Issuu on Google+


March 14 - 20, 2012

We brought the great outdoors indoors!

2

Scan QR for more information

Jackson Only Indoor Bouldering Facility! 127 Dyess Road|Ridgeland, MS 39157|601-977-9000


March 14 - 20, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 27

contents VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

RL NAVE

6 Street Feat It won’t be paved with gold, but the Fortification Street refurb may keep cars from bottoming out. DANE CARNEY

Cover photo of a Campbell’s Bakery cookie by Virginia Schreiber

26

THIS ISSUE:

The Southern Komfort guys know how to get the Paddy’s party started right. JEAN SEYMOUR

hal white there. He also recalls Mal being unimpressed by a young band that later achieved international rock stardom as 3 Doors Down. In the early 1990s, the Mississippi Legislature legalized dockside gambling along the Mississippi River and Gulf Coast, which dramatically changed the state’s entertainment landscape. Hal & Mal’s could no longer compete to draw national acts because casino operators could triple the Whites’ offer to artists. “You live and die with the times. One time you’re the big fish and the next time you’re the little fish. And now we’re the little fish. We just try to hang on and bring good music to Jackson as best we can,” White said. It’s not uncommon for White to spend 18-hour days at the bar or to see him jump in the kitchen when a cook calls in sick. He actually doesn’t mind the long days—as long as he can take a Caribbean vacation with Anne, his wife of 25 years, once a year and play a round of golf on Sunday. A father of three and grandfather of three laments the few extra points that age has added to his handicap of 15 or 16 (it used to be closer to 10), but is quick to add that he does not take the game seriously. “The game of golf is hard enough without worrying about beating the next guy,” White said. “It’s a game. Enjoy it as a game and don’t get excited. That’s really the way life ought to be, don’t you think?” —R.L. Nave

Look Twice

27

Jean Seymour’s eclectic artistic creations combine a variety of styles and media with a bit of whimsy.

Girl Power

36

Title IX made it possible for women’s sports to make strides for equal footing with the guys.

jacksonfreepress.com

Harold Taylor White, Jr. is as much a fixture in Hal & Mal’s as his 28-year-old restaurant is of downtown Jackson. On most days, patrons will find White perched at the corner of the bar, where he can watch the kitchen, dining room and behind the bar. “I thought at my age that I’d be over this, that I’d be gone,” White says over a plate of chicken tenders and a salad. White, a northeast Jackson resident who celebrated his 63rd birthday March 13, is far from being gone. In addition to wanting to keep the place open so his 30 employees won’t join the jobless ranks, White just loves the restaurant business. Born in Hattiesburg, he studied culinary arts at Northeast Mississippi Community College. He and his brother, Malcolm—or Mal—first wanted to open their restaurant in Hattiesburg, but Hal was making too much money as a drilling fluid engineer to walk away from the oil business. After Hal spent a decade as an oilman, the White brothers settled in Jackson and opened Hal and Mal’s in the former GM&O freight depot building in 1984, a time when downtown Jackson had few eateries. As a result of the lack of competition and 36,000 square feet, Hal & Mal’s flourished as the city’s No. 1 live-music venue. Leon Russell, B.B. King, the Average White Band, and Omar and the Howlers are a few of the big acts White remembers playing

FAIR USE

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 12 .................. Business 14 ................... Editorial 14 .... Editorial Cartoon 15 ................. Opinion 16 .............. St. Paddy’s 27 .............. Diversions 28 ........................ Film 31 ...................... Books 32 .................... 8 Days 33 ............. JFP Events 34 ...................... Music 35 ......... Music Listing 36 ..................... Sports 38 ....................... Food 42 ................ Astrology 45 .............. Body/Soul 46 .... Girl About Town

Komfort Thee

3


editor’snote

Briana Robinson Deputy Editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a sophomore at Millsaps College. She coordinated the St. Paddy’s Day stories.

Kristin Brenemen Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dystopianism. Her 2012 cosplay plans include ASBOs, Jedi and Rarity the My Little Pony. She designed the cover and many pages in this issue.

Jacob Fuller Reporter Jacob Fuller is a former student at Ole Miss. When not reporting, he splits his time between playing music and photographing anything in sight. He covers the city for the JFP. Send him story ideas at jacob@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Jacob Rowan Jacob Rowan is a writer and artist who lived in nine different places before arriving at Jackson and attending Belhaven University. He wrote an arts feature story.

Whitney Menogan Editorial intern Whitney Menogan is from Madison and holds bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College. She enjoys reading, writing and having mind-blowing conversations with friends. She wrote a food story.

Tam Curley Editorial intern Tam Curley loves telling about her move from liberal California to begin a new life with her hubby and daughter in conservative Mississippi. She is an Arkansas native and enjoys time with her two lab puppies. She wrote the Body/Soul feature.

Greg Pigott Greg Pigott is truly an avid fan of every kind of music. He’s also the guy who takes karaoke seriously. He wrote a music story.

March 14 - 20, 2012

Kimberly Griffin

4

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time, she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

A Romney Runs Through Us

C

ampaigning in Mississippi last week, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney set off a mini-firestorm in our offices. Sometime between joking about grits and forking up some hay, downsouth style, Romney uttered words that made us nearly sputter in response: “If the federal government were run more like here in Mississippi, the whole country would be a lot better off.” Say what, Gov. Romney?! See, we JFP folks cover the state government, and we watch it very closely up here in the capital city. How can we say this nicely? It’s a bona fide mess. We were so astounded that four of our staffers launched a round of Twitter satire using hashtag #runitlikeMississippi to make the point that this state is no model for running anything, much less the federal government (see page 7 for our favorites). We love this city, and state, and want it to succeed. It is home for many of us, and some of our staff came here precisely because it’s such an interesting place to live and work (and so much journalism left undone). We appreciate our state despite its shortcomings, and we work every day to try to make it better. But to say—even while pandering for votes—that our state is a model of governance is flabbergasting and insulting to our citizens. We have a Legislature spending much of our time trying to figure out unconstitutional legislation to limit the right to an abortion, despite the resounding message Mississippi voters sent last fall on the personhood fiasco. They are scheming to force underpaid police officers to pull over people who look like they might be undocumented immigrants (meaning: Latinos). They ignore the nonpartisan data that show that immigrants, even undocumented ones, actually help our economy. Meantime, we are one of the poorest states in the nation with the resulting crime, and our education system is almost entirely divided between decent schools for the wealthy and continually weakening education for the poor and people of color (especially thanks to No Child Left Behind). Only 42 years after courts forced schools here to integrate, our publicschool system is abysmally re-segregated. State lawmakers won’t take seriously the need to ensure just “adequate” funding of public schools to help make up for the resulting inequities of our Jim Crow years. Instead, they want charter schools, but without enough serious consideration of how to do them well, and what to do with kids who get left out of them. In other words, the (mostly) men running the state Legislature want to dictate from on high what’s good for the rest of us, but without considering the benefit of context, historical lessons or the need to make sure our residents have a level playing field to give them a chance at success. They want to tell women what to do with our bodies, even if it puts our lives at risk. And they continue to push the kind of bigotry against “the other” in the antiimmigration bill that isn’t exactly helping our state look like the kind of state where strong

companies want to come in and set up shop. Diversity is important in the business world; why would companies subject their employees to a state whose leaders push or support stereotypes about “the other,” or whose supporters are more likely than not to believe the president is a Muslim (which is meant as a slur)? This is no way to run a state, or a country, Gov. Romney. Jackson is especially hurt by state leadership and its aversion to (a) a majority-black capital city run by (b) an African American mayor who refuses to pander to them. Last year, Mayor Johnson nearly came to blows with then Gov. Haley Barbour and now-Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves to get them to honor bonds to help this city’s severe water infrastructure problems. It was mortifying to watch the state leadership play a power game with the city where lawmakers make laws (and let’s be honest, party) over something as basic as aging, crumbling water pipes. The victims of this power-dance were the local business and restaurant owners with empty cash registers and refrigerators full of food rotting when we couldn’t flush our toilets for several days. These are not model legislators. Meantime, they introduce bills to require drug testing of Medicaid recipients (and prohibit them to have vanity license plates). They also do everything possible to enact expensive voter ID even without evidence of voter fraud it would stop. Oh, and the chairwoman of the Senate Tourism Committee was the keynote speaker for the white-supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens here in Jackson in 2009—not raising an eyebrow at the capitol. Really, Mr. Romney: Are you positive you really want to run it like Mississippi? Fortunately, we have many people of all

races working to turn Mississippi around and change our reputation (granted, an uphill battle at times). Unfortunately, the folks you pandered to here tend to drown them out. I was honored two weeks ago to be invited to the White House alongside two dozen diverse Jackson business leaders (ranging from Sen. John Horhn and Mayor Johnson to Derek Emerson of Walkers Drive-Inn and Monique Davis of Lumpkins Barbeque). Meeting with the White House Business Council to talk about what the Jackson business community needs, it was apparent that this was a different kind of group than most state leaders. Yes, we talked about the loss of manufacturing jobs in the state and our under-educated work force, but the entire conversation (from both us and the White House team) was grounded in a context of our historical and current challenges as a city and as a state. For five hours, we discussed everything from what we could do about food deserts—entire poor neighborhoods with no access to good food—to the difficulty of educating kids (and thus a good work force) who are growing up in poverty and attending challenged schools. This conversation was real, and it didn’t focus on politics (one attendee brought up politics, and another steered the talk back on topic). It was about how we can and must strengthen the health and potential of our community at large and our local businesses—and about how the two are intertwined. There was no denial in that room that day in Washington. And there was certainly no sense that Mississippi was being run in a way that is going to lift us off the bottom. Gov. Romney, I urge you to find another way to run than by acting like you want to govern like our leaders. It’s just a horrible idea.


Saturday, March 17th, 2012

$5 at the door – Indoor & Outdoor shenanigans RAIN OR SHINE! Professional stage, lighting, and sound

Irish Food, Irish Beer, Irish Fun!

Legacy (Traditional Irish): 2p-4:30p | Otis Lotus (Grateful Dead Tribute): 5p-7:30p Gary Burnside (Hill Country Blues): 8:00p-10:30p 901 E. Fortification Street | 601-948-0055 | www.fenianspub.com

MISS

3 Cour se Tradition al Ir ish Din n e r $ 24 Ma

r ch 1 5

Entree C hoices in Pork Ten clude d e rl o i n , R Seared S oasted Lamb, & almon

jacksonfreepress.com

DON’T

5


6

March 14 - 20, 2012


Fortification Street Bids Coming VIRGINIA SCHRIEBER

F

ortification Street is a minefield of potholes and cracks and a patchwork of new and old resurfacing. After years of talk, Jackson officials have finally announced that the street, arguably the worst in the city, is getting a much-needed makeover. The stretch of Fortification from Greymont Street to Farish Street is a hilly thoroughfare that commuters use to get to and from the interstate and several local businesses, such as Belhaven University and the Baptist Health complex, as well as residential areas including Belhaven and Belhaven Heights. The only people who might want to see Fortification Street remain in its current condition are the mechanics who fix the cars that frequent the road. “Since I’ve been living in Jackson, I’ve had to have the front end on my car aligned like three different times, just from driving on Fortification,� Fenian’s Pub manager Josh Steights said. Money is the biggest issue with getting the street repaved. Now, Jackson has combined funding from the city, state and federal governments and is ready to get started. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said he anticipates bids for the project March 27. “(It’s) a multi-million dollar project. We can’t give you an exact number because it’s still in the bidding process,� Johnson said. The proposed plan will include a lot more than just repaving the street. From Greymont to Jefferson Street, the section nearest Inter-

Fortification Street is about to get a facelift. Finally.

state 55, workers will paint new lines and turn the current four-lane stretch of Fortification to three lanes, with the center lane serving as a designated turn lane. New and wider sidewalks and decorative light posts are also part of the plan, as is moving above-ground power lines that parallel the street to an underground vault. “It’s going to make that area of Fortification much more pedestrian-friendly, slow

¹)F THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WERE RUN MORELIKEHEREIN-ISSISSIPPI THEWHOLE COUNTRYWOULDBEALOTBETTEROFF² ²IRUPHU0DVVDFKXVHWWV*RY0LWW5RPQH\

¹-ISSISSIPPI YOUHAVEANOPPORTUNITYTO NARROW THE RACE BETWEEN A CONSERVATIVE ANDINSIDERMODERATE² ²IRUPHU 3HQQV\OYDQLD 6HQ 5LFN 6DQWRUXP FRPSDULQJKLPVHOIWRIRUPHU0DVVDFKXVHWWV*RY 0LWW5RPQH\

¹(E´S ANTI WOMAN ANTI GAY AND ANTI EDUCATION² ²ZRPHQœV ULJKWV DFWLYLVW &ULVWHQ +HPPLQV H[SODLQLQJ ZK\ ZDV SURWHVWLQJ IRUPHU 3HQQV\OYDQLD 6HQ 5LFN 6DQWRUXPœV YLVLW WR -DFNVRQ

¹/BAMAISM IS A REPUDIATION OF THE $ECLARATIONOF)NDEPENDENCE² ²IRUPHU 86 +RXVH 6SHDNHU 1HZW *LQJULFK UHIHUULQJWR3UHVLGHQW%DUDFN2EDPD

by Jacob Fuller down traffic (and) also give those businesses a clear turning lane,� said Chris Mims, director of communications for the mayor’s office. The project will also replace some of the oldest water lines in the city. Mims said a few of the lines near Fortification are 80 years old. “Every time the weather changes, one of the water mains breaks,� Fenian’s Pub general manager T. Francis said. “It’s gotten to the point now that (no one) freaks-out when it’s like, ‘Oh, the water’s crappy again.’� Residents may experience short water outages during the replacement, but the city will notify them ahead of time, Mims said. Once started, the entire project should take about 18 months, Mims said, but at least one local business manager is skeptical. “We’re lucky if it (takes) 18 months. Everything else in Jackson takes longer,� Francis said. The plan also includes the placement of traffic cameras along with fiber-optic wires, six new traffic signals and all new street signs along the 1.2-mile stretch. Several businesses located on Fortification are meeting next month to discuss how they will deal with the construction once it starts and reaches the entrances to their buildings. “We’ve got a couple meetings in the first week of April with Kats Wine Cellar, the people at Pizza Shack and McDade’s,� Francis said. “We’re going to talk about how we’re going to use parking lots.� Comment at www.jfp.ms.

‘Run It Like

A

WDFDPSDLJQVWRSLQ3DVFDJRXOD ZKHUH*RY3KLO%U\DQWHQGRUVHGKLVUXQIRUWKH SUHVLGHQF\ 0LWW5RPQH\VDLGWKDW³LIWKHIHGHUDOJRYHUQPHQWZDVUXQOLNH0LVVLVVLSSL WKHZKROHFRXQWU\ZRXOGEHDORWEHWWHURII´  7KH-)3ZHOFRPHV5RPQH\LQWRWKHIROGDQGDUHHDJHUWRVKDUHWKHPDQ\EHQH¿WV RIRXUVWDWHœVJRYHUQPHQWZLWKWKHQDWLRQ+HUHœVZKDWWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVZRXOGORRNOLNHLI 5RPQH\JRWKLVFKDQFHWRUXQLWOLNH0LVVLVVLSSL ‡3HQQV\OYDQLD$YHQXHZRXOGFORVHHYHU\RWKHUZHHNWRUHSDLUEXUVWZDWHUSLSHV ‡7KHSUHVLGHQWZRXOGEHDQLQWHUQDWLRQDOFRUSRUDWHOREE\LVWDQGQRRQHZRXOGFDUH ‡7KHSUHVLGHQWZRXOGSURSRVHFRQVROLGDWLQJPDMRULW\EODFNFLWLHVWRPDNHWKHPUXQPRUH  HI¿FLHQWO\ ‡7KH:KLWH+RXVHSUHVVFRUSVZRXOGKDYHWR¿QGRXWDERXWEULH¿QJVE\ZDWFKLQJ)2;1HZV ‡7KHSUHVLGHQWZRXOGEHFRFKDLUPDQRI3HUVRQKRRG86$ ‡7KHQDWLRQDOÀDJZRXOGFHOHEUDWHWKH&RQIHGHUDF\ ‡'ULOOEDE\GULOOLQWKH3RWRPDF ‡&KDUOHV0DQVRQ7HUU\1LFKROVDQGWKHXQGHUZHDUERPEHUZRXOGEHWUXVW\VDWWKH:KLWH+RXVH ‡865HS6WHYH+ROODQG'0LVVZRXOGSURSRVHUHQDPLQJ0H[LFRDV1HZ$PHULFD%UD]LO ZRXOGQœWJHWWKHMRNHSURPSWLQJDQLQWHUQDWLRQDOLQFLGHQWDQGDFDPSDLJQWRUHQDPH6RXWK $PHULFDWR6RXWK0H[LFR ,QFLGHQWDOO\PDQ\$PHULFDQVNQRZWKHFRQWLQHQWDV0H[LFRDQ\ZD\

‡7KH8QLWHG6WDWHVZRXOGDVNIRUPRUHKDQGRXWVIURPWKH8QLWHG1DWLRQVWKDQDQ\RWKHUQDWLRQ ‡7REHHOHFWHGSUHVLGHQW\RXZRXOGKDYHWRJRWR2OH0LVVRUDXQLYHUVLW\RXWVLGHRIWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHV ‡%DUDFN2EDPDZRXOGZHDUPRQRJUDPPHGFRZER\ERRWV ‡+LOODU\&OLQWRQZRXOGWDNHDVOHGJHKDPPHUWR,UDQœVQXFOHDUWHVWLQJIDFLOLWLHV ‡7KH8QLWHG6WDWHVZRXOGEHRQHRIWKHSRRUHVWQDWLRQVRQWKHSODQHW *RWDQ\PRUHLGHDVRIZKDWWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVZRXOGORRNOLNHLI*RY0LWW5RPQH\JHWVWKH FKDQFHWRUXQLWOLNH0LVVLVVLSSL"7HOOXVRQ7ZLWWHU#MISSROLWLFVDQGXVLQJWKDWKDVKWDJ

Wednesday, March 7 The city breaks ground on a new water-storage tank to replace Jackson’s only well system still in use. ‌ A New York Times article features four women who helped revive Water Valley, Miss. Thursday, March 8 Personhood Mississippi announces another petition drive to get an anti-abortion constitutional amendment back on the ballot. ‌ The state Supreme Court finds that former Gov. Haley Barbour’s end-ofterm pardons are valid. Friday, March 9 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes a campaign stop at the Farmers Market in Jackson. Candidates Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich also traveled to Jackson to woo voters. ‌ Harold Camping issues an apology for predicting the world would end last year. He says his predictions were “incorrect and sinfulâ€? and that he has “no new evidence pointing to another date for the end of the world.â€? Saturday, March 10 Officials release a South African man from prison after the state Supreme Court upholds his pardon from former Gov. Barbour, but immigration officials take him into custody as soon as he is released. ‌ Opponents of Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin stage a rally in Moscow, saying his election was unfair. Sunday, March 11 “The Loraxâ€? is No. 1 at the box office for the second straight weekend. ‌ A U.S. soldier allegedly shoots and kills 16 civilians near Kandahar, Afghanistan. Monday, March 12 The State Commission on School Accreditation meets to discuss problems with the Jackson Public Schools special-education program. The commission will vote on whether JPS should lose its accreditation next month. ‌ Public Policy Polling says 52 percent of likely Republican primary voters in Mississippi think President Obama is a Muslim. Tuesday, March 13 The Mississippi House passes a bill to require all physicians performing abortions in clinics to have admitting privileges at a local hospital and be certified in obstetrics and gynecology. ‌ The Arab League chief accuses Syria’s regime of crimes against humanity and calls for international inquiry. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

news, culture & irreverence

The world’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade on record is 1737’s South Boston St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Boston, Mass., hosted by the Irish Society of Boston. The parade still happens annually.

Anne Reed supports personhood. p9

7


statetalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

Personhood Wants Another Vote

P

sonhood Mississippi has signed an agreement with the conservative nonprofit law firm Liberty Counsel to work together on any future legislation or litigation. Personhood USA announced a similar partnership earlier this week. ELIZABETH WAIBEL

ersonhood may be dead in the Mississippi Legislature, but supporters of last fall’s ballot initiative to define embryos as human beings are stepping up their efforts to put another personhood amendment before voters. Last week, Personhood Mississippi supporters announced that they would begin collecting signatures for another ballot initiative. At the press conference March 8 to make the announcement, personhood supporter Ashley Sigrest spoke about her experience having an abortion after she got pregnant through rape at age 18. “Everyone will tell you that rape is a good excuse for an abortion, but unfortunately I had to learn the hard way that it is not,â€? Sigrest said. “After my abortion, I fell into a deep depression because I finally understood that what I chose to do to my unborn child was far worse than what my rapist chose to do to me. My rapist did take advantage of me, he did hurt me, but what my abortion did was far greater.â€? About 15 women and nine children gathered on the Capitol steps last Thursday afternoon, surrounded by about 25 strollers meant to represent abortions. Sigrest said women who oppose personhood do not speak for all women. “We are the women for personhood, and we want to share our side with you,â€? she said. Anne Reed said she had an abortion when she was 17, but is now involved in antiabortion advocacy and bible study for women who have had abortions. “Abortion is war on women,â€? she told the JFP after the press conference. â€œâ€Ś Abortion damages a woman in every way—physically, psychologically, emotionally, spiritually—in every way.â€? Les Riley, president and founder of Personhood Mississippi, announced that the group is starting another petition drive to put personhood back on the ballot. He said Per-

Anne Reed speaks at a “Women for Personhood� press conference on the Capitol steps. Rape victim Ashley Sigrest stands to her left.

Liberty Counsel is based in Orlando, Fla., and is affiliated with Liberty University, which was founded by the Rev. Jerry Falwell. It has argued in favor of anti-abortion laws and represented students who want to distribute religious literature on campuses. It has also argued against gay marriage. Since four personhood resolutions in the Legislature failed to make it out of committee, Riley said Personhood Mississippi would go back to voters. “We think the people have spoken; we just don’t think they said, ‘We don’t want this.’ They said, ‘We want something better.’ ... Ultimately, we’re going to win the hearts

and minds of the people, because it’s the right thingâ€? he said. “Social change is not something that happens overnight.â€? Riley said the group will be activating its political action committee to support personhood efforts. The PAC will also tell voters which politicians supported Initiative 26 before the election, but didn’t support anti-abortion efforts in the Legislature. Laurie Roberts, who volunteers with the Jackson area chapter of the National Organization for Women, stood near the Capitol steps with others who oppose personhood amendments. “When you give a fertilized egg the distinction of a person, you automatically take away reproductive choices,â€? she said after the press conference. “And that’s not just choices in abortion. That’s choices in how you treat women for pregnancy; that’s choices in birth control, and they can say that those amendments to those bills took care of that, but we know that it didn’t.â€? Riley said after the press conference that a constitutional amendment is not designed to answer every possible scenario, including which forms of birth control could be affected. Opponents of a personhood amendment say it could outlaw any forms of birth control that might prevent the implantation of a fertilized egg, including the pill. “The bottom line is we don’t want to affect any forms of birth control that don’t take human life. That’s a question we need to ask, isn’t it?â€? Riley said. â€œâ€Ś I think anything that it can’t be proven that it intentionally takes a life will probably be very hard to (make illegal), but if it intentionally takes a life, obviously that’s something entirely different.â€? Roberts said many Mississippians who are against abortion will not vote for an amendment that does not protect birth control and in vitro fertilization methods, so another initiative is unlikely to pass. “I think that their battle is going to be a

little bit different this time, because people are more educated,â€? she said. “They think that everyone was confused, but I think Mississippians are a lot smarter than people give them credit for. ‌ Even people who are pro-life, many of them are not for a Mississippi that does not have exemptions for abortion for the health of the mother and rape, so for a lot of people, an abortion-free Mississippi is too extreme.â€? Although she had not told many people about her abortion before last fall, Sigrest now supports personhood and other anti-abortion efforts, and encourages other women to do likewise. She said she is not against birth control or IVF, however. “I got involved right before the election to share my story, and since then have really been out about everything to tell them the truth and to share my side with everyone,â€? Sigrest said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

!NTI !BORTION,EGISLATION :KLOHDOOIRXUSHUVRQKRRGUHVROXWLRQVGLHGLQ FRPPLWWHHVHYHUDORWKHUDQWLDERUWLRQELOOV UHPDLQLQWKH/HJLVODWXUH „(" THE#HILD0ROTECTION!CTLQFOXGHVDVHF WLRQWKDWZRXOGDOORZSDUHQWVWRVXHDQ\RQHZKR KHOSVDPLQRUJHWDQDERUWLRQZLWKRXWSDUHQWDOFRQ VHQW,WDOVRUHTXLUHVSK\VLFLDQVWRSUHVHUYHIHWDO WLVVXHIURPDERUWLRQVRQJLUOV\RXQJHUWKDQDQG VXEPLWWKHWLVVXHWRWKH%XUHDXRI,QYHVWLJDWLRQ „("UHTXLUHVWKHSUHVFULELQJSK\VLFLDQWREH LQWKHURRPZKHQDZRPDQWDNHVDERUWLRQLQGXF LQJGUXJV,WDOVRUHTXLUHVSK\VLFLDQVWRPDNH DOOUHDVRQDEOHHIIRUWVWRVHHWKHSDWLHQWIRUD IROORZXSYLVLW „("VD\VWKDWDSHUVRQZKRSHUIRUPVDERU WLRQVPXVW¿UVWGHWHUPLQHZKHWKHUDIHWXVKDVD GHWHFWDEOHKHDUWEHDW+HRUVKHPXVWLQIRUPWKH ZRPDQLQZULWLQJLIWKHUHLVDKHDUWEHDW „("UHTXLUHVDOOSK\VLFLDQVDVVRFLDWHGZLWK DQDERUWLRQIDFLOLW\WRKDYHDGPLWWLQJSULYLOHJHVDW DORFDOKRVSLWDO,WDOVRUHTXLUHVWKHPWREHERDUG FHUWL¿HGRUHOLJLEOHLQREVWHWULFVDQGJ\QHFRORJ\

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Pardongate Draws to a Close by R.L. Nave

March 14 - 20, 2012

T

8

ZRPRQWKVDIWHU+DOH\%DUERXUœVODVWPLQXWHFOHPHQF\DFWVVSDUNHG SROLWLFDOFRQWURYHUV\DURXQG0LVVLVVLSSLDQGWKHFRXQWU\WKH3DUGRQ JDWHHSLVRGHKDVFDPHWRDFORVH,QDYRWHKDQGHGGRZQ0DUFK WKH0LVVLVVLSSL6XSUHPH&RXUWGHFOLQHGWRRYHUWXUQ%DUERXUœVPRUH WKDQSDUGRQVDQGFRPPXWDWLRQVHYHQIRUWKRVHZKRIDLOHGWRSXEOLVK QRWLFHRIWKHLUSDUGRQDSSOLFDWLRQVDVWKHVWDWH&RQVWLWXWLRQUHTXLUHV  ³:HKROGWKDWDIDFLDOO\YDOLGSDUGRQLVVXHGE\WKHJRYHUQRU²LQZKRP RXU&RQVWLWXWLRQYHVWVWKHFKLHIH[HFXWLYHSRZHURIWKLVVWDWHDQGZKRLV WKHKHDGRIWKHFRHTXDOH[HFXWLYHEUDQFKRIJRYHUQPHQW²PD\QRWEHVHW DVLGHRUYRLGHGE\WKHMXGLFLDOEUDQFKEDVHGVROHO\RQDFODLPWKDWWKH SURFHGXUDOSXEOLFDWLRQUHTXLUHPHQWRI6HFWLRQZDVQRWPHWRUWKDWWKH SXEOLFDWLRQZDVLQVXI¿FLHQW´ZURWH3UHVLGLQJ-XVWLFH-HVV+'LFNLQVRQLQ WKHPDMRULW\RSLQLRQMRLQHGE\-XVWLFHV*HRUJH&&DUOVRQ$QQ+/DPDU -DPHV:.LWFKHQV'DYLG$&KDQGOHUDQG/HVOLH'.LQJ  ,QXSKROGLQJWKHSDUGRQVWKHFRXUWDOVRYDFDWHGWKHWHPSRUDU\UH VWUDLQLQJRUGHUWKDW+LQGV&RXQW\&LUFXLW&RXUW7RPLH*UHHQLVVXHG-DQ ZKLFKUHTXLUHG¿YHIRUPHUPDQVLRQLQPDWHZRUNHUVWRFKHFNLQZLWKVWDWH FRUUHFWLRQVRI¿FLDOV7KDWRUGHUDOVRNHSWVRPHSDUGRQHHVLPSULVRQHG VLQFHHDUO\-DQXDU\

 -XVWLFH0LFKDHO.5DQGROSKZURWHDSRZHUIXOO\ZRUGHGGLVVHQWZLWK ZKLFK&KLHI-XVWLFH:LOOLDP:DOOHU-UDQG5DQG\*3LHUFHFRQFXUUHG Âł7RGD\ÂśVGHFLVLRQLVDVWXQQLQJYLFWRU\IRUVRPHODZOHVVFRQYLFWHGIHORQV DQGDQLPPHDVXUDEOHORVVIRUWKHODZDELGLQJFLWL]HQVRIRXU6WDWH´ 5DQGROSKZURWH  +HFRQWLQXHGÂł7RGD\ÂśVGHFLVLRQDOORZVVRPHFRQYLFWHGIHORQVWRDYRLG WKHLUFRQVWLWXWLRQDOREOLJDWLRQVDQGDOORZVDFRRUGLQDWHEUDQFKWRHVFKHZ PXOWLSOHFRQVWLWXWLRQDOREOLJDWLRQVDQGGXWLHVLQIDYRURIWKRVHFRQYLFWHG IHORQVDQGLQWRWDOGLVUHJDUGRIVXEVWDQWLYHFRQVWLWXWLRQDOULJKWVUHVHUYHG E\WKHSHRSOHRI0LVVLVVLSSL´  6HYHUDOSLHFHVRIOHJLVODWLRQWKDWZRXOGKDYHUHLQHGLQWKHJRYHUQRUÂśV DELOLW\WRSDUGRQIDLOHGWREHYRWHGRXWRIFRPPLWWHHEHIRUHWKH0DUFK GHDGOLQH$WWRUQH\*HQHUDO-LP+RRGZKRVXHG%DUERXULQFLUFXLWFRXUWWR EORFNWKHSDUGRQVIURPWDNLQJHIIHFWVDLGWKDWDOWKRXJKKHUHVSHFWHGWKH FRXUWÂśVGHFLVLRQKHZDQWVDVWDWHZLGHEDOORWLQLWLDWLYHWRUHTXLUHFRXUWVWR HQIRUFHWKHGD\QRWLFHSURYLVLRQLQWKHVWDWHFRQVWLWXWLRQ  Âł7KH\DUHDOOIUHHPHQ´+RRGWROGUHSRUWHUVGXULQJDFRQIHUHQFHFDOO )ULGD\DIWHUQRRQÂł,KRSHWKH\JRIRUZDUGDQGOHDGSURGXFWLYHOLYHV��´  &RPPHQWDWZZZMISPV

Attorney General Jim Hood wants a ballot initiative to clarify that the courts must enforce the Constitution’s publication provision with respect to pardons.


Legislature: Week 10

by R.L. Nave

Wedge Issues Bring Heated Debates rampant voter fraud (McDaniel could only think of two). From 2004 to 2007, Attorney General Jim Hood’s office investigated 38 voter-fraud cases, most of which involved absentee ballots. Derrick Johnson, state chairman of the Mississippi branch of the NAACP, said the DOJ made the right call if the Texas voter ID law suppressed the Latino vote. “We have long contended that voter ID is another form of poll tax,” he said. “Voter ID is one tool looking to be implemented by national conservatives to suppress voting.” Medicaid Doctors who accept Medicaid could see the managed care cap go to 75 percent from its current level of 15 percent if the House passes SB 2711. Instead of receiving per-diem payments, the doctors would get reimbursed on a diagnosis-related group reimbursement that provides incentives to improve efficiency. The bills aims to shift costs away from acute care such as emergency department visits toward cost-saving preventative care by offering doctors more flexibility. Still Out There So far, much of the legislation the House and Senate leadership wanted has been cleared off the calendars. What’s left in the Senate includes the reworking of the Public Employees’ Retirement System, which passed in the Senate but has not been transmitted to the House, and the Sunshine Act. The House has passed the Sunshine Act, which would limit the powers of the attorney general by permitting agency heads to use lawyers other than the attorney general, the state’s chief lawyer. Attorney General Jim Hood, who has said he would sue should the Sunshine Act pass, suggested that the Supreme Court set a precedent in siding with Barbour. As a constitutional officer, Hood said, “I hope the court gives me the same deference they gave the governor.” Comment at www.jfp.ms and subscribe to jfpdaily.com for breaking legislative news. Free.

jacksonfreepress.com

Immigration HB 488 requires police officers to stop people who look like they might be undocumented immigrants. Monday morning, before the House convened, that body’s Democratic Caucus held a hearing on the measure that would also require schools to determine the immigrant status of enrollees. Mississippi’s bill mirrors laws in Arizona and Alabama, although a federal judge blocked part of the Alabama law that required immigrants to carry their documents at all times. The original Mississippi bill contained a similar provision, but sponsor Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, removed it. Sam Brooks, of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Immigrant Justice Project, called Alabama’s bill one of unintended consequences. “You all have the benefit of hindsight,” Brooks told legislators in attendance, most of whom were Democrats. Tamar Jacoby, chief executive officer of ImmigrationWorks USA, a national employers’ group, said those unintended consequences include 80,000 immigrants having left Alabama and damage to the reputation of state now perceived as hostile to immigrants. “The editorials write themselves,” she said. “Think twice before you follow Arizona and Alabama down the wrong road.”

Abortion Despite passionate appeals of women legislators—and a handful of men—the House passed a bill that will require doctors who perform abortions to be certified as ob-gyns and have admitting privileges at a local hospital. Rep. Sam Mims, R-McComb, acknowledged that the law would affect only one facility, the Jackson Women’s Health Organization. Tamar Jacoby, head of employer organization ImmigrationWorks, When pressed, Mims, warned lawmakers about following Arizona and Alabama down the legislation’s sponsor, the wrong road with a restrictive immigration law. stated he believes life starts at conception and said the bill “makes it a little step harder” to er protection for the Mississippi Center for have an abortion “to save that life.” Justice, said she is still reviewing the bill but But the Democratic women of Hinds that she’s interested in knowing more about County’s delegation were not interested in the terms of the installment loans and how the making Mims’ life any less hard. interest and fees will be calculated. Rep. Alyce Clarke, D-Jackson, requested The proposal allows lenders to charge an that only individuals capable of having an annual percentage rate of up to 99 percent and abortion be allowed to vote on the bill. Rep. a closing fee of 10 percent on loans of $1,500 Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson, noted that or less. The bill also sets monthly fee limits of women with the option to terminate an un- $69 on loans of $1,500.01 and up to $124 on wanted pregnancy were less likely to end up loans up to $4,000. on state welfare rolls. “What options are there for a woman Voter ID who gets raped by one of these convicts goverThis week, the U.S. Justice Department nor (Haley) Barbour just turned loose?” asked struck down a law recently passed in Texas Rep. David Baria, D-Bay St. Louis. that requires citizens to present photo identiMims rebuffed the objections. The bill, fication to vote, saying the requirement would HB 1390, passed 80 to 37. disenfranchise too many Hispanic voters. The ruling could prove significant for Payday Loans Mississippi, which passed a similar law through Lingering on the House calendar is a pro- statewide ballot initiative last fall. Also, Senate posal to establish the Consumer Installment Bill 2774 takes voting rights away from people Loan Act, which regulates businesses that offer convicted of voter fraud and requires voters to payday loans and other types of small install- present “proper” identification at the polls. ment loans. The Mississippi Check Cashers During the debate, Sen. John Horhn, Act currently regulates the loans. D-Jackson, prodded Sen. Chris McDaniel, Paheadra Robinson, director of consum- R-Ellisville, about the evidence that exists of R.L. NAVE

D

emocrats turned up the heat in debates over abortion, immigration and voter rights last week. Up against deadlines to get bills out of committee and through floor votes, the Mississippi House and Senate dispensed with noncontroversial items to tackle wedge-issue bills. By the end of this week, the House and Senate must sift through the bills that are still alive—about two-thirds of the bills died March 6—vote on them and send them to the other chamber for consideration. Just last week, lawmakers faced the deadline for bills to be voted out of committee in the chamber in which they originated.

9


eye

ADAM LYNCH

media

by Valerie Wells

Charging for Inexperience

A

s a dozen experienced journalists at The Clarion-Ledger weigh the pros and cons of taking an early retirement, the daily newspaper’s parent company wants to start charging for online content. Gannett Co. Inc. told stockholders Feb. 22 about its new plan to generate $100 million. Whether readers preferred paper or electronic news, they would pay a flat fee. A Gannett paper would allow online viewers to see five to 15 stories, depending on the market. A paywall screen would appear at the story limit, preventing readers from accessing other stories or continue reading unless they buy a subscription. The Clarion-Ledger, like other Gannett newspapers, already has a paywall for archived stories. If you want to read a story from more than two weeks ago, you get a short summary and then an invitation to pay a fee to read the rest of it. We don’t know yet how many stories The Clarion-Ledger will let you read for free once the new plan is in place. What we do know is that it is likely several top newsroom leaders will be gone when the paywall appears. Gannett offered an early retirement package to about 600 employees who were at least 56 years old and who had at least 20 years with the company. For those

who qualify, he or she will get two weeks pay plus some benefits for every year on Gannett’s payroll. The candidates have until the end of March to make a choice. If the 12 people who qualify at The Clarion-Ledger refuse the offer, they may not get another deal like it. In other words, they could lose their jobs without a severance package in the future. And they can’t talk about it, or they will lose the option of taking the buyout. It seems like odd timing to put up a paywall for work that used to be free. Now, Gannett will ask readers to pay for work from less-experienced reporters and editors. Charles Corder, a former Clarion-Ledger staffer and present managing editor of the Greenwood Commonwealth, wrote about the buyouts and the demise of Jackson’s daily newspaper in a Feb. 17 column. Corder wrote that The Clarion-Ledger has cut 30 percent of its staff since 2008. “Many of them were friends, people I had worked with for years,� he wrote. Giving away free reading material online, Corder contends, factors into the newspaper’s continued struggle. He also wrote about the possibility that sports writers Rick Cleveland and Bobby Cleveland are taking the buyout option. During a Feb. 22 webcast for investors,

Gannett chiefs explained other money makers for the corporation, such as expanded sports coverage. If Corder is correct and the Cleveland brothers do take the buyouts, The Clarion-Ledger’s sports coverage is unlikely to expand. It’s more likely the daily paper will lose readers who are loyal Cleveland fans. If The Clarion-Ledger loses other longtime journalists—say perhaps Editorial Director David Hampton or popular feature writers Gary Pettus and Billy Watkins—it will lose institutional knowledge and name recognition. It could also lose more readers. Ronnie Agnew, former executive editor at The Clarion-Ledger, left that job in the fall to become executive director of Mississippi Public Broadcasting. Gannett did not fill his position at the newspaper. In a company that says it values diversity, it also blindly lost one of its best assets: Former Managing Editor Don Hudson, one of Gannett’s respected black editors, got the axe in November 2010. He hasn’t been replaced, either. With all the departures, younger journalists will have a chance to make a mark, much like state reporter Elizabeth Crisp did. After establishing a good reputation in Jackson, Crisp moved on to cover the Missouri Legislature for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, owned by Iowa-

As The Clarion-Ledger loses more journalists, its parent company wants to charge for online content.

based Lee Enterprises. Jerry Mitchell, the paper’s award-winning investigative reporter, is not among the dozen buyout candidates. He told a Friday Forum crowd Feb. 17 that the paper did not offer him a buyout. A member of the audience at the Koinonia Coffee House gathering asked him about the future of The Clarion-Ledger. “It’s disconcerting. I’ve got to be honest,� he said. Mitchell said he had the years—he started at the newspaper in 1986—but he’s not 53, yet. He said he felt for his colleagues. “If the vast majority take buyouts, it’s going to be difficult,� Mitchell said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Mediterranean

'JTI(SJMM

QSFTFOUT

%DDIE#OTTON

NOW OPEN

ST. PADDY’S DAY BLOWOUT 318 South Street Begin and End the Parade with Us

'SJEBZ4BUVSEBZÂ…QN

WITH+ING%DWARD 4VOEBZÂ…QN

0QFO.JD&WFSZ5IVSTEBZÂ…QN -JWF.VTJD&WFSZ8FEOFTEBZ

/FFERING"ONE)N#ATFISH

0ANTROUT3HRIMP &ISH3PECIALSIDES -ONDAY &RIDAYUNTIL 0ME$BOUPO3PBE 3JEHFMBOE .4 NFEGJTIHSJMMDPNÂ…

is a program where our best students are put together in bands to rehearse and to put on shows!

March 14 - 20, 2012

-J]SYŠHPMOIXSNSMR6SGO &ERHGEPPYWXSHE]

10

'SQIXSSYV JMVWXWLS[SJ HYVMRK

SOUTH BOUND TRAFFIC

%VXW)EXW

&IEXW 3RXLI*SRHVIR7XEKI

Tacos, Beer & Live Music

1EVGLRH TQ

All Day

607 Fondren Place Jackson, MS

318 South State Street Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

www.fondrenguitars.com

601.362.0313

March 31

The Church Keys CD Release Party

$5 Pays for entry and 1 copy of the new album - Party starts at 9:00 -Best Of Jackson 20121st: Best Hangover Food in Jackson

2nd: Best Place to Shoot Pool & Best Place to Drink Cheap 3rd: Best Dive Bar • Good Showing: Best Plate Lunch, Best Red Beans & Rice, & Best Jukebox

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson


THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/14 New Bourbon St. Jazz Band (DR)

Y E L L O W S C A R F

TRIO (Brian Ledford, Jamie Weems & Taylor Hildebrand)

Pa r t 1

Andy Hardwick Trio

Mal’s Saint Paddy’s Blast

March 16, 2012 | 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM 741 Harris Street, Suite E | Jackson, MS 39202 DONATION 20.00 per person /35.00 per couple This is a BYOB and BYOSnacks event. For additional information: info@ojahmediagroup.com

FRI 3.16: Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp start and end at Hal and Mal’s! The Lucky Hand Blues Band and The Rumprollers directly after the night march. WOOD in the Red Room SAT 3:17 Mal’s St. Paddy’s Day Parade biggest party of the year happens in downtown Jackson! After Parade at Hal & Mal’s: Awards Ceremony and Street Party featuring The Bluz Boys, Pinstripe Brass Band, Ol’ Skool Revue & DJs, $5.00 Cover, 21+, No Coolers Allowed

Monday - Friday Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. | Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

jacksonfreepress.com

H o n o r in g Th e M a s t e rs

THURSDAY 3/15

11


biztalk

by R.L. Nave

Beer for Everybody

8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS

Allowing sales of higher-gravity beer in Mississippi would help small brewers as well as large ones like Anheuser-Busch.

Changing the law would benefit regional brewers like Lazy Mag all the way up to some of the world’s largest brewers like AnheuserBusch, MillerCoors, Abita, Sierra Nevada and InBev, which also have craft divisions. Ricky Brown, president of the Mississippi Malt Beverage Association, which represents beer distributors, said the impact the law change would have on distributors is unknown until companies decide to enter the Mississippi, which could come as early as July when the new law would take effect. Beer has been legal in Mississippi since 1934, a year after Congress repealed Prohibition and set up the three-tier brewery, distribution and retail system that made it illegal for beer makers to be directly involved in distributing and selling beer in stores, Brown said. St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch has poured its support into Mississippi’s Raise Your Pints, which has an aggressive marketing and social-media campaign to build support for changing the law. “Increasing the state’s ABW limits will allow beer drinkers access to a greater variety of beers, including many of Anheuser-Busch’s high-end, specialty beers. It also will boost the state’s beer and hospitality industries,� said on, Not the uti P ol

m ble ro

Part of th eS

601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

"EER&ACTS

to Par

eP robl em

Revealing Heaven On Earth

MAKSIM

M

ark Henderson, the co-owner of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Co., likes to say they even get to drink their mistakes. Located in the small south Mississippi town of Kiln, Lazy Mag, as Mississippi beer lovers know it, created the world’s first beer made with pecans, which inspired about a half-dozen other pecan brews now in production. “It’s a little science, a little flavor, a little mad scientist, a little southern cooking, and you’ve got yourself a world-class beer,� said Henderson, a chemical engineer who runs the beer business with his wife and fellow engineer, Leslie. With its 10,000-square-foot facility, 21 employees and $2.5 million in sales, a large portion of which comes from out-of-state sales, Lazy Magnolia has quickly become a world-class craft brewery. But if Mississippi alters its beer laws to allow beer up to 8-percent alcohol by weight to be sold in the state, Lazy Mag could experience even more rapid growth. Because it’s now illegal to sell beer stronger than 5-percent alcohol by weight, brewers like Lazy Magnolia can’t even make higher-gravity beer to sell in other states. It has also meant that Lazy Magnolia, the state’s only commercial beer maker, has to turn down offers for contract brewing from far-flung beer companies wanting their beer to be manufactured closer to distributors and retailers in the South. “It’s cost us not an insignificant amount of money,� Henderson said. In fact, the company is negotiating with a beer company to take on a contract that hinges on the outcome of the Mississippi limit law. On Monday, the Senate passed the 8-percent beer bill 38 to 13. Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson, who chairs the Senate Economic Development Committee, explained that the bill would not strengthen the alcohol content in beers already sold in the state. He also cited research showing that increasing the limit in other states did not lead to an increase in binge drinking or drunk-driving arrests.

March 14 - 20, 2012

ft h he tt Solution, No

12

‡7KHQDWLRQÂśVWKUHH ODUJHVWEUHZHUV²$Q KHXVHU%XVFK,QF 6$%0LOOHUDQG0ROVRQ &RRUV%UHZLQJ&RP SDQ\²UHSUHVHQWHG PERCENTOFTOTAL DOMESTICBEERSALES LQ ‡,QBEERRANKED FOURTHINPER CAPITA DRINKCONSUMPTION EHKLQGFDUERQDWHGVRIW GULQNVERWWOHGZDWHU DQGFRIIHH%HKLQG EHHUZHUHPLONDQG IUXLWGULQNV ‡7KH1DWLRQDO $VVRFLDWLRQIRUWKH 6SHFLDOW\)RRG7UDGHD

JURXSUHSUHVHQWLQJWKH JRXUPHWIRRGLQGXVWU\ HVWLPDWHVWKDWVSH FLDOW\IRRGLWHPVUDQJ XSBILLIONIN SALESIN²DERXW SHUFHQWRIDOOUHWDLO IRRGVDOHV ‡4HECRAFT BEER INDUSTRYEXPERIENCED  PERCENTGROWTK E\YROXPHDQG SHUFHQWJURZWKLQ UHWDLOVDOHVIURP WRFRPSDUHGWR WKH86EHHUPDUNHW ZKLFKVDZD PERCENT DECLINELQWR ELOOLRQRU PLOOLRQEDUUHOV

Doug Bailey, Anheuser-Busch’s regional vice president of state affairs, in a news release. According to Anheuser-Busch, the beer industry contributes $664 million to Mississippi’s economy annually, including 9,000 jobs and $239 million in wages. Lazy Magnolia’s Henderson said the current beer laws hurt economic development in the state, because when beer drinkers make beer runs to other states, they often pick up more than just the six-pack. “It’s not just the impact it has on the beer side of things; you’ve now created a pull for people to cross over to other states,� he said. “That pull results in them in spending a bunch more money.� Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Magnolia Data Solutions Environmental Services and Information Destruction Specialists

Do you, or your business, have confidential information that needs to be destroyed? Magnolia Data Solutions offers Hard-Drive shredding to make sure your business stays compliant with all information regulations. For more information on how we can help your business,

please call 601-919-0062

EPA, HIPA, GLBA & FACTA Compliant 160 Fairbanks St. • Jackson, Ms 39202 • www.MagnoliaDataSolutions.com


Are you

YOUNG and

INFLUENTIAL?

Know someone who is? Every summer, BOOM Jackson honors the area’s best and brightest under 40 (wearing hot looks from locally owned boutiques).

To nominate a young hero of Jackson

editor@boomjackson.com or call

601.362.6121 ext. 16 by March 20, 2012 Also in the BOOM summer issue: • The Business of Health Care • The Creative Workplace • Cool, Too: The Gulf Coast • Hot Pads of Cool Writers • Garden, Baby, Garden

jacksonfreepress.com

To advertise in the big Young Influentials issue, ads@boomjackson.com or call 601.362.6121 ext. 11.

13


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Get out the Voter ID

A

t a recent event, Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann said he hoped new voter-identification laws will be in place by September—in time for federal elections. He’s waiting on the Legislature to decide how to apply the new amendment that will require photo ID at the polls, though, and depending on how strict our law is when the Legislature is through with it, Mississippi could be waiting much longer than that before voter ID becomes a reality. Just this week, the Department of Justice blocked a new voter-identification law in Texas, saying it would disproportionately harm Hispanic voters, who are less likely to have photo IDs. Late last year, the department blocked a similar law in South Carolina that it said harmed black voters. The Justice Department is likely to submit Mississippi’s voter-ID law to the same scrutiny as it gave to those two states—and rightly so. Barely 50 years ago in Mississippi, African Americans who wanted to exercise their right to vote could face violence, intimidation or a jumble of bureaucratic nonsense designed specifically to keep them away from the polls. The Justice Department—and our state lawmakers—owe it to Mississippians of all colors to ensure that our new voter-identification law does not punish citizens for the “crime” of not possessing a photo-ID card. The fact that most people already have driver’s licenses or other state-issued ID cards is no reason to disenfranchise those who do not. On the contrary, officials should take extra pains to make sure that the voices of minority groups are heard. While it’s true that African Americans and Hispanics are less likely to have photo identification, racial minority groups are not the only ones affected. People with low incomes, senior citizens, people with disabilities and students are also less likely to have IDs. For some, even getting the birth certificate required to apply for a photo ID is an expensive and time-consuming obstacle. The new voter-ID requirements especially threaten seniors who were born before giving infants birth certificates became common practice. In Mississippi, you need a birth certificate to get an ID, and an ID to get a birth certificate. The Legislature must address this. Fortunately, lawmakers have an opportunity to make our voter-ID law as fair as possible, without subverting the public’s will to have a photo-ID law. Two bills in the Legislature right now seek to interpret the voter-ID amendment, with a few differences. For example, one would allow college students to vote using their student IDs—a relatively simple way to make it easier for that demographic to vote. Volunteers can help, too, by educating people about the documents they need to get an ID, or by driving elderly relatives or neighbors to apply for ID cards. It’s time to get organized, folks, and get out the voter ID.

KEN STIGGERS

Nothing But a Number

D

march 14 - 20, 2012

J Itch Got to Scratch: “Unemployed, underemployed, part-time DJ blog No. 31412-1/2. I just finished a DJ gig at Clubb Chicken Wing’s monthly Senior Citizen Hot Wing Happy Hour. At first, I was unsure about connecting with an older audience. Nevertheless, Lil’ Momma Roscoe, organizer of the Hot Wing Happy Hour, assured me that everything would be fine. A couple of days before the gig, she schooled me on the music the seniors liked, and suggested I mix in some tasteful contemporary music. “I also consulted with my mentor, ‘Old School’ Pete. He suggested I play music from James Brown, Fontella Bass, The Temptations, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Chubby Checker and Paul “Hucklebuck” Williams. “The vibe at the Senior Citizen Hot Wing Happy Hour was nice and very educational. I eavesdropped in on several discussions between the senior citizens. Hearing those seniors from all walks of life talk about everything from politics to sex was like browsing through an oral-history library. Old Man Pops, Poppa Wheelie and Grandma Pookie were impressed with my music selection. And when I played the ‘Hucklebuck’ by Paul Williams, all of the seniors jumped out of their seats, crowded the dance floor and did the electric slide. “The most rewarding experience for me was when Lil’ Momma Roscoe and the seniors took up a monetary love offering for me. After seeing the seniors party and socialize so hearty, I’ve concluded that age is nothing 14 but a number.”

KAMIKAZE

Healing Starts at Home

S

o, #STOPKONY is a new trending topic in social media. If you’re not familiar, the “Stop Kony” movement refers to Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony. Kony lived in relative anonymity before last week when a video from activist group Invisible Children went viral. The video garnered millions of views and had celebrities such as P. Diddy, Jay-Z, and Oprah taking to Facebook and Twitter to spread the word about the campaign. Suddenly, the leader of the “Lord’s Resistance Army,” allegedly responsible for atrocities such as abducting children and forcing them to become soldiers, had become an international name. What a lot of people don’t realize is that Kony has terrorized his country for nearly two decades. His horrific acts are nothing new to the people of Uganda. But last week, Kony became the popular “cause of the moment” with many folks who can barely be motivated to care about social issues at any other juncture. Now, I’m not here to criticize what some folks have termed “overnight activism.” I’m actually pleased when folks find causes—anything—that they are passionate enough about to share. The “when” is not as important to me. Whether you champion a cause at its beginnings or in the last five minutes is fine by me. Just act. I also have no quarrel with someone getting active because a celebrity tells them

to. That’s what celebrities should be using their influence for. If they can excite an apathetic fan base with a tweet, hey, have at it. What grinds my gears is not our haste to join the Stop Kony movement, but our deaf ears and blind eyes turned to atrocities that are much closer to home. Sure, Kony’s crimes need to be punished, but what about the pseudo warlords who live in our cities and in our neighborhoods—the black ones and the white ones who terrorize us by either selling drugs and violence to our kids through gangs or by pilfering a city’s pockets through dirty politics and white collar crime? Where’s the Stop ______ movements for those? Where are the 3 million views for a video decrying Clear Channel Communications Inc. for continuing to carry Rush Limbaugh? Where’s the outrage for the dope boy with the dope house on your street that everyone knows but says nothing about? Where’s the video for Jackson Public Schools? And what about one for Ward 3? Are we more concerned with wrongs thousands of miles away instead of ones that are right in our faces? It may be “cooler” to get mad about something because Diddy is, but remember: Wherever you are, the healing starts at home. And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


TOM HEAD

Men: Hold Creeps Accountable EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Elizabeth Waibel Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Contributing Editor Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander,Tam Curley, Brittany Kilgore,Whitney Menogan, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Staff Photographer Virginia Schreiber Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers Trip Burns, William Patrick Butler,Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Eric Bennett, Erica Sutton

ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executives Amanda Beach, Adam Perry Sales Assistant Marissa Lucas Sales Interns Morgan Bares, Samantha Towers

BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Events Coordinator Shannon Barbour Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Mik Davis, Clint Dear, Richard Laswell

ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

A

grizzled, middle-aged man protests across the street from Mississippi’s only abortion clinic, shouting horribly offensive language—racial epithets, misogynistic slurs, religious condemnation—at women as they go in. I don’t pretend to know whether he really believes that abortion is murder, but the joy in his eyes as he verbally abuses these women is disconcerting. I can’t escape the feeling that somebody who honestly believed that he was witnessing a series of murders wouldn’t look so happy to be there. You certainly don’t see that kind of joy on the face of somebody protesting against war or the death penalty, and you don’t see it on the faces of the priests, nuns, and other gentle souls who once formed the rank-and-file of the antiabortion movement. The look in his eyes is the same look I see in Rush Limbaugh’s eyes when I look at video footage of his attacks on Sandra Fluke. Fluke was to speak before Rep. Darrell Issa’s congressional panel on birth control, but was excluded at the last minute— leaving an all-male slate of speakers. When Fluke told her story on YouTube, Limbaugh called her a “slut� and a “prostitute,� demanded video evidence of her sexual history, and—over a series of days—essentially used his radio show as a vehicle for sexual harassment. Audio clips from his Fluke segments sound immature, less like the work of a radio commentator and more like overheard snippets from a very longwinded obscene phone call. And video clips reveal shifty eyes, a puerile grin—an expression that indicates he has just surprised somebody with a dirty joke he knows they didn’t want to hear. You can see the same expression, at times, on the faces of Bill Maher and Howard Stern. In Virginia, lawmakers made an unsuccessful attempt to require women who have an abortion to first face a mandatory transvaginal probe—an invasive and medically unnecessary procedure performed against the woman’s will as a punishment for considering abortion. In Mississippi, some lawmakers gloated as the state seemed poised to ban birth control and in-vitro fertilization last November with the broadly worded Personhood Initiative. Voters defeated the initiative in Mississippi, and Virginia lawmakers rethought their stance after a huge nationwide outcry, but both measures still have their advocates. And some of the advocates seem to be disturbingly happy about that. I’m writing this column on International Women’s Day, and with the convic-

tion that—despite a series of bizarre policy initiatives targeting women’s rights, despite the coarsening of public rhetoric surrounding women’s bodies, despite all of these things—the women’s movement in America has never been stronger. I am finding it increasingly difficult, however, to see these recent controversies as a series of policy differences. I think they represent something more fundamental, more disturbing, about the way many men feel about the prospect of women as equal partners. As somebody who really prefers to believe that most people are good hearted, who likes to believe that everyone has valid reasons for holding the beliefs that they do, I find this upsetting. But I am increasingly coming to believe that the most vocal among these men can’t be reasoned with, that they can only be avoided and, when they attempt to channel their impulses into bad policy, challenged. Most of the time, these successful challenges will not, and should not, be led by men. The defeat of the Personhood Initiative last November can be directly traced to the work of women like Cristen Hemmins and Atlee Breland, women who were directly targeted by the language of Initiative 26. But I think we men, myself included, have not done enough to confront other men. We have let too much slide. We have ignored sexist remarks, failed to speak out against misogynistic policies, undervalued women who have been mentors in our lives, read too few female authors, paid too little attention to the realities of women’s lives—and this needs to change. As critical race scholar Aaron Bady writes: “The fact that Limbaugh doesn’t even understand how female contraception works doesn’t diminish his rhetorical position a whit. On the contrary, he is defending precisely his right not to know how it works.� Men ridicule each other’s ignorance on many topics, but seem to give each other a pass on women’s health issues—even if they’re voting on policies that directly affect women’s lives. We have a responsibility to call out men like Rush Limbaugh and help create a culture where this sort of behavior is recognized as creepy, where it finally becomes more embarrassing to the men who perpetrate it than it is to the women who have to endure it. Freelance writer Tom Head is a Jackson native. He has written or co-written 24 nonfiction books, is a civil liberties writer for About. com and is a grassroots progressive activist.

I think we men, myself included, have not done enough to confront other men. We have let too much slide.

!DMINISTRATIVE!SSISTANT

&DGGOOH&RQVXOWLQJ)LUPFXUUHQWO\VHHNVD37)7 $GPLQLVWUDWLYH$VVLVWDQW7KHLGHDOFDQGLGDWHVKRXOG KDYHSUHYLRXVH[SHULHQFHZLWK4XLFNERRNVSD\UROO DQGJHQHUDODFFRXQWLQJ7KHFDQGLGDWHVKRXOGEH VHOIPRWLYDWHGDQGKDYHDQXSEHDWSHUVRQDOLW\ 5HVSRQVLELOLWLHVLQFOXGHLQSXWWLQJFOLHQWGDWDLQWR 4XLFNERRNVUHFRQFLOLQJGDWDSUHSDULQJVDOHVDQG WD[UHSRUWVFRPSLOLQJÂżQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDVZHOODV SHUIRUPLQJJHQHUDORIÂżFHZRUN&DQGLGDWHPXVWEH GHWDLORULHQWHGRUJDQL]DWLRQDOZLWKH[FHOOHQWFRPSXWLQJ VNLOOV)RUZDUG\RXUUHVXPHDQGFRYHUOHWWHUWR FDGGOOHÂżUP#DROFRPIRULPPHGLDWHFRQVLGHUDWLRQ

2EADYTO,OSE7EIGHT

&KDQJH\RXUOLIHWKHKHDOWK\ZD\ZLWKGHOLFLRXV9LVDOXV VKDNHV7KLUW\PHDOVIRU6L[W\PHDOVIRU EZLOGHUERG\E\YLFRP  

#LEAN#ITY7ASTE#OLLECTION

$WWHQWLRQFKXUFKHV VPDOOEXVLQHVVHV:HZLOOSURYLGH JDOWUDVKFDQHPSWLHGRQFHDZHHNIRUMXVW PRQWK  

/RGANIC(EALTHY"EVERAGES

+HDOWK\&RIIHH7HDDQG+RW&KRFRODWHZLWK*DQRGHUPD 6XSSOHPHQWV1DWXUDOKHUEEULQJVDPD]LQJKHDOWK UHVXOWVEROVWHUVLPPXQHV\VWHP  DUWQGRULVRUJDQRJROGFRPDQGRJFRIIHHSD\VFRP

(ELP7ANTED

0DNHPRQH\PDLOLQJEURFKXUHVIURPKRPH)5(( 6XSSOLHV+HOSLQJ+RPH:RUNHUVVLQFH *HQXLQH2SSRUWXQLW\1RH[SHULHQFHUHTXLUHG6WDUW ,PPHGLDWHO\ZZZWKHZRUNKXEQHW

!,,!2%!3 2//--!4%3#/-

%URZVHKXQGUHGVRIRQOLQHOLVWLQJVZLWKSKRWRVDQG PDSV)LQG\RXUURRPPDWHZLWKDFOLFNRIWKHPRXVH 9LVLWKWWSZZZ5RRPPDWHVFRP

2%!$%23-53)#,/6%23

*UHDWHVW1RYHOV DXGLRERRNV 21/< SOXVVK ,QFOXGHV033OD\HU $FFHVVRULHV %2186&ODVVLFDO0XVLF:RUNV 0RQH\%DFN *XDUDQWHH&DOO7RGD\

'!)..!4)/.!,%80/352%

5HDFKRYHUPLOOLRQ\RXQJHGXFDWHGUHDGHUVIRURQO\ E\DGYHUWLVLQJLQZHHNO\QHZVSDSHUVOLNHWKLV RQH&DOO-DVRQDW7KLVLVQRWDMRERIIHU

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


What I Like 
 About the South

COURTESY MALS ST PADDYS PARADE FACEBOOK PAGE

I St. Paddy's

Malcolm White started Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade in 1983.

W

hat do we like about the South? There’s the food, for one thing—hams cured with southern sugar served up with black-eyed peas and cornbread. Sweet tea that goes with long afternoons on the front porch. Hitch a ride in the back of Felder Rushing’s big green truck and roll COOKIE BY CAMPBELL’S BAKERY; with us through town, because there’s food and fun and folks with whom PHOTO BY VIRGINIA SCHREIBER we’re gonna celebrate livin’, and that’s what we like about the South. — from malsstpaddysparade.com/

St.
Paddy's, 
Jackson
 Style by Dustin Cardon

T

he Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade, held March 17 this year, is widely considered one of the most successful and popular public events in Mississippi. The event regularly attracts more than 60,000 locals and tourists to participate in the festivities and brings upwards of $7 million into the local economy. The parade’s website describes the celebration as “a green Mardi Gras … a lighthearted homecoming where everyone is king and queen for a day.” The host of the event is Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.), owned by brothers Hal and Malcolm White. Proceeds from the parade—through float registrations and other event entry fees—benefit the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children. The parade is free. The proceeds come from the Pet Parade, which has a $5 entree fee, and the after-parade street dance in the Hal and Mal’s parking lot, which has a $5 admission fee. The parade was first held in downtown Jackson in 1983 when Malcolm White, missing the fun he’d had celebrating Mardi Gras while living in New Orleans in the ’70s, decided to hold his own springtime celebration. White obtained a permit from the city, rounded up a few local bands and a pickup truck and gathered a group of friends dressed up as characters from various Tennessee Williams plays, then led the procession down Capitol Street. That first parade attracted a few hundred curious onlook-

ers, and the event only grew from there. Over the years, the parade has featured involvement from the Bluz Boys Band, the O’Tux Society, the Rude Men, the Krewe of Kazoo, the Sweet Potato Queens, and other local parading and social clubs. The theme of this year’s parade is “That’s What I Like About the South.” The original parade route started at CS’s, passed down Capitol Street and ended at Ole Tavern at George Street. (This year’s Friday night second line will start at CS’s and end at Hal & Mal’s.) The main parade Saturday starts at 1 p.m. at the corner of State and Court streets in downtown Jackson, and makes its way up West Capitol Street, past the Old Capital Museum, then on to South Lamar Street, where it makes its way back to Court Street. At 8 a.m. on March 17, the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade Race starts at the Jackson Convention Complex on Pascagoula Street. The race features a 5K run and walk and a 1-mile fun run. At 9 a.m., the Trustmark Children’s Festival takes place in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art on South Lamar Street. A pet parade is at 10 a.m., and a children’s parade at 11 a.m., both in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art. The main parade starts at 1 p.m. After the parade, Hal & Mal’s hosts a street dance in its parking lot on South Commerce Street featuring live music from the Bluz Boys Band and Ole Skool Review. Admission is $5.

St.
Paddy's
 
Walking
 
Krewes
 
101

COURTESY KAREN L KAY

March 14 - 20, 2012

Batson Children’s Hospital; collection boxes are at CS’s, Ole Tavern at George Street and Hal & Mal’s (the stops along the way of the Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp) throughout parade week. Green Ladies: Sporting their signature green satin jackets, the Green Ladies’ slogan is “Showing our asses since ’99.” Founder Lesley McHardy started this krewe in 1999 when Malcolm White suggested that the parade needed more marching krewes. She and her friend, Ruma Haque (now deceased), each invited 10 friends to join the krewe and had jackets made, and the group was born. Their signature is throwing handmade domino necklaces customized with racy sayings (though they also make sure to have kid-friendly throws). The Standing Krewe of Umlaut: In its seventh year, this krewe’s constitution specifically prohibits its members from marching in the parade; rather, the krewe establishes camp at the corner of Capitol Street and Congress Street. Jay Losset is a founding member, but the krewe has grown exponentially and

COURTESY KAREN L KAY

M

embers of the marching krewes take Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade seriously: As one member of the Green Ladies puts it, “People plan pregnancies around this parade.” So you know who’s who, here’s a little guide. O’Tux Society: The O’Tux Society’s most famous (or infamous) member is St. Paddy’s Parade founder Malcolm White. Originally all male, this krewe wears tuxedo jackets and hands out green and white carnations in exchange for kisses—an idea based on the New Orleans parade tradition. Over the years, the membership has expanded to include women and the children of its members. Krewe of Kazoo: The Krewe of Kazoo’s colors are pink and green. Marching behind the O’Tuxers, they carry decorated umbrellas and parody a popular song each year with parade-themed lyrics, to which they choreograph a routine to perform in front of the judges’ stand. VA Patterson is a founding member, and Gay Reynolds currently heads up the krewe. The Kazooers and the Green 16 Ladies Krewe collaborate on a toy drive for the Blair E.

JAY LOSSET

by Julie Skipper

Jay Losset helped found the parade’s only official standing krewe.

last year boasted 65 members. Too Live Krewe: This ragtag group of Jackson Free Press staffers, readers, artists (Josh Hailey helped start it) and other misfits randomly inserts itself wherever it can find a space in the parade lineup. This year, the Too Live Krewe is walking in the Marching MALfunctions Second Line Stomp Friday night instead of the parade. It is considering a float next year. Write assistant@jacksonfreepress.com if you’d like to join in.


S LAM AR ST REET

SMITH PARK

E AMITE

STREET

ST RE ET

cop central OLD CA TOL MUSEUPIM

E PEARL

STREET

E PASCA GOULA STREET PLANETA RIUM THALIA MARA H ALL MS MUSE U OF ART M

Trustmark

childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival E SOUTH

STREET

MISSISSIP COLISEU PI M MIS STATE FA SISSIPPI IRGROU NDS

Ă&#x153;MLAĂ&#x153;T HEADQUARTERS S PRESID ENT ST REET

CONVEN TIO CENTER N

STREET GOVERNOR MANSION â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

S CON GRESS STREET

CAPITOL

S JEFFER SON ST REET

FARISH STREET

ROACH STRE ET

MISSISSIP PI STREE T

Buckethead Judges

5k Run/Walk Start & End CO UR T

MISSISS STATE C IPPI APITOL

STATE ST REET

HIGH ST REET

HAL & M RESTAUR ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANT

bead alley (LOAD UP)

start

home stretch (FEWEST BEADS)

Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s st. paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parade route St.â&#x20AC;ŠPaddy'sâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;ŠScheduleâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Šofâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;ŠEvents Marchâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Š16

T

KHJUHHQHVWPDQLQ-DFNVRQLVDERXWWRGRZKDW WKHJUHHQHVWPDQRXJKWWRGR/HDGDKXJH SDUDGHRQ6W3DWULFNÂśV'D\<RXÂśYHOLNHO\VHHQ )HOGHU5XVKLQJDURXQGWRZQGULYLQJKLVSLFNXS WUXFNZLWKKLVGRJ5XVW\DQGDURZG\JDUGHQJURZ LQJLQWKHEDFNFRPSOHWHZLWKERWWOHWUHHVDQGOLNH  2U\RXÂśYHKHDUGKLVGHOLJKWIXOUDGLRVKRZÂł7KH *HVWDOW*DUGHQHU´RQ0LVVLVVLSSL3XEOLF%URDGFDVW LQJ2U\RXÂśYHUHDGRQHRIKLVIXQDQGPRWLYDWLRQDO JDUGHQLQJJXLGHVWKDWPDNH\RXZDQWWRGLJLQWRWKH GLUWHYHQLI\RXGRQÂśWNQRZWKHGLIIHUHQFHEHWZHHQD EXOEDQGDĂ&#x20AC;RZHUSRW  (YHU\\HDUDODUJHUWKDQOLIHFKDUDFWHUOHDGV 0DOÂśV6W3DGG\ÂśV3DUDGHDQG5XVKLQJLVSHUIHFWIRU WKHSDUW+HÂśOOEHGULYLQJKLVWUXFNDQGVKRZLQJZK\ KHÂśVRQHRIWKHWKLQJVZHORYHDERXWRXUVRXWK

6:30 p.m., Marching MALfunction and Second Line Stomp to Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). The parade starts at CSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1359 ½ West St.). Catch the Fondren Express Trolley from Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to CSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starting at 4:30 p.m. The Lucky Hand Blues Band, the Southern Komfort Brass Band and the Rumprollers perform. WOOD plays in the Red Room ($5). Costumes welcome. Call 601-948-0888.

Marchâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;Š17 8 a.m., St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5K Run, at the corner of North Farish and East Pascagoula streets. Proceeds benefit the Blair E. Batson Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. Register March 14-16 at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51, Ridgeland). $25; visit stpaddys5k.com. 9 a.m., Trustmark Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festival, at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Tickets required for rides and games. 9 a.m.-2 a.m., St Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll BBQ at Club Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (824 S. State St.). Music from Spank the Monkey, Diesel 255, Hairicane, Dylon Moss Project, DVDJ Reign and DJ Young Venom. Visit clubmagoos.com.

"UCKETHEADS

10 a.m., Pet Parade, on South Lamar Street in from of the museum. Register at 9:30 a.m. $5 entry fee per pet; proceeds benefit the Mississippi Animal Rescue League. Green fur welcome.

E\6KDPHND+D\HV+DPLOWRQ

WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

E

YHU\\HDUWKRXVDQGVRISHRSOHFRPHIURPDOORYHU 0LVVLVVLSSLWRHQMR\WKH0DOÂśV6W3DGG\ÂśV3DUDGH 7KHH[FLWHPHQWLQWKHDLULVSDOSDEOH*HWWKHUH HDUO\HQRXJKDQG\RXÂśOOHQMR\KDYLQJDVHDWVRFORVH WKDWWKHWKURZVFRXOGODQGLQ\RXUODS$UULYHODWHDQG KHDYHQKHOS\RXWRÂżQGDSDUNLQJVSDFH7KHHODERUDWH DQGHQWHUWDLQLQJĂ&#x20AC;RDWVFDSWXUHWKHH\HVDQGKHDUWVRI SDUDGHJRHUVEXWZKRKROGVWKHUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUMXGJ LQJWKHVHĂ&#x20AC;RDWVDQGJLYLQJWKHEHVWĂ&#x20AC;RDWVWKHLUGXH"  7KH\ÂśUHFDOOHGWKHÂł%XFNHWKHDG-XGJHV´RU Âł%XFNHWKHDGV´IRUVKRUW7KLVVHFUHWJURXSRIPHQ DQGZRPHQWDVNHGZLWKMXGJLQJHDFKSDUDGHĂ&#x20AC;RDWFDQ EHLGHQWLÂżHGE\WKHLUHODERUDWHKHDGZHDUWKDWFORVHO\ UHVHPEOHEXFNHWV  7U\LQJWRÂżQGRXWWKHLGHQWLW\RIWKH%XFNHWKHDG -XGJHVLVWKHHTXLYDOHQWRIWU\LQJWRQDPHWKHPHPEHUV RIWKHORFDO0DVRQLF/RGJH,I\RXÂśUHDQRXWVLGHU\RX PD\QHYHUNQRZDQGHYHQRXUFDOOVZHQWXQDQVZHUHG  2QHPLJKWZRQGHUZK\WKH\ZHDUWKHVHKDWV,V LWDIDVKLRQVWDWHPHQW"$WUDGLWLRQRIVRPHVRUW"7KH DQVZHULVTXLWHVLPSOHLI\RXFDQJHWLWÂł1HFNODFHVWKH SDUDSKHUQDOLDWKH\KLWXVLQRXUKHDGV´VDLG0DUJDUHW 0RFNEHHLQDUDUH%XFNHWKHDGLQWHUYLHZZLWK :/%7Âł7KHVHEXFNHWVSURWHFWRXUKHDGV´7KHMXGJHV VHWXSLQIURQWRIWKH*RYHUQRUÂśV0DQVLRQDQGHDFK Ă&#x20AC;RDWUHFHLYHVDWZRPLQXWHOLPLWLQIURQWRIWKHMXGJHVÂś VWDQGWRJLYHWKHLUEHVWSHUIRUPDQFHFRPSHWLQJWRZLQ

10 a.m., Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade, on S. Lamar St. in from of the museum. Register for the parade at 9:00 a.m. Trophies given for creativity, originality and performance. Inky the Clown is the emcee, and Curious George is the grand marshal. Trophies given. 11 a.m., St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Block Party at Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (901 E. Fortification St.). Irish beer and music all day. Legacy at 2 p.m., Otis Lotus at 5 p.m. and Gary Burnside at 8 p.m. $5; call 601-948-0055. 11 a.m., Downtown Throwdown at Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St.). Crawfish, wings and beer; live music from 2 p.m.-2 a.m. Lineup includes US, Crossin Dixon, the Chad Wesley Band, Riverwolves, Gunboat, Swamp Babies, Passenger Jones, Spacewolf and Dirty Bourbon River Show. Enter to win a trip to Hawaii or Las Vegas. $10 cover; call 601-960-2700.

1 p.m., the parade starts at State and Court streets. FDVKSUL]HVWURSKLHVDQGEUDJJLQJULJKWV7KHĂ&#x20AC;RDWVDUH MXGJHGRQFUHDWLYLW\H[HFXWLRQVW\OHDQGH[XEHUDQFH 7KHFULWHULDSULQWHGRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RDWUHJLVWUDWLRQIRUPVWDWH ÂłWKRVHWKURZLQJVORSDWWKHMXGJHVPD\EHEDQQHG IURPIXWXUHSDUDGHV*LIWVKRZHYHUDUHZHOFRPH´ 0DNLQJRQHZRQGHUMXVWZKDWRFFXUUHGLQWKHSDVW

 6RLI\RXÂśUHQHZWRWKHSDUDGH ,DWWHQGHGP\ÂżUVW ODVW\HDU WKHZKROHHYHQWPD\VHHPWREHWRRPXFK FURZGVRISHRSOHHODERUDWHĂ&#x20AC;RDWVSRWHQWLDOO\GDPDJLQJ WKURZVWKDWJLYHWKHMXGJHVUHDVRQWRZHDUSURWHFWLYH KHDGZHDUDQGDQRYHUDOO0DUGL*UDVOLNHIHHO  'RQÂśWEHGLVFRXUDJHGWKRXJK&RPHRXWEULQJ \RXUIDPLO\DQGHQMR\WKHELJJHVW-DFNVRQSDUW\RIWKH \HDU-XVWGRQÂśWKLWD%XFNHWKHDG

After the parade, a street party follows at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking lot. The Bluz Boys and Ole Skool Review perform. No coolers or pets. $5. 2 p.m., Crawfish Boil at Popâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon (2636 S. Gallatin St.). Free crawfish, live music, a DJ and open-mic. Call 601-961-4747. At Crawdad Hole (1150 Lakeland Drive), Fulkerson and Pace perform at 3 p.m., and Shadz of Gray performs at 6 p.m. Call 601-982-9299. At Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos (318 South State St.), South Bound Traffic performs after parade. Visit jacostacos.com. 9 p.m.-midnight, Babalu Tacos and Tapas (622 Duling Ave.) has $2 tacos, $5 margaritas and Babaritas, and $1 off draft beers. Call 601-366-5757. Wing Stop (925 N. State St.) has $1 draft beers all day. Call 601-969-6400. (More: jfpevents.com)

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY MPB

&ELDER´STHE-AN

17


I St. Paddy's

HW

Y

51

Y PA R A D E D A S T. P A D D Y ’S X IN D E D IS C O U N T ut

S TA TH R NO

STR TE

EET

COUNT

RI DG EW OO D

ro ug ho ti se rs ’ A ds th C he ck A dv er fo r of fe r de ta il s. th e pa pe r TI SI N G PA ID A D V ER

Y L IN E R D.

19

M IL LS A

NORT

D OL

WOODR

CA

NT

O W W IL SON

PS AVE .

55

DR.

.

S TAT E

H S TA TE

17

RD ON

INTER

STRE

ET

N O RT H SI D E

15

LAKELA

ND DR.

9

SH S T

14

C A P IT O

18 16

21

A T IO N S T.

H IG H S T.

I 55

FARI

GALL

AT I N

ST

F O R T IF IC

L S T.

PEARL

S T.

SOUTH

S T.

INTER

S TAT E

22

20

Oh,
Yeah Three actors have brought the character of St. Patrick to film. • Gabriel Byrne played the saint in the TV movie “Patrick” (2004). • Patrick Bergin played St. Patrick in another television production, “Patrick: The Irish Legend” (2000). • More than 90 years ago, Ira Allen played the role in the film “In the Days of Saint Patrick” (1920).

Who would make the best St. Patrick in a new production? While St. Patrick was born to a Briton family in the 300s, these actors are all native Irishmen. • Liam Neeson: William John Neeson was born June 7, 1952, in Ballymena, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. • Colin Farrell: Colin James Farrell was born May 31, 1976, in Castleknock, County Dublin, Ireland. • Jonathan Rhys Meyers: Jonathan Michael Francis O’Keefe, as he was known at birth, was born July 27, 1977, in Dublin, Ireland.

Emergency

 Kit by Elyane Alexander

ST. PA D DY ’ S DAY D I S C O U N T O F F E R S : 1. Last Call: $3 Jameson and 2-for-1 Irish Car Bombs All Day

12. Briarwood Wine & Spirits: Wine & Liquor Specials

2. Pop’s Saloon: Crawfish Boil

13. The Pizza Shack: $6 Pitchers

3. Crawdad Hole: Fulkerson & Pace 3pm, Shadz of Gray 6pm

14. Martin’s: St. Paddy’s Day Blowout with Electric Mudd & Friends

4. Fenian’s: Block Party $5 Cover, Indoor and Outdoor - Irish Food, Irish Beer, Irish Fun - Legacy, Otis Lotus, Gary Burnside

15. Bourbon Street: Crossin Dixon 9pm $10 Cover, Green Beer & Irish Drink Specials All Weekend

5. F. Jones Corner: Amazin’ Lazy Boi 8-11pm, Sherman Lee Dillion and His Mississippi Sound Midnight - Until

16. Club Magoo: 1st Annual St. Paddy’s Rock N Roll BBQ, Live Music All Day

6. Ole Tavern: Party on the Patio, $10 Cover, Live Music, Food 7. Underground 119: Grady Champion, 9pm - 1am, $5 before 8:30pm, $10 after

March 14 - 20, 2012

8. Hal & Mal’s: After Party, Awards Ceremony and Street Party featuring The Bluz Boys, Pinstripe Brass Band, Ol’ Skool Revue, DJs, $5.00, 21+ No Coolers Allowed

18

9. Wing Stop: $1 Draft All Day 10. Sportsman’s Lodge: DoubleShotz 8-12pm, Green Beer and Jameson Specials, Beads, hats, and prizes 11. NUTS: Lucky Discount Draw (3/17-3/19)

17. Babalu: $2 Tacos, $5 Margaritas & Baba-rita’s, $1 off draft 9pm - midnight 18. Jaco’s Tacos: Live Music All Day, Tacos & Beer 19. Time Out: 2-for-1 Irish Shots & Green Beer Specials - McDade’s Markets: Beer & Food Discounts 20. Burgers & Blues: After Parade Party with Drink Specials, Liz Stroud Band 2:00 - 6:00, South of Twenty 6:00 - 10:00 21. Reed Pierce’s: Draft Green Beer, $3 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosa’s, Boiled Shrimp 22. Wasabi: Green Beer

• Cillian Murphy: Cillian Murphy was born May 25, 1976, in Douglas, County Cork, Ireland. • Pierce Brosnan: Pierce Brendan Brosnan was born May 16, 1953, in Navan, County Meath, Ireland. • Gabriel Byrne: Gabriel James Byrne was born May 12, 1950, in Dublin, Ireland. (Sure, he could do it again— why not?) • Stephen Rea: Stephen Rea (born Graham Rea) was born Oct. 31, 1946, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. • Ciarán Hinds: Ciarán Hinds was born Feb. 9, 1953, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. • Stuart Townsend: Stuart Townsend was born Dec. 15, 1972, in Howth, County Dublin, Ireland. • Peter O’Toole: The legendary actor Peter Seamus O’Toole was born Aug. 2, 1932, in Connemara, County Galway, Ireland.

Are you heading out to the 30th Annual St. Paddy’s Parade this Saturday? Here are a few items you might want to bring: • comfortable shoes • portable chairs • water • sunscreen • snacks • cooler • entertainment for the kids • towels • hand sanitizer • camera • book bag or tote for your beads • stroller • deodorant • sunglasses • spray fan • first-aid kit • extra shirt • umbrella • watch • gum • a kid to attract beads


I St. Paddy's

3.

Fold the corners of the connected part of the newspaper into the center to make two triangles.

Directions:

4.

Fold the bottom of the newspaper up and secure with a piece of tape. Repeat on the other side.

1.

Color or paint your newspaper if you’d like your hat to have a solid background color. I painted mine green to get in the St. Patrick’s Day spirit. A word of advice: If you use paint, only apply a thin layer (or else the newspaper will be too fragile).

2.

Fold newspaper in half.

5.

Decorate and wear! I attached a string to ensure my hat would stay put in windy conditions and kept the colors with the St. Paddy’s Day theme, but you can decorate yours however you see fit.

jacksonfreepress.com

P

arade season is a perfect time to get crafty. You can use old newspapers and other supplies you have on hand to create a personalized parade hat to keep you stylish and shaded on the parade route.

19


20

March 14 - 20, 2012


COURTESY MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY

I St. Paddy's

I

n the early part of the 19th century, a group of people traveled to Mississippi to escape some of the ethnic prejudices they faced in other parts of the country. Although fewer in number here than in other places, Irish immigrants contributed to many areas of Mississippi culture, from building grand mansions to founding towns to serving the church. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ethnic Heritage in Mississippi: The Twentieth Centuryâ&#x20AC;? (University Press of Mississippi, 2012, $40), Celeste Ray writes that some of the first Irish immigrants came to the Natchez area of Mississippi, where the Spanish colonial government sought Englishspeaking Irish priests to help convert British settlers to Catholicism. Other people of Irish descent came later; some from Ireland and some from the Northeast. Whereas in northern cities large numbers of Irish immigrants faced discrimination and banded together into their own communities, Irish immigrants to Mississippi came in smaller numbers and assimilated into southern culture, Ray writes.

Many immigrants worked building railroads and canals, but others became wealthy business or plantation owners. Frederick Stanton, an Irish immigrant, built one of Natchezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now-famous whitecolumned mansions in 1858 and named it Belfast. Stanton made a fortune in cotton and owned more than 16,000 acres of cotton plantations. He died a month after his home was finished. The house is now known as Stanton Hall, and is a stop for tourists during the spring and fall pilgrimages in Natchez. The Newton County Historical and Genealogical Society found several Irish families who settled in the area during the early 1800s. Several families from County Antrim in Ireland sailed on a ship called the Caledonia from Belfast, Ireland, to Charleston, S.C., in 1822. Some of them migrated west to Mississippi and settled in Newton County, in an area that came to be known as New Ireland. In Newton County, immigrants founded the New Ireland Baptist Church and the Erin Cumberland Presbyterian

Stanton Hall, built by an Irish immigrant, is now a stopping point for tourists.

Church. A street in Newton still bears the name â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Ireland.â&#x20AC;? Other Irish immigrants came through the Port of New Orleans to settle in New Ireland and in other areas, including Kemper and Neshoba counties. Other Irish immigrants came to Mississippi through the Catholic Church. Several bishops of Natchez were born in Ireland, including John Edward Gunn. Gunn was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, and was appoint-

ed the sixth bishop of Natchez in 1911. During his time as bishop, the number of Catholic churches in the area almost doubled. One story says that in 1915, while he was visiting an archbishop in Detroit, Mich., a German spy poisoned the soup at a banquet with arsenic. Gunn and four others were poisoned, but he survived. His will says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In life and in death I am proud of three things: My Irish birth, my Catholic faith and my American citizenship.â&#x20AC;?

4HINGS!BOUT3T0ATRICK

2.

$JURXSRI,ULVKUDLG HUV WRRN D WHHQDJH 3DWULFNSULVRQHUGXULQJDQ DWWDFN RQ KLV IDPLO\ÂśV HV WDWH7KHUDLGHUVVHQWKLP WR,UHODQGZKHUHKHVSHQW VHYHQ\HDUVLQFDSWLYLW\

3.

'XULQJWKLVWLPHKHZRUNHGDVDVKHS KHUG7KHORQJTXLHWKRXUVRILQWURVSHF WLRQOHGKLPWR&KULVWLDQLW\

4.

6L[\HDUVDIWHUFRPLQJWR,UHODQG3DWULFN HVFDSHGWR%ULWDLQ+HVDLG*RGWROGKLP LWZDVWLPHWROHDYH,UHODQG

5.

3DWULFNVWXGLHGUHOLJLRQIRUPRUHWKDQ \HDUV$IWHUEHFRPLQJDSULHVWKHZHQW EDFNWR,UHODQG

6.

+LVPLVVLRQZDVWRFRQYHUWSDJDQVDQG DOVR WR PLQLVWHU WR &KULVWLDQV ZKLFK PHDQV KH ZDVQÂśW WKH SHUVRQ WR LQWURGXFH &KULVWLDQLW\WR,UHODQG 

7.

3DWULFNXVHGERQÂżUHVWRFHOHEUDWH(DVWHU EHFDXVH WKH ,ULVK KRQRUHG WKHLU JRGV ZLWKÂżUH+HDGGHGDVXQWRWKHFURVVWRFUH DWHZKDWLVQRZFDOOHGD&HOWLFFURVV

8.

2QHRIWKHP\WKVDERXW6W3DWULFNEH VLGHVLQWURGXFLQJWKH,ULVKWR&KULVWLDQLW\ LVWKDWKHGURYHDOOWKHVQDNHVLQWKHODQGLQWR WKHVHDWRWKHLUGHVWUXFWLRQ+HGLGQÂśW

9. 10.

3DWULFNVXSSRVHGO\XVHGDVKDPURFNWR H[SODLQWKHFRQFHSWRIWKH+RO\7ULQLW\

6W3DWULFNGLHGRQ0DUFK7KHH[ DFW \HDUV RI KLV ELUWK DQG GHDWK DUH XQNQRZQEXWKHGLGOLYHGXULQJWKHWKFHQ WXU\ ²9DOHULH:HOOV

I

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always envied the Irishâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they know how to live. And by live, ever suggested this; it just began to happen naturally. And through I mean more than just survive each day. If you can say anything the weekend, as his condition deteriorated and he eventually about the Irish heritage, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that they can celebrate moments. I passed, the stories never slowed. If anything, they intensified, with know, â&#x20AC;&#x153;insert Irish drinking joke here.â&#x20AC;? But beyond the pints, another story ready to be told almost before the first had finished. these are folks who could treasure a milestoneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even some of the We told stories about the time he accidentally forwarded all his inones weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d sooner forget. Like death. coming calls to 911 or about his ability to My family isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Irish. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a hybrid consider any opposing viewpoint without of Scottish and Welsh, and at some point a judgment, no matter how greatly that view Swede got into the gene pool and contribmight have differed from his own. Family uted the blond hair. But other than genetmembers, friends, students and everyone ics, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always associated my family with who met him had something to tell. Not the Irish in our general approach to life just a kind statement about him being a and community. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re loud, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rough, nice guy, but fully fleshed out anecdotes we have tempers; we have a keen appreciathat had the entire waiting area laughing tion for a finely honed insult, and we celâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an odd sound in the hospital halls. ebrate lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s joys the same way we celebrate The stories continued as family memthe tragediesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we gather together, and we bers arrived in town and as friends posted tell stories. on his memorial Facebook page (which exThis past month, we lost an irreplaceploded to more than 800 members in unable member of the Kenyon family, my der a week). What could have been a time uncle, Dr. Wynn Kenyon. This was a man of anger and sadness was instead a time of you never forgot once you met him. He laughter and memory, an appropriate epihad an explosive laugh that startled you Dr.Wynn Kenyon, chair of the philosophy logue for a man who spent so much of his even when you were prepared for it, he had department at Belhaven University, life laughing. And through the telling of a repertoire of used jokes but his telling of embodied the Irish spirit of laughter and his stories, in large groups and over a full them never got old, and he achieved celeb- storytelling. table of food, we found that despite the loss rity status at Belhaven University, where he of one of our most memorable members, chaired the philosophy department. Wynn we are still a family. So, in my opinion, we was equal part Socrates and the Absent-Minded Professorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a man didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold a funeral for Dr. Kenyon last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we had a wake. who could deliver a stunningly brilliant lecture on existentialism The Irish have the right idea. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a potential joy in every while wearing mismatched shoes. This was a man with no shortage moment, even the sad ones. And a life remembered is so much of stories. more powerful than a life mourned. The true luck of the Irish isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t When he unexpectedly passed a few weeks ago, the family chance that happens to favor you, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading a life full of fantastic could have easily been driven to their separate corners by the shock. storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both happy and tragicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and being part of a community But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the way we do things. We, like the Irish, cope via sto- that knows how to properly retell them when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re goneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which ries. Even while Wynn was still in intensive care, those of us in the means never leaving out the good parts. hospital sat outside and began to swap memories of him. No one Death really isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a laughing matter. But maybe it should be. 21 jacksonfreepress.com

3DWULFN JUHZ XS LQ WKH WK FHQWXU\ LQ D 5RPDQ YLOOD DORQJ WKH 5LYHU 6DEULQD RQ %ULWDLQÂśV ZHVWFRDVW

COURTESY BRET KENYON

ANDREAS F. BORCHERT

1.


I St. Paddy's Krissy Hall That’s just it, most of us can’t REMEMBER, lol. Like • 1 David-Mathew Espinosa All the best ones I can’t remember at all, lol. Like • 1 Tracee Kelly Crazy Patrick the artist on a float. Like • Lori Gregory Garrott I think my favorite will be this year. The first one my kid will be young enough to see and understand NONE of it. But she’ll love the beads and costumes. Like •

March 14 - 20, 2012

@flipflops: When I just sat downtown and prayed last year because I’m innocent and pure like fresh snow. @FlyBoyMike: The whole thing is a blur. But the craziest part would be when @aspiehler got his new nickname. Spewler. @aspiehler: @Flyboymike. Yes, good times. The theme this year is moderation. @FlyBoyMike: What the hell is a moderation? My new motto: I don’t get drunk. I get awesome. @flipflops: @aspiehler @Flyboymike damn well better be, or you’re staying downtown until you’re sober. #spewler @FlyBoyMike: @flipflops @aspiehler just cover the bedroom in plastic sheeting, like a regular Saturday night!!! heyooooo

22

clubmagoos.com


www.thepizzashackjackson.com

Best Pizza 2009-2012 Open on Parade Day Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily

$6 Pitchers

NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

(in the former FabraCare Building, between Kat’s & Fenian’s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com

jacksonfreepress.com

2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

23


Irish
 
Heroes 
 by Richard Coupe

COURTESY RICHARD COUPE

I St. Paddy's

My brother had this drawing commissioned of our ancestors William and John Breen at the battle of Little Round Top.

March 14 - 20, 2012

I

24

sensed trouble as my brother’s three sons and wife slunk out of the room slowly, without making eye contact. It had started well enough. I was in town and hadn’t seen my brother or his family for a few months, and they had invited me over for dinner. There had been some cryptic remarks from my sister-in-law concerning the fact that I had told my brother that we had two relatives, great-uncles they would be, who had fought in the Civil War. They were sons of an Irishman who had immigrated to the United States in the early 1800s. My brother, Will, had asked if I would like to see the research he had on the Breen brothers. Instantly, a chill had set in the atmosphere. I could tell that the question was significant as Will’s family was sitting tensely on the edge of their seats awaiting my response. But my little brother looked at me so pleadingly with big puppy-dog eyes that I blithely answered, “Sure.” I understood the family’s reaction a few minutes later when Will re-entered the room with an enormous stack of notebooks, pictures, books, maps and other papers. He proceeded enthusiastically—barely taking a breath over the next several hours—to relate the Breen brothers’ Civil War experience to me. William and John Breen reunited about 8:30 p.m. July 2, 1863, on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg. Look closely at the drawing Will commissioned of the event. William’s pack (left) has the insignia of the 32nd Massachusetts and on John’s pouch the 9th Massachusetts. William’s pants and canteen have bullet holes in them from fighting all day in the wheat field. John Breen is in his marching gear, as the 9th had just arrived at Little Round Top. John has a bedroll instead of a knapsack; he apparently cast it off during the long march up from Virginia. His records show the army charged him $2.14 for his knapsack after the

Gettysburg campaign. If you look very close to the upper left side of Haslett’s Battery, you will see Col. Guirney of the ninth on horseback. Much like my brother’s rediscovery of our two Irish kinsmen, St. Patrick’s Day always reminds me of my Irish heritage. Ireland has 6 million Irish people, but 35 million Americans think they are Irish, and I am one of them. The entire linage on my mother’s side of the family hailed from Ireland. My grandmother was a first-generation Irish American—her father emigrated from Ireland around 1900. She was a sweet woman, but hated the British and was an Irish Republican Army supporter. Most of us have forgotten the bloody sectarian violence between Catholics and Protestants that defined Northern Ireland for many years. I remember going to some St. Patrick’s Day parades in my youth that were scary places to be. Although parades in Northern Ireland were celebratory for the most part, floats and marchers always reflected both sides of the conflict. Participants hung British soldiers in bloody effigy, and death’s head-wearing revelers followed by taunting Catholics. My brother pointed out that the Breens fought in nearly every major engagement in the eastern theater of the war. Hauntingly, though, it did not go well for either of them. William was captured late in the war and died miserably of exposure in a prison camp. John was wounded in the battle of Spotsylvania and spent the rest of his life with a mangled arm. Listening to my brother, my mind jumped to the present and to my two nephews. Both are Marines, and both have served two tours of duty in Iraq. Neither came back the boys they were when they left. In my mind, the Breen brothers are linked across the centuries with the Coupe cousins by their shared sacrifice of youth and innocence. The Irish have given hope to the modern world. Somehow, some way, wiser heads were able to prevail in Northern Ireland—the bloody violence has halted, and peace reigns. Will the same hold for Iraq and Afghanistan? Only time will tell. The Breen brothers were not heroes in the classic sense. Neither led a desperate charge to halt the enemy advance, nor did they win any medals for bravery. But heroes they are nonetheless, because when duty called, they answered. The same goes for my nephews. I remember roughhousing with them when they were young boys. (One claims his earliest memory is of me dangling him by his feet from a balcony over a barbecue—that can’t be.) They are now men and heroes in my eyes. As we celebrate St. Paddy’s Day this year, wearing green and drinking beers, as we catch and fight over superfluous trinkets and thrown beads, it would do us well to remind ourselves of the sacrifices necessary for justice and peace in this world, and of those men and women who willingly do their duty when called.


25

jacksonfreepress.com


I St. Paddy's DANEY CARNEY

T

he festivities for the St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start with the parades on Saturday. Friday night is the second annual Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp. The second line starts at 6:30 p.m. in the parking lot of CSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1359-1/2 N. West St., 601-969-9482) behind Millsaps College. It will make a stop at the Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St., 601-960-2700) and end at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888). Fondren Express Trolly and Midtown Partners will provide transportation to CSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starting at 4:30 p.m. What is a second line, some Mississippians may wonder. In New Orleans, when parade watchers start to follow the band to enjoy the music, it is referred to as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;second lineâ&#x20AC;? of the parade. The first line is the official parade. People also have second lines sometimes just to celebrate. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t uncommon to see them held with marriages, funerals or even family reunions. Capital City Beverages will sell Yazoo Brew and Lazy Magnolia specialty beers. The proceeds go to buying toys for the Blair E. Batson Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. Each stop during the second line also has bins for participants to drop off toys.

Southern Komfort Brass Band will play during the Marching MALfunctions Second Line Stomp Friday, March 16.

Mark Roemer will play at CSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. After the second line, enjoy live music in the Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant from The Lucky Hand Blues Band and The Rumprollers for free. WOOD plays in the Red Room ($5). All members of the public are encouraged to dance, march, jog or even ride their bikes during this free event. The route of this second line celebrates and commemorates the original St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade route 30 years ago. March with Southern Komfort Brass Band, and enjoy traditional brass band music during the second line. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your umbrella!

St.â&#x20AC;ŠPaddy'sâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;ŠDayâ&#x20AC;Š â&#x20AC;ŠQuiz

Mediterranean Cuisine

FILE PHOTO

by Julie Skipper

Now Serving $10 Lunch

-We also cater weddings & parties.-

M-Th 11-2, 4:30-9 â&#x20AC;˘ F-Sat 11-2, 4:30-10

WILLIAMS PLAYS; 12. BUCKETHEADS; 13. ARCHITECT SAMBO MOCKBEE; 14. MISSISSIPPI ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE; 15. FALSE; 16. 1737; 17. BOSTON; 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;HEALTHâ&#x20AC;?; 19.THIRD; 20. BLAIR E. BATSON HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN

1896 Main Street, Ste A in Madison 601-853-0876 â&#x20AC;˘ mezzams.com

AND ST. JOSEPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY, THERE ARE GROUPS OF MEN WHO DRESS IN TUXEDO JACKETS AND HAND OUT FLOWERS IN EXCHANGE FOR KISSES; 8. KAREN GILDER; 9. BLUE; 10. MAEWYN SUCCAT; 11. CHARACTERS FROM TENNESSEE

26

-Wood Fired Brick Oven Pizzas-Hookahs on a Beautiful Patio-Now Serving Lebanese Wine-Now Serving Spirits-

:KDWDQQLYHUVDU\GRHVWKH0DOÂśV6W 3DGG\ÂśV3DUDGHFHOHEUDWHWKLV\HDU" :KRLVWKLV\HDUÂśV*UDQG0DUVKDO" :KDWLVWKHWKHPHRIWKLV\HDUÂśVSDUDGH" +RZPDQ\SLQWVRI*XLQQHVVZLOOEHFRQ VXPHGRQ6W3DWULFNÂśV'D\ZRUOGZLGH" 6W3DWULFNÂśV'D\LVFRQVLGHUHG LQ,UHODQG DWOHDVW WKHOXFNLHVWGD\WRGRZKDW"

ANSWERS: 1. 30TH; 2. FELDER RUSHING; 3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WHAT I LIKE ABOUT THE SOUTHâ&#x20AC;?; 4. ACCORDING TO GUINNESS, APPROXIMATELY 13 MILLION; 5. GET MARRIED.; 6. BLUZ BOYS BAND; 7. BECAUSE IN NEW ORLEANS, ON ST. PATRICKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

March 14 - 20, 2012

Includes entree, side, and tea.

:KDWEDQGKDVSOD\HGDWWKHVWUHHWSDUW\ DIWHUWKH0DOœV6W3DGG\œV3DUDGHHYHU\\HDU" :K\GRPHPEHUVRIWKH2œ7X[6RFLHW\ZHDU WX[HGRMDFNHWV" :KRZDVWKH¿UVWIHPDOHPHPEHURI WKH2œ7X[HUV" :KDWFRORUZDVRULJLQDOO\DVVRFLDWHG ZLWK6W3DWULFN" :KDWZDV6W3DWULFNœVJLYHQQDPH" :KDWGLG0DODQGKLVIULHQGVGUHVVDVLQ WKH¿UVW6W3DGG\œV3DUDGH" :KDWDUHWKH6W3DGG\œV3DUDGHMXGJHV FDOOHG" :KRZDVWKHRULJLQDORQH RI1R " :KDWRUJDQL]DWLRQEHQH¿WVIURPWKH 3HW3DUDGH" 7UXHRUIDOVH7KHUHDUHPRUH,ULVK SHRSOHLQ,UHODQGWKDQWKHUHDUH$PHULFDQV RI,ULVKRULJLQ ,QZKDW\HDUZDV6W3DWULFNœV'D\¿UVW FHOHEUDWHGSXEOLFO\" ,QZKDWFLW\ZDV6W3DWULFNœV'D\¿UVW FHOHEUDWHGSXEOLFO\" 6W3DWULFNœV'D\UHYHOHUVWRDVWZLWKD FKHHUIXO³6ODLQWH´:KDWGRHVWKDWPHDQ" 7KH0DOœV6W3DGG\œV3DUDGHLVWKHBBBB ODUJHVW6W3DWULFNœV'D\FHOHEUDWLRQLQWKH 8QLWHG6WDWHV 3URFHHGVIURPWKH0DOœV6W3DGG\œV 3DUDGHEHQH¿WZKDWRUJDQL]DWLRQ"


FILM p 28 | BOOKS p 31 | 8 DAYS p 32 | MUSIC p 34 | SPORTS p 36

COURTESY JEAN SEYMOUR

Like this print from “Sixteen Ways to Look at a Blackbird,” Jean Seymour’s art is eclectic and whimsical.

Looking Again

G

allery 119, nestled in the heart of downtown Jackson, may lack a grand entrance, but behind its doors is a sizable space that has housed myriad southern artists’ works since the gallery’s creation in 2010. The layout is open and rectangular, allowing visitors to take in a body of work as a whole, with plenty of room to examine individual pieces. In February, the gallery was filled with the eclectic and often whimsical art of Jean Seymour. While Seymour uses a variety of styles and media, the motif of a blackbird unified the show. The namesake of the show, “Sixteen Ways To Look at a Blackbird,” is a series of monochromatic square panels, each with a gestural silhouette of the iconic bird. Overall, Seymour’s work is a fusion of recognizable imagery, abstracted pattern and texture. This body of work grew out of Seymour’s repeated visits to the beach with her husband. “My husband and I are the definition of beach bums,” Seymour says with a smile. “We love the beach.” All the birds, particularly seagulls and blackbirds, fascinated her, and she began taking pictures and drawing them. “They were just so funny, so I started painting them,” she says. That body of work kept building and eventually became the show at Gallery 119. Seymour says she had a lot of fun painting the blackbirds, but she admits: “I think I may be done with painting birds. I got it all out of my system.” The artist has painted a variety of subject matter and says she has trouble narrowing her focus. “It’s all just

so interesting,” she says. However, her fascination with pattern and texture generally unifies her work. She mentions the artist Gustav Klimt as a major source of inspiration, though certainly not the only one. The bookshelf in her studio, located in the back of her spacious home near Fondren, is laden with books full of images, instructional advice and art theory. Paint, brushes and other supplies crowd the counter adjacent to book shelves. Paintings are stacked against the walls and stuffed in drawers. Seymour is in her studio from noon to 5 p.m. every weekday, and the work accumulates quickly. She takes the weekends off to spend time with her husband. “The hardest part is getting started,” she says. “Staring at the blank surface can be intimidating. The most satisfying part is the process itself. It takes you to a whole other place. It sucks you in.” When a piece seems finished, Seymour will sit down with a cup of tea and stare at it to decide what else it needs. She’ll make the adjustments, then have another cup of tea and look again. Seymour has always loved making art. “Some people were born with a silver spoon in their mouth,” she says. “I was born with a crayon in my hand.” It wasn’t until she retired from the paralegal profession at age 50, though, that she was able to start focusing on being an artist. “My husband has been very supportive, which has been great,” she says. The artist meets with a group of other artists once a month for a friendly critique. “Each artist needs to have a real good friend who is savvy about art. Someone you trust and admire,” Sey-

mour says. “We all make suggestions and offer advice and then go back to our studios. If we want to, we take the advice and if not, we leave our paintings the way they are, and there are no hard feelings. It’s important to get out of the house and socialize.” Community and support are two things Seymour has had in abundance. She was raised in the Jackson area by her music-loving father, William Reid Gainey, and her two older sisters were both singers. Fondren has also provided her with an outlet for her art. She has been invited to participate in several of Fischer Gallery’s themed shows. “I would like to see some kind of list of all the artists working in Fondren,” she says. “Sixteen Ways” is Seymour’s fourth solo show, and she continues to gather acclaim. “I was recently accepted into the American Watercolor Society show in New York, which is an international juried show,” she says proudly, and justifiably so. The American Watercolor Society will be the fourth major arts society she has been invited to join. She is a signature member of the Pastel Society of America, the International Society of Acrylic Painters and the Mississippi Watercolor Society. Seymour is in a comfortable place that she describes as, “loving what I do and where I am, but knowing I’ve got farther to go.” See Jean Seymour’s work at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119 (119 S. President St., 601-969-4091) and at SummerHouse (1109 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite D, Ridgeland, 601-853-4445). Visit her website at jeanseymour.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Jacob Rowan

27


DIVERSIONS|film

The Colonels

Saving the Day

by Anita Modak-Truran COURTESY WALT DISNEY STUDIOS

March 16 & 17 | 9:00pm •Green Draft Beer and Boiled Shrimp All Day on St. Paddy’s Day! • Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night

NO COVER CHARGE! • $3 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm 6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS • 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

Follow us on Facebook

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Mar. 16- Thurs. Mar. 22 2012 21 Jump Street

R

3-D John Carter PG13

Act Of Valor

John Carter (non 3-D) PG13

3-D Ghost Rider: Spirit Of Vengeance PG13

Silent House

R

A Thousand Words PG13 3-D Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax PG Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (non 3-D) PG

March 14 - 20, 2012

Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds PG13

Project X

R

The Artist

PG13

R

This Means War PG13 3-D Journey 2 Journey 2 (non 3-D) Safe House The Vow

PG

PG R PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

28 Movieline: 355-9311

Taylor Kitsch plays time-traveling Confederate soldier John Carter who transports to the planet Mars. Will he conquer in this quarter-billion dollar Disney extravaganza?

D

isney imagineers went stark raving mad creating “John Carter,” a $250-million movie based on Edgar Rice Burroughs’ series about a Confederate war veteran transported via magic medallion from the Wild West on Earth to Mars. The ailing planet, which the indigenous people call “Barsoom,” is going down the black hole thanks to greedy, selfish warmongers charged up by electric blue forces from the ninth ray. What Were They Thinking? O’ Mother of Isis, can you imagine the writing sessions leading up to “John Carter”? I envision a dimly lit conference room. Academy Award winner Andrew Stanton (who also wrote “Toy Story,” “A Bug’s Life,” “Finding Nemo” and “WALL-E”) heads the table. His sleeves are rolled up, as are those of his compatriots, Mark Andrews (a talented story-board artist) and Michael Chabon (who won a Pulitzer Prize for “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay”). Smoking is prohibited, but the trio puffs on some Cuban cigars for a bit of a buzz. Minions place on the table 5-foot stacks of folders containing notes from the 79 years this movie has been in pre-production. The energy in the room goes into warpspeed as the writers explore different “what if” scenarios. What if we pluck elements from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek,” then add some “Indiana Jones,” scare it up with some “Transformers,” “Braveheart,” and “Gladiator” elements, add in leaps and bounds from “Superman,” “Wonder Woman,” and “Xena, the Warrior Princess,” mix it up with a few classical twists from “Stage Coach” and “The Wizard of Oz” (exchange ruby red slippers for magic medallion and repeat mumbo jumbo and you’re home), and, well, there’s got to be a dog, but a Martian dog with a blue tongue who resembles a bulldog. Put it all into the cinematic blender, and the result is a megalomaniac, operatic extravaganza. Michael Giacchino’s score perfectly suits the epic breadth of the film, and Stanton, who also directs the film, seems to have a lot of fun putting it together.

Smack Talking Undeserved Some reviewers have been smack-talking Taylor Kitsch (known for his work in “Friday Night Lights”), who portrays John Carter. In a completely unbelievable film, Kitsch is at home. He squints like Clint, utters dialogue in the right note and has perfect pectorals. He works, and he’s easy on the eyes. So does Lynn Collins, the princess of Mars—I mean, Barsoom—whose gorgeous blue eyes and black hair conjure up the immortal Elizabeth Taylor. Collins is terrific. She’s Julliard trained, which explains her ability to squeeze lemonade from the lemons hurled her way. Further, those who condemn this film fail to understand JC’s educational teachings. As a threshold matter, this movie offers a “Where’s Waldo?” experience for movie buffs. The game is to match the scene to the original movie. (Hint: see above.) But more importantly, “John Carter” teaches us important survival skill sets for Mars—I, mean Barsoom. Lessons Learned from ‘John Carter’ Never, ever toss out the magic medallion. You may need it to return to Earth. Never, ever tell aliens where you are from. If you say that you are John Carter from Virginia; they will call you Virginia. This leads to unnecessary gender confusion. When indigenous beings from other planet request that you jump, you better jump. Not only are they bigger than you and have four arms, but your contrary behavior will get other nice aliens in trouble. Always make friends with alien dog creatures. They will save your butt at the crucial time. They also run faster than you and can clean you up in a single lick. This is a science thing, but when on other planets, gravitational forces are significantly altered. You will not bruise, you will not age, you are able to wear the same clothes day in and day out and not stink, and you can defend yourself and survive against armies of aliens. The key is that you are a rebel without a cause—only you really have one, which is why you win the day. I hope you are as ready to take on the universe as I am.


SALMON HAS ARRIVED! $8.95 PER ENTREE EVERY TUESDAY IN MARCH • 5-9PM

BELHAVEN

904 B E AST F ORTIFICATION • J ACKSON , M S 601.352.2002 • WWW . GLENNFOODS . COM

:PVS1PUPG (PME-PDBUJPO

1220 East Northside Dr. | Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. www.nandyscandy.com

Learn to

GottaSwingHattiesburg.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Your
Instructor

+PIOOZ#FOEFS

Swing Dance

29


ST0LACE

7INGSIN*ACKSON

Serving Green Beer Day of The Parade



 

TQ^cc[Tb

(HG=:R/N>L=:R   ;HG>E>LLPBG@GB@AM

Sushi & Wine Tasting March 22 â&#x20AC;˘ 6:00 - 9:00pm Call For Reservations

sushi, steak, martini and more! 601.948.8808

100 E. Capital St. Suite 105 â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson MS â&#x20AC;˘ www.wasabims.com â&#x20AC;˘ wasabijackson@gmail.com

(1TTab>]CP_ PcbT[TRc[^RPcX^]b K =>KRHN +K> *KE:MM>KL?HK +:KMR+ > MA>@:F

+AHG>A>:= % %$$#

% (!#!#!"

"('7XVWfPh$ =  7P\_bcTPS1[eS AXSVT[P]S 2[X]c^]

% (%(%% % (%(%# #"4[[Xb0eT ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^] 9PRZb^]

:M>KBG@O:BE:;E>

7^dab

P\ !_\&3PhbPFTTZ

â&#x20AC;˘ Plate Lunches â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Home-Made Desserts â&#x20AC;˘ Cosmo Burger On Fridays â&#x20AC;˘ Take-Home Casseroles 2947 Old Canton Rd Suite G â&#x20AC;˘ Fondren Village Jackson, MS 39216 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.983.4450

Now Serving Lunch Tuesday-Fridayâ&#x20AC;˘11:00am-2:00pm

*96

March 14 - 20, 2012

H7M:7:

30

Dramatic Presentations Home, Garden and Church Tours Carriage Rides Double Decker Bus Rides 10K Run Tales from the Crypt

@=6

OPEN WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SUNDAY

&RESH ,OUISIANA #RAWÂťSH AREBACK

.7JKH:7Os(7H9> !KBA;HIED+79;FC .>7:PE<=H7OFC #RAWÂťSHÂ&#x201E;3HRIMPÂ&#x201E;#RAB,EGSÂ&#x201E;#ORNÂ&#x201E;4ATERSÂ&#x201E;3AUSAGE

,AKELAND$R\Â&#x201E;Â&#x201E;


DIVERSIONS|books

Grace and Humor

Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity” (Shambala Publications, 2010, $14.95) had me laughing out loud and weeping, sometimes at the same time. I recognized much of my own life in Moon’s deeply personal exploration, which she wrote in her 60s. In the chapter titled “Senior Moment, Wonderful Moment,” she writes: “It’s not my fault when I have a senior moment any more than it was my fault when my hair turned gray. I’m just a human being after all. I’ve had a lifetime of junior moments, when one word follows another in logical—and boring—succession, when each action leads to the next appropriate action. For countless years, I have remembered to bring the pencil with me when I go downstairs to use the pencil sharpener. I think I’ve earned the right to break free from the imprisonment of sequential thinking.” Damn right. Moon says she and her friends have claimed the word “crone” for their own. In “Crones Don’t Whine: Concentrated Wisdom for Juicy Women” (Conari Press, 2005, $14.95), author Jean Shinoda Bolen dives into the word with abandon. “To be a crone is about inner development, not outer appearance,” she writes. “A crone is a woman who has wisdom, compassion, humor, courage and vitality. She has a sense of truly being herself, can express what she knows and feels, and take action when need be. She does not avert her eyes or numb her mind from reality. She can see the flaws and imperfections in herself and others, but the light in which she sees is not harsh or judgmental. She has learned to trust herself to know what she knows.” In this slim volume, Bolen, a psychiatrist, feminist and author of numerous books (including the popular “Goddesses in Everywoman” in 1983) gives older women a 13-point “blueprint” for living lives to the fullest, including “Crones are fierce about what matters to them,” “Crones improvise” and “Crones laugh together.” I loved every juicy word, especially her four guiding principles: 1. Show up; 2. Pay attention; 3. Speak your truth; and 4. Pray for the best outcome. Finally, if you’re so inclined, two books by Suza Francina are sure to inspire anyone considering beginning yoga at midlife (as I did). “The New Yoga for Healthy Aging: Living Longer, Living Stronger and Loving Every Day” (Health Communications, 2007, $16.95) and “The New Yoga for People Over 50: A Comprehensive Guide for Midlife and Older Beginners” (Health Communications, 1997, $11.95) offer a wealth of knowledge and practical advice for people who are ready to explore their bodies in new ways.

Dmbttft!gps!Fwfszpof!Jodmvejoh; Mfwfm!2

Npoebz!8;26!qn Uvftebz!2;26!qn Uvftebz!7;11!qn Xfeoftebz!8;11!qn Uivstebz!2;26!qn Gsjebz!6;41!qn Tbuvsebz!:;11!bn

Zphb!Pwfs!61

Tbuvsebz!!21;41!bn

Hfoumf!Zphb

Tvoebz!5;11!qn 4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

jacksonfreepress.com

HEALTH COMMUNICATIONS SHAMBALA PUBLICATIONS

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

CONARI PRESS

I

n my over-50 yoga class, I frequently see people frustrated by their inability to get a pose “right.” I gently remind them that they’re not 20-somethings any more and, usually, they laugh at themselves for trying so hard and relax a bit. After 50, bodies just don’t respond like they used to. Muscles take longer to warm up, don’t stretch as much, lose strength and take longer to recover. Everything’s a little broader and hangs a little lower. Hair sprouts where it shouldn’t and falls out where it really ought to stick around. Our bodies slowing down and dealing with the inevitable effects of gravity are a couple of the things that suck about aging. But I’ve also seen people become more graceful and, by far, become much more accepting of themselves and comfortable in their own skins. After 50, we tend to worry a lot less about what others think about us, confident that our lives have given us, if not the ability to handle life’s bumps, at least the knowledge that we’ll likely get over them. In my classes, I’ve seen the competitive instinct turn off, allowing students to explore their lives on a much deeper level. Psychologists, Carl Jung among them, agree that the second half of life can be our most fulfilling time. If we’ve raised families, our fledglings have flown (although they may have come back). Friendships and relationships now span decades, allowing for greater ease and deeper intimacy. The fury of hormones subsides. It’s a natural time to embrace deeper spirituality and comfortably explore new interests. Recently, I’ve had the pleasure of discovering several books that address the multifaceted matter of aging with grace and humor. Ruth Fishel’s “Wrinkles Don’t Hurt: Daily Meditations on the Joy of Aging Mindfully” (Health Communications, 2011, $14.95) is a daybook stuffed full of quotes, poetry, common-sense wisdom and affirmations. Fishel draws from numerous faith traditions, including Christianity, Judaism and Buddhism, and from authors, poets, humorists and many names I don’t recognize. The June 16 entry is a quote from Walt Whitman (“Seeing, hearing and feeling are miracles, and each part and tag of me is a miracle”). Jan. 4 is this question from Satchel Paige, “How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?” You could work your way through from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, but I think picking pages at random is just as much fun. Susan Moon’s memoir “This is Getting Old:

by Ronni Mott

31


BEST BETS March 14 - 21, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 3/14

WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

Scientist and businessman Dr. D. Satman Lal Sethi talks about immigrating to the United States at the Jackson 2000 luncheon at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $12, $10 members; email bevelyn_ branch@att.net to RSVP. … Political commentators Jere Nash and Andy Taggert talk about redistricting during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Make miniature cocoon sculptures for the upcoming Cocoon Jackson art project at 3:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the BancorpSouth Classroom. Free; call 601-960-1515. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike. … Cary Hudson is at Fenian’s. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday. … The Med Grill hosts the Battle of the Bands at 9 p.m. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers and Blues.

FRIDAY 3/16

The Jackson Garden and Patio Show kicks off at 9 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.) and runs through March 18. $5 per day, children 12 and under free; call 601-919-8111. … CS’s hosts the St. Paddy’s Parade Party and Pub Crawl at 3:30 p.m. The O’Tuxers with Mark Roemer perform. … The Marching MALfunction and Second Line Stomp and Street Dance starts at CS’s at 6:30 p.m. (trolley service from Hal & Mal’s starting at 4:30 p.m.) and ends at Hal & Mal’s. The Southern Komfort Brass Band, the Lucky Hand Blues Band and the Rumprollers perform. WOOD performs in the Red Room ($5). Costumes welcome; call 601-948-0888. … The Gulf Coast Conference Wheelchair Basketball Championship opens with a banquet at 7 p.m. at Jackson Medical Mall, Center Stage (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Games are March 17-18 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Walter Payton Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). $20 banquet, free games; call 601-918-5830. … Tyrese performs at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $49.50-$54.50; call 800-745-3000. … Guilt Ridden Troubadour plays at Ole Tavern. … The Andy Hardwick Trio performs from 8-11 p.m. at Yellow Scarf Listening Room (741 Harris St., Suite E). $20, $35 couples… Suite 106 hosts Free Your Mind with DJ Spre. $5.

SATURDAY 3/17

St. Paddy’s events kick off at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) with the Trustmark Children’s Festival at 10 a.m. (free) and the Pet Parade at 11 a.m. ($5 entry fee per pet benefits the Mississippi Animal Rescue League). The Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is at 1 p.m. at the corner of State and Court streets, and street dance is after the parade at Hal & Mal’s. Call 601-948-0888; visit malsstpaddysparade.com. … Other St. Paddy’s events include music from South Bound Traffic after the parade at Jaco’s Tacos, the St. Paddy’s Blowout at Martin’s with Electric Mudd and Friends, Fenian’s annual block party with Legacy, Otis Lotus and Gary Burnside ($5 cover), Ole Tavern’s Downtown Throwdown with US, Crossin Dixon, Swamp Babies and more, the St. Paddy’s party at Sportsman’s Lodge with DoubleShotz, the St. Paddy’s party at Burgers and Blues, the crawfish boil at Pop’s, music from Brian Sivils, Akami Graham and Reginald McEachin at the King Edward The annual Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is March 17 at 1 p.m. in downtown Jackson.View the parade map on p. 18 for a schedule of related events.

March 14 - 20, 2012

The Young Leaders in Philanthropy Membership Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. at United Way (843 N. President St.). Free; call 601-441-1889 to RSVP. … Learn blacksmithing at the Discover Series - Real Men Craft Class at 6 p.m. at the Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland) $25; call 601-856-7546. … The Youth Spring Break Talent Show is at 6 p.m. at the Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Free; call 601-559-9040 or 601-321-2135. … Michael W. Smith performs at 7 p.m. at Evangel Temple Church (104 Skyland Drive, Meridian). $25 in advance, $30 day of show; call 800965-9324. … Bourbon St. hosts Ladies Night/Men Are Pigs Night with Snazz. … The D’lo Trio performs at Cherokee 32 Inn. … Lisa Mills performs at Underground 119.

SUNDAY 3/18

Disney’s Phineas and Ferb: The Best Live Tour Ever is at 1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum. $14$40; call 800-745-3000. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the ballet film “Le Corsaire” at 2 p.m. $16, visit msfilm.org. … Aya Korem performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

MONDAY 3/19

The Wine Tasting Fundraiser is at 6 p.m. at Olga’s and benefits CARA. $45 in advance, $55 at the door; call 601366-1366 or 601-842-4404. … The Mississippi Improv Alliance hosts Open Space at 7 p.m. at The Commons. Free; call 601-497-7454. … Andrew Brewer is at The Penguin.

TUESDAY 3/20

Pianist Dr. Stephen Sachs performs at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601974-6494. … Jesse Robinson is at Underground 119.

WEDNESDAY 3/21

Mississippi State University journalist-in-residence Sid Salter speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Call 601-576-6998. … SXSW/JXN includes concerts at Duling Hall at 7 p.m. and Whiskey River Saloon at 9 p.m. $10 per show, $18 all shows for both venues; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Israel native Aya Korem performs March 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. CASSSETTA MUSIC

THURSDAY 3/15

Hotel, and the St. Paddy party at Slick’s Bar and Grille (ladies get in free until 11 p.m.; wear green for a free drink). More options on page 18. … Party with the Jackson Nuggets youth basketball team at 5:30 p.m. at Dreamz JXN. $5. … Shadein Mars, AKA London, is the featured poet during Nameless Open-mic at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. $5 cover, $3 to perform.


jfpevents St. Patrick’s Block Party March 17, 11 a.m., at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St.). The indoor and outdoor festivities include Irish food and beer, and live music. Performers include Legacy at 2 p.m., Otis Lotus at 5 p.m. and Gary Burnside at 8 p.m. $5; call 601-948-0055. Zippity Doo Dah Parade Weekend March 22-25, in Fondren. The Sweet Potato Queens headline the event that includes Arts, Eats and Beats March 22; a Big Hat Luncheon and music from Molly and the Ringwalds March 23; and a children’s street carnival, parade and after-party March 24. Jill Conner Browne also celebrates here now book “Fat Is the New 30” March 24. Proceeds from fundraisers benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Call 601-981-9606. Sante South Events. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. Call 601-987-0020. • Viking Culinary Dinner March 22, 6 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Sommelier Norm Rush pairs wines with food from chef Jeremy Enfinger and Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Limit of 36 seats. $125. • Wine and Dine Ladies Luncheon March 24, 11 a.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Enjoy a four-course gourmet lunch with wine pairings. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. $75; call 601-987-0020.

HOLIDAY Marching MALfunctions Second Line Stomp and Street Dance March 16, 7 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The kick-off to St. Paddy’s weekend includes a parade, and performances from the Lucky Hand Blues Band and the Rumprollers. Costumes encouraged. Call 601-948-0888. St. Patrick’s Celebration Weekend March 16-18, at Chateau Ridgeland (745 S. Pear Orchard Road, Ridgeland). The event for senior citizens includes a Taste of Ireland Supper March 16 at 5:30 p.m., a Luck of the Irish Party March 17 at 2 p.m. and an Irish history seminar March 18 at 11 a.m. RSVP. Free; call 601-956-1331. Go Green for St. Patrick’s Day March 17, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Make crafts and participate in activities related to recycling. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-5437. Downtown Jackson Events, March 17 • St. Paddy’s Day 5K Run 8 a.m. The race begins at the corner of N. Farish and E. Pascagoula streets. Proceeds benefit the Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Register March 14-16 at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51, Ridgeland). $25; visit stpaddys5k.com. • Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade 1 p.m. The annual Mardi Gras-style parade begins on the corner of State and Court streets. At the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), enjoy the Trustmark Children’s Festival (free entry) and the Pet Parade ($5 entry fee per pet; proceeds benefit the Mississippi Animal rescue League) before the main event. Call 601-948-0888.

COMMUNITY Zoo Connections Teacher Workshop March 14, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Teachers for grades 3-5 learn how to incorporate a zoo visit into a curriculum. Bring lunch. $15, $5 for 0.5 CEU credits optional; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241. “History Is Lunch” March 14, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Political commentators Jere Nash and Andy Taggart present “A Historical Perspective of Redistricting in Mississippi.” Bring lunch; coffee and water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998.

Young Leaders in Philanthropy Membership Lunch March 15, 11:30 a.m., at United Way (843 N. President St.). Topics include volunteer projects and leadership opportunities. P.F. Chang’s provides lunch. RSVP. Free; call 601-441-1889.

Progressive Art and Literary Club Scholarship Tea March 17, 2 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), in the Community Meeting Room. Proceeds go toward education costs for selected high-school and college students. $10; call 601-362-3364.

Precinct 3 COPS Meeting March 15, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). These monthly forums help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0003.

Wine Tasting Fundraiser March 19, 6 p.m., at Olga’s Fine Dining (4760 Interstate 55 N., Suite D). Enjoy wine samples, heavy hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction and door prizes. Hunter Gibson performs. Proceeds benefit Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA). For ages 21 and up. $45 in advance, $55 at the door; call 601-366-1366 or 601-842-4404.

Friday Forum Fridays, 9 a.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Featuring speakers on a variety of topics each Friday. Free; email nmcnamee@greaterjacksonpartnership.com. Jackson Garden and Patio Show March 16-18, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Shop for garden products and attend seminars. Hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. March 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. March 17 and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. March 18. $5 per day, children 12 and under free; call 601-919-8111. Gulf Coast Conference Wheelchair Basketball Championship March 16-18. The Metro Area Community Empowerment Banquet of Champions is March 16 from 7-9 p.m. at Jackson Medical Mall, Center Stage (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), and games are March 17-18 from 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Walter Payton Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). Competitors include the Rolling Tigers Wheelchair Sports and Recreation Team. $20 banquet, free games; call 601-918-5830. FirstLove Youth Alliance Meeting March 17, 10 a.m., at God’s Refuge Christian Fellowship Center (1931 Boling St.). Youth ages 11-18 learn about leadership and responsibility. Registration recommended. Free; visit firstloveya.eventbrite.com. Be Bold Beer Run March 17, 4 p.m., in downtown Jackson. Registration is at 4 p.m., and the run/walk is at 4:30 p.m. The race includes stops at designated restaurants for drinks. Free, drink prices vary; call 262-391-9265. Mississippi Employment Expo March 21, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Bring resumes and come dressed for possible interviews. Free; call 601-321-6154. Spring Break English II Exam Crash Course March 14, 9:30 a.m., at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). The course helps high-school seniors prepare for the state-mandated March 21 exam. Sessions are from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Breakfast served at 8:30 p.m. Limit of 20 students; pre-registration required. Free; call 601-948-4725. Veterans of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement Conference March 21-25, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) and Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Activities include panel discussions, a banquet, workshops, a civil rights tour and film screenings. Limited seating. $100, $40 one day,$25 college students, $10 high school students; call 601-979-1515 or 601-918-7809. Leadership, Personal Development and Life Skills Seminar Series through May 22, at Operation Shoestring (1711 Bailey Ave.). Operation Shoestring and Kuumba Promos host the seminars for youth on first and third Tuesdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Enrollment required. Free; call 601-353-3663 or 601-957-2969. Community Empowerment and Awareness Month through March 30, at Northside Senior Center (104 E. Northside Drive). Enjoy an inspirational movie and popcorn Fridays at 6 p.m., and forums Saturdays at 9 a.m. Limited seating; reservations required. Free; call 601-960-2166.

WELLNESS Madison County Health Seminar March 20, 6 p.m., at Ridgeland High School (586 Sunnybrook Road), in the cafetorium. Learn ways to maximize a fitness program. Registration required. Free; visit madisoncountyhealthseminar.com.

BE THE CHANGE

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Call 601-960-1552. • “Mummies: Secrets of the Pharaohs.” Shows are weekdays at noon and Saturdays at 4 p.m. $6.50, $5.50 seniors, $4 ages 4-12. • “Wild Ocean.” Shows are Monday-Saturday at 2 p.m. $6.50, $5.50 seniors, $4 ages 4-12. • Art House Cinema Downtown March 18. Films include the ballet “Le Corsaire “ at 2 p.m. ($16) and an independent film at 5 p.m. ($7). Popcorn and beverages sold. Visit msfilm.org. Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. • “Casablanca 70th Anniversary Event” March 21, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. The film explores the movie’s legacy and includes behind-the-scenes stories. • “Can U Feel It - The UMF Experience” March 22, 7 p.m. The documentary is about the 2001 Ultra Music Festival in Miami and includes redcarpet footage. Youth Spring Break Talent Show March 15, 6 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Youth ages 8-21 are welcome to sign up and perform as soloists, choirs, dancers and steppers. Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber is the speaker. Refreshments served. Free; call 601-5599040 or 601-321-2135. “Gold in the Hills” March 16-31, at Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Set in the 1890s, the play features life in the New York Bowery. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. $10, $5 children 12 and under; call 601-636-0471. Disney’s Phineas and Ferb: The Best Live Tour Ever March 18, 1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). $14-$40; call 800-745-3000.

MUSIC Ardenland Concert Series. Call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. • Aya Korem March 18, 7:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The Israel native sings jazz and contemporary music. $10 in advance, $15 at the door. • SXSW/JXN March 21. Lovedrug, Maggie Eckford and Happy New Year perform at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.) at 8 p.m., and American Royalty, Machines Are People Too and Cherub perform at Whiskey River Saloon (209 S. Commerce St.) starting at 9 p.m. $10 per show, $18 all shows for both venues. Tyrese March 16, 8 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The R&B singer performs to promote his new album “Open Invitation.” $49.50-$54.50; call 800-745-3000. Faculty Recital March 20, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Pianist Dr. Stephen Sachs plays Chopin and Liszt ballads. Free; call 601-974-6494.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.) at 5 p.m.; readings at 5:30 p.m. Call 601-366-7619.

• March 14, Alex George signs “A Good American.” $25.95 book. • March 15, Amy Franklin-Willis signs “The Lost Saints of Tennessee.” $25 book. • March 20, Lucy Ferriss signs “The Lost Daughter.” $15 book. • March 22, Howard Bahr signs “The Black Flower.” $16 book. Oxford Conference for the Book March 22-24, at University of Mississippi (100 University Ave., Oxford). The conference promotes reading and literacy. Free; call 662-915-5993.

CREATIVE CLASSES Discover Series - Real Men Craft Class March 15, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). This month’s focus is blacksmithing. $25; call 601-856-7546. Casino Rueda Dance Workshops March 17, 11 a.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Daniel Pena gives the beginner and refresher workshop at 6 p.m., and the intermediate and advanced workshop at 7 p.m. $10 per workshop; call 601-213-6355. “Acting Is Being” Six-week Acting Intensive March 18-April 29, at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). Denise Halbach teaches the course Sundays from 6-8 p.m. Space limited. $125; email denise@theatrediva.com.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS A Walk through History March 22, 6 p.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The Foundation for Mississippi History hosts the fundraising gala for the future Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History. $100; call 601-576-6855. Events at Greater Jackson Arts Council (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Call 601-960-1557. • FIGMENT Art Festival Call for Entries. GJAC seeks artists and volunteers for FIGMENT, a free interactive arts event, April 28-29 at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). The deadline is March 30. Free; call 601-874-7993. • Storytellers Ball Juried Exhibition Call for Art. GJAC seeks artwork in preparation for the Aug. 9 Storytellers Ball. This year’s theme is “Blame It On the Blues.” The deadline is June 14. The exhibition is July 17-Aug. 31. $25 entry fee. Look and Learn with Hoot March 16, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The program for 4-5 year olds features art and story time. “This week’s story is “Curoius George.” Please dress for mess. Free; call 601-960-1515. Open Space March 19, 7 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). The Mississippi Improv Alliance hosts the art, dance and music showcase on third Mondays at 7 p.m. All acts welcome. Free; call 601-497-7454. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

33


DIVERSIONS|music

COURTESY MATT COLLETTE

Capital City Karaoke King

Karaoke host and DJ Matt Collette loves seeing and helping people go outside their comfort zones.

W

hen Matt Collette started hosting karaoke at Martin’s seven years ago, he thought it would be fun and a good part-time gig to make a little cash. In the process, he’s learned a few things. For instance: “I find myself listening to country now, something that I would normally not have done if it had not been for karaoke,” he says.

The Key of G by Garrad Lee

34

• Wu-Tang Clan, Dec. 18, 2007, Fox Theatre, Boulder, Colo., $40 Maybe not the best Wu-Tang show I have ever seen, but seeing my all-time heroes in a packed theater with a capacity of

The Virginia native considers Jackson his hometown, he says, having lived in Mississippi for more than 30 years. He’s been traveling to the city since he got his driver’s license at age 15 and attended the University Southern Mississippi, majoring in radio, TV and film production. These days, Collette, 38, hosts karaoke and DJs full time but at different venues almost every night. He has real love and enthusiasm for the job. He says that karaoke in big cities such as New Orleans, Nashville and New York City focus on club settings and feature a lot of singing by hosts or club regulars. Karaoke with Collette, like with most hosts in Jackson, focuses more on the karaoke and less on the host. Collette admits that he loves singing karaoke, but likes to make his gigs about the other singers. “I went to Cat’s Meow in New Orleans once,” he says. “I had done one song, and the host had done five. To me, that’s not what karaoke is about.” Collette provides an assorted playlist for singers to choose from: kids’ songs, Broadway show tunes, rap, big band, rock ’n’ roll and traditional Irish songs. He credits acts such as The Monkees, The Beatles, Billy Joel, Queen, Guns N’ Roses and Styx influence his style. These popular acts remain some of Collette’s favorites karaoke bands. His own karaoke performances include old standards, children’s songs, rap and rock ‘n’ roll. He loves the diversity of music, though, and admits that he’s found new favorites through his karaoke. “I have to be honest, I would have never gotten into John Legend, Adele, Robin Thicke, Katy Perry or Kings of Leon if it hadn’t have been for karaoke,” he says. “I really think that’s what adds to karaoke—that you can maybe hear a song you might not hear on the radio.”

Collette gives anyone who wants to sing a chance on the microphone, creating a variety of talent and entertainment on stage. Beyond getting people to get up and perform, one of the biggest thrills Collette gets from his job is getting people to try a new song that they might not have tried otherwise. “I like getting people out of their comfort zone, and even if they aren’t a good singer, they can find a way to make a song a lot of fun in their own way,” Collette says. “A lot of times, someone will try a song for the first time, and then it goes really well. Then, that song becomes the song they always want to sing.” Of course, he always gets requests for traditional favorites such as “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond or “Dead Or Alive” by Bon Jovi and all the usual karaoke duets, but it’s not uncommon to hear “Take On Me” by A-Ha right before a sarcastic version of “She’s Like The Wind” by Patrick Swayze or a grandmother rapping to Snoop Dogg’s “Gin and Juice.” Collette enjoys performing songs from Ben Folds, Adam Sandler and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” “You are definitely going to have fun,” Collette says. “There’s no doubt that, on a nightly basis, I am all about the karaoke. I can do just the music and DJ if you want it for a private event, but my love is karaoke.” Collette hosts karaoke Monday nights at Fenian’s (901 E. Fortification St., 601-948-0055) at 8 p.m., Tuesday nights at Martin’s Lounge (214 S. State St., 601-354-9712) at 10 p.m., Wednesday nights at Sportsman’s Lodge (1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 100, 601-366-5441) at 8 p.m. OnThursday, Friday and Saturday nights, catch him at Club Magoo’s (824 S. State St., 601-487-8710) at 8 p.m. He is also available for private functions and parties for all ages. Find him on Facebook at facebook.com/matt.collette1.

Lots of Shows, Lots of Memories

only 700 was something that will always be special, even when you know for a fact from experience that they are going to encore with “Triumph.” • Sebadoh with Man or Astro-Man, Feb. 10, 1994, 121 Millsaps Ave., Jackson, $8 This show was such big news for us in high school—a sub-pop band coming to Jackson. What really made the show memorable, though, was Man or Astro-Man’s performance. We had never heard of them, but were turned into instant fans of the surf rock from three guys from Auburn, Ala., who were a little too convinced they were from outer space. • The String Cheese Incident, Sept. 26, 2003, Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Ga., $27.50 I am well aware of the fact that The String Cheese Incident is not the coolest band in the world. But judging by the inchhigh stack of ticket stubs from their shows, I obviously don’t care. There is a part of me that loves to spend a few nights dancing around with a bunch of dudes who smell like patchouli and chicks wearing fairy wings to songs about love and nature. On

this night, the second set went like this: “Land’s End” > “Looking Glass” > “Joyful Sound” > “Texas” > “Orion’s Belt” > “Black Clouds.” If you know what that means, then, well, you know what that means. • Sonic Youth with Polvo and Unwound, Nov. 19, 1995, New Daisy Theatre, Memphis, Tenn., $15 GARRAD LEE

March 14 - 20, 2012

A

s I mentioned a couple of weeks ago, my wife, Catherine, and I recently bought and moved into a new home in Fondren. While unpacking, we stumbled upon our collection of ticket stubs from our years of going to concerts. The stubs, housed in two large cookie jars, got packed up over a year ago as part of our effort to prepare for moving, so we hadn’t even thought about them in a long while. But, as always, seeing them brought back many good memories, which is why we keep them in the first place. So, as Catherine took on the task of organizing our arts and crafts closet (yes, gangsters can have arts and crafts closets), I went through the ticket stubs. I thought it would be fun to share a short list of some of my favorite shows whose stubs survived, in no particular order.

by Greg Pigott

Ticket stubs always bring back good music memories.

In high school, my folks did not trust me to drive out of town for concerts, mainly due to the fact that my car was a 1979 Datsun station wagon that had a hard time topping 50 mph. So, in a father-of-the-year

award move, my dad drove me, my brother Jesse and our best friend to Memphis for what was, at the time for us, the show of the century. Sonic Youth was on the tour for “Washing Machine,” so we got a 20-plus minute “Diamond Sea” to end it, which bookended well with the opener, our all time favorite, “Teenage Riot.” After the show, dad was waiting out front to take us back to Jackson so we could make it to school the next day, which was part of the deal. • Sound Tribe Sector 9, May 1, 2004, TwiRoPa Live Room, New Orleans, La., $20 You know how it goes at Jazz Fest. Spend all day at the fairgrounds at the festival. Go to any one of many 10 p.m. shows (Galactic and Jurassic 5 at State Palace on this night) and then hit up a 2 a.m. late show. Our cab driver from the State Palace to TwiRoPa was a guy named Charlie. He gave us his number and told us to call when the STS9 show was over. We did. I will never forget watching the sun come up as Charlie diligently plowed through hippies who were looking for rides to find us.


MARCH 14 - WEDNESDAY )HQLDQ¶V#ARY(UDSON 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH %RXUERQ6WUHHW+ARAOKE &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP +DO 0DO¶V.EW"OURBON3TREET *AZZ"AND 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDS SP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 8QGHUJURXQG"EN0AYTON EOXHV

&OXE&DQWRQ2OCK3TOCKSP

0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQ SULQWDQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP -XOHS3HAUN0ATTERSON )HQLDQ¶V"LIND$OG/TIS 2OH7DYHUQ'UILT2IDDEN 4ROUBADOUR -DFR¶V7DFRV3OUTH"OUND4RAFFIC 3HOLFDQ&RYH$OUBLE3HOTZ 3RS¶V6DORRQ2OWDY3OUTH 6KXFNHU¶V3NAZZ 6XLWH&REE9OUR-INDWITH$* 3PRESP <HOORZ6FDUI+DUULV6W6XLWH( !NDY(ARDWICK4RIOSP FRXSOHV 2OJD¶V2ONNIE-C'EE 'HER¶V/RXQJH+ARAOKE 6RXOVKLQH2OG)DQQLQ"ARRY ,EACHSP $EHED(WKLRSLDQ5HVWDXUDQW 4IMOTHY!LLENSP

MARCH 17 - SATURDAY

+DO 0DO¶V3T0ADDY´S$AY 0ARADE3TREET$ANCE &6¶V4IM!VALON&RIENDS SP 0DUWLQ¶V3T0ADDY´S$AY"LOWOUT W%LECTRIC-UDD&RIENDS MARCH 15 - THURSDAY SP )HQLDQ¶V3T0ADDY´S$AY0ARTY +DO 0DO¶V*AMIE7EEMS 4" -AIRTINDE#OGAIN /TIS,OTUS ,EDFORD 4AYLOR(ILDEBRAND 'ARY"URNSIDE 7KH0HG*ULOO/PEN-IC.IGHTW 2OH7DYHUQ3T0ADDY´S$AY +ENNY$AVISSP 0ARTY#RAWFISH"OILFEAT53 2OH7DYHUQ,ADIES.IGHT #ROSSIN$IXON #HAD7ESLEY 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT "AND 2IVERWOLVES 'UNBOAT +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 3WAMP"ABIES 0ASSENGER &OXE0DJRR¶V,ADIES.IGHTW *ONES 3PACEWOLF $IRTY $6$*2EIGN "OURBON2IVER3HOWSP %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE -DFR¶V7DFRV3OUTH"OUND4RAFFIC /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE DIWHUSDUDGH

.LQJ(GZDUG*AZZ"EAUTIFULW 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH3T0ADDY´S 0AM#ONFERSP $AY0ARTYW$OUBLE3HOTZ %RXUERQ6WUHHW,ADIES.IGHT SP -EN!RE0IGS.IGHTWITH3NAZZ &UDZGDG+ROH&ULKERSON0ACE &KHURNHH,QQ$´LO4RIO SP3HADZOF'RAYSP 8QGHUJURXQG,ISA-ILLS %XUJHUV %OXHV3T0ADDY´S$AY )HQLDQ¶V,EGACYW-AIRTINDE 0ARTY,IZZ3TROUDSP3OUTH #OGAIN OFSP 'UHDP]-;1#ENTRIC4HURSDAYS .LQJ(GZDUG*ULOO"RIAN3IVILS W!KAMI'RAHAM !KAMI'RAHAM 2EGINALD (YDQJHO7HPSOH0HULGLDQ-ICHAEL -C%ACHINDPSP 73MITHSP 6XLWH.AMELESS/PEN-IC .IGHTSP MARCH 16 - FRIDAY 0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\3OULFUL 3ATURDAYSSP &6¶V3T0ADDY´S$AYTH9EAR +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 0ARADE0ARTY0UB#RAWLW 4HE/´4UXERSW-ARK2OEMER &OXE0DJRR¶V(AIRICANE %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE SP 3RS¶V6DORRQ2OWDY3OUTH +DO 0DO¶V-ARCHING 5HHG3LHUFH¶V4HE#OLONELS -!,FUNCTION3TREET$ANCE 8QGHUJURXQG'RADY 3ECOND,INE3TOMPFEAT4HE #HAMPION 3OUTHERN+OMFORT"RASS"AND ,UCKY(AND"LUES"AND 7OOD &HUDPL¶V$AN(AMMONDSP 2OJD¶V(UNTER'IBSON2ONNIE 4HE2UMPROLLERS -C'EE 0DUWLQ¶V/TIS,OTUS *UDWHIXO 6KXFNHU¶V3NAZZ 'HDGWULEXWHEDQG SP 'HER¶V/RXQJH4HE*UST5S"AND 0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\-ARTINI SP &RIDAYSSP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKESP 6RXOVKLQH7RZQVKLS#HRIS'ILL SP 7KH%RDUGZDON+ARAOKE 7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTONSP &OXE0DJRR¶V!LL$ANCE.IGHTW MARCH 18 - SUNDAY $6$*2EIGN 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ+NIGHT 7KH+DXWH3LJ4HE$UNNS "RUCEDP EUXQFK

7DEOH$AVID0IGOTT )LW]JHUDOG¶V!NDY(ARDWICK 5HHG3LHUFH¶V4HE#OLONELS EUXQFK DP 8QGHUJURXQG'RADY 7DEOH2APHAEL3EMMES MD]] #HAMPION EUXQFK DPSP &HUDPL¶V*AMES"AILEY#AROLE 6RPEUD0H[LFDQ.LWFKHQ*OHN #ANTRELLSP -ORADPSP

7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTONSP 3HOLFDQ&RYH3HAUN0ATTERSON +ENNY$AVIS 'XOLQJ+DOO!YA+OREMSP DGYGRRU +RW6KRWV%\UDP-IKEAND -ARTY´S*AM3ESSION

MARCH 19 - MONDAY +DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3"LUES 3OCIETYSP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE 2OH7DYHUQ0UB1UIZ %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE 0HG*ULOO#LAY3COTT PHPEHUV RI6DYLQJ$EHO

2OJD¶V(UNTER'IBSONSP 7KH3HQJXLQ!NDREW"REWER

MARCH 20 - TUESDAY +DO 0DO¶V0UB1UIZ 2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQ¶V/PEN-IC 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT 0DUJDULWDV*OHN-ORASP 2OG6FKRRO,IVE*AZZ"LUES /PEN-IC0OETRYSP 3L]]D6KDFN2OG&DQWRQ5G 4HE2UMINANTSWDANIEL JOHNSONSP 8QGHUJURXQG*ESSE2OBINSON

MARCH 21 - WEDNESDAY 'XOLQJ+DOO3837*8. ,OVEDRUG -AGGIE%CKFORD (APPY.EW9EARSP :KLVNH\5LYHU6DORRQ3837*8. -ACHINES!RE0EOPLE4OO #HERUB !MERICAN2OYALTY SP )HQLDQ¶V3ETH,IBBEY 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH %RXUERQ6WUHHW+ARAOKE &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDS SP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 8QGHUJURXQG#HIMNEY#HOIR 'HER¶V/RXQJH+ARAOKE"IKE .IGHTSP

6HQGPXVLFOLVWLQJVWR 1DWDOLH/RQJDW PXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP RUID[WRE\QRRQ 0RQGD\IRULQFOXVLRQLQWKHQH[W LVVXH0XVLFOLVWLQJVPXVWEH UHFHLYHGE\WKH)ULGD\EHIRUH WKHQHZLVVXHWREHFRQVLGHUHG IRU'D\VSLFNV

)RUDOLVWRIDGGUHVVHVDQG SKRQHQXPEHUVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

03/14

LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES

NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM

Otis

FRIDAY

03/16

Lotus

SATURDAY

03/17

St.Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day

New full dinner menu starting March 20th. Now accepting reservations Wednesday,March 14th

BEN PAYTON

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, March 15th

LISA MILLS

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, March 16th

GRADY CHAMPION

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, March 17th

GRADY CHAMPION

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Tuesday, March 20th

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 6-11, $5 Cover Wednesday,March 21st

PINEROSS

(American) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, March 22nd

ABID SABIR & PINK GARLAND (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, March 23rd

VASTI JACKSON

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

BLOWOUT with Electric

Saturday, March 24th

Mudd & Friends Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

EDEN BRENT

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30 Coming April 21 - Marcia Ball

          

(EART %RICK"AKER±+RXVHRI%OXHV1HZ2UOHDQV 2OYAL#OMEDY4OUR±%RLVIHXLOOHW-RQHV&LYLF&HQWHU$WODQWD "UKU-USIC !RT0ROJECT±0DUGL*UDV:RUOG1HZ2UOHDQV 4YLER0ERRY´S-ADEA'ETSA*OB±2USKHXP7KHDWUH0HPSKLV

Tickets available on Ticketmaster.com

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

35


by Bryan Flynn by Bryan Flynn

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best time of for basketball fans. Do you have the picks to win your office pool?

FRIDAY, MAR. 16 College basketball (full coverage on CBS, TBS, TNT and TruTV): Every game of the Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament is on TV for the second year in a row. SATURDAY, MAR. 17 College basketball (every tournament game on four networks, above, starting at 11 a.m.): Half of the Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament field gets trimmed down to the Sweet 16 today. SUNDAY, MAR. 18 College basketball (full coverage on four networks, above, starting at 11 a.m.): The rest of the Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament field gets cut down to the final 16 teams, until next Thursday, that is. MONDAY, MAR. 19 College basketball (6-10 p.m. ESPN 2): the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament begins to cut down its field to 16 teams. TUESDAY, MAR. 20 College basketball (Tuesday night 6-10 p.m. ESPN 2): The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament field gets cut down to final 16 teams for a National Championship. WEDNESDAY, MAR. 21 NBA (7 p.m. ESPN): Jeremy Lin and the New York Knicks look to get back to their winning ways against the Philadelphia 76ers on the road. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

I

n 1995, Nike produced an iconic com- in a penalty shootout, Brandi Chastain ripped Daytona 500 and the first woman driver mercial. In it, young girls cited facts off her jersey and fell to her knees in a great since Shawna Robinson ran the race in and figures about the benefits of girls show of emotion. Here was a woman showing 2002. Patrick is the only woman to win a playing sports. the sheer joy of accomplishment. race in the Indy Car Race Series. She won â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you let me play, I will like myself Chastainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spur-of-the-moment exuber- the Indy Japan 300 in 2008, and her thirdmore,â&#x20AC;? the first girl said, followed by another ance has become iconic, and several news place 2009 Indianapolis 500 finish is the saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be more self-confident.â&#x20AC;? One girl magazines featured her photo. highest ever by a woman. stated statistics on reduced breast-cancer rates Title IX has allowed one strong woman, Since the passage of Title IX, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (60 percent less likely), and others sports broadcasting has gained cited research showing lower rates momentum. Seeing women on of depression and teen pregnancy TV engaged in sports is no longer â&#x20AC;&#x153;if you let me play sports.â&#x20AC;? A solrelegated to Olympic years, gymemn little girl sitting on a swing nastics or figure skating. Now, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will be more likely to leave networks show every game of the a man who beats me.â&#x20AC;? Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA basketball tourJust about everyone who nament and the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World saw it still remembers the ad. Cup. Women started the WNBA Nike, nearly always ahead of the in 1997, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still going strong curve, recognized that women 15 years later. were an under-tapped market As the Nike commercial for its athletic shoes and apparel. pointed out, women playing The commercial has been critisports is not all about accomcized and praised, but you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plishments on the field. Recent deny that it sparked a change by studies from such prestigious finally acknowledging that wominstitutions as the University of en played sports and that it was Pennsylvaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wharton School good for them. of Business show that girls who The fuel for growth in womplay high school sports are 20 enâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sports is Title IX. percent more likely to graduate Also known as the Mink and 20 percent more likely to go Brandi Chastain expressed pure joy after she made the gamewinning kick in the 1999 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Cup. Equal Opportunity in Education on to college. Other studies show Act, Title IX became law June 23, that girls who play sports have 1972. The law states, in part, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No person in Pat Summitt, to build a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball more self-esteem, earn higher grades and are the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be program that rivals any of the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Summittâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less likely to become teen mothers. Girls are excluded from participation in, be denied the University of Connecticut women have had also less likely to become obese later in life if benefits of or be subjected to discrimination winning streaks not seen since John Wood- they play sports. under any education program or activity re- en at UCLA. Woodenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s UCLA menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team As women have become a bigger part of ceiving federal financial assistance.â&#x20AC;? The act won 88 straight games from 1970-71. The the sports world, studies show their participastrives to end sexual discrimination in all edu- UConn women had a streak of 70 wins that tion helps women in the business world. Fecational opportunities, but its biggest impact broke in 2003. Five years later, a new group male athletes succeed in business and are more may be on athletics; Title IX forced schools of extraordinary women went on to win 90 likely to be hired later in life than their nonand universities across the country to stop straight games. No streak in college basketball sports playing counterparts. starving their womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sports programs. is longer, and Summitt has more wins as a colWomen who played sports are in the Think about this: Before Title IX, one in lege basketball coach than any man or woman boardrooms and succeeding at the top of 25 women or girls played sports. Today, nearly who has ever coached the sport. thriving companies. One of the best ex40 years later, that rate has mushroomed: One This past summer, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer amples is Kraft CEO Irene Rosenfeld, who in three women or girls play sports. caught the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention once more. The played sports in high school and at Cornell Here are some of the big womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mo- Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Cup in Germany provided University. ments that have happened with the first gen- several great moments by skilled players like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be crazy to say that sports will solve eration of girls to play sports after Title IX. Abby Wambach and Hope Solo. every problem for women, but it has helped In the 1999 finals of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Women are also slowly breaking into open doors previously closed to them. Title IX Cup, the United State scored a victory over some boys-club sports as well. Danica Pat- has had a major impact on leveling the playing China. After making the game-winning kick rick is only the fourth woman to race in the field for Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls and women. FAIR USE

THURSDAY, MAR. 15 College basketball (11:40 a.m.2 p.m. TruTV): USM plays their first tournament game in 21 years against Kansas State. â&#x20AC;Ś College basketball (full coverage on CBS, TBS, TNT and TruTV): Day one of the NCAA Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball Tournament.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If You Let Me Playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant â&#x20AC;˘ Dancing Big

March 14 - 20, 2012

T 36

ZRWHDPVIURP0LVVLVVLSSLPDGHLWWRWKH1&$$ 7RXUQDPHQWWKLV\HDU7KHUHFRXOGKDYHEHHQ WZRPRUHEXW0LVVLVVLSSL6WDWHXQGHUSUH IRUPHGODWHDQG2OH0LVVGXJWRRGHHSRIDKROH HDUO\WRPDNHWKH%LJ'DQFH  6RXWKHUQ0LVVKDGQRWPDGHWKHWRXUQDPHQW VLQFH²WKDWœV\HDUVIRUQRQPDWKPDMRUV²VR WKLVLVDORQJGURXJKWHQGHG*ROGHQ(DJOHVKHDG FRDFK/DUU\(XVWDFK\LVEDFNLQWKHWRXUQDPHQWDIWHU GHUDLOLQJKLVFDUHHUZKLOHKHZDVDW,RZD6WDWH  860SOD\VDWHDPZLWKWKHVFDULHVWFRDFKLQ UHFHQWPHPRU\LQDVHFRQGURXQGPDWFKXSDJDLQVW .DQVDV6WDWH*RJJOH)UDQN0DUWLQ.68KHDGFRDFK

DQG\RXZLOOVHHZKDW,DPWDONLQJDERXW  0LVVLVVLSSL9DOOH\6WDWHKDGWRZLQWKHLUFRQIHU HQFHWRXUQDPHQWWRJHWLQWRWKHÂżHOG$6:$& UHFRUGZRXOGQRWKDYHKHOSHGWKH'HOWD'HYLOVJHWLQ  6HDQ:RRGV0968KHDGFRDFKKDVDFKDQFH WRPDNHDWRXUQDPHQWPHPRU\DVDFRDFKWKLVWLPH DURXQG2QHWKLQJLVJXDUDQWHHG*UDQW+LOODQG &KULVWLDQ/DHWWQHUZLOOQRWEHWKHUHWRUXLQKLV PRPHQWEXWDYHU\JRRG.HQWXFN\WHDPPLJKWUXLQ LWDQ\ZD\  $QGVSHDNLQJRI,RZD6WDWHIRUPHU&\FORQHV SOD\HU)UHG+RLEHUJLVEDFNWRWKHWRXUQDPHQWZLWK ,RZD6WDWH7KLVWLPHKHLVDFRDFKQRWDSOD\HU

OLNH:RRGV  +HUHDUHDIHZPLGPDMRUV\RXVKRXOGJHWWR NQRZWKLV\HDU9&8 UHPHPEHUWKHÂżQDOIRXUUXQ IURPODVW\HDU" 1HZ0H[LFR6WDWH0XUUD\6WDWH WKHRQO\WHDPLQWKHFRXQWU\ZLWKMXVWRQHORVV DQG &UHLJKWRQ*RQ]DJDFRXOGPDNHDGHHSUXQLIWKH\ FDQJHWSDVWDEDGEUDFNHWSOD\LQJ:HVW9LUJLQLDLQ 3LWWVEXUJK6DLQW0DU\ÂśVLVDQRWKHUPLGPDMRUWKDW FRXOGPDNHQRLVH  $VIXQDVLWLVWRIDOOLQORYHZLWKWKHPLGPDMRUV XVXDOO\LWÂśVDWHDPIURPWKHSRZHUFRQIHUHQFHVWKDW HQGXSZLQQLQJLWDOO'RQÂśWH[SHFWWKDWWRFKDQJH WKLV\HDU

 .HQWXFN\LVWKHEHVWWHDPLQWKHWRXUQDPHQW EXWWKH\DUH\RXQJ6\UDFXVHZLOOEHDFRQWHQGHUDV ZHOO.DQVDVDQG'XNHSOD\HGDERYHWKHPVHOYHVIRU PRVWRIWKH\HDULQWKHH\HVRIH[SHUWV6WLOOHYHQ SOD\LQJKLJKHUWKDQWDOHQWOHYHOWKH-D\KDZNVDQG %OXH'HYLOVDUHVWLOOJRRGWHDPV  &RQQHFWLFXWLVWU\LQJWREHWKHÂżUVWWHDPWRUHSHDW DV1DWLRQDO&KDPSLRQVVLQFH)ORULGDDFFRPSOLVKHG WKHIHDWLQ7KH%LJ7HQDQGWKH%LJ(DVW RQFHDJDLQQHHGDJRRGVKRZLQJWRMXVWLI\DOOWKH WHDPVWKH\JRWLQWRWKHGDQFH  *RRGOXFNÂżOOLQJRXW\RXUEUDFNHWVDQGWU\LQJWRZLQ \RXURIÂżFHSRRO(QMR\WKHPDGQHVVWKDWLV0DUFK


Grab ya beads and come on out!

St. Paddy’s Day BLOWOUT! Diesel 255

March 16: Back 40 9pm, $5 Cover March 17: Crossin Dixon 9pm, $10 Cover

Green Beer & Irish Drink Specials All Weekend!

Happy Hour 2 for 1 EVERYTHING at the BAR Mon - Sat | 4:00pm - 7:00pm

Tuesday: Taco Tuesday with Jason Turner

$5 All You Can Eat Taco Bar During Happy Hour also Doug Frank & Chris Gill 8pm $5 Cover

8:30-until *OUTRAGEOUS COSTUME CONTEST *BOBBING FOR BEER CONTEST $2

DRAFT PINTS OF GREEN BEER

2-4-1 IRISH

SHOTS ALL NIGHT

6601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

Every Wednesday: Karaoke | 7:00pm

2012 NCAA March Madness New $5 food items $1.99 House Draft

During all March Madness Games Starting March 13

St. Paddy’s Day Saturday High Frequency |9pm

$1 Drafts | $2 Margaritas

Every Thursday:

Ladies Night & Men are Pigs Night featuring Snazz Ladies Get In Free Ladies Win Prizes $2.50 Coors Light Bottle

Bourbon St. in the Quarter (Formely Poets) 1855 Lakeland Drive Jackson, MS

601.987.0808

$3 Jameson 2 for 1 Irish Car Bombs ALL DAY 1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

LUNCH SPECIALS EVERY DAY starting at $7.95

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX! - BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

New Blue Plate Special & KARAOKE

THUR. MARCH 15

BUDWEISER GAME NIGHT

MARCH MADNESS & SEC HQ!

PRIZES & SWAG

BEER BUCKET SPECIAL $5 JAGER BOMBS

thu | mar 15 Acoustic Crossroads 5:30-9:30p

SAT. MARCH 17

DOUBLE SHOTZ

fri | mar 16 Point Blank 6:30-10:30p

GREEN BEER & JAMESON SPECIALS BEADS, HATS, & PRIZES

MON. MARCH 19 IN-DA-BIZ NITE TUES. MARCH 20 JACKPOT TRIVIA

live music march 14 - 19 wed | mar 14 Jessie “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p

FRI. MARCH 16 NCAA TOURNEY

2-FOR-1 SPECIAL

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

sat | mar 17 | st. paddy’s day

20 FLAT SCREEN TVS

Scan this code or text EATWITHUS to 601-707-9733 for the deal of the week

Parade After Party! Live Music & Drink Specials All Day Liz Stroud | 2:00-6:00p South of 20 | 6:00-10:30p sun | mar 18 Chris Gill 3:00 - 7:00p mon | mar 19 Karaoke 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

CRAWFISH BOIL

After the St. Paddy’s Day Parade Free Crawfish Thursday, March 15th LADIES NIGHT

Friday, March 16th & Saturday, March 17th

ROWDY SOUTH Sunday, March 18th

9 BALL TOURNAMENT 2636 S. GALLATIN JACKSON | 601-961-4747 | WWW.MYSPACE.COM/POPSSALOON

jacksonfreepress.com

WED. MARCH 14 LADIES NIGHT

37


DINING|food by Robyn Jackson

COURTESY HOLLY CLEGG AND LEE JACKSON

Meatless Mondays GOTTA-TRY-IT HOMINY CASSEROLE

MEXICAN BEAN CASSEROLE

Hominy has deep southern roots, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not an ingredient many of us use today. It has a chewier texture than regular whole-kernel corn. Give this Southwestern-flavored casserole a try.

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a quick and hearty meal thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also cheap, Mexican Bean Casserole fits the bill. Spanish rice is a nice accompaniment to this casserole.

2 15-ounce cans hominy 1 4-ounce can diced green chiles 1/3 cup chopped green onions 1 8-ounce carton sour cream 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Holly Cleggâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stuffed Greek potatoes have 229 calories each.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;M

eatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? is more than just a cute catchphrase. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an international campaign that encourages people to eat less meat for their personal health and the health of the planet. Growing vegetables has less of an impact on the earth than raising animals for food, and vegetables have fewer calories than meat. The idea actually dates back to World War I, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rationed some items and encouraged families to reduce their consumption of key staples to help the war effort. The FDA coined the slogan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food Will Win the War,â&#x20AC;? and the terms â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheatless Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;? to remind Americans to reduce consumption of meat and bread. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? made a return during World War II, when meat was rationed again. Marketing professional Sid Lerner, in conjunction with the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Center for a Livable Future, founded the contemporary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? initiative in 2003. It follows nutrition guidelines developed by the USDA. The idea is catching on. Top chefs such as Mario Batali are adding â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? selections to their menus ,and diners are becoming more aware of their foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s origins. Twenty restaurants in Aspen, Colo., began offering â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meatless Mondayâ&#x20AC;? options in 2011. Diners are also flirting more with vegetarianism and flexitarianism, a diet with very little meat. In 2011, Oprah Winfrey encouraged viewers of her show to consider going meatless for a day when she did a program about vegan living. A report by the American Meat Institute in February 2011 found that 18 percent of American households now participate in Meatless Mondays. There are plenty of alternatives to meat, including beans, potatoes, pasta, rice and vegetables. Just add bread and salad for a complete meal.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Drain one can of hominy, and then blend with remaining ingredients except cheese. Pour into a greased two-quart casserole. Sprinkle cheese over top. Bake for 35 minutes. Makes four servings. SOURCE: â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST OF THE BEST: 500 FAST & FABULOUS 5-STAR, FIVE INGREDIENT RECIPES,â&#x20AC;? (QUAIL RIDGE PRESS, BRANDON, $16.95, 2007) BY GWEN MCKEE AND BARBARA MOSELEY. USED BY PERMISSION

1 16-ounce can of black beans 1 16-ounce can of refried beans 1 small box corn muffin mix 1 14.5-ounce can of Mexican-style diced tomatoes Sour cream (optional) Grated cheddar cheese (optional) Spanish rice (optional)

Drain and rinse black beans and combine in mixing bowl with refried beans. Add half of the salsa and stir until combined. Spread in bottom of small casserole dish. Make cornbread batter according to package directions and spread over bean mixture. Bake at temperature specified on cornbread package until cornbread is golden brown. Serve with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of grated cheddar cheese, if desired. Serve over cooked Spanish rice to make it even heartier. Makes four servings.

STUFFED GREEK POTATOES These baked potatoes make a hearty vegetarian meal for two, full of Mediterranean flavor. And they only have 229 calories each. 2 medium baking potatoes 3 tablespoons nonfat plain yogurt 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves 2 tablespoons chopped Kalamata olives 1/4 cup chopped green onions 2 tablespoons crumbled reduced-fat feta cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash potatoes and dry thoroughly. Place potatoes directly on oven rack and bake approximately one hour or until soft when squeezed. Let potatoes rest until cool enough to handle. Cut thin slices off top of each potato and scoop out inside, leaving thin shell. In a bowl, mash potatoes with yogurt and oregano until creamy. Stir in olives, green onions and feta. Spoon mixture into potato shells. Reduce oven to 350 degrees and bake potatoes for approximately 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and potatoes are hot. You can also reheat these in the microwave. Makes two servings. SOURCE: â&#x20AC;&#x153;TOO HOT IN THE KITCHEN,â&#x20AC;? ($24.95, 2010) BY HOLLY CLEGG.

HOMEMADE MAC & CHEESE Just about everyone loves macaroni and cheese, but homemade is so much better than the stuff that comes in a box. This version is hearty enough to be the main course. 1 8-ounce package elbow macaroni 1/2 stick butter 1/4 cup flour 2 cups milk 2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese, divided

Cook macaroni in boiling salted water for about eight minutes. Drain, then pour into greased casserole dish. In a saucepan, make a roux with butter and flour, then add milk and cheese until sauce reaches desired consistency. Add half the cheese to the sauce, and stir until it melts. Pour sauce over macaroni and stir well to combine. Sprinkle top with remaining cheese. Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes, or until cheese is golden brown and sauce is bubbly. Makes four servings.

38

CHARLES HAYNES

March 14 - 20, 0212

Eat Like Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Irish E\:KLWQH\0HQRJDQ

I

UHODQGLVNQRZQIRULWVKHDUW\PHDOVRIPHDWDQGSRWDWRHVDQGIRULWV PRVWIDPRXVGLVKWKH,ULVKVWHZ,WLVWKHQDWLRQDOGLVKIRUWKHFRXQWU\ DQGLVWKLFNKHDUW\DQGÂżOOLQJ  2YHUWKH\HDUVWKHLQJUHGLHQWVKDYHFKDQJHGIURPWKHWUDGLWLRQDOUHFLSH ZKLFKLQFOXGHGSRWDWRHVRQLRQVSDUVOH\DQGODPERUPXWWRQ:KHQVRPH ,ULVKPLJUDWHGWRWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVWRHVFDSHWKH*UHDW)DPLQHWKH\KDGWR DGDSWWRORFDOO\DYDLODEOHIRRG6KHHSZHUHQRWDVFRPPRQLQWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHVVRFRRNVEHJDQXVLQJEHHILQVWHDG&RRNVDGGHGYDULRXVQHZLQJUHGL HQWVWRÂżWWKHWDVWHRIWKHPDNHU7KHUHDUHHYHQJRXUPHW,ULVKVWHZV

 $QRWKHU,ULVKIDYRULWHLVEDFRQDQGFDEEDJH,NQRZLWVRXQGVRGG EHFDXVHZHDUHXVHGWRHDWLQJFRUQHGEHHIDQGFDEEDJH2ULJLQDOO\EHHIZDV RQO\IRUWKHZHDOWK\LQ,UHODQGVRSRUNZDVDPRQJWKHPHDWVWKDWWKHUHVW RIWKH,ULVKSRSXODWLRQDWH,WZDVQÂśWXQWLODIWHUWKHPLJUDWLRQWRWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHVWKDWWKH,ULVKLPPLJUDQWVDGRSWHGFRUQHGEHHIEHFDXVHRIKRZDIIRUG DEOHLWZDV7KHUHFLSHIRUEDFRQDQGFDEEDJHFKDQJHGWRFRUQHGEHHIDQG FDEEDJHDQGZDVH[SRUWHGEDFNWR,UHODQG'RQÂśWH[SHFWWRVHHEDFRQDQG FDEEDJHLQYHU\PDQ\UHVWDXUDQWVDQGSXEVLQ$PHULFDDOWKRXJKLWLVVWLOO PRUHWUDGLWLRQDODQGSRSXODUGLVKHDWHQLQ,UHODQG


Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street cornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Mexicanâ&#x20AC;? specialties mix extremely well with their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best of Jackson 2012â&#x20AC;? magaritas. Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Bourbon Street in the Quarter (1855 Lakeland Drive, 601-987-0808) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hot new spot for great New Orleans cuisine, live entertainment and libations from the bar featuring daily lunch specials and happy hour in the landmark Poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location. Reed Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Hole in the Wall,â&#x20AC;? has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the fries! Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports CafĂŠ (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even â&#x20AC;&#x153;lollipopâ&#x20AC;? lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more!

Now Offering

LIVE MUSIC Friday and Saturday Nights

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

5A44 FX5X

Best Fried Chicken In Town & Best Fried Chicken in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

Voted Best Veggie Burger

-Food & Wine Magazine-

-Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Lunch Specials are listed daily at

www.stevestown.com 200 South Lamar St. T: 601.714.5683

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ¡V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG

12:23(1 +DEDFKL/XQFK6SHFLDOV 0RQGD\)ULGD\



7UHHWRS%OYG)ORZRRG06Â&#x2021; %HKLQGWKH$SSOHEHH¡VRQ/DNHODQG

_ZZZIXVLRQMDSDQHVHWKDLFXLVLQHFRP

jacksonfreepress.com

%*/&+BDLTPO

39


Try The

(a very high-class pig stand)

%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

Located in Highland Village, Suite 144 | Jackson MS 39211 601.981.1975 | www.earthwalkshoes.com| Like Us On

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” specialties mix extremely well with their “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar service.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Bourbon Street in the Quarter (1855 Lakeland Drive, 601-987-0808) Jackson’s hot new spot for great New Orleans cuisine, live entertainment and libations from the bar featuring daily lunch specials and happy hour in the landmark Poet’s location. Reed Pierce’s (6791 Siwell Rd., Byram, 601-376-0777) Eat, Drink, Play! Burgers, Po-Boys, pub fare and dinner specialties including ribeye, filet, fried shrimp and more. 9-Ball lounge features tourney tables, full bar, live entertainment. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Al’s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

March 14 - 20, 2012

ASIAN

40

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Mimosas, coffees and more!


ES - O - TER - I - CA: A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippi’s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens • Pendulums Books • Wands • Moldavite Jewelry & More National Natural Landmark

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

jacksonfreepress.com

www.ppsjackson.org

41


0)3#%3&EB -ARCH

6HDKRUVHVKDYHDQXQXVXDODSSURDFKWRUHSURGXFWLRQ,W¶VWKHPDOHRIWKHVSHFLHVWKDW FDUHVIRUWKHHJJVDVWKH\JHVWDWH+HFDUULHVWKHPLQD³EURRGSRXFK´RQKLVIURQWVLGH 2IFRXUVHLW¶VWKHIHPDOHZKRFUHDWHVWKHHJJVLQWKH¿UVWSODFH$IWHUDQDO\]LQJWKH DVWURORJLFDOIDFWRUVFRPLQJWREHDURQ\RXUGHVWLQ\3LVFHV,VXVSHFW\RXZLOOEHQH¿W IURPKDYLQJDVHDKRUVHOLNHTXDOLW\LQWKHFRPLQJZHHNV:KDWHYHUJHQGHU\RXDUH \RXUDUFKHW\SDOPDVFXOLQHTXDOLWLHVVKRXOGSOD\DQHVSHFLDOO\VWURQJUROHDV\RXQXUWXUH DSURMHFWWKDW¶VLQLWVHDUO\GHYHORSPHQWDOSKDVHV

!2)%3-ARCH !PRIL

7KLVZHHN\RXPD\OHDUQWKHUHDOUHDVRQWKHWRUWRLVH EHDWWKHKDUHZK\WZRRIWKHWKUHHEOLQGPLFHZHUHQ¶W UHDOO\EOLQGDQGWKHVKRFNLQJWUXWKDERXWWKHUHODWLRQVKLS EHWZHHQ&LQGHUHOOD¶VIDLU\JRGPRWKHUDQGWKHKDQGVRPH SULQFH0\WKVZLOOEHPXWDWLQJ$ULHV1XUVHU\UK\PHVZLOO VFUDPEOHIDLU\WDOHVZLOOIUDFWXUH7KRUWKHJRGRIWKXQGHU PD\PDNHDWHPSWLQJRIIHUWR6QRZ:KLWH7KHFRZ¶VMXPS RYHUWKHPRRQFRXOGWXUQRXWWRKDYHEHHQIDNHGE\WKH &,$$QXJO\GXFNOLQJZLOOOD\DQHJJWKDW&KLFNHQ/LWWOH FODLPVLVLUUHIXWDEOHSURRIWKH0D\DQ$SRFDO\SVHLV LPPLQHQW6RXQGVOLNHDURZG\JRRGWLPHIRUDOO

4!5253!PRIL -AY

³5RRWVDQGZLQJV%XWOHWWKHZLQJVJURZURRWVDQGWKH URRWVÃ&#x20AC;\´6SDQLVKSRHW-XDQ5DPRQ-LPHQH]ZURWHDQG QRZ,¶PSDVVLQJLWRQWR\RX,WZLOOVHUYHDVDNH\QRWHIRU WKHWXUQLQJSRLQW\RX¶UHDERXWWRQDYLJDWH,QWKHFRPLQJ ZHHNVDV\RXJHQHUDWHJRRGIRUWXQHE\H[SRVLQJ\RXU GDUNP\VWHULRXVGHSWKVWRWKHELJEULJKWVN\\RX¶OOEH ZLVHWREULQJ\RXUVRDULQJGUHDPVGRZQWRHDUWKIRUDSLW VWRS7KHKLJKVQHHGWKHLQÃ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIWKHORZV7DXUXVWKH XQGHUQHDWKZLOOEHQH¿WIURPIHHOLQJWKHORYHRIZKDW¶VXS DERYH7KHUH¶VRQHIXUWKHUQXDQFHWREHDZDUHRI,WKLQN \RXZLOO¿QGLWH[WUDLQWHUHVWLQJWRLQWHUZHDYH\RXUSDVW ZLWK\RXUIXWXUH*LYH\RXUULFKWUDGLWLRQVDWDVWHRIWKH VWRULHVWKDWDUHDV\HWXQZULWWHQ

'%-).)-AY *UNE

,VLWSRVVLEOH\RXZHUHDVSLGHULQDSUHYLRXVOLIH",IVR SOHDVHFDOORQWKHDELOLWLHV\RXGHYHORSHGEDFNWKHQ<RX

QHHGWRFUHDWHDQH[WUDELJVXSHU¿QHZHEPHWDSKRULFDOO\ VSHDNLQJVRWKDW\RXFDQFDSWXUHDOOWKHUDZPDWHULDOV\RX ZLOOQHHGLQWKHFRPLQJZHHNVDQGPRQWKV,I\RX¶UHQRW VXUHZKHWKHU\RXDUHWKHUHLQFDUQDWLRQRIDVSLGHUWKHQ VLPSO\LPDJLQH\RXZHUH6WLPXODWHGD\GUHDPVLQZKLFK \RXYLVXDOL]H\RXUVHOIDVDPRYHUDQGVKDNHUZKR¶VVNLOOHG DWVQDJJLQJWKHUHVRXUFHVDQGKHOS\RXUHTXLUH

#!.#%2*UNE *ULY

%ULWLVKZULWHU.HQQHWK7\QDQDVNHGDPRYLHGLUHFWRUDERXW KRZKH¶G¿OPDQDGYDQFLQJDUP\'LGLWPDWWHUZKHWKHU WKHDFWLRQZHQWIURPULJKWWROHIWDFURVVWKHIUDPHRUOHIW WRULJKW"³2IFRXUVH´WKHGLUHFWRUVDLG³7RWKH:HVWHUQ H\HHDV\RUVXFFHVVIXOPRYHPHQWLVOHIWWRULJKWGLI¿FXOW RUIDLOHGPRYHPHQWLVULJKWWROHIW´7KHGLUHFWRUVKRZHG 7\QDQDQLOOXVWUDWHGERRNDVHYLGHQFH2QRQHSDJHD FDQRHVKRRWLQJWKHUDSLGVZDVJRLQJIURPOHIWWRULJKW ZKLOHDPDQFOLPELQJDPRXQWDLQZDVKHDGHGIURPULJKWWR OHIW8VHWKLVLQIRUPDWLRQWR\RXUEHQH¿W&DQFHULDQ(YHU\ GD\IRUWKHQH[WWZRZHHNVYLVXDOL]H\RXUVHOIPRYLQJIURP OHIWWRULJKWDV\RXIXO¿OODGUHDP\RXZDQWWRDFFRPSOLVK

,%/*ULY !UG

+DQDGL=DNDULDDO+LQGLLVWKH¿UVW6DXGL$UDELDQZRPDQ OLFHQVHGWRÃ&#x20AC;\DSODQH%XWWKHUH¶VDQDEVXUGODZLQKHU FRXQWU\WKDWSURKLELWVZRPHQIURPGULYLQJFDUVVRVKH QHHGVDPDQWRJLYHKHUDOLIWWRWKHDLUSRUW,VWKHUHDQ\ VLWXDWLRQLQ\RXURZQOLIHWKDWUHVHPEOHVKHUV/HR"0D\EH \RX¶YHDGYDQFHGWRDKLJKHUOHYHOZLWKRXWJHWWLQJFHUWL¿HG RQDORZHUOHYHO2UPD\EH\RXKDYHSHUPLVVLRQDQG SRZHUWRRSHUDWHLQDVSKHUHWKDW¶VPHDQLQJIXOWR\RXHYHQ WKRXJK\RXVNLSSHGDVWHSDORQJWKHZD\1RZZRXOGEHD

JRRGWLPHWRWKLQNDERXWZKHWKHU\RXVKRXOGGRDQ\WKLQJ DERXWWKHGLVFUHSDQF\DQGLIVRKRZWRGRLW

JHWLQWXLWLRQVDERXW\RXUVRXO¶VFRGHWKDW\RXKDYHQ¶W EHHQUHDG\WRXQGHUVWDQGXQWLOQRZ

6)2'/!UG 3EPT

3!')44!2)53.OV $EC

,)"2!3EPT /CT

#!02)#/2.$EC *AN

5HFHQWVFLHQWL¿FVWXGLHVKDYHFRQ¿UPHGZKDW1DWLYH $PHULFDQIRONORUHUHSRUWV%DGJHUVDQGFR\RWHVVRPH WLPHVFRRSHUDWHZLWKHDFKRWKHUDVWKH\VHDUFKIRUIRRG 7KHFR\RWHVDUHEHWWHUDWVWDONLQJSUH\DERYHJURXQG DQGWKHEDGJHUVWDNHRYHULIWKHKXQWHGDQLPDOVOLSV XQGHUJURXQG7KH\VKDUHWKHVSRLOV,VXJJHVW\RXGUDZ LQVSLUDWLRQIURPWKHLUH[DPSOH9LUJR,VWKHUHDSHUVRQ \RXNQRZZKR¶VVNLOOHGDWDWDVN\RXKDYHWURXEOHZLWK DQGZKRFRXOGEHQH¿WIURPVRPHWKLQJ\RX¶UHJRRGDW" ,W¶VSULPHWLPHWRFRQVLGHUIRUPLQJV\PELRWLFUHODWLRQ VKLSVRUVHHNLQJRXWXQXVXDOSDUWQHUVKLSVWKDWSOD\WR ERWKSDUWLHV¶VWUHQJWKV

+RZGLGWKH9LNLQJVQDYLJDWHWKHLUVKLSVWKURXJKURXJK QRUWKHUQVHDVRQFORXG\DQGIRJJ\GD\V"0HGLHYDO WH[WVVSHDNRIWKHP\VWHULRXV³VXQVWRQH´D³9LNLQJ FRPSDVV´XVHGWRGHWHFWWKHKLGGHQVXQ0RGHUQ WKHRULHVVXJJHVWWKDWWKLVWHFKQRORJ\PD\KDYHEHHQ ,FHODQGVSDUDPLQHUDOWKDWSRODUL]HVOLJKWPDNLQJLW XVHIXOLQSORWWLQJDFRXUVHXQGHURYHUFDVWVNLHV'R\RX KDYHDQ\WKLQJOLNHWKDW/LEUD²DQDYLJDWLRQDODLGWKDW JXLGHV\RXUGHFLVLRQVZKHQWKHVXQ¶VQRWRXWPHWD SKRULFDOO\VSHDNLQJ"1RZZRXOGEHDQH[FHOOHQWWLPH WRHQKDQFH\RXUFRQQHFWLRQZLWKZKDWHYHULWLVWKDWFDQ SURYLGHVXFKSRZHU

3#/20)//CT .OV

,I\RXVHWXSWZRPLUURUVLQMXVWWKHULJKWZD\\RXFDQ JHWDFOHDUORRNDWWKHEDFNRI\RXUKHDG<RX¶UHDEOHWR VHHZKDW\RXUERG\ORRNVOLNHIURPEHKLQG,VXJJHVW \RXWU\WKDWH[HUFLVHVRPHWLPHVRRQ,WZLOOHQFRXUDJH \RXUVXEFRQVFLRXVPLQGWRKHOS\RXGLVFRYHUZKDWKDV EHHQPLVVLQJIURP\RXUVHOINQRZOHGJH$VDUHVXOW\RX PD\EHGUDZQWRH[SHULHQFHVWKDWUHYHDOWKLQJVDERXW \RXUVHOIWKDW\RX¶YHEHHQUHVLVWDQWWRVHHLQJ<RXFRXOG EHVKRZQVHFUHWVDERXWEXULHGIHHOLQJVDQGZLVKHVWKDW \RX¶YHEHHQKLGLQJIURP\RXUVHOI%HVWRIDOO\RXPD\

$FFRUGLQJWRP\6DJLWWDULXVIULHQG-RQDWKDQ=DSWKH *UHHNSOD\ZULJKW$ULVWRSKDQHVKDGDQDPELYDOHQWDW WLWXGHDERXWGLYLQHEOHVVLQJV+HVDLGWKDWQRJUHDWJLIW HQWHUVWKHKXPDQVSKHUHZLWKRXWDFXUVHDWWDFKHGWR LW,¶PVXUH\RXNQRZWKLVOHVVRQZHOO2QHRIODVW\HDU¶V ELJJLIWVKDVUHYHDOHGLWVGRZQVLGHLQZD\VWKDWPD\ KDYHEHHQFRQIXVLQJRUGHÃ&#x20AC;DWLQJ%XWQRZKHUHFRPHV DQXQH[SHFWHGSORWWZLVWDOORZLQJ\RXWRDGGDFRURO ODU\WR$ULVWRSKDQHV¶IRUPXODWLRQ6RRQ\RXZLOO¿QG DVHFRQGEOHVVLQJWKDWZDVKLGGHQZLWKLQWKHFXUVHLQ HPEU\RQLFIRUP<RX¶OOEHDEOHWRWHDVHLWRXWULSHQLW DQGDGGLWWRWKHERXQW\RIWKHRULJLQDOJLIW

³7KHUH¶VDQROGMRNH,I\RXWHOOVRPHRQHWKHXQLYHUVHLV H[SDQGLQJKH¶OOEHOLHYH\RX´ZURWH&RUH\63RZHOOLQ WKHVFLHQFHPDJD]LQH'LVFRYHU³,I\RXWHOOKLPWKHUH¶V ZHWSDLQWRQWKHSDUNEHQFKKH¶OOZDQWWRWRXFKLWWR PDNHVXUH´,QDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHDVWURORJLFDORPHQV &DSULFRUQ,LQYLWH\RXWRUHEHODJDLQVWWKLVWKHRU\, WKLQNLW¶VTXLWHLPSRUWDQWIRU\RXWRGHPDQGDVPXFK SURRIIRUELJIDUDZD\FODLPVDVIRUWKRVHWKDWDUHFORVH DWKDQG'RQ¶WWUXVWDQ\RQH¶VDVVHUWLRQVMXVWEHFDXVH WKH\VRXQGORIW\RUHOHJDQW3XWWKHPWRWKHWHVW

!15!2)53*AN &EB

,W¶VDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHWREHWWHUDSSUHFLDWH\RXU#   YH[DWLRQVDQGERWKHUDWLRQV,QIDFWOHW¶VJRDKHDGDQG PDNHWKLV+RQRU<RXU#  ,UULWDWLRQVDQG$QQR\ DQFHV:HHN7RSURSHUO\REVHUYHWKLVKROLGD\VWXG\WKH SHRSOHDQGWKLQJVWKDWLUN\RXVR\RXFDQH[WUDFWIURP WKHPDOOWKHEOHVVLQJVDQGWHDFKLQJVWKH\PD\SURYLGH $UH\RXWRRWROHUDQWRIDQDQQR\LQJVLWXDWLRQWKDW\RX QHHGWRSD\FORVHUDWWHQWLRQWR",VLWWLPHWRUHFODLPWKH SRZHU\RX¶YHEHHQORVLQJEHFDXVHRIDQH[DVSHUDWLQJ HQHUJ\GUDLQ"'RHVVRPHMHUNUHPLQG\RXRIDTXDOLW\ \RXGRQ¶WOLNHLQ\RXUVHOI",VWKHUHDYDOXDEOHFOXHRUWZR WREHJOHDQHGIURPDSDVVLYHDJJUHVVLYHSURYRFDWHXU"

+RPHZRUN:KDWZDVWKHSDLQWKDWKHDOHG\RXPRVW":KDWZDVWKHSOHDVXUHWKDWKXUW\RXWKHZRUVW"7HVWLI\DW )UHH:LOO$VWURORJ\FRP

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

%<0$77-21(6

$OWN

±0UH LEEZE²\RX¶YHJRWWRHQXQFLDWH

March 14 - 20, 2012

!CROSS

42

.LQJZLWKDJROGHQWRXFK 3ODFHWRJHWDPRFKDDQGDSDSHU /RIW\SRHW 7UDYHOZHEVLWHZLWKORQJWLPH VSRNHVPDQ:LOOLDP6KDWQHU 0DNHWKRVHFOXPV\IRROVHDUQ WKHLUOLYLQJ" 6HQGDTXLFNPHVVDJH 7KH%DQG3HUU\¶V³,IBBB<RXQJ´ :HDSRQDW+RJZDUWV *HQHVLVQDPH 0LVVRXUL5LYHUWULEXWDU\ -DFRE¶VWZLQ ³2QWKH5RDG´SURWDJRQLVWBBB 3DUDGLVH 3RUWLRQHG RXW

5HGXQGDQWO\QDPHGXQGHUJDU PHQW"

5HVSRQVHDEEU )ORULGDFLW\KRPHWRWKHKHDG TXDUWHUVRI7HOHPXQGR %HKDYLRUPRGL¿FDWLRQ" +XJLQWKHVKRZHU" ³7KDW¶VDWRXJKBBBIROORZ´ 'LJLQ )LQLWR 7DNHDNQHHRQWKH¿HOG 7KUHHSHUVRQFDUGJDPH 0RQH\RQWKHOLQH 5HQWBBB 'XWFKBBB 3UDFWLFHIRUEHLQJIRUFHGLQWR VRPHWKLQJ" 7RRIRUZDUGDVEHKDYLRU 'DWLQJJDPHVKRZRIWKHV 5LQJVRXW 2Q¿OP

*HWWKH\DUGGRQH :RUGVH[FKDQJHGDWWKHDOWDU :KDWWKHGHDGWDNHLQDPDFDEUH SKUDVH ,QYLWHGWRRQH¶VDSDUWPHQW *URXSWKDWVDQJWKHOLQH³,¶P .LOUR\´ &RPSXWHU¶V³EUDLQ´IRUVKRUW +HZRQWKH1+/¶VWRSURRNLHDZDUG ZKLOHVWLOODWHHQDJHU 1HZWRQIUXLW ,W¶VDOVRFDOOHGWKH³/LQFROQ/DZ´ IRXQGLQ*2/)&$57

6ZLUO\VZLPPHU *LUOZKROLYHVLQWKH3OD]D+RWHO 3HUVRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQOLWHUDOO\ ,PPXQHV\VWHPERRVWHU 'RHVWKH¿HOGDJDLQ )LIWKTWUV ³5XVKPRUH´GLUHFWRU$QGHUVRQ +RPHRIWKH6XQ'HYLOVDEEU 3DODWLDOKRPHV 8QVHHQGLVDVWHUZDLWLQJWR KDSSHQ &DQDGD¶V¿UVWSURYLQFHDOSKDEHWL FDOO\ +RPHRIDPDLORUGHUVWHDN EXVLQHVV ³,ZDVQRWH[SHFWLQJLWWREHWKDW JRRG´ 6PDOOLQOHW 5LFBBB ZDY\IDEULF

%XOOULQJKHUR ³,W:DVD*RRG'D\´UDSSHU ,VODQGVWRSRQD&DULEEHDQFUXLVH ³.LOOLQJ0H6RIWO\ZLWK+LV6RQJ´ VLQJHU)ODFN 7LHV )XOO\SUHSDUHG 7KHHOGHUO\IRUVKRUW %XOOULQJKHURDJDLQ 7HPSHUDWXUHWHVWHU *LQRUPRXV

,W¶VWKHKRWWHVWWKLQJDURXQG 2UJWKDWJLYHVRXWGLJLW,'V 8SVWDWH1<VFKRRO 7KHQLJKWEHIRUH *X\V (QGLQJIRUOHPRQRU3RZHU 7ULSS\WDE

Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU# MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOO FHQWVSHUPLQXWH 0XVWEH2UWRELOOWR\RXUFUHGLW FDUGFDOO5HIHU HQFHSX]]OH

%<0$77-21(6

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

±3TEPPING3TONE3UDOKU² (DFKFLUFOHGVTXDUHLQWKLVVXGRNXLVWKHVDPHQXPEHURIVWHSVDZD\IURPDQRWKHUFLUFOHGVTXDUHZLWKWKHVDPH GLJLWLQLWDVWKHGLJLWLQWKRVHWZRFLUFOHGVTXDUHV)RUH[DPSOHDFLUFOHGVTXDUHZLWKDLQLWZLOOKDYHDQRWKHU FLUFOHGVTXDUHZLWKDLQLWH[DFWO\VWHSVDZD\&RQYHUVHO\DVTXDUHWKDWLVQRWFLUFOHGZLOOQRWKDYHDQRWKHU RFFXUUHQFHRILWVGLJLWWKDWPDQ\VWHSVDZD\$VWHSLVDPRYHLQWRDKRUL]RQWDOO\RUYHUWLFDOO\QHLJKERULQJVTXDUH GLDJRQDOO\GRHVQ¶WFRXQW 1RWHWKDWQRQHRIWKHFLUFOHGVTXDUHVFRQWDLQVWKHGLJLWEHFDXVHWKDWZRXOGUHTXLUHD VHFRQGLQWKHVDPHURZRUFROXPQ$OVRQRWHWKDWWKHQXPEHURIVWHSVLQDSDWKEHWZHHQWZRVTXDUHVLVFRXQWHG DVWKHVPDOOHVWQXPEHURIVWHSVUHTXLUHGWRWUDYHOEHWZHHQWKRVHWZRVTXDUHV:KHQ\RX¶UHGRQHMXVWDVZLWKD VWDQGDUG6XGRNXHDFKURZFROXPQDQG[ER[ZLOOFRQWDLQWKHGLJLWVH[DFWO\RQHWLPH'RQ¶WEHVFDUHG\RX FDQGRLW2UFDQ\RX"SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP


(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm â&#x20AC;˘ Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-366-5676 â&#x20AC;˘ www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly

jacksonfreepress.com

H>DF>=Ă&#x192;C70E4 C>5>;;>FC74 A08=1>F5>AC78B 8A8B76>;3

43


BWP_TD_5^aBd\\Ta =^4]a^[[\T]c5TT5aTTCP]]X]V BTT2[dQbU^a3TcPX[b

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Just Wear Your Green,

Eat Your Green

901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 | Flowood, MS in front of Walmart flowood@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-992-3488

2155 Highway 18, Suite E | Brandon, MS across from Home Depot brandon@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-706-4605

4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 | Jackson, MS in front of Kroger jacksonms@anytimefitness.com | www.anytimefitness.com

Phone: 601-321-9465

Join For Free!

Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

No Contract â&#x20AC;˘ 24/7 Access

Thank You for Voting Knockout Fitness & MMA

March 14 - 20, 2012

One of the Best Martial Arts Studios in the Jackson Area

44

Monday - Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00pm - 8:00pm Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ 11:00am - 12:00pm 205 Belle Meade Blvd Flowood, MS 39232

2807 Old Canton Road in Historic Fondren 601.366.1602 www.rainbowcoop.org

769-233-7901

www.knockoutfitnessmma.com


by Tam Curley read more Body&Soul stories and the blog at jacksonfreepress.com

FILE PHOTO

FILE PHOTO

Sweet Tartness

Among its many uses, vinegar is a natural sanitizer and disinfectant.

!N!PPLEA$AY

$IRTY$OG

U

D

VLQJYLQHJDUSURYLGHVUHDOKHDOWKEHQHÂżWV*D\OH 3RYLV$OOHPDQ065'RQKRZVWXIIZRUNVFRP JLYHVWKHUHDOGHDOZLWKWKHWLSVEHORZÂł2QO\DSSOH FLGHUYLQHJDUVKRXOGEHXVHGIRUDQ\WKLQJSHUVRQDOERWK LQVLGHDQGRXWVLGHWKHERG\´DGYLVHVGLDJQRVHPHFRP  Âł'RQRWXVHZKLWHGLVWLOOHGYLQHJDUDVLWFDQURE\RXU ERG\RIHVVHQWLDOPLQHUDOV´ Â&#x2021; 6INEGARHELPSTHEBODYABSORBCALCIUM6DODG JUHHQVDUHIXOORIFDOFLXP,I\RXÂśUHDYHJDQZKRKDV VWRSSHGGULQNLQJPLONGXHWRHQYLURQPHQWDOFRQFHUQV DYLQHJDU\VDODGPLJKWEH\RXUEHVWVRXUFHIRU FDOFLXP Â&#x2021; 6INEGARSEEMSTOHELPPEOPLEWITHTYPEDIABETES ,WPD\LQFUHDVHLQVXOLQVHQVLWLYLW\LQWKRVHZKRDUH LQVXOLQUHVLVWDQW Â&#x2021; 5SEVINEGARTOREPLACEHIGH FATFOODSOLNHPD\RQ QDLVHDQGWDUWDUVDXFH0L[LQJYLQHJDUZLWKJLQJHU JDUOLFDQGRWKHUIUHVKLQJUHGLHQWVFDQKHOS\RX UHSODFHWKRVHKLJKIDWJDUQLVKHVDQGGLSSLQJVDXFHV 0L[DQGEOHQGLQJUHGLHQWVWRJHWWKHSHUIHFWVSUHDG DEOHWH[WXUHIRUVDQGZLFKHV Â&#x2021; 6INEGARCANADDSOMEMUCH NEEDEDSPICETOADIET $Q\GLHWLVPRUHDSWWRZRUNLILWLVWDVW\DQGYLQHJDU KDVRQO\FDORULHVSHUKDOIFXS Â&#x2021; 7ASHINGPRODUCELQDPL[WXUHRIZDWHUDQGYLQHJDU FDQKHOSUHPRYHFHUWDLQSHVWLFLGHVDFFRUGLQJWRD VPDOODPRXQWRISXEOLVKHGUHVHDUFK9LQHJDUDOVRDS SHDUVWREHKHOSIXOLQJHWWLQJULGRIKDUPIXOEDFWHULD RQIUXLWVDQGYHJHWDEOHV

RQÂśWOLPLWYLQHJDUWR\RXUKRPHDQGGLHW-RVK3HWHUVRQZULWLQJRQ KRZVWXIIZRUNVFRPJLYHVWKHVHWLSVIRU\RXUFDU Â&#x2021;8VHYLQHJDUWRREMOVEUNWANTEDBUMPERSTICKERS Â&#x2021;#LEANTHECAR´SINTERIORZLWKYLQHJDUDQGZDWHU Â&#x2021;0OLISHTHECHROMERQWKHRXWVLGH Â&#x2021;3XWDERZORIYLQHJDULQ\RXUFDURYHUQLJKWWRREMOVEODOR Â&#x2021;&RDWZLQGRZVZLWKYLQHJDUWRPREVENTFROST  9HUVDWLOHYLQHJDURUJKDVDOLVWRIYLQHJDUÂśVXVHVIURP)LGRWR\RXUODZQ DQGJDUGHQ7KHZHEVLWHVD\VWKDWWKHVHXVHVKDYHQRWEHHQWHVWHGEXWFRPH IURPDYDULHW\RIVRXUFHV Â&#x201E;7RKILLGRASSONSIDEWALKSANDDRIVEWAYSSRXUIXOOVWUHQJWKZKLWH GLVWLOOHGYLQHJDURQLW Â&#x2021;6SUD\ZKLWHGLVWLOOHGYLQHJDUIXOOVWUHQJWKRQWKHTOPSOFWEEDSTOKILL THEM5HDSSO\RQDQ\QHZJURZWKXQWLOSODQWVKDYHVWDUYHG Â&#x2021;$GGLQJWZRWDEOHVSRRQVRIVXJDUDQGWZRWDEOHVSRRQVRIZKLWHYLQHJDUWRD TXDUWYDVHRIZDWHUZLOOKEEPCUTžOWERSFRESHLONGER7ULPVWHPVDQG FKDQJHZDWHUHYHU\ÂżYHGD\V Â&#x2021;$WHDVSRRQRIZKLWHGLVWLOOHGYLQHJDUIRUHDFKTXDUWERZORIGULQNLQJZDWHU IRUDSRXQGDQLPDO KHOSVKEEPYOURPETFREEOFžEASANDTICKS Â&#x2021;7RGETRIDOFODORONADOGXVHDPL[WXUHRIRQHFXSZKLWHGLVWLOOHGYLQHJDU DQGWZRJDOORQVRIZDWHU:HWWKHGRJZLWKIUHVKZDWHUWKHQVDWXUDWHLWV FRDWZLWKWKHYLQHJDUVROXWLRQ/HWWKHGRJGU\ZLWKRXWULQVLQJ Â&#x2021;$RYERSHEETSANDLIQUIDSOFTENERSARE½LLEDWITHHAZARDOUSINGREDIENTS VXFKDV%HQ]\ODFHWDWHZKLFKLVOLQNHGWRSDQFUHDWLFFDQFHUDQGFKORUR IRUPDQHXURWR[LQDQHVWKHWLFDQGFDUFLQRJHQ UHSRUWVZHOOQHVVZHEVLWH VL[ZLVHFRP,QVWHDGÂł$GGFXSRIZKLWHYLQHJDUWRWKHULQVHF\FOHDVD IDEULFVRIWHQHU)RUYHU\ODUJHRUKHDY\ORDGV\RXFDQLQFUHDVHWKHDPRXQW WRFXSV´ZULWHV$QJHOD%UDG\RQJUHHQOLYLQJQDWLRQDOJHRJUDSKLFFRP

+EEPINGTHE$OCTOR!WAY-AYBE

A

ERXWD\HDUDJRIUHDGWKDWDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUFDQKHOS ZLWKZHLJKWORVVVR,WKRXJKW,ZRXOGWU\VRPHWKLQJVLPSOH ,GUDQNDODUJHJODVV²KDOIZDWHUKDOIDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDU 7KDWZDVVRZURQJ$ERXWKDOIDQKRXUODWHUP\EHOO\ZDVDFK LQJDQG,ZDVIHHOLQJQDXVHRXV1H[WWLPH,œOOKHHGZHEPGFRPœV LQVWUXFWLRQV  ³ª6RPHSHRSOHWDNHWZRWHDVSRRQVDGD\ PL[HGLQDFXSRIZDWHU RUMXLFH ª$WDEOHW DYDLODEOHLQPRVWKHDOWKIRRGVWRUHV RIPLO OLJUDPVLVDQRWKHUFRPPRQGRVDJH´  ,FDQœWSHUVRQDOO\VZHDUDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUKHOSVZLWKZHLJKWORVV EHFDXVH,ZDVQHYHUFRQVLVWHQWZLWKGULQNLQJWKHVWXII$QGDOWKRXJKWKH PHGLFDOEHQH¿WVRIDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUPD\QRWEHVFLHQWL¿FDOO\SURYHQ

VRPHGDWDDQGORWVRIIRONPHGLFLQHLQVLVWVWKDWWKH\DUH+HUHÂśVDSDUWLDO OLVWRIWKRVHEHQHÂżWVIURPDQ\YLWDPLQVFRP Â&#x2021;#ONSTIPATION)LEHUVXFKDVWKHSHFWLQLQDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUDVVLVWV WKHERG\E\SURPRWLQJUHJXODULW\ Â&#x201E;(EART7KHSRWDVVLXPLQDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDULVEHQHÂżFLDOWRWKHKHDUW $SSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUSURPRWHVWKHKHDOWKRIYHLQVDQGFDSLOODULHVDQG LVXVHIXOLQDVVLVWLQJNHHSLQJ\RXUKHDUWDQGEORRGSUHVVXUHKHDOWK\ Â&#x201E;-ETABOLISM3HRSOHKDYHXVHGDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUIRUFHQWXULHVWRDLG LQGHWR[LI\LQJWKHOLYHUWRKHOSGLJHVWULFKIDWW\DQGJUHDV\IRRGVDQG IRUSURSHUPHWDEROL]LQJRISURWHLQVIDWVDQGPLQHUDOV Â&#x201E;3ORETHROAT:KHWKHUGXHWRDEDFWHULDORUYLUXVLQIHFWLRQDJDUJOH PDGHIURPDSSOHFLGHUYLQHJDUDQGZDWHUFDQEHDJUHDWUHOLHI

jacksonfreepress.com

I

remember when I was a little girl, we used vinegar to color our Easter eggs. I never liked the smell of vinegar much, but I did like how pretty the eggs were once the color took. I also remember eating pickled eggs and pickled sausages, which both used vinegar. I sometimes liked eating fresh tomatoes or boiled eggs with just a little vinegar, salt and pepper. As I became an adult and more conscious of my health, I began to explore natural alternatives for my household cleaning. I know now that vinegar is one product with multiple uses. It has benefits for the home (inside and out) and benefits for better health. I am an avid viewer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dr. Oz Show,â&#x20AC;? and I always like to try things I learn from it, such as how to make under500-calorie meals, belly-busting remedies using cinnamon, and how to clean the microwave and coffee pot without harsh ingredients. My best friend from sixth grade, Jamesia, and her husband, are naturalists. Her husband is the most frugal person I knowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even more than me. Jamesia is always telling me about the many uses of vinegar (like using it to sanitize and disinfect her home) and how her husband likes to experiment and make his own household cleaning products using vinegar. When my husband and I bought our house, we wanted to have nice, stainless steel appliances. We visited salvage centers and thrift stores, and scouted Craigslist for good deals. One thing we purchased was a stainless steel dishwasher. The only problem: It had not been used and had sat for months in a garage. It smelled like dirty, wet socks and had dark stains that we assumed were permanent. I decided to run plain vinegar through the dishwasher a few times. What do you know? The dishwasher was clean and ready to go. My husband was ecstatic, and he used it to clean our high-efficiency washer, too. These days, when we want to clean something right, sanitize it and feel good about not using harsh chemicals, our family mixes vinegar and water in a spray bottle and cleans the entire house. Whether you are looking for cleaning alternatives or testing a weight loss theory, vinegar should be on your grocery list. I am no doctor or scientist who has spent hours in the lab conducting years of research, but I am a frugal, natural shopper always looking for ways to save money and to live life healthy. Since vinegar is not a drug, and it comes from nature, you can choose how and when you use it. As with any food source, use caution when consuming.

Apple-cider vinegar derives benefits from apples.

Vinegar is one product with multiple uses. It has benefits for the home (inside and out) and benefits for better health.

45


Mention this ad for

1000’s of batteries for everything in the world… For All Your Battery Needs!

or camera battery. expires 3/21

by Julie Skipper

The Countdown to Spring Break Has Begun!

Springtime and Wine JULIE SKIPPER

Z ZZ

10% off on any cell phone

We now have battery packs for Dewalt, Milwaukee & Makita cordless tools.

601.932.2250

4220 Lakeland Dr. Flowood, MS 39232 located at the intersection of Airport Rd. & Lakeland Dr. www.batteryworldonline.com

Let
Sun
Gallery
help
you
get
 ready
for
your
next
Spring
 Break
getaway!

Anders Ferrington, Kate Eidt and Mandy Ferrington (left to right) made for fun table companions at a recent wine social at Julep Restaurant and Bar.

•Open 7 days a week at both locations

Bring in this ad and get $10 off any tanning or airbrush package Fondren 601-366-5811 Ridgeland 601-957-7502 Follow us on Facebook www.sungallerytanningstudio.com

Create Your Very Own Jewelry!

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

or aiser f A fundr ritan Center od Sama The Go

MARCH TAG SALE 9ELLOW4AGSOFF "ROWN4AGSOFF 114
Millsaps
Ave.
•
Jackson,
MS
39202
•
(601)
355-7458
 Friday
9:30
-
5:30
&
Saturday
10:00
-
4:00

Olde Tyme Commissary Come Play With Us.

March 14 - 20, 2012

-Serving The Jackson Metro Area Since 1972-

46

Our Eggs Don’t Crack! Hand painted, personalized wooden eggs an Olde Tyme Commisary original since 1972

Located in Highland Village 4500 I-55 North Suite 122 • Jackson MS 39211 601.366.1849 • www.commissarytoys.com

I

find that engaging in what I refer to as “Sunday Fundays” is a great way to wind down the weekend and get ready for a new week. Maybe it’s the weather, but they tend to increase in frequency in the springtime. Luckily for me, a number of local restaurants host wine tastings on Sunday afternoons. Learning about and enjoying wine most certainly qualifies as a first-rate Sunday Funday activity. When I heard about a new series of wine tastings organized by Tasho Katsoboulas of Kats Wine and Spirits (921 E. Fortification St., 601-983-KATS, katswine.com) and Patrick Kelly of Julep Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N., 601-362-1411), I couldn’t wait to attend. The format for this series of tastings—all of which feature tasty food along with wines rated at 90 points or higher—is that of a “wine social,” rather than a formal tasting format where a sommelier talks about each glass as attendees taste them. So, it’s educational but like a party. Sign me up. On Feb. 27, the day of the event, I was happy that my companion and I ran into some friends on the way in. Knowing that we’d have interesting conversation along with good wine started things off right, but then it got even better. Like any good social event, we were greeted with a glass of bubbly (a NV Montsarra Brut, for those of you curious). Patrick is clearly a man of my own mindset. When discussing the wine, he used one of my own catchphrases: “Bubbles make everything better.” He meant it in the context of pairing sparkling wines with food, but I subscribe to it as a good theory in general. Before we began tasting, Tasho and Patrick talked to the group a bit, and Tasho passed out some educational material on the wines that included tasting exercises to try along the way, such as comparing moderately weighted to more heavily weighted wines to get a feel for body as a wine component. After that, we were free to taste the eight wines offered

at our own pace and enjoy each other’s company, going to get our next glass only when we were ready. Patrick and Tasho made their way around to the tables during the social as well, so we could ask questions one-on-one. Julep’s new event space provided a great setting for the social. Some folks sat at tables, but given the laid-back format (no wine snobbery allowed), some folks stood and mingled the whole time. Our table followed along with the tasting exercises and made notes of our favorites, so I left with a good list of some new bottles to purchase for home. You know, dear readers, that I love wine, so I’m looking forward to the next tasting in this series (unannounced as of this writing), and to a number of other opportunities this spring for wine tasting. If you’re new to exploring wine, tastings are a fun and easy way to discover what you like and what you don’t in an unintimidating environment, so find one to attend. Find information on the Kats-Julep series at katswine.com. Meanwhile, Local 463 (121-A Colony Crossing, Madison, 601-707-7684, local463. com) is teaming up with Scott Jackson of Colony Wine Market (121-B Colony Crossing, Madison, 601-898-1075, colonywinemarket. com) to host a series of tastings on Local 463’s patio on Saturday afternoons. I also look forward to tastings at BRAVO! Italian Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 244, 601-982-8111, bravobuzz. com) with Mitchell Earrey and, of course, the Sante South Wine Festival (santesouth.com) in April, which benefits the Alzheimer’s Association and features more than 120 wines. Olga’s Fine Dining (4760 Interstate 55 N., Suite D, 601-366-1366) and Sombra Mexican Kitchen (1037 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601-707-7950) have wine tastings coming up, too. So you’ve no excuse not to enjoy a tasting soon. As Alexander Fleming (the man credited with discovering penicillin) said, “Penicillin cures, but wine makes people happy.”


<RXFDQKDYH\RXUIDYRULWHHYHU\GD\ .%7!,,3)8,5.#(&%!452%3./7!6!),!",%$!),9

-ONDAY­3ATURDAY

Â&#x2026;4XFFU#BTJM#FFG Â&#x2026;%SVOLFO/PPEMFT Â&#x2026;5IBJ$BTIFX$IJDLFO Â&#x2026;#FJKJOH/PPEMFT Â&#x2026;4ISJNQ4DBMMPQ%FMJHIU Â&#x2026;1BE5IBJ$IJDLFO ONLYEACHINCLUDINGTAXANDTEA 8*/&%08/8&%/&4%":¯)BMG1SJDF#PUUMFTPG8JOFFWFSZ8FEOFTEBZ/JHIU ."35*/*5)634%":¯)BMG1SJDF4JHOBUVSF.BSUJOJTFWFSZ5IVSTEBZ/JHIU 364))063¯.POEBZ¯'SJEBZGSPN¯QN XJUIBTQFDJBMNFOVGSPNPVS(POH#BSGFBUVSJOH)BMG1SJDF4VTIJ "QQFUJ[FST  4BLF .BSUJOJTBOE.PSF

)RNS]MXEPPMRSYVPSYRKIKSRKFEVSVSRXLITEXMS

%HVW$VLDQ5HVWDXUDQW%HVWRI-DFNVRQ²

jacksonfreepress.com

0RQGD\6DWXUGD\SPÂ&#x2021;6XQGD\SP +DUERXU3W&URVVLQJÂ&#x2021;5LGJHODQG06 Â&#x2021;ZZZSDQDVLDFRPÂ&#x2021;

47


CLASSIFIEDS, PAGE 15

S

Consignment Shop We pay our clients 65% on anything we sell! Hoarding Stopper Consignment Shop 898 Centre St. Ridgeland, MS â&#x20AC;¢ 601-955-3304 www.hoardingstopper.com â&#x20AC;¢ Mon. - Sat. 10:00am - 5:00pm

Security Cameras â&#x20AC;¢ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;¢ Free Wi-Fi

1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) M-F 8am-9pm â&#x20AC;¢ Sat & Sun 7am-7pm CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

$ISCREET 4ALK

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the

6030 I-55 North- EXIT 102B (601) 977-9040

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

$INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

6ISITALADDININJACKSONCOM

7%$%,)6%2

)RQGUHQ%HOKDYHQ80&DUHD

,AKELAND$R *ACKSON -3 7HORU )D[

6ISIT OUR'R OCE 3TOREN RY EXT DOOR

2IDGE7AY 3TE% &LOWOOD -3 7HO )D[


v10n27 - Kiss Me I'm Southern! St.Paddy's In Jackson, Begorra!