVT[P]S 2[X]c^]

% (%(%% % (%(%# #"4[[Xb0eT ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^] 9PRZb^]

:M>KBG@O:BE:;E>

7^dab

P\ !_\&3PhbPFTTZ

jacksonfreepress.com

The Best Pizza in Jackson

43


BWP_TD_5^aBd\\Ta =^4]a^[[\T]c5TT5aTTCP]]X]V BTT2[dQbU^a3TcPX[b

NATURAL GROCERY

FOOD!

Glorious Food!

901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 | Flowood, MS in front of Walmart flowood@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-992-3488

2155 Highway 18, Suite E | Brandon, MS across from Home Depot brandon@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-706-4605

4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 | Jackson, MS in front of Kroger jacksonms@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-321-9465

Food should be good for you. Â&#x201C;=^_TbcXRXSTb Â&#x201C;=^WTaQPRXSTb Â&#x201C;=^=XcaPcTb Â&#x201C;=^6<>B

M

OURS ALWAYS IS!

IN

IR

IT E X P O

Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

April 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;22

EARTH DAY WEEKEND 10:00 A.M to 6:00 P. M.

Tickets only $25

Cabot Lodge Jackson, MS

P DFUL S

25 + Exhibitors

Speakers Free vision board room

April 11 - 17, 2012

Cloth goodie bags for the first 10 0 guests

44

Body + Mind + Spirit www.intuitiveencounters.com


by Adriane Louie read more Body&Soul stories and the blog at jacksonfreepress.com

Fuel Your Day

â&#x20AC;¢ Choose chicken or fish instead of beef. â&#x20AC;¢ Choose grilled options over fried. â&#x20AC;¢ Choose a side salad or baked potato instead of french fries. â&#x20AC;¢ Use low-fat or vinaigrette dressings. â&#x20AC;¢ Drink water, iced tea or juice instead of sugary soft drinks. â&#x20AC;¢ Avoid condiments such as mayonnaise and sandwich dressings; substitute mustard instead. â&#x20AC;¢ Remember that portion size is important. If the serving is big enough for two people, split it with a friend or save the other half for later.

E\7DP&XUOH\

A

IHZ \HDUV EDFN , VWRSSHG HDWLQJ JURXQGEHHI,GLGQRWOLNHVHHLQJWKH ZKLWHIDWDQGJULVWOHDQGWKHVPHOORI WKHPHDWZKLOHFRRNLQJFRPSOHWHO\JURVVHG PHRXW  <HDUVODWHU,IRXQGRXWWKDWEHHI²KLJK LQ VDWXUDWHG IDW²LV QRW SDUWLFXODUO\ JRRG IRU \RX ,W DOVR WDNHV ORQJHU WKDQ RWKHU PHDWVWRGLJHVWDQG,DOUHDG\KDYHGLJHV WLYHSUREOHPV,WZDVHQRXJKIRUPHWRVWRS HDWLQJEHHIDOWRJHWKHU  0RUH UHFHQWO\ WKH PHGLD KDYH GLVFRY HUHG³SLQNVOLPH´DND³OHDQ¿QHO\WH[WXUHG EHHI´/)7%LV³ODUJHO\WULPPLQJVW\SLFDOO\ XVHGIRUSHWIRRGDQGFRRNLQJRLO´5HXWHUV UHSRUWHG³7KHWULPPLQJVZHUHWUHDWHGZLWK DPPRQLDWRNLOOGDQJHURXVEDFWHULD´VXFK DVVDOPRQHOODDQG(FROL³DQGPL[HGLQWR JURXQGEHHI´([SHUWVVD\WKDWXSWRSHU FHQWRIKDPEXUJHUPHDWLQJURFHU\VWRUHV DW IDVWIRRG UHVWDXUDQWV DQG LQ VFKRRO OXQFKHVFRQWDLQSLQNVOLPH8JK  ,ORYHWXUNH\DQG,XVHLWWRUHSODFHEHHI LQPDQ\UHFLSHV0RVWSHRSOHGRQRWUHDO L]HWKH\DUHHDWLQJJURXQGWXUNH\LQVWHDGRI JURXQGEHHIZKHQ,FRRN  , FUHDWHG WKLV DZHVRPH WXUNH\ EXUJHU UHFLSHZKHQ,ZDVVWLOOOLYLQJLQ&DOLIRUQLD

&ORTHEBURGERS WHDVSRRQVROLYHRLO SRXQGVJURXQGWXUNH\ FXSUHGRQLRQVFKRSSHGRUGLFHG FXSEHOOSHSSHUVFKRSSHGRUGLFHG WRWDEOHVSRRQVRI0RRUH·V+LFNRU\0DULQDGH RULJLQDO

$IHZGDVKHVRIVHDVRQLQJVVXFKDVJDUOLFRQLRQSRZGHU JRXUPHWVHDVRQLQJVDOWDQGSHSSHU KDPEXUJHUEXQV &ORTOPPINGS FXSVDXWpHGUHGRQLRQV VOLFHV6ZLVVFKHHVH MDODSHQRVVOLFHG LI\RXOLNHVSLF\

WHDVSRRQVRI\RXUSUHIHUUHGVSUHDGKRQH\'LMRQRUVSLF\ PXVWDUGNHWFKXSEDUEHFXHVDXFHRUPD\R EDUEHFXH VDXFHDGGVWRWKHJRXUPHWWDVWH   ,QDODUJHVNLOOHWKHDWWKHRLORQPHGLXP$GGDFXSRI UHGRQLRQV IRUWRSSLQJ DQGVDXWpIRUWKUHHWR¿YHPLQXWHV 5HPRYHRQLRQVIURPVNLOOHWDQGSODFHWRWKHVLGH  2QDSODWHVHDVRQJURXQGWXUNH\DQGDGGPDULQDGH FKRSSHGRQLRQVDQGEHOOSHSSHUV*UDEDKDQGIXORIWXUNH\ PHDWDQGPROGLQWRVL[PHGLXPSDWWLHV  3ODFHDVPDQ\SDWWLHVDV\RXFDQ¿WZLWKRXWRYHUODSSLQJ LQWRWKHVNLOOHWRQPHGLXPKHDW%URZQHDFKVLGHRIWKH SDWWLHVXQWLOPHGLXPWRZHOOGRQHDERXWWRPLQXWHVSHU VLGH5HPRYHSDWWLHVIURPWKHVNLOOHWDQGSODFHWRWKHVLGHLQ DFOHDQXQFRYHUHGGLVK  6SUHDGKRQH\'LMRQRUVSLF\PXVWDUGNHWFKXSEDUEHFXH VDXFHRUPD\RRQERWKVLGHVRIWKHKDPEXUJHUEXQV3ODFH SDWWLHVRQWKHEXQVWRSSLQJWKHPZLWK6ZLVVFKHHVHVDX WpHGRQLRQVDQGMDODSHQRV %HZDUHLI\RXKDYHDFLGUHÃ&#x20AC;X[ 6SLF\DQGDFLGLFIRRGVVXFKDVMDODSHQRVDQGRQLRQVFDQUXLQ \RXUQLJKWLI\RXHDWWKHPWRRODWHLQWKHGD\ 6HUYHZKLOH VWLOOKRW  0DNHVVL[VHUYLQJV

3ALAD$AYS!RE(ERE!GAIN E\&UDZIRUG*UDERZVNL

A few in-season substitutions, like asparagus for green beans, can add new life to a classic dish.

L

DVW VXPPHU , VSHQW D ZHHN LQ &RORUDGR :KLOHWKHPRXQWDLQVZHUHEHDXWLIXO,ZDV PRUHLPSUHVVHGZLWKWKHUHVWDXUDQWVDQG WKHIRRG H[FHSWIRUP\VRODURYHQEDNHGFRUQ EUHDGEXWWKDW¶VDQRWKHUVWRU\ )ULHQGVLQWUR GXFHGPHWR(WKLRSLDQIRRG,DWHVRPHDPD] LQJ7KDLGXPSOLQJVDQG,GLVFRYHUHGWKDW,ORYH EHHWV7KHGLVKWKDWUHDOO\VWDQGVRXWKRZHYHU ZDVDVLPSOH6DODG1LFRLVH  %DFNKRPHRQDUHFHQWWULSWRWKHIDUPHUV¶ PDUNHW,UHDOL]HGWKDWWKH\KDGDOPRVWHYHU\ WKLQJ,QHHGHGWRPDNHDYDULDWLRQRIP\QHZ IRXQGIDYRULWHVDODG'XHWROD]LQHVV,XVXDOO\ SUHIHUVDODGVPDGHE\RWKHUSHRSOHVR,DVNHG P\VHOILI,UHDOO\ZDQWHGWRZDVKSHHODQGFKRS LQJUHGLHQWV7KLVWLPHWKHDQVZHUZDV\HV  6DODG1LFRLVHLVDKHDUW\)UHQFKVDODGWKDW W\SLFDOO\ FRQVLVWV RI OHWWXFH VXUURXQGHG E\ SRWDWRHV JUHHQ EHDQV HJJV DQG ROLYHV 7KH ZKROH WKLQJ LV WKHQ WRSSHG RII ZLWK FDSHUV DQFKRYLHV DQG WXQD , RI FRXUVH KDG WR SOD\ ZLWKWKHUHFLSH$VSDUDJXVLVFRPLQJLQWRVHD VRQ²ZK\QRWXVHWKDWLQVWHDGRIWKHEHDQV", GRQ¶WOLNHFDQQHGWXQDDQGZKHQ,WU\WRFRRN IUHVKWXQDLWFRPHVRXWUXEEHU\VR,DVNHGP\ VHOI³:K\QRWVDYHWKHPRQH\DQGMXVWRPLWLW DOWRJHWKHU"´  %HHWV7KHVDODGQHHGVURDVWHGEHHWV+HUH LVWKHUHFLSHIRUP\WDNHRQWKHVDODG

+INDA3ALAD.ICOISE KHDGRIOHWWXFHWRUQLQWRELWHVL]HGSLHFHVRUWKHHTXLYDOHQW LQVDODGJUHHQV QHZSRWDWRHVTXDUWHUHG EXQGOHDVSDUDJXVEODQFKHGRUURDVWHG HJJVKDUGERLOHGDQGKDOYHG ODUJHEHHWURDVWHGDQGFXEHG .DODPDWDROLYHV RUZKDWHYHUYDULHW\ORRNVJRRGDWWKH ROLYHEDU

$RESSING FXSROLYHRLO WDEOHVSRRQVOHPRQMXLFH FORYHVJDUOLFPLQFHG WDEOHVSRRQV'LMRQPXVWDUG RUZKDWHYHUEURZQPXVWDUG RQKDQG

WHDVSRRQWDUUDJRQ  0L[WRJHWKHUGUHVVLQJLQJUHGLHQWVDQGVHWDVLGH  %HJLQURDVWLQJEHHWVDFFRUGLQJWRGLUHFWLRQVEHORZ  %RLOSRWDWRHVXQWLOWHQGHUEXWQRWPXVK\DERXWPLQXWHV  0L[OHWWXFHRUVDODGJUHHQVZLWKGUHVVLQJDQGSODFHRQD SODWH$GGUHPDLQLQJLWHPVEXWGRQ¶WWRVVZLWKWKHOHWWXFH0L[ WKHÃ&#x20AC;DYRUVDV\RXHDWGRQ¶WPHOGDOORIWKHPWRJHWKHULQLWLDOO\  'LJLQDQGHQMR\  6HUYHVIRXU 2OASTING"EETS  ,WWRRNPHVHYHUDOWULHVWRURDVWEHHWVVXFFHVVIXOO\0\¿UVW IHZDWWHPSWVOHIWPHZLWKDVLGHGLVKWKDWEDVLFDOO\WDVWHGOLNH VZHHWHQHGGLUW²QRWDJRRGDGGLWLRQWRDQ\PHDO,¿QDOO\JRWLW ULJKWE\LJQRULQJDOOWKHGLUHFWLRQV,IRXQG+HUH¶VP\PHWKRG  3XWEHHWVRQIRLODQGGUL]]OHZLWKROLYHRLO:UDSWKHIRLO DURXQGWKHEHHWVDQGSXWRQDFRRNLHVKHHW5RDVWDW GHJUHHVIRUDERXWWRPLQXWHV7RWHVWIRUGRQHQHVVVWLFND IRUNLQDEHHWLIWKHIRUNJRHVLQHDVLO\LW¶VGRQH  5HPRYHEHHWVIURPRYHQDQGXQZUDS5XQFROGZDWHURYHUWKH EHHWVXQWLOWKH\¶UHHDV\WRKDQGOHDQGSHHORIIWKHVNLQV7KH\ VKRXOGFRPHRIIIDLUO\HDVLO\EXW\RXPD\KDYHWRXVHDNQLIHIRU RQHRUWZRVPDOOVHFWLRQV

jacksonfreepress.com

3AY³.O´TO3LIME

CLIPART

CLIPART

can make your own or purchase reduced- or low-sodium options. Soup will help to fill you up before your main mealâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a way to make sure you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overeat. Fresh fruit and fruit cups are excellent additions to your lunch. Berries such as blueberries, raspberries and strawberries are high in antioxidants and dietary fiber. Fruit can also satisfy your sweet tooth if you are a dessert lover. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to prepare your lunch ahead of time, look for healthier items now available on many fastfood menus:

'OURMET4URKEY"URGERS

Making turkey burgers can take less than 20 minutes.

CLIPART

W

hen you are on the go, it can be difficult to find portable and healthy foods that still satisfy your hunger. Planning ahead and packing smart solve the dilemma. These quick ideas take little preparation. The foods are packed with essential vitamins and are sure to give you the fuel to help you make it through your day. Sandwiches are easy lunch items to prepare. Choose whole wheat bread and lean meats like turkey, ham and roast beef. Load up your sandwich with lots of fresh veggies loaded with vitamin C such as spinach, tomatoes and peppers. Salads also make great go-to lunches. Prepare salad items the night before. Protein is important for muscle health, so add lean protein such as chicken or tuna packed in water. Garnish your salad with almonds, walnuts or dried cranberries for added punch. Pre-cut carrots and celery are great alternatives to fast-food chips and fries. Carrots contain lots of vitamin A, which promotes a healthy immune system. For convenience, place the veggies in small lunch bags in single servings. Dunk them in your favorite low calorie dip or salad dressing. Soup is another quick and easy lunch alternative. You

45


Photographer:Virginia Schreiber Fashion Stylist: Meredith W. Sullivan Hair and Makeup: William Wallace Salon Models: Carly Good, Alex Good and Malika Shettar

I

remember it like it was yesterday: The long, black gown with gold sequins, the shoes I just had to have (even though they were a half size too small), the tanning sessions, the manicure, the up-do—PROM! It’s that time of year again, when all the gals are getting pretty for prom. Thankfully, it’s no longer 1999, and prom wear is much more fun. Step out of the box and dance the night away as a rockabilly babe, a pastel princess, a Grecian goddess or a rocker chick. Have fun with your look and take lots of pictures because this is a moment you will want to remember forever.

April 11 - 17, 2012

Malika is wearing a white and silver one-shouldered prom dress ($240) from KerriBella; square dangle earrings ($20) from Lipstick Lounge; and silver glitter shoes ($190) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces.

46

Alex is wearing a Dave and Johnny yellow prom dress ($199) and a yellow headband ($5) from Frock Fashions; a gold starburst ring ($15) and polka dot platform shoes ($45) from Lipstick Lounge; and a gold Sheila Faul ring ($195) from The Shoebar at Pieces.

Carly is wearing a seafoam ruffled prom dress ($160) and pink earrings ($15) from KerriBella; a silver bowtie bracelet worn as a necklace ($20) from Frock Fashions; an ivory clutch ($9) from Orange Peel; and tan and pink metallic platforms ($50) from The Shoebar at Pieces. The pink flower ring and bracelets are the stylist’s own.


Frock Fashions, 111 Colony Crossing, Suite 270, Madison, 601-898-4643; KerriBella, 4612 Medgar Evers Blvd., Suite 11, 601-255-4338; Lipstick Lounge, 304 Mitchell Ave, 601-366-4000; Nancy Price Interior Design, 3110 Old Canton Road, 601-982-4181; Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977; The Shoe Bar at Pieces, 425 Mitchell Ave., 601939-5203; Swell-O-Phonic, 2906 N. State St., Suite #103, 601-366-9955

Malika is wearing a purple and gold long prom gown ($150) from KerriBella; golden egg earrings ($20) from Lipstick Lounge; a gold cuff ($166) and gold bracelet ($660) from Nancy Price Interior Designs.

Carly is wearing a Black by Blush Prom dress ($249), a gold and white bracelet ($28) and pearl bracelet ($15) from Frock Fashions; red Converse shoes ($50) from Swell-O-Phonic; a polka dot scarf ($5) from Orange Peel; a white flower ring ($12) from KerriBella; and a black rhinestone belt ($40) from Lipstick Lounge. Alex is wearing a red strapless dress ($60) from KerriBella; a pink snake belt ($18), leopard print shoes ($49) and white bead necklace ($24) from Frock Fashions; and a Robert Rodriguez sequined blazer ($38) from the Orange Peel.

jacksonfreepress.com

Malika is wearing a strapless prom dress in gunmetal ($125) from KerriBella; and trio hoop earrings ($20) and pewter rocker stud wedges ($75) from Lipstick Lounge. The socks and leather bracelet are the stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own.

47


AUCTIONS & REALTY Proudly Presents for Live & Online Auction

Guitar Liquidation

LIVE ON- SITE & ONLINE AUCTION

Mention this ad, receive 10% off on one item (offer expires 7/31/12)

Saturday, April 21, 2012 â&#x20AC;¢ 10 a.m. 289A Commerce Park Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ Ridgeland, MS 39157 601.898.5233 â&#x20AC;¢ www.HeadAuctions.com

MUST REGISTER TO BID!

Forget Me Nots of Brandon Antiques & Consignment

1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) M-F 8am-9pm â&#x20AC;¢ Sat & Sun 7am-7pm CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

1325 Flowood Dr. â&#x20AC;¢ www.!eamarketms.com Sat: 9am-5pm â&#x20AC;¢ Sun: 12pm-5pm â&#x20AC;¢ $1 Admission

Free Admission with this ad!

204 E Government St, Brandon, MS 601-824-9766 â&#x20AC;¢ Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm Sat 10am - 5pm â&#x20AC;¢ forgetmenotsofbrandon

10% Onsite BP / MS Lic. # 892

Security Cameras â&#x20AC;¢ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;¢ Free Wi-Fi

Over 36,000 sq ft of antiques, collectibles, jewelry, furniture, crafts, glassware, & architectural salvage.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on this incredible selection of acoustic, electric and bass guitars, violins, amps and much, much more!

S

Consignment Shop We pay our clients 65% on anything we sell! Hoarding Stopper Consignment Shop 898 Centre St. Ridgeland, MS â&#x20AC;¢ 601-955-3304 www.hoardingstopper.com â&#x20AC;¢ Mon. - Sat. 10:00am - 5:00pm

$ISCREET 4ALK

NOW HIRING!

.543ISLOOKINGFORENER GETIC HARDWORKING CUSTOMER SERVICEORIENTEDFOLKSWITHA FLAIRFORTHECREATIVE

.EWLOCATIONCOMINGSOON 0LEASEVISIT

WWWGOODSAMARITANCENTERORGJOBS FORAPPLICATION

114!Millsaps!Ave.!â&#x20AC;¢!Jackson,!MS!39202!â&#x20AC;¢!(601)!355-7458! Friday!9:30!-!5:30!&!Saturday!10:00!-!4:00

Come Try Our New Menu 136 South Adams Stree | Jackson | 601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net | Mon-Fri | 8:00 am - 6:00 pm Sat | 8:00am - 2:00pm Sun | CLOSED

4EXVMGO,EVOMRWLEWRI[PIWWSR WPSXWEZEMPEFPI 8EOIPIWWSRWJVSQEPSGEPP]S[RIH WLSTMRXLILIEVXSJ*SRHVIR

%PP7X]PIW%PP0IZIPW 0MQMXIHWPSXWEZEMPEFPI73 '%0083(%= *SRHVIR+YMXEVWEPWSSJJIVW PIWWSRWMR 4PE]MRKTVSJIWWMSREPP]JSV]IEVW

Â&#x2C6;&EWW Â&#x2C6;&ERNS Â&#x2C6;(VYQW Â&#x2C6;1ERHSPMR

Â&#x2C6;4MERS Â&#x2C6;:SMGI

607 Fondren Place Jackson, MS â&#x20AC;¢ 601.362.0313 â&#x20AC;¢ www.fondrenguitars.com â&#x20AC;¢ find us on facebook


v10n31 - Foodie Take Jackson: Spring Food 2012