Issuu on Google+


Smokey Robinson !"#$%&'(&&)&&*+, The Arena at Golden Moon

<:2999&!40=4>%.&!?=@1&A#"B4=>C Join us at midnight in the Silver Star Promenade after the show!

Call 78*9986(:8;999 or visit Ticketmaster.com for tickets.

When It Rains, It Pours! -"./#0"12&3+#45&6

Earn up to $45 in bonus point value.

March 7 - 13, 2012

We Are D@"#5&E4F@#&E@C?#.8 2

Vegas with Sweet Tea! !"#$%&'()"$&'"*+$,&-&./+0,#12&34&-&56788699:6;<:=&-&1116>"#$%$()"$$"*+$,60+? @&A")"%+>?"B,&+C &,/"&3(**(**(>>(&D#BA&+C &./+0,#1&EBA(#B*


March 7 - 13, 2012

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 26

contents COURTESY JH& H ARCHITECTS

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

8 New Digs Some elementary schools kids in west Jackson can look forward to a brand new school soon. VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

Cover photo of Brittany Henderson and Kristen Lucas by Virginia Schreiber

14

THIS ISSUE: Ranking Rep

ERIC ETHERIDGE

debi green spiritual matters and welcoming new members. Green said she loves making a difference in people’s lives and strengthening the community, whether it is through her church, WIN or the Chamber Partnership. “I believe in who we are, in our purpose and in what we are doing,” Green says. “(The chamber partnership) encompasses all aspects of what a business needs, whether it is a big business or a small mom-and-pop store. I consider this my ministry. I have a chance to make a difference in somebody’s world as it relates to their business.” Originally from Vicksburg, Green moved to Hattiesburg in her freshman year of high school, where she attended Hattiesburg High School. She went to the University of Southern Mississippi from 1973 to 1975 and was focusing on nursing before she paused her education for marriage. Green moved to Jackson in 1980 with her former husband. Green has two daughters and three grandchildren. Her daughters are Dacia Green, a registered dietician at UMMC, and Brittany Green Christian, who is completing an education degree to teach middle school and eventually college. If you would like to participate in WIN, to be a guest speaker for one of the luncheons or to get more information, email dgreen@ greaterjacksonpartnership.com or call 601948-7575. —Dustin Cardon

29 Warm and Fuzzy A new interactive art exhibits comes to Jackson, and it’s all about community participation.

42 Color Me This, Too When it comes to fashion features, we just can’t get enough. Here’s what didn’t fit up front.

jacksonfreepress.com

Debi Green’s job is to bring businesses together to improve the economy and quality of life for the greater Jackson area. Green began working with the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership in 1985 and is now the executive director of membership, sales and retention for the partnership. “I am essentially the voice of the business community (in Jackson),” Green says. “I go out and visit with new businesses that have located in the greater Jackson area and talk with them about available opportunities. I help them take opportunities to grow their business, have greater visibility in the community and make good investments.” In addition to encouraging membership in the organization, Green recently developed a new professional women’s group called WIN—Women’s Information Network. WIN kicked off in August 2011 and has since grown tremendously. The group allows women to come together to network with one another and grow personally and professionally. WIN holds luncheon meetings on the fourth Tuesday of each month for women to hear educational speakers and discuss issues of interest to women professionals, such as health, fitness, career opportunities, home and more. Green is also heavily involved with Pinelake Baptist Church, where she works as a decision counselor by counseling people on

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

4 ..............Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 10 ........................ Tech 12 ................... Editorial 12 .... Editorial Cartoon 13 ................. Opinion 20 ....... Spring Fashion 26 .................. Hitched 29 .............. Diversions 30 ........................ Film 31 .................... 8 Days 32 ............. JFP Events 33 ...................... Music 34 ......... Music Listing 36 ..................... Sports 38 ....................... Food 41 ................ Astrology 42 ......... Fly Shopping

Long-time Democratic U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson talks about what’s important to him.

3


editor’snote

Meredith W. Sullivan Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She coordinated Spring Fashion.

R.L. Nave Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. He interviewed Bennie Thompson and wrote Talks. Contact him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12.

Virginia Schreiber Staff photographer Virginia Schreiber is a recent graduate of Millsaps College. When she’s not working, she spends her time watching films of the Peter Pan genre. She took many of the photos in this issue.

Dustin Cardon Copy Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi from Brandon. An English major, he enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day. He wrote the Jacksonian.

Sharon Dunten Sharon Dunten came to Mississippi as a journalist to cover Hurricane Katrina. She visits Mississippi often to write and photograph the state and its distinctive culture, which captured her heart. She wrote the Diversions feature.

Pamela Hosey Pamela Hosey is originally from West Point, Miss. She loves to write, read James Patterson novels and spend time with her family. She wrote a Hitched article.

Briana Robinson Deputy Editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a sophomore at Millsaps College. She wrote the music story.

March 7 - 13, 2012

Adam Perry

4

Account Executive Adam Perry is a local musician who lives in Flowood where he, his wife and daughter are herded through life by two supreme beings posing as unruly house-cats. He manages JFP sales accounts.

by Ronni Mott, Managing Editor

A Woman’s Power

L

ast week, I was part of a panel that explored the question of why more women don’t run for public office, sponsored by She Should Run. The Washington, D.C.-based organization is at the vanguard of researching the current landscape (women hold only 17 percent of congressional seats, for example) and dispelling the myths of women taking leadership positions. As I listened, it occurred to me that we women relinquished our personal power. It’s not surprising given the unrelenting attack on our freedoms and rights since the height of the women’s movement in the 1970s. Pam Shaw, a consultant with the Center for Education Innovation, asked each panelist questions based on her profession. Mine involved the role of women in the press. She began by asking whether being a woman affected how I approached journalism. My answer (in a nutshell): How could it not? Being a woman is who I am. It’s not everything I am, of course, but it is one of my reality lenses. I have others: being an immigrant and being white among them. Since that evening, I’ve thought about what the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision really means to women. Regardless of whether your faith or morality allows you to embrace the decision in practice, it was still a game-changing victory for women in America. Ultimately, the decision provided a legal basis for claiming our bodies as our own. We are not the property of the government, or our husbands, lovers, or even that of our children. The decision also highlights that our sexuality is part of who we are. We can’t disconnect from it, and we shouldn’t. One of the weirder effects of the women’s movement is that many of us tried to be men. Women popped up everywhere wearing suits and ties, albeit more fashionable versions. We padded our shoulders to within an inch of our ears to disguise our lack of upper-body strength. We railed against women’s roles of wifedom and motherhood, demanding that men share in them equally. We mistakenly thought that by growing virtual balls, we would magically open the doors to men’s back rooms and stinky locker rooms. We thought becoming men would be easy. Ultimately, of course, women can no more be men than cats can be fishes or trees can be puppies. Denying our fundamental essence never works for long. But thwarted in our giddy ideological pendulum swing, many of us simply went back to sleep. We failed to organize strongly to withstand the onslaught of resistance. We didn’t speak up enough about the powerful economic and religious forces aligned to roll back the freedoms we had scratched and bled to win. We failed to tell our daughters that freedom requires constantly struggling with those who believe civil rights is a zero-sum game. Forty years later, conservatives are shoving women’s backs to the wall. Again. We’re not the only group under attack, but being

women—regardless of ethnicity—cuts across all those other designations. Together, we are the majority. And that’s powerful. 2012 is a much different world than 1973. This is a world where our access to information and our ability to network (aka organize) is, for most, ubiquitous. In this world, others hear our voices instantaneously and globally. And we don’t require a megaphone, just an Internet connection. I’m hardly a Luddite, but it’s taken me a while to understand the power of social media. Even this late bloomer can’t deny its power to shake up the status quo and unite people of like persuasions. My small Internet universe contains politicians, artists, teachers, mothers, fathers, and people of all races and sexual orientation. It contains believers of diverse theologies and experts in numerous disciplines. Daily, everything from silly animal tricks and bumper-sticker opining to uplifting quotes bombard me. But my network also gives me access to serious journalistic investigations and research into real issues that affect my life. Most important, though, is social media ability to bring injustices and lies to light and right wrongs. Women should fiercely embrace that power. The playing field may never be level, but we can do our damndest to plow under the highest hills and fill in the lowest informational swamps. The danger is that we’ll end up doing a lot of ineffectual navel gazing. Machiavelli said that we should keep our friends close and our enemies closer. It’s good advice. We must be ever vigilant to the subtleties of sexism (and the overt attacks from people like Rush Limbaugh), becoming as finely tuned to it as some are to that of racism. And we can’t hesitate to call it out at every opportunity.

That brings me back to women reclaiming their power. Some people—mostly white men by my tally—find the power every woman inherits as her birthright to be threatening. Primarily, the one power women have that men don’t is the ability to bring life into the world. Without the power, some seek to control it. From burning witches and outlawing midwives, they would have us believe that they can’t leave womanhood in our feminine, dainty hands. But as any woman who has birthed a baby knows, our hands are far from delicate. Still, we’ve allowed the shouts of our persecutors to wear us down, and we’ve developed some bad habits. We obfuscate and soften our words; we don’t speak up for fear of offending; we don’t arm ourselves with facts. Instead of leading, we’re conciliatory. We speak in soft and passive language and wonder why no one’s listening. Manifesting our power is also every woman’s birthright, as it is for every man. Women are more than half the population of the world; yet we limit ourselves because we believe we can’t win. First, it’s not true. A woman is just as likely as a man to win an election, for example. Second, winning isn’t always a worthy goal. Much of our strength comes from our bias for cooperation and compassion. Most women would rather be part of an effort for greater good than assume leadership. That’s OK. Women are most effective when we cooperate and share the work. What is damaging—to our sisters and to our world—is to refrain from enjoining the work at all. Fighting for our rights isn’t something we can do once, then sit back and enjoy. Not if we expect to keep them, not if we want to give our daughters (and sons) a better world.


Saturday, March 17th, 2012

$5 at the door – Indoor & Outdoor shenanigans RAIN OR SHINE! Professional stage, lighting, and sound

Irish Food, Irish Beer, Irish Fun!

Legacy (Traditional Irish): 2p-4:30p | Otis Lotus (Grateful Dead Tribute): 5p-7:30p Gary Burnside (Hill Country Blues): 8:00p-10:30p 901 E. Fortification Street | 601-948-0055 | www.fenianspub.com

DON’T Dead Ir is

MISS

St. at’s Pre-Par ty (Celtic R w i th P r a t t y ock) Fr iday, Ma

r ch 9 t h •

9p-12a

jacksonfreepress.com

h Blues T h u r s d ay , M a r ch 8 th • 8 p - 1 1p P

5


news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, March 1 The Mississippi Supreme Court sets March execution dates for two more death row inmates, Larry Matthew Puckett and William Gerald Mitchell. â&#x20AC;Ś Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio claims that President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth certificate is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;computer-generated forgery.â&#x20AC;? Friday, March 2 Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos, one of the downtown Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest restaurants, celebrates its grand opening. â&#x20AC;Ś A United Nations panel says both forces loyal to former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and opposition fighters committed war crimes during a conflict in Libya last year. Saturday, March 3 High-school basketball teams face off in championship games at the Mississippi Coliseum. â&#x20AC;Ś About 100 tornadoes touch down in at least 10 states Friday and Saturday, killing at least 37 people. Sunday, March 4 A judge allows Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jefferson County, where Birmingham is located, to move forward with bankruptcy. The county borrowed more than $4 billion for its sewer system. â&#x20AC;Ś U.S. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor endorses Mitt Romney for the Republican presidential nomination.

March 7 - 13, 2012

Monday, March 5 The Jackson Redevelopment Authority approves a non-binding memorandum of understanding to loan $10.2 million to Farish Street developers. â&#x20AC;Ś The Apple App Store reaches 25 billion downloads.

6

Tuesday, March 6 City officials announce plans for the first Southern Crossroads Music and Tamale Festival in August. â&#x20AC;Ś Ten states hold primary elections. This â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super Tuesday,â&#x20AC;? 419 delegates are up for grabs. Presidential candidates need 1,144 delegates to secure their partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nomination. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

SOURCE: U.S. DIPLOMATIC MISSION TO GERMANY

Cooper-Stokes Making Waves

by Jacob Fuller

N

ewly minted Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes walked into the City Council chambers at City Hall on Friday ready to make changes. The first thing she noticed was that council membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chairs had been rearranged since her last visit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s counter-clockwise. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sitting in three. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sitting counter-clockwise. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been clockwise for years,â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes said of the seats, each marked with a name plaque. From left to right, the order was Ward 7, 6, 4, 5, 2 and 1, with an empty spot for Ward 3 between Councilman Tony Yarber of Ward 6 and Ward 4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Frank Bluntson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This means, to me, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re turning back the clock,â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any part in this.â&#x20AC;? Even before Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; swearingin, she was causing waves reminiscent of the countless her husband, Kenneth Stokes, sent through City Hall during his 22 years as Ward 3 Councilman. A fiery divide between Cooper-Stokes and Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell has become a hot debate. Whitwell told reporters the day before the Feb. 28 Ward 3 runoff election that he had heard of voter intimidation at some of the precincts during the special election Feb. 14. His comment caused an exchange between Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; husband (now a Hinds County supervisor) and Whitwell in The Clarion-Ledger.

JACOB FULLER

Wednesday, Feb. 29 Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood and state Auditor Stacey Pickering sue Hinds County District 1 Supervisor Robert Graham. The suit alleges that Graham violated the law by submitting time sheets that show he worked for the city during the time he was running training classes for his company. â&#x20AC;Ś Davy Jones, former member of The Monkees, dies of a heart attack at age 66.

The Anti-Masonic party held the first presidential primary convention in Baltimore, Md., in 1831. The Anti-Masons were also the first third-party group and supposedly invented party platforms.

Developer Ted Duckworth is moving forward with plans for a new development. p9

Hinds County Judge Houston Patton administers the oath of office to Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes. Her husband, Hinds County Supervisor Kenneth Stokes, holds the Bible.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I was trying to intimidate him, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d come knock the (expletive) out of him,â&#x20AC;? Kenneth Stokes told reporters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to make idle threats. A threat would be me putting my foot up his (expletive). That would be a threat.â&#x20AC;? Whitwell said there is no place for comments like that from public officials. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His comments are shameful,â&#x20AC;? Whitwell told the Jackson Free Press Friday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are an indicator of why we have a drying up pop-

ulation in this city. We need people who want to govern to make Jackson a better city.â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; swearing-in speech brought Whitwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comments about the election back to the forefront. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the unprecedented, unlawful and unrepentant interference to the runoff election process by a member of the Jackson City Council representing Ward 1 into the elecWAVES, see page 7

Spring into Style ¹)FYOUWERETOASKPEOPLEWHAT)´VEDONE TO BE CONSIDERED ANGRY THEY COULDN´T TELL YOU ) HUNT ) ½SH ) EAT AT 7AFžE (OUSE 9OUKNOWWHAT)´MSAYING"ECAUSE)DON´T ½TTHEMOLDOFWHATTHESYSTEMWANTSOFA PERSON WHYDOESTHATMAKEMEANGRY² ²0LVVLVVLSSL'HPRFUDWLF865HS%HQQLH 7KRPSVRQUHVSRQGLQJWRFKDUJHVWKDWKHLV DQDQJU\PDQ

¹) KNOW WHAT PUTTING EMBRYOS BEFORE THE LIVESOFWOMENDOESTOWOMEN3URGERY SAVEDMYLIFESOTHAT)COULDGOONANDBEA PARENTTOTHESECHILDREN² ²/DXULH 5REHUWV VSHDNLQJ DW DQ DQWL SHUVRQKRRG SUHVV FRQIHUHQFH DW WKH &DSLWRO 5REHUWV VDLG ZKHQ VKH ZDV \RXQJHU VKH ZDV KDYLQJ D GDQJHURXV PLVFDUULDJH DQG ZDQWHG DQ DERUWLRQ EXW D &DWKROLF KRVSLWDO UHIXVHG WR RSHUDWH EHFDXVH GRFWRUV FRXOG KHDU D IDLQW KHDUWEHDW6KHLVWKHPRWKHURIVHYHQFKLOGUHQ

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to bring your spring wardrobe from where ever itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been hibernating, Jacksonians! When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to add a few items to bring your look up to date, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a handy list for you.

IN

OUT

â&#x20AC;˘ Patterned nails â&#x20AC;˘ Pencil skirts

â&#x20AC;˘ UGGs

â&#x20AC;˘ Colorful socks

â&#x20AC;˘ Ed Hardy

â&#x20AC;˘ Man bags

â&#x20AC;˘ Mom and dad jeans

â&#x20AC;˘ Accessories for men

â&#x20AC;˘ The dirty or grunge look

â&#x20AC;˘ Statement necklaces

â&#x20AC;˘ Your boyfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jeans

â&#x20AC;˘ Boyfriend jeans

â&#x20AC;˘ Anything with rhinestones

â&#x20AC;˘ Bold colors

â&#x20AC;˘ Being too matchy

â&#x20AC;˘ Denim shirts

â&#x20AC;˘ Low-cut jeans

â&#x20AC;˘ Buttoning the top button of your shirt/blouse

â&#x20AC;˘ Capris

â&#x20AC;˘ Crocs


talk

news, culture & irreverence

WAVES, from page 6

Cooper-Stokes said she plans to continue the role her husband played in the City Council. She said he taught her to be accessible, open and honest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have learned a lot from being beside my husband all these years,â&#x20AC;? she said. Several of the councilwomanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supporters spoke after her swearing-in. All used the platform to praise Cooper-Stokes, who has never held public office. Several also took the time to speak less-than favorably about Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. and the City Council. Gilbert Sturgis, former at-large member of the Hinds County Planning Board and a community activist, said the mayor, who was in Washington, D.C., for a meeting at the White House, needs to stop bringing items to the council at the 11th hour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mayor is not here,â&#x20AC;? Sturgis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mayor does not work with the City Council, and (Cooper-Stokes) knows that. She knows what she has to do. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to continue to handle this mayor until he decides that the buck stops with this City Council.â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes told reporters at City Hall on Friday that children will be her first priority as councilwoman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to work closely with the schools in Ward 3,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will begin to start to visit the schools and talk with the administrations to see how the City Council, and Ward 3 in particular, can help to keep our children in schools every day.â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes concluded her speech by stating her support for economic development, calling her ward â&#x20AC;&#x153;greatly advanced compared to other wards.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ward 3 is officially open for business,â&#x20AC;? she said. The councilwoman began her term Monday. The Hinds County Circuit Court could overturn the Feb. 28 election based on Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s election appeal, however. In that case, Ward 3 will have to hold a third election. Until then, Cooper-Stokes is moving forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The race in Ward 3 will be run by relay, with God the Father in the first leg, Jesus Christ in the second leg, the Holy Spirit in the third leg, with LaRita Cooper-Stokes running in their footsteps,â&#x20AC;? she said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Save Up to 75% on over 5,000 Medications Call MedSavings Express today to learn how you can save on your medication. -Mention this ad for FREE shipping.-

Locally Owned & Operated No Fees No Co-Pays

T

RFKDQQHO,YDQ'UDJRWKH,WDOLDQ6WDOOLRQÂśV 6RYLHWQHPHVLVLQ5RFN\,9,IDELOOGLHGWKLV ZHHNLWGLHG  7XHVGD\ZDVWKHGHDGOLQHIRUELOOVWRPDNH LWRXWRIFRPPLWWHHLQWKHFKDPEHUVZKHUHWKH\ RULJLQDWHGDQGRQWRWKHFDOHQGDUIRUĂ&#x20AC;RRUGHEDWH  2Q0RQGD\MXVWEHIRUHWKHGURSGHDGGDWH PRUHWKDQSLHFHVRIOHJLVODWLRQĂ&#x20AC;RDWHG DURXQGWKHYDULRXV+RXVHDQG6HQDWHFRPPLW WHHVJLYLQJODZPDNHUVRQHGD\WRVRUWWKURXJK WKHPDOO  6RKRZGLGWKH\GR"$WSUHVVWLPHWKH +RXVHFDOHQGDUKDGVZHOOHGWRLWHPVFRP SDUHGWRLQWKH6HQDWH  0DQ\RIWKHELOOVOLNHO\WRVSDUNGHEDWH PDGHLWWKURXJKORQJEHIRUHWKHGHDGOLQH

LQFOXGLQJ0LVVLVVLSSLœVYHUVLRQRI$UL]RQDDQG $ODEDPDœVLPPLJUDWLRQODZV+%%URRNKDYHQ 5HSXEOLFDQ5HS%HFN\&XUULHLQWURGXFHGWKHELOO ZKLFKSDVVHGWKH+RXVH-XGLFLDU\%&RPPLWWHH WKHZHHNEHIRUHDQGVDLOHGWKURXJKWKH(GXFD WLRQ&RPPLWWHHODWHODVWZHHN  )ROORZLQJD¿HU\SUHVHQWDWLRQIURP:DVK LQJWRQ'&EDVHG%ODFN$OOLDQFHIRU(GXFDWLRQ 2SWLRQVWKH+RXVH(GXFDWLRQ&RPPLWWHHDJUHHG WRPRYHWKHFKDUWHUVFKRROVELOODORQJ7KH6HQDWH SUHYLRXVO\YRWHGRQWKHELOO  6RIDU*RY3KLO%U\DQWKDVVLJQHGMXVWRQHELOO WKDWDOORZVWKH+DQFRFN&RXQW\7RXULVP'HYHORS PHQW%XUHDXWRFROOHFWWRXULVPUHODWHGWD[HV ²5/1DYH  6HHPRUHOHJLVODWLYHQHZVDWZZZMISPV

Strength

Our Price

Celebrex

200mg

$158.92

Lipitor

40mg

$189.98

Singulair

10mg

$157.98

Benicar

40mg

$134.54

Plavix

75mg

$143.41

24tabs

$155.28

Viagra

No Deductibles

The Legislature: Week 9

Drug

3 month supply Generics but Brands are available!

Use Your Prescription ONLY SAVINGS

Call MedSavings Express TODAY! 601-853-6070 Fax: 601-853-6077 â&#x20AC;˘ www.medsavingsexpress.com 717 Rice Road, Suite A, Ridgeland, MS 39157

jacksonfreepress.com

tion affairs of Ward 3, LaRita Cooper-Stokes stands before you today as the Councilwoman of Ward 3,â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes told the crowd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She got sworn in. She needs to focus on governing,â&#x20AC;? Whitwell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I look forward to working with her on the City Council.â&#x20AC;? The councilman defended his earlier statements, saying there was nothing unlawful about them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never accused any candidate of wrongdoing,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a duty, as do all elected officials, to make sure our election commission (is) properly staffed and properly trained. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well documented that I had problems in my election, and we had irregularities in those (Ward 3 elections).â&#x20AC;? Cooper-Stokes claims a reporter told her about Whitwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement on Feb. 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was solely unfounded, and Whitwell is a liar. And he has refused to apologize,â&#x20AC;? she said. Whitwell is not the only one claiming foul play at the Ward 3 polls. Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opponent in the runoff election, Joyce Jackson, filed an official election challenge with the Circuit Court March 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to contest the entire election because it was too much fraud,â&#x20AC;? Jackson told the JFP earlier. She declined to comment further last Friday, saying only that her legal counsel advised her not to speak with the media before the court hearing. Jackson told the JFP Tuesday that her lawyer, John Reeves, had until Monday evening to file the appeal, but that to her knowledge, a court date had not been set. Cooper-Stokes defeated Jackson by 156 votes, double the 78 votes that the Hinds County website reported in its unofficial results on election night. While Jackson is claiming poll fraud in court, Kenneth Stokes said to supporters at his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swearing-in that he made sure the votes werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tampered with after the election. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We rode around by the courthouse, trying to make sure they (were) not going to mess with that (ballot) box. And the door was open,â&#x20AC;? Stokes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we tried to shut the door, and we talked with the judge. We said: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Judge, this courthouse door is open. Would you come lock it?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; This is true. And we locked that door. We ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taking no chances.â&#x20AC;?

7


Mediterranean Fish & Grill presents

Eddie Cotton Friday & Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ 9:00pm

Free

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms medfishgrill.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601--956-0082

NOW OPEN â&#x20AC;˘ Two for One Margaritas on Wednesdays â&#x20AC;˘ Live Music Fridays â&#x20AC;˘ Full Bar 318 South State Street | Jackson, MS www.jacostacos.com

Now Offering

LIVE MUSIC

New School Planned for West Jackson

P

lans for a new elementary school in west Jackson are nearing completion. The new school, which will be built at 1520 W. Capitol St., will replace Barr and Poindexter elementary schools. JH&H Architects, the firm that is designing the school, is planning a two-story building with 18 classrooms, a representative from the firm said at a January school board meeting. The plans also include computer labs, a media center with a reading room, playgrounds and art rooms. Pre-kindergarten through first-grade students will have classes on the ground floor, while second through fifth graders will have classes upstairs. Because the property has a steep slope down from the street, the architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plan includes two retaining walls to even out the land, one in front of the school and one at the back. Only the top floor of the school will be visible from the street. The new school will be built in the same area where Barr and Poindexter are now located, next to the Boys and Girls Club, and will serve about 400 students. The school will be named for Jessie Bryant Mosley, who helped save the historic Smith Robertson School from being torn down, and Edwin Mullen, a former teacher and Jackson Public Schools principal. The JPS board approved naming the new school in honor of Mosley and Mullen at a February meeting. In addition to serving as the first director of the Smith Robertson Museum,

Friday and Saturday Nights

Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

March 7 - 13, 2011

Hinds County has agreed to change the way Henley-Young Juvenile Justice Center treats children housed at the facility.

8

Street Date: 3/14/12 Ad Deadline: 3/8/12

Plans for a new school on West Capitol Street call for large windows to let in natural light.

Mosley established a child-care center near Poindexter and Barr elementary schools. She also organized the National Council of Negro Women Inc. for Mississippi. She died in 2003 at age 99. Mullen was born in Grenada and served in the Army during World War II and the Korean War. He earned his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from Jackson State University and his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from the University of Michigan. He and his wife, Daisy, were both teachers. After retirement, he worked part time as coordinator of the parent center at Van Winkle Elementary School. He died last year at the age of 86. After his death, JPS issued a resolution mourning Mullenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passing.

2EFORMS#OMINGTO(ENLEY 9OUNG FILE ART

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011

by Elizabeth Waibel

COURTESY JH&H ARCHITECTS

with King Edward Sunday â&#x20AC;˘ 6:00pm Open Mic Night Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 8:30pm -Live Music Every WednesdayFish Special $10.99 with two sides M-F until 6:30

educationtalk

C

KLOGUHQHQWHULQJ+HQOH\<RXQJ-XYHQLOH-XVWLFH &HQWHUZLOOQRZJHWDPHQWDOKHDOWKHYDOXDWLRQ DQGFRXQVHOLQJDWWKHEHJLQQLQJRIWKHLUVWD\D VLJQLÂżFDQWFKDQJHIURPUHFHQWSUDFWLFHV<RXWK LQFDUFHUDWHGDWWKH+LQGV&RXQW\GHWHQWLRQIDFLOLW\ZLOO DOVRKDYHEHWWHUUHKDELOLWDWLRQRSWLRQVLQSXWIURPIDPLO\ DQGDGYRFDWHVDQGPRUHWLPHRXWVLGHWKHLUFHOOV  7KHVHFKDQJHVDUHVRPHRIWKHKLJKOLJKWVRIDQ DPLFDEOHVHWWOHPHQWEHWZHHQ+LQGV&RXQW\DQGWKH 6RXWKHUQ3RYHUW\/DZ&HQWHU/DVWVXPPHUWKH63/& DQGWKHDGYRFDF\JURXS'LVDELOLW\5LJKWV0LVVLVVLSSL VXHGWKHFRXQW\RYHUWKHWUHDWPHQWRI\RXWKDWWKH FHQWHU7KDW-XQHODZVXLWQRWHGWKDW\RXWKZLWK

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mullen was a valued and treasured part of the Jackson Public School District Family, and his dedication, commitment and passion to teaching our children will undoubtedly leave a void,â&#x20AC;? the resolution states. At the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s January meeting, board member Timothy Collins said it could help the area to have a brand new school built in the neighborhood. Otha Burton, who is also on the school board, said he thought that the project was one of the most exciting developments going on in west Jackson right now. After the design for the school is finalized, the board will put out a request for bids for the construction of the project. Comment at www.jfp.com.

E\9DOHULH:HOOV

PHQWDOKHDOWKLVVXHVZHUHGHQLHGYLVLWVIURPDGYRFDWHV DQGODFNHGFRXQVHOLQJRUDVVHVVPHQWVIURPPHGLFDOSUR IHVVLRQDOV6HYHUDOFKLOGUHQDWWHPSWHGVXLFLGHRUZHUH GHQLHGPHGLFDODWWHQWLRQWKHVXLWFODLPHG,QDGGLWLRQLW FODLPHGWKDW+HQOH\<RXQJRI¿FLDOVNHSWNLGVLQDEXVLYH XQVDQLWDU\DQGXQVDIHFRQGLWLRQVLVRODWHGFKLOGUHQLQ FHOOVIRUWRKRXUVDGD\GHQLHGWKHPHGXFDWLRQDO DQGFRXQVHOLQJVHUYLFHVDQGYHUEDOO\DEXVHGGHWDLQHHV  &KLOGUHQ¶VDGYRFDWHVZRUNHGIRUPRQWKVZLWK +LQGV&RXQW\RI¿FLDOVWRDJUHHRQDSODQWRLPSURYH FRQGLWLRQVDW+HQOH\<RXQJDIDFLOLW\GHVLJQHGWR KRXVHDERXWFKLOGUHQZKRKDYHEURNHQWKHODZ 0LVVLVVLSSLKDVFRXQW\RZQHGMXYHQLOHGHWHQWLRQ FHQWHUV+HQOH\<RXQJLVWKHODUJHVW.LGVDJHV ZKRFRPPLWPLQRUFULPHV²GUXJVRUWUXDQF\²JHW ORFNHGXSDW+HQOH\<RXQJ  &RUULH&RFNUHOODQ63/&DWWRUQH\ZRUNLQJRQWKHFDVH VDLGVKHZDVSOHDVHGZLWKWKHVHWWOHPHQW³%RWKSDUWLHV ZRUNHGKDUG´VKHVDLG³,W¶VYHU\FRPSUHKHQVLYH´  :KLOHWKHFRXQW\GHQLHGWKHODZVXLW¶VFODLPVERWK SDUWLHVDJUHHGRQVHYHUDOSRLQWVWRLPSURYHFRQGLWLRQVDW WKHFHQWHU6RPHRIWKHFKDQJHVZLOOKDSSHQULJKWDZD\ ZKLOHRWKHUVDUHVFKHGXOHGIRUWRGD\VIURPQRZ  7KHSDJHVHWWOHPHQWLQFOXGHVUHPHGLHV³QHFHV VDU\WRFRUUHFWDQRQJRLQJYLRODWLRQRIDIHGHUDOULJKW´ :LWKLQDQKRXURIHQWHULQJWKHIDFLOLW\\RXWKZLOOJHW DKHDOWKVFUHHQLQJWKDWZLOOLQFOXGHDSV\FKRORJLFDO HYDOXDWLRQ7KHIDFLOLW\ZLOOGHYHORSDSROLF\DERXWZKHQ DQGKRZJXDUGVVWULSVHDUFKFKLOGUHQ)RUHYHU\HLJKW FKLOGUHQRQHVWDIIPHPEHUZLOOEHRQVLWHGXULQJWKHGD\

$WQLJKWWKHUDWLRZLOOEHRQHVWDIIPHPEHUIRUHYHU\ LQPDWHV6WDIIFDQœ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œVFRPSOLDQFHZLWKWKHVHWWOH PHQW'L[RQLVH[HFXWLYHGLUHFWRURIDVLPLODUIDFLOLW\ LQ0LFKLJDQWKH:D\QH&RXQW\&KLOGUHQDQG)DPLO\ 6HUYLFHV-XYHQLOH'HWHQWLRQ)DFLOLW\  &U\VWDO0DUWLQ+LQGV&RXQW\%RDUGRI6XSHUYLVRUV DWWRUQH\ZDVQRWDYDLODEOHIRUFRPPHQWIRUWKLVVWRU\  :KLOHWKH63/&VXFFHHGHGLQJHWWLQJWKHFRXQW\WR DJUHHWRPDQ\UHIRUPV&RFNUHOOVDLGPRUHFRXOGEH GRQHIRUWKHFKLOGUHQGHWDLQHGDW+HQOH\<RXQJ  ³2XUJRDOLVWKDWWKHFRXQW\ZRXOGORRNDWDOWHUQD WLYHVWRGHWHQWLRQFHQWHUV´VKHVDLGDQGPHQWLRQHGGD\ WUHDWPHQWDQGPHQWRULQJSURJUDPVDVWZRH[DPSOHV %RWKZRXOGDOORZDFKLOGWRVWD\LQKLVRUKHUFRPPXQLW\ 7KHVHW\SHVRISURJUDPVZRXOGDOVREHPRUHFRVWHIIHF WLYHIRUWKHFRXQW\&RFNUHOOVDLG³,WFRVWVDORWRIPRQH\ WRRSHUDWHDGHWHQWLRQIDFLOLW\´  &RPPHQWDWZZZMISPV


developmenttalk

5A44 FX5X

by Jacob Fuller

Developers plan to build The District at Eastover at the former location of the Mississippi School for the Blind off Interstate 55 after numerous delays.

A

deal to redevelop the old Mississippi School for the Blind site is finally coming to fruition. The District Land Development Company, through its manager Duckworth Realty, finalized a deal Feb. 24 with the State Department of Finance and Administration to purchase the property off Interstate 55 in north Jackson for $3.3 million. The deal has been in the works since 2006. It required state legislators to pass a bill in 2010 to allow Mississippi to sell the property. “That (bill) got changed three different times. It got vetoed by the governor one time,” said Ted Duckworth, president and CEO of Duckworth Realty. The bill that finally passed, House Bill 637, gave the state Department of Finance and Administration the rights to sell the property. The District Land Development Company’s payment for the land will go to the Mississippi School for the Blind, now located across Eastover Drive from its former location. On Monday, Duckworth said he was excited to finally purchase the property. The plans for The District at Eastover, at the corner of the Interstate 55 North Frontage Road and Eastover Drive, include 500,000 square feet of retail, hotel, restaurant, office and residential space, Duckworth said. The company will

build the project in phases, with construction of the first phase beginning in fall of this year. “We think it’s a four-to-seven-year buildout,” Duckworth said. “We think the first building will be delivered sometime in the summer of 2014.” Duckworth expects the completed District at Eastover to generate about 600 jobs and, potentially, about $1.9 million in annual revenue to the city and $4.9 million to the state. However, the biggest benefit for Jackson will come from retaining growth in the city, Duckworth said. Kevin J. Upchurch, executive director of the Department of Finance and Administration, agrees. “We believe that this project will spark tremendous economic development opportunities and growth for Jackson and Mississippi,” he said in a statement. “It is going to generate property taxes and sales taxes, but even bigger than that is really just the ability to be able to maintain some growth in the marketplace,” Duckworth said. “There’s been so much growth (outside Jackson). ... Had there been a site in the city, a lot of those things wouldn’t have occurred.” The District at Eastover has an advantage over suburban development, because the population is already close by. During the day, three times as many people live and work

within a five-minute drive of the location than in Ridgeland, Duckworth said. And the development will help keep the population in Jackson and give them a nearby place to go. Unlike some of the mixed-used developments in the suburbs, which provide little more to look at than concrete, brick and mortar, Duckworth said The District will keep many of the existing trees as part of green spaces for residents and visitors. “We just want to have that feel that this is a place where you want to go hang out,” Duckworth said. Chris Mims, director of communications for Jackson Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., said the city has been communicating with Duckworth Realty about the project for years. “Ted Duckworth is really a pioneer in mixed-used development here in the city of Jackson,” Mims said. “He worked on the Electric Building. It was an office building that he transformed into a mixed-used development that has apartments in the upper floors and now has a couple of restaurants located there.” Duckworth said he doesn’t expect any costs to the city for infrastructure changes, because the Interstate 55 Frontage Road and Eastover Drive provide plenty of street access to the property, and the property already has sufficient water and sewage access. While interest in the project has been stirring for years, Duckworth said that until it purchased the land, The District Land Development Company had nothing physical to offer potential partners. As such, it has yet to finalize building contractors, or hotel, restaurant, office and retail partnerships. The School for the Blind will use part of the sum paid for the land, $1.2 million, to build a storage and maintenance building on its current campus, located across Eastover Drive from its former campus, as well as a new residence for the school’s superintendent, Rosie L.T. Pridgen. The remainder of the $3.3 million will go into the School for the Blind Trust Fund. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Voted Best Veggie Burger -Best of Jackson 2010-2012-

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Drop In For Our

Early Bird Special M-Th from 5-7

2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Best Fried Chicken In Town & Best Fried Chicken in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY DUCKWORTH REALTY

Duckworth Finalizes Bid for Eastover ‘District’

9


Revealing Heaven On Earth 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS

on, Not the uti P ol

to Par

eP robl em

m ble ro

Part of th eS

601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

March 7 - 13, 2012

ft h he tt Solution, No

10

E\6DP+DOO

L

et’s take a little diversion from talking about hardware, software and tech companies this week. All the recent discussion about charter schools and virtual charter schools got me thinking about the role technology does and should play in education of our children. This is not a column about charter schools and whether or not they are the answer to what ails our public schools. Instead, it’s more to answer a question that has been rattling around in my ol’ noggin: Why has technology not been better used in our public schools? When you consider what technology has done in the business world over the last 50 years—heck, over the past 20 years— you have to wonder why our schools have not made the same type of advancements. The business world has become more efficient, and smaller businesses have been able to scale their operations faster. The ability to use talent from around the world in one operation is now commonplace thanks to email and Skype. Large file boxes and overstuffed satchels are no longer required to carry just about every file you need for a project. And meetings and presentations are now far more interactive and engaging than they once were. (OK, so most meetings are still boring and useless.) But our public schools? They are still using overhead projectors and writing on transparencies. They still consume reams and reams of paper every week. Students are still lugging heavy textbooks and having to make multiple trips to their lockers between classes. Why? Is it the failing of the schools? No. Not at all. It’s simply the result of the free market system. Businesses invest in technology at a much faster rate because it either saves them money or makes them more money. Either way, it affects the bottom line. For public schools, investment in technology costs money, and in Mississippi we’ve resisted paying any more money into our schools than absolutely necessary.

Magnolia Data Solutions Environmental Services and Information Destruction Specialists

Do you, or your business, have confidential information that needs to be destroyed? Magnolia Data Solutions offers Hard-Drive shredding to make sure your business stays compliant with all information regulations. For more information on how we can help your business,

please call 601-919-0062

EPA, HIPA, GLBA & FACTA Compliant 160 Fairbanks St. • Jackson, Ms 39202 • www.MagnoliaDataSolutions.com

Thankfully, some people and organizations are trying to do something about this. In Mississippi, we have the Barksdale Institute, which not only pushes education but also technological advancement. Then there are tech giants Bill Gates and the late Steve Jobs. Gates runs a foundation that, in addition to countless other humanitarian endeavors, seeks to place technology in schools.

For all of the talk about “running government as a business,” we have failed to do something very basic with the public schools. We have failed to look at how we can use technology to make education more efficient, more profitable and more successful. Mississippi needs to invest in a program to extend high-speed mobile and wireless Internet access throughout every part of our state. This is the first step. We are better off than some critics say, but we are nowhere near well off enough to do what we need to do for our schools. The state also needs to look now at how we can put iPads and laptops into the hands of every student and teacher. This is a Tools like the SmartBoard Interactive Whiteboard make education fun. hefty investment, but the payoffs Jobs was a champion of education, and are huge. It provides a tremendous advanpart of his vision for Apple—and especially tage for teachers to be able to interact with the iPad—was the role they could play in their students in the classroom setting. (I’m education. Thus, his last, greatest achieve- not advocating that these machines necesment may have been this year’s earlier an- sarily go home. Some schools with similar nouncement about textbooks coming to pilot programs in other states and Canada the iPad. Not only will they be dynamic, keep the machines in-house.) these textbooks will cost a fraction of what To do this, we need to partner with their paper-product counterparts cost. private benefactors who will help achieve Apple, Microsoft, Dell, HP, Google this goal. It can’t be done overnight, and it and other tech companies also offer steep can’t be done all at once. But by partnering discounts and donate hardware to schools with private industries, we can move forand educators. ward faster. Sadly, this is not enough. For all that Some public schools have done very Barksdale, Gates, Jobs and others have well with technology, but the state cannot done, it is still not enough. Until the state boast a universal approach to using technolof Mississippi decides it is time to invest ogy to make major changes at the classroom heavily into upgrading the technological level. Teachers want this change. Students infrastructure of our public schools, then would welcome this change. And Missiswe will continue to lag behind. sippi would benefit from this change.

COURTESY LFT

8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table

Hacking Education


11

jacksonfreepress.com


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Stop the City Council Game-Playing

H

ere we go again. When the Jackson Free Press started 10 years ago, the City Council members from Ward 1 (Ben Allen) and Ward 3 (Kenneth Stokes) were constantly at each other’s throats. It wasn’t an intellectual disagreement with occasional laughs; they made the city look like a laughing stock with their constant insults of each other. Now both men are gone—but are replaced by surrogates, so to speak. The Ward 1 councilman is now Quentin Whitwell, a lobbyist Allen supported in his bid for the seat. And Stokes’ wife, LaRita Cooper-Stokes, has taken his place. Many people had feared that Cooper-Stokes would be a repeat of her husband—not showing up for work sessions, mouthing off about fellow council members, and spending valuable council time renaming bridges and roads (not a bad thing, as long as other city work is getting done as well). We did not endorse her—she wouldn’t even return calls for her campaign Q&A—but we did hope that she might show up and prove herself to be the better half of the duo. Instead, she immediately brought drama to council, complaining about the chair placement on her first day (see Jacob Fuller’s report, pp. 6-7). And as if it’s 2002 all over again, the Ward 1 councilman has jumped out front as another Stokes’ most vocal (and insulting) critic. In her first week, the two have traded embarrassing barbs—and even probably given some residents in each ward more reasons to feel divided from the people in the other one. This isn’t helpful, and we cannot afford such petty games in Jackson. It’s one thing to disagree, and another to sound like it’s a scuffle at recess. And while we agree with some of Whitwell’s concerns—like that of any elected official, Stokes should actually attend the work sessions—it’s not like he doesn’t have skeletons in his own closet. As a lobbyist, Whitwell has supported payday lenders in their efforts to keep making massive money off many of our poorest communities, such as parts of Councilwoman Cooper-Stokes’ ward. That is, it’s not like Whitwell needs to be throwing stones from his own glass house, even if it is a local sport for people in his ward to belittle a Stokes. Enough already. We need an adult City Council going forward—which includes members who come to all the meetings and take the process seriously. We urge Cooper-Stokes to show us a new level of representation for Ward 3 and urge Whitwell to re-examine his friendly stance beliefs toward enterprises that bring serious problems that plague Cooper-Stokes’ district.

YOUR TURN

Movement for Education

T

March 7 - 13, 2012

he link from education to the economy, health and crime is easy to see, and Blueprint Mississippi 2011 makes this compelling case with fresh data. As a teacher at one of Jackson’s public high schools, I work mostly with lowincome students, and I believe education is the best way to intercept the cycle of poverty. Yet even innovative policy solutions will only make incremental change without the grassroots support of the communities they seek to serve. By looking for answers in education, we are counting on students to lift our communities and our economy. In the face of economic and social obstacles, this is a hefty burden for an adolescent to carry. If they are to succeed, students need support and guidance from day one. The Jackson Free Press pointed out that children need preparation even before kindergarten. This should include not just a large vocabulary, but also behavioral, emotional and moral instruction. Students like mine may not get such instruction at home. It truly takes a village. Regardless of whether there are two, one or no parents around, children of all ages need to see strong role models in their community. These role models must be in school, in church, in businesses and on the streets. In teaching, we say “show, don’t tell.” For students to know what they are capable of, we must show them what people who share their skin color and gender and who came from their neighborhood have accomplished. Too often, this message of empowerment is drowned out by violent, materialistic and divisive distractions. Many organizations, like the United Way and Young Life, already work with students to pave their road to success, but the kids only benefit if they choose to engage. With so much riding on our students’ choices, Jackson needs a united, grassroots movement that can reach every child. This movement will invoke the key to Janice Parker’s life story: “leading by example.” It will show children, from day one, what they are capable of achieving and how to achieve it. —Alexander Barrett 12 Jackson

YOUR TURN

Bring Net Metering to Mississippi

M

ississippi is on the verge of being the last state in the union to adopt a netmetering policy. I have tried for about two years to bring the topic of net metering to the attention and action of our state legislators. Others in our state have been trying longer than I have. I have repeatedly contacted Sen. W. Briggs Hopson III, R-Vicksburg, Rep. George Flaggs Jr., D-Vicksburg, and Rep. Alex Monsour, RVicksburg, who represent my county of residence, Warren County. Sen. Hopson is the only one who has ever responded, but he showed no interest in pushing or supporting net metering. If you are not familiar with net metering, consider learning more about it. Briefly, net metering requires public electricity providers, like Entergy, to credit customers’ accounts if the customers generate their own electricity. The energy provider is required to allow customers to connect and send their excess electricity into the grid. By adopting a net-metering policy, the state could open job opportunities to small Mississippi companies at no taxpayer cost. A net-metering policy does not require interest-free state loans to out-of-state companies for unproven technologies, as has been done recently with KiOR. A net-metering policy merely requires action by the Public Service Commission and the state Legislature. Almost all other states are already taking ad-

vantage of net metering. For families and small businesses nationwide, solar power is the most popular renewable energy, and solar-power panel systems are readily available in almost all states. Mississippi stands out—along with Tennessee, South Dakota and Washington, D.C.—as a state without a net-metering policy. Louisiana and Arkansas, both Entergy customers, have such policies, and Entergy customers there can have netmetering systems installed and receive credit for the electricity they produce. Because Mississippi is so late to adopt a net-metering policy, the state can learn from all the other states’ actions to develop the best possible net-metering policy. Net metering is old technology now. The Monroe, La., area has at least four solar-power providers. Small businesses in Mississippi could immediately move into the growing market of solar and wind energy if the state would adopt a net-metering policy. In addition to my local state leaders, I have (over the past two years) contacted MPB, Jackson TV stations and The Clarion-Ledger regarding net metering. However, my attempts to bring net metering to the public view have failed. I hope that the Jackson Free Press can bring net metering to the public attention, and that people will ask their state officials to develop the best net-metering policy in the nation. W.D. Corson Vicksburg

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


The Attack on Republicanism Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Elizabeth Waibel Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Contributing Editor Valerie Wells Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Larry Morrisey, Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander,Tam Curley, Brittany Kilgore,Whitney Menogan, Adria Walker Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Staff Photographer Virginia Schreiber Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers Trip Burns, William Patrick Butler,Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Eric Bennett, Erica Sutton

ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executives Amanda Beach, Adam Perry Sales Assistant Marissa Lucas Sales Interns Morgan Bares, Samantha Towers

BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Events Coordinator Shannon Barbour Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Mik Davis, Clint Dear, Richard Laswell

ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

H

ow ironic that Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital city is named after Andrew Jackson. Last month, state Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, introduced a bill that would do precisely what Andrew Jackson feared lawmakers might try. Gipsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personhood resolution, and another like it in the Senate sponsored by Sen. Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, would once again ask voters in Mississippi to place an amendment in the state constitution that defines life as beginning at conception. If we put aside the feelings we all have on abortion, I think we can agree that this maneuver is odious. Andrew Jackson believed that the people of the United States were the final authority on any issue. He went so far as to argue that federal judges should be elected and that the Electoral College be eliminated. He definitely believed that once the people spoke on an issue, the decision was final. Jackson was wrong about a lot of things, but he was never more right about anything than the meaning of republicanism. Under our form of government, whether certain interest groups like it or not, once the people have spoken on an issue, it is decided. Recently, however, a radical minority of Republicans has brought our entire concept of government under fire. Whether it was the various legal attempts to invalidate the 2008 election of Barack Obama through the courts or the decision to play legislative chicken with the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s credit-card bills, this radical minority has cared little for the will of the majority. The issue of personhood, which has never in the history of the United States been considered prior to the last few years, is the newest front in the attack on republicanism. Whether or not we support abortion, I certainly hope all Americans support a republican form of government. In fact, the document that the radical minority cites so often, the Constitution, guarantees it. For what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth, the Constitution says nothing about abortion, because no one opposed it in 1787. The Founding Fathers believed abortion was acceptable until a woman could feel the child moving in her womb. Thankfully, Gipson and Fillingane are a lot smarter than George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. Sure, Gipson will claim that his proposed amendment is substantially different from the one soundly rejected by voters in November. He is wrong. The proposed amendment contains several ad-

ditional clauses, none of which would effectively address the fundamental issues in the original. Local police will still be forced to investigate every miscarriage to determine if it was truly â&#x20AC;&#x153;unintended,â&#x20AC;? and zealous prosecutors looking to make themselves stars in the radical wing of the Republican Party will surely prosecute. The newly proposed amendments are nothing more than an insult to the educated and well-intentioned voters of Mississippi. Requiring another vote on an issue that was already soundly defeated is a clear attempt to subvert the sacrosanct will of the electorate. It seems that Andy Gipson and Joey Fillingane want to replace that will with their own. Why do these men feel they know better than Mississippians what is good for us? More importantly, why do they feel they know better than women what is good for them? As weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen at the hearings on birth control held recently in the U.S. House of Representatives, the voices of women have been excluded. Why would these men continue to add fire to the war on women that the radical wing of the Republican Party is pushing? I, for one, am certain that it comes down to dominance. For reasons I cannot understand, the thought of independent women frighten these menâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the radical minority they represent. Perhaps it stems from their religious beliefs. I will likely never know, but wherever it comes from, it is a 19th-century belief that must be purged. We live in a world where a woman is the U.S. secretary of state, where women sit on the Supreme Court and run Fortune 500 companies. They sure as hell can choose their method of birth control. If they take this right away from women of Mississippi, what else does the radical minority want to take away? Should the women of Mississippi be relegated to being pastorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wives or church secretaries? I hope Andy Gipson and Joey Fillingane are willing to engage in an open and fair conversation about these issues. After all, they are obviously smarter men than George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Andrew Jackson. What can they have to fear by addressing the women of Mississippi? Brian McGowan is an assistant professor of history at a local college. Contrary to popular opinion, he moved to Mississippi from his home state of New Jersey because of the weather, not Snooki.

Recently, a radical minority of Republicans has brought our entire concept of government under fire.

And the Winners of the Oscars Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;em Are â&#x20AC;Ś First Place

($100 Parlor Market)

James Griffin

Second Place

($50 Fatsumo Sushi)

James Parker

Third Place

($25 Parker House)

Perry Allen

!DMINISTRATIVE!SSISTANT

&DGGOOH&RQVXOWLQJ)LUPFXUUHQWO\VHHNVD37)7 $GPLQLVWUDWLYH$VVLVWDQW7KHLGHDOFDQGLGDWH VKRXOGKDYHSUHYLRXVH[SHULHQFHZLWK4XLFNERRNV SD\UROODQGJHQHUDODFFRXQWLQJ7KHFDQGLGDWH VKRXOGEHVHOIPRWLYDWHGDQGKDYHDQXSEHDW SHUVRQDOLW\5HVSRQVLELOLWLHVLQFOXGHLQSXWWLQJ FOLHQWGDWDLQWR4XLFNERRNVUHFRQFLOLQJGDWD SUHSDULQJVDOHVDQGWD[UHSRUWVFRPSLOLQJ ÂżQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDVZHOODVSHUIRUPLQJ JHQHUDORIÂżFHZRUN&DQGLGDWHPXVWEHGHWDLO RULHQWHGRUJDQL]DWLRQDOZLWKH[FHOOHQWFRPSXWLQJ VNLOOV)RUZDUG\RXUUHVXPHDQGFRYHUOHWWHUWR FDGGOOHÂżUP#DROFRPIRULPPHGLDWHFRQVLGHUDWLRQ

2EADYTO,OSE7EIGHT

&KDQJH\RXUOLIHWKHKHDOWK\ZD\ZLWKGHOLFLRXV9LVDOXV VKDNHV7KLUW\PHDOVIRU6L[W\PHDOVIRU EZLOGHUERG\E\YLFRP  

#LEAN#ITY7ASTE#OLLECTION

$WWHQWLRQFKXUFKHV VPDOOEXVLQHVVHV:HZLOOSURYLGH JDOWUDVKFDQHPSWLHGRQFHDZHHNIRUMXVW PRQWK  

/RGANIC(EALTHY"EVERAGES

+HDOWK\&RIIHH7HDDQG+RW&KRFRODWHZLWK*DQRGHUPD 6XSSOHPHQWV1DWXUDOKHUEEULQJVDPD]LQJKHDOWK UHVXOWVEROVWHUVLPPXQHV\VWHP  DUWQGRULVRUJDQRJROGFRPDQGRJFRIIHHSD\VFRP

(ELP7ANTED

0DNHPRQH\PDLOLQJEURFKXUHVIURPKRPH)5(( 6XSSOLHV+HOSLQJ+RPH:RUNHUVVLQFH *HQXLQH2SSRUWXQLW\1RH[SHULHQFHUHTXLUHG6WDUW ,PPHGLDWHO\ZZZWKHZRUNKXEQHW

(%,07!.4%$

([WUD,QFRPH$VVHPEOLQJ&'FDVHVIURP+RPH1R ([SHULHQFH1HFHVVDU\&DOORXU/LYH2SHUDWRUV1RZ (;7ZZZHDV\ZRUNMREVFRP

#!3(&/2#!23!NY#AR4RUCK

5XQQLQJRU1RW7RS'ROODU3DLG:H&RPH7R<RX &DOO)RU,QVWDQW2IIHU ZZZFDVKFDUFRP

'!)..!4)/.!,%80/352%

5HDFKRYHUPLOOLRQ\RXQJHGXFDWHGUHDGHUVIRURQO\ E\DGYHUWLVLQJLQZHHNO\QHZVSDSHUVOLNHWKLV RQH&DOO-DVRQDW7KLVLVQRWDMRERIIHU

jacksonfreepress.com

BRIAN M. MCGOWAN

13


VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

The JFP Interview:

Rep. Bennie Thompson Pulls Rank by R.L. Nave

Democratic U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson talks about the role of men at Central United Methodist Church in Jackson.

March 7 - 13, 2012

what he characterizes as a full-throated effort by the region’s powerful white political and business establishment to keep Delta residents poor and uneducated to maintain a supply of dirt-cheap labor. Thompson names Greenville, the Delta’s largest city, as a symbol of that decline. Nevertheless, he believes that other Delta cities such as Clarksdale and Cleveland are primed for economic growth. Coincidentally, Greenville just also happens to be the city where Heather McTeer, his opponent in the March 13 Democratic primary, served two terms as mayor. “Far as I can tell, my opponent’s a good person,” he said of McTeer, adding that he appeared in television commercials supporting McTeer during both her mayoral campaigns. The Jackson Free Press sat down with the congressman in his office in sleepy downtown Bolton to talk about his path to power, economic development in the 2nd Congressional District and Mississippi politics. You used to teach high school? When I finished Tougaloo (College), I taught school for two years. What did you teach? Social studies. I have a political science undergraduate degree and, basically, I became politically active my first year in teaching. Why was that? Because that was the year a lot of the civ-

il-rights emphasis in Mississippi was in getting African Americans elected to public office. The municipal elections were in 1969, but in ‘68 I was teaching in Franklin County, Mississippi, and coming home on the weekends. Was this a segregated school? Oh, yeah. The schools were technically were desegregated in Mississippi in January 1970. We had what was commonly referred to as a freedom of choice, but that was a joke. Black kids chose to go to some of the white schools, but very few white kids chose to go to the black schools, so that was a farce. It ultimately went to busing, and when busing came

VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

B

ennie G. Thompson has worked for the government his whole life. Born and raised in the small town of Bolton, located 20 miles west of Jackson, he worked as a high school civics teacher before becoming the first black mayor of his majority-black hometown where he still lives today. From there, Thompson joined the Hinds County Board of Supervisor where he served for 13 years when won a special election to fill then-U.S. Rep. Mike Espy’s seat in Congress in 1993. In that time, the Democratic Party to which Thompson belongs has been in the majority for a total of six years. Still, eight terms and three presidential administrations later, Thompson, who served as chairman of the Homeland Security Committee the last time Democrats held power in the House, from 2007 to 2011, wants to return to Washington, D.C., for a ninth term. As a member of Congress, he sees his role as a conduit for grants and other kinds of support, but he is frustrated that cities and counties in his district don’t always take full advantage of federal cash. “I’ve run a city, and I’ve run a county. At the federal level, I know the resources to bring to areas if those areas choose to want them,” said 64-year-old Thompson. The congressman points to the Mississippi Delta, which comprises the largest portion 14 of his district in terms of area, as a crushed by

along the growth of the segregated private schools started. I ran in 1969 for the board of aldermen here. How old were you at the time? Twenty, and I turned 21 before I took office. I served four years on the board of aldermen here, and that was part of our effort to try to work with the community. There were five aldermen. We thought taking three would give us a working majority then the mayor and town clerk would still be white. But it didn’t work out. Those four years, not much was done because the mayor has veto power and it would

Name: Bennie G. Thompson Age: 64 Born: Bolton, Miss. Residence: Bolton, Miss. Family: Wife, London Thompson; One daughter, BendaLonne; two grandchildren Employment: Teacher, Alderman and Mayor, Bolton Hinds County Supervisor, U.S. Representative (1993-present) Currently: Ranking Member, House Homeland Security Committee


THOMPSON, see page 16

-ITT2OMNEY  0LWW5RPQH\IRXQGHG DQGUDQSULYDWHHTXLW\ÂżUP %DLQ&DSLWDOXQWLOZKHQ KHEHFDPHJRYHUQRURI0DV VDFKXVHWWV'XULQJKLVWHQXUH WKHVWDWHSDVVHGDKHDOWK FDUHUHIRUPWKDWVHUYHGDVDPRGHOIRUDVLPLODU IHGHUDOODZZKLFK&RQJUHVVSDVVHGLQ +HUDQXQVXFFHVVIXOFDPSDLJQVIRUVHDWVLQWKH 866HQDWHDQGIRUSUHVLGHQWLQDQG UHVSHFWLYHO\5RPQH\UDQWKH6DOW/DNH&LW\ 2O\PSLF6WHHULQJ&RPPLWWHH+LVIDWKHU*HRUJH 5RPQH\VHUYHGDVJRYHUQRURI0LFKLJDQDQGDOVR UDQIRUSUHVLGHQW

FILE PHOTO

7ILL/ATIS  %RUQLQ6LOYHU&UHHN2DWLV HDUQHGDEDFKHORUÂśVGHJUHH LQKLVWRU\IURPWKH8QLYHUVLW\ RI6RXWKHUQ0LVVLVVLSSLDQG GLGWKUHHFRPEDWWRXUVLQ$I JKDQLVWDQDVDPHPEHURIWKH PLOLWDU\,QKHUDQIRU0LVVLVVLSSLJRYHUQRU DVDQLQGHSHQGHQWDQGFLWHVHGXFDWLRQHFRQRPLF GHYHORSPHQWDQGUHVWRULQJ0LVVLVVLSSLÂśVLPDJHDV DPRQJKLVWRSSULRULWLHV 2OGER7EINER  'U:HLQHUDFDUGLRORJLVW UXQVWKH:HLQHU+HDUWDQG &DUGLRYDVFXODU,QVWLWXWHLQ &ODUNVGDOH+HLVRULJLQDOO\ IURP3KLODGHOSKLD3DDQG KDVPDGHWKHWRSLFVRIHGXFD WLRQKHDOWKFDUHWKHHFRQRP\FUHDWLQJMREVDQG UHVWRULQJYRWHUVÂśULJKWVWKHIRFDOSRLQWVRIKLV FDPSDLJQ

86+RXVHRI5HSUHVHQWDWLYHVQG'LVWULFW (EATHER-C4EER  +HDWKHU0F7HHUEHFDPH WKHÂżUVWIHPDOHDQGÂż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

2ICK3ANTORUM  5LFN6DQWRUXPUHSUHVHQW HG3HQQV\OYDQLDIRUWZRWHUPV LQWKH866HQDWHIURP WR+HKDVPDGHVHYHUDO DWWHPSWVWRFDSWXUHWKH*23 SUHVLGHQWLDOQRPLQDWLRQDQG LVFRQVLGHUHGRQHRIWKHPRVWVRFLDOO\FRQVHUYD WLYHFDQGLGDWHVVWLOOLQWKHUDFH$IWHUDVOXJ JLVKVWDUW6DQWRUXPVXUJHGODWHDQGLVLQQRZLQ DWLJKWWZRZD\UDFHZLWK5RPQH\

GAGE SKIDMORE

PATTI DRAPALA

!LBERT.'ORE*R  $OEHUW1*RUH-ULVWKH FKDLUPDQRIWKH2NWLEEHKD &RXQW\'HPRFUDWLF([HFX WLYH&RPPLWWHH$9LHWQDP ZDUYHWHUDQ*RUHVD\VKH FRPSOHWHGMXPSVDVDQ DUP\SDUDFKXWLVWDQGUHFHLYHGQXPHURXVPLOLWDU\ KRQRUVLQFOXGLQJWKH3XUSOH+HDUW%URQ]H6WDU DQGD0HULWRULRXV6HUYLFH0HGDO+HKDVGHJUHHV IURP0LOOVDSV&ROOHJHDQG'XNH8QLYHUVLW\GLYLQ LW\VFKRRO

2ON0AUL  7KLVPDNHV5RQ3DXOÂśV WKLUGSUHVLGHQWLDOFDPSDLJQ ,QDGGLWLRQWRKLV FDPSDLJQIRUWKH5HSXEOLFDQ QRPLQDWLRQKHUDQDVD /LEHUWDULDQLQ3DXOLV DPHGLFDOGRFWRUDQGVHUYHGWKUHHVWLQWVLQWKH 86+RXVHRI5HSUHVHQWDWLYHVIURPWKH+RXVWRQ 7H[DVDUHD

PUBLIC DOMAIN

533ENATE

GAGE SKIDMORE

"ARACK/BAMA  %RUQLQ+DZDLL%DUDFN 2EDPDDWWHQGHG&ROXPELD 8QLYHUVLW\DQG+DUYDUG/DZ 6FKRRODQGZRUNHGDVFRP PXQLW\RUJDQL]HUFRQVWLWX WLRQDOODZ\HUDQGSURIHVVRU +HVHUYHGWKUHHWHUPVLQWKH,OOLQRLV6HQDWHDQG RQHWHUPLQWKH866HQDWHZKHUHKHVHUYHGIURP WR+HEHFDPHWKHWK86SUHVLGHQW LQ+HLVXQRSSRVHGIRUWKH'HPRFUDWLF QRPLQDWLRQIRUSUHVLGHQWLQ0LVVLVVLSSL

KENYA HUDSON

0RESIDENT

.EWT'INGRICH  )RUPHU*HRUJLD&RQJUHVV PDQ1HZW*LQJULFKUHSUH VHQWHGQRUWKFHQWUDO*HRUJLD LQFOXGLQJSDUWVRIWKH$WODQWD VXEXUEV LQWKH86+RXVHIRU \HDUVEHIRUHKHUHVLJQHG XQGHUSUHVVXUHIURPKLVRZQSDUW\LQ,QKLV ODVWWZRWHUPVKHZDVWKH+RXVH6SHDNHUIURP DQG+HLVFUHGLWHGZLWKHQJLQHHULQJ WKH5HSXEOLFDQ+RXVHWDNHRYHURIZKLFK EURNHWKH'HPRFUDWVÂśIRXUGHFDGHORQJORFNRQ SRZHU6SHDNHU*LQJULFKDOVRSUHVLGHGGXULQJ WHPSRUDU\JRYHUQPHQWVKXWGRZQVLQDQG  $OVRRQWKHEDOORWDUHWKHVHFDQGLGDWHVZKRKDYH ZLWKGUDZQIURPWKHUDFH *ON(UNTSMANIRUPHU8WDKJRYHUQRU -ICHELE"ACHMANN865HSRI0LQQHVRWD 'ARY*OHNSONIRUPHU1HZ0H[LFRJRYHUQRU 2ICK0ERRY7H[DVJRYHUQRU

533ENATE %!LLEN(ATHCOCK°)NFORMATIONNOTAVAILABLE 2OBERT-ALONEY°)NFORMATIONNOTAVAILABLE 2OGER7ICKER  6WDUWLQJLQ5RJHU :LFNHUKHOGVHYHQWHUPVLQ WKH86+RXVH'XULQJKLV ODVWWHUP:LFNHUUHTXHVWHG WRSSHGWKHOLVWRI&RQJUHV VLRQDOHDUPDUNUHTXHVWHUV,Q WKHQ*RY+DOH\%DUERXUDSSRLQWHG:LFNHU WR¿OOWKHVHDWYDFDWHGE\UHWLULQJ866HQ7UHQW /RWW,Q:LFNHULQWURGXFHGDQDPHQGPHQW WRWKHGHIHQVHVSHQGLQJELOOWKDWZRXOGOHW PLOLWDU\FKDSODLQVGHFOLQHWRSHUIRUPPDUULDJH FHUHPRQLHVLIWKHFKDSODLQREMHFWVIRUUHDVRQVRI FRQVFLHQFH

jacksonfreepress.com

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in public service your whole adult life. Given peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attitudes toward Congress nowadays, why do you want to come back for a ninth term? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to work with a lot of communities in my district that need champions. When I talk to mayors and supervisors, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for an advocate. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve run a city, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve run a county. At the federal level, I know the resources to bring to areas if those areas choose to want them. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to run a city or county anymore. I want to help those local officials. When those officials have come and identified problems to me, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been Johnnyon-the-Spot. But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a magic wand. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inherit this district. This district was created long before Bennie Thompson was born but I do all I can to make it better. I support community development projects, health projects.

0RESIDENT

GAGE SKIDMORE

You mean charter schools? Yes, charter schools. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at a lot of things that cause me real concern. In a lot of instances, people still are struggling to be the best that they can be. I look at the banks in this community. The majority of them donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any person of color on their corporate boards of directors. We still have a lot of work to do, so why canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a person talk about those issues when they run for public office? Why do I have to run a campaign that does not address them? Other people do, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine. Bennie Thompson prefers to run campaigns based on the truth.

2EPUBLICAN0RIMARY

FILE PHOTO

People who spent their careers doing civil rights often get pegged as angry, which is something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard about youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re an angry black man with a chip on your shoulder. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interpreted. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a proud black person. I take nothing for granted. My first school I attended in this town was called Bolton Colored School. I walked past Bolton School to get to Bolton Colored School. My mama and daddy worked, paid taxes, but their son had to attend an inferior school. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever want history to repeat itself.

The big thing now for candidates of color is to run race-neutral campaigns. What do you make of that? In a perfect world, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine. But in reality there are still some changes that need to be made. In our state, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re debating issues like voter ID, which is a poll tax on steroids. We are dealing with an effort to destroy public education.

$EMOCRATIC0RIMARY

WEINER CAMPAIGN

Even before the city of Jackson? Long before the city of Jackson. We were the poster child for what an aggressive voter education and registration campaign could do. My being fairly young, I spent a lot of time talking all over the state about what communities of color could do if they put their minds to it. To the extent I organized the Mississippi Conference of Black Mayors because we did not have a real forum to get our concerns heard . . . and to that organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s credit, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still alive in 2012. We grew from about 10 mayors back then to pretty close to 100 now. And where they used to be concentrated in the Delta, now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all over the state. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a credit to the black political participation. During that time, Sen. Henry Kirksey and I sued the Hinds County Board of Supervisors in 1971 to redistrict Hinds County. At that time, Hinds County was about 40 percent African American, but there were no blacks on the Board of Supervisors. We got a decision in the latter part of 1978 that said Hinds County has to redistrict, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run in districts that are malapportioned and deny African Americans the right to choose a supervisor of their choice. Well, when we got the court-ordered plan, this area was one of the majority African American seats on the board of supervisors. So I was asked to run in 1979, and I was fortunate enough to win. I served from 1980 until I was elected to Congress. So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been a change agent for a while.

Do you feel like you have a bit of a right to be angry? No, I feel that I have a right in America to choose the route that I take. And that route is one of being a change agent, and many times the system acts negatively to change agents.

/NTHE0RIMARY"ALLOTS

MCTEER CAMPAIGN

Was Bolton predominantly African American at this point? It was always African American. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that until we ran in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;69 they had never had an election. We forced them to have an election in this town. We could not find any records of elections being held. So I ran for mayor. From 1973 on, when I served as mayor we were able to get a new city hall, a new fire station. We upgraded our water and sewer system. We obtained firefighting equipment; we lowered our fire insurance ratingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a lot of things that should have been done all along. The good thing is Bolton sparked the renaissance of black people running for office in Hinds County because we were the first people to elect black people in the county.

To that extent, I have always been a champion of making our system of government work for everybody. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perceived that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m angry, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be angry. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been married to the same woman 43 years. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve belonged to the same church in this little town all my life. I was a Boy Scout, a paperboy. The only thing is I became involved in the community. Now, if I was a white boy growing up doing that, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be a star. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be called angry. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be called having a chip on my shoulder. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be called somebody thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to go places. If you were to ask people what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done to be considered angry, they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you. I have friends who are ordinary people. I hunt. I fish. I eat at Waffle House. You know what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m saying? Because I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit the mold of what the system wants of a person, why does that make me angry?

PUBLIC DOMAIN

take four votes to override the mayor. We passed motions to improve the water system here, the water system, to apply for housing grants an the mayor always vetoed everything and we could not get the fourth vote to override. So four years later, we decided this wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working out. So I ran for mayor at the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suggestion.

15


THOMPSON, from page 15 VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

When NAFTA was passed, we lost 1,100 jobs in Greenville Mississippi. Fruit of the Loom had a major facility in Greenville. As soon as NAFTA passed, they closed it. Jockey was in Belzoni for over 30 years, and we had case after case of that. But the Delta was predicated on cheap labor, and a long time before mechanization came, people harvested crops by the sweat of their brow so you had a real need for a labor supply, and those elected officials discouraged any opportunities that would be a threat to that labor supply. (Then-Sen.) John Stennis was Armed Services (Committee) chairman when we located more military bases in this country than at any other time, but none of them were located in the Delta.

Democratic Congressman Bennie Thompson wants voters to give him a ninth term as U.S. Representative for Mississippi’s 2nd Congressional District.Thompson, who lives in Bolton, faces former Greenville Mayor Heather McTeer, in the March 13 primary.

I was the only (Mississippi congressman) to vote for the Affordable Care Act that the president promoted. When NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) was proposed under Bill Clinton, I was the only person in our delegation to vote against it because I knew what it would do for a substantial number of lower-

wage employees in our district and in our state. Fast forward, and I was absolutely correct. Do you think NAFTA contributed to the decline of places like the Delta? Oh, ain’t no question. In just about every area in Mississippi, there was an apparel operation that afforded employment to people.

You’re saying there was a concerted effort to keep people in the Delta poor and uneducated? Oh, ain’t no question. That’s well-documented. When you start representing a district that didn’t have the infrastructure to make a difference that is a challenge. A member of Congress is only one person. I can’t apply for the grants. I can encourage communities to do it, and if they do, I can do all I can to help them get it funded. In other words, people are leaving too much money on the table. No question. That’s because there are still

some capacity issues in communities that are not really up on applying for the programs, managing the grants, and in return a lot of communities suffer. But if you look at every program that has been offered during my 18 years in office, anything that would alleviate pain and suffering, I supported it. So my job in Washington is to support good legislation. The other part of my job is to encourage people who are elected, appointed, or in responsible positions locally to take advantage. Why don’t you just get on the phone to Mayor Whomever and say, ‘I’ve got this grant, and I need your application tomorrow.’? I do it all the time. Some do, some don’t. But most of the mayors, with the exception of a few, are part-time. They have limited budgets so they’re challenged also. It’s those local officials who tend to be the most aggressive are the ones whose communities reflect things happening. All the grants are competitive, but you have to apply. So what’s it going to take? People talk about the Delta like it’s a Third World country. I say Third World as opposed to developing because the attitude is that there’s no developing going on. Years of neglect will generate many of the things you have. The only transit system in the

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

March 7 - 13, 2012

W

16

orking with troubled teens at a wilderness therapy program in Utah not only introduced Allison Meyer to her future husband John Bell, but it brought her a new occupation as well: restaurateur. Bell told Meyer on their first date that he was going to marry her, she agreed and a month later they were officially engaged and almost 4 months later, they have given birth to their first project together: Jaco’s Tacos. Jaco’s Tacos is Downtown Jackson’s newest restaurant and if you think you’re in for the standard Tex-Mex meal, think again. All of the items on Jaco’s innovative menu are not only handmade fresh daily, but they are melded from recipes that Bell experienced from his extensive travels to the Southwest. Start off your meal with the unlimited salsa bar, but make sure you save room for the homemade Guacamole Dip. Jaco’s guacamole is a refreshing, tropical dip made with fresh avocados, ripe tomatoes, jalapeños, onions, garlic, cilantro, and a hint of lime. Make sure you try the Shrimp Brochette, a large shrimp stuffed with fresh mango, jalapeños, and cheese, wrapped in pecan wood-smoked bacon. Jaco’s is taking pizza to a new level with their Mexican Pizza. A madefrom-scratch flour tortilla is smothered in melted cheese, pico de gallo, beans, and your choice of grilled chicken, Mojave pork, steak, or shrimp. Add the toppings— jalapeños, onions, bacon, sour cream, and avocado—and you can say adios to your hunger pangs. Looking for something on the lighter side? Give one of Jaco’s fresh salads a try. Fresh salad greens with all of your veggies piled on with pecan woodsmoked bacon and your choice of chicken, pork, steak, or shrimp all mixed in with homemade dressing. If you’re a Tex-Mex traditionalist, give one of the many Quesadilla, Taco, or Burrito options a try. All the steaks Jaco uses are premium cuts and aged to perfection, and all of the meats are fresh, never frozen, seasoned in authentic homemade marinades. If you feel the need to shake a tail feather on Fridays after a long work week, make your way to Jaco’s for live music every Friday night. Add some of the best margaritas in the city and your weekend is off to a caliente start!


Delta is a federally funded transit system in spots. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a state transit system so to a large extent, the lack of basic infrastructure compounds the problem. But again, those state and county leaders are the ones who are going to have to take advantage of the opportunities to make things happen. And if those things are not a priority, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get done. A member of Congress can suggest, urge, and highly recommend that communities take advantage but at the end of the day, the decision rests with the leaders of those communities. Are communities in the 2nd Congressional District unique in that, compared to the other districts in the state? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re unique in the sense that the challenges are greater. Are we at the point where you could argue to a company looking to locate a business that they should come to the district as opposed to somewhere? Or are there structural issues that need to be addressed first? There are places in the district that are more conducive to certain kinds of development. If a company is going to invest its money into an area, there are certain things that they look for. They look at how the schools are performing, the health care issue, the hous-

ing that may be available. They might want to know where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a symphony or where can my children get a pizza. Somebody might say I want to be close to a river or an interstate highway. There are a lot of variables, but it is public knowledge that when industry is coming that they are going to look for certain things. Just having a lot of people who need jobs is not going to guarantee you that industry is going to invest its money. Where are those opportunities? Vicksburg, for instance. They have the river and a port. They have a major hospital, River Region Health Center. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s available housing and an airport nearby. Canton is a community that is positioned to do great things. If you go further north into the district, Batesville is doing a good job. We worked with getting Lockheed Martin located over here in Clinton in the old WorldCom building. Well, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 350 jobs. They looked at Jackson, Clinton and Vicksburg. My role was to say whatever criteria you have, you can get a better fit in Mississippi than you can in any other state. They came back and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right.â&#x20AC;? The GE plant thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s located in Batesville. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here for going on four years now, and they love it. So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to start the process of attracting some Fortune 100 companies to the area.

Join For Free!

No Contract â&#x20AC;˘ 24/7 Access

Some of our communities are gonna have to understand the likelihood of getting an industry in your town might be more challenging than you can overcome, but you can still do the things to keep your community safe and sanitary. You mentioned Canton, which is experiencing a lot of growth, especially in terms of its immigrant population. Mississippi is considering immigration legislation similar to what Arizona and Alabama have done already. As ranking member of the Homeland Security Committee, which oversees the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees Immigration and Customs Enforcement, what do you think about states treading into immigration matters? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strictly federal jurisdiction. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the resources at the state level to become the immigration cops. But the argument is that the federal government isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deploying the necessary resources. Well, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what they say. The jurisdiction of my committee has border enforcement; Judiciary has interior enforcement. But Alabama just went through its effort of trying to be immigration cops, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proven to be very embarrassing, including the fact that one

of the first people to be caught in that trap was one of the Mercedes-Benz executives. Plus, if you get a state person involved in a federal immigration case, that state person has to follow that case. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe we have the resources at the state level to start deploying those resources for immigration purposes. Those state and local resources ought to be going to catching burglars, robbers, murders and others committing state crimes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just an effort by certain people in this state to single out immigrants for the wrong reasons. Do you see this an extension of some of the earlier civil-rights fights you were involved in? It could be because if you look at the background on a lot of immigration challenges, most of the people who are in this country illegally are here for economic betterment reasons. They work hard at work that otherwise somebody may or may not do. (At) the cotton gin here in Bolton, 75 percent of the employees are Latino. The migrant labor stream is alive and well and this state. If we all of a sudden close the doors to that stream with the threat of passing certain legislation, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to have significant adverse impact in our state.

THOMPSON, see page 19

%HVW$VLDQ5HVWDXUDQW %HVWRI-DFNVRQ²

1HZ'DLO\/XQFK)HDWXUHV ,QFOXGHVWD[ WHDIRURQO\



Thank You for Voting Knockout Fitness & MMA Monday - Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00pm - 8:00pm Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ 11:00am - 12:00pm 205 Belle Meade Blvd Flowood, MS 39232

769-233-7901

www.knockoutfitnessmma.com

0RQGD\6DWXUGD\SPÂ&#x2021;6XQGD\SP +DUERXU3W&URVVLQJÂ&#x2021;5LGJHODQG06 Â&#x2021;ZZZSDQDVLDFRPÂ&#x2021;

jacksonfreepress.com

One of the Best Martial Arts Studios in the Jackson Area

17


t s i Tw

Put A

March 7 - 13, 2012

On It

18

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

Always Drink Responsibly


VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

THOMPSON, from page 17

Jesse Gallagher Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman PAUL MITCHELL SIGNATURE SALON NOW CARRYING PAUL MITCHELL AWAPUHI

775 Lake Harbour Drive #H in Ridgeland 601.856.4330 | fax: 601.856.4505

Mississippi’s 2nd District U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson grew up in Bolton, just west of Jackson. In 1969, he became the town’s first black mayor.

On related homeland-security note, you’ve spoken about domestic terrorism. How well are our homeland security agencies positioned to deal with things like the recent Ohio school shooting and last year’s incident involving Rep. Gabby Giffords? There has not been a successful terrorist attempt coming from the outside. We’ve successfully sealed our borders so terrorists have been kept out since 9-11. What we do see is a growing escalation of what we call lone wolves. The gentleman who killed those individuals in Arizona and shot the Congresswoman, he acted on his own. There was no connection to any foreign or domestic terror organization. He’s just a crazy fellow. This young man who killed the three kids in Ohio, it looks like a combination bullyingmental situation, but he acted on his own. Sure, they’re dastardly deeds, but there’s no conspiracy. And I’m not sure we can protect every person in every situation but if somebody wakes up on a particular day and wants to do harm, and doesn’t mind getting caught, that’s a real challenge. Lastly, do you know Mayor McTeer? I helped her get elected. I cut a commercial for her when she ran, both times. How do you think she’s done in Greenville in terms of our discussion about progress in the Delta?

I’d say to you like this: The sheriff of Washington County is supporting me. The tax assessor is supporting me. The chancery clerk is supporting me. The clerk of the county is supporting me. You’ve got a lot of money. What’s that got to do with it? They have to run, too. Nobody wants to anger a powerful congressman. O.K., brother. Whatever you say. I knew them before they were elected. Just like Heather, I helped them get elected. I’ve never told them how to do their jobs but they respect me for being a straight up kind of guy. When I was elected, there wasn’t a single African American in Washington County government. Look at it now. At some point you’re not going to want to be in Congress anymore. What does the future U.S. representative for the 2nd District have to do, or be, to represent it effectively? You have to care about it. It can’t be a public-relations effort. You have to know individuals and communities. You have to listen to people. I don’t have all the answers, but I’m willing to go to the smallest areas in my state and listen to people. I have a staff that understands we’re here to serve the public. We don’t have voicemail on these phones. When you call here, you get a name. You talk to a person. And just like I made myself available on Sunday morning, I don’t know too many other people who would do that. This is my second meeting. I had one at 7 o’clock this morning. So when I don’t have the energy or the drive, I’ll know. But I’ve been a blessed individual. I’ve seen a lot, I’ve helped change a lot and, I make no bones about it, I want my state to be better. Comment and read other candidate interviews at jfppolitics.com.

Located in Highland Village, Suite 144 | Jackson MS 39211 601.981.1975 | www.earthwalkshoes.com| Like Us On

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Dmbttft!gps!Fwfszpof!Jodmvejoh; Mfwfm!2

Npoebz!8;26!qn Uvftebz!2;26!qn Uvftebz!7;11!qn Xfeoftebz!8;11!qn Uivstebz!2;26!qn Gsjebz!6;41!qn Tbuvsebz!:;11!bn

Zphb!Pwfs!61

Tbuvsebz!!21;41!bn

Hfoumf!Zphb

Tvoebz!5;11!qn 4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

jacksonfreepress.com

You don’t think there are enough out-of-work American citizens in Bolton to fill those jobs at the cotton gin if the immigrants went away? I’ll put it to you like this—time will tell. The question is for the type of hours worked and the physical labor that’s required, you might or might not. But it’s a business and if a business is not able to get the labor supply it needs locally, who are we to tell that business who it can employ?

19


o O o 0 o o 0 O o O 0 o O o 0 o o Kristen is wearing a turquoise dress ($46.95) and yellow teardrop earrings ($16.95) from Pink Bombshell, a floral ruffle tank ($5) and an ivory Gap sweater ($14) from Plato’s Closet, a gray snake skinny belt ($5) from Orange Peel, and coral L.A.M.B. heels ($265) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces.

into the colors of the season

March 7 - 13, 2012

Photographer: Virginia Schreiber Fashion Stylist: Meredith W. Sullivan Hair/Makeup: Kate McNeely for Social Agenda (2947 Old Canton Road, 601-982-5547) Models: Kristen Lucas, Mark Bradshaw and Brittany Henderson for The Renee’ Agency (thereneeagency.com) Location: Old House Depot (639 Monroe St., 601-592-6200, oldhousedepot.com)

20

Mark is wearing a purple Express polo ($8) from Plato’s Closet, RVCA pants ($69) from Slavebird and red suede CONS ($40) from Swell-O-Phonic. Brittany is wearing a yellow tuxedo blouse ($36.95) and a gold necklace ($24.95) from Pink Bombshell, a pink snake belt ($5) from Plato’s Closet, gray Poleci pants ($14) from Orange Peel, and Madeline green suede heels ($70) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces.


o O o 0 o o 0 O o O 0 o O o 0 o o Brittany is wearing a blue floral top ($6) from Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet, Citizens of Humanity Mandy floral pants ($189) from Red Square Clothing Co., ivory teardrop earrings ($16.95) from Pink Bombshell and Jessica Simpson nude suede platforms ($115) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces. Mark is wearing a Ben Sherman plaid shirt ($109) and Citizens of Humanity Sid jeans ($205) from Red Square Clothing Co. and Nike Zoom Stefan Janoski shoes ($95) from SwellO-Phonic.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll always love

jacksonfreepress.com

our prints, but this spring is all about COLOR. You can go light with pastels or bright with a pop of color or, better yet, combine the two for a tone-ontone look. 21


into the colors of the season from page 21

o O o 0 o o 0 O o O 0 o O o 0 o o Kristen is wearing Citizens of Humanity Chloe cut-off shorts ($168) from Red Square Clothing Co., a floral American Eagle blouse ($8) from Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet, a denim shirt ($47.50) from Posh Boutique, and a plaid fedora ($24.95) and multicolored earrings ($16.95) from Pink Bombshell.

March 7 - 13, 2012

Mark is wearing a neon H&M shirt ($7), Madison shorts ($12), sunglasses ($5) and blue Adidas Climacool sneakers ($25) from Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet.

22


o O o 0 o o 0 O o O 0 o O o 0 o o Kristen is wearing a light pink bandeau top ($55) and gold Sheila necklace ($150) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces, a red floral maxi dress worn as a skirt ($12) from Orange Peel, a gold triangle necklace ($24.95) from Pink Bombshell, a snake print bangle ($14) from Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet, and a blue-andwhite scarf ($3) from Repeat Street.

0 o O o 0 o o

Kristen is wearing a sheer striped tie top ($38.95), and peachand-gold earrings ($18.95) from Pink Bombshell, Hudson Nico skinny jeans ($158) from Red Square Clothing Co., L.A.M.B. suede wedges ($345) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces, and sunglasses ($5) from Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet.

jacksonfreepress.com

From the Cover: Brittany is wearing a gray T-shirt ($18.95), pink pleated skirt ($38.95), horn necklace ($24.95), Belle Noel gold ring ($18.95) and handbag ($36.95) from Pink Bombshell; a silk scarf ($3) from Re-Runs Consignment Shoppe; and combat boots ($60) from Posh Boutique.

23


from page 23 into the colors of the season

Brittany is wearing a coral BCBG dress ($20) and a feather necklace ($7) from Plato’s Closet; a leather vest ($48.50) from Posh Boutique; Coconuts wedges ($75) from The Shoe Bar at Pieces; a blue-and-silver bracelet ($12.95), a peach-and-gray woven bangle ($12.95) and a gold Belle Noel bracelet ($25.95) from Pink Bombshell. Kristen is wearing a mint green blouse ($32.95), a gold necklace ($24.95), green and fuschia bracelets ($12.95 each), and a clutch ($32.95) from Pink Bombshell; a green Gap T-shirt ($7) from Orange Peel; light green J.Crew shorts ($10) and heels ($16) from Plato’s Closet; and glasses ($11.50) from Posh Boutique. The Missoni socks are the stylist’s own.

o O o 0 o o 0 O o O 0 o O o 0 o o

WHERE2SHOP O

0 o O o 0 o o

Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-3649977; Pink Bombshell, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5007, Ridgeland, 601-8530775; Plato’s Closet, 1260 E. County Line Rd., Ridgeland, 601-487-8207; Posh Boutique, 4312 N. State St., 601-364-2244; Red Square Clothing Co., 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 9004, Ridgeland, 601-853-8960; Repeat Street, 626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland, 601605-9393; Re-Runs Consignment Shoppe, 1645 W. Government Cove, Brandon, 601-8243663; The Shoe Bar at Pieces, 425 Mitchell Ave., 601.939.5203; Slavebird, 2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601-366-9955; Swell-O-Phonic, 2906 N. State St., Suite103, 601-366-9955

March 7 - 13, 2012

fab fashion . fun gifts . fresh accessories

24

Highland Village | 4500 I 55 North, Suite 120 | 601-981-4311


p m Ju -RXS Spring With so many items to choose from including tops, skirts, pants, dresses, jewelry and shoes, your spring wardrobe has never been so easy to put together.

NEW SPRING ARRIVALS ARE HERE! 422 Mitchell Ave. in Fondren

601.364.9977

Wear ORANGE into the store March 7-14

to get 10% off your total purchase

We also carry men’s and children’s clothing as well as home items. We receive new merchandise daily so check back frequently.

Find Your Pot of Gold

Sell us your gold and silver for a chance to win $100 cash! PLUS! with every purchase of $25 or more, your could win instant discounts, prizes or up to $100 in store credit!

5070 Parkway Drive Jackson, MS 601.991.0500 Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sat 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

EVERYONE WINS SOMETHING! *All March Long*

Voted the metro’s #1 consignment store in the Best of Jackson 2012. Voted state’s best consignment/resale by Mississippi Magazine.

Best Jewelry Designer

Ridgeland Location: 626 Ridgewood Road | 601.605.9393 REVOLUTION Starkville: 327A Hwy 12 West | 662.324.2641

-Best of Jackson 2012-

West Jackson St. • Ridgeland, MS 601-607-7741215 • bfineartjewelry.com

Like Us on Facebook: Repeat Street Metro Jackson Follow Us on Twitter: @RepeatSt | www.repeatstreet.net

Voted “Best Tailor”

or aiser f A fundr ritan Center Sama he Good

in Best of Jackson 2011 and 2012

T

MARCH TAG SALE 9ELLOW4AGSOFF "ROWN4AGSOFF 114
Millsaps
Ave.
•
Jackson,
MS
39202
•
(601)
355-7458
 Friday
9:30
-
5:30
&
Saturday
10:00
-
4:00

Come Play With Us.

-Serving The Jackson Metro Area Since 1972-

Our Eggs Don’t Crack! Hand painted, personalized wooden eggs an Olde Tyme Commisary original since 1972

Located in Highland Village 4500 I-55 North Suite 122 • Jackson MS 39211 601.366.1849 • www.commissarytoys.com

FLOWOOD 258 Dogwood Blvd. | Flowood, MS 39232 Mon-Sat 9:00am-6:00pm | 601.992.1373

RIDGELAND 1000 Highland Colony Parkway Ste. 4004 Renaissance | Ridgeland, Ms 39157 Mon-Fri 8:30am-6:00pm | Sat 8:30am-6:00pm 601-607-3443 www.customtailoringbyal.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Olde Tyme Commissary

Ridgeland & Flowood

25


Wedding Pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Qâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from the Experts COURTESY WENDY PUTT

ADAM + ALLI

day. The last thing you want is to be fatigued when greeting 50 or 100 guests at the reception. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The week of their wedding, (couples) donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to go to their jobs past Tuesday, so they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be stressed out,â&#x20AC;? suggests Wendy Putt, owner of Fresh Cut Catering and Floral in Flowood.

Wendy Putt

I

f youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re planning a wedding and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the slightest clue about wedding doâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ts, let the experts guide you for your important day. Here are the top-10 wedding etiquette rules no bride or groom should forget during the wedding process.

COURTESY DEBORAH SIMMONS

10. Send invitations to the appropriate people. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to invite

a friend or family member to the bridal shower or bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party, invite him or her to the wedding, too. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If not, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re basically saying: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, come to this party. Give me a gift; but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not important enough to give a wedding invitation to,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? wedding planner Shanna Lumpkin says. 9. Make sure invitations and programs are properly written. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As far as correct

spellings, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a given,â&#x20AC;? Lumpkin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re inviting a coworker and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, get the correct spelling. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;and family.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Deborah Simmons, an accredited bridal consultant for Signature Occasions, says to always â&#x20AC;&#x153;send a personal, handwritten thank-you note for a gift received.â&#x20AC;? 8. Take at least half a week off from work before your wedding. Weddings

FILE PHOTO

are a big deal and involve a lot of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time and effort to guarantee a memorable

6. Choose a reasonable reception venue. It might be nice to have both the

perfect wedding and reception venues, but if those areas are too far apart, the only one who will appreciate them after the drive is you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A venue for the reception needs to be logistical to the ceremony site,â&#x20AC;? Putt says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It needs to be accessible. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need

W

March 7 - 13, 2012

Â&#x2021;"OWTIESAREMAKINGACOMEBACK7KHWLPHOHVV -DPHV%RQGORRNZLWKDVLPSOHEODFNWX[HGRDQG DEODFNERZWLHLVDOZD\VDQHDV\FRPSOHPHQWDU\ PDWFKIRUWKHZHGGLQJÂśVWKHPHFRORUHVSHFLDOO\DV PRUHEULGHVFKRRVHEODFNDQGZKLWHRULYRU\WKHPHV Â&#x2021;4IESAREN´TTHESAMEBORINGBLACK BLUEORWHITE %ROGDQGULFKFRORUVVXFKSXUSOHSLQN\HOORZDQG HYHQSULQWVDUHSRSXODUQRZ)RUIRUPDOZHGGLQJV DQDVFRWRUFUDYDWLVSDUWRIWKHHQVHPEOH7KHVH ZLGHORQJWLHVFRPHIURPWKH(QJOLVKWUDGLWLRQ

itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your day, that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give you license to throw off a painstakingly prescheduled chunk of time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The wedding party takes cues from you,â&#x20AC;? Lumpkin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to try really hard to make everything OK,â&#x20AC;? but if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stick to your schedule, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t blame other people when things are running late. 1. Be considerate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one wants to deal

to have a venue thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20 miles away from your reception site, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll lose all the guests.â&#x20AC;? 5. Remember your wedding partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget when choosing wardrobes.

Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found the perfect set of bridesmaidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dresses, consider your wedding partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a younger bride, and all your friends are in college, take that into consideration when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re picking out bridesmaidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dresses or tuxedos,â&#x20AC;? Lumpkin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another option is contributing $50 to make it a little more affordable, so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not making your bridesmaids pay $350 for a dress when they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have jobs because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all still in college.â&#x20AC;?

try to make your wedding ceremony even more memorable by letting loose a shout, or maybe the sheer excitement causes you to giggle with glee, but the wedding is symbolic of the rest of your life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Save the fun and theatrics for the reception,â&#x20AC;? Simmons says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember, a wedding is a sacred ceremony.â&#x20AC;? 3. Be prepared for children. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

inviting lots of friends and family to your wedding, chances are a few kids are going to come. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a lot of people in the past

Sharp-Dressed Men HGGLQJGD\IDVKLRQWUHQGVKDYHFKDQJHG WKURXJKWKH\HDUVQRWRQO\IRUEULGHVEXW DOVRIRUJURRPVDQGJURRPVPHQ3UHYLRXVO\ DJURRPÂśVDWWLUHVWD\HGFRRNLHFXWWHUVDIHEXWQRZ PHQDUHPDNLQJEROGQHZVWDWHPHQWV7KHVHGD\V PHQDUHWXUQLQJKHDGVDORQJZLWKWKHLUEULGHV

26

Shanna Lumpkin

4. The reception is for celebrating; the wedding is a ceremony. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tempting to Deborah Simmons

few years who say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;no kids,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and I hate to burst their bubble, because sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not possible,â&#x20AC;? Lumpkin says. She suggests having a playroom with toys or video games to keep children entertained. 2. Stick to the schedule. Even though

7. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make your guests wait. If

youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had to wait at someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wedding, you can appreciate this tip. Five minutes can seem like 30 listening to the same organ tune repeat, and looking at a delicious buffet at the reception is nearly torture while guests wait for the bride and groom to have the first bite. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When your guests arrive at the reception, food and alcoholâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if there is alcoholâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;should be available from the very beginning,â&#x20AC;? Lumpkin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś Then they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care if you take 30 to 45 minutes to take your pictures. But if they have to wait, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just rude.â&#x20AC;?

by Byron Wilkes

with a bride or groom who is not nice,â&#x20AC;? Simmons says. Your wedding day should be one of jubilation, not anxiety because something didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go as planned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget each other,â&#x20AC;? Putt says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the main thing.â&#x20AC;? Being gracious to your guests and family will go a long way for both the bride and groom. As Lumpkin says, your wedding day â&#x20AC;&#x153;is kind of what you make it,â&#x20AC;? so make yours a joyful occasion.

The Experts Wendy Putt, owner Fresh Cut Catering and Floral 108 Cypress Cove, Flowood, 601-939-4518 Deborah Simmons, accredited bridal consultant Signature Occasions 209 Commerce Park Drive, Suite A, Ridgeland, 601-952-1960 Shanna Lumpkin, owner Shanna Lumpkin Events 4500 Interstate 55, Suite 214 601-953-1340

by Pamela Hosey

DQGORRNJRRGZLWKDPRUQLQJFRDW0DWFKLQJ FXPPHUEXQGVKDYHSKDVHGRXW,QVWHDGWKH JURRPDQGJURRPVPHQZHDUYHVWVLQWKHVDPH FRORUVRUSULQWVDVWKHWLH Â&#x2021;!DDCOLORWITHBOUTONNIERES0DNHHYHU\ JURRPVPDQÂśVERXWRQQLHUHGLIIHUHQWPDWFKLQJLWWR WKHERXTXHWRIWKHEULGHVPDLGKHHVFRUWVGRZQ WKHDLVOH2UGLWFKWKHĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVDOWRJHWKHUDQGKDYH ERXWRQQLHUHVRIZKHDWKHUEVRUOHDYHVIRUWKH ÂłJUHHQ´EULGHRUDPRUHPDVFXOLQHORRN Â&#x2021;"RIDESANDGROOMSAREMOVINGFROMFORMAL WEDDINGATTIRETOAMORECASUALLOOK6LPSOH GDUNVXLWZLWKZKLWHVKLUWVDQGPDWFKLQJWLHV DUHDQRSWLRQIRUDQLQIRUPDOFHUHPRQ\'R\RX ZDQWWRJRDOLWWOHPRUHFDVXDO"3DLUNKDNLSDQWV ZLWKDQDY\EOD]HUDQGDZKLWHRUSDVWHOVKLUWWR FRRUGLQDWHZLWKEULGHVPDLGVÂśGUHVVHV,IWKDWÂśV

WRRERULQJKDYHWKHJX\VZHDUPDWFKLQJVRFNV SRFNHWVTXDUHVRUWLHVLQFRORUIXOIXQSDWWHUQV Â&#x2021;7HILEMOSTTUXEDOSWILLSTILLBEINSHADES OFGRAY OTHERCOLORSAREINDEMAND0HQDUH ZHDULQJGDUNEODFNFRIIHHVKDGHVRIEURZQIRU IDOOZHGGLQJVDQGSRSXODUL]LQJOLJKWHUVKDGHVRI EURZQ WKLQNPRFKDRUPXVKURRP \HDUURXQG 1DY\WX[HGRVDUHDOVRDQRSWLRQ,YRU\MDFNHWV ZLWKWKLQFRORUVWULSHVDUHDPRQJWKHQHZHVW WUHQGVLQWKHEULGDOPDJD]LQHVDQGVKRZV7KH ORRNLVGUDPDWLFDQGUHJDOZKHQSDLUHGZLWK GDUNHUSDQWV Â&#x2021;:HORYHWKHSROLVKHGVKRHVWKDWFRPHZLWKHYHU\ WX[HGRUHQWDOEXWPRVWO\WELOVEMENWEARING SHOESTHATSHOWTHEIRPERSONALITIESZKLOH SURYLGLQJFRPIRUW*X\VDUHGLWFKLQJWKHJHQHULF EODFNSROLVKHGVKRHVIRU&RQYHUVH72066KRHV


Learn to

ES - O - TER - I - CA:

Swing Dance

A collection of items of a special, rare, novel or unusual quality. We are Mississippi’s premiere source for metaphysical esoterica from nature.

Featuring: Natural Crystals Specimens • Pendulums Books • Wands • Moldavite Jewelry & More

Create Your Very Own Jewelry!

Owner - Dani Mitchell Turk, featured on the Food Network’s Ultimate Recipe Showdown Photo by Hull Portraits

4950 Old Canton Road Jackson, MS 39211 Phone: 601-991-2253

Mention this ad for

10% off on any cell phone 1000’s of batteries for everything in the world… For All Your Battery Needs!

or camera battery. expires 3/21

We now have battery packs for Dewalt, Milwaukee & Makita cordless tools.

601.932.2250

4220 Lakeland Dr. Flowood, MS 39232 located at the intersection of Airport Rd. & Lakeland Dr. www.batteryworldonline.com

GottaSwingHattiesburg.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Cakes and Cupcakes for ALL Occasions!

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Your
Instructor

601-879-8189 124 Forest Park Rd., Flora, MS www.MSPetrifiedForest.com

+PIOOZ#FOEFS

National Natural Landmark

Weddings • Corporate Events • Holiday Parties • Tailgate • Business Lunches

27


J

oin guide and historian, Jack Mayfield for a historic driving tour of Oxford and the University of Mississippi on the famous Double Decker bus. Tour will also include stops at two historic homes: the L.Q.C. Lamar House and Cedar Oaks Mansion.

Tickets are $8 for adults and $4 for children and include admission into both homes. Tickets can be purchased Monday-Friday 8am-5pm from the City Hall Visitors Center or the day of the tour from the Skipwith Cottage Visitors Center, located next door to City Hall. Tours depart from Skipwith Cottage.

March 7 - 13, 2012

Tour Dates

28

Saturday, March 10 at 1pm Saturday, March 24 at 1pm Saturday, March 31 at 1pm (Downtown Council Spring Open House)

Saturday, April 7 at 1pm

Saturday, April 21 at 11am (Ole Miss Red/Blue Game)

Friday, April 27 at 3pm (Double Decker Weekend)

Friday, May 11 at 3pm

For more information, contact the Oxford CVB at 662.232.2477.


FILM p 30 | 8 DAYS p 31 | MUSIC p 33 | SPORTS p 36

Project Cocoon by Sharon Dunten

Why is recording prayers important for the Cocoon experience? The Cocoon project is a representation of multitudes of individual voices and expressions that, when gathered together, say something compelling and powerful about the community as a whole. These recordings are done anonymously in a sound-proof place, compiled

ERIC ETHERIDGE

found objects or weaving mats as a cohesive community carries a meaning that words alone cannot express. The agency of the individual is exercised through the construction or weaving or processing, and the processes are at the same time in service to a shared community goal. This connection of labor in service to a mutually beneficial end is strikingly powerful. It can be a healing process.

Artist Kate Browne Cocoon in Plaza de las Tres Culturas, Mexico City

coons. During the weeks of March 12 through 24, the Cocoon will be constructed, assembled and illuminated. The Cocoon Jackson pilgrimage, set for Friday, March 23, at 5:30 p.m., is a symbolic acknowledgement of the past, present and future of Jackson. Members of the community will process through downtown Jackson past sites of historical and personal importance. This procession is a shared experience for all involved. Woven mats, made by participants in the days preceding, will be carried through downtown during the procession, arriving ultimately in the Art Garden where Cocoon is installed. These mats cover the skeleton of the Cocoon and complete the structure. We are asking people to help design the

ERIC ETHERIDGE

What drew you to Jackson to build Cocoon? I am drawn to Jackson because of its rich history and its diversity of people.

How will the cocoons be introduced to the Jackson community? Individuals and groups in the area have begun constructing their own little co-

processional route by marking spots on a map that are important to them or to the history of Jackson. One such interactive map is on the wall of The Palette Café by Viking at the museum. The Cocoon skeleton will be in the Art Garden while close to 200 people come with the woven mats. Each individual in the procession wears a light around their neck. … The procession casts shadows on the streets and buildings important to us as a group. The power of light is important symbolically to illuminate the sites along the route, some of which may have had troubled histories. On Saturday, March 24, at 5:30 p.m., Cocoon Jackson will be illuminated at the ANNE ETHERIDGE

Can you describe the work of a conceptual artist? A conceptual artist produces work without language. In other words, I work through structures and imagery so people can relate to it without the use of words.

and put into an audio loop. The power of the spoken word is integral to the experience. Each vision is going to be different; people will say many different things. The audio compilation is a chorus that speaks to where we are today in the community of Jackson. My job is to bring as many people into the artwork as possible. It is not about my own conceptions of the place or of the community; rather, the participants shape the experience and dictate its ultimate meaning.

Mississippi Museum of Art, and the public will be invited to enter the completed installation, encountering the collected little cocoons along with the recorded wishes and stories. Elaborate on the psychological effects of “recovering a childlike state of wonder and surprise.” People participating in the physical construction have interesting experiences that are freeing and surprising. The process of constructing a little cocoon from

How did you develop the concept of cocoon sculptures? As a writer and director in the theater, I collaborated directly with an audience. Cocoon is created outdoors, and people participate in constructing their sculptures, building the Cocoon and offering their individual prayers and statements. I am fairly invisible. Each Cocoon is about the people in the community and what they want to do with the project. We reach out to different people to get ideas for the material used to build it. For example, in New York, Cocoon was built and shaped with interlocking circles that are shaped around gigs (hooks) with silver maple saplings while another New York location will use orange tubing. In Greenwood, willow was used for the Cocoon. Each large design is a 26-by-10foot structure, including the frame or skeleton, and is covered by a semi-transparent skin, but the materials are locally sourced and tied to the community in a very real way. People take their experience very seriously. It has great meaning, and people who participate are very sincere. Different cultures react to it differently. It’s what makes the entire process so interesting and compelling. What do you want readers to know about you and your work? I think Jackson is really drawn to places with rich history and a diversity of people. My interest in Jackson comes from growing up in rural Pennsylvania and seeing the world the way I saw it growing up, combined with the elements I saw living in urban New York City. I think growing up in a rural setting is why I have an interest in outdoor work. Jackson is the largest city in a historically vast, rural state, and these characteristics of the place offer very interesting possibilities. In my experience, people will be surprised at the meaning and understanding they gain from participating in a project so uniquely tied to the history of 29 consciousness of their community. jacksonfreepress.com

I

n a couple of weeks, Jacksonians will have an opportunity to participate in an international art event: Cocoon Jackson. “Anyone can participate in constructing the Cocoon,” says Kate Browne, an artist, writer and director who is bringing the project to Jackson. “The Cocoon is made almost entirely of local materials. It will be built by members of the community and is meant to reflect the collective consciousness of the city’s residents.” Participants will build Cocoon Jackson, measuring 26 feet long by 10 feet high, in the Art Garden at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) March 12 through 24, when it will open to the public. The project is part of a sculpture series that already has installations in Cragsmoor, N.Y., Mexico City, and Greenwood, Miss. Inside the larger structure, individuals will contribute their personal cocoons, Browne says. “These little cocoons are literal vessels for individuals’ hopes and dreams for the future and collectively, they serve to commemorate and record the hopes of the community at large,” she says. “I will also interview those who make little cocoons and record their hopes and wishes. The audio will play on loop as part of the Cocoon installation.” Browne, 51, grew up in rural Pennsylvania and graduated from Hampshire College in Massachusetts in 1978. She now lives and works in New York City with her husband, Eric Etheridge, and their daughter, Maud Etheridge.


DIVERSIONS|film

Art-House Offerings

by Anita Modak-Truran COURTESY WARNER BROS.

The Academy Award-winning film “The Artist” began as an art-house movie.

“T 6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. Mar. 9- Thurs. Mar. 15 2012 3-D John Carter PG13 John Carter (non 3-D) PG13 Silent House

R

A Thousand Words PG13 3-D Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax PG Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (non 3-D) PG Project X

R

The Artist

PG13

Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds PG13

March 7 - 13, 2012

Act Of Valor

30

Gone

PG13

3-D Ghost Rider: Spirit Of Vengeance PG13 This Means War PG13 The Secret World Of Arrietty G 3-D Journey 2 PG Journey 2 (non 3-D)

PG

Safe House The Vow

R PG13

Chronicle PG13

R

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

he Artist,” this year’s Academy Award winner for the really big awards of Best Picture, Director and Actor, started out as an art-house offering. Quite understandably, its makers did not believe that a black-andwhite silent film with a funny little dog would appeal to a mainstream audience. But the originality of the film, the quality of the performances and the brilliant marketing strategy of the Weinstein brothers caused this film to cross from a niche market to popular success. Art-house cinema exists because of those brave creative souls who seek to unabashedly express themselves on celluloid or a digital medium. The typical restraints of big budgets and wanting to please everyone—granny to baby—aren’t issues when someone is following their passion and fulfilling a dream on a micro, if not nonexistent, budget. Beyond any expectations you may have, Jackson has an art-house cinema series. The Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St., 601-960-1550) screens fabulous films in the heart of downtown every Sunday, and the March line-up includes a medley of cinematic diversions: “Balibo,” directed by Robert Connolly, is based on a true story that didn’t reach the international community when it occurred in 1975, and it throws a powerful political punch against government cover-ups. The film depicts the last days of five Australian journalists—Greg Shackleton (Damon Gameau), Tony Stewart (Mark Winter), Gary Cunningham (Gyton Grantley), Brian Peters (Thomas Wright) and Malcolm Rennie (Nathan Phillips)—whom Indonesian forces murdered while they were reporting on the impending invasion of East Timor. Roger East (Anthony LaPaglia), a former war correspondent turned freelance journalist, investigates their disappearance and uncovers violent atrocities by the Indonesian government and ugly inaction by the Australian government. “The Skin I Live In,” which was an official selection at the Cannes Film Festival last year and stars Antonio Banderas and Elena Anaya, is an inventive melodramatic cocktail that only someone with the chutzpah of Spanish director Pedro Almodovar would dare try. The movie shakes

up different parts of common Almodovar themes of betrayal, loneliness and sexual identity and adds a kick of sci-fi bordering on horror. The story, twisted and original, concerns Dr. Robert Ledgard (Banderas), an eminent plastic surgeon and university researcher who is literally molding a young woman named Vera (Anaya) into his dead wife’s image. The cuckoo doctor is a Frankenstein creator seeking to dominate women and eliminate male interference because of his own tortured background. Everyone suffers, but there is a comic glee in the excessiveness of the tragedy. The Bolshoi Ballet takes center stage in “Le Corsaire,” which was originally choreographed by Marius Petipa in 1899 and recently revived and refreshed by Alexei Ratmansky and Yury Burlak. The story involves battling pirates, girls sold into slavery and a love affair between Medora, a young Greek girl, and Conrad, a dashing pirate. However, the story is secondary to the exuberant showmanship and incredible talents of a world-class ballet company. According to dance critic Sarah Crompton of The Daily Telegraph, Petipa created “this spectacle of largesse and refinement to allow lots of lovely young women in short tutus to unfurl their legs in front of an audience of rich patrons. Its three acts run for (hours), … throwing in everything but the kitchen sink in its attempt to delight and titillate.” More than a hundred years later, “Le Corsaire” continues to enchant audiences with the timeless delight of longlegged lovelies running around half-clad. Opera and cinema converge in “La Boheme,” which pairs one of the most beloved operas of all times with exquisite vocalists—Fiorenza Cedolins as Mimi, Christopher Maltman as Marcello and Ramón Vargas as Rodolfo—performing at Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu Opera. The inspiration for the Broadway musical “Rent,” Puccini’s opera explores the fragile nature of happiness in a world of poverty, cold and disease. Within everyday life, stuffed with dreams and disappointments, Mimi and Rodolfo find love. And love is definitely something to sing about. For more information on what’s showing at Art House Cinema in Jackson, visit msfilm.org.


BEST BETS March 7 - 14, 2012 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

CAMILLE MONKHAUS

The National Cutting Horse Association Championships at the Kirk Fordice Equine Center (1200 Mississippi St.) run through March 16. Free; call 817-244-6188. … Cartoonist Marshall Ramsey speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers and Blues. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday. … The California Guitar Trio performs at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601-291-7121 or 800-7453000. … West Restaurant and Lounge hosts the Wild and Out Wednesday Comedy Show at 8:45 p.m. $2. … The Med Grill hosts the Battle of the Bands at 9 p.m. … Dain Edwards is at Fenian’s. … Swing de Paris is at Underground 119.

Orchestra plays in the restaurant (free), and Rayland Baxter and T.B. Ledford & Friends perform in the Red Room at 7:30 p.m. ($10; call 601-291-7121). … The Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). $20, $5 students; call 601-594-5584 for more details.

FRIDAY 3/9

The Home Show 2012 kicks off at 10 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1207 Mississippi St.); runs through March 11. $7 general admission, $10 admission and cooking school; call 601-362-6501. … Luckenbach plays at Kathryn’s. … James Bailey and Carole Cantrell perform at Cerami’s. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents “Chamber III: Three Thrilling Ensembles” at 7:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). $15; call 601-960-1565. … … Josh Turner performs at 7:30 p.m. at MSU Riley Center (2200 Fifth St., Meridian). $68, $62; call 601-696-2200. … South Bound Traffic plays at Jaco’s Tacos. … Carolina Story is at Sam’s Lounge. … Martin’s has music from Juston Stens and the Get Real Gang with Sun Hotel. … Forever Friday is at 10 p.m. at Dreamz JXN with music from James Crow, K.T., J. Da Groova, Dre Rock and DJ Phingaprint. Call 601-4548313; email 4everfriday601@gmail.com. … The Chad Wesley Band and Gemma Ray play at Ole Tavern.

SATURDAY 3/10

Bring your family to Zoo Day at 10 a.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). $9, $8.20 seniors, $6 children ages 2-12, members and babies free; call 601-352-2580. … Lemuria Story Time at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.) features Michael Rosen’s book “We’re Going On a Bear Hunt.” Free; call 601-366-7619. … Cerami’s has music from Ron Sennett at 6 p.m. … The Murrah High School Jazz Band performs at 6:30 p.m. at Murrah High School (1400 Murrah Drive). Free, donations welcome; call 601-937-1135. … Yarn and Wild Feathers play at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $10; call 601-292-7121. … Seth Libbey and the Liberals are at Fenian’s. … Faze 4 performs at Reed Pierce’s.

THURSDAY 3/8

The art show for Liefje Hogg Smith is at 5 p.m. at Fischer Galleries. Free; call 601-291-9115. … The opening reception for Tom Harmon’s art exhibit is from 5-7:30 p.m. at the Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). Free; call 601960-1582. … Kerry Thomas and M.L. perform during Centric Thursday at Dreamz JXN. … Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer performs at the King Edward Hotel from 7-10:30 p.m. … The play “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” is at 7 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.); final show March 11 at 2 p.m. $10, $7 children 12 and under; call 601-948-3533. … Trans-Siberian Orchestra presents “Beethoven’s Last Night” at 7:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum. $31.50-$51.50; call 800-745-3000. … At Hal & Mal’s, the Thomas Jackson

Andy Hardwick performs during Fitzgerald’s 11 a.m. brunch. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) features the films “Balibo” at 2 p.m. and “The Skin I Live In” at 5 p.m. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org. … Roosta Cool, Famlee Jewels and more perform during the Generation NXT Indie Concert Series at 6 p.m. at Dreamz JXN. … Author Katrina Byrd’s “Portrait of a Woman” reading is at 7 p.m. at Lumpkins BBQ. $20; call 601-813-4266.

MONDAY 3/12

Jeffrey Yentz’s “Mississippi … Another Perspective” art exhibit ends today at the Jackson Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). Free; call 601-960-1582. … Enjoy beer, burgers and bluegrass during Raise Your Pints’ He-Man Manly Night at 5 p.m. at Underground 119. $25 (includes commemorative glass); visit raiseyourpints.com.

TUESDAY 3/13

The recording of the Mississippi Happening podcast is at 7 p.m. at Pizza Shack, Colonial Mart (5046 Parkway Drive). Visit mississippihappening.com. … James Martin and Maryann Kyle perform during the Mississippi Opera cabaret “An Evening with Cole Porter” at 7:30 p.m. at Underground 119. $15, food for sale; call 601-960-2300.

WEDNESDAY 3/14

Political commentators Jere Nash and Andy Taggert talk about redistricting during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-5766998. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike. … Cary Hudson is at Fenian’s. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

The California Guitar Trio performs at Duling Hall March 7 at 8 p.m.

BILL ELLISON

Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer (Confer pictured) performs Thursdays from 7-10:30 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel.

SUNDAY 3/11

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 3/7

31


jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Zippity Doo Dah Parade Weekend March 22-25, in Fondren. The Sweet Potato Queens headline the event that includes Arts, Eats and Beats March 22; a Big Hat Luncheon and music from Molly and the Ringwalds March 23; a children’s street carnival, parade and after-party March 24. Proceeds from fundraisers benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital. Call 601-981-9606. BOOM Fashion Show April 5, time TBA. BOOM and the JFP present the city’s hottest spring fashions to benefit Dress for Success Metro Jackson. Includes food and an after-party. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 23; visit boomfashionshow.com.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Call 601-352-2580. • Zoo Day March 10, 10 a.m. Enjoy arts and crafts, games and face painting. $9, $8.20 seniors, $6 children ages 2-12, members and babies free. • Critters and Crawlers March 10, 10 a.m. For toddlers ages 2-3. Prices vary; call ext. 241. • Spring Zoo Camp March 12-16, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. For children ages 6-12. $35, $30 members for one class; $115, $105 members for four days. • Zoo Connections Teacher Workshops March 12 (grades K-2) and March 14 (grades 3-5), 9 a.m. $15, $5 for 0.5 CEU credits optional; call ext. 241. “History Is Lunch” March 7, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Meet cartoonist Marshall Ramsey. Free; call 601-576-6998. Zip39 CEO Forum March 8, 4 p.m., at Butler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens and Cannada (1020 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Featured executives give insight on leadership. $30; call 601-605-2554. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting March 8, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol St.). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0002 Women’s Spring Basketball League Registration through March 9, at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Register at the Department of Parks and Recreation from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Games begin March 19. $325 per team; call 601-960-0471. National Cutting Horse Association Eastern National Championships through March 16 at Kirk Fordice Equine Center (1207 Mississippi St.). Free; call 817-244-6188. Community Shred Day March 9, 7:30 a.m., at Home Depot, North Jackson (6325 Interstate 55 N.). Limit of five bags each; no businesses. Free; call 601-359-3680.

March 7 - 13, 2012

Friday Forum March 9, 9 a.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). Mississippi NAACP president Derrick Johnson speaks. Free; email nmcnamee@greaterjacksonpartnership.com.

32

Heron, Great Egret and Anhinga Rookery. WMA permit required ($5-$15) at any sporting goods store) except for seniors over 65 children under 16. Free; call 601-956-7444. Laura Felts Missionary Society 100th Anniversary Celebration March 11, 3:30 p.m., at Pearl Street AME Church (2519 Robinson St.). The event also includes the 53rd annual Richard and Sarah Allen Tea. Free; call 601-979-1474 or 601-352-6087. He-Man Manly Night March 12, 5 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). The fundraiser for Raise Your Pints is a “man-fest” of beer, burgers and bluegrass. $25; visit raiseyourpints.com. W.I.N.E. (Women Inquiring, Networking and Engaging) Meeting March 12, 6:30 p.m., at the home of deborah Rae Wright (135 Grand Ave.). Attendees meet to discuss a chosen topic. Bring wine; RSVP. Email winejackson@gmail.com. Community Empowerment and Awareness Month through March 30, at Northside Senior Center (104 E. Northside Drive). Enjoy an inspirational movie and popcorn Fridays from 6-8 p.m., and forums Saturdays at 9 a.m. Limited seating; RSVP. Free; call 601-960-2166. Call for Scholarship Applicants through April 16, at Community Foundation of Greater Jackson (525 E. Capitol St., Suite 5B). Amounts per scholarship range from $500-$3,200 and are based on merit and need. Apply by April 16. Visit cfgj.org for guidelines. Call 601-974-6044. Call for Volunteers through April 30, at Jackson Inner-city Garden (Medgar Evers Blvd. and Northside Drive, behind the BP station). Help prepare the garden for spring planting Saturdays from 8-11 a.m. Email tre.roberts@jiggarden.org.

WELLNESS Fitness Center, at Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers Market (2548 Livingston Road). Options include aerobics and Zumba classes, resistance training, and a children’s gym. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays until April 1, and 8 a.m.7 p.m. April 1-Nov. 30. Free; call 601-987-6783. Zumba Classes, at Dance Unlimited Studio, Byram (6787 S. Siwell Road, Suite A, Byram). Classes are held weekly. Visit peurefun.com for class schedule information and directions. $5; call 601-209-7566.

Parent/Guardian Education Advocacy Training March 10, 11 a.m., at Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Road). The topic is “State of Emergency: Mentoring Our Youth.” Lunch provided. RSVP. Free; call 877-892-2577 or 601-862-4772. Walk Against Fear 2012 March 11-April 7. The civil-rights march for immigrants begins at the National Civil Rights Museum (450 Mulberry St., Memphis) and ends at the Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Workshops included. Email walk.against.fear.2012@gmail.com. Art House Cinema Downtown March 11, 2 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See “Balibo” at 2 p.m. and “The Skin I Live In” at 5 p.m. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org.

MUSIC Ardenland Concert Series. Call 601-291-7121. • California Guitar Trio March 7, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The band consists of Paul Richards of Utah, Bert Lams of Belgium and Hideyo Moriya of Japan. For ages 18 and up. Enjoy cocktails before the show at 6:30 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Tickets available through Ticketmaster. • Rayland Baxter March 8, 7:30 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The Nashville singer-songwriter is known for the songs “Willy’s Song” and “The Woman for Me.” T.B. Ledford and Friends also perform. $10. • Yarn and Wild Feathers March 10, 7:30 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). Enjoy cocktails at 7:30 p.m. and the show at 9 p.m. Yarn is an alt-country band from Brooklyn, N.Y., and Wild Feathers, a folk band, is from Nashville. $10 at the door. Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music Concert March 8, 7:30 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol Street). $20, $5 students; call 601-594-5584. Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Beethoven’s Last Night March 8, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). $31.50-$51.50; call 800-745-3000.

Breast Cancer Conference March 10, 9 a.m., at Cabot Lodge Millsaps (2375 N. State St.). Rebirth Alliance hosts. $50 and up; call 601-966-7252.

Chamber III: Three Thrilling Ensembles March 9, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra’s quintets perform. $15; call 601-960-1565.

The Dragon’s Way Weight Loss and Stress Management Program March 13-April 18, at The Shepherd’s Staff Counseling Center (2508 Lakeland Drive). Space limited; registration required. $199; call 601-664-0455.

Mississippi Happening March 13, 7 p.m., at Pizza Shack, Colonial Mart (5046 Parkway Drive, Suite 6). Guests include Kate Browne, The Swamp Babies and Nathan Harper. Call 601-497-7454.

Two Dollar Tuesday Zumba Classes, at Richland Community Center (410 E. Harper St., Richland). Paula Eure leads the Latin-inspired dance classes. Visit peurefun.com for a schedule. $2; call 601-209-7566.

The Home Show 2012 March 9-11, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Enjoy product showcases and workshops. Open March 9-10 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and March 11 from noon-4 p.m. The show includes the Taste of Home Cooking School March 10 from 6-8 p.m. $7, $10 admission and cooking school; call 601-362-6501.

Mississippi Farmers Market through Dec. 15, at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573.

Boxers Rebellion Fight Clinic March 9-11, at Mississippi Basketball and Athletics (2240 Westbrook Road). Boxers, kickboxers and mixed martial artists learn ways to sharpen their skills. The luncheon is March 9, and classes are March 10-11 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $125, $100 one day; visit boxersrebellion.org.

Sky Shows, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Options include “WSKY: Radio of the Stars” Saturdays at 1 p.m. and “Our Home in the Milky Way” Saturdays at 3 p.m. $5.50, $4.50 seniors, $3 children; call 601-960-1552.

Jackson Audubon Society Spring Field Trip March 10, 7:45 a.m., at Turcotte Lab (Highway 43 S., Canton). Carpoolers depart to the Great Blue

BE THE CHANGE Pure Give March 10, 11 a.m., at Pure Barre (Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 235-A, and 201 Northlake Ave., Ridgeland. Proceeds from the exercise class benefit Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA) at the Jackson location and the Mississippi Diabetes Foundation at the Ridgeland location. Participants receive a free class gift card. Donations welcome (cash or check only); call 769-251-0486 or 601-707-7410.

FARMERS MARKETS

STAGE AND SCREEN

“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” March 8, 7 p.m., and March 11 at 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $10, $7 children 12 and under; call 601-948-3533.

“An Evening With Cole Porter” Cabaret March 13, 7:30 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). James Martin and Maryann Kyle perform. $15, food for sale; call 601-960-2300.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • “The Healing” March 7, 5 p.m. Jonathan O’Dell signs books; reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. • “Glory Be” March 8, 4 p.m. Augusta Scattergood signs books. $16.99 book. • Lemuria Story Time March 10, 11 a.m. Free. • “A Good American” March 14, 5 p.m. Alex George signs; reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. “Portrait of a Woman” Reading March 11, 7 p.m., at Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Road). Author Katrina Byrd reads her collection of writings. Dinner served. $20; call 601-813-4266. Weekly Storytime, at Campbell’s Bakery (3013 N. State St.) Wednesdays from 4:30-5 p.m. Volunteers and books welcome. Free; call 601-362-4628.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515. • Little Cocoon Workshops March 10, 10 a.m., and March 14, 3:30 p.m. Make sculptures for the Cocoon Jackson exhibit. Free. • Flower Bulb Lecture and Workshop March 14, 10:30 a.m. $75. Events at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg). Call 601-631-2997. • Ballroom Dance Lessons March 11, 5 p.m. James Frechette, owner of Applause Dance Factory, teaches the Fox Trot and the Country Twostep in the Academy Building. $10. • Memoir Writing Workshop March 12-13, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Irene Graham teaches the class at Cobb House. $345, $330 members.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Events at Jackson Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-960-1582. • “Mississippi … Another Perspective” through March 12. See Jeffery Yentz’s works in ink. A portion of the proceeds from sales benefits the Bower Center for the Arts and the gallery. • Tom Harmon Art Exhibit through April 30. See watercolor and oil paintings. The opening reception is March 8 from 5-7:30 p.m. • Mississippi Celebrates Architecture Exhibit through May 1. The exhibit features works from members of AIA Mississippi and student architects. Liefje Hogg Smith Art Show March 8, 5 p.m., at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). See the artist’s oil paintings. Free; call 601-291-9115. Call for Papers through March 9, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The Margaret Walker Center seeks proposals for the Creative Arts Festival April 13-14. Proposals should be 250-500 words, and categories include poetry and spoken word, visual arts, writing and performing arts. Call 601-979-2055. FIGMENT Art Festival Call for Entries. The Greater Jackson Arts Council seeks artists and volunteers for FIGMENT, a free interactive arts event, April 28-29 at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.) and throughout the Millsaps Arts District. The deadline for submissions is March 30. Free; call 601-874-7993. Knife Show and Hammer-in March 10-11, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). See an exhibit of knives. Jason Knight gives a forging demonstration. $8, children 12 and under, military and police free; $50 demonstration; call 601-892-1867 or 601-720-7342. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS|music COURTESY ASTRALWERKS

Opera Lets Its Hair Down

James Martin and Maryann Kyle will perform a number of hit songs from composer and songwriter Cole Porter as part of the Opera Underground series.

O

n March 13, Mississippi Operaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opera Underground series presents Maryann Kyle and James Martin in an Evening with Cole Porter. Kyle and Martin will sing some standard favorites from the renowned songwriter Cole Porter as well as some of his lesser-known songs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night and Day,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Lovelyâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Still of the Nightâ&#x20AC;? are just a few examples.

Natalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Notes by Natalie Long

James Martin is a vocal professor at Millsaps College, and Maryann Kyle is a vocal professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. Both perform with the Mississippi Vocal Arts Ensemble and have active opera and cabaret performance careers. The Opera Underground series, Martin says, is meant to help performers reach a broader audience and â&#x20AC;&#x153;also to show that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just sing with big orchestras on big stages. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of nice to have an opportunity to let our hair down.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really successful experiment as a way of providing more contemporary and intimate performances for people who enjoy great music,â&#x20AC;? Martin says about the Opera Underground series. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing opera arias and mixing them with the American songbook standards.â&#x20AC;? The last installment of Opera Underground this season will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Broads of Broadwayâ&#x20AC;? with Lester Senter on May 8. Senter is a renowned mezzo-soprano vocalist who has performed in more than 60 roles across the country and abroad. In 2001, the Mississippi Arts Commission presented her with the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award for Excellence in the Arts. Mississippi Opera will also present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Elixir of Love,â&#x20AC;? an Italian opera, on April 21 at Thalia Mara Hall. The Opera Underground series is at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.) at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Admission costs $15 with food for sale. Call 601-960-2300, or visit msopera.org for more information and to buy tickets.

Dianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Friendship Playlist by Briana Robinson

M

L[WDSHVJRZD\EDFN6RPHRI\RXPLJKWUHPHPEHUUHFHLYLQJ WKHPDVJLIWVRUJLYLQJWKHPWRVRPHRQHVSHFLDO:KLOH ZHGRQ¶WXVHFDVVHWWHWDSHVDQ\PRUHDQGGLJLWDOIRUPDWV RIPXVLFDUHWDNLQJRYHUPL[HG&'VDUHVWLOOVRPHZKDWSRSXODU 5HFHQWO\RQHRIP\EHVWIULHQGVJDYHPHD&'WKDWVKHPDGHDQG GHFRUDWHGIRUPH7KHWUDFNVRQLWDUHIXQDQGUDQGRPDQGVRPH DUHDELWPHDQLQJIXOWRRXUUHODWLRQVKLS+HUH¶VDOLVWRIWKHVRQJV WKDWPDNHKHUWKLQNRIPH  ±"REATHE²E\7HOHSRSPXVLN  ±'ET/FF²E\)R[\  ±$OUBLE$UTCH"US²E\)UDQNLH6PLWK  ±'OOD4IME²E\&U\VWDO&DVWOHV  ±"ENDABLE0OSEABLE²E\+RW&KLS  ±+IDS7ITH'UNS(OT#HIP2EMIX ²E\*RULOOD]  ±(EARTSON&IRE²E\&XW&RS\  ´7KH:KLVWOH6RQJµE\)UDQNLH.QXFNOHV  ±/DESSA²E\&DULERX  ±%MPATHY²E\&U\VWDO&DVWOHV  ±$!2%3OULWAX2EMIX ²E\*RULOOD]  ±%XTRABALL"REAKBOT2EMIX ²E\%UHDNERW  ±7E(AVE,OVE²E\+RW&KLS

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guitars COURTESY TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

I

first heard the Trans-Siberian Orchestra a few years ago, when one of its songs was set to strobing Christmas lights in a beer commercial (which I thought was rather cool). TSO has made several stops in Mississippi, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe that I have never gone to see them or have any of their records. To tell the truth, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never been properly introduced to the band and, because a Saenger Theater production of The Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommyâ&#x20AC;? in 1996 was the only rock opera I had ever witnessed (and loved!), I was somewhat skeptical. I thought it would be some corporate rock band with old fogies trying to play classical music. I was wrong. Since rock composer and lyricist Paul Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill formed TSO in 1996, it has sold more than eight million copies of its first five rock operas, which include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas Eve and Other Storiesâ&#x20AC;? (1996), â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Christmas Atticâ&#x20AC;? (1998) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lost Christmas Eveâ&#x20AC;? (2004). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night Castleâ&#x20AC;? (2009) was TSOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first double album; it debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard Top 200 Chart, and the Recording Industry Association of America certified it gold within eight weeks of its release.

Hot Chipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Have Loveâ&#x20AC;? is just one of the songs that both Diana and I love.

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra will perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Nightâ&#x20AC;? March 8 at the Mississippi Coliseum.

Another gold album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Nightâ&#x20AC;? (2000), was TSOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first non-holiday release. It features classic works by Beethoven and Mozart as well as several originals. In its 15 years of performing, this band has become one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top touring acts, playing to more than nine million people in cities all over the world and selling more than $334 million worth of tickets. TSO is an act that both older

and younger audiences can enjoy, infusing up-and-coming new talent with wellrespected music and musicians who have honed their craft for years. The Trans-Siberian Orchestra will perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Nightâ&#x20AC;? for only one tour date in Jackson on Thursday, March 8, at the Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St., 601-961-4000) before heading to the studio to focus on a new album and live concert. For tickets ($31.50 to $51.50), visit ticketmaster.com. Another great band coming to the capital city is the California Guitar Trio, set to play at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., 601941-1432) Wednesday, March 7. The band is comprised of Paul Richards of Salt Lake City, Bert Lams of Belgium and Hideyo Moriya of Japan. The California Guitar Trio recently celebrated 20 years of picking and grinning together. They met in England while studying with legendary King Crimson guitarist Robert Fripp. After touring with Frippâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s League of Crafty Guitarists, the three musicians reconnected in Los Angeles and formed the California Guitar Trio in 1991.

Astronauts used CGTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music as a wake-up call on the space shuttle Endeavor, and major news networks around the world have featured the band. In 2010, CGT released its album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Andromedaâ&#x20AC;? on Inner Knot Records. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Andromedaâ&#x20AC;? features such musical greats as Tony Levin, Julie Slick, Eric Slick, Tom Griesgraber and Tyler Trotter. The band has had the distinct honor of playing with acts such as Leftover Salmon, King Crimson, Tito Puente and Taj Mahal. The trio released its latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masterworks,â&#x20AC;? in 2011. CGTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blend of European classical music, bluegrass, rock, blues, jazz and surf rock (just to scratch the surface) has made it one of the music industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bestkept secrets. Tickets are $15 and are available at ticketmaster.com or can be purchased for $20 at the door. Both of these shows are must-sees, as is all the awesome local music our city has to offer. Please clear your calendars, and make it a point to hear great music this week. You have plenty to choose from. Have a good one, and if you see me out and about, please say hello!

jacksonfreepress.com

PERFORMING ARTS ENCYCLOPEDIA

by Briana Robinson

33


livemusic MARCH 7 - WEDNESDAY

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 3/7

SATURDAY 3/10

Singer/Songwriter Night with Natalie Long (DR)

Jon Clark (DR) YARN w/ Wild Feather (RR)

THURSDAY 3/8 Thomas Jackson (DR) Rayland Baxter (RR)

FRIDAY 3/9

TUESDAY3/13 PUB QUIZ w/ Erin & friends (restaurant)

Deadstring Brother (DR)

Coming Soon FRI 3.16: Marching MALfunction & Second Line Stomp start and end at Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s! The Lucky Hand Blues Band and The Rumprollers directly after the night march. WOOD in the Red Room

MALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

SAT 3:17

ST. PADDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PARADE

Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest party of the year happens in downtown Jackson!

Monday - Friday Blue Plate Lunch March 7 - 13, 2012

with corn bread and tea or coffee

34

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. | Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQ SULQWDQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP

&OXE0DJRR¶V!LL$ANCE.IGHT W$6$*2EIGN 'XOLQJ+DOO#ALIFORNIA'UITAR 0DUWLQ¶V*USTON3TENSFORMERLY 4RIO OF$R$OG THE'ET2EAL 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 'ANGW3UN(OTEL 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE &UDZGDG+ROH+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW .DWKU\Q¶V,UCKENBACH $*-IKE 7KH+DXWH3LJ4HE$UNNS :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH 7DEOH$AVID0IGOTT :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT *HRUJLD%OXH3HAUN0ATTERSON 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW 2OH7DYHUQ#HAD7ESLEY"AND SP W'EMMA2AY 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 5HHG3LHUFH¶V'LITTER"OYS 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 8QGHUJURXQG"IG!L4HE 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE (EAVYWEIGHTS %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² &HUDPL¶V*AMES"AILEY#AROLE 3MITH #ANTRELLSP %RXUERQ6WUHHW+ARAOKE -XOHS,ARRY"REWER &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT )HQLDQ¶V0RATTY SP +DO 0DO¶V$EADSTRING"ROTHER +DO 0DO¶V3INGERS 'UHDP]-;1&OREVER&RIDAYS 3ONGWRITERS.IGHTSP -DFR¶V7DFRV3OUTH"OUND 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDS 4RAFFIC SP 2OJD¶V2ENEGADE /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU4HE 8QGHUJURXQG3WINGDE #OLONELSSP 0ARIS 6RXOVKLQH7RZQVKLS&INGERS )HQLDQ¶V$AIN%DWARDS 4AYLOR-ARK7HITTINGTON 6RXOVKLQH2OG)DQQLQ3TEVE MARCH 8 - THURSDAY #HESTER )-RQHV&RUQHU*ESSE'UITAR 3MITH EOXHVOXQFK

MARCH 10 - SATURDAY &KHURNHH,QQ$´LO4RIO 0DUWLQ¶V"ANNER&AIR 06&ROLVHXP4RANS 3IBERIAN 0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\3OULFUL /RCHESTRA 3ATURDAYSSP +DO 0DO¶V2AYLAND"AXTERW +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKE 4",EDFORD&RIENDS %LJ SP 5RRP 4HOMAS*ACKSON +DO 0DO¶V*ON#LARK UHVW 9ARN /RCHESTRA UHVW

W7ILD&EATHERSFRFNWDLOV 2OH7DYHUQ,ADIES.IGHT SPVKRZSP 0DUWLQ¶V,ADIES.IGHT %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKE 5HHG3LHUFH¶V&AZE SP 2OH7DYHUQ6IVA6IVAW.AKED 7KH0HG*ULOO+ENNY$AVIS 'ODS &OXE0DJRR¶V,ADIES.IGHTW 8QGHUJURXQG"ILL0ERRY4RIO $6$*2EIGN &HUDPL¶V2ON3ENNETTSP %UDG\¶V+ARAOKE 0F%¶V&ULKERSON0ACE .LQJ(GZDUG*AZZ"EAUTIFULW 3DSLWR¶V3HAUN0ATTERSON 0AM#ONFERSP 3HOLFDQ&RYH,ARRY"REWER %RXUERQ6WUHHW,ADIES.IGHT )HQLDQ¶V3ETH,IBBEY4HE -EN!RE0IGS.IGHTW3NAZZ ,IBERALS 7KH0HG*ULOO/PEN-IC.IGHT +DO 0DO¶V*ON#LARK SP 2OJD¶V'LEN'AINES 6KXFNHUV$OUBLE3HOTZSP %RXUERQ6WLQWKH4XDUWHU4HE /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE #OLONELSSP 8QGHUJURXQG!NDY (ARDWICK4RIO MARCH 11 - SUNDAY 6W$QGUHZ¶V&DWKHGUDO-3 !CADEMYOF!NCIENT-USIC 'UHDP]-;1'ENERATION.84 #ONCERTVWXGHQWV 3PRING"REAK%DITION2OOSTA )HQLDQ¶V$EAD)RISH"LUES #OOL &AMLEE*EWELS *ACK$ 'UHDP]-;1#ENTRIC4HURSDAYS -ISSISSIPPI3NO -ADAM4 W+ERRY4HOMAS-, $EZOF(ELLBORN #ADILLAC*AY "AY" *AY#ROSS $*4WILIGHT SP MARCH 9 - FRIDAY +RW6KRWV%\UDP-IKEAND )-RQHV&RUQHU*ESSE±'UITAR² -ARTY´S*AM3ESSION 3MITH EOXHVOXQFK

6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ+NIGHT 6DP¶V/RXQJH#AROLINA3TORY "RUCEDP EUXQFK

0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\-ARTINI )LW]JHUDOG¶V!NDY(ARDWICK &RIDAYSSP EUXQFK DP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKE 7DEOH2APHAEL3EMMES SP MD]]EUXQFK DP 7KH%RDUGZDON+ARAOKE SP 7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTON 6RPEUD0H[LFDQ.LWFKHQ*OHN SP -ORADPSP

       

7KH0HG*ULOO%DDIE#OTTON SP %XUJHUV %OXHV3HAUN 0ATTERSON

MARCH 12 - MONDAY 8QGHUJURXQG(E -AN -ANLY.IGHT"EER "URGERS "LUEGRASS  +DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3 "LUES3OCIETYSP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE 2OH7DYHUQ0UB1UIZ %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE

MARCH 13 - TUESDAY +DO 0DO¶V0UB1UIZ 2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQ¶V/PEN-IC 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT )LUH/PEN-IC#OMEDY.IGHT 0DUJDULWDV*OHN-ORASP 060XVHXPRI$UW-USICIN THE#ITYSP 2OG6FKRRO,IVE*AZZ"LUES /PEN-IC0OETRYSP 3L]]D6KDFN2OG&DQWRQ5G -3(APPENINGSP 8QGHUJURXQG/PERA 5NDERGROUND*AMES-ARTIN -ARYANN+YLE

MARCH 14 - WEDNESDAY )HQLDQ¶V#ARY(UDSON 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE :HVW5HVWDXUDQW /RXQJH :&DSLWRO6W7ILD/UT 7EDNESDAY#OMEDY3HOW SP 3DSLWRV*OHN-ORASP 7KH%RDUGZDON,IVE$* 6SRUWVPDQ¶V/RGJH+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH %RXUERQ6WUHHW+ARAOKE &OXE0DJRR¶V/PEN-IC.IGHT SP +DO 0DO¶V.EW"OURBON 3TREET*AZZ"AND 0HG*ULOO"ATTLEOFTHE"ANDS SP /DVW&DOO+ARAOKE 8QGHUJURXQG"EN0AYTON EOXHV

6HQGPXVLFOLVWLQJVWR 1DWDOLH/RQJDW PXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP RUID[WRE\QRRQ 0RQGD\IRULQFOXVLRQLQWKHQH[W LVVXH0XVLFOLVWLQJVPXVWEH UHFHLYHGE\WKH)ULGD\EHIRUH WKHQHZLVVXHWREHFRQVLGHUHG IRU'D\VSLFNV

4REY3ONGZ "IG3EAN±/DQGHUV&HQWHU6RXWKDYHQ #HEECHAND#HONG±%HDX5LYDJH&DVLQR%LOR[L 0INK&LOYD%XPERIENCE±-HPLVRQ&RQFHUW+DOO%LUPLQJKDP -ARTY3TUART±*UDQG7KHDWUH&DUWHUVYLOOH*D

)RUDOLVWRIPXVLFYHQXH DGGUHVVHVDQGSKRQH QXPEHUVYLVLW MISPVPXVLFYHQXHV


The Glitter Boys

Weekly Lunch Specials

$

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

03/07

LIVE KARAOKE

Faze 4 March 11 | 9:00pm • Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NO COVER CHARGE!

LADIES

NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

Wednesday,March 7th

SWING DE PARIS

March 8

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM Friday March 9

Chad Wesley Juston Stens Band

FRIDAY

NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS

03/09

• $3 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosas Every Saturday & Sunday until 6pm

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, March 8th

ANDY HARDWICK TRIO (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, March 9th

BIG AL & THE HEAVYWEIGHTS

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS • 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

with Gemma Ray

Follow us on Facebook

Saturday

March 10

Naked Gods (Former Dr. Dog) & The Get Real Gang with Sun Hotel SATURDAY

03/10

BANNER

FAIR

with Viva Viva

Monday

March 12

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

sponsored by

March 13

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

March 14

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

Don’t Forget To Stop By Our

MID DAY CAFE Serving Lunch 11-2!

214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

FREE WiFi

Saturday, March 10th

BILL PERRY TRIO

(Jazz) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Monday, March 12th

HE-MAN MANLY NIGHT Beer, Burgers and Bluegrass Tips Go To Raise Your Pints

(Bluegrass) 5-10, $25 Cover Tuesday, March 13th

OPERA UNDERGROUND (Opera) 6-11, $15 Cover

Wednesday,March 14th

BEN PAYTON

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, March 15th

LISA MILLS

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, March 16th

GRADY CHAMPION

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

Saturday, March 17th

GRADY CHAMPION

Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

(Blues) 9-1, $5 Cover before 8:30 $10 Cover after 8:30

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

601-960-2700

jacksonfreepress.com

March 10 | 9:00pm

9.99

35


Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

Saints Dig a Hole

T

KHRIIVHDVRQKDVQRWEHHQJUHDWIRU WKH1HZ2UOHDQV6DLQWV,QIDFWLWMXVW NHHSVJHWWLQJZRUVH  1HZ2UOHDQVZDVDOUHDG\ HQJDJHGLQSXEOLFFRQWUDFWQHJRWLDWLRQV ZLWK'UHZ%UHHVDQGHQGHGXSSODFLQJWKH IUDQFKLVHWDJRQWKHTXDUWHUEDFN%UHHV DQGWKH6DLQWVZHUHUHSRUWHGO\PLOOLRQ DSDUW7KHUXPRULVWKDWWKH6DLQWVRIIHUHG %UHHVPLOOLRQD\HDUDQG%UHHVZDQWHG PLOOLRQ%\IUDQFKLVLQJ%UHHVKHFRXOG HDWPLOOLRQWRPLOOLRQRIWKLV\HDUÂśV FDS %UHHVÂśQXPEHUZLOOQRWEHVHWXQWLO DIWHUWKHIUHHDJHQWSHULRGLVRYHUDQGKH ZLOOJHWDQDYHUDJHRIWKHWRSÂż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

LQIUHHDJHQF\DQGWKH\DUHDEOHWRNHHS WKHLUNH\SOD\HUVWKH6DLQWVPD\KDYHMXVW FORVHGWKHLUFKDPSLRQVKLSZLQGRZ  7KH1HZ(QJODQG3DWULRWV¶³6S\JDWH´ LVQRWWKHVDPHNLQGRILVVXHEXWLW¶VWKH FORVHVWWKLQJWRFRPSDUHWR1HZ2UOHDQV¶ ³%RXQW\JDWH´ ,KDYHORQJVDLGWKDWWKH3D WULRWVGLGQRWJHWDFRPSHWLWLYHDGYDQWDJH IURP¿OPLQJGHIHQVLYHVLJQDOV)HHOIUHHWR DVNPHZK\LI\RXVHHPHRXWDQGDERXW   7KHSHQDOWLHVLQ6S\JDWHLQFOXGHGWKH ORVVRID¿UVWURXQGSLFNDQG LQ¿QHV IRUWKH3DWULRWVDQG IRU%LOO%HOLFKLFN   6DLQWVRZQHU7RP%HQVRQNQHZDERXW WKHERXQW\SURJUDPDQGWROGJHQHUDO PDQDJHU0LFNH\/RRPLVWRVWRSLW/RRPLV GLGQ¶WVWRSWKHSURJUDPDQG%HQVRQQHYHU IROORZHGXSDVIDUDVZHNQRZ+HDGFRDFK 6HDQ3D\WRQORRNHGWKHRWKHUZD\+H GLGQ¶WVWRSWKHSURJUDPHLWKHU*UHJ:LO OLDPVWKH6DLQWV¶GHIHQVLYHFRRUGLQDWRULV JRQH,WZLOOQRWVDYH1HZ2UOHDQV  /RRNIRUWKH1)/WRWDNHDZD\VHFRQG DQGWKLUGURXQGSLFNVWKLVVHDVRQDQGD ¿UVWURXQGSLFNQH[WVHDVRQ7KH1)/FRXOG UHDOO\FRPHGRZQRQ1HZ2UOHDQVDQGWDNH VHFRQGURXQGDQGWKLUGURXQGSLFNVDJDLQ QH[WVHDVRQ  ³%RXQW\JDWH´FRXOGKDYHIDUUHDFKLQJ HIIHFWV/RRNIRUP\IXOODUWLFOHDIWHUWKH 1)/SHQDOWLHVGURSRQ1HZ2UOHDQV

by Bryan Flynn

Fire up your computer and start doing research. It Xxxx is time to fill out your NCAA brackets and win your office pool. THURSDAY, MARCH 8 College basketball (noon-2 p.m. CBSSN): In its first C-USA Tournament game, Southern Miss faces the winner of the Rice/East Carolina game. â&#x20AC;Ś College basketball (6:30-11 p.m. CBS): SEC Tournament live from New Orleans ends the day with Ole Miss facing Auburn starting at 6:30 p.m. Mississippi State versus Georgia follows 30 minutes after.

March 7 - March 13, 2012

FRIDAY, MARCH 9 College basketball (6:30-11 p.m. CBS): SEC Tournament quarterfinals could feature Ole Miss against Tennessee and Mississippi State against Vanderbilt, if both state schools win Thursday.

36

SATURDAY, MARCH 10 College basketball (noon-4 p.m. ABC): The SEC Tournament semifinals could feature Ole Miss against Mississippi State for a third time this season. SUNDAY, MARCH 11 College basketball (5-6 p.m. CBS): Find out where your favorite team is going in

the NCAA Basketball Selection Show. â&#x20AC;Ś Documentary (8-9:30 p.m. ESPN) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Announcementâ&#x20AC;? by ESPN Films tells the story of Magic Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement to the world that he has AIDS and about his life afterward. MONDAY, MARCH 12 College basketball (6-7 p.m. ESPN): Get the lowdown on the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA Tournament with the selection show for the ladies. TUESDAY, MARCH 13 College basketball (6:30-11 p.m. TruTV): The first round of the NCAA Tournament features two games live from Dayton, Ohio. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 College basketball (6:30-11 p.m. TruTV): The first round of the NCAA Tournament wraps up with two more live games from Dayton, Ohio. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


March 10

Open Road Show 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover -Best Of Jackson 20121st: Best Hangover Food in Jackson

2nd: Best Place to Shoot Pool & Best Place to Drink Cheap 3rd: Best Dive Bar • Good Showing: Best Plate Lunch, Best Red Beans & Rice, & Best Jukebox

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

DVDJ Reign

Wednesday - March 7

Friday, March 9

ROCK KARAOKE

Thursday - March 8 Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free

Fri & Sat - March 9 & 10

Backroads Gas Station Disco Saturday, March 10

$10 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials •March 5 - 9

Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Mon | Shrimp Etouffee or Meatloaf Pie Tue | Peppersteak over Rice or Shrimp Scampi Wed | Smoked Pork Loin or Country Fried Steak Thu | Ham & Asparagus Lasagna or Chicken & Bowtie Pasta Fri | Catfish Parmesan or Beef Brisket

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

Grab ya beads and come on out!

- Wednesday - Open Mic Night - Thursday Night: Ladies Night with DJ Venom -Karaoke in The Jazz Bar (Thu - Sat)

Sunday - March 11 9 Ball Tournament 7:00 pm

- Happy Hour in The Jazz Bar Tuesday - Friday 4-7pm 2 -4 -1 Wells, Calls, & Domestics, PLUS $5 appetizers To book a private party please call

after St. Paddy’s Day Parade

Crawfish Boil Free Crawfish

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

601-487-8710 1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

LUNCH SPECIALS EVERY DAY starting at $7.95

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX! - BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

March 10: Colonels 9pm, $5 Cover

Happy Hour 2 for 1 EVERYTHING at the BAR Mon - Sat | 4:00pm - 7:00pm Tuesday: Taco Tuesday with Jason Turner

$5 All You Can Eat Taco Bar During Happy Hour also Doug Frank & Chris Gill 8pm $5 Cover

New Blue Plate Special WED. MARCH 7 LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

THUR. MARCH 8

BUDWEISER GAME NIGHT PRIZES & SWAG

BEER BUCKET SPECIAL + 1/2 OFF BLOODY MARYS

BRIAN JONES

$5 SHOTS

Every Thursday:

TUES. MARCH 13 JACKPOT TRIVIA

Ladies Night & Men are Pigs Night featuring Snazz Ladies Get In Free Ladies Win Prizes $2.50 Coors Light Bottle

Bourbon St. in the Quarter (Formely Poets) 1855 Lakeland Drive Jackson, MS

601.987.0808

fri | mar 09 Chris Gill & Soul Shakers 6:30-10:30p

SUN. MARCH 11

2-FOR-1 SPECIAL

live music february 15 - 21 thu | mar 08 Blake Pierce 5:30-9:30p

SAT. MARCH 10

Every Wednesday: Karaoke | 7:00pm

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

wed | mar 07 Jessie “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p

FRI. MARCH 9 NBA BASKETBALL

MON. MARCH 12 IN-DA-BIZ NITE

$1 Drafts | $2 Margaritas

MARCH MADNESS & SEC HQ!

20 FLAT SCREEN TVS

Scan this code or text EATWITHUS to 601-707-9733 for the deal of the week

sat | mar 10 GreenFish 6:30-10:30p sun | mar 11 Shaun Patterson 3:00 - 7:00p mon | mar 12 Karaoke tue | mar 13 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight | 601-899-0038

jacksonfreepress.com

March 9: Colonels 9pm, $5 Cover

37


DINING|food by Andrew Dunaway

G

astronomes across the country, especially those with a penchant for Creole cuisine, know the name John Besh. The man has cemented himself as a pillar of the New Orleans restaurant world, and as an advocate for young chefs and Gulf Coast seafood conservation. His restaurant empire spans from Restaurant August in the Central Business District to La Provence on Lake Pontchartrain’s North Shore and now to San Antonio with an outpost of his Brasserie Lüke. Beyond owning and operating restaurants, Besh has also appeared as a “Top Chef” judge and a “Top Chef Masters” contestant. More than 200 public-television stations around the country air his cooking show, “My New Orleans.” Besh released his second cookbook, “My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking” (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2011, $35), in November. This volume begins with a plea for families to shun salt- and sugar-laden packaged foods, to ignore manufactured convenience and to “cook real food instead.” It’s an admirable mission, and Besh even takes pot shots at food fanatics who “fetishize celebrity chefs” and ignore their own kitchen. From the start, “My Family Table” is a stark departure from Besh’s first cookbook, “My New Orleans” (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2009, $45). In it, Besh paid homage to his hometown and its rich culinary tradition. “My Family Table” respects that tradition, but it attempts to simplify and streamline the flavors while incorporating more of what makes up modern New Orleans cuisine. This modern approach is evident in the section titled “The Essential Pantry,” which gives equal billing to harissa, hoisin sauce, sambal and rice wine vinegar as it does to familiar ingredients such as grits, pasta, Arborio rice and olive oil. Hoping to entice busy families to cook on weeknights rather than order pizza, Besh has a two-part system. The first step comes to life in the chapter “Sunday Supper.” With families typically having more time in the kitchen on a Sunday afternoon, the idea is to cook large cuts of meat

COURTESY ANDREWS MCMEEL PUFLISHING

Real Food at Home

John Besh shows his love for New Orleans and its cuisine with his latest cookbook.

such as slow-roasted pork shoulder, herb-roasted chicken and slow-cooked beef chuck roast. With the exception of the chicken, most of these recipes require little prep work and are far from fussy. I exclude the chicken because, regardless of the seasoning, without fastidious attention to the temperature of the meat, things can go from juicy and succulent to stringy and dry in a flash. That being said, Besh’s herb-roasted chicken recipe is easy to prepare and a solid contender for the Sunday dinner table. I found another stumbling block in the “Sunday Supper” section: the slow-cooked beef chuck roast. In this

Fit for a King E\$ORQ]R/HZLV FILE PHOTO

March 7 - 13, 2012

38

MOTHER’S CHOCOLATE CAKE RECIPE 4 9-inch cake pans Cooking spray 4 cups sugar 3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1-1/2 cups cocoa powder 3 teaspoons baking powder 3 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons salt 4 eggs 1 cup evaporated milk mixed with 1 cup water 1 cup vegetable oil 4 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups boiling water

M

y mother was one of the best cooks in the world. On any given day, she could make a meal fit for a king. Mother had her own natural rhythm, her own unique swag. She would sing the hymns and praise God while simultaneously cooking for 15 people, me included. I loved my mother’s cooking so much that I would hang on her apron string and watch her every move. She was truly an artist. She could craft up recipes that could

recipe, the cook takes a 5-pound chuck roast, seasons and sears the meat, and then roasts it on a bed of vegetables in a low oven for one hour and 15 minutes or until it is a rosy medium rare at 125 degrees. While this procedure would work beautifully with a tender cut like prime rib, it falls flat with chuck. Even with the lightly marbled, grass-fed Charolais beef that Besh recommends in the book, the results will be pretty, but little more than a chewy hunk of meat over a bed of undercooked vegetables. Disastrous as the chuck roast may be in its original form, beef comes into its own in the chapter “School Nights.” Working with leftovers from “Sunday Supper,” dinners take minutes instead of hours. Two cups of diced meat from the herb-roasted chicken is easily transformed into an Asian chicken salad full of the bold flavors of basil, cilantro and mint. Even the chuck roast redeems itself in a hearty baked pasta dish. What was once chewy becomes a rich component of a pasta casserole that is on the table in less than an hour. For those worried that Besh has lost his New Orleans touch, never fear. “Jazz Brunch” features new takes on some old favorites. Gone are the Canadian bacon, English muffin and ordinary hollandaise sauce of eggs Benedict. For his version of the classic poached-egg dish, Besh uses crab cakes and a decadent satsuma hollandaise. Garlicky baked oysters offer the best of the Gulf, and the crown roast of pork with dirty rice dressing revives a favorite Cajun side. “My Family Table” contains stunning photographs and, mostly, well-planned recipes. It is another excellent cookbook from a man eager to share his love for food and his home with his readers. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Besh established himself as a representative of New Orleans and Louisiana, and he’s done it with a passion for his craft and a hearty smile. While some of the recipes in “My Family Table” may take a few attempts to perfect, it’s a solid addition to any bookshelf.

Frosting

2 sticks butter completely melted 1 cup cocoa powder 6 cups powdered sugar 2/3 cup milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Grease and flour the cake pans, or spray them with cooking spray. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Mix sugar, flour, cocoa powder, baking

raise the dead. I would rhythmically pat my foot under the table as I ate her cooking. I would often use these and other gestures to show my appreciation and affection for her hard work and dedication to the art of making us happy. I remember one Sunday night I came home late and saw a four-layer chocolate cake sitting on the kitchen table.

powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Add eggs, evaporated milk, vegetable oil and vanilla extract, and beat on medium speed for four minutes. Stir in boiling water to make a thin batter. Pour into pans. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until cake springs back upon touching it in the middle or when a toothpick

inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool for about 10 minutes, and turn out onto waxed paper. Cool completely. To make the frosting, stir in cocoa with melted butter. Add powdered sugar and milk, beating on medium speed to spreading consistency. Add more milk, if needed. Stir in vanilla.

Mother was up, as usual. (She would not sleep until the last of her children were safe at home.) I asked her if this cake was for a special occasion, and she said no. She was always reading my mind, so she told me that I could have a piece but to save some for the other children. Well, since I was the oldest in the house at that time, I felt special.


MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

6ISITALADDININJACKSONCOM

6ISIT OUR'R OCE 3TOREN RY EXT DOOR

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ·V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG

12:23(1

/XQFK 6SHFLDOV 6WDUWLQJDW

 $INEINOR4AKE/UT 6XQ7KXUVDPSP )ULDQG6DWDPSP

7%$%,)6%2

)RQGUHQ%HOKDYHQ80&DUHD

,AKELAND$R *ACKSON -3 7HORU )D[

Try The

2IDGE7AY 3TE% &LOWOOD -3 7HO )D[

7UHHWRS%OYG)ORZRRG06Â&#x2021; %HKLQGWKH$SSOHEHH·VRQ/DNHODQG

_ZZZIXVLRQMDSDQHVHWKDLFXLVLQHFRP

(a very high-class pig stand)

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;¢ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;¢ 601.853.8538

*96

H7M:7: @=6

OPEN WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SUNDAY

&RESH ,OUISIANA #RAW»SH AREBACK

<H?:7Os(7H9> H7M:7:>EB;87D:

Purchase Regular Hibachi Dinner And Two Drinks

And Get A Second Hibachi Dinner 50% Off second hibachi must be equal or lesser value offer valid monday-thursday after 5pm

#RAW»SHÂ&#x201E;3HRIMPÂ&#x201E;#RAB,EGS #ORNÂ&#x201E;4ATERSÂ&#x201E;3AUSAGE

sushi, steak, martini and more!

,AKELAND$R\Â&#x201E;Â&#x201E;

100 E. Capital St. Suite 105 â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson MS â&#x20AC;¢ www.wasabims.com â&#x20AC;¢ wasabijackson@gmail.com

601.948.8808

NEED TO FUEL UP BEFORE THAT NEXT ALL-NIGHT STUDY SESSION?

LET BASILâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BELHAVEN GET YOU GOING!

Lunch Specials www.stevestown.com 200 South Lamar St. T: 601.714.5683

10% OFF

WITH LOCAL COLLEGE ID

BELHAVEN

904 B E AST F ORTIFICATION â&#x20AC;¢ J ACKSON , M S 601.352.2002 â&#x20AC;¢ WWW . GLENNFOODS . COM

jacksonfreepress.com

are listed daily at

39


www.thepizzashackjackson.com

Best Pizza 2009-2012 Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

(in the former FabraCare Building, between Katâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

ST0LACE

7INGSIN*ACKSON



 

 ?1A<X[[Ta7XVW[XUTQ^cc[Tb

(HG=:R/N>L=:R   ;HG>E>LLPBG@GB@AM

(1TTab>]CP_ PcbT[TRc[^RPcX^]b

March 7 - March 13, 2012

K =>KRHN +K> *KE:MM>KL?HK +:KMR+ > MA>@:F

40

+AHG>A>:= % %$$#

% (!#!#!"

"('7XVWfPh$ =  7P\_bcTPS1[eS AXSVT[P]S 2[X]c^]

% (%(%% % (%(%# #"4[[Xb0eT ($!=BcPcTBc 9PRZb^] 9PRZb^]

:M>KBG@O:BE:;E>

7^dab

P\ !_\&3PhbPFTTZ


6KXQU\X6X]XNLZDVD=HQPDVWHUZKRVHERRNVKHOSHGSRSXODUL]H=HQ%XGGKLVPLQ $PHULFD$VWXGHQWRQFHDVNHGKLP³+RZPXFKHJRGR\RXQHHG"´+LVDXVWHUHUHSO\ ZDV³-XVWHQRXJKVRWKDW\RXGRQ¶WVWHSLQIURQWRIDEXV´:KLOH,V\PSDWKL]HZLWK WKHYDOXHRIKXPLOLW\,ZRXOGQ¶WJRTXLWHWKDWIDU,WKLQNWKDWDVOLJKWO\KHIWLHUHJRLI RIIHUHGXSDVDZRUNRIDUWFDQEHDJLIWWRWKHZRUOG:KDWGR\RXWKLQN3LVFHV"+RZ PXFKHJRLVJRRG"7RZKDWGHJUHHFDQ\RXFUHDWH\RXUHJRVRWKDWLW¶VDEHDXWLIXODQG G\QDPLFVRXUFHRISRZHUIRU\RXDQGDQLQVSLUDWLRQIRURWKHUSHRSOHUDWKHUWKDQDJUHHG\ QHHG\SDUDVLWHWKDWGLVWRUWVWKHWUXWK"7KLVLVDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHWRUXPLQDWHRQVXFKPDWWHUV

!2)%3-ARCH !PRIL

³&RQWUROOHGK\VWHULDLVZKDWLVUHTXLUHG7RH[LVWFRQVWDQWO\ LQDVWDWHRIFRQWUROOHGK\VWHULD´SOD\ZULJKW$UWKXU0LOOHU VDLGLQVSHDNLQJDERXWKLVFUHDWLYHSURFHVV³,W¶VDJRQ\ %XWHYHU\RQHKDVDJRQ\7KHGLIIHUHQFHLVWKDW,WU\WRWDNH P\DJRQ\KRPHDQGWHDFKLWWRVLQJ´,KRSHWKLVOLWWOHRXW EXUVWLQVSLUHV\RX$ULHV,W¶VDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHIRU\RXWR KDUQHVV\RXUK\VWHULDDQGLQVWUXFW\RXUDJRQ\LQWKH¿QH DUWRIVLQJLQJ7RERRVW\RXUFKDQFHVRIVXFFHVVLQSXOOLQJ RIIWKLVGLFH\IHDWXVHHYHU\PHDQVDW\RXUGLVSRVDOWR KDYHIXQDQGVWD\DPXVHG

4!5253!PRIL -AY

7KH&KHURNHH+HULWDJHZHEVLWHZDQWVSHRSOHWRNQRZWKDW QRWDOO1DWLYH$PHULFDQWULEHVKDYHWKHVDPHWUDGLWLRQV ,QWKH&KHURNHHEHOLHIV\VWHPLW¶V*UDQGPRWKHU6XQDQG *UDQGIDWKHU0RRQZKLFKLVWKHRSSRVLWHRIPRVWWULEHV &KHURNHHGRQRWKDYHVKDPDQVRQO\PHGLFLQHPHQDQG ZRPHQDQGDGDZHKLVRUUHOLJLRXVOHDGHUV7KH\GRQ¶W KDYH³SLSHFDUULHUV´GRQ¶WGRWKH6XQ'DQFHDQGGRQ¶W ZDONWKH³*RRG5HG5RDG´,QIDFWWKH\ZDONWKH:KLWH 3DWKKDYHDSXUL¿FDWLRQFHUHPRQ\FDOOHG³*RLQJWR:DWHU´ DQGSHUIRUPWKH*UHHQ&RUQFHUHPRQ\DVDULWXDOUHQHZDO RIOLIH,VXJJHVW\RXGRDVLPLODUFODUL¿FDWLRQIRUWKHJURXS \RX¶UHSDUWRIDQGWKHWUDGLWLRQV\RXKROGGHDU7DXUXV 3RQGHU\RXUWULEH¶VXQLTXHWUXWKVDQGZD\V,GHQWLI\WKHP DQGGHFODUHWKHP

'%-).)-AY *UNE

,QWKHFRPLQJZHHNVWKHDFWLYLW\JRLQJRQLQVLGH\RXU PLQGDQGKHDUWZLOOEHHVSHFLDOO\LQWHQVHDQGLQÃ&#x20AC;XHQ

WLDO²HYHQLI\RXGRQ¶WH[SOLFLWO\H[SUHVVLW:KHQ\RX VSHDN\RXUWKRXJKWVDQGIHHOLQJVRXWORXGWKH\ZLOOKDYH XQXVXDOSRZHUWRFKDQJHSHRSOH¶VPLQGVDQGUHDUUDQJH WKHLUPRRGV:KHQ\RXNHHS\RXUWKRXJKWVDQGIHHOLQJV WR\RXUVHOIWKH\ZLOOVWLOOOHDNDOORYHUHYHU\WKLQJEHQGLQJ DQGVKDSLQJWKHHQHUJ\¿HOGDURXQG\RX7KDW¶VZK\,XUJH \RXWRWDNHH[WUDFDUHDV\RXPDQDJHZKDW¶VJRLQJRQ ZLWKLQ\RX0DNHVXUHWKHHIIHFW\RX¶UHKDYLQJLVWKHHIIHFW \RXZDQWWRKDYH

#!.#%2*UNE *ULY

$UWLVW5LFKDUG.HKOWHOOVWKHVWRU\RIDWHHQDJHJLUOZKRJRW WKHFKDQFHWRDVNDTXHVWLRQRIWKHHPLQHQWSV\FKRORJLVW &DUO-XQJ³3URIHVVRU\RXDUHVRFOHYHU&RXOG\RXSOHDVH WHOOPHWKHVKRUWHVWSDWKWRP\OLIH¶VJRDO"´:LWKRXWD PRPHQW¶VKHVLWDWLRQ-XQJUHSOLHG³7KHGHWRXU´,LQYLWH \RXWRFRQVLGHUWKHSRVVLELOLW\WKDW-XQJ¶VDQVZHUPLJKW EHPHDQLQJIXOWR\RXULJKWQRZ&DQFHULDQ+DYH\RX EHHQFKXUQLQJRXWRYHUFRPSOLFDWHGWKRXJKWVDERXW\RXU PLVVLRQ"$UH\RXDWULVNRIJHWWLQJDELWWRRJUDQGLRVHLQ \RXUSODQV"0D\EH\RXVKRXOGDWOHDVWGUHDPDERXWWDNLQJ DVKRUWFXWWKDWORRNVOLNHDGHWRXURUDGHWRXUWKDWORRNV OLNHDVKRUWFXW

,%/*ULY !UG

$QROG&KLQHVHSURYHUEVD\V³0\EDUQKDYLQJEXUQHGWR WKHJURXQG,FDQVHHWKHPRRQ´7KHVSHDNHURIWKRVH ZRUGVZDVPDNLQJDQHIIRUWWRUHGH¿QHDWRWDOORVVDVD SDUWLDOJDLQ7KHEXLOGLQJPD\KDYHEHHQJRQHEXWDVD UHVXOWKHRUVKHKDGDEHWWHUYLHZRIDQDWXUDOZRQGHUWKDW ZDVSUHYLRXVO\GLI¿FXOWWRREVHUYH,GRQ¶WIRUHVHHDQ\RI

%<0$77-21(6 Ã&#x20AC;LFN .QXFNOHFUDFNLQJHJ :RUOGFDSLWDOZLWKLQWKH'LVWULWR )HGHUDO 8QLYHUVDO¶V2OLYLD1HZWRQ -RKQPXVLFDO ³%UHDNLQJ%DG´QHWZRUN $EEUIRUDSUHVLGHQW $GMHFWLYHIRUIDLU\WDOHVDQG1LFN -UVKRZV 9RWHVKRZQRQ&63$1 6SRLOHGNLG &RPHDIWHU

6)2'/!UG 3EPT

³<RXFDQGLVFRYHUPRUHDERXWDSHUVRQLQDQKRXURISOD\ WKDQLQD\HDURIFRQYHUVDWLRQ´1XPHURXVZHEVLWHVRQ WKH,QWHUQHWDOOHJHWKDW*UHHNSKLORVRSKHU3ODWRPDGHWKLV VWDWHPHQWZKLFK,UHJDUGDVKLJKO\XQOLNHO\%XWLQDQ\ FDVHWKHWKRXJKWLWVHOIKDVVRPHPHULW$QGLQDFFRUGDQFH ZLWK\RXUFXUUHQWDVWURORJLFDORPHQV,ZLOOPDNHLW\RXU PRWWRIRUWKHZHHN7KLVLVDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHWROHDUQPRUH DERXWDQGEHFRPHFORVHUWRWKHSHRSOH\RXFDUHIRUDQG QRWKLQJZRXOGKHOS\RXDFFRPSOLVKWKDWEHWWHUWKDQJHW WLQJWRJHWKHUIRULQWHQVLYHLQWHUOXGHVRIIRROLQJDURXQGDQG PHVVLQJDURXQGDQGKRUVLQJDURXQG

,)"2!3EPT /CT

³:KHQZHDUHQRORQJHUDEOHWRFKDQJHDVLWXDWLRQZHDUH FKDOOHQJHGWRFKDQJHRXUVHOYHV´+RORFDXVWVXUYLYRU9LNWRU )UDQNOVDLG+LVDGYLFHPLJKWEHMXVWZKDW\RXQHHGWRKHDU ULJKWQRZ/LEUD+DYH\RXVWUXJJOHGPRVWO\IUXLWOHVVO\WR FKDQJHDVWDJQDQWVLWXDWLRQWKDWKDVUHVLVWHG\RXUEHVWHI IRUWV",VWKHUHDORFNHGGRRU\RX¶YHEHHQEDQJLQJRQWRQR DYDLO",IVR,LQYLWH\RXWRUHGLUHFW\RXUDWWHQWLRQ5HFODLP WKHHQHUJ\\RXKDYHEHHQH[SHQGLQJRQFORVHGGRZQ SHRSOHDQGPROGHULQJV\VWHPV,QVWHDGZRUNRQWKHXQ¿Q LVKHGEHDXW\RIZKDWOLHVFORVHVWDWKDQG\RXUVHOI

3#/20)//CT .OV

,QWKLVSDVVDJHIURP³6WLOO/LIHZLWK:RRGSHFNHU´7RP 5REELQVSURYLGHVDKRWWLS\RXVKRXOGNHHSLQPLQG ³7KHUHDUHHVVHQWLDODQGLQHVVHQWLDOLQVDQLWLHV,QHVVHQWLDO LQVDQLWLHVDUHDEULWWOHDPDOJDPDWLRQRIDPELWLRQDJJUHV VLRQDQGSUHDGROHVFHQWDQ[LHW\²JDUEDJHWKDWVKRXOG KDYHEHHQGXPSHGORQJDJR(VVHQWLDOLQVDQLWLHVDUHWKRVH LPSXOVHVRQHLQVWLQFWLYHO\VHQVHVDUHYLUWXRXVDQGFRUUHFW HYHQWKRXJKSHHUVPD\UHJDUGWKHPDVFRRFRR´,¶OODGG

3!')44!2)53.OV $EC

,GRQ¶WWKLQN\RXZLOOQHHGOLWHUDOPHGLFLQHWKLVZHHN<RXU SK\VLFDOYLJRUVKRXOGEHJRRG%XW,¶PKRSLQJ\RXZLOO VHHNRXWVRPHVSLULWPHGLFLQH²KHDOLQJDJHQWVWKDWIRUWLI\ WKHVHFUHWDQGVXEWOHSDUWVRI\RXUSV\FKH:KHUHGR\RX ¿QGVSLULWPHGLFLQH":HOOWKHVHDUFKLWVHOIZLOOSURYLGHWKH LQLWLDOGRVH+HUHDUHVRPHIXUWKHULGHDV([SRVH\RXUVHOI WRVWLUULQJDUWDQGPXVLFDQG¿OPVKDYHFRQYHUVDWLRQV ZLWKHPSDWKLFIULHQGVDQGWKHVSLULWVRIGHDGORYHGRQHV VSHQGWLPHLQWKHSUHVHQFHRIDQDWXUDOZRQGHUIDQWDVL]H DERXWDWKULOOLQJDGYHQWXUH\RXZLOOKDYHRQHGD\DQG LPDJLQHZKR\RXZDQWWREHWKUHH\HDUVIURPQRZ

#!02)#/2.$EC *AN

(DFKRIXVLVWKHVWDURIRXURZQPRYLH7KHUHDUHDIHZ RWKHUOHDGDQGVXSSRUWLQJDFWRUVZKRURXQGRXWWKHFDVW EXWHYHU\RQHHOVHLQWKHZRUOGLVDQH[WUD1RZDQGWKHQ WKRXJKSHRSOHZKRPZHUHJDUGDVPLQRUFKDUDFWHUV VXGGHQO\ULVHWRSURPLQHQFHDQGSOD\DSLYRWDOUROHLQ RXUXQIROGLQJGUDPD,H[SHFWWKLVSKHQRPHQRQLVQRZ RFFXUULQJRUZLOOVRRQRFFXUIRU\RX&DSULFRUQVRSOHDVH EHZLOOLQJWRGHSDUWIURPWKHVFULSW2SHQ\RXUVHOIWRWKH SRVVLELOLW\RILPSURYLVDWLRQ3HRSOHZKRKDYHEHHQSOD\LQJ ELWSDUWVPD\KDYHPRUHWRFRQWULEXWHWKDQ\RXLPDJLQH

!15!2)53*AN &EB

7KH³FRFNWDLOSDUW\HIIHFW´UHIHUVWR\RXUDELOLW\WRKHDU \RXUQDPHEHLQJVSRNHQZKLOHLQWKHPLGVWRIDVRFLDO JDWKHULQJ¶VFDFRSKRQ\7KLVLVDQH[DPSOHRIDQLPSRUWDQW SUDFWLFHZKLFKLVKRZWRGLVFHUQWUXO\PHDQLQJIXOVLJQDOV HPEHGGHGLQWKHQRLVHRIDOOWKHLUUHOHYDQWLQIRUPDWLRQ WKDWVXUURXQGV\RX<RXVKRXOGEHHVSHFLDOO\VNLOOHGDW GRLQJWKLVLQWKHFRPLQJZHHNV$TXDULXV²DQGLWZLOOEH FUXFLDOWKDW\RXPDNHDEXQGDQWXVHRI\RXUVNLOO$V\RX QDYLJDWH\RXUZD\WKURXJKWKHFOXWWHURIV\PEROVDQGWKH RYHUORDGRIGDWDEHDOHUWIRUWKHIHZNH\PHVVDJHVWKDW DUHKLJKO\XVHIXO

+RPHZRUN1DPH\RXUJUHDWHVWXQQHFHVVDU\WDERRDQGKRZ\RXZRXOGYLRODWHLWLILWGLGQ¶WKXUWDQ\RQH )UHH:LOO$VWURORJ\FRP 0RYHOLNHDZDOODE\ :RUGVDIWHU³/RRNPD´ 6RYLHWPRQVWHU &RXQWU\VLQJHU.HLWK 3UH¿[EHIRUHWDQRUIURVW 1RWIRFXVHG 3HQGHVNFRQQHFWRUDWVRPH EDQNV ³7KH*RGIDWKHU´¿OPVFRUHUBBB 5RWD 6LQJHU(U\NDK ³7KLV¶OOEHWKHGD\WKDWBBB´

³$PHULFDQ3LH´UHIUDLQ

2QHGD\DEEU %HDWKHVSLDQ &ODVVLF-DJXDU Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU# MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOO FHQWVSHUPLQXWH 0XVWEH2UWRELOOWR\RXUFUHGLW FDUGFDOO5HIHU HQFHSX]]OH

%<0$77-21(6

$OWN

*SFRQFHUQHGZLWKULJKWV 3ODFHWRVWRUHWRROV )RUPHU,VUDHOL3ULPH0LQLVWHU5DELQ :LWKSHUIHFWWLPLQJ ³7KDW¶VGLVJXVWLQJ´ %LJBBB &DOLIRUQLDUHJLRQ

³+H\ZDLWBBB´ :KHQGXHOVWDNHSODFHRIWHQ 6FDU\ORRNLQJ¿VK 0RURFFR¶VFDSLWDO ±(APPYTH 5NIVERSAL²WKHVWXGLR¶VUHVWRULQJRILWV /LNHVRPHKLULQJSUDFWLFHV FODVVLFVWKHVHGLGQ¶WPDNHWKHFXW ³7LQ\%XEEOHV´FURRQHU ´SV\FKRQDXW´0F.HQQD !CROSS ³,¶PQRWW\SLQJULJKWQRZ´DFURQ\P ³BBBZLVK´ OLQHIURP³7KH3ULQFHVV :LWKDFURVV8QLYHUVDO¶V ³)RUVDOHE\BBB´ %XUW5H\QROGVFRPHG\ %ULGH´

³.LOUR\:DV+HUH´JURXS ³'LG,GRWKDW"´FKDUDFWHU 0DNHUVRIWKHDQG 2QHZLVKIRUWKHQHZ\HDURQ &KHZWR\¿OOHU ³*QDUO\´ PDQ\DJUHHWLQJFDUG 0&'GLYLGHGE\; 6RUHUWKDQVRUH :HVWHQG" 0RYLHUROHSOD\HGE\*HRUJH%XUQV )XVLRQFKHI0LQJBBB *SWKDW¶OOWHDFK\RXKRZWRVHUYH DQG0RUJDQ)UHHPDQ ³,WZDV\HDUVBBBWRGD\´ ,QWKHWKLFNRI ³*DQJVWD/RYLQ¶´UDSSHU 8QLYHUVDO¶V&KHY\&KDVH BBB%RUD PRXQWDLQDUHDLQROGELQ 7ZLQ)DOOV¶VWDWH FRPHG\ /DGHQQHZV

6HHDFURVV %XUJHUFKDLQZLWKDELUGPDVFRW /DZQWRROV 1RWDWVHD ,QYDVLYHFUDZOLQJSODQW )ULHGULFK+D\HN¶V¿HOG &DSLWDOKRPHWRWKH9LNLQJ6KLS 8QLYHUVDO¶V5LFKDUG3U\RU $GLGDVDOWHUQDWLYH 0XVHXP FRPHG\ 5HVLGHQWBBB 3OD\6WDWLRQJDPH

5HVXOW 3URQRXQVHSDUDWHGE\DVODVK $FWRU-DUHGZKRVLQJVLQ ³+DG\RXIRROHGIRUDVHFRQG +DYHWKHGHVLUH 6HFRQGVWR0DUV WKHUH´ ³/DWHU´ )ROORZLQVWUXFWLRQV 8QLYHUVDO¶V(PLOLR(VWHYH] /DWHZULWHUSKLORVRSKHU +RVWHVVVQDFNV

WKLV6FRUSLR%HFUD]LO\ZLVHDQGZLVHO\FUD]\LQWKHFRP LQJZHHNV,WZLOOEHKHDOWK\IRU\RX+RQRUWKHZLOGLGHDV WKDWEULQJ\RXMR\DQGWKHRGGGHVLUHVWKDWUHPLQG\RXRI \RXUFRUHWUXWKV

/DVW:HHN·V$QVZHUV

±+AIDOKU² (DFKRIWKHOHWWHUVRIWKHDOSKDEHWLVUHSUHVHQWHGLQWKLVJULGE\DQXPEHUEHWZHHQDQG8VLQJOHWWHU IUHTXHQF\ZRUGSDWWHUQUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKHQXPEHUVDV\RXUJXLGHV¿OOLQWKHJULGZLWKZHOONQRZQ(QJOLVK ZRUGV +,17VLQFHD4LVDOZD\VIROORZHGE\D8WU\KXQWLQJGRZQWKH4¿UVW 2QO\ORZHUFDVHXQK\SKHQ DWHGZRUGVDUHDOORZHGLQNDLGRNXVR\RXZRQtWVHHDQ\WKLQJOLNH672&.+2/0RU/21*/267LQKHUH EXW \RXPLJKWVHH$)*+$1VLQFHLWKDVDQXQFDSLWDOL]HGPHDQLQJWRR 1RZVWRSZDVWLQJP\SUHFLRXVWLPHDQG 62/9(SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP

jacksonfreepress.com

0)3#%3&EB -ARCH

\RXUEDUQVJRLQJGRZQLQÃ&#x20AC;DPHV/HRVR,GRQ¶WH[SHFW \RX¶OOKDYHWRPDNHDVLPLODUUHGH¿QLWLRQXQGHUGXUHVV +RZHYHU\RXKDYHFHUWDLQO\H[SHULHQFHGHYHQWVOLNHWKDW LQWKHSDVWDQGQRZZRXOGEHDQH[FHOOHQWWLPHWRUHYLVH \RXUWKLQNLQJDERXWWKHLUPHDQLQJ$UH\RXEUDYHHQRXJK DQGLQJHQLRXVHQRXJKWRUHLQWHUSUHW\RXUKLVWRU\",W¶V¿QG WKHUHGHPSWLRQZHHN

41


The Rest of the Story by Meredith W. Sullivan

A

good stylist always has options. We show up to a shoot with more clothes than we need, just in case. That means we always have pieces or looks that we love but just couldn’t work into the current assignment. Here are a few of my favorites that didn’t make the spring fashion shoot (see page 20) but could well be in your wardrobe for the upcoming season.

Handmade wooden bead necklace, The

Alternative Apparel burnout tee,

Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $48

Slavebird, $28

J.Crew T-shirt,

Orange Peel, $8 Coral pink skinnies, Pink

Bombshell, $36.95 RVCA plaid shirt,

Slavebird, $52

Banana Republic neon blouse, Orange Peel, $8

Lucky Brand cut-off shorts,

Plato’s Closet, $12

Where2Shop: Green lace shorts, Posh Boutique, $42.50. Twelve watches, The Museum Store

at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $22

The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, 380 S. Lamar St., 601960-1515; Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977; Pink Bombshell, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5007, Ridgeland, 601-853-0775; Plato’s Closet, 1260 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland, 601-487-8207; Posh Boutique, 4312 N. State St., 601-364-2244; Slavebird, 2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601-366-9955

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com.

Drench Day Spa and Lash Lounge (118 W. Jackson St., Suite

Leap Frog Children’s Consignment and More (104 Village

(3110 Old Canton Road, 601982-4181) Nancy Price has a new collection of fabulous and affordable small sculptures.

Blvd., Madison, 601-898-0727) Make sure your kiddo is ready for Easter with our new tees.

Coattails (111 W. Jackson St.,

Blue Jean Boutique (608 Highway

Ridgeland, 601-853-1313) Colored denim is all the rage for spring. Stop by and see all of our fabulous colors for spring and summer.

51, Suite C, Ridgeland, 601-6052929) Once the boutique reaches 200 Facebook “likes,” you’ll enjoy 20% off your next purchase.

March 7 - 13, 2012

2B, Ridgeland, 601-707-5656) Check out the Eberjay night wear, perfect for warmer nights ahead.

Nancy Price Interior Design

42

Check out flyjfp.com for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


y t u a e B

t s u J t ’ n Is

p e e D n ki

• • • •

No Animal Testing No Parabens Organic Natural

2807 Old Canton Road in Historic Fondren 601.366.1602 www.rainbowcoop.org

jacksonfreepress.com

S

43


%NCUUKHKGFURCIG

New Savings for Auto Customers

Alfaâ&#x201E;˘ believes good customers should be rewarded. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why our new automobile policy recognizes loyalty and good driving habits and rewards you with lower rates. For a free quote, call or stop by today. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right there with you with service you expect and savings you deserve.

Kodi D Hobbs 1425 Lakeland Dr. Suite 110F Jackson, MS 39216 Bus: (601) 321-9364 KHobbs@alfains.com

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the

L ACE Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S S

AUTO â&#x20AC;˘ HOME â&#x20AC;˘ LIFE www.AlfaInsurance.com

A

L

O

Hair & Acc

N

e ss orie s

601.397.6398 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

6030 I-55 North- EXIT 102B (601) 977-9040

Mediterranean Cuisine

Now Serving $10 Lunch Includes entree, side, and tea. Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi

-Wood Fired Brick Oven Pizzas-Hookahs on a Beautiful Patio-Now Serving Lebanese Wine-Now Serving Spirits-We also cater weddings & parties.-

1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) M-F 8am-9pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sat & Sun 7am-7pm CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

1896 Main Street, Ste A in Madison 601-853-0876 â&#x20AC;˘ mezzams.com

M-Th 11-2, 4:30-9 â&#x20AC;˘ F-Sat 11-2, 4:30-10


v10n26 - JFP Interview: Bennie Thompson & Spring Fashion