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Jackson Only Indoor Bouldering Facility! 127 Dyess Road|Ridgeland, MS 39157|601-977-9000

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Led by New York artist !"#$%&'()*$, Cocoon Jackson is part of an international participatory sculpture series involving local individuals and communities. Cocoon is a collaborative project resulting in an illuminated and interactive public ar twork, measuring approximately 26 feet long by 10 feet high. $ - . /0& 1 # 2 2 - 3 2 4 &/- &" 5 5 &"6 2 . 7%%

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Jackson Free Press Production

On March 14 2012, BOOM Jackson celebrated the Spring issue of BOOM at Fondren Art Gallery. Awards were presented to coolest office winners Balch and Bingham and The Ramey Agency. Party goers enjoyed food from Babalu, Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery, Fatsumo Sushi and Underground 119. Kats Wine and Spirits provided the wine.


March 21 - 27, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 28

contents VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

7 Tough Law Anti-abortion legislation in Mississippi seeks to put the state’s only clinic out of business. COURTESY MILLSAPS COLLEGE

Cover painting by Anthony DiFatta

31

THIS ISSUE:

A Millsaps College archeology professor gets a stab at fame in a new National Geographic film. COURTESY GRANT PROBST

rickey thigpen years ago, and we did a tour of Jackson, and they thought it was going to be a complete waste of time. “They got off the bus and were just completely flabbergasted.” After graduating from Jim Hill High School in 1983, Thigpen earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Mississippi Valley State University in 1987. “I came into the tourism industry through the side door—I was the computer guy,” he says. Thigpen is also as a mentor and lecturer to high school and college students, and he judges high-school speech contests. He is pursuing his master’s degree in leadership from Belhaven University. When it comes to his personal life, Thigpen’s family takes priority. His parents, Beray and Dora Thigpen, live in Jackson, and his sister, Sharon Thigpen, is a physical therapist in Texas. Thigpen also has a chocolate labrador retriever named Hershey. “Family keeps me grounded,” he says. “I’m blessed to have them.” Thigpen challenges the residents of Jackson to develop and build up their city. “I don’t like for people to put down our state,” he says. “If you’re going to be here, don’t complain about it. Be a part of the improvement. If everyone whined about the problems in Jackson, we wouldn’t get anywhere.” —Brittany Kilgore

Obstacle Zeal

40

Take hundreds of contestants and challenge them with mud, walls and fire. Whaddaya get? Warrior Dash.

Gluten-Free

42

Eating gluten-free foods provides health benefits for everyone, not just those allergic to the wheat protein.

jacksonfreepress.com

Rickey Thigpen has a few words of advice for Jackson’s young people: It’s better to be great than to be successful. “Set your goals and aspirations high,” he says. “… I use the word ‘success’ tentatively, but I like the word ‘great.’” Success has boundaries, such as money, titles and notoriety. But when you’re great, you transcend those boundaries. There’s nothing wrong with being financially well off, Thigpen says, but being really great means having a positive impact on other people’s lives. “I try to encourage young people, when I talk to them, to look on the inside of themselves and discover their passion for life,” he says. Thigpen, 46, is executive vice president at the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau, where he has worked for 26 years. Through the JCVB, he has helped with special events, tours, festivals and exhibits that bring visitors and their spending power to the city. “It’s not really as hard as you think it is, because people from all over the world come to Jackson to experience our tourism products. Here in Jackson, we take them for granted,” he says. The city draws people with its blues music, culinary offerings and architecture, as well as its civil rights and Civil War history. Jackson also hosts the International Ballet Competition every four years. “So many of us go every day and pass those things and don’t know they exist,” Thigpen says. “I did a family reunion here several

JANE FLOOD

4 .........Publisher’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 7 .......................... Talks 12 ........................ Tech 14 ................... Editorial 14 .... Editorial Cartoon 15 ................. Opinion 16 .. Zippity Doo Dah 22 .................. Fondren 31 .............. Diversions 32 ...................... Books 33 ........................ Film 34 .................... 8 Days 35 ............. JFP Events 36 ...................... Music 37 ......... Music Listing 38 ....................... Food 39 ................ Astrology 40 ..................... Sports 42 ....................... Food 46 .......... FLY Shopping

Lost Tribe

3


Briana Robinson Deputy Editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a sophomore at Millsaps College. She coordinated the Zippity Doo Dah section.

Anthony DiFatta Artist Anthony DiFatta is a native of Hattiesburg and currently lives in Jackson with his wife and son. Anthony is a lover of art, nature and southern culture. He painted the cover illustration.

Trip Burns Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He enjoys Richard Ford’s “Bascombe” books and the cinema of Stanley Kubrick. He wrote an arts feature.

R.L. Nave Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. He wrote Talks and a Fondren story. Contact him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12.

Elizabeth Waibel Reporter Elizabeth Waibel grew up in Clinton. In May, she received her journalism degree from Union University in Jackson, Tenn. She likes coffee and trying new cake recipes. She wrote Talks and a Fondren story.

Bryan Flynn Sports writer Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippi native who lives in Jackson. When not writing for the JFP, he writes a national blog, playtowinthegame. com. He lives with his wife and their four cats. Follow him @ jfpsports. He wrote sports stories.

Meredith W. Sullivan Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She coordinated the FLY page.

March 21 - 27, 2012

Korey Harrion

4

Web Producer Korey Harrion is a saxophonist who runs a small computer-repair business. He enjoys reading, writing and playing music, origami and playing video games. He loves animals, especially dogs.

publisher’snote

by Todd Stauffer, Publisher

The War on Math: Obama’s Debt

A

s the Republican presidential hopefuls auger toward the finish line in what will probably result in the nomination of Mitt Romney, it seems the candidates, in straining to hurl things at one another and President Obama, perpetuate something that I like to call (with apologies to Rachel Maddow) the GOP’s “War on Math.” Full disclosure: I’m an Obama fan. I don’t see eye-to-eye with the president on everything, and I’d like to state for the record that good ideas also come from smart Republicans—although I have seen few so far from GOP presidential candidates. I give Obama credit for trying to find common ground in his early years in office, even if it was naive to think he could get any help from GOP members who stated categorically that their No. 1 goal was to see him removed from the White House. I also remember the last guy. And I remember what happened to the country under the watch of a GOP president and GOP Congress. I remember the unnecessary war (and war spending) and the deficits, even as the economy was growing, because of a misguided, ideological need to cut taxes (rammed through Congress using budget reconciliation, lest you who rail against “Obamacare” forget) instead of continuing to shore up the country’s balance sheet. Both sides of the aisle have good ideas. The (somewhat incomplete) Ryan budget introduced this week has options we should consider: a flatter tax code, fewer behaviorrelated tax subsidies and items designed to shore up social safety-net programs. As we recover (hopefully) from the Great Recession, we should see a tightening of our collective belt, an increase in revenues (both from general growth and higher effective rates on people who can afford them) and proposals that restructure how we deal with skyrocketing health-care costs. But before we can get to those solutions—if we ever can—we’ve got to clean up the rules of the game. It all comes back to this idea that you can have your own opinions, but you can’t have your own facts. Like this one: “Obama has added more to the debt than all other presidents combined!” This is not true. Since Obama took office, roughly $5 trillion has been added to the debt. That’s a lot—no doubt—but it doesn’t represent more than all other presidents have added to the debt, which stands at roughly $15.5 trillion, with $10.7 trillion or so owed to the public. (The rest is intragovernmental debt owed to the Social Security and other trust funds.) And blaming most of that $5 trillion on Obama is disingenuous at best. An analysis by The Washington Post, in conjunction with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, found that programs George W. Bush championed while in office—tax cuts, defense and special war

spending, Medicare expansion, and other spending programs—added about $5.07 trillion to the debt. Obama’s spending programs—stimulus spending and stimulus tax cuts, non-defense spending and health-care reform—will have added about $983 billion to the debt by the year 2017, which would be the end of his (not yet realized) second term. As Ezra Klein writes in the piece, “When Obama entered office, the Bush tax cuts were already in place and two wars were ongoing. Is it fair to blame Obama for war costs four months after he was inaugurated, or tax collections 10 days after he took office?” What’s even more interesting about this question is the context in which it’s raised— the country has added to the debt, in part, because the Great Recession saw revenues plunge from 2008 to 2011. Why? Because most people and companies were making less money, thus paying less in taxes. (Math again.) But during that same time, mandatory spending (social programs, Medicare, defense spending) continued to go up at the same time that Obama implemented some extraordinary stimulus spending—and additional tax cutting as stimulus. So, with less money coming in and more money going out (with roughly 20 percent of it due to a swipe of the President’s pen), deficits increased. One prominent school of thought in economics suggests that deficits should increase during recessions, as the government adds spending on infrastructure investments to keep employment at reasonable levels. (Arguably, we didn’t do enough of this in

2008, although in hindsight, the deficit burden already in place from the Bush administration might have meant a smaller stimulus was all we could “afford.”) Want a little silver lining? One of the few advantages that the country has experienced over the course of the Great Recession is that the interest the government pays for the money it borrows is ridiculously low right now. So low, in fact, that the amount of interest dollars the government paid on its debt in 2011 was about the same it paid in 2006, even though that debt principal has doubled. Imagine if your new credit-card rates were so low that you were actually lowering your monthly payments by rolling an older, higher-rate card over to the lower one, again and again. That’s been one side effect of the spending and borrowing to get us through this recession: We’ve gotten a much better deal on the money we’ve been borrowing. That won’t last forever—and, in fact, it could change quickly—but it’s given us some breathing room. So what’s next? As we plunge deeper into the election season, let’s try to start from this simple place: Deficit spending is bad, but it’s tough to avoid during recessions, and it hasn’t been as bad as some like to pretend. From here, we need good ideas about how to keep the economy on a growth path, how to raise revenues to pay off those debts and how to trim fat from the budget without seriously curtailing growth or devastating the safety net. We will have differing opinions on how best to do that, but the best ideas will come when people decide to start with actual facts, not lies worthy of a chain email.


For gainful employment statistics, please visit: www.deltatechnicalcollege.com/GE

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VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Abortion Foes Push New Restrictions

House Bill 1390 would require doctors who practice at abortion clinics, like the Jackson Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Organization, to get admitting privileges at a local hospital.

W

ith personhood legislation finally out of the spotlight, lawmakers are taking aim at smaller anti-abortion issues, like placing new restrictions on abortion providers. HB 1390 would require all physicians associated with an abortion facility to have admitting privileges at a local hospital. The bill would also require those physicians to be board certified or eligible in obstetrics and gynecology, and a staff member trained in CPR would have to be at the facility at all times. Barbara Whitehead, president of Mississippi Right to Life, said doctors who perform abortions should be part of the local medical community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If something goes wrong, then that doctor can continue the care in a local hospital,â&#x20AC;? she said. Shannon Brewer, director of the Jackson Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in the state, said that in the past, local hospitals would not give the clinicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctors admitting privileges.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally just feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because we do abortions,â&#x20AC;? she said. All of the doctors at the clinic are already certified OB-GYNs, Brewer added. Jack Mazurak, spokesman for the University of Mississippi Medical Center, said only UMMC faculty can have admitting privileges there. Robby Channell, spokesman for Baptist Health Services, said performing abortions would not keep physicians from getting admitting privileges at the hospital, although they would have to meet certain certification and insurance requirements. Brewer said the bill would affect the clinic directly, if it passes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But of course, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to do, because our doctors are from out of state,â&#x20AC;? she told the Jackson Free Press. Local doctors who have worked at the clinic in the past have faced pressure and harassment for performing abortions, so they quit, Brewer said. The House also passed a bill to require

by Elizabeth Waibel doctors to check for a fetal heartbeat before performing an abortion. While the billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s description initially suggested it would only require a woman to acknowledge a fetal heartbeat and sign a waiver, the most recent version says it would ban abortions if the doctor finds a fetal heartbeat. The bill actually contains both provisions, presumably since the courts are unlikely to uphold the section banning abortions after doctors can detect a fetal heartbeat. Nonetheless, Personhood Mississippi President Les Riley sent out a statement after the bill passed the House saying that under the current version, the bill would outlaw abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detectable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The intent appears to be that if the Senate passes this bill, that surgical abortion in this state will largely be eliminated,â&#x20AC;? the statement said. Felicia Brown-Williams, regional director of public policy of Planned Parenthood Southeast, said the bill is a definite attempt to challenge Roe v. Wade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This bill is unconstitutional, and could ban all abortions as far as five to six weeks into pregnancy, before many women know theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pregnant,â&#x20AC;? Brown-Willams said. The Christian Action Commission, the political arm of the Mississippi Baptist Convention, sent an email to supporters expressing concern over whether the Senate will take up the bill. The organization blamed Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and Senate leaders for letting their own anti-abortion bills die in committee. Rep. Andy Gipson, who introduced the bill, was not available for comment. Both bills now go to the Senate. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Odd Parades â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Round the World ) THINK -ISSISSIPPIANS HAVE COMMON VALUES AND ) DON´T THINK THOSE COMMON VALUES ARE THAT WE SITBACKANDSHOOTSPITBALLSATEACHOTHERATOUR #APITOLFORFOURMONTHSEACHYEAR ²)RUPHU5HS%UDQGRQ-RQHV'3DVFDJRXODFULWLFL]LQJ WKHFXUUHQW5HSXEOLFDQOHGOHJLVODWLYHVHVVLRQ 4HEINTENTAPPEARSTOBETHATIFTHE3ENATEPASSES THIS BILL THAT SURGICAL ABORTION IN THIS STATE WILL LARGELYBEELIMINATED ²3HUVRQKRRG 0LVVLVVLSSL 3UHVLGHQW /HV 5LOH\ RQ ZKDWKLVRUJDQL]DWLRQKRSHVDÂłIHWDOKHDUWEHDWELOO´LQ WKH/HJLVODWXUHZLOODFFRPSOLVKIURPDVWDWHPHQW 4HEREISAROOFGARDENTHATGOESOVERTHERETAILFROM THESECONDžOOROFRESIDENTIALSPACE 4HAT´SAREAL GARDENTHATYOUCANREALLYPLANTREALFOODON ²)XOO 6SHFWUXP 1< &22 &DUOWRQ %URZQ DERXW 7HUUH 9HUWHDW6TXDUH IRUPHUO\2OG&DSLWRO*UHHQ

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Wednesday, March 14 The Mississippi House works late into the night, passing controversial immigration and anti-abortion measures. â&#x20AC;Ś Republican presidential candidate and former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum tells a newspaper in Puerto Rico that the commonwealth should adopt English as one of its official languages. Thursday, March 15 Members of the University of Southern Mississippi band taunt a Puerto Rican player from Kansas State with chants of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your green card?â&#x20AC;? during an NCAA tourney game, prompting an apology from USMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s president. USM lost the game. ... Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich reports to prison to serve a 14-year sentence on federal corruption charges that include trying to sell President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vacated U.S. Senate seat. Friday, March 16 The Mississippi Legislature deals with the deadline for passing general bills out of their house of origin. â&#x20AC;Ś The military identifies the soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians as Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. Saturday, March 17 More than 65,000 people attend the Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade in downtown Jackson. ... Wikileaks founder Julian Assange announces he will run for the Senate in his native Australia. Sunday, March 18 In SEC college baseball, Mississippi State beats LSU 7-1, and Ole Miss falls to Auburn 10-4. ... Mitt Romney wins the Puerto Rico primary, capturing 20 delegates in his drive for the Republican presidential nomination. Monday, March 19 The Jackson Police Department investigates the death of a man found lying in a ditch. ... The U.S. Treasury Department completes the sale of $225 billion in mortgage-backed securities it bought to stabilize the economy, which netted taxpayers $25 billion in profits. Tuesday, March 20 With work on general bills largely behind them, Mississippi lawmakers begin discussing state revenue forecasts, which will influence budget priorities. ... The FBI launches an investigation into the death of black Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. A white neighborhood watch patrolman shot and killed the teen last month. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

news, culture & irreverence

From its ever-so-humble beginnings in 1982, the world now boasts 6,248 â&#x20AC;&#x153;O-fficialâ&#x20AC;? Sweet Potato Queen chapters in more than 20 countries. Each chapter chooses its own theme and costumes.

Brandon Jones sees work ahead for the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democratic Party. p 9

7


Legislature: Week 11

by: R.L. Nave

Suppressed GOP, Frustrated Dems

P

The Mad Dash Racing against the Friday, March 16, deadline to pass bills out of their originating chamber, the House and Senate burned through their respective calendars to clear as many items as possible last week. That included a pair of marathon sessions in the House that saw the passage of several controversial bills, including the anti-abortion â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartbeat beat,â&#x20AC;? an anti-undocumented immigrant law and enabling legislation for the voter-identification amendment approved last fall. Before Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, handled the immigration bill on the House floor, he introduced a number of amendments, including one to exempt services such as purchasing utilities from one provision

that criminalized making business transactions with undocumented immigrants, and he changed the bill so that the law would apply only when police make arrests. Gipson, who did not return calls for this story, gloated AMILE WILSON

hilip Gunn didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully realize what was in store for him when colleagues elected him as speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. Gunn, a Clinton Republican, told attendees at a Capitol Press Club luncheon Monday that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been surprised by how many groups want to him to speak or that international visitors to the Capitol would solicit his thoughts on nuclear-arms proliferation. Gunn also seemed surprised how hard it would be to assemble his leadership team of chairmen and assign bills. The fact that the process took so long has drawn complaints from House Democrats, who say the body accomplished little other than crossing off items on conservative lawmakersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wish lists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Republicans, having been suppressed for a while with their agenda, are trying to get it all on the table at once,â&#x20AC;? Gunn said, responding to question about the Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perceived hyper-partisanship. With the March 28 deadline to consider revenue bills looming, the Legislature now enters Phase 2 of the legislative session of budget negotiations. Although, budget talks are likely to yield more partisan culture wars as lawmakers haggle over funding for education and social safety-net programs, hot-button topics like immigration, abortion, workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights and guns wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be going away.

Despite the rancor, House Speaker Philip Gunn, R-Clinton, said Republicans â&#x20AC;&#x153;got out every bill we really wanted to get out.â&#x20AC;?

that his bill is different from the Arizona and Alabama laws in that his tweaked law excludes nonprofits and religious organizations that provide for â&#x20AC;&#x153;basic needs.â&#x20AC;? Gipson added that he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;acceptâ&#x20AC;? the characterization of HB 488â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supporters as racist, saying that he helped start a Hispanic ministry at his church. Democrats who opposed the bill said it would hurt agriculture in the state, conflict with federal enforcement of immigration laws and would further tarnish a state with a reputation for being hostile to non-whites. Before taking the final vote, the minority party did achieve one victory in the immigration bill. Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, succeeded in stripping out the part of the bill that forces schools to collect immigration status of students. After the immigration bill passed just before midnight, 70 to 48, the House debated and passed the anti-abortion â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartbeat bill,â&#x20AC;? which requires doctors to look for a fetal heartbeat before performing an abortion. The proposal is controversial because finding a heart-

beat in the early stages of pregnancy requires an invasive transvaginal ultrasound probe; a traditional ultrasound cannot detect a heartbeat for up to 6 weeks. The measure passed by a vote of 77 to 37, with several Democratic men supporting it. Workers Under Fire? The House Democratic caucus remained unified and received support from several Republicans to kill the workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compensation reform bill HB 555. It sought to remove the â&#x20AC;&#x153;found dead presumptionâ&#x20AC;? that says if a worker is found dead on company property, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presumed they died from the work they were performing. HB 555 failed 52 to 62 with five Republicans joining Democrats to defeat the measure. However, the House will return to the issue once more when it considers the Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comp bill. Another workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights bill prompted Sen. David Blount, D-Jackson, to deliver an impassioned speech opposing SB 2380, legislation that would remove Mississippi State Personnel Board protections for two years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrible idea,â&#x20AC;? Blount told the Jackson Free Press, calling the bill a potential return to the spoilsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or, political patronageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; system. Blount said approximately 25,000 state workers should be worried because removing these civil-service protections means they could be fired and not have any recourse. Sen. Terry Brown, R-Columbus, said the step is needed because the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget situation has worsened in the past five years. He dismissed concerns of Blount and others, noting that employees would still retain federal workplace protections. In literature opposing SB 2380, the Mississippi Alliance of State Employees/Communications Workers of America say the goal of the Gov. Phil Bryant-backed bill is to create a work force that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;politically motivated to see everything his way.â&#x20AC;? The measure passed and moved to the House for consideration. Taking Aim at Gun Laws In the coming weeks, the Senate will

consider three gun bills that sailed through the House in early March with little vocal opposition. The three pieces of legislation, all backed by the Fairfax, Va.-based National Rifle Association, would either increase the number of firearms in the Magnolia State or make it more difficult to reduce the number of guns around the state. Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, sponsored House Bill 455, which repeals a state recordkeeping requirement for licensed gun dealers. Supporters, Gipson included, argue that federal recordkeeping laws make Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laws redundant and, therefore, unnecessary. HB 455 passed 98 to 21, and the Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Republican leadership assigned it to the Judiciary B Committee, which Democratic Rep. Hob Bryan, of Amory, chairs. House Bill 627, sponsored by Rep. Gary Chism, R-Columbus, prohibits state and local governments from participating in gun buyback programs, designed to take guns that might be used in crimes off the streets. Chismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill, which passed the House 92 to 28, is also assigned to Judiciary B. HB 695, which would require Mississippi to recognize gun-carry permits from other states, also passed, 106 to 12, and the Senate leadership assigned it to the Judiciary A Committee, which Sen. W. Briggs Hopson III, RVicksburg, chairs. A 2010 report, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trace the Guns: The Link Between Gun Laws and Interstate Trafficking,â&#x20AC;? determined that Mississippi leads the nation for the number of guns it sends to other states that are used to commit crimes. In a statement criticizing the Delaware Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passage of a pilot gun buyback program, the NRA called the program a â&#x20AC;&#x153;drain on taxpayer money that could be better used by police to enforce current law.â&#x20AC;? Doug Bowser, president of the Mississippi chapter of the NRA, echoed the national organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s viewpoint, saying the programs do little to deter violent crime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the worst part is that people bring in unserviceable guns, and they get money for them,â&#x20AC;? he said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. AMILE WILSON

Despite More Revenue, Budget Fight Looms by R.L. Nave

March 21 - 27, 2012

E

8

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Sen. David Jordan, D-Greenwood, wants school funding to be a bigger part of the education debate. OHYHOVWKHVDPHIRUWKHQH[WÂżVFDO\HDU  Âł,IWKH\GRQÂśWGRWKDWWKH\ÂśUHMXVWPHDQ´+ROODQG VDLGKLWWLQJWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUZLWKKLVFDQH  &RPPHQWDWZZZMISPV


politicaldish

by R.L. Nave

Former Rep. Brandon Jones wants to introduce modern campaigning to his Mississippi Democratic Party.

B

randon Jones says the Mississippi Democratic Trust, a new political action committee he helped start in 2011 and now heads as executive director, grew from “humble recognition” of his party’s shortcomings, many of which helped Republicans achieve a near-sweep in the last statewide election. “There’s no question that Republicans cleaned our clocks in November, and they didn’t do it by running as Republicans light. They ran more engaged and compelling campaigns and were willing to push harder, perhaps, than we were,” said Jones, 34, who represented Pascagoula in the Mississippi House until Republican upstart Charles Busby defeated him by a slim 35-vote margin in the last election. As a result of Democrats breezing to a majority in the House for more than a century, the party failed to adapt to the 21stcentury way of politicking, Jones said. Now, he sees Democrats struggling to regain a foothold in state politics in the face of a bigger, better-funded Republican machine. That’s where he hopes the Mississippi

Democratic Trust can come in by being a much-needed fundraising, communications and policy development arm of the party. Members of the trust include Rep. Earle Banks of Jackson, Rep. David Baria of Bay St. Louis, Sen. Kelvin Butler of McComb, and Northern District Public Service Commissioner Brandon Presley. Recently, Jones explained to the Jackson Free Press what’s wrong with the Democratic Party and how his organization is trying to fix it. From what I know of it, the Mississippi Democratic Trust’s aim is to support Democratic candidates. What does that mean? I don’t think I’m saying anything that’s all that profound when I say we as Democrats have done a poor job at laying out our vision, and we’ve done a poor job keeping pace with Republicans when it comes to messaging and fundraising. Why aren’t Democrats doing these things already? When you are able to win elections without running modern campaigns, the muscles you use to communicate and fund raise atrophy. Over the course of time, Democrats, despite not running modern campaigns, have been able to have some electoral success. Did Democrats get comfortable? I think that would be a fair thing to say. I don’t know how else you describe where we are right now. Now, that’s the grim point of view. I have full confidence that this will not be nearly as long a journey as some people might expect. I was concerned going into this legislative session how we might articulate what Democrats stand for and how we articulate that we are looking out for Mississippians in a way that the Republican Party is not. Then the legislative session started, and that is becoming more and more clear

every day: You have a party in power that is obsessed with chasing down wedge issue after wedge issue in an effort to settle political scores and to go after political enemies with little regard for the real issues that are on peoples minds across the state.

don’t even think we can be fairly appraised right now, because you can’t really gauge what you’re working with until you get a full-throated effort from the other side. And up to this point, Democrats have not given that full-throated effort.

But didn’t the people put Republicans in power? They ran more engaged and compelling campaigns and were willing to push harder, perhaps, than we were. But they didn’t tell the people of Mississippi, “Elect us and as of March 1, we will have signed one bill, which is a tax increase on the citizens of Hancock County.” They didn’t say, “Elect us, and we’ll roll out yet another abortion bill, yet another in a long line of gun bills, yet another in a long line of immigration bills and yet another in a long line of bills aimed at Jim Hood.”

What are some examples of modern techniques? Speed. I think we’ve been quicker on the draw (in communicating with the news media) than Republicans for the first time in eight years. Most members of the press corps are probably noticing that, because it so striking for Democrats to be fast at anything. The other way is basic communication (between) Democrats in the House and Senate. Now, don’t get me wrong, it happens in pockets, but in terms of … trying to develop a cohesive strategy, we’re not as good as we ought to be.

Didn’t they? Actually, the centerpiece of (Gov.) Phil Bryant’s campaign was jobs. I would challenge anyone in the state to show me what he’s done to create jobs. Now, did they win their election? Sure. But this is not what we were promised. I think Mississippians have common values, and I don’t think those common values are that we sit back and shoot spitballs at each other at our Capitol for four months each year.

What’s being done about the shortage of young Democratic talent in the state? The challenge of young Democrats is so much greater, because they’re dealing with an opposition that’s so much better financed and so much better organized. But I think that’s one of our most important roles – to develop that young talent and encourage them to get involved.

Why is it so hard for Democrats to raise money in Mississippi when it has so many core Democratic constituencies? My feeling is effort. How many Democrats are out there dialing these constituents to ask for money, to let them know that campaigns cost money and we need their support in other ways, like reaching out to their friends? These are things that are second nature to Republicans. Again, I think Democrats in Mississippi have been slow to waking up to what you need to do to run modern campaigns. I

By the end of the session, what tangible thing would you like the MDT to have achieved? We have to get our house in order on the inside before we worry about what the paint looks like on the outside. So it’s a rebuilding year? For us as a group, something we’d like to see, we’d like to be looked at as the go-to entity for folks who are interested in looking to advance their party. We’ve just started, and we’ve got some work to do in that respect. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

R.L. NAVE

Rebuilding His Party

9


developmenttalk

by Jacob Fuller

1822 Square (Almost) Ready to Break Ground

Full Spectrum NY expects to break ground by the end of June on 1822 Square, a mixedused development at the location of the Old Capitol Green in downtown Jackson.

the parking garage, the developers say. To fund the residential building, Full Spectrum is working with the Federal Housing Administration’s 221(d) loan program, which helps fund new construction and substantial rehabilitation of apartment properties.

Carlton Brown, chief operating officer of Full Spectrum NY, said tenants have signed letters of intent to fill about 80 percent of the Legacy Office Building and 1822 SQUARE, see page 11

March 21 - 27, 2012

we have not had any definitive discussions about either the cost of the improvements or financing.” The City Council will have to approve any tax-increment financing. Full Spectrum NY has received funding from several government agencies in planning 1822 Square. In 2009, the state Legislature passed Senate Bill 3281, which approved an up-to-$20-million loan through Hinds County to go toward the development’s parking garage. In December 2011, the county approved a $13million loan out of the state-approved $20 million. In August 2010, the Mississippi Business Finance Corp. approved a resolution for Full Spectrum NY to receive industrial revenue bonds and Gulf Opportunity Zone bonds, which were designed to stimulate investment in areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. Combined, the bonds were worth $45 million, which Full Spectrum plans to use to build the development’s Legacy Office Building. In January of this year, the Jackson Redevelopment Authority approved an urban renewal bond worth up to $4 million to cover the final funding needed to construct

COURTESY FULL SPECTRUM NY

T

he fate of a major mixed-used development in downtown Jackson rests in the hands of city leaders. If the mayor and Jackson City Council approve the funding and execution of needed infrastructure improvements, Full Spectrum NY is ready to break ground on 1822 Square at Old Capitol Green by the end of June this year. Once completed, the project will feature about 88,000 square feet of office space, 130 residential units, 57,500 square feet of retail shops and a 480-space, stateof-the-art automated parking garage. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said the city is working with Full Spectrum and contractors on a plan for infrastructure improvements needed for the development’s first phase. Phase one will include extending Court Street from Commerce Street to Jefferson Street, as well as reconstructing sections of Commerce, Tombigbee and Pascagoula streets. Plans include new sidewalks, bike lanes and a jogger’s path along Commerce Street. “Typically, infrastructure like that would be dealt with with the tax-increment financing mechanism,” Johnson said. “So we’ll certainly look at that, but

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12

Create Standalone Browser Apps

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arlier this month, Apple CEO Tim Cook took center stage in California to unveil the newest model of the iPad. For months now, tech writers have been speculating about what the new iPad would include, and for the most part, Cook presented few surprises. The biggest news was the retina display, bringing the iPad into the same league as the iPhone 4 screen. I remember when Apple released the iPhone 4 with the retina display in 2010. Nothing has ever compared to it, and I even found myself not enjoying the iPad display nearly as much because it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the same pixel density as the iPhone. For some, â&#x20AC;&#x153;pixel densityâ&#x20AC;? doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem like an issue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My screen is just fine,â&#x20AC;? they say. And that may be true, especially for a phone. However, I suspect that on the iPad, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a tremendous plus. This is akin to watching a football game in HD versus tired, olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; digital cable. Just as the Kindle is a tremendous reading experience because of e-ink technology, the iPad with its retina display is set to be even betterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least when glare is not an issue. You literally have to â&#x20AC;&#x153;see it to believe it,â&#x20AC;? which I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet. Other new additions include LTE connectivity bringing 4G speeds to the iPad, an improved 5-megapixel camera with backlight sensor, HD video recording, voice dictation for text input and the ability to turn the iPad into a personal hotspot. All things considered, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty modest update. In fact, if you just read the previous paragraph, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sound like much at all. But, dear reader, I cannot stress enough what having the retina display on the iPad is going to be like. That alone is enough to make me look at buying the new model. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m notâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least not right now. The iPad 2 is a tremendous device, and it is a workhorse for me. While Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love the

S

COURTESY APPLE

E\6DP+DOO

Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new iPad features a retina display screen with incredible clarity.

retina display, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make do. Apple has settled into a set release pattern with their iOS devices. One release is a monumental update, complete with new hardware design and breakthrough features (such as the iPhone 4 with its new design and the retina display). The following release is more of a build-on release. It includes the same form-factor but throws in some really cool under-the-hood improvements (such as the iPhone 4S that brought about Siri and a much faster processor). The company followed the same pattern with the iPhone 3G and the iPhone 3GS. The 3G was a brand new hardware designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;albeit the worst of the three designs, in my opinionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;coupled with 3G connectivity, and the 3GS added a speed boost and some cool GPS tools. The iPad 2 was a tremendous redesign. It included a faster processor and introduced 3G models that worked on both AT&T and Verizon. Now comes the new iPad (not the iPad 3 or the 2S, just iPad), which has mostly the same hardware design, though it is ever so slightly thicker.

ometimes you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how fantastic a feature can be until you use it under real-world conditions. For instance, I learned to love Fluid for Mac (fluidapp.com), when I got it set up to run CapsuleCRM (capsulecrm.com), one of the tools we use for sales management (like, hourly) here at the Jackson Free Press publishing empire. What makes Fluid cool is that it can essentially turn any hosted Web applicationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as your CRM, Gmail, Google Docs, or Quickbooks Web Editionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;into something that feels like a standalone desktop application, with its own icon and its own presence on the Dock. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just handy for launching the app. The killer feature is

The real update is under the hood. Apple is able to settle into such a comfortable release scenario because they are so far ahead of the competition. The iPhone remains the most popular single phone in the world. The iPad is even further ahead of its competition. Apple created the tablet market as we know it today with the iPad. And so far no oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I mean not a single competitorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is offering anything close to what the iPad offers. My buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice? If you have the iPad 2 and are happy with it, stick with it. Only make the purchase if you might use the dictation capability or if you do a tremendous amount of reading and are craving the retina display. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be worth it. Otherwise, the iPad 2 will be just fine. Finally, if you are looking to buy your first iPad, then you can choose between the iPad 2 or the new iPad. Despite the $100 difference, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a no-brainer. The new iPad is the obvious choice. The retina display alone is worth the extra $100, and all the other goodies are just gravy. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

how handy it makes it to switch to that Web-based app. Imagine your life right now, where your Gmail or Yahoo! or Facebook account is probably buried somewhere in the windows of Safari or Firefox or Chrome. Yuck. Now picture Gmail (or Yahoo or Facebook) with its own icon, own window, own tabs and the ability to Apple+tab directly to it. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Fluid does. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got â&#x20AC;&#x153;appsâ&#x20AC;? for Capsule, WorkFlowy, Gmail, Google Docs, BackPack and Zoho right on my Dock, for easy access and switching. (Bonus feature: You can keep your cookies separate in different apps if you desire, giving you a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sandboxedâ&#x20AC;? app for, say, accessing

your bank account or Mint.com.) Mac this, Mac that? Well, there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an exact equivalent for Windows that I can find, but Google Chromeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Create Application Shortcutâ&#x20AC;? command (under the Wrench icon, then Tools > Create Application Shortcut) offers a similar experience. While viewing a site, choose the command and it adds a shortcut for that Web page to your desktop. Click it later and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a standalone Chrome browser window for that particular hosted application. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get quite the same firewall, although it is its own application thread, meaning a crash in the application shortcut shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t crash other instances of Chrome. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Todd Stauffer


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13


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Services Aren’t Like Toasters

P

oliticians, especially the tight-fisted ones, love to compare the government to your home. When money is tight at home, they’ll explain condescendingly, you may have to send your toaster to a repair shop, put off that Disney family vacation or drive that old clunker around for another year or two. These gross over-simplifications scream of tone deafness. The fact of the matter is that most people we know aren’t choosing between Mickey Mouse and Mercedes-Benzes. They’re calculating precisely how far a couple bags of groceries will stretch in feeding their families until the next payday. Or they’re asking themselves whether this month’s payment to the electric company takes precedence over the payment for the Internet service their children need to complete their homework. Or they’re putting off going to the doctor when they get sick because even if they have insurance, the co-pays and price of medicines is more expensive than they can afford right now. This week, the Mississippi Legislature cleared its plate of general bills and looked toward crafting a budget plan that is sure to involve making some of the same gut-wrenching choices. Former Gov. Haley Barbour set the tone and provided cover for the leaders in the executive and legislative branches who succeeded him. Before he left office, he recommended 2.9 percent in cuts to state agency budgets and called for consolidation of public-school districts and historically black colleges and universities. Gov. Phil Bryant upped Barbour’s ante with the 5.35 percent average cut he laid out in the executive budget recommendation he presented in February. Our elected leaders have repeatedly told Mississippians to get used to having fewer state-supported services to rely on. But Medicaid isn’t a toaster that can be jerry rigged to keep it from falling apart; it’s more like the minor—albeit costly—surgery you undergo to keep your whole leg from falling off five years from now. With state economist Darren Webb’s announcement this week of $99 million more coming to the state treasury this year than predicted, lawmakers can have a serious discussion about putting money where it needs to go rather than asking what cuts bring the fewest political consequences. Lawmakers who received the positive revenue prognosis with caution are probably justified in their trepidation. After all, $99 million is by no means a windfall or a cure-all for the state’s myriad problems. And, given the shaky state of the recovery, those gains could disappear in no time. However, the sum may be just enough to stave off many of the unkindest cuts to public education, Medicaid, mental-health care and other safety-net programs that most states have fought through in recent years. Lawmakers should go slowly in allocating in the extra money, but Mississippians can’t afford for them to sit on it, either.

FEEDBACK

Logic, Offended

March 21 - 27, 2012

I

14

do not consider myself to be pro-life, and I opposed the Personhood Initiative, but the article by Brian McGowan (“The Attack on Republicanism,” Vol. 10, Issue 26) offended my sense of logic. Mr. McGowan lauds our system of republicanism because “once the people have spoken on an issue, it has been decided.” It is therefore incredibly ironic (something that is clearly lost on Mr. McGowan) that he proceeds to attack people trying to legislate on abortion. The legality of abortion was decided 39 years ago not by “the people,” but nine U.S. Supreme Court justices. The people who are trying to pass the Personhood Initiative are trying to do exactly what Mr. McGowan supports in theory but apparently not in practice: trying to get “the people to decide something.” Another point that is totally lost on Mr. McGowan when lauding Jackson and denigrating (Rep. Andy) Gipson (R-Braxton) and (Sen. Joey) Fillingane (R-Sumrall), is that Jackson famously ignored a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, something the personhood amendment does as well. Elliott Haller Jackson

YOUR TURN CLAY A. MCCOLLUM

No March for March 1st

“W

hat do we want? Full equality! When do we want it? Now!” These sentiments provided a unified chant for gay-rights protesters March 1 on the south steps of the Mississippi Capitol building. As I drove south on Interstate 55 the morning of Fondren’s March for Gay Equality last week, the sky, which had been a beautiful early-morning blue, began to cloud over. I checked the weather and saw a 30-percent chance of rain beginning at 9 a.m., the time when the march was set to begin. I then thought of people who protested in the past for rights they were denied, and I remembered the stories of the civil-rights marches in 1960s Alabama and the atrocities of the raids at New York City’s Stonewall Inn. Walking in Jackson in the rain seems better. At Cups in Fondren, where the march to the Capitol was to begin, I wasn’t surprised to see a police presence—10 uniformed officers, six patrol cars and two police motorcycles. About 60 people waited for the three-mile hike down State Street to begin. Not long after, it became apparent that we were not walking anywhere. With amplification, a policeman announced that we could not walk together to the Capitol. Bob Gilchrist, who organized the march, had not secured the liability insurance required for an organized group to walk together. We could drive to the Capitol and stage a protest on the south steps, but the march was off. Later I learned that a group of seven people, after questioning officers, did make the sidewalk trek, carrying an ACLU banner, and that Gilchrist walked the designated route alone Thursday afternoon. At the Capitol, amid a rather impressive media presence, Gilchrist and others led those present in chants. A desire for equality and the ability to partici-

pate fully in society—to marry—certainly emerged. Some protesters loudly cursed. I don’t agree with that behavior, because professionalism and emphasis on commonality are essential in winning support. The demonstration ended as many participants joined the second annual Mississippi AIDS Day press conference in the Capitol second-floor rotunda to implore the Legislature to find $2.5 million to finance AIDS treatment in the state. Mississippi’s allocated funding for AIDS is about 10 times less than monies allocated by neighboring states. As one of the people at AIDS Day said, “Mississippians want to live, not only survive.” In my opinion, LGBT persons everywhere have tired of institutionalized relegation to the outskirts of society, which is precisely why home-grown, grassroots protests like Fondren’s March for Gay Equality are becoming more popular. Even in categorically conservative Mississippi, gays and lesbians have wearied of any “majority” having license over them. Desperately wanting marriage equality, gays and lesbians will no longer be silent and hide their feelings somewhere in the idiomatic closet. They say publicly, “I am somebody, and I deserve full equality.” Despite the fact that the march was called off, Gilchrist said he remains optimistic. I talked to him by phone March 8, and he said that as we were speaking, he was standing with his rainbow flag outside the Hilton on County Line Road. “Newt Gingrich is at the Hilton,” he said. Gilchrist said that although he was expecting more to march last Thursday he still feels that the turnout was beautiful. He is pleased, because Jacksonians saw that “we were not silenced.” Gilchrist is planning another walk to the Capitol March 24. See the Facebook event page for details.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


LORI GREGORY GARROTT

Boots, Again EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Elizabeth Waibel Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon,Tam Curley, Contributing Editor Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Larry Morrisey, Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Brittany Kilgore, Whitney Menogan, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Staff Photographer Virginia Schreiber Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers Trip Burns, William Patrick Butler,Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Eric Bennett, Erica Sutton

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Marketing and Sales Support Ninja

esterday afternoon I got in my car and immediately wished I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quit smoking five months ago. I had nothing easy and obvious to soothe the hand gestures and curse words that typically characterize me in high dudgeon. I ended up just sitting in the car curled over the steering wheel, sweating and furiously typing on my phone. I was at the Capitol, and I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave. I wanted to put the car in drive and maneuver straight into the largest glass of wine Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen. But, for some reason, I just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drive away. A few hours before, I had watched the House pass a bill that I knew would cause lowincome Mississippi women to lose access to health care. I almost felt like it was a battlefield, that I had dead soldiers I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave behind. Eventually, I did drive. I made it home, where my beleaguered husband went silent at my answer to â&#x20AC;&#x153;How was your day?â&#x20AC;? He knows when I say things like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I fit the criteria for an inpatient admission,â&#x20AC;? it means one of two things: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m either homicidal or suicidal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suicidal?â&#x20AC;? he asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nope.â&#x20AC;? He breathed a sigh of relief and went into the kitchen to pour me a glass of wine. I am nothing if not chock full of hyperbole on most days. That day it was mixed with a whole lot of sad and a whole lot of tired. About a year ago, I wrote a column that will probably get lumped with this one because I mention â&#x20AC;&#x153;putting on my bootsâ&#x20AC;&#x153; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;getting ready to marchâ&#x20AC;? in both of them (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give you fair warning). But I find myself on the other side of that year knowing that I am different for it. I am a little more whole. I am a little less naĂŻve. And I suffer a lot less nonsense. This past year, lobbying against Initiative 26 started eating up any life I had outside of work. Every weekend for months there seemed to be something we needed to do to get out the word. Then we voted. Then we won. It was awesome. But I cannot say that I was not angry at the people who forced me to take time away from my life, and my family, to keep rights afforded to me in the U.S. Constitution. And that anger carried forward. As I talked to The Women, I began to notice that they were all still pissed, too. They were also vigilant. These women are pretty awesome. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thank Initiative 26 enough for the women it caused to cross my path. They are amazingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;smart, strong, educated, loving, independent women (and a few men, too!). I count them as my friends now. And right now we are all angry. Angry that The Men on High Street decided they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to listen to usâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;their constituents. And more

so, angry at the entire tone the country has taken toward women in general. Because, unlike some, I know that anti-woman rhetoric actually increases the odds that my daughter will be raped in her lifetime. I grew up in a world that had a place for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;beside the men. Even in the Mississippi Delta in the 1980s, things were not as strange and backward as they are now. I was told that I could do and be anything I wanted. I was taught to love other people. I was taught to take care of people who had less than me. I was taught to be kind to people. I was taught to treat other people the way I want to be treated. And I was told that being a girl was goodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that I could do anything a man could doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; anything. I was also taught to stick up for myself and handle my own business. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come from weak stock. And I like to think I was raised a lot like other Mississippi kids. Today, the Mississippi Legislature is discussing several bills that are germane to women in this state retaining access to reproductive health care. Lawmakers introduced 32 bills this session that deal with regulating or restricting womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive health care. Yes, 32. The number of bills introduced concerning denying men their constitutional rights? None. The number of bills about one of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;highest prioritiesâ&#x20AC;? this session, charter schools? Six. And, yet, people keep saying women arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t under attack. Legislators are not talking about the economyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unless we count unconstitutional immigration bills. They sure arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talking about jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unless its restrictions to unemployment (in a state where the unemployment rate is higher than 10 percent). In short, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to make the charge that they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listening to us at all. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to finally pull out the boots, ladies. Because I am just done. I am done with people wanting to put probes in vaginas and men not allowing women a seat at the table and mothers being prosecuted for accidents and the elevation of embryos above flesh-and-blood humans. I am done. On Thursday, March 29, I will be putting those boots back on. And then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to wear them as I march to the Capitol so they can see that I mean what I say. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m bringing The Women with me. And I want you to join us. Bring your boots. Mississippi W.A.R. (Women Are Representing) will march from Smith Park to the State Capitol in silent protest (signs welcome) starting at 9 a.m. on March 29. Come join other Mississippi womenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and women across the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as we tell our Legislature to represent all of us. Visit facebook.com/groups/WOWMS.

People keep saying women arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t under attack.

Do you live and breathe customer service? The JFP/BOOM Jackson advertising department needs your help keeping our advertisers and partners happy and prosperous! Your key duties will include planning and hosting marketing events, so flexibility for evenings and some weekends is ideal. Other duties including covering phones, generating reports, shooting product photos, running ad copy, helping with logistics. Part-time and hourly to start, but the right person can expand this position.

Send cover letter and resume to todd@jacksonfreepress.com.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

NEEDED

15


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PATTON AVENUE

Thursday, March 22

HARTFIELD STREET BATSON JUMP ZONE

FONDREN

DC

PLACE

OL

MAIN STAGE

MORGAN PLACE

OXFORD ST.

MITCHELL STREET

AN TO N

DULING AVENUE

RO AD

FONDREN JUNGLE OUTPOST

STA TE S TRE ET

Comcast Come-On-In Party: Noon â&#x20AC;&#x2122;til Cainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do It No Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at Fitzgeraldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at The Jackson Hilton (1001 E. County Line Road, 601-957-2800). The Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; very favorite â&#x20AC;&#x153;Missiciansâ&#x20AC;? (singer/songwriters from all over the state) rock from the get-go! Free and open to all. 5-9 p.m. Arts, Eats and Beats: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giant annual street party to welcome spring to Jackson. Enjoy live music, street vendors, food and great company. Free. 6:30-7:30 p.m. See the Budweiser Clydesdales up close and personal on Duling Avenue in Fondren. The raffle drawing will be held for the winner to ride the Bud rig during the Zippity Doo Dah Parade Saturday.

LORENZ AVENUE

Friday, March 23

LAKELAND DRIVE

11 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Big Hat Luncheon is at Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; $21 in advance; $26 at the door (not included in the Weekend Pass*. Call 601-368-1919 to make your reservation.) 12:45 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Hats on Paradeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;(informal sashay from Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s into the center of Fondren). 2-5 p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Everyday Gourmetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Wannabe Welcome Party. (Included in Weekend Pass*.) 3-7 p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Chillinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Gossipinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Tellinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Liesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in Fitzgeraldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at the Jackson Hiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;snacks and music provided by the Hilton (included in Weekend Pass*) 6-9 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dance Concert on Duling Avenue featuring Memphis dance band The Bouffants; free. 8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The first-ever Pepsi Big Hair Ball with music from the Mississippi Blues All-Stars, benefiting Animal Rescue Fund of Mississippi is at the Jackson Hilton. Prizes for biggest hair, weirdest hair and funniest hair (included in Weekend Pass* or $10 at the door).

TAYLOR STREET PARADE LINEUP CARNIVAL

STAGE

/00 !"#"$% 12-3%

SAL & MOOKIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARNIVAL

March 21 - 27, 2012

Saturday, March 24

16

8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fondren Un-Zipped port-a-potty decorating begins, $75 per business, school, team or individual. 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bacon, Biscuits, Bloodies & Booksâ&#x20AC;? Jill Conner Browne signs copies of her new book at Duling Hall. $20 ticket includes a copy of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fat is the New 30: The Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide to Coping with (the crappy parts of) Life.â&#x20AC;? Featuring Cathead Vodka Zing Zang Bloody Marys or Screwdrivers for those 21 and older (included in Weekend Pass*). 10 a.m.-2 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5th Anniversary Street Carnival on the Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Memorial Stadium green space and at the Batson Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Jump Zone on Duling Lawn. Includes a silent auction from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Sweet Potato Tots Coronation at 1 p.m.; Pizza Pie and Ice-Cream Eating Contest from 1-2 p.m. 1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Mississippi Mass Choir performs on the Main Stage. 3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The winners of the Fondren Un-Zipped Port-a-Potty Decorating announced at the Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carnival Stage. 7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;BankPlus Zippity Doo Dah Parade with Grand Marshall Jackson State University President Dr. Carolyn Meyers. Featuring the Sweet Potato Queens, the JSU Sonic Boom of the South and the Budweiser Clydesdales. Free. Immediately following the parade, join the Street Party on Duling Avenue with music from the Delta Mountain Boys. The winner of the Patty Peck Honda Doo Dah Day Blue Car Giveaway will be announced. 9:30 p.m.ish â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pearls & PJs with Chris Gill and The Sole Shakers is at the Hilton-Jackson. Late-night snacks from the Hilton. (Included in Weekend Pass*) *Order your $89 ZDD Weekend Pass at zddparade.com/store/weekend.php. More details at zddparade.com.



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by Lynette Hanson

Spud Studs: According to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato

DWAYNE JONES

Queens Book of Love,â&#x20AC;? Spud Studs are â&#x20AC;&#x153;men in the entourage of the Sweet Potato Queens who make themselves useful in various and sundry delightful ways. May include current and/or former boyfriends, fiancĂŠs and husbands. No one is ever allowed to escape.â&#x20AC;? On parade day, the Spud Studsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; usefulness extends to marching alongside the SPQ float and making sure no one gets dangerously exuberant in their quest for beads.

Potato-Queens time, grown women fell under the spell of the Sweet Potato Queens and were heard to utter, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wannabe be one!â&#x20AC;? Thus, the term was born that describes Sweet Potato Queen Wannabes who march all around the Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; queenly float adorned in beloved, passed down SPQ finery, sequins and foam rubber included. Wannabe Wannabe: After a few years, the

Sweet Potato Queens who ride the queenly float upgraded their finery to include even more sequins, fringe and foam rubber. This led to the idea of the official Wannabes finding their own Wannabes, women who willingly jumped at the chance to march in the parade in the earlier finery. Willingly in neon letters, I might add, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;cause thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I got to do myownself (a favorite SPQ word). More Queenly language from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sweet Potato Queens Book of Loveâ&#x20AC;?:

As wannabes pour into Jackson from around the world, and spanning generations, watch the stock prices of boa makers. Surely to goodness itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great investmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least every March.

you may hear it often enough to have the anthem stuck in your head for days.)

same tiara which sparkles splendidly atop the curly, glossy red hair on parade day.)

Tammy: The official name of each and every

Lolling About: The official activity of the

Sweet Potato Queen, used to preserve some shred of a semblance of anonymity. (In other words, you may now call yourself Tammy followed by the name the world knows you by, as in Tammy-Lynette or Tammy-Ronni.

Sweet Potato Queens, sometimes referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not Doing Jack Sh*t.â&#x20AC;? (Parade weekend means little to no lolling about due to the amount of fun to be had.) Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all set now. You know how to talk the language. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to parade like royalty. Just be careful who you make promises to, if you know what I mean. Lynette Hanson was a proud WannabeWannabe before she moved off to Portland, Ore.

Four Major Food Groups: According to the

Sweet Potato Queens, these would be Sweet, Salty, Fried and Au Gratin. (My advice, partake of one or more group during the Zippity Doo Dah Parade and Festival Weekend at various locations around Jackson.) Kacey Jones: Not the railroad man or the

inward spiritual act of embracing oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Queenliness, should be worn for some part of every dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important. (This is the

JULIE SKIPPER

I

f youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re roaming the streets of Fondren before the start of the Zippity Doo Dah Parade, be sure to watch out for the bulls. It may not be Pamplona, exactly, but the Magnolia Roller Vixens will bring some excitement and entertainment while clearing the way before the parade starts. For the uninitiated, the Roller Vixens are one of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roller-derby teams and have existed for about three years. As the sportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent resurgence in popularity continues to grow, the team has increased to around 30 Vixens, who range in age from 18 to â&#x20AC;&#x153;young at heart.â&#x20AC;? They also have a Junior Derby, a junior varsity squad of sorts, for girls who are too young to play in bouts (18 is the minimum for the regular league) but want to learn about the sport. The Running of the Bulls is based on an annual event held by derby teams in other southern cities with parades, says Anna Masters, a skater with the Roller Vixens. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community involvement is a big part of what we do,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to give back as much as we can ... so this was a natural extension.â&#x20AC;? It also provides an opportunity to show

Tiara: The outward physical symbol of the

by Julie Skipper WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

Little ZDD participants are lovingly called tater tots. And, yes, there are beads to catch.

baseball man, Kacey Jones is the official Songstress to the Sweet Potato Queens who wrote and sings â&#x20AC;&#x153;Never Wear Panties to a Party,â&#x20AC;? the SPQ anthem. (Parade weekend,

The Magnolia Roller Vixens will take their skills to the street for Zippity Doo Dah and the chirren.

people what the derby is about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that roller derby is making a comeback and that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different than it was in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s. Rather than being just for show, now there are strategies and rules, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real sport. We want people to know about it not just to recruit fresh meat (the name for new players), but so they come watch our bouts and support us,â&#x20AC;? Masters says. For the Running of the Bulls, the Vixens will decorate their helmets with horns and get dressed up in derby attire. Once they

are â&#x20AC;&#x153;released,â&#x20AC;? they will skate through the streets to make way for the parade, swatting those in their way with foam bats. The Jackson Rugby Football Team is joining the fun by running in front of the Vixens. The addition of the rugby team made sense because both roller derby and rugby are full-contact sports that are a bit outside of the mainstream, so they support each other, Masters says. She first met the Roller Vixens when they came to a Jackson Rugby Football Team matchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;her husband plays on the team. In addition to his support she found that the girls on the team take their time with new members and help them learn the sport. Participating in community events like the parade increases the camaraderie among members. Look for the Roller Vixens right before the parade starts, or learn more about them at magnoliarollervixens.com. Follow them on Twitter at @magnoliarollers or find them on Facebook. The Vixensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; next bout is March 31 at the Jackson Convention Complex against the Capital Defenders.

Boom Time by Marika Cackett

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Here are a few terms to literally increase your knowledge of the phenoms known far and wide by the acronym SPQ.

Wannabe: From the beginning of Sweet-

DWAYNE JONES

V

isualize the Sweet Potato Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; smiling women throwing beads from a queenly float wearing costumes covered in green and pink sequins, spangles, and fringe; long, curling, glossy red hair; sparkling tiaras; and pink majorette boots during the Zippity Doo Dah Parade.

17


Be MORE Particular ([FHUSWIURP´)DWLVWKH1HZ¾E\-LOO&RQQHU%URZQH

by Sam Hall

T

COURTESY AMAZON PUBLISHING

he idea behind this review was twofoldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to get a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective on the latest Sweet Potato Queen book and to do a bit of a combo review of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dummy Line,â&#x20AC;? a novel by Mississippian Bobby Cole whom Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, Kyle Jennings, represents. Put another way, this review is for the men. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t generally read Jill Conner Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-selling Sweet Potato Queen books and might be interested in knowing if they would enjoy it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for people who would love a good thriller chase through the woods where a father has to defend his daughter from a band of psychotic thugs out for revenge. (Read my upcoming review of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dummy Lineâ&#x20AC;? in the JFP for more.) Now, for those SPQ fans who have continued reading, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry. This review is not nearly as bad as my qualifiers make it sound. In fact, I laughed heartily at and identified with several of the yarns throughout â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fat Is The New 30: The Sweet Potato Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Coping with (the Crappy Parts of) Lifeâ&#x20AC;? (Amazon Publishing, 2012, $14.95). If you enjoy bold, irreverent and sometimes crude humorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and most men doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find plenty to keep you turning the pages. But there is much more to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in here than a few lines about how a bummed-out birthday boy canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be cheered up on his special dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even by sexual favors, a fart joke or two, and a recollection about a news story detailing a naked guy falling through a ceiling. What Browne writes here has heart and soul, and if you are a man who loves southern womenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and most men doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then you will appreciate the heart and soul of her writing along with the humor. The hardest part for men may be getting through a book that reads like a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gossip circle, where boisterous women tell tales and guffaw and call names. In real life, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a circle to which men are generally not invited and usually would never seek to enter. Granted, we men have our own form of said circle. In some ways, we can relate. So, to help my fellow first-time male readers of a Sweet Potato Queens book along, I offer this tidbit of advice: Put yourself in the mindset of a large camping trip with good friends and family. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s later in the

evening, a few good beers into the conversation when everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit loosened up. Then, allow Jill Conner Browne to hold court. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good at it. Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great achievement with this book is simply being able to bring humor and fun to some stories that clearly are not humorous. The birthday boy story includes an accident with his son, an unrelated suicide and a friend battling cancer. Granted, there is little depth of discussion to these stories, but the point is clear: Humor makes it easier to relate to lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lessons. These â&#x20AC;&#x153;crappyâ&#x20AC;? things in life are fairly universal, even if men donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t discuss them quite as much as women. Men will be able to relate, even if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t discuss the fact that they read a Sweet Potato Queens book as much as women are willing to. Nonetheless, in doing the review, I found several of my male friends who have read and enjoyed a few of Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not to a few, yet, but on this one, you can count me among them. This is fun, light reading. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not my first choice to pick off a shelf, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly enjoyable enough to be picked up eventually. Browne signs the book 10 a.m. Saturday at Duling Hall. See zddparade.com for ticket information.

SPQ Shopping List 7KHZRUOGÂśVPRVWSDGGHGEUD ([WUDH[WUDVWUHQJWKKDLUVSUD\ $ZLJZLWKKLJKWHDVLQJUDGLXV 6XQJODVVHVSUREDEO\FDWH\HV 7LDUD 'XK  )LVKQHWVPDPD 3LQNJUHHQULQVHUHSHDW %OLQJRQWRSRIEOLQJRQWRSRIEOLQJ +RPHFRPLQJ4XHHQVDVK &RPI\VKRHV7KH\DLQÂśWORRNLQÂśDW\RIHHW

ES - O - TER - I - CA:

March 21 - 27, 2012

A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

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Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens â&#x20AC;˘ Pendulums Books â&#x20AC;˘ Wands â&#x20AC;˘ Moldavite Jewelry & More National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

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by Marika Cackett

Trace Alston and his daughter, Mary, built a wildlife scene on their golf cart for this year’s Zippity Doo Dah parade in Fondren. Show up at 7 p.m. on March 24 to see the little elephant (and friends) roll.

as Lee puts it, “love, peace and SPQ.” This year, to go along with the theme, the Mates’ golf cart will be decked out in vines, flowers and jungle animals as they parade through the streets of Fondren. “We’ll be marching in our tutus and

butterfly wings,” Lee promises. The Zippity Doo Dah Parade is open to anyone wanting to participate, although it is too late to get a float in the parade. Parade details are on the event’s website at zippitydoodahparade.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

decorated electric-powered golf carts. Alston says his float will coincide perfectly with this year’s theme, “Amazon: Run through the Jungle,” with its colorful animal motif. Now all grown up, the Rude Boys (now Rude Men) along with their Rude Women and Rudelets dazzle the crowds with outlandish creations and beads—and their own golf-cart creation. Last year was Lynn Lee’s fifth year participating in a parade. In the first ZDD parade last year, Lee’s group, The Queen’s Classy Mates, raised more than $20,000 for the children’s hospital. “We just want to bring the spotlight to support Fondren and the children’s hospital,” Lee says. “We live in the shadow of that hospital and have family and friends that count on that hospital.” Lee’s reasons for supporting the parade and the hospital go beyond her desire to dress up and decorate a tie-dyed float. Lee’s granddaughter, Abbie, seeks treatment for severe asthma at Batson. “That hospital is near and dear to our hearts,” Lee says of Batson. Because The Classy Mates began with former classmates of Jill Conner Browne, their float always involves tie-dye and,

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

A

lexander “Trace” Alston, 50, has been to every Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade since the beginning. As part of the Rude Men Krewe, Alston and 75 fellow krewe members from all over the country descend on downtown Jackson every March to dazzle the crowds with big beads and even bigger floats. But don’t think the Rude Men are limited to one weekend out of the year. As the second annual Zippity Doo Dah Parade rolls through Fondren, Alston and his krewe will be marching to a jungle-themed tune as part of this year’s festivities. “We’ve been marching with the Queens since 1982, when we were known then as the Rude Boys,” Alston says. When the Sweet Potato Queens decided to leave the St. Paddy’s Parade in 2011, head queen Jill Conner Browne founded the Zippity Doo Dah Parade and Festival Weekend in Fondren to benefit Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. The first event raised more than $65,000 for sick and injured children in Mississippi. Last year’s parade lured visitors from 39 states and four countries. Like any great parade, this one has floats, but the Zippity Doo Dah floats are

19


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March 21 - 27, 2012


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All are invited to join us in worship.

is a program where our best students are put together in bands to rehearse and to put on shows!

GALLOWAY UMC 305 North Congress Street | Jackson, MS www.gallowayumc.org

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1EVGLRH TQ 607 Fondren Place Jackson, MS

www.fondrenguitars.com

Palm Sunday, April 1

601.362.0313

9:30 a.m. Palm Sunday Parade for the whole family! 11:00 a.m. on the Capitol Lawn under the Oak Trees across from the Church! Bring a blanket and/or chairs and dress for a picnic. Picnic lunch to follow the 11 a.m. Worship

Easter Sunday, April 8 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Easter Worship Service Rev. Drs. Connie and Joey Shelton

20% Off

for Queens

& Wannabes Located in Highland Village, Suite 144 | Jackson MS 39211 601.981.1975 | www.earthwalkshoes.com| Like Us On

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Gallowayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Church on the Grounds Worship

21


Back to the Present Photos by Frank Ezelle

M You wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it, but this is Butterfly Yoga.

aybe Jacksonians living under a rock, or a newcomer or visitor to Jackson, might not know by now that native Kathryn Stockett based her novel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Help,â&#x20AC;? on tragic history right here in her hometown. When the film crew showed up, they brought retro styling back to â&#x20AC;&#x153;downtownâ&#x20AC;? Fondren (actually, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first suburb), where â&#x20AC;&#x153;the stripâ&#x20AC;? (as locals like to call the row of small, local businesses along North State Street near Duling Avenue), was transformed back to the 1960s all over again. (They even brought the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coloredsâ&#x20AC;? balcony back to the Pix/Capri.) Once the film crew left, Fondren went back to normal, with the old Shell returning to Butterfly Yoga and the Capri back to its sadly empty self. You can still see a few signs of the retro facelift, though, if you look closely.

The film crew added the â&#x20AC;&#x153;coloredâ&#x20AC;? balcony entrance back to the Capri.

The Pix/Capri has seen better daysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and XXX-rated ones.

F 

Beehives and car fins filled the neighborhood for about a week.

Et Tu, Pix? by Dustin Cardon

COURTESY CHRISTINE BURNS

March 21 - 27, 2012

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Brentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drugs is no longer a drugstoreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fabulous dinerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but it was once again for the film.

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Fine and Funky

David Waugh is the president of the Fondren Association of Businesses. His main role for ZDD was getting merchants on board.

N

orth Carolina native David Waugh, 62, lived in New York City for 15 years before he met his soon-to-bewife, Jane Sanders, and moved to Jackson in 2007. Waugh, a pastor at Madison Chapel, is the president of the Fondren Association of Businesses, known as FAB, and is the executive recruiter of Professional Staffing Group. A combination of his wife, the cofounder of Professional Staffing Group, and the community of people in Fondren made Waugh decide to become a leader in Jackson’s funkiest neighborhood. What drew you to Fondren? This is my wife’s company. And it’s where her company’s located. ... (But) if her company wasn’t here, Fondren is the closest thing to the funkiness and fineness of the beat, the vibe, the political-social consciousness that I was used to in New York. Downtown is beginning to be revitalized and have some creatives move into it, but Fondren is the place that has the heartbeat that I was used to, be it from Vermont to Rhode Island to New York. It’s a community that’s got a center to it, a heart to it. It has enough diversity that makes it fun—young and old, gay and straight, black and white—it’s not as diverse as I’d like for it to be, but for Mississippi, it’s mighty fine. What has FAB had to do to prepare for the Zippity Doo Dah Parade? When the (Fondren) Renaissance Foundation hired (a director) in December, it became quickly apparent that we needed to have an organization that had liability coverage (for the parade), and FAB doesn’t. FAB can’t afford that—it’s about $1,000, and we’ve got a $6,000 budget. So we passed the sponsorship from FAB to FRF. And because we discovered the first year how much

work was involved. This year, FAB seeks to operate as a sister in a fraternal relationship. So FAB really has not had to do a lot of planning this year. ... What FAB has to do is get our merchants behind it. What will be different this year? This time, to get folks moving, all day on Saturday, as well as during Arts, Eats and Beats (Thursday night), we will have nonsimultaneous events occurring. So everyone is not having a band at 1 o’clock on Saturday. At 1 o’clock on Saturday, you’re going to have something going on over at Brent’s and McDade’s. At 3 o’clock, around the corner at Cups and circa., Pam Confer and band will be doing jazz. At 4 o’clock, somebody’s going to be doing something over at Nick’s. So it’s keeping the crowd moving. We’ve asked the businesses to get together in clusters and sponsor something for their cluster. So it’s not one store doing it, but you’re cooperatively drawing them to your location. Then once they’re at your location, we hope they’ll shop, or they’ll know what’s there. We’re also trying to get out of the mindset that this is all about shopping now. This is about helping people realize that Fondren is funky, yes. Fondren is diverse, yes. Fondren is also very fine. Right here, we’ve got Babalu, we’ve got Fatsumo, we’ve got Walker’s, and we’ve got Nick’s. We’ve got fine food all around us. Where will parade-goers park? Over at (Veterans Memorial Stadium); we have that lot. And then there are a couple of other lots related to churches around here that’ll provide parking spaces. We’re also discouraging people from parking in the central area, (if they are) just coming in for the events. There will be parking lots available for them. Proceeds from the parking costs go to Blair E. Batson (Children’s Hospital). There will be shuttles to get people from those parking places. Will people be allowed to have alcohol outside during the parade? We say no. Open-container laws still apply. And we bill this as a family-friendly thing. Sometimes the officers choose to look the other way, but we’re not encouraging them to look the other way. We are saying ‘Here are the places you can buy.’ The different restaurants will have cordoned-off places around them where the permit is available. And that’s where it should be. I know with the St. Paddy’s parade (downtown), people just bring in coolers and just set up, but that’s not legal and it’s not permitted, (police look) the other way. We’re encouraging that not to happen. We’re encouraging (Zippity Doo Dah) to be very family-friendly. Visit zddparade.com for more information on Zippity Doo Dah and the various events happening around Fondren.

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VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

by Jacob Fuller

23


Stroll. Shop. Dine. Enjoy!

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Fair Trade Green In the Rainbow Plaza 2807 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39216 601-987-0002 10-6 M-F 10-4 Sat

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25


Meet â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sylum Heights Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Going To Be A Long Weekend, Fondren.

COURTESY LBHF AND MRS. HELENE ROTWEIN

NATURAL GROCERY

by Dustin Cardon

Ginger Brew Tummy Soother

The fork of State Street and Old Canton Road begins the strip of Cadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alley that ends at the old Pix theater. Today AmSouth bank and Sun Gallery have replaced the businesses above.

W

Fruit Enzyme Perks up skin

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Restore Electrolytes

Castille Soap Need we say more?

hat Jacksonians now know as the historic Fondren district grew up around the former Mississippi Lunatic Asylum on the current site of the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Located near the fork in the road where the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s northernmost boundaries reached Canton Road, the mental hospital provided many jobs, mostly menial ones, which drew large numbers of people to the area. During the Civil War, most of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plantations, many of which had belonged to the Garland family, were destroyed. After the war, the state divided up the properties, and Isham Cade, a former slave, purchased a large parcel of this land. The area was officially known as the Isham Cade Survey, but many locals called it â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sylum Heights. (State Street, from the Old Canton fork to the Pix/ Capri was known as Cadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alley.) David Fondren, who was white, purchased some of Cadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land in 1893 and built a wood-frame general store called David Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Merchandise and Fancy Grocery. Located in the fork between Canton Road and Tougaloo Road (now State Street), the land fronted an Illinois Central railroad spur, which served the insane asylum and gave Fondren easy access to

An hour every now and then may not be enough to get you a ticket into heaven. But it might help you find the right track.

Hang Over Supplement

March 21 - 27, 2012

Helps undo what last night did...

26

incoming supplies and outgoing timber. The community established a post office inside Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grocery in 1894. Feeling that â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sylum Heights wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the best name, locals petitioned the U.S. Postal Service to establish the office as Fondren. The Fondren post office still exists today, only a block away from the original location. In 1918, the state established the Mississippi State Hospital, commonly known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whitfield,â&#x20AC;? after the community outside Jackson where it relocated. The old asylum was demolished, but the area lived on. The Fondren family built several homes in the area on Tougaloo Road (now North State), and many businesses set up shop there as well. Drugstores, restaurants, filling stations, a neighborhood theater and other businesses joined the community. Many individual buildings were joined together as the commercial district grew, and a number of permanent stores also grew out of existing housing. By 1925, housing development in Jackson had reached the southern edge of the old Fondren hospital grounds. Jackson annexed Fondren, the first inclusion of a developed community within the city limits. Read more about Fondren at fondren.org.

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Join Us!

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McDade’s Market in Fondren is celebrating with a tent out in front of the store! Jesse Robinson, Mississippi Blues guitarist, will be playing from 5 pm until 9 pm and we will have food samples as well.

Frozen?

We Think Not.

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27


Business Good at â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Stripâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by R.L. Nave

is certain) Campbell. Moore believes the teacakes sustained the business even through Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seedier days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As long as we do the teacakes, people keep coming back,â&#x20AC;? Moore said.

how it happens.â&#x20AC;? Editorial photography is more closely aligned with storytelling, he says. Find Pattersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work at 119gallery.com. Kolbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grand Cleaners 933 N. State St.; 601-366-1453 Established in 1926, Kolbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grand Cleaners moved to its present Fondren location from Amite Street in 1960. Mike and Tina Highfill run the business, which specializes in leather, drapery, wedding gown preservation and large-scale laundry service for medical facilities. Kolbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other locations include Ridgeland, Castlewoods, Byram, Florence and downtown.

COURTESY FRANK EZELLE

G

o west, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;specifically to the west side of State Street between East Mitchell and Duling avenues. Perhaps because crossing busy State Street can be treacherous depending on the time of day, the venerable Jackson businesses that occupy this strip donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t receive as nearly the publicityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or customer foot trafficâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as their relatively younger counterparts on the other side of the street. But the west side businesses are full of rich history and characters that have seen Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highs and lows, and, therefore, deserve a little more love.

Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cut and Curls 3015-1/2 N. State St; 601-362-0326 Forty years ago, when Bob Smith opened his barbershop in Fondren, theater-goers so packed the sidewalks you would have to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;pleaseâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;excuse meâ&#x20AC;? when leaving Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shop. In that time, Fondren has ebbed and flowed with a series of boom-and-bust cycles, Smith said. A native of Smith County, Smith attended a barber college in Lincoln, Neb., and although he has never bothered to count the number of haircuts heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given, he can tell you that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s barbered clients from 60 different countries. Smith sold the shop last fall to a woman heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never met before she showed up to inquire about purchasing the business. Still, the door still bears Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, and he maintains a robust clientele from Jackson, around the state and even a handful from out of state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not bragging. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just stating the facts,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery 3013 N. State St., 601-362-4628 After years of a revolving door of owners, Mitchell Moore and his business partner Robert Lewis, took ownership of Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery in March 2011. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somebody needs to love this place for a change,â&#x20AC;? he said of the decision to buy and remodel the 48-year-old bakery. According to Moore, if Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it, meaning that everythingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from the icing to the pie shellsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is made from scratch. That includes the bakeryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top-selling teacake, made from the same recipe as original owner Louis (or Lewis; no one

Now

Castle House Antiques 3009 N. State St., 601-982-5456 Castle House started out as purely a clock shop 42 years ago before expanding into other antiques. Now, it specializes in antique European imports from the 18th through the early 20th centuries with Donnie and Darlene Register handpicking each piece that goes into the store. It will be closing at the end of the month, so hurry in. Visit www.castlehouseantiques.com for Castle Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inventory. Jackson Shoe Rebuilders 3001 N. State St., 601-366-1481 Jackson Shoe Rebuilders takes care of all your leather and fashion needs, from head to toe. Located at the corner of North State Street and East Mitchell Avenue, the business specializes in fixing footwear but also sells menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes (and, of course, multicolor shoe polish, shoe horns and leather cleaner) and offers an assortment of hats, neckties, cuff links, billfolds, cologne and purses.

SE Lock and Key 3003 N. State St., 601-362-0541 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Definitely the areas has picked up a lot,â&#x20AC;? said SE Lock and Key owner Jason Meeks of the more than 15 years heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked as a locksmith in Fondren. SE Lock and Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clients range from the guy who locks himself out of his house to sprawling apartment complexes to government agencies. Meeks said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoping to remodel the business that cuts keys, changes locks and makes emergency calls around Jackson. He credits neighborhood festivals and other events for the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s renaissance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The area has everything someone would need,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good time for Fondren.â&#x20AC;?

James Patterson Photography 3017 N. State St., 601-918-3232 In his studio on State Street, in a space shared with Ron Blaylock, photographer James Patterson shoots portraits and commercial photography. He is also an editorial photographer for news agencies including Getty Images, The New York Times, The Boston Globe and The Washington Post. He distinguishes the work he does for journalism organizations as different from photojournalism, which he calls the â&#x20AC;&#x153;purest form is

Wellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cleaners 3007 N. State St., 601-366-3522 Carol and E.G. Moore have run Wellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cleaners for 20 years, but the business has been in the family for more than 75 years. Fondren, where the Moores also live, has â&#x20AC;&#x153;changed for the betterâ&#x20AC;? in that time, Carol said. The cleaners specializes in archiving wedding dresses, passed down through generations of brides. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On your 50th, you can put it back on and see if it fits,â&#x20AC;? Carol said.

28

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

March 21 - 27, 2012

$

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

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Perfect-Fit Alterations 538 Mitchell Ave., 601-362-7829 People just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go into the alterations business anymore. One might think that means companies like Perfect-Fit Alterations would struggle as a result, but owner Michael Olowo-Ake said the opposite is true: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good business. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough help to keep up with demand.â&#x20AC;? Olowo-Ake, a native of Nigeria, moved the business to Fondren in 1992 and credits the Fondren Association of Businesses for improving the neighborhood. Perfect-fit not only does alterations, but can also make garments from scratch (prom dresses are a big seller this time of year). Olowo-Ake adds that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the few tailors in town that works with furs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicate,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to know what you are doing.â&#x20AC;?

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VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Blaylock Photography 3017 N. State St., 601-506-6624 Photographer Ron Blaylock is as much an artist as he is a journalist. Blaylockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork is on permanent display at the Mississippi Museum for Art and has been featured at the New Orleans Museum of Art. His photojournalism has appeared in The Clarion-Ledger, The Washington Post and Real Simple magazine. Blaylock also teaches photography at Millsaps College and offers private classes and workshops. Visit blaylockphoto.com for more information.

VIRGINIA SCREIBER

During â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Helpâ&#x20AC;?

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Best Pizza 2009-2012

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(in the former FabraCare Building, between Katâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

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29 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: Jackson Free Press. 2012. 9.5â&#x20AC;? x 6.167â&#x20AC;?. Commissioned by Robby Channell.


Learn to

Seth Libbey (Blues)

THURSDAY 3/22

Beth Patterson (Irish/Humor) FRIDAY 3/23

Triple Threat (Rock & Roll)

SATURDAY 3/24

Hollywood & The Way To Go Band (R&B)

MONDAY 3/26

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 3/27

H

istoric driving tour of Oxford and the University of Mississippi on the famous Double Decker bus. Tour will include stops at two historic homes: the L.Q.C. Lamar House and Cedar Oaks Mansion.

Tickets are $8 for adults and $4 for children and include admission into both homes. Tour departs from Skipwith Cottage on the Square.

Tour Dates Saturday, March 24 at 1pm Saturday, March 31 at 1pm

Saturday, April 21 at 11am Friday, April 27 at 3pm

Saturday, April 7 at 1pm

(Double Decker Weekend)

Saturday, March 31: Downtown Council Spring Open House includes: pictures with the Easter Bunny from 10-12, and an egg hunt and egg decorating on the Courthouse Lawn beginning at 12:15. Plus, enjoy shopping with our Downtown Council members.

For ticket information, contact the Oxford CVB at 662-232-2477.

Open Mic with A Guy Named George

Try our new

HAPPY HOUR MENU

March 21 - 27, 2012

• Drink Specials • Limited Time Food Menu

30

Available Monday - Friday 4pm - 7pm

(Ole Miss Red/Blue Game)

(Downtown Council Spring Open House)

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WEDNESDAY 3/21

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Dramatic Presentations Home, Garden and Church Tours Carriage Rides Double Decker Bus Rides 10K Run Tales from the Crypt

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BOOKS p 32 | FILM p 33 | 8 DAYS p 34 | MUSIC p 36 | SPORTS p 40

Finding the Maya

by Trip Burns

D

Left to right: Richard Lawrence as James and Stacey Overstreet as Marty in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Circle Mirror Transformation.â&#x20AC;?

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r. George Bey does not subscribe to the belief based on marketing, says getting a spotlight on stories at the college is powered. We think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a first-of-its-kind, a model for bioculthe Mayan calendar that the world will end Dec. 21, important, to the school and to students. In this particular case, tural types of research and has the potential to serve the college 2012. However, he has a request of believers: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Please Beyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research at Kiuic was of national interest. for a century.â&#x20AC;? give me your money a few days before,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I The journey to the documentary began August 2010, About 12 years ago, local Mayans told Millsaps researchwould like to use it toward research.â&#x20AC;? ers about some land that was up for sale. In his office at Millsaps College, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The patriarch of this family had died,â&#x20AC;? among his maps and books and in the Bey says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And all the parcels were going company of a life-size skeleton hovering by to be divided.â&#x20AC;? his desk, Bey leans back in his chair and The Millsaps group was looking for speaks excitedly about his research on the an archeological research site, and Mexiancient Maya civilization in Mexico. He can government officials were looking for works part of the year with his archeology somewhere to preserve the local biology. students in the Yucatan at Kiuic, a 4,000Working with the Mexican governacre biocultural reserve near the Mayan ment, which provided some funding, town of Oxkutzkab about two hours south Millsaps acquired the land to create a of Merida, Mexico. Millsaps owns the restructure for research and learning that serve, and the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s non-profit organizawould include a variety of disciplines. It tion, Kaxil Kiuic, manages it. became a â&#x20AC;&#x153;living laboratory,â&#x20AC;? Bey says. Experts know the Maya people for New archeological technology has their pre-Columbian written language, and become invaluable at Kiuic, he says. Refor their art, architecture, and mathematisearchers use computers, remote sensing cal and astronomical systems. The culture, equipment, satellites and radar to map which dates back to around 1800 B.C., out the landscape and buildings on the reached its peak in the first century. For site, which is much more efficient than reasons yet to be explained, the civilization older methods. went into decline beginning around A.D. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What you can do (now) in one year Millsaps professor George Bey (inset) narrates a new National Geographic documentary, 800, and the people abandoned many citwould have taken you five,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quest for the Lost Maya,â&#x20AC;? premiering on PBS March 28. ies. Today, descendants of the Maya are But while technology may spread throughout Central America. speed up certain aspects of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bey is the narrator of a new National Geographic docu- when science writer Dan Vergano published â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Long, Said work, archaeologists cannot do all their research remotely. mentary, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quest for the Lost Maya,â&#x20AC;? premiering March 28 on the Mayaâ&#x20AC;? in USA Today. Vergano had traveled to the Yucatan â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to have an interest in being on the ground,â&#x20AC;? PBS. The film highlights research and discoveries at the Kiuic and spent a week with Bey and his students at Kiuic. Eventual- Bey says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to walk around, talk to local people, check site, one inexplicably abandoned Maya site. Bey interviews ly, the article wound up in a brainstorming session at National maps and photographs. You have to survey, and you have to do expertsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from locals to students to researchersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to â&#x20AC;&#x153;paint a Geographic. After a few weeks of discussion with Bey, produc- detailed excavations.â&#x20AC;? picture of the past,â&#x20AC;? he says. ers decided to pursue the project. The deal was completed afIn the process, Bey believes his team of Millsaps researchNot all Mayans were alike. Bey says research on the north- ter National Geographic received funding from Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tokyo ers are uncovering important truths about the ancient Mayan ern-most groups has been neglected, in part because written Broadcasting System and Franceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canal 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quest for the Lost civilization. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The question of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;why did they leave?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; is perhaps language was less important to them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Questâ&#x20AC;? explores the pos- Mayaâ&#x20AC;? was shot on location and includes interviews, live action not as important as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;why didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t they come back?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? he says. sible social, economic and political motivations of the Maya. recreations, illustrations and animation. Oh, and about that calendar: Mayan calendars are cycliThe mass abandonment is intriguing in light of fresh evidence Although the documentary focuses on the archeological cal. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resetting, Bey says, not ending. that some people intended to return. They overturned some research, researchers are engaged in other types work at Kiuic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quest for the Lost Maya,â&#x20AC;? airs March 28 at 7 p.m. on PBS. objects, for example, protecting them from the elements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do biology, geology and sustainable living,â&#x20AC;? Bey says. Check with your local provider for channel information, or visit Patti Wade, Millsapsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; director of communications and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built an off-the-gird research and learning center, solar- pbs.org to learn more about the documentary.

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Lunch Bunch Join us for an exciting presentation about Ask for More Arts, a school-community-arts partnership that believes today’s Jackson Public School students need arts learning to improve their academic performance, graduate, and prepare them to become engaged and productive 21st Century citizens. Come listen to teachers, students, and artists as they relate their experiences in a residency and see the artwork their students created over the past several months. The residency program connects teaching artists with schools to create collaborative teaching and learning arts experiences that integrates the arts with academic learning. We will also reveal exciting details about the forthcoming student exhibit in April!

Lunch Bunch is generously sponsored by

Contact Linda Cockrell at 601-969-6015 ext 320 or lcockrell@parents4publicschools.org to reserve a $5.00 lunch.

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hen I met Gerard Helferich last fall, he handed me a piece of jade. The dark green disk, carved in the shape of an ear, was about an inch and a half high. As we spoke about his book, “Stone of Kings: In Search of the Lost Jade of the Maya” (Lyons Press, 2011, $24.95), I held the stone, methodically rubbing my thumb over its smooth surface. Helferich attributes synchronicity to his writing the book. Mary Lou Ridinger gave her husband, Jay Ridinger, a copy of Helferich’s 2004 book, “Humboldt’s Cosmos.” The couple lived in Guatamala, prospecting for and selling jade, and her husband mentioned that he wouldn’t mind meeting the author. A couple of years later, Helferich and his wife, Teresa Nicholas (Yazoo City native and author of 2011’s “Buryin’ Daddy”), were in Guatemala on assignment from Fodor’s, and they met Mary Lou. Jay was too ill to meet Helferich, though; he died two months later. “I have this feeling that he wanted to meet me to try to get me to write a book about him,” Helferich said. And he did, without my even meeting him. … He just set it up—aligning the forces of the universe.” Helferich wove four narrative threads into his surprisingly engaging book. “It’s the story of how jade is formed and how it’s carved,” he said. “It’s the story about the Maya and the Olmecs and what jade meant to them. It’s a story about the archeologists who found the caches of jade. …. And then, the fourth story of the Ridingers and … the scientists and prospectors.” When Helferich and I parted company, I found it hard to return the jade. “Mary Lou gave that to me, and I wondered why it’s in the shape of an ear,” he said. “I have a feeling it was her way of telling me to be a good listener, to pay attention.” Archeologists found beautiful jade artifacts, yet there was a mystery about where it came from. I think the fact that it was hard to find increased its value to the people. The Maya and the Olmec lived in an animistic world where every natural phenomenon, every object had its own internal spirit. You had to satisfy these spirits because they had the power to control human destiny. There were several things about jade that suggested that its internal spirit was particularly strong: It was rare; it was very hard; … it seemed eternal. … It didn’t burn. And it was beautiful, of course. The Maya, in particular, favored really brilliant, emerald green; it’s called imperial green jade. … Green was the color of life; it was the color of water, like the water that collected in the cenotes where they drew their water. It was the color of the sacred corn plant. It was the color of the quetzal feather. It was associated with wind and with breath. It was the wind that brought the rains. Jade was associated with breath because when it was cold, if you breathed on it, your breath would condense

by Ronni Mott

Author Gerard Helferich

on it, so it would collect breath. When jade was hot from the sun, and you poured water on it, it would give up the breath in vapor.

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Date:Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Time:11:45 a.m. Where: Jackson Medical Mall Community Room

The Magic of Jade

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DIVERSIONS|books

I loved your description about how to carve jade. It’s so dense that you can’t carve it the way you carve marble. You have to actually scratch it. … It was so hard to carve that by the time you carved something, it was valuable just because of the work you put into it. That’s still true today. Unless you’re talking about imperial green jade, raw jade ... isn’t really valuable. Has anyone ever found instructions on how to find or carve jade? Not really. They wrote a lot of things on their jade pieces, but they were all drawings of gods and kings. ... There really was no practical information. The way that they know how the Maya, for instance, carved jade, was really just by trial and error. People experimented. They looked at the work and they sort of pieced together how they did it, how they used pieces of wood dipped in animal fat and then dipped in ground garnets to saw it, and how they’d take a hollow bird bone and do the same … to carve a hole for a bead. … In terms of the Maya, there was absolutely no clue, which is why it took 400 years for people to finally find (the sources), because they’re not mines in the sense of big holes in the ground. You trip over these. A lot of times, a “mine” is just really an area. You collect loose stones washed down from mountains over thousands of years. When you pick it up, there’s no trace it was ever there. Meet Helferich March 22 at 4:30 p.m. when he reads from “Stone of Kings” at Millsaps College (1700 N. State St., 601-974-1000) in the Ford Academic Complex, Room 137. Helferich and Nicholas, present “Book Partners: Living Together, Writing Together,” March 27 at 9:30 a.m. at Hinds Community College (505 E. Main St., Raymond, 601-857-5261.)


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A M A LC O T H E AT R E

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ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Mar. 23- Thurs. Mar. 29 2012

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The Hunger Games PG13

Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (non 3-D) PG

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21 Jump Street R 3-D John Carter PG13 John Carter (non 3-D) PG13 Silent House

R

A Thousand Words PG13

R

Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds PG13 Act Of Valor

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This Means War PG13 Journey 2 (non 3-D) Safe House

PG R

3-D Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax PG

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tell (him) that something is sick in the soul of our country, and history tells (him) that we’re headed for disaster if we don’t change our course of action now.” Cameron interviews one commentator who blames the current administration in Washington, D.C. You almost expect an endorsement at the end, advising that this message has been approved and endorsed by (insert the name of your favorite Republican candidate). Cameron retraces the beginnings of America. He discovers a monument to the founding fathers that answers what core principles will keep America strong, free and well. (Spoiler Alert: If you read any further, you will know the secret, and for some that may diminish the cinematic experience.) Those core principles (i.e., the secret ingredients for success) are freedom, justice, education, morality and religion that all boil down to evangelical Christianity. To add to the film’s message, Cameron plans to release supplementary study materials for families, schools and churches. Hindu and Muslim temples and Jewish synagogues were not mentioned, but I’m sure that the materials would be given to all groups if they ask. “Monumental: In Search of America’s Treasure” is being shown as part of Tinseltown Pearl’s specialty film series and will be screened at 411 Riverwind Drive in Pearl, on Tuesday, March 27, at 6:30 p.m. The 130-minute program, hosted by Cameron, will include interviews with media, faith and political figures; live music; and a screening of the 90-minute film. Tickets are $11.50 for adults, $10.50 for seniors/students and $9.50 for children.

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irk Cameron had an idea that led to a cinematic quest to discover what has made America’s legacy for freedom, prosperity and global leadership. I didn’t recognize Cameron’s name at first, but it evoked shadowy memories of a teen idol plastered on the glossy covers of Tiger Beat and Teen Beat magazines. A quick Google searched confirmed what I suspected: Cameron was a teen star who played a snarky adolescent making television-appropriate trouble in the ABC sitcom “Growing Pains.” He not only met his future wife, Chelsea Noble, on set, but the seeds for his evangelistic calling took root during the show. Cameron’s film career of late has focused on Christian-themed movies, such as the “Left Behind” trilogy and “Fireproof.” (The latter was an unexpected box-office success, made for a half-million dollars and grossing more than $33 million.) He also hosts a reality show/ministry vigil called “The Way of the Master.” Cameron’s most recent project is “Monumental: In Search of America’s Treasure,” a documentary reflecting Cameron’s personal views of America. It’s unclear whether the film’s success will be overshadowed by Cameron’s comments a few weeks ago on “Piers Morgan Tonight,” where he said, “Homosexuality is unnatural, detrimental and ultimately destructive to foundations of civilization.” Perhaps these comments will boost interest in the film. Cameron is savvy and well spoken; he knows and understands his fans and target audience. In press materials for “Monumental: In Search of America’s Treasure,” Cameron states: “Now this is my project, but it’s about all of us, it’s about our kids and securing a monumental future for them. “How do we teach them the truths that will set them free internally and externally for the world that they live in and secure their future?” I suppose that Cameron’s interview on “Piers Morgan Tonight” provides one of the answers. The 90-minute documentary, directed by Duane Barnhart, chronicles Cameron’s personal journey to sites across Europe and the U.S. to find the secret ingredients that has made our nation great. Cameron narrates the journey, telling us that “America’s the richest freest nation the world has seen,” but—there’s always a but—“BUT all signs

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BEST BETS March 21 - 28, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 3/21

COURTESY SHUBHANGI SAKHALKAR

The Gemstone Trunk Show at B. Liles Studio (215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland) runs through March 24. Open from 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. through March 23 and March 24 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission; call 601-607-7741. … Mississippi State University journalist-in-residence Sid Salter speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … See the film “Casablanca 70th Anniversary Event” at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. … SXSW/JXN includes concerts at Duling Hall at 7 p.m. and Whiskey River Saloon at 9 p.m. $10 per show, $18 all shows for both venues; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday. … Chimney Choir performs at 8 p.m. at Underground 119.

Jones Jazz performs. Proceeds benefit Art of Life of Mississippi. $15, $25 couples (cash or check); call 601-969-4009. … New Stage Theatre presents the play “Circle Mirror Transformation” at 7:30 p.m. at the Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.); runs through March 24. For mature audiences. $7; call 601948-3533, ext. 224. ... Hunter Hayes performs at 8 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $20; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

FRIDAY 3/23

The Zippity Doo Dah Weekend continues with the Big Hat Luncheon at 11 a.m. at Sal & Mookie’s. $21 in advance, $26 at the door; call 601-368-1919 to RSVP. Additional Sweet Potato Queen activities throughout the day at Fitzgerald’s and Everyday Gourmet (1625 E. County Line Road, Suite 500); details at zippitydoodahparade.com. … The Margaret Walker Center unveils the Frankye Adams Johnson Black Panther Party Papers and Exhibit at 4:30 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) at Ayer Hall. Free; call 601-9793935. … Rooster Blues and Continental play at Ole Tavern. … Chimney Choir and Wooden Finger perform at 8 p.m. at Sneaky Beans. … Luckenbach plays at Burgers and Blues.

SATURDAY 3/24

Zippity Doo Dah continues with Jill Conner Browne’s book signing of “Fat Is the New 30” at 10 a.m. at Duling Hall ($5, $20 with book), the Children’s Street Carnival at the green space behind Sal & Mookie’s and Duling Green (Duling Avenue and Old Canton Road) from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. ($1 armband, games and food prices vary), the parade at 7 p.m., and the street party featuring the Delta Mountain Boys after the parade on Duling Avenue. More at zippitydoodahparade.com. … The Sante South Wine and Dine Ladies Luncheon is at 11 a.m. at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. $75; call 601-987-0020. … The opening reception for “The Collective” Senior Art Exhibition is from 2-4 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.); hangs through April 8. Free; call 601-9601557. … The Hindustani Classical Music Concert is at 6 p.m. at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo) at the Bennie G. Thompson Center. Free; call 601-977-4431. … The Casino Night Fundraiser is at 6 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Shubhangi Sakhalkar (above) and Kedar Karmarkar perform at the Hindustani Classical Music Concert at March 24 at 6 p.m. at Tougaloo College.

March 21- 27, 2012

Zippity Doo Dah Weekend in Fondren kicks off with Arts, Eats and Beats at 5 p.m. Free; call 601-981-9606. … The Buckley-Goodman Art Show is at 5 p.m. at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119 (119 S. President St.). Free; call 601-969-4091. … The Foundation for Mississippi History hosts the “A Walk through History” fundraising gala at 6 p.m. at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). $100; call 601-576-6855. … The Sante South Viking Culinary Dinner is at 6 p.m. at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. Limit of 36 seats. $125; call 601987-0020. … The Art of Life Expotential is at 6 p.m. at Mis34 sissippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Howard

SUNDAY 3/25

Dos Loco plays at 3:30 p.m. at Crawdad Hole. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the opera film “La Bohème” at 2 p.m. ($16) and an independent film at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org. … Doe Hicks, Lil’ Mal, Gutta Boy and more perform at the GenerationNXT Concert Series at Dreamz JXN.

MONDAY 3/26

Amos Brewer performs from 6-9 p.m. at The Penguin. … Taste of Mississippi is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services. $65 in advance, $80 at the door; call 601-353-2759; visit tasteofms.org. … Martin’s hosts an open-mic free jam.

TUESDAY 3/27

The Mississippi Happening broadcast from 7-9 p.m. at Pizza Shack, Colonial Mart (5046 Parkway Drive, Suite 6) features representatives from FIGMENT, PyInfamous, Belhaven University’s Cynthia Newland and photographer James Patterson. Free; visit mississippihappening.com.

WEDNESDAY 3/28

Mississippi Community College Board executive director Eric Clark speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601576-6998. … Debo’s Lounge hosts Karaoke and Bike Night from 7-11 p.m. … Brian Jones is at Fenian’s. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Chimney Choir performs March 21 at 8 p.m. at Underground 119 and March 23 at Sneaky Beans. IAN HUTCHISON

THURSDAY 3/22

Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. $10, $40 poker tournament; email millsapscasinonight@hotmail.com. … The Mississippi Community Symphonic Band and Mississippi Swing perform at 7 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-605-2786. … Coke Bumaye’s “Translation 3” CD release party is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106.


jfpevents Zippity Doo Dah Parade Weekend March 22-25 in Fondren. The Sweet Potato Queens headline the event that includes Arts, Eats and Beats March 22; a Big Hat Luncheon and music from Molly and the Ringwalds March 23; and a children’s street carnival, parade and after-party March 24. Jill Conner Browne also celebrates her new book, “Fat Is the New 30,” March 24. Proceeds from fundraisers benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Call 601-981-9606 or visit zippitydoodahparade.com. Sante South Preliminary Events. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. Call 601987-0020. • Viking Culinary Dinner March 22, 6 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Limit of 36 seats. $125. • Wine and Dine Ladies Luncheon March 24, 11 a.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). $75. “Circle Mirror Transformation” March 22-24, 7:30 p.m., at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). New Stage Theatre presents the play. For mature audiences. $7; call 601-948-3533, ext. 224.

HOLIDAY “HOP” Into Easter through April 7, at Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland), at Center Court. Celebrate the release of the movie “HOP” on DVD with children’s photo sessions March 23 from 11 a.m.-8 p.m., a tea party March 24 from 2-4 p.m., pet photos March 25 and April 1 from 4-6 p.m., and an Easter egg hunt March 31 from 2-3 p.m. Visit simon.com/kidgits.

COMMUNITY Events at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). • Millsaps Forum March 23, 12:30 p.m., in room 215. Freedom Rider Rabbi Philip M. Posner is the speaker. Free; call 601-974-1305. • Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series March 26, 7 p.m., in the recital hall. Rick Cleveland, Boo Ferriss and Jay Powell discuss Mississippi’s baseball legacy. $10; call 601-974-1130. “History Is Lunch” March 21, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Mississippi State University journalist-in-residence Sid Salter presents “The Changing Role of the Press in Mississippi Politics.” Bring lunch; coffee and water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998. Medgar Evers/Ella Baker Civil Rights Lecture Series March 21, 6:30 p.m., at Tougaloo College, Woodworth Chapel (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). The topic is “The Continuation of Black Women’s Activism: Sharing the Torch with a New Generation of Women.” Free; call 601-918-7809. Veterans of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement Conference March 21-25, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) and Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Limited seating. $100, $40 one day, $25 college students, $10 high school students; call 601-979-1515 or 601-918-7809. All 4 Children Consignment Sale March 22-24, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Purchase maternity and junior clothing, shoes, toys, home decor and furniture. Hours vary. Free admission, $10 pre-sale (restricted); call 601-566-7046. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting March 22, 5:30 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0004. Third Thursday Nature Lecture March 22, 7 p.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton), in Price Hall. Wildlife biolo-

gist Matt Hinderliter presents “Gopher Tortoise: Endangered But Not Forgotten.” Free, donations welcome; call 601-926-1104. Move to be Fit 5K Run/Walk March 24, 7 a.m., at New Summit School (1417 Lelia Drive). Registration is at 6 a.m. The event is a fundraiser for New Summit School. Pre-register to receive a T-shirt. Awards given. $25; call 601-982-7827. Sistas2Daughters Mini-conference March 24, 8 a.m., at Farish Street Missionary Baptist Church (619 N. Farish St.). Adult women advise girls and young women ages 13-19. Pre-registration recommended. Free; call 601-957-2969 or 601-979-6928. Great Southern Motorcycle Expo March 24-25, 10 a.m., at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). Enjoy bike exhibits and stunts, music, food and a police skills competition. March 25, see the Budweiser Clydesdales from 2-4 p.m. $15 per day, $20 two-day armband; call 601-832-3020. Jackson Showboats Basketball Open Tryouts March 24, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Basketball and Athletics (2240 Westbrook Road). The Jackson Showboats is a new semi-professional basketball team. Registration required. Call 769-203-2108 or 601-630-6776. Spring Open House March 24, 10 a.m., at The Mustard Seed Gift Shop (1085 Luckney Road, Brandon). Call 601-992-3556. Town Hall Meeting March 31, 10:30 a.m., at Central United Methodist Church (500 N. Farish St.). Topic is “Why Vote? What Are the Issues?” Enjoy an NAACP presentation, lunch and a discussion. RSVP by March 25. Free; call 601-355-7858.

WELLNESS MILES Corporation Brain Injury Conference March 27-28, at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Free for brain injury survivors and caregivers. $125-$150 professionals, $175 exhibitors, $100 students; call 601-824-4865. Art in Mind Art Program March 28, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). For people with early-stage dementia and their caregivers. Space limited; register by March 26. Free; call 601-987-0020; visit alz.org/ms. Cancer Prevention Study Enrollment through March 30. Volunteers for the long-term study must be between 30-65 years old and have never had cancer. Visit cps3jackson.org; call 888-604-5888.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Casablanca 70th Anniversary Event” March 21, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. • “Can U Feel It - The UMF Experience” March 22, 7 p.m. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. • “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” March 26, 7 p.m. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children. “Where There Is a Will, There’s a Way...” March 22, 6 p.m., at The Parker House (104 N.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the four-act interactive comedy. RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752. Spring Dance Concert March 23-24, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.), at Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for children and Belhaven faculty, staff and students; call 601-965-1400. Thacker Mountain Radio Show March 24, 7 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (505 E. Main St., Raymond), in Cain-Cochran Auditorium. Special guests include poet Natasha

BE THE CHANGE Street Carnival Call for Volunteers at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St.). March 24, volunteers assist from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Email maggieb@salandmookies.com; include a callback number. The Art of Life Expotential March 22, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy food, a silent auction and artwork from artisans with disabilities. Howard Jones Jazz performs. Proceeds benefit Art of Life of Mississippi. $15, $25 couples (cash or check); call 601-969-4009. Character Breakfast for a Cure March 24-25, 9 a.m., at Mint (Renaissance, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5002, Ridgeland). Have breakfast with Disney characters. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Limited seating. Tickets also sold at Julep. $20; call 601-898-6468. “Making Dreams Come True” Mini Comic Con March 24, 9 a.m., at Flowood Library (103 Winners Circle, Flowood). Enjoy art exhibits, comic book and food vendors, and a costume contest for ages 4 and up. Proceeds benefit Friends of the Flowood Library and Make-A-Wish Foundation of Mississippi. $5, $3 children ages 4-10, children 3 and under free; call 601-919-1911. Casino Night Fundraiser March 24, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). Admission includes $20 worth of chips for the game tables. Also enjoy the Texas Hold ‘Em 27-person poker tournament at 6:15 p.m. Prizes given. Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. $10, $40 poker tournament; email millsapscasinonight@hotmail.com. Taste of Mississippi March 26, 7 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Enjoy gourmet food, a silent auction and live music. Hunter Gibson and the Gators, and Pryor and the Tombstones perform. Benefits Stewpot Community Services. $65 in advance, $80 at the door; call 601-353-2759. Tretheway, bluesman Eddie Cotton and a surprise guest. Visit hindscc.edu.

CREATIVE CLASSES

Humanities Festival March 26-April 1, at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Cultural events take place at several campus locations. Free; call 601-977-7749; visit tougaloo.edu.

Spring Figure Drawing Session March 26-May 28, 6 p.m., at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119 (119 S. President St.). $275; call 601-668-5408.

MUSIC Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Free; call 601-974-6494. • Orchestras and Strings Concert March 23, 7:30 p.m. Music students showcase their talents. • All-state String Orchestra March 24, 3 p.m. The orchestra consists of high-school string students. SXSW/JXN March 21. Lovedrug, Maggie Eckford and Happy New Year perform at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.) at 8 p.m., and American Royalty, Machines Are People Too and Cherub perform at Whiskey River Saloon (209 S. Commerce St.) starting at 9 p.m. $10 per show, $18 all shows for both venues; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. Events at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). • Hindustani Classical Music Concert March 24, 6 p.m., at the Bennie G. Thompson Center. Free; call 601-977-4431. • Spring Choir Concert March 25, 4 p.m., at Woodworth Chapel. The Tougaloo College Concert Choir performs. Free; call 601-977-7749. Mississippi Happening March 26, 7-9 p.m., at Pizza Shack, Colonial Mart (5046 Parkway Drive, Suite 6). Guaqueta Productions hosts. Download podcasts at mississippihappening.com.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • “Cherished Witness” and “Blood Rite” March 21, 5 p.m. Melanie Atkins signs books. $9.99 books. • “The Black Flower” March 22, 5 p.m. Howard Bahr signs copies; reading at 5:30 p.m. $16 book. • “The World in a Skillet: A Food Lover’s Tour of the New American South” March 23, 5 p.m. Paul and Angela Knipple sign books; reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book. • Lemuria Story Time March 24, 11 a.m. Free. • “Spell Bound” March 26, 4 p.m. Rachel Hawkins signs books. $17.99 book. “Every Night’s a Saturday Night” Signing and Concert March 24, 3 p.m., at LemuriaBooks.com Building (4506 Office Park Drive). Saxophonist Bobby Keys signs books and performs. Refreshments given. $25 book; call 601-366-7619.

Shut Up and Write! Sign up for one of Donna Ladd’s new creative non-fiction class series. Only 11 seats a class, so hurry! Starts at $50 for one-day workshops up to $150 for the six-class series. Get on the mailing list at class@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121 ext. 15.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. • Still Curious? Lecture Series March 27, 6 p.m., The speaker is author Louise Borden. • Gallery Guild Spring Lecture March 28, 10 a.m. Portraitist Jason Bouldin is the speaker. Gemstone Trunk Show March 21-24, at B. Liles Studio (215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland). Free admission; call 601-607-7741. Buckley-Goodman Art Show March 22, 5 p.m., at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119 (119 S. President St.). Free; call 601-969-4091. A Walk through History March 22, 6 p.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Benefits the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History. $100; call 601-576-6855. Frankye Adams-Johnson Black Panther Party Collection Unveiling March 23, 4:30 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the Margaret Walker Center. Free; call 601-979-2055. Nano Days March 24, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Learn about nanotechnology through experiments and activities. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-5437. FIGMENT Art Festival Call for Entries. The Greater Jackson Arts Council seeks artists and volunteers for the interactive arts event April 28-29. The deadline is March 30. Free; call 601-874-7993. Art Exhibit through March 31, at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place). Exhibitors include Michelle Allee, Lori Gordon and Elizabeth Huffmaster. Artist reception is March 22 during Arts, Eats and Beats. Free; call 601-982-4844. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

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DIVERSIONS|music VIRGINIA SCHRIEBER

Arts in the Core

Raoul Jerome, in 1965 while he was studying in the university’s acclaimed jazz music program, and they married a year later. The School of Music at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) brought them to Hattiesburg in August 1966, when the school hired Raoul to teach. Since then, the couple has been bringing music to south Mississippi as educators and performers. Althea Jerome is a professional singer and music teacher, who plays piano and flute. Jerome worked for the Hattiesburg Public School District for 25 years. Her students sang and played for state music conferences and for local businesses with some 340 public performances. Her students in the Hattiesburg Children’s Chorus performed in All-State choirs and for choral music conferences nationwide from 1984 to 1999. Since 2000, Jerome has been educating teachers at USM while freelancing as a teaching artist in public schools. As if that’s not enough to keep her busy, she leads professional development workshops and artist residencies throughout the state. She has also served on multiple boards, including 22 years with the Mississippi Music Educators Association, 20 years with Hattiesburg Civic Light Opera and 15 years with the American Choral Director’s Association. She also found time to serve on a committee to reorganize the Mississippi Alliance for Arts Education in 1989, where she is still an officer and board member. Her numerous achievements haven’t gone unnoticed. This year she received the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

The state of Mississippi recognized Althea Jerome’s dedication to music education with one of the 2012 Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts.

A

lthea Jerome has spent 35 years teaching Mississippi children how to sing. Her lifelong passion for music started when she was growing up in Dallas, Texas. “My dad was an amateur musician, and Mother took us to piano lessons,” the Hattiesburg resident recalls. “I also lived near one of the finest music schools in the nation, the University of North Texas.” Jerome enrolled there in 1963. She met her husband,

by Natalie Long

March 21 - 27, 2012

I

36

hope all of you have recovered from the St. Paddy’s Parade weekend or are on the mend from such a glorious parade this year. With three parades in two weeks, Jackson is blessed with the opportunity to win the hearts of thousands of people who come to the city and take part in our finest traditions. As usual, this week has a pretty impressive lineup of musical acts. On Wednesday, March 21, at 7:30 p.m., Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601941-1432) and Whiskey River Saloon (209 Commerce St., 601-592-1000, formerly known as Club Fire), bring SXSW to Jacktown. Lovedrug from Canton, Ohio, Maggie Eckford from Nashville, Tenn., and Happy New Year from Brooklyn, N.Y., perform at Duling Hall for an all-ages show. Continue the Jackson SXSW experience and head over to Whiskey River Sa-

Congratulations on being one of the recipients of the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts. Were you surprised when you found out that you won? I was, because it’s extremely competitive. I knew I was nominated, but I didn’t have any confidence I would be chosen. They just choose one arts educator a year. The other slots are usually artists and writers. It’s a measure of lifetime achievements. I’m very humbled to win this award. If people have confidence in my work, I’m very grateful. I feel like I have been the student all along and a lifelong learner, and it’s my job to share it with others.

Why is it important for children to be exposed to music, art, theater and dance? What they learn in the arts is generally applicable to life. When you take the arts out of the schools, you limit the curriculum students are exposed to. In kindergarten through 8th grade, all four disciplines are required (by Mississippi policy) to be taught, but if you don’t have someone who is trained, it will be taught by the classroom teacher, if at all. In grades nine through 12, arts courses are electives. How do you prepare teachers who have little or no training in the arts to teach them? I train teachers to integrate music (into their lessons), and I do model lessons. ... I’ve taught a lot of students about the longleaf pine tree using music. You look at images of pine trees and pinecones with music playing behind it to give you a sense of the majesty of the tree. One of the things the arts do is help teachers vary how they present the information. How important is it to use technology in arts education? Today’s children are very comfortable using computers the Internet. You can’t do school today without doing some sort of technology. You need samples of artwork, and you can find them on the Internet. In music, there are layers of technology. Even on my cell phone, I’ve got music that I can plug into speakers and play in the classroom. It gives you access to things in the arts. You can show a video then ask the students to create their own work. It’s innovative; it’s creative. Teachers really respond to it. Does arts education help students retain information? That’s a big problem for teachers. How do you improve performance? Arts education as a field has become very sophisticated. Years ago, the arts decided to stand together, those national disciplines of art, theater, music and dance. Federal law says the arts are to be taught as a core subject. It’s become my mission to make sure (students) get that education.

JXN ROX

loon at 9:30 p.m. to hear American Royalty from Los Angeles, Machines Are People, Too from Chattanooga, Tenn., and Cherub from Murfreesboro, Tenn. Visit ardenland.net for more information. Thursday, March 22, the famous Sweet Potato Queens roll in with a huge party! The SPQ’s Come On In Party is at the Jackson Hilton (1001 E. County Line Road, 601957-2800) with a stellar lineup of Mississippi musicians starting at noon and going until the wee hours of the morning. Bob Gates, Kathy Dougan, Virgil Brawley, Hunter Gibson, Cody Cox, Taylor Hildebrand, and several other wonderfully talented acts will be playing throughout the day and night. The event is free and open to all; be prepared to feel totally regal after attending. On Friday, March 23, the SPQs hosts their Big Hair Ball at the Hilton at 8 p.m. featuring The Mississippi Blues All-Stars (Fingers Taylor, Jewel Bass, Jesse Robinson and King Edward), and Kacey Jones. The

event is a fundraiser for the Animal Rescue Fund (ARF), a local animal shelter run by SPQ Pippa Jackson, so please come out to support the cause. (Other SPQ events benefit the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children.) At 7 p.m. Saturday, March 24 (immediately following the Zippity Doo Dah Parade featuring the Sweet Potato Queens, Jackson State University’s Sonic Boom of the South and the famous Budweiser Clydesdale horses), the Fondren neighborhood hosts a street party featuring The Delta Mountain Boys. The Mississippi Mass Choir performs at 2 p.m. For information on Zippity Doo Dah and all the queenly activities, visit sweetpotatoqueens.com and zddparade.com. If you’re looking for alternatives to the SPQ happenings, I highly suggest checking out teenage country-music heartthrob Hunter Hayes Thursday night at Hal and Mal’s. Also Thursday, Wooden Finger with Chimney Choir from Denver, Colo. is at Sneaky Beans. Alvin Youngblood Hart’s

COURTESY LOVEDRUG

Natalie’s Notes

by Robyn Jackson

Lovedrug is just one of the awesome bands playing at Duling Hall for SXSW.

Muscle Theory plays at Martin’s Friday night, and Coke Bumaye’s “Translation 3” CD release party is at Suite 106 Saturday starting at 9 p.m. Also on Saturday night Glasgow rocks it out at Old Tavern, and Underground 119 has Eden Brent. Please continue to send me your listings by Monday at noon for the upcoming weekend. Check out more upcoming events at jacksonfreepress.com/music, and if you see me out and about, please say hello!


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Weekly Lunch Specials

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

03/21

LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES

NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM THURSDAY

03/22

Gun Party with That Scoundrel

Alvin Youngblood

FRIDAY

03/23

Open for dinner Sat. 4!10pm Thursday

SATURDAY

03/24

The Werks

March 22

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM Friday March 23

The Continental with Rooster Blues Saturday

March 24

Glasgow

with Today the Moon, Tomorrow the Sun Monday

Hartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Muscle Theory

9.99

March 26

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

sponsored by

March 27

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

March 28

KARAOKE Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

w/ DJ STACHE

FREE WiFi Open Mon!Sat, Restaurant open Mon!Fri 11 am!10 pm & Sat 4!10 pm

601!960!2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

37


THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/21 Restaurant Open As Usual

THURSDAY 3/22 Hunter Hayes (BR)

FRIDAY 3/23

New full dinner menu starting March 20th. Now accepting reservations

Yankee Station

Wednesday,March 21st

PINEROSS

(American) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, March 22nd

ABID SABIR & PINK GARLAND

Adam Doleac (RR)

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Eric Sommer (restaurant)

Friday, March 23rd

March 23 & 24 | 9:00pm

MONDAY 3/26 Blues Monday with Central MS Blues Society (restaurant)

• Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE!

TUESDAY 3/27 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (restaurant)

Coming Soon SAT 4.07: Dax Riggs TUE 4.13-14: Crossroads Film Festival WED 4.18: Eilen Jewell & The Hackensaw Boys

Saturday, March 24th

EDEN BRENT

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday, March 27th

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 6-11, $5 Cover Wednesday,March 28th

CHALMERS & BABY JAN

Blue Plate Lunch

Thursday, March 29th

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! March 21 - 27, 2012

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Monday - Friday with corn bread and tea or coffee

38

VASTI JACKSON

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT (Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, March 30th

THE JUVENATORS

(Funk) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, March 31st

LOUIS “GEARSHIFTER“ YOUNGBLOOD

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Coming April 21 Ardenland Presents Marcia Ball

Tickets available on Ticketmaster.com

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

• $3 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS • 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

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39


by Bryan Flynn by Bryan Flynn

The Ultimate Obstacle Course GRANT PROBST

Peyton Manning has made up his mind; the only thing missing is a TV special called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indecision.â&#x20AC;? Now, Tim Tebow gets to go to a team that believes in him. THURSDAY, MAR. 22 College Basketball (CBS and TNT 6-11:30 p.m.): Sweet 16 kicks off after the field was cut from 68 teams to 16 last week. FRIDAY, MAR. 23 College Basketball (CBS and TBS 6-11:30 p.m.): Tune in for the final half of the Sweet 16 games. After tonight, the tournament will be down to the Elite Eight. SATURDAY, MAR. 24 College basketball (CBS 3-8 p.m.): Two games played in the Elite Eight will set half the field for the Final Four coming up in New Orleans March 31 and April 2. SUNDAY, MAR. 25 College basketball (CBS 1-6 p.m.): The last two teams from the Elite Eight will be cut down to the two best teams that will head to New Orleans for the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Final Four. MONDAY, MAR. 26 College basketball (ESPN 6-10 p.m.): After Sunday, the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Final Four is set, and tonight, half the ladies Elite Eight kick off to set the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Final Four. TUESDAY, MAR. 27 College basketball (ESPN 6-10 p.m.): Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament will have their Final Four set after two more Elite Eight games tonight. Four womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teams will head to Denver April 1 and 3. WEDNESDAY, MAR. 28 NBA (ESPN 6-9:30 p.m.): The Orlando Magic and Dwight Howard head to the Big Apple to face a reeling New York Knicks team. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

Every Warrior Dash event includes a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Muddy Mayhemâ&#x20AC;? obstacle, which consists of crawling under barbed wire through a mud pit.

M

ost days, Ben Lott runs around the perimeter of his apartment complex and into nearby neighborhoods working on getting into shape. Ever since his friend Scott Livingston encouraged him to enter the Warrior Dash in mid-February, he has been training. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At first, I was in bad shape, and it took me a while to start to get into shape,â&#x20AC;? Lott says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would start running and have to stop and start walking, but now I am running anywhere between a half mile to a mile every time I go running.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It helps I got better running shoes as well,â&#x20AC;? Lott adds. He also hopes working out with Tony Hortonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;P90Xâ&#x20AC;? DVD will help him, too. Lott, 25, is an engineer who is originally from Wiggins, but was living in Richland when he started working for Siemens USA in Jackson. Livingston and a group of co-workers decided to run in the Warrior Dash in April and invited several co-workers to join. Lisa Parker, Lottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girlfriend, is also running in the event. Lott says that she is in much better shape than he is. She ran a half-marathon a couple of weeks ago. On April 21, Lott and other modern-day â&#x20AC;&#x153;warriorsâ&#x20AC;? will descend on Jackson to compete in the first Warrior Dash held in Mississippi. The Warrior Dash is a race slightly longer than a 5Kâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;3.40 milesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;over natural terrain with 12 grueling obstacles.

Starting at 8 a.m. the first wave of contestants will begin the race at Mississippi Offroad Adventures (118 Elton Road, 601-9277957), and waves will continue in 30-minute intervals until all the contestants have run. The Warrior Dash began in 2009 with the first race run in Joliet, Ill., national Media Relations Director Alex Yount said. That first race sold out at 2,000 participants. Yount said the event made big strides in 2010 by adding 10 races in as many different U.S. states with 120,000 participants. Worldwide, 2011 saw 32 events with 650,000 participants. 2012 should see a million warriors. Asked to describe the Warrior Dash, Yount said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be the craziest day of your freaking life.â&#x20AC;? On paper, the Warrior Dash looks like it will live up to his description. The obstacles look like something you would see on an episode of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Survivor,â&#x20AC;? but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re squeezed into a one-day race instead of 39 days. Every event features different obstacles, but two are standard at every Warrior Dash: The Warrior Roast, where participants leap over fire, is the No. 12 on the Jackson course, and Muddy Mayhem, which consists of crawling under barbed wire through a mud pit, is No. 11. Other events include scaling walls and slogging through water, in addition to running between the obstacles. Every obstacle has a medical station with trained staff to assist participants who might

injure themselves. Yount said safety is the No. 1 priority, but most injuries sustained during the Warrior Dash are typical of those found in a marathon, such as rolled or sprained ankles. The course includes two water stations, and after finishing the race, contestants get bananas and more water. Mississippians were vocal about bringing the event to Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We received emails, calls, Facebook posts and tweets asking us to bring the Dash to Jackson,â&#x20AC;? Yount said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the requests made us feel like Jackson would be a prefect site to add a Warrior Dash event.â&#x20AC;? Just about anyone can compete in a Warrior Dash, as long as they are at least 14 years old. Yount has seen competitors in their 80s and, he says, contestants donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be in world class shape. He is proud that the Warrior Dash has a 50-50 split in male and female participants. Every warrior receives a fuzzy warrior helmet that looks like a Viking helmet with horns coming out of each side, a T-shirt, a warrior medal and, if the contestant is of proper legal age, one free beer. The top three overall finishers for male and female contestants and the top three finishers in each age division, male and female, also get an award in the form of a steel Warrior helmet. Crazy costumes are not required but are encouraged at the Warrior Dash. The best costume will also receive a steel Warrior helmet. Another award will be given to the participant with the best beard. Spectators are encouraged to come out and root for the warriors. Lott says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not looking to break any course records, but says something good has come out of signing up for the event, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a healthy new habit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I will keep training and runningâ&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have found out it makes me happier and gives me more energy. Maybe not train as intense, but do enough to stay in shape.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit warriordash. com. Go to the locations page for details on the Jackson course. Registration is $70, and participants can sign up to help raise money for St. Judeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. On the day of the race, parking (for spectators and contestants) is $10. Outside food and drinks are not allowed. Spots are limited and available until registration closes April 9, or until all the spots fill up.

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant â&#x20AC;˘ Pick Up the Phone

March 21 - 27, 2012

R 40

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$10 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘March 19 - 23

Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Mon | Shrimp Etouffee or Meatloaf Pie Tue | Peppersteak over Rice or Shrimp Scampi Wed | Smoked Pork Loin or Country Fried Steak Thu | Ham & Asparagus Lasagna or Chicken & Bowtie Pasta Fri | Catfish Parmesan or Beef Brisket

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

2012 NCAA March Madness

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music march 21 - 27

New $5 food items $1.99 House Draft

wed | mar 21 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p

During all March Madness Games Starting March 13

thu | mar 22 Jobub 5:30-9:30p fri | mar 23 Luchenbach 6:30-10:30p sat | mar 24 Lucky Hand Blues Band 6:30-10:30p

March 24

The Be 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

sun | mar 25 Double Shotz 3:00 - 7:00p mon | mar 26 Karaoke

-Best Of Jackson 20121st: Best Hangover Food in Jackson

tue | mar 27 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

601-362-6388

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

2nd: Best Place to Shoot Pool & Best Place to Drink Cheap 3rd: Best Dive Bar â&#x20AC;˘ Good Showing: Best Plate Lunch, Best Red Beans & Rice, & Best Jukebox

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

LUNCH SPECIALS EVERY DAY

$7.95

- BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

WED. MARCH 21

LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

THUR. MARCH 22 BUD LIGHT NIGHT

MARCH MADNESS

$2 PINTS & LONGNECKS

Burritos * Tacos * Full Bar 318 South State Street | Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

Mediterranean

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Wednesday - March 21 KARAOKE

Friday, March 23

Thursday - March 22 Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free

Friday - March 23

FRI. SAT. SUN. MARCH 23 - 25

Justin Adams

MARCH MADNESS BEER BUCKET SPECIALS

Saturday - March 24

MON. MARCH 26 IN-DA-BIZ NITE

Splendid Chaos Saturday, March 24

2-FOR-1 SPECIAL

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Venom -Karaoke in The Jazz Bar (Thu - Sat)

TUES. MARCH 27

$5 SHOTS

The Colonels

20 FLAT SCREEN TVS Scan this code or text EATWITHUS to 601-707-9733 for the deal of the week

Dylan moss Sunday - March 25 9 Ball Tournament 601-961-4747

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- Happy Hour in The Jazz Bar Tuesday - Friday 4-7pm 2 -4 -1 Wells, Calls, & Domestics, PLUS $5 appetizers To book a private party please call

601-487-8710 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

jacksonfreepress.com

NOW OPEN

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX!

41


DINING|food by Jane Flood

JANE FLOOD

Gluten-Free and Delicious

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

I

spent my teenage years in India and was able to travel to European countries twice a year. This experience exposed me to meals such as gluten-based breads, pastries and pastas. When I returned to America for college, I found myself having trouble adjusting to the food. I experienced nausea, weakness and fatigue. Much later, I learned that the wheat I ate in Europe and Asia is very different from the wheat we have available here. All kinds of folks, from athletes and super models to people with arthritis or osteoporosis tout gluten-free diets. Benefits include clearer skin, improved digestive health, and even lessening symptoms of autism, anemia and multiple sclerosis. Wheat, rye and barley all have the gluten protein, as do any derivations of these grains. It is the tough, sticky, adhesive coating that remains on the grain after washing it to remove the starch. Oats do not contain gluten, but are often listed as taboo

in a gluten-free diet because, agriculturally, farmers rotate oats and wheat crops on the same ground, so it is impossible to keep the two grains completely separate. Here in the United States, we have created a monoculture of high-gluten wheat. Gluten makes bread rise, which makes beautiful, puffy loaves of bread, pizza crusts and bagels. Unfortunately, this strain of wheat presents one specific antigen (a substance that can stimulate production of antibodies), and a lot of people develop an allergy to gluten as a result. Typically, these allergies occur in midlife or later, but studies have shown that with celiac disease patients, gluten can compromise even a young childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s developmental capabilities. It can seem like gluten is in everything we love to eat, but with careful planning and thoughtful choices, going â&#x20AC;&#x153;gluten freeâ&#x20AC;? becomes second nature. Many starchy vegetables and grains are naturally gluten-free, including corn, potatoes, rice, tapioca, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, millet and soybeans. A gluten-free diet can also guide us toward healthier choices such as fresh fruits, vegetables and meats. Unfortunately, food manufacturers are sneaky with gluten. It can show up in unexpected products like ketchup, soy sauce, some beers and even ice cream, so read labels carefully if you are considering going 100 percent gluten free. For my family, I have been trying to gradually replace gluten in our diet and, so far, no one has missed the gluten products. This may be a good choice for you as well if you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure how well your family will receive dietary changes. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find a lot of gluten-free products availableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;bread, corn chips, and even cereals and cookie mixes. A local health-food store such as Rainbow Natural Grocery is a good place to find gluten-free foods, but national chains carry and advertise more and more gluten-free items based on consumer demand. The products tend to be a bit pricier, but you may find, like I have, that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll eat less bread when the loaf is more expensive. Speaking of which, going gluten free is not a way to lose weight. The calories in gluten and gluten-free foods are similar. And, as with any diet choice, vitamins and minerals are important. With a gluten-free diet, you must carefully balance fiber, B vitamins, iron and calcium. Ask your doctor if you are considering a gluten-free diet. The resultsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;less bloating, less intestinal pain and clearer skinâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make it worth the trouble. Here is a great, gluten-free pasta dish my family enjoys. Find rice noodles in the gluten-free or international

RICE NOODLES WITH TOMATOES, GARLIC AND RED PEPPER FLAKES While you can use any pasta sauce with glutenfree noodles, this one is not only light, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun to prepare. As you heat the tomatoes in olive oil, they skitter about until they reach tender perfection. Keep the lid on to achieve maximum flavor (and prevent splattering). This recipe is also a brilliant use for over-ripe tomatoes. 1 pound gluten-free rice noodles 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound of ripe grape or cherry tomatoes Handful of basil leaves, chopped coarsely Salt and pepper to taste Pecorino Romano cheese, grated

Cook pasta as directed on package. I like to cook mine in chicken stock to add extra flavor. Stir often with a pasta fork as some gluten-free pastas tend to stick together more than their semolina counterparts. Meanwhile, gently warm the olive oil and red pepper flakes with a sprinkling of salt in a skillet. Take care not to over brown. Add the tomatoes, and roll them around in the pan until the skins pop. This will take two to three minutes. For added flavor, I like to put a lid on the pan and let the tomatoes cook on low for a bit longer until they are meltingly caramelizedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;10 minutes or so. Add garlic later in the cooking process, being careful to simmer on a very low heat so the garlic does not scorch. Drain pasta, saving a few tablespoons of the pasta water to add to sauce. Add drained pasta, reserved pasta water and basil to sauce and simmer several more minutes. Serve topped with the grated Pecorino Romano cheese. Serves four.

Get Flamed E\(O\DQH$OH[DQGHU

March 21 - 27, 2012

42

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Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

-ONDAY­3ATURDAY

COFFEE HOUSES

Â&#x2026;4XFFU#BTJM#FFG Â&#x2026;%SVOLFO/PPEMFT Â&#x2026;5IBJ$BTIFX$IJDLFO Â&#x2026;#FJKJOH/PPEMFT Â&#x2026;4ISJNQ4DBMMPQ%FMJHIU Â&#x2026;1BE5IBJ$IJDLFO

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street cornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Mexicanâ&#x20AC;? specialties mix extremely well with their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best of Jackson 2012â&#x20AC;? magaritas. Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Bourbon Street in the Quarter (1855 Lakeland Drive, 601-987-0808) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hot new spot for great New Orleans cuisine, live entertainment and libations from the bar featuring daily lunch specials and happy hour in the landmark Poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location. Reed Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Hole in the Wall,â&#x20AC;? has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the fries! Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports CafĂŠ (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily$9 ?1A<X[[Ta7XVW[XUTQ^cc[Tb lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even â&#x20AC;&#x153;lollipopâ&#x20AC;? lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more!

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Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, poboys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkin’s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011’s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Awardwinning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive., 601-982-9299) Serving up fresh seasonal crawfish, shrimp and crab legs the Crawdad is Jackson’s crawfish destination. You’ll also want to try their delicious gumbo while enjoying Friday night karaoke! Crab’s Seafood Shack (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

March 21 - 27, 2012

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

44

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout. Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine.


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Best Fried Chicken In Town & Best Fried Chicken in the USA

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45


How to Shop Fondren

Girl About Town Julie Skipper, left, and Fly Girl Meredith W. Sullivan.

by Meredith W. Sullivan and Julie Skipper

W

hen the Fly Girl and the Girl About Town get together, we shop. Or at least we talk about shopping. So, we decided to start a series of “How to Shop” guides. Our first stop: Fondren. The little gem of a neighborhood is packed full of fantastic restaurants and locally owned boutiques stocked with everything from artisan gifts, art and fair-trade finds.

Claus Porto Cerina Soap $18 Tangle Boutique and Salon

(607 Duling Ave, 601987-0123) Tangle isn’t just a hair salon; it’s a great place to find unique gifts and cards, thanks to owner Brian Brower’s penchant for stocking yummy-smelling lotions and potions and some great vintage-inspired jewelry lines.

Jeffrey Campbell Kelsey Cage Wedges, $190 The Shoe Bar at Pieces (425 Mitchell Ave., 601-939-5203)

There’s not a stiletto we’re afraid to try, and The Shoe Bar offers a fabulous selection of funky skyscrapers. Plus, manager Becki Hicks always posts what’s just arrived on Twitter, so we can run to get them before anyone else. Ghost Pines Red Blend 2009, $17.95 Fondren Cellars (633 Duling Ave., 769-2162323) We love that the folks at Fondren Cellars know wine is precious cargo. They will carry it to your car and buckle it into the passenger seat. Now THAT’s service!

One-shouldered watercolor dress, $4 Man’s Hat, $29.50 Slavebird (2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601-981-3547)

Like its sister store, Soma, this new men’s store, located inside popular skate shop Swell-O-Phonic, features pieces all under $100. We like that the fellas can even scoop up some accessories, which are totally on trend.

Silly Billy’s Consignment Shop (534 Mitchell Ave., 601-672-6693) The first time we set foot in Silly Billy’s, the helpful owners gave us a onceover and immediately nailed our styles, flitting around the store and bringing items we loved. What’s better than bargain prices on quality second-hand items plus assistance with styling?

Printed pants, $79.99 Posh Boutique (4312 N. State St., 601-364-

2244) Even though you have to venture up State Street a bit to the north Fondren location, this hip boutique is always exciting. Keisha Marie stays up to date on the current trends while stocking great classic pieces for the working gal as well.

March 21 - 27, 2012

Pepe O’Malley, $8

46

Babalu Tacos & Tapas (622 Duling Ave.,

601-366-5757) Even the best table-side guac in town can’t keep us from ordering a fancy cocktail the second we sit. It’s always a toss-up between the Babarita and the Pepe O’Malley.

Silk wrap dress, $18 The Green Room (3026 N. State St., 601-981-

9320) We’ve never stepped into this place without falling in love with something. From the retro drinking glasses and croquet set to the clothes and jewelry from the ’60s and ’70s, if you’re like us and a sucker for vintage, you won’t leave empty handed.


Every bunny shops at Nandyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the

NANDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CANDY 1220 E Northside Dr, #380, Jackson, MS 601-362-9553 â&#x20AC;˘ Mon-Sat 10-6 www.nandyscandy.com

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L ACE Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Create Your Very Own Jewelry!

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601.397.6398 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

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Right down,the street from the host hotel. WWW.REPEATSTREET.NET Featuring fashions, furnishings and fabulous funk! Voted the metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #1 consignment store in the Best of Jackson 2012. Voted stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best consignment/resale by Mississippi Magazine. Ridgeland Location: 626 Ridgewood Road | 601.605.9393 REVOLUTION Starkville: 327A Hwy 12 West | 662.324.2641 Like Us: Facebook:Repeat Street Metro Jackson | Twitter: @RepeatSt | www.repeatstreet.net

Find Your Pot of Gold

Sell us your gold and silver for a chance to win $100 cash! PLUS! with every purchase of $25 or more, your could win instant discounts, prizes or up to $100 in store credit!

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Try Our Lunch Specials Starting At $8.95 Teriyaki, Hibachi and Sushi! Served Monday-Friday 11-2:30

sushi, steak, martini and more! 601.948.8808

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CLASSIFIEDS, PAGE 15

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Shut Up and Sign up for one of Donna Ladd’s new creative non-fiction class series. Only 11 seats a class, so hurry! Starts at $50 for one-day workshops up to $150 for the six-class series. Get on mailing list at class@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121, ext. 15. !

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v10n28 - All Eyes On Fondren  

All Eyes On Fondren Abortion Foes Fight Back Kirk Cameron's Crusade Shopping 'Sylum Heights