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460 Briarwood Dr. | Jackson, MS 39206 Phone: 601.709.4610 | Fax: 601.709.4611

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Are you currently pregnant & your DAUGHTER is ALSO expecting?! If this is your unique situation, a major cable network wants to document your lives! This docuseries will follow the exciting and dramatic journey of a mother and daughter who are pregnant at the same time. If both you and your mother are outgoing & open to sharing your stories on national television,

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December 21 - 27, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

1 0 N O . 15

contents FILE PHOTO

BRIANA ROBINSON

6 Two Down The Jackson Redevelopment Authority nixes two developer bids for the Convention Center Hotel. SUZI ALTMAN

Cover photograph by Kristin Brenemen LEGO shopping info, p. 50

36

THIS ISSUE: Freeze Frame

Suzi Altman’s photography in the Mississippi Invitational captures her beloved Delta. OXFORD AMERICAN

tatiana mcdonald at all levels. ... If a person looks Hispanic or Vietnamese, even if they were born here, they are being called ‘illegals.’ There is a lack of understanding that people who look like me can be U.S. citizens by birth or naturalization.” Through her own experiences and by seeing the difficulties faced by other immigrants, McDonald was motivated to make a difference. “When you get to a (new) country, you really don’t understand what your rights are or what you can do to make your life normal,” McDonald says. “During my work with immigrants, I realized that immigrants, with or without documents, need a voice, so they can be heard.” McDonald has been a CCIC caseworker since April. “My job is to find out what I can do for each person,” she says. “We help a lot of victims of domestic violence as well as victims of crimes. We encourage people to report any incident they have and to not be afraid of the police. We also give presentations on knowing your rights. Whether you have documents or not, you have rights in this country.” Catholic Charities Immigration Clinic is located at 200 N. Congress St., Suite 100. For more information, call 601-948-2635, or visit catholiccharitiesjackson.org. —Dustin Cardon

41 Ten Things Do you have the new Oxford American music issue, yet? Here are 10 reasons to get one today.

46 Kitchen Goodies Check here for great gift ideas for the budding cook on your list or for the family chef extraordinaire.

jacksonfreepress.com

Tatiana McDonald had modest beginnings when she arrived in the United States from Bogota, Colombia, eight years ago. “Before I entered the nonprofit world, I was always trying to make a living cleaning or babysitting, like most of us do when we come to the United States,” McDonald says. “My first job in the nonprofit (as a legal assistant) was what made me want to do more. I was always trying to know more and more about the struggle immigrants face once they get here.” Today, McDonald works for the Catholic Charities Immigration Clinic, where she devotes her time to helping immigrants adapt to life in the United States and understand their rights. McDonald, 37, attended Unitec University in Bogota, where she received a diploma in hotel management, and was a travel agent there. She first came to Jackson while on vacation to visit a friend who had also lived in Colombia. She ended up staying after meeting her former husband. Like many immigrants, McDonald encountered difficulties after her arrival in the United States. “I have experienced racial profiling and have been undermined by clerks at stores or at gas stations,” McDonald says. “One of the greatest difficulties facing immigrants here is ignorance of the immigration laws

FILE PHOTO

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 7 .. The Week in Jacktown 12 ................... Editorial 12 ................. Kamikaze 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 36 ............... Diversions 38 ........................ Films 39 ..................... 8 Days 40 .............. JFP Events 41 ........................ Music 42 .......... Music Listing 44 ...................... Sports 46 ........................ Food 49 ................. Astrology 50 ................. Gift Guide

3


editor’snote

Kristin Brenemen Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dystopianism. Her Zombie Survival Kit now has a life sized cut out of Jack Sparrow. That helps, right? She designed the cover and many pages in this graphic-heavy issue.

R.L. Nave Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote Talks and GOOD features.

Elizabeth Waibel Reporter Elizabeth Waibel grew up in Clinton. In May, she received her journalism degree from Union University in Jackson, Tenn. She wrote Talks and GOOD features. Send her news ideas at elizabeth@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601.362.6121 ext. 13.

Andrea Thomas Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland and is a proud Antonelli College graduate. She loves to sing, dance and write poetry in her free time. She would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas.

Sharon Dunten Sharon Dunten came to Mississippi as a journalist to cover Hurricane Katrina. She visits Mississippi often to write and photograph the state and its distinctive culture, which captured her heart. She wrote an arts feature for this issue.

Anita Modak-Truran Film reviewer Anita ModakTruran is a southern convert, having moved here from Chicago more than a decade ago with her husband and son. She loves the culture, cuisine and arts in these parts. She wrote film reviews for this issue.

Jessica Mizell Jessica Mizell’s interests include watching “Love & Hip Hop,” crawfish boils, couponing and her poodle Lola Belle. She is the current JFP New Orleans liaison. She wrote a book review.

December 21 - 27, 2011

Korey Harrion

4

Web Producer Korey Harrion is a saxophonist who runs a small computer-repair business. He enjoys reading, writing and playing music, origami and playing video games. He loves animals, especially dogs.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

In the Flow of Good Work

M

y obsession with the spirituality and science behind “good work” started innocently enough. We were about five years into publishing this newspaper and were working so much that I didn’t have time to think about, well, work. I was certainly busy trying to change the world, and our city especially, for the better, but I hadn’t considered slowing down to think about what it meant to come to work every day. I was decent at teaching writing and reporting and getting people to work hard, but I hadn’t done research into what really makes human beings want to do good work. Or how to help those who want to but are blocked in various ways. Then one day I got a call from Millsaps professor Raymond Clothier who directs an outfit there called the Lilly Interns and Fellows program. He wanted to send me a fellow—essentially an intern they would pay—who wanted to explore how we do journalism. Specifically, I would learn, the Lilly Foundation offers Millsaps students (and others around the country) the “opportunity to make connections between academic learning and personal, professional and spiritual growth.” The fellows go into workplaces they believe do “good work”—meaning good works in the community in some way—so they can observe it close at hand and then discuss and think about it to explore how it’s done. Yes, I was flattered that anyone would put the JFP in such company. But more importantly, these fellows (I’ve had a string of them since then, including one who helped create this GOOD Ideas series) taught me to look at work in a more spiritual way. In many ways, the Lilly program changed my life. For one thing, it made me evolve the way we manage and teach our interns. I copied the reading list from our first Lilly fellow (the fabulous Luke Darby), and I dove into much of it, reading about collective mentoring and using spirituality (not religion necessarily) to make one’s work more personally meaningful, and a greater experience for employees, interns, clients and, in our case, readers. I redesigned my workshops with much more emphasis on conversation and big ideas, and I started asking more questions—the ageold Socratic method of getting students to come up with the answers themselves. Luke’s reading list led me quickly to Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (CHICK-sent-me-high) who co-authored (with Howard Gardner and William Damon) a book called “Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet” (Basic Books, 2001, $17.50). The book explores the moral and ethical questions behind “good work” in the fields of journalism and genetics—industries that have suffered from ethical lapses and in journalism’s case, corporatization that waters down our potential to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable as needed. That book inspired me and gave me strength to deal with the challenges that inevitably come our way. It addresses media outlets’

tendency to water down the truth in deference to advertiser concerns (something we’re known for not doing); the fake “objectivity” that keeps good information from getting out; and the lengths many media outlets will go to in order to please politicians. It talks about crime sensationalism and the negative effects bowing to blood thirst inevitably brings to a community. The book takes a long view of our profession, and others, and calls for us to do the right thing and wait, so to speak (a phrase my partner Todd Stauffer adopted years back to deal with inevitable attacks when we reveal something some “power” would rather we didn’t). Near the end, the authors call for any reader, regardless of profession, to be “good workers”—meaning ethical and focused on the greater good. If invited to write a letter to young workers, they say they would urge revisiting principles behind what’s good in specific professions, not to mention the core of their spiritual beliefs. Young workers should seek the support of others who share a higher work purpose. Find allies, on or off the job, or become a social entrepreneur and start your own workplace for “good” (what we did in 2002). They then write: “But having strong principles and support may not be enough. You will also need a third vital ingredient—the resolve to stick by your principles. Knowing what should be done and having the means to do it are useless without personal commitment. In the last analysis, no one else is responsible for upholding the values of your work. Either you live up to the implicit covenant that justified professional status, or you do not.” They promise that “the joy we derive from doing our best work, according to high standards, is rewarding enough, even if we must

sometimes struggle in lonely confusion.” Now, all that may seem like spiritual mumbo-jumbo to many of you, but here’s the wrinkle: Turns out it’s also science. Remember that I said above that the Lilly folks turned me onto both the spirituality and the science behind good work? Five years ago, I had no clue what was going on in the world of neuroscience. But the reading path Luke and his fellowship sent me down landed me at the door of discovery that is brain science. Now, I admit that I’m a tad obsessed with it. When applied to the workplace, recent brain science has revealed so much about how we can work and manage better. My favorite discovery was the concept of “flow,” which Csikszentmihalyi discovered some years back and that about every brain-science expert quotes repeatedly. Detailed in his book, “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience” (HarperPerennial, 1990, $14.99), it’s powerfully simple: People are happiest at work and at leisure when we are in “flow”—fully focused on a challenging task at hand, whether playing sports, writing a story or figuring out how to re-organize the dang garage. It is mindfulness on steroids. It also means that we humans cannot effectively multi-task (this includes talking on a cell phone and driving: not safe) and that we will continue to be agitated if we cannot focus completely on the task at hand. “Flow” is potential work (and leisure) nirvana. Yes, it takes practice, but so does anything worth doing. My suggestion is to turn the phone off, mute the constant email alerts, close your door and allow yourself to sink into whatever you need to do next. And if it’s work to make our city and world a kinder, gentler, more compassionate place, all the better.


news, culture & irreverence

Friday, Dec. 16 Mississippi Highway Patrol welcomes 51 new troopers at a graduation ceremony. â&#x20AC;Ś Controversial writer Christopher Hitchens dies at age 62 from pneumonia, a complication of esophageal throat cancer. Saturday, Dec. 17 The U.S. Senate passes a $1 trillion-plus budget bill. â&#x20AC;Ś Czech playwright and politician Vaclav Havel dies at age 75. The anti-communist dissident became president of Czechoslovakia in 1989 after the end of communist rule there, and later became the first president of the Czech Republic. Sunday, Dec. 18 The last U.S. troops leave Iraq, ending the eight-year war. They ride into Kuwait. â&#x20AC;Ś Kim Jong Il, dictator of North Korea, dies of heart failure at age 69. Before he died he named his son, Kim Jong Un, as his successor.

December 21 - 27, 2011

Monday, Dec. 19 The FBI reports that violent crime continues to fall in the United States. Property crimes are also down despite the bad economy and conventional wisdom. â&#x20AC;Ś The U.S. International Trade Commission rules that an Apple patent covers features in smartphones, even some in Google Androids.

6

Tuesday, Dec. 20 President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval rating rises to almost 50 percent. â&#x20AC;Ś Afghanistan frees a woman imprisoned for adultery after a relative raped her. President Hamid Karzai intervened on her behalf.... Gov. Haley Barbour proposes 2.9 percent cuts in his budget. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

SOURCE: BLUEPRINT MISSISSIPPI/GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY JOBS PROJECTION STUDY

Elephant in the Hotel Room

T

he Rev. Ronnie Crudup ended the Dec. 16 Jackson Redevelopment Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special meeting on a positive note. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe we are going to get a convention center hotel very shortly,â&#x20AC;? he said, soon after the JRA board voted to decline all existing proposals on the table. On Friday, Dec. 16, the JRA rejected in executive session the only two submitted proposals, one from TCI Investments, the Dallasbased company that owns the land across the street from the Convention Center, and the other from Journeyman Austin Holdings, also based in Texas. JRA and the city of Jackson will issue a new request for proposals in the first quarter of 2011. Essentially, the board did not want to rush into making a decision without looking at the layers of complexity of the project and the financing. Crudup said that the board took into account the financial obligation to the city, the short time frame of the two-week submission period and a multitude of potential legal concerns that not even all the lawyers agreed on. It all resulted in the board saying no to both developers. With Gulf Opportunity Zone bonds ending Dec. 31, manyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including TCI representativesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wanted to take advantage of that public funding. Journeyman Austin, however, said that while it would like the benefits of such a program, its proposal wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contingent on GO Zone bonds. Journeyman Austin offered three dif-

FILE PHOTOS

Thursday, Dec. 15 Republican presidential candidates participate in another debate, this time in Iowa. â&#x20AC;Ś Farmers in southern China rebel over a government land grab and death of an organizer. Residents of Wukan, a village in Guangdong province, drive off officials and police.

By 2018, 54 percent of Mississippi jobs will require some training beyond a highschool degree.

ferent sites and options in its proposal. One includes an unoccupied City Centre tower at 200 S. Lamar St. that Parkway Properties

The Jackson Convention Center lacks a hotel.The Jackson Redevelopment Authority will request proposals early in 2012.

owns. All three Journeyman options had plans for 300 rooms, parking, retail space, extended convention meeting space and local involvement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is our mainstay business, delivering convention center hotels,â&#x20AC;? said Robert Gallup, vice president of Journeyman Austin. The developer has built 10 convention center hotels

¹) HAVE NO PROBLEM WHATSOEVER WITH CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY ) HAVE A PROB LEMWITHASKINGTHEPEOPLEOF-ISSIS SIPPITOBEGUINEAPIGS² ²1RUWKHUQ'LVWULFW3XEOLF6HUYLFH&RP PLVVLRQHU %UDQGRQ 3UHVOH\ H[SODLQLQJ ZK\ KH KDV YRWHG DJDLQVW WKH H[SHUL PHQWDO 0LVVLVVLSSL 3RZHU &R SODQW XQ GHUFRQVWUXFWLRQLQ.HPSHU&RXQW\ ¹6ISION WITHOUT ACTION IS JUST AHALLUCINATION² ²/W*RYDQG*RYHOHFW3KLO%U\DQW VSHDNLQJ DW D 'HF  SROLF\ VXPPLW LQ-DFNVRQ SOURCE: WLBT.

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by Valerie Wells

FILE PHOTO

Wednesday, Dec. 14 The Euro falls as the U.S. dollar rises. â&#x20AC;Ś The National Transportation Safety Board says that states should ban drivers calling or texting on cellphones while on the road. â&#x20AC;Ś President Barack Obama makes remarks to troops at Fort Bragg, N.C., about the end of the Iraq war.

Gov. Haley Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commission recommends a freeze on PERS adjustments. p 10

in the 12 years. He mentioned some examples of completed projects: the Austin Hilton, Austin Hilton Downtown, Denver Hyatt, San Antonio Hyatt and hotels in Omaha, Neb., and Vancouver, Wash. Journeyman is also involved with developing a convention center hotel in Savannah, Ga. That cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s convention complex is across the river from its downtown with not much else happening in the vicinity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time I go to Savannah, walk in the convention centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and no one is there,â&#x20AC;? Gallup said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes me sick. It is sitting there.â&#x20AC;? Gallup said the funding for the Jackson project should involve private investment. The company is not asking for 100 percent financing from the city. At least 10 percent would come from private sources. Don Hewitt represented Advance Technology Building Solutions, a Jackson-based firm working with Journeyman. His company is renovating the old Regions building downtown, the Jackson Free Press reported in August. Hewitt said Journeymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hotel project would include as much local participation as possible. He stressed that Journeyman has criteria for hiring minority subcontractors. One of the board members asked if it was necessary to have GO Zone bonds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is not a deal killer,â&#x20AC;? Gallup responded. TCI, on the other hand, says it needed the GO Zone bonds to proceed. Hewitt pointed HOTEL, see page 8

Six Jobs You Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Want to Have on Christmas Day

1.

Cashier at national drugstore chain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Last-minute gift shoppers will blame you personally for the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depleted inventory of popular sleeved blankets and canned pumpkin.

2. 3.

Emergency veterinary hospital worker â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Animals eat strange things sometimes. Now add persimmon pudding.

4. 5.

Window washer or any job that involves submersion of bare skin in water. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cold in December

President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An attempted coup dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠtat in an esoteric French Polynesian nationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or a Joe Biden gaffeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;potentially interrupts your imbibing of Hawaiian eggnog.

Santa Claus â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sure, he gets 364 days off a year. But the one day he does have to work, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotta visit 2.2 billion kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; houses in one day, about 91.6 million an hour.

6.

Front-desk clerk at a seedy motel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; If someone is seeking payby-the-hour, cash-only accommodations on Christmas Day, you probably donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to handle their cash.


talk

news, culture & irreverence

4HE7EEKIN*ACKTOWN

Send Jacktown news tips to: news@jacksonfreepress.com

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7


businesstalk

by R.L. Nave

Online Tax Debate Looming

S

FILE PHOTO

idewalks, busy sidewalks. In the air, to U.S. Sens. Mike Enzi and Lamar Alexander, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feeling that the economy might Republicans from Wyoming and Tennessee, finally be picking up momentum if respectively, expressing support for a bill they trends during the holiday shopping sea- authored that would allow states to collect son are any indication. sales tax on online purchases. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re up over last year,â&#x20AC;? said Julia Daily, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifteen years ago, when e-commerce executive director of the Craftsmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guild of was still a nascent industry, it made sense to Mississippi, which operates the Mississippi exempt startups like Amazon.com from colCraft Center in Ridgeland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this economy, lecting and remitting sales taxes in states where we consider that a banner year.â&#x20AC;? they had no facilities,â&#x20AC;? Barbour wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today, Despite a national economy that contin- e-commerce has grown, and there is simply no ues to claw out from a recession, people are longer a compelling reason for government to doing a surprising amount of shopping. continue giving online retailers special treatThe National Retail Federation reported ment over small businesses.â&#x20AC;? national retail sales for November, bolstered by storesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offering holiday promotional deals, grew 4.5 percent over 2010. Calling the numbers stronger than expected, the Washington, D.C.-based trade group said Americans spent $52 billion during Black Friday weekend, the period from Thanksgiving Day through the following Sunday. The NRF did not sepaWhen large online retailers do not collect state sales tax, it rate sales from those in brick- hurts cash-strapped states and small business owners like and-mortar shops from those artisans at the Mississippi Craft Center (pictured). of online retailers but did show sizable year-over-year increases for electronics, clothing and accesNot only should states be allowed to sory stores, sporting goods, hobby, book and collect taxes however they see fit, Barbour music stores, all of which are popular items to said, he added that failure to â&#x20AC;&#x153;level the playpurchase online. ing fieldâ&#x20AC;? could put Main Street retail operaWhile booming sales figures are welcome tors out of business. for online retailers and politicians, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so That Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notoriously anti-tax great for local and state governments that ex- Republican governor called for what some perienced unprecedented revenue shortfalls consider a tax increase understandably raised during the economic downturn. States donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eyebrows and distanced Barbour from notable collect sales taxes from most online purchases. members of his own party. The problem is so dire in Mississippi that Republican Phil Bryant, Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gov. Haley Barbour weighed in on the issue lieutenant governor and successor, balked on his way out the door. at the idea. In late November, Barbour wrote a letter But local retailers such as the Mississippi

December 21 - 27, 2011

HOTEL, from page 6

8

out that other bonds would be available from state agencies, including the Mississippi Business Finance Corp. Alfred Crozier represented TCI at the meeting, but wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepared for a formal presentation. In his impromptu address, he said he had given a presentation already to a committee the day before and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have all his consultants on hand Friday. He stressed that TCI has been working on the project for years, even before the 2008 economic dip. The company assembled parcels equaling four city blocks across from the convention center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone through the gambit to massage this to a level we find comfortable,â&#x20AC;? Crozier told the board. He said that TCI is in final negotiations with Sheraton to become the â&#x20AC;&#x153;flagâ&#x20AC;?

hotel. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same mixed-use plan TCI had presented before. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are prepared to close by the end of the year to utilize GO Zone,â&#x20AC;? Crozier told the board. JRA board member Beneta Burt asked Crozier: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the GO Zone (funds), will you move forward?â&#x20AC;? Crozier talked around her question, at which point she interrupted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be a no,â&#x20AC;? she said. Before the board went into executive session, Crudup commented on a story in The Clarion-Ledger that examined connections several JRA consultants on the project had with TCI. The story mentioned Malachi Financial Products, law firm Butler Snow, law firm Chambers and Gaylor, and Swerdling and Associates, a hospitality real

Craft Center, which runs an online store of its own, now has to compete with much larger Internet companies for consumers who want hand-crafted goods. Daily, the Mississippi craft gallery director, echoes Barbour in the need for online operations to charge a sales tax. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would make things more fair across the board,â&#x20AC;? she said. One the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest online retailers also agrees with Daily and Barbour. Speaking to the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, Paul Misener, a vice president for Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc., said the company â&#x20AC;&#x153;strongly supports enactment of a federal bill with appropriate provisions.â&#x20AC;? The bill would exempt online companies making less than $500,000 per year in sales. Misener argued 1 percent of Internet sellers make $150,000 a year. In 2010, online retail sales grew 13 percent to $176 billion in the United States. Sales are on pace to grow 12 percentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to $197 billionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in 2011, according to forecasts from technology and market research firm Forrester Research. Even if the federal online legislation becomes law, the next battleground will be in state legislatures. Anticipating a budget fight with Mississippi House Republicans, new state Rep.-elect David Baria, D-Pascagoula, said lawmakers will face the decision to cut teachers or raise local taxes to make ends meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anything that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to vote on thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to raise revenue,â&#x20AC;? Baria said. The state Department of Revenue recently reported $4.9 million less than expected in tax receipts in November. Marty Wiseman, director of the John C. Stennis Institute of Government at Mississippi State University, called the prospect of an online sales debate a potentially interesting standoff between industry and local government. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beginning to impact Main Street Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? Wiseman

said of the loss of state tax revenue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be an interesting discussion between business and industry and local governments in Mississippi. It deserves a thorough discussion before it goes down.â&#x20AC;? Comment at www.jfp.ms.

estate firm. The article said that TCI gave Porter Bingham, CEO of Malachi, $65,000 in retainers and that Malachi could make $1.57 million in fees.

It should not reflect on personal integrity of board members.â&#x20AC;? After he made the comments, the board voted to go into executive session to discuss the two proposals. When they reopened the meeting, they voted down both developers. The fifth floor meeting room in the Warren Hood Building slowly cleared. In the elevator going down, Gallup said Journeyman Austin would definitely submit another proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are competitive,â&#x20AC;? he said. When the elevator door opened, Crozier from TCI was standing in the first-floor lobby with his legs crossed and arms folded, but he turned and walked away without commenting on his companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future plans. Want the history? Go to jfp.ms/hotel for details. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;That would be a no.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Beneta Burt

Crudup, who is chairman of the JRA board, said he found it â&#x20AC;&#x153;most worrisomeâ&#x20AC;? that the story in the paper might leave readers with the suggestion that JRA board members had done something wrong. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is absolutely not so,â&#x20AC;? Crudup said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of us receive a dime. This whole issue of liability is an elephant in the room.

Local Fights Back

S

tacy Mitchell, a senior researcher with The New Rules Project, an initiative of the Minneapolis-based Institute for Local Self-Reliance, examined how local businesses have fared compared to their national competitors in recent years. She compiled information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Economic Census, National Association of Chain Drugstores, American Booksellers Association, American Independent Business Alliance and other sources. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some of what she found. To see the full report, published in March 2011, visit http://www. newrules.org/retail/news/localism-index.

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businesstalk

by R.L. Nave

R.L. NAVE

Supremes Question Kemper

Residents near a planned 582-megawatt coal plant protested the project that threatens to raise their electric rates by 45 percent.

I

n all the pages of court records regarding a dispute between environmentalists and an electric utility company—pages that one Mississippi Supreme Court justice characterized as the most voluminous he has seen in his eight years on the court—one important piece of information eluded the justices. What changed between April and May for the Mississippi Public Service Commission to reverse itself and allow Mississippi Power Co. jack up the cap on a 582-megawatt Kemper County coal plant by $480 million dollars? “So far I don’t find anything in the commission’s order itself—and haven’t yet found in the record—what it is that would help me understand that the commission is justified in making this factual conclusion that the risks are now balanced,” presiding Justice Jess H. Dickinson said last week. Brandon Presley, the PSC’s northern district commissioner, has an idea. Presley voted against fellow commissioners Lynn Posey and Leonard Bentz, of the central and southern district respectively, on the cap increase. “The only thing I saw change was letters came in from Barack Obama’s energy secretary and Haley Barbour,” Presley said. Last summer, Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Gov. Barbour wrote letters asking Presley to reconsider his opposition to Mississippi Power raising the price tag of the plant, which is now under construction. Presley balked at the idea, calling the project a bad deal for consumers. “If President Obama or Governor Barbour like this plant so much, let them come up with a way to pay for it,” he told the Jackson Free Press last week. Presley, along with consumer and en-

vironmental advocacy groups, has fought to oppose the plant, albeit for slightly different reasons at times. “I have no problem whatsoever with clean coal technology,” Presley said. “I have a problem with asking the people of Mississippi to be guinea pigs.” The Sierra Club opposes the 582-megawatt plant because it is slated to use experimental internal gasification combined technology to burn low-grade lignite coal. As the basis for its lawsuit against Mississippi Power and the PSC, the suit before the Mississippi Supreme Court, the Sierra Club also argued that the commission failed in its obligation to publicly explain its rationale for the reversal. On April 29, 2010, Commissioners Posey and Bentz issued a decision limiting the ratepayer cost of the plant to $2.4 billion. Mississippi Power stockholders of Company would have to pick up any costs above $2.4 billion, they said at the time. The Atlanta-based utility complained that it should be able to pass any additional costs down to the ratepayers, and warned that it could not afford to build the plant if not allowed to pass on all the costs, including those above $2.4 billion. Less than one month later, the commission revised its decision May 26, allowing the company to charge ratepayers up to $2.88 billion for the plant. Mississippi Power did not publicly release the amount of the rate increase customers would shoulder as a result. After being pressed by justices at the hearing, Sierra Club attorney Robert Wiygul said he obtained confidential information showing that ratepayers’ energy bills could rise as much as 45 percent. Since the hearing, the justices are reviewing the remainder of the court documents and could bring the parties back to clarify some points before the three-judge panel or the full nine-member court. From there, they can remand the issue back to the PSC for review or strike provisions of the deal. PSC Commissioners Posey and Bentz did not return calls by press time. “I’m not counting any chickens before they hatch,” said Louie Miller, state director of the Mississippi Sierra Club. “I’m going to remain cautiously optimistic.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Old Capitol Green Could Get $13 Million

T

he long-delayed Old Capitol Green downtown development project drew a little closer to fruition Monday when the Hinds County Board of Supervisors agreed to negotiate with developers to appropriate $13 million from a $20 million Mississippi Development Authority loan. In August 2010, supervisors approved a tentative agreement with the city of Jackson and New York City-based developers

Full Spectrum Inc. establishing financial support for infrastructure related to the proposed Old Capitol Green development in downtown Jackson. Under the agreement, the county would provide Full Spectrum $20 million, using a loan from the MDA, while the city would install water and sewer infrastructure to support the proposed mixed-use development. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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living, though Schloegel, who chaired the committee, said right now, the cost-of-living adjustment that retirees get each year is set at 3 percent— higher than the actual rate of inflation. The commission recommended freezing costof-living adjustments for three years and tying future adjustments to the Consumer Price Index with a 3-percent cap. If Gov. Haley Barbour’s PERS Study Commission called for changes to public employees’ retirement benefits. the Legislature adopts the commission’s recommendations, new retirees ick Anderson shook his head as would not receive a 13th check for the first Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel three years after they retire. and Gov. Haley Barbour detailed Funding from PERS comes from three proposed changes to the Public Em- sources: Employers, employees and returns on ployees Retirement System during a press investments. conference last week. Anderson, a local artist The commission is calling for the Legand retired teacher, said he has been to almost islature and the PERS board to make other all the PERS study commission meetings and changes to the system, such as lowering the doesn’t like what he has heard. Anderson said amount PERS expects to get back on its inthe commission should have had more public vestments from 8 percent to 7.5 percent. employees, such as retired teachers like him, The Legislature passed a bill to raise benwho will feel the impact of cuts. efits through PERS without providing fund“What angers me about that study com- ing several years ago, Schloegel said. That, mittee is (that) they met, they had an agenda; combined with the recent stock-market dewhen they leave they’re done,” he said. “Noth- cline, created the “perfect storm” for PERS. ing that they do or propose or suggest will have “In the short term, PERS can pay its benefits,” any impact or influence on them whatsoever. he said. “However, unless the Legislature takes They’re gone.” action, the long-term sustainability and afAfter a four-month wait and much fordability of PERS is at serious risk.” speculation, a commission studying PERS has Anderson said his insurance costs will recommended freezing the cost-of-living ad- continue to go up whether his cost-of-living justment paid to retirees for three years. adjustment does or not, and he thinks teachBarbour appointed the 12-member ers and public employees might leave the state commission in August to make recommenda- and look for a better deal elsewhere. tions for PERS’ improvement. Much of the Barbour sees the PERS issue from a difcontroversy surrounding the commission has ferent perspective. He said public employees stemmed from concern that it might recom- and retirees should be concerned that the sysmend changes to the so-called “13th check,” tem is not sustainable. or cost-of-living adjustments for retirees. “I think that the public, I think the emThe 13th check is money state retirees ployees, I think the retirees ought to be beatget every year to account for the rising cost of ing on the door of the Legislature, saying we

R

cannot accept this,” he said during the press conference. “It’s not fair to the younger retirees, much less the current employees, to have a system that we know is in this bad of shape.” The Legislature will have to approve any changes to PERS. In past discussions about the study commission, legislators have been reluctant to take such an unpopular step as reducing the 13th check. “Charlton Heston said it would be very hard to get the gun out of his hand unless he was dead,” Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian, said in September. “That’s how it’ll be if they come after state retirement.” The commission has recommended an additional one-year study period and fiscal analysis before modifying PERS, and Schloegel said it will be difficult for the Legislature to make changes to the system. “There’s a lot of hype out there because people are so scared,” he told the Jackson Free Press. “It’s going to be real difficult to calm the masses down so the Legislature can give it a real objective look, but I hope they’re able to (overcome) that.” Schloegel said he hopes now that the report is out, people will be reassured that the commission does not have the authority to make any changes and that legislators will “do what’s right for the future.” Read the full PERS report online at governorbarbour.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

PERS Study Highlights • Tie the cost-of-living adjustment to the Consumer Price Index with a 3 percent cap. • Freeze the COLA for the next three years, or for three years after retirement. • Raise the normal retirement age from 60 to 62. • Lower the investment return assumption from 8 percent to 7.5 percent. • Study adding a defined contribution component to the state’s retirement program. • Study the Supplemental Legislative Retirement Plan to determine whether that benefit for legislators and the lieutenant governor is appropriate.

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statetalk

by R.L. Nave

Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 Budget At a Glance

presents Its 2012 Season:

COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

meet any budget shortfalls. Under his college consolidation proposal, which he floated in previous budgets, Jackson State University would absorb Mississippi Valley State University and Alcorn State University; Mississippi University for Women would join Mississippi State University. All of the campuses would remain open, but the mergers would save the state $10 million, Barbour said. Barbour recommended budget increases for a few areas. In addition to a 35.6 percent increase for the state crime lab and a Gov. Haley Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 budget plan calls for merging Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University and Alcorn State University, all historically black universities, and Mississippi University for Women. 41.1 percent increase for the state medical examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, Barbour wants to hire n his final budget recommendations beâ&#x20AC;&#x153;If we reduce ours to the national avmore auditors to collect what fore leaving office, Gov. Haley Barbour erage, we would save $24 million a year,â&#x20AC;? he said is the 5 percent in state taxes that put everything from Mississippi Pub- Barbour said. He added that consolidat- go uncollected. lic Broadcasting to the Egg Marketing ing some school districts would improve â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not for raising peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; taxes, but Board on the chopping block Tuesday. the quality of education. If school districts I am for collecting the taxes that are owed This week, in his $5.48 billion state- overspend, he said that those districts would to us,â&#x20AC;? Barbour said. spending plan for fiscal year 2013, Barbour be able to borrow money from the state to Comment at www.jfp.ms. called for a 2.9 percent average funding reduction to various state agencies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to return to discipline,â&#x20AC;? said (ERE´SASNAPSHOTOF"ARBOUR´SRECENTBUDGETPROPOSALS Barbour, who will leave office in January. !REA &9 &9 #HANGE As part of that discipline, Barbour said -XGLFLDU\ -XVWLFH    that community colleges should learn how ([HFXWLYH $GPLQLVWUDWLYH    to self-fund athletics programs and that 3XEOLF(GXFDWLRQ    Mississippi Public Broadcasting should take 3XEOLF+HDOWK    a lesson about how to be profitable without +RVSLWDO +RVSLWDO6FKRROV    government help from Nickelodeon and $JULFXOWXUH    other broadcasting entities that provide (FRQRPLF'HYHORSPHQW    programming for children. &RQVHUYDWLRQ    His $2.1 billion appropriation for &RUUHFWLRQV    K-12 education represents a 1.4 percent 6RFLDO:HOIDUH    decrease, achieved primarily by reducing 0LOLWDU\3ROLFH 9HWHUDQVÂś$IIDLUV    administrative expenses and consolidating 0LVFHOODQHRXV    school districts. Barbour said that while 'HEW6HUYLFH    nationally K-12 schools spend 7.6 percent 7RWDO6WDWH6XSSRUW    on administrative costs, Mississippi spends 8.8 percent.

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Are ‘Workers’ All We Want?

A

s we move into the fourth or fifth year of the Great Recession (depending on whose measurement you use), it’s more and more difficult to divorce anything from its ability to make money and create jobs. Education isn’t exempt. Parents and students want to know that schooling will help on the path toward good, stable work and a decent salary, one that will at least allow grads to eat while paying back those exorbitant student loans. Measured in economic terms, the purpose of education is to fill the workforce pipeline. With any luck, you and your kids will pick the right specialization to make it in the “real world,” whether it’s business, technology or Japanese. That’s the problem with looking at education from an economic-only viewpoint: Unless you’re psychic, choosing the “right” specialty can be a lot like spinning the roulette wheel. Few could foresee the explosion of technology 30 years ago. Twenty years from now, or maybe 10, today’s skills will be obsolete. Some specialties, like medicine, will always be useful. Pundits once said the same thing about law. Until recently, a law degree, especially one from a top school, guaranteed a successful, moneyed future. These days, job-placement counselors are encouraging law-school graduates to lower their expectations. Like nearly every other industry, the law has more applicants than positions. Not so long ago, education was a privilege, not a right. Thank God those days are over, right? Truthfully, it hasn’t taken long to bend even something as seemingly benign and beneficial as education into fodder for commerce. Ask Gov. Haley Barbour in whose interest it is to keep a quarter of Mississippians impoverished and ignorant. Such a savvy, business-oriented leader would move the dial on prosperity, health, and education if those were necessities for car manufacturers, port operators or strip mines. But they’re not. When education is a commodity, leaders will funnel students into whatever most benefits the narrow interests of the marketplace. Prison-industry analysts look at how Mississippi’s third-graders are doing to predict how much capacity they’ll need in 10 years. Pre-K education and a prosperous, egalitarian society is not in that multi-billion dollar industry’s best interest. To lift all Mississippians, we need school programs that emphasize soft skills—organization, socialization and cooperation—at all grade levels. Instill confidence, love of learning, and striving for excellence by challenging kids with music, art, languages, philosophy and logic. Not every youngster will bite at the apple, but 20 years from now, people with complete (dare we say liberal) educations and flexibility will be ready to take on the challenges we can’t even name today. Lawyers may need remedial retraining. Instead of rushing to produce more workers, let’s shift education toward producing well-rounded, thinking adults. And let’s begin now with 3-year-olds.

KEN STIGGERS

The Dirty Lowdown

C

December 21 - 27, 2011

ongressman Smokey “Robinson” McBride: “Citizens of the Ghetto Science community: I am honored to host the premiere broadcast of ‘Christmas at Clubb Chicken Wing Holiday Television Special.’ “The Ghetto Science Team’s Christmas Holiday Committee produced this program to uplift the depressed spirit of the Ghetto Science community. They noticed homes in poor and middle-class neighborhoods are without Christmas lights because many unemployed homeowners faced mass foreclosures by the finance pimps. Because of the widespread summer layoffs, office Christmas parties have fewer employees. “Corporations and purchased politicians thumbed their noses at the poor and middle classes—the scorned 99 percent all across America and the world— so they occupied public parks and town squares to protest corporate greed and blatant disenfranchisement of common people. “To sum up this holiday season, I’ll paraphrase singer Boz Scaggs: Poor and middle-class Americans have faced the sad truth, the dirty lowdown. “Now it’s time to drown our societal sorrows with some holiday cheer on the ‘Christmas at Clubb Chicken Wing Holiday Television Special.’ Look out for some great musical performances by the Vegetarian Church Tabernacle Christmas Choir and the Good God Gospel Quartet (from Rev. Cletus’ Car Sales Church broadcast). The Sausage Sandwich Sisters will electric slide to music of the late Donny Hathaway’s ‘This Christmas.’ Rev. Preacher, Sister Encouragement, and representatives from the Hanukkah and Kwanzaa Squads will share their special messages of peace, good will and culture. 12 “Happy holidays and welcome to ‘Christmas at Clubb Chicken Wing.’”

KAMIKAZE

Parental Sanity

O

ur children are our greatest commodities. It is our responsibility as parents, as teachers and adults to protect and nurture them so they can grow to be productive citizens. Now more than ever, our young people are faced with obstacles that neither you nor I may have envisioned during our childhood. More of our kids are being born into poverty. More of our kids are homeless. More of our kids are experiencing failing school systems with nonchalant instructors who just want to make it to Friday every week. With that said, as a society, we need to begin doing a better job of shielding our children from those ills that can ruin them at an early age. We must let our kids be kids, yet we must give peace of mind to parents and guardians like me who suffer from the anxiety of holding a child’s life in our hands. I’m saddened at the recent rash of incidents involving adults molesting children. It’s sickening, quite frankly. Gone are the days where youth coaches could be trusted completely—those surrogate mothers- or fathers-away-from-home whom you thanked for whipping your kid into shape and for teaching them about sportsmanship and hard work—no more. In light of all these cases, we may distrust teachers whom we once revered. Sure, not all coaches or teachers are pedophiles. In fact, the majority of them aren’t. But those guilty few have made it much harder for parents like me to ever feel comfortable entrusting the safety of my kids to anyone else. Literally. It scares me to death that we can’t be in several places at once. It scares me even more that at first glance you can never tell if someone aims to do harm to your kid. What do you say to a Green Elementary student who had his trust betrayed by an adult who should have been caring for him? What if the acts were re-

vealed to other adults, and they, too, swept them under the rug? What do the parents do? How can they continue to have faith? What does a father do when watching a video of his child being assaulted on a school bus and sees that an adult watched from only a few feet away? What if that adult, the bus driver, felt he’d be reprimanded for “touching” a child if he tried to break up the assault? We have a problem if we can’t distinguish between sexual assault and breaking up a fight. How do you discipline two teenaged mothers in Alabama who leave three toddlers at home unattended, left to fend for themselves? How do we send the message that we are serious about not harming children and make it stick? Can parents keep their sanity while being leery of day-care providers, baby sitters and summer-league coaches? Can our kids lead productive lives if we keep them from hanging out with friends in the neighborhood because we’re afraid some adult nearby will cheer on a scuffle instead of breaking it up? As a father of four, I’m disappointed where our society has gone as it relates to our children. It is paramount that we keep them not only safe, but also warm, fed, educated and supplied with the proper tools to survive in a fast-paced world. Call me paranoid, but I lose sleep and sanity any time my kids are not under my wing. And although I’m sure my parents had similar concerns, they had to have a level of comfort that we modern parents will never achieve. Observation, proper planning, research and prayer are the best tools we have to save our kids from predators and bullies. Let’s love these kids, whether they are yours or not. It still takes a village. And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


The Best Work Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Reporters R.L. Nave, Elizabeth Waibel Events Editor Latasha Willis Editorial Assistant LaShanda Phillips Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Natalie Long, Larry Morrisey, Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant,Tom Ramsey, Julie Skipper, Ken Stiggers, Rebecca Wright Editorial Interns Tam Curley, Brittany Kilgore Photography Intern Robert Hollins Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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ome people just seem to have it all: work they are good at, love and great personal lives, too. How does this happen? People grow and thrive given the right climate and conditions. When you are growing wiser and becoming a better person, you are in the right job. If your career meets your needs, uses your signature strengths and has you making better choices, the work is right for you. Consequently, you create a fulfilling life because what is most important to youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those things that other people just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to get around toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are front and center. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling numb, burnt out, overworked, underutilized or just stale, the first thing to do is to get crystal clear about why you work. Find the purpose behind why you do what you do, whether you work as a solo business owner, in the executive suite, as an employee or at home. The more powerfully connected you are to the purpose and meaning of your work, the more clear you are about your vision, the more energy you will have to create the right climate to thrive. Your practical steps will be purposeful and fall more easily into place, whether those steps lead to the security of a warm home, or to the freedom that comes from doing the work of your heartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calling. When you use your signature strengths and values in service of your purposeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;your big pictureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you put forth your best, most effective efforts. We can all make a significant lasting impact, or can choose to, within the sphere of our influence. Sometimes that impact is unintended but desirable, and other times it is unintended and undesirable, so you might as well go for the big outcomes you want. This takes courage. Courage comes from being clear and unwavering about the impact you want to make. The best way to be clear and unwavering, especially in the midst of an uncertain climate, is to have a plan, deeply anchored in who you are at your core and what is most important to you. People who have that kind of plan take actions they otherwise would not, even in challenging circumstances. They persevere. The ultimate reward is this: careers they love and sustaining, nurturing relationships. The callings of their hearts, not just their to-do lists, show up each and every day. Even if you do not have your dream job, yet, when you are connected to the purpose behind why you work, you will have a greater ease in getting your job

done well. Are you ready to make your work be as good as it can be in 2012? Use these four questions to start making your plan. 1. What do I most deeply want to feel and experience in my life? Know that, and you know the reason why you do what you do (or what you really want to do, as the case may be). Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be positioned to make the best use of your time, money and resources. Money is a means to achieve things you want, but not the compelling desire or final outcome. It might represent access to dance classes, or braces or food on the table. 2. What it is I most want others to experience? How does my work allow me to give them this experience? The answer to these questions further clarifies who you are at your core and what you are here to do. It might be a greater sense of connection by joyfully providing a life rich with experiences for your family. 3. How can my work support these experiences? In other words, this is what your life has prepared you do, which may or may not be about money. This is the work you are capable of doing when you are at your best and boldest, because it grows from your signature strengths and is aligned with your core values. If the answers bubbling up make you excited or nervous, you are on the right track. 4. What will give me the courage to reach for more? This is less about pride or hubris, and more about the impact you most sincerely want to have in your corner of the world. It is what will help you find your swagger, your strut. Maybe you intend to be the finest role model for your child. Or maybe you are fed-up feeling overstressed and under-rewarded by a demanding boss, spouse, colleague or friends. When you get clear and really dig in, things happen. Maybe not always in the time frame you would like or in the way you hope, but they do happen. You get the outcomes you want when you take specific actions that build from your strengths, are supported by your attitude and are rooted in the impact you want to make. That is the best work. Deirdre M. Danahar is a personal coach who helps busy people with complex lives focus on what matters most. She owns InMotion Consulting and Coaching LLC, based in Jackson. Reach her at deirdre@inmotioncc. com or visit her website at inmotioncc.com.

Are you ready to make your work be as good as it can be in 2012?

My Office Is Cooler Than Yours!

Nominate local offices for BOOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coolest Office Contest by sending photos and an e-mail explaining why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cool place to work to editor@boomjackson.com by December 31, 2011. BOOM will choose finalists and send a team of judges in January to pick a winner. Winner will be featured in March 2012 BOOM and win a catered staff lunch.

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jacksonfreepress.com

DEIRDRE M. DANAHAR

13


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PUBLIC DOMAIN

The Jobs Act: Help or Not? by Ronni Mott

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tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder that economics is called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;dismal science.â&#x20AC;? Regardless of what motivated Thomas Carlyle to coin the term (some say it was a prediction that the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources could never keep up with population, while others say it was a negative reaction to ending slavery), no one can call economics an exact science. The arbitrary nature of economic theory surfaced once again on the heels of President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s September unveiling of the American Jobs Act, a comprehensive package of tax cuts, credits, and relief designed to stimulate job retention and creation. Thirty-four economists weighed in on the plan in a Bloomberg survey published in late September, about a month after the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement. On the high side was Mark Zandi of Moodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Analytics (1.9 million jobs retained or created); on the other end of the spectrum was State Street Global Market LLC, which predicted a net loss of 30,000 jobs (a gain of 340,000 jobs in 2012, followed by a loss of 370,000

in 2013). The median average for the 34 economists was a gain of 288,000 jobs over two years, lowering the unemployment rate by about 0.3 percent. Bloomberg didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include John Irons of the Economic Policy Institute in its survey. EPI is a non-profit, non-partisan think tank created in 1986 â&#x20AC;&#x153;to broaden discussions about economic policy to include the needs of low- and middle-income workers,â&#x20AC;? according to its website. Irons predicted â&#x20AC;&#x153;the package would increase employment by about 4.3 million jobs,â&#x20AC;? including a â&#x20AC;&#x153;boostâ&#x20AC;? of 2.6 million jobs and retention of 1.6 million jobs. One fact is not in dispute: Americans need jobs now. The official U.S. unemployment rate is stubbornly stuck at around 9 percent nationally, and 46.2 million Americans live in poverty. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poverty rate is the highest in the nation at 22.6 percent, and its unemployment rate for October was 10.6 percent statewide, with nearly 138,000 collecting unemployment insurance benefits.

In the Jackson metro, 22,900 people were officially unemployed in October. The unofficial numbers could be twice as high, given that many have exhausted their benefitsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and their energy to find jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;while others have taken part-time or lower-level work out of desperation. No one officially counts the chronically unemployed or the underemployed. Congress wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass every facet of the act, nor will it leave parts it passes unchanged, but, as Deborah Sweeney wrote in Forbes magazine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is all too easy to step back and poke holes in these plans, citing all the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;what-ifsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and variables inherent in this type of legislation.â&#x20AC;? For many Americans, Congress just poking holes and doing nothing is not an option. Following are highlights of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the American Jobs Act as proposed by Obama in September and the estimated benefits for Mississippi where available. (Find a fact sheet on the act and the full text at whitehouse.gov.)

4AXCUTSANDOTHERRELIEF â&#x20AC;˘ A 50-percent cut in payroll taxes on the first $5 million in payroll, benefitting both employers and workers. â&#x20AC;˘ A payroll-tax holiday for employers adding new workers or giving workers raises. â&#x20AC;˘ Access to lower-interest mortgages.

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â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Returning homeâ&#x20AC;? tax credits for hiring returning veterans. â&#x20AC;˘ Preventing teacher layoffs while keeping cops and firefighters employed. â&#x20AC;˘ Modernizing public schools. â&#x20AC;˘ Repairing and modernizing roads, rail, airports and waterways. â&#x20AC;˘ Rehabilitating homes, businesses and communities through â&#x20AC;&#x153;Project Rebuild,â&#x20AC;? emphasizing public-private collaborations. â&#x20AC;˘ Expanding high-speed Internet access. (OW-ANY/F½CIALLY â&#x20AC;˘ Establishing a bipartisan National Infrastructure Bank. 5NEMPLOYED

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December 21 - 27, 2011

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â&#x20AC;˘ Unemployment subsidies for workers whose employers choose work sharing (reducing jobs to part-time) over layoffs. â&#x20AC;˘ Improving state programs for the unemployed, including an extension of unemployment benefits. â&#x20AC;˘ Subsidies for the unemployed to become entrepreneurs. â&#x20AC;˘ Tax credits for employers hiring longterm unemployed workers. â&#x20AC;˘ Prohibiting discrimination against unemployed people when hiring. â&#x20AC;˘ Expanding opportunities for low-income youth and adults.

,Q-DFNVRQPHWURSROLWDQDUHD  ,Q0LVVLVVLSSL  ,QWKH8QLWHG6WDWHV   $YHUDJHUDWHRIXQHPSOR\PHQWLQ 0LVVLVVLSSLPERCENT 8QHPSOR\PHQWUDWHLQ+LQGV&RXQW\ PERCENT ,Q5DQNLQ&RXQW\ ORZHVWUDWHIRU 2FWREHU PERCENT ,Q&OD\&RXQW\ KLJKHVWUDWHIRU 2FWREHU PERCENT $YHUDJHUDWHRIXQHPSOR\PHQWLQWKH 86PERCENT SOURCES: MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, LABOR MARKET DATA FOR OCTOBER 2011. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS EMPLOYMENT SITUATION SUMMARY, DEC. 2 (FOR NOVEMBER 2011)


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jacksonfreepress.com


Where The Jobs Are â&#x20AC;Ś and Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t by R.L. Nave

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December 21 - 27, 2011

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SOURCE: MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY

by R.L. Nave

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Lowest unemployment rates â&#x20AC;&#x201D;BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, SEASONALLY ADJUSTED

homas Davis is passionate about beef jerky. An aficionado of jerky himself, he invested in his own business. But this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t your average filling station dried meat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is great beef jerky. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tender, tasty, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for you,â&#x20AC;? said Davis, who pays about $12 a week for his own online portal through which he can sell jerky and about seven ounces of the product. He wishes he could invest more in the company, but the jerky business is just the latest in a series of jobs heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had to string together to get by. And even if the business venture doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work, he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;At least I got some jerky to eat.â&#x20AC;? As industrious as Davis is, he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone. Some 7.3 million Americans, about 5.2 percent of all workers, engage in what the U.S. Labor Department calls multiple job-holding. Others simply call it moonlighting or running a side hustle. To people who hold second and third jobs to supplement their incomes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called basic survival. In the middle of the most challenging economic climate since Franklin D. Rooseveltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administration, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d think moonlighting would be on the rise. That isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the case. In fact, the rate of multiple jobholders in the U.S. has remained steady over the past two decades. It peaked, ironically, in the more economically robust mid-1990s at just above 6 percent. Still, unemployment remains palpable. Some employers complain of difficulty finding enough workers to fill vacancies, making now an ideal time to launch a secondâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or third, or fourthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;career.

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here are the jobs? Everybody should move to North Dakota, where there are more jobs than people and more people than housing. But you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to go so far as Fargo to find work. While Mississippi has more folks out of work than a lot of other places, growth is happening here, too. The Mississippi Department of Employment Security projects job growth of close to 13 percent from 2008 to 2018. So the jobs are thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if you know where to look.

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jacksonfreepress.com


Good Schools=Good Jobs by Elizabeth Waibel

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or a healthy economy that can compete on a national and international level, job training begins earlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;very early. Children are preparing to find jobs later in life even as they learn to stack blocks, count toys and read picture books. While government incentives and tax breaks can bring in new industry, some Mississippi business leaders are pointing to education as an important component in attracting and keeping good jobs in the state. Business leaders released Blueprint Mississippi recommendations in October insisting, among other things, that businesses donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just want incentives; they want an educated work force that can compete and innovate on a national level. Blake Wilson is president of the Mississippi Economic Council, which helped develop the recommendations. He said business leaders from around the state tell him that education is important to business. Companies can train workers, but employees need to have basic skills that come from a solid elementary education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just comes up consistently when you talk to business leadersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that fourth-grade testing scores are so critical,â&#x20AC;? Wilson said. If students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn what they need to know early on, they will spend the rest of their school years trying to catch up and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enter the work force able to compete, he said. Wilson added that a lack of education contributes

to high teenage birth rates and poverty: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s across the board, and why is this happening? Education, education, education.â&#x20AC;? A good education often pays off in the form of a good job. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics found that high-school graduates earned $182 more per week than those who did not graduate high school. Those with a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree earned $594 more per week. The figures came from the median weekly

earnings in 2010. The bureau also found that in 2010, those with higher degrees were much less likely to be unemployed. The unemployment rate for those with less than a high school diploma was 14.9 percent, while the rate for high school graduates was 10.3 percent. Those with a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree saw an unemployment rate of only 5.4 percent, almost three percentage points below the national average at the time.

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A Great Ride by Ronni Mott

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December 21 - 27, 2011

At midlife, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re frequently empty nesters and often single career library. Make a list of possible and interesting matches, again (or for the first time). Often, our passions have cooled for even if they sound implausible. big money and power. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural to become more reflective, Â&#x201E;4ALKTOPEOPLEALREADYINTHOSEJOBSORCAREERS Ask what interested in simplifying and making a lasting impact. they love and hate about their job, how they got where they If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re considering a are and if they can offer any career change, here are tips advice. for a successful transition: Â&#x201E;,EARNNEWSKILLS Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never Â&#x201E;4AKEINVENTORY Make lists too late to go back to school. of your accomplishments, You may need to brush up competencies and satisfacon some things, need special tions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Affirming your valucertification or even a differable experience and successes ent degree. helps ground you in your Â&#x201E; /FFER TO WORK FOR FREE OR strengths and remind you of TAKE A PAY CUT if you can what you do well. It serves afford it. An internship is a as a compass and provides great opportunity to try out a refueling for the journey new career. Also look for inahead,â&#x20AC;? writes Ellen Ostrow tra-company opportunities. Resources: on About.com. If you find Â&#x201E; .ETWORK Go to where â&#x20AC;˘ About.com Job Searching (jobsearch.about.com) yourself struggling, ask your people in your desired career â&#x20AC;˘ Forbes magazine â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making a Midlife Career Change.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ midlife-career-change.com family and friends to help network, including profesâ&#x20AC;˘ careerchangepathways.com with your lists. sional association meetings Â&#x201E;#LARIFYYOURVALUES Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and chambers of commerce. important to you in your Mine your contacts for inworkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;creativity, autonomy, intellectual stimulation, power, formation. In addition to face-to-face networking, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget money, making a difference? social networking sites such as LinkedIn. Â&#x201E;7HATDOYOULOVETODO What if money were no object? I Â&#x201E; 2EWRITE YOUR RESUME to highlight the skills you have aclove yoga, for example, and I love to teach. I combined the two quired throughout your career that are relevant and transferable and learned how to teach yoga. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay much, especially to your new job. because I only teach a couple of classes a week, but I enjoy it. Â&#x201E;2ELAXANDENJOYTHEJOURNEY Nothing is written in stone. Â&#x201E; 'ATHER INFORMATION Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve narrowed down whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Changing a career can be scary and frustrating, but it can also important, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to figure out what kinds of jobs or careers be invigorating, exhilarating and liberating. If you can embrace might match. Check job sites and classified ads. Visit a college it, this can be one of the most rewarding times of your life. FILE PHOTO

fter nine years with one company, I got a pink slip. It was inevitable. The company had been sold several times, and with each takeover, my departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget and staff shrank. Nonetheless, when the day arrived, it was a blow. With more than 25 years of experience in marketing and related fields, I knew finding a job to replace the one I lost would be difficult. A few months later, I had probably sent out hundreds of resumes, resulting in exactly one interview. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get an offer. It was time to try a different approach. Honestly evaluating my strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, dreams and goals, I quickly realized that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to spend another minute marketing other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stuff, but I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear what my options were. One afternoon at Lemuria Books, Julia Cameronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativityâ&#x20AC;? (Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, 2002, $16.99) kind of jumped into my hand. I had considered myself an artist once upon a time, but that was long ago. Perhaps, I thought, what I needed was a jump-start back to that way of thinking. I paid for my copy and began reading and following Cameronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suggestions that very day. Long story short, that book was the beginning of my journey to change careers. At the tender age of 50, I began an internship with the Jackson Free Press that, five years later, has me in the managing editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spot. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great fun and hard work. Best of all, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned more in the past five years than in the last 10 years of my previous career. Changing careers at mid-life isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all that unusual. Sometimes, as in my case, a change occurs because of a layoff or a company closes its doors. Other folks just reach the point where they find their work boring and unsatisfying. AARP reports that about 6 percent of workers over 50 re-evaluate their 18 jobs and careers.


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EAT • DRINK • PLAY

New Year’s Eve Bash featuring The Colonels December 31, 2011 • 9pm

$20 Cover

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Includes party favors and champagne toast. Reservations accepted, or get your tickets at the door.

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Smoke-Free Indoors Smoking available on the 3,000 sq ft Patio with New Orleans Style Fountain & Outdoor Tiki Bar.

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Voted Best Steak and Best Sportsbar

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in Jackson by Metromix 2011

Voted Best of Jackson 2011

Best Country Band Best Cover Band

Directions: From Jackson, take I- 55 South to the Byram Exit. Stay right on Siwell Road. 2.2 miles on the left.

6791 Siwell Rd. Byram, MS • 601.376.0777 www.reedpierces.com

jacksonfreepress.com

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19


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21st Century Job Hunting by Valerie Wells

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sites, you might come closer to hitting your target if you post on a site aimed to your field or industry. For example, the Mississippi Society of Certified Public Accountants offers accountant job seekers a place to post resumes at careers.ms-cpa.org. The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (sme.org/jobsconnection) and Mississippi Hospitality and Restaurant Association (msra.org) offer similar services. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alumni association or other organizations you belong to. Chances are those groups have websites that allow you to post a resume.

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or many fields, the 21st century job seeker benefits from having an online resume. First, get a blog. Blogger and WordPress are free online hosts for blogs where you can post your resume. Have pages that link to different projects or a page of great comments from your references. Focus the content toward your ideal job. Take advantage of LinkedIn, a site perfect for job seekers. List your experience and education, then connect with people you know in your field. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essentially a virtual resume. Checking your references can be instant and interactive. A little time invested can lead to introductions to other professionals at a company you would like to work for. Study your prospective employer. You might be interviewing with an old-fashioned firm that expects a hard copy of your resume on heavyweight paper. Or your potential boss might expect a cellphone bump to instantly download your stats. Be prepared for any possibility. Along the same lines, have several versions of your resume available. Tailor one resume to emphasize your skills and knowledge, and another one that is a traditional chronological list of your experience. Always have an extra copy of your resume when you go to an interview. CNET.com suggests a free software program that can help. It gives its highest rating to JobTabs Job Search and Resume 2011, a program that helps you write a resume and even organizes your job search. You can get a 14-day free trial. Download at www.jfp.ms/work/resumes. The Internet offers many online resume builders. Some are free. Also, many employers such as the U.S. government have online resume builders targeted specifically for particular jobs and career fields. To see how it works, start a profile at usajobs.gov. While you can post your resume on Monster.com or other similar

Beyond a resume, job seekers and all professionals need a platformâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a modern word for brand. If this seems overwhelming, companies such as FirstDigital are popping up to help you create your personal branding. The company helps you with resumes, online multi-media presentations, job aggregation from multiple sites plus a snazzy website. Even if you decide not to use the service, take a tour of the site at firstdialog.com/home and get some ideas you can use when developing your platform. A platform is part mission statement, part personal vision. It is a combination of your social media presence, your professional demeanor and your future aspirations. To build your personal brand, choose how you wish the world to see you as a professional. Become an expert. Then consider teaching classes, writing magazine articles, blogging or being a guest speaker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emerging is when you use a platform to come into your own,â&#x20AC;? marketing guru Seth Godin writes on this blog at sethgodin.typepad. com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Merging is when you sacrifice who you are to become part of something else.â&#x20AC;? Scott Ginsberg, who calls himself NameTag Scott, suggests authenticity and approachability as key concepts in creating a personal brand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If someone canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t approach you, how can they get behind you?â&#x20AC;? Ginsberg asks. He wears a nametag as part of his philosophy. When developing your brand and your platform, Ginsberg says to follow the three Cs: credibility, consistency and commitment. These qualities show in your work, your tweets and your personal interactions. You can read more of Ginsbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tips at hellomynameisscott.com.

+EYSTO9OUR0LATFORM â&#x20AC;˘ Credibility â&#x20AC;˘ Consistency â&#x20AC;˘ Commitment SOURCE: HELLOMYNAMEISSCOTT.COM

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December 21 - 27, 2011

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The Big 50: Tips for Work Success by Donna Ladd

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1. Be a well-rounded, likeable person people want to hire. 2. Get out of the house and meet people constantly. 3. Get everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business card or email address and drop a quick â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonderful to have met youâ&#x20AC;? note within 24 hours. (Or be creative: JFP events coordinator Shannon Barbour sent me a note, a signed book and a Barbie doll to get my attention when she was interviewing with us.) 4. Help other people as often as possible and however you can. They will, in turn, pass on opportunities to you. 5. Get involved in any alumni organization you can. 6. Be organized about your search: have a list of places and people to check in with regularly. 7. Call someone you admire, in a field you want to work in, and ask for an informational interview to learn more about what they do. Ask lots of questions. 8. To get someone to like (and want to help) you, ask them lots of questions about themselves, then listen intently. Humans canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resist people who do this well. 9. Take classes in areas you want to work in to increase your skills and your network. Then stay in touch with the teacher and other students afterward. 10. Do volunteer work; it often leads to great jobs and references.

1. First, research the company and its management like mad. Follow it on social media; learn what matters to its management. 2. Write an amazing cover letter targeted to the job. The resume is important, too, but the letter is your chance to make a good first impression and tell them how great they (and you) are. 3. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make errors in your letter or resume. Show you took time to get it right. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shoddy before youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hired, well ... 4. Figure out what skills they need and start learning or improving them. If they need you to know a certain software program, sign up for a program or a webinar. 5. Be clear that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not just looking for a job, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a career with their companyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;today and five years from now. 6. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be negative about a former boss under any circumstance. 7. Over-dress a little for the interview even in â&#x20AC;&#x153;creativeâ&#x20AC;? offices. It shows youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a professional. 8. Do not ever walk into an interview smelling like cigarette smoke or strong perfume. Or pot. 9. Have great questions to ask about the company; show youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dying to work there and will overcome hurdles to get the job. 10. Follow up immediately with a thank-you email and in a day or two, a handwritten note. Extra points if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cool arty card.

1. Be who you said you are in your interview. Follow through. 2. Be a problem-solver and action person. Go to your boss with problems and possible solutions. 3. Be enthusiastic about learning new skills and taking on new challenges on the job. 4. Never â&#x20AC;&#x153;delegate back upâ&#x20AC;? to a boss by not finishing a job and expecting them to, or not checking your work so someone else has to catch your mistakes. Grrr. 5. Be positive every day; compliment people (like hairstyle and shoes, not their figure); praise others; say good morning, goodnight, thank you, please. 6. Own your mistakes and show you are determined to fix them. 7. Look everyone you talk to in the eye; study and use good body language. Have a firm handshake. 8. Be your bossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; favorite person to turn to in a crunch so they believe they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it without you. 9. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t constantly overwork, but make your deadlines. 10. Manage your time and be organized. Never have to be reminded about your responsibilities.

1. Demonstrate from day one that you want to learn and teach those around you. 2. Project confidence in your skills; one way is to praise others, even your manager. 3. Admit mistakes fast and fix them immediately. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take feedback personally; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just feedback. 4. Surprise people because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done things before being asked. This makes managers happy. 5. Be someone who lifts up the whole team with your enthusiasm and passion. Participate in office activities from events to Dirty Santa. Be a company loyalist and family member. 6. When someone expresses a problem, immediately suggest how to fix it and/or help communicate it to those you can. 7. Be an innovative idea machine. 8. Show youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not allergic to workâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that you, in fact, enjoy and thrive on focused work 9. Radiate a can-do attitude. If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it, explain why calmly. 10. Demonstrate regularly that you can delegate, teach and mentor, and enjoy doing it.

1. Know that the last thing you do is the first thing your employer will remember. Always. 2. When possible, warn your employer well in advance that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking about leaving. Then it becomes a partnership in making your exit work well for everyone. 3. Professionals show they value their contribution by offering good notice. Saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;two weeks is standardâ&#x20AC;? makes you sound like a service worker who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take your job seriously. 4. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think your boss will consider your vacation and holidays as real â&#x20AC;&#x153;notice.â&#x20AC;? Count notice days as they do: how many days youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be fully employed in the office, prepping for replacement. 5. Tie up every loose thread, and do everything you say you will. 6. Make checklists for your replacement, and mentor them well. 7. Never make negative statements about the company and employees to the replacement. They always tell what you said. 8. Take every personal item you brought to the company. 9. Never goof off and utter or think the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are they going to do, fire me?â&#x20AC;?; actually, they will just decline a reference. 10. Always write a personal note thanking your employers for what they taught you; then stay in touch with them to stay fresh in their minds for references.

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For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at, www.magnoliacollegeofcosmetology.com Photo Courtesy of Pivot Point International Inc.

CAREER MAKER, HINDS STUDENT.

Register Now â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jan. 6 for Spring classes 1.800.HINDSCC

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December 21 - 27, 2011

4725 I-55 N â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.362.6940 www.magnoliacollegeofcosmetology.com

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Hinds Community College offers equal education and employment opportunities and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability or veteran status in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Dr. George Barnes, Vice President for Administrative and Student Services, 34175 Hwy. 18, Utica, MS 39175, 601.885.7001.


Finding Time by Donna Ladd

7ORKAHOLICS!NONYMOUS 9ES 9OU#AN

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es, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real addiction. And, yes, it is harmful to your health, your family and social life, and even to the workplace. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a form of hubrisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just have too much to doâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;that actually causes you to manage your time poorly and spread out tasks to fit long days and weeks. Just learn to just say no to workaholism. You can find a list of recovery tools at workaholics-anonymous.org. They include these suggestions: 1. Learn to listen, to yourself and loved ones, and your higher power. 2. Learn to prioritize what is most important to do first. 3. Stay flexible and reorganize to accommodate changes and opportunities. 4. Allow more time than you think a project takes. 5. Schedule time to play; make sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a work project. 6. Learn to concentrate and do one thing at a time. 7. Work at a comfortable pace, and rest before you get too tired. 8. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get â&#x20AC;&#x153;wound up,â&#x20AC;? so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to unwind. 9. Learn to relax, especially when you feel pressure building. 10. Accept the outcomes of your actions and forgive yourself. 11. Ask others and your higher power for help. Accept it. 12. Talk to other workaholics about struggles and progress. 13. Serve others, including other workaholics. 14. Live in the now; imbue each moment with serenity, joy and gratitude. 15. Balance work with effort to maintain personal relationships, spiritual growth, creativity and playful attitudes.

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serviced, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find your keys and your printer cartridge is dead? Some folks say they work â&#x20AC;&#x153;bestâ&#x20AC;? like this; but imagine how much better they could be if they learned basic timemanagement skills? There are many systems for time managementâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;my favorite is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting Things Done: The Art of StressFree Productivityâ&#x20AC;? by David Allen (Penguin, 2002, $16), or GTD as geeks and artist like to call it. (And now I use OmniFocus software to support it.) I like GTD because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about just getting to high priorities and never getting around to the little stuff that nags (and then causes big problems later). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a system that captures all your tasks in â&#x20AC;&#x153;contextâ&#x20AC;? (such as all phone calls together) and so on. The main thing is to get everything you need to do, large and small, out of your head to free up â&#x20AC;&#x153;mental ramâ&#x20AC;? so you can have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;mind like waterâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and get to the stuff that really matters to you. Regardless of how you schedule your time, however (index cards, moleskine, software, etc.), the key is always whether you follow it and keep it up. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the rubber hits the road. So while you look around for the best system for yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and you must; carrying tasks in your head leads to unbridled insanityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;here are tips that help on (and off) the job no matter which system you choose:

Â&#x201E;$OITNOWIf it can be done within two minutes, do it. If not, schedule it for another time. Â&#x201E;$ON´TKEEPLONGTO DOLISTSItâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to pick six top priorities each day that you must get to. Â&#x201E;0LANYOURDAY WEEKANDDAYSOUTThis isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to-theminute; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about blocks of time to work on the big stuff, as well as blocks of time to take care of the little things. Â&#x201E;4AKEONETOTWOHOURSAWEEKTOÂąPROCESS²: meaning to deal with backed-up emails; clean your desk; adjust your calendar and your blocking; sort papers; and so on. â&#x20AC;˘ Always take a few minutes to PLANYOURDAYin the morning or the end of the day for the next day. Â&#x201E;5SEA FOLDERTICKLERSYSTEM Have a folder for each day of the month to help find papers when you need them. Â&#x201E;!LWAYSDIVIDELARGEPROJECTSINTOSTEPS (project plans) and then schedule the individual steps over weeks leading up to the deadline. Â&#x201E;"ATCHSIMILARTASKSand errands together. Â&#x201E;5SEYOURCALENDAR´SREMINDERS(And, yes, the iPhoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Siri is a godsend.) Â&#x201E;,IMITINTERRUPTIONSPost your office hours or schedule time you can help co-workers with certain projects. Â&#x201E;.EVERCHECKEMAIL½RSTTHING Seriously. Always get one important task out of the way before you risk screensuck. Then donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t check email constantly; have scheduled times and turn off those distracting email alerts. â&#x20AC;˘ Anything you or your company does more than once should HAVEACHECKLIST of steps on how to do it. Never scramble to reinvent a wheel. 7RITEITDOWN Â&#x201E;3TOPANDBREATHEwhen you feel frenzied. Think about your process; then start again.

-OST7ORKAHOLIC#OUNTRIES Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14

Country Japan Australia South Africa South Korea United States Canada Brazil India Sweden China Poland Italy Russia Mexico

% take all vacation days 33% 47% 47% 53% 57% 58% 59% 59% 63% 65% 66% 66% 67% 67%

avg. hrs work year 1,714 1,690 NA NA 1,768 1,699 NA NA 1,610 NA 1,966 1,773 1,997 1,857

# of Fed Holidays* 16 8 12 (+21) 15 (+19) 10 9 11 (+30) 16 (+12) 11 11 (+10) 10 11 12 8

* THE (+) IS NUMBER OF VACATION DAYS THE GOVERNMENTS REQUIRE EMPLOYERS TO OFFER, IF ANY. / SOURCE: BUSINESSINSIDER.COM

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jacksonfreepress.com

H

umans are funny creatures when it comes to dealing with time. Most of us always want more of it while wasting much of what we have. Or we spend valuable time worrying about what we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to do. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s silly, really. And frustrating. Meantime, the key to both being happy and successful in the workplace (or anywhere) is getting tasks done smoothly with minimum drama and then moving on to the next thing (which might be something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dying to do if we have time). In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time Management for the Creative Personâ&#x20AC;? (Three Rivers Press, 1998, $14), Lee Silber teaches new tricks to the group most often clock-challenged due to our right-brand tendencies: creative folks. (And if the strategies can help easily distracted and idea-soaked creative types, imagine what it can do for the rest of society.) First, Silber sets our minds at ease over the idea that creative people shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother with structured stuff like time management and schedules: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Actually, you need some structure in your life to allow your creativity free rein. Chaos is not creative.â&#x20AC;? Think about that: How many times are you in a tizzy because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the last minute and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not done with a project? Meantime, your car breaks down because it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

23


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How are Dependable Source Care Providers selected? Each caregiver is a Dependable Source employee who is carefully screened and trained before caring for a client. Each must undergo a rigorous process including national and local criminal background checks, MVR, and personal and professional reference checks. All Dependable Source care providers are insured and covered by Workers’ Compensation insurance for our clients’ peace-of-mind. We strive to hire the very best caregivers to become Dependable Source Care Providers, because we only hire people we would want caring for a member of our own family. If you or a loved one needs in-home or hospice care support, we at Dependable Source look forward to serving you. Your physician, social service representative at the hospital, or family member may call: (601) 355-3889 or 1-888-933-7363. Please see our website at www.dependablesourcehomehealth.com for a list of services or please contact us to discuss an individualized plan to suit your needs.

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7HATTO$O

Defining Sexual Harassment by Elizabeth Waibel

T

itle VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits harassing someone because of their sex, which includes making unwanted sexual advances, threatening to demote someone if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give

sexual favors or making offensive comments about someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sex. Last year, more than 11,000 people filed sexual harassment complaints with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The commission recovered $48.4 million through resolving the complaints, not including money obtained through litigation. Despite high-profile sexual-harassment suits and settlements on the evening news, however, misconceptions remain about what constitutes sexual harassment. For example, people of either sex can be harassers and victims, and the victim does not have to be the opposite sex of the harasser. Last year, 16.4 percent of the people who filed

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1st Place: TomTom GPS + $25 Dining 2nd Place: Golf Bag + $25 Dining 3rd Place: Beer Cooler + $25 Dining

26

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complaints with the EEOC were males. The harasserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s target is not the only victim of harassment; offensive behavior can affect others if it creates a hostile work environment for them. For example, when a man makes offensive sexual comments to a woman in the office, the person sitting in the next desk is a victim as well. The EEOC says the best way to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace is by preventing it. This means making sure employees know that sexual harassment is not acceptable and how they can file a complaint if they are being harassed. It also means letting people know what sexual harassment is and how to avoid becoming a harasser.

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www.thepizzashackjackson.com

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or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef Thursday : Chicken Diane

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or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or Chicken & Dumplings

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Always Drink Responsibly

29


Creative Work Options by Valerie Wells

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eirdre M. Danahar of Jackson-based InMotion Consulting and Coaching has operated her company from home successfully for eight years. She offers these tips for being productive while working from home.  7UHDW\RXUGD\OLNH\RXDUHJRLQJWRWKH RIĂ&#x20AC;FHHave a dedicated space for work, ideally a separate room with a door.  ,IDVHSDUDWHURRPLVQRWDQRSWLRQĂ&#x20AC;QGD GHVLJQDWHGVHFWLRQRIWKHURRPDQGGHFODUHLW \RXUZRUNVSDFH That room should not be your bedroom. Your work space is where you think, create and solve problems. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always lead to a restful slumber,â&#x20AC;? Danahar says.  6HW \RXUVHOI D Ă&#x20AC;UP ZRUN VFKHGXOH DQG VWLFN WR LW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in my office early in the morning,â&#x20AC;? Danahar says. She stays there from about 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Condition yourself that those are your hours.â&#x20AC;? She suggests avoiding the temptation of washing a pile of dirty dishes, folding laundry or sneaking in a Netflix session.  5HPLQGRWKHUSHRSOHZKDW\RXUERXQGDU LHV DUH ERWK LQ VSDFH DQG LQ WLPH Danahar recalls a time when neighbors had a last-minute request to watch children. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not saying never help out. If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an emergency, of course you would help, just as you would if you commuted to a brick-andmortar job site. The key things are that it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t become a regular thing and to know the difference.  %HDFFHVVLEOH If you take a telecommuting job or if you are working on a large project, make sure your boss or your client knows how to reach you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Designate times to check emails,â&#x20AC;? Danahar says. Let key people know when you are available to return phone calls or emails.  'UHVVIRUWKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FHIt might be tempting to leave your PJs on, but dressing the part of a professional affects your attitude. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At least put on clean jeans and a top,â&#x20AC;? Danahar advises. For more tips and other advice, visit Danaharâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at inmotioncc.com. Contact her at Deirdre@inmotioncc.com.

nother creative work structure allows two people to share one job and one salary. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a part-time job with long-range goals. â&#x20AC;˘ About 13 percent of companies allow some form of job sharing. â&#x20AC;˘ Small companies are four times more likely than large ones to offer job-sharing options, 15 percent vs. 4 percent.

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SOURCE: WORKPLACE FLEXIBILITY 2010, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW CENTER

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Manufacturing 24%

Education and health services 25.6%

Transportation and utilities 25.7%

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Lowest rate in construction, 20%

Information industry 34.9%

Professional & business services, 37.6%

Financial services, 37.7 %

private sector, 28.9%

December 21 - 27, 2011

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SOURCE: WORKPLACE FLEXIBILITY 2010, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW CENTER

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he Congressional Budget Office estimates the cost allowing federal employees to telecommute is $30 million over five years. But the cost-benefit might balance out. In 2010, John Berry, director of the Office of Personnel Management, claimed the government actually saved $30 million in estimated productivity during last winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s snowstorms. Workers who were snowed in were able to get the job done at home. SOURCE: FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK, MAY 25, 2010.

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Ask about our clay pots, perfect for the cold weather. Monday-Wednesday: All You Can Eat Lunch All you can eat edamame, fried gyoza, miso soup, light weight and middleweight rolls includes a drink. There is an hour time limit from the start of the ticket and no to-go.

Tuesday: Brown Rice Day Brown Rice as an option on all rolls

Thursdays: 2 for $22

Choice of 1 Grand Champion roll & 1 Middleweight roll or Choice of 1 Grand Champion roll 1 Lightweight roll &1 Starter

jacksonfreepress.com

Fridays: Mai Taiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Mimosas $3 | 11-6pm Saturdays: Bloody Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $4 | 11am-6pm

31


â&#x20AC;&#x153;High tech requires high touch.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Naisbitt

Help Employees Shine by Donna Ladd

M

anaging todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workplace is a lot different than back in your granddaddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day. Offices arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just receptacles for command-control tactics; the boss canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just run around barking orders (or pinch his secretaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s butt, for that matter). And these days, the boss may well not be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;he.â&#x20AC;? Most importantly, it is vital to treat workers with respect to keep them happy, productive and, well, just to keep them. Of course, finding the balance between a rigid boot-camp feel and a hippie-dippy do-it-whenever-you-feel-like-it vibe is tougher than it sounds, especially in a world where just about everyone has attention deficit disorder, thanks in no small part to our non-stop technology. Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minds jump around constantly, and many even texted their way through college classesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;meaning they might have a hard time focusing on one thing at a time. Neuroscience discoveries of the last two decades reveal why managing seems to have become more challenging in recent years, and offers some clues into how to use brain-science advances to create an energetic, innovation work atmosphere. Edward M. Hallowell is a psychiatrist who teaches at Harvard Medical School and an expert in â&#x20AC;&#x153;using brain science to get the best from your peopleâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which happens to be the subtitle of his recent book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shineâ&#x20AC;? (Harvard Business Review, 2011, $26.95). Hallowell warns that, in many workplaces, the problem is not that people arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working hard enough; often they are working too hard and in the wrong jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and their brains canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t handle it. So they shut down. What good managers have to do is help them find a path to do the opposite: learn to work smarter and to enjoy it. To overcome what he calls your employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;overloaded circuitsâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;that can lead to everything from negativity and apathy to frantic workaholism, all badâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hallowell developed what he calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;five steps to peak performance.â&#x20AC;? He warns that these steps need to come in order to be effective.

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3OURCES

“THE E-MYTH REVISITED:WHY MOST SMALL BUSINESSES DON’T WORK AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT,” MICHAEL E. GERBER (HARPERCOLLINS, 1995, $18.99) “HUG YOUR PEOPLE,” JACK MITCHELL (HYPERION, 2008, $19.95) “THE ONE-MINUTE MANAGER,” KENNETH BLANCHARD (BERKLEY TRADE, 1983, $12) “START WITH WHY: HOW GREAT LEADERS INSPIRE EVERYONE TO TAKE ACTION,” SIMON SINEK (PORTFOLIO, 2009, $26.95) “THE ULTIMATE SALES MACHINE,” CHET HOLMES (PORTFOLIO, 2008, $15) “ZILCH:THE POWER OF ZERO IN BUSINESS” BY NANCY LUBLIN (PORTFOLIO, 2010, $25.95)

jacksonfreepress.com

Don’t shy away from systems and checklists.

33


Intern Your Way to The Top by Donna Ladd

A

sk a professional with a great job if he or she ever interned. Chances are the answer will be yes. Internships (and externships, which often refer to shorter intern periods) are an invaluable way to bridge the experience gap between school and a job. When done right by the employer and the intern, they are a way for interns to learn professional, social and time-management skills that their college or high-school teachers might not have instilled (sadly). Internships also offer shed a light on what life is really like in a profession, or in a particular industry segment. A successful internship may well get someone to choose a different career: better to learn youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not right for a certain path before youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too far down it. Some folks shy away from internships because they think they are just free labor where they will just do mindless tasks. You can still learn about an industry in such an internship, but

theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re certainly not ideal. The best internships require high standards (similar to those for regular employees) and give interns both substantive work and training, including classes and workshops, not to mention honest feedback and advice. Good internships can be paid, and sometimes theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not. But it is not a â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? free internship if an employer doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide educational tasks and learning opportunities (and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t legal, to boot.) Also, an employer can never promise an intern a job after completing a free internship, although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfectly cool for them to apply for one. (Our art director here, for instance, replied through Twitter to a call for internships, and proved herself so valuable that we hired and quickly promoted her. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, happen every time, though.) The key to good internships is for the intern and the employer to give serious thought to what the intern is going to get out of the learning experiences. Here are strategies:

&ORTHE%MPLOYER

cially Generation Y, tend to love these gab-fest gatherings. â&#x20AC;˘ Give inspirational talks. Interns love to be inspired to change the world. Tell them often how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing it. â&#x20AC;˘ Whenever possible, include interns in staff and professional meetings and workshops and treat them like everyone else. We like to â&#x20AC;&#x153;workshopâ&#x20AC;? and use Socratic-type questioning in our gatherings to promote innovation and feedback; we include our interns just like everyone else. â&#x20AC;˘ Tell them why you do things the way you do. â&#x20AC;˘ Invite interns to give you feedback and tell them the appropriate ways and times to do so. â&#x20AC;˘ Get interns to work in teams to learn project-management strategies. Let them plan without you and then get approval. â&#x20AC;˘ Teach interns appropriate boundaries, such as when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK to bound into the bossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office or get chatty. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fireâ&#x20AC;? interns if they repeatedly skip come in late, not at all or do other inappropriate things. Sometimes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the splash of cold water they need to get their attention and help them.

â&#x20AC;˘ An intern is not there to get coffee and file all day. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine to have them do some tedious tasks to get the feel for how such an office works, but it should be mixed in with significant work that challenges their comfort zones and offers real on-the-job training. â&#x20AC;˘ When possible, allow interns to set their own schedulesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; many have school and other jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but then hold them to their hours. This is key. If you treat the intern as a second thought, you are not teaching professionalism and time management. â&#x20AC;˘ Likewise, interns must dress like other professionals in the office. If they want to wear shorts and flip-flops, they should stay home or go hang at the reservoir. â&#x20AC;˘ Know that many interns do not have basic professional skills such as time management and knowledge of how work-flow systems work. Teach them everything you possibly can. â&#x20AC;˘ Hold classes and workshops and give homework and require readings. You might be surprised to find that interns, espe-

34

â&#x20AC;˘ Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interning for free, you are using employersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; resources. Show up on time and honor your commitments. â&#x20AC;˘ Observe the vibe in the office. If people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get into long personal conversations at work (and in good offices, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t), then donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it yourself. â&#x20AC;˘ Dress professionallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and more like the person youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to be in the office than the one you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Seriously, no shorts and flipflops. â&#x20AC;˘ Meet your deadlines even if you have to put in extra time. This will get you great references, and maybe even a job. â&#x20AC;˘ Listen intently, and ask staffers questions. It shows youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in something other than yourself. This is good. â&#x20AC;˘ Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to be told to work. When you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have something to do, ask for something. Always try to have a company project in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;background.â&#x20AC;? Work on that project if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have other work. Read trade journals and industry blogs. This is called being a â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-starter,â&#x20AC;? and people notice. â&#x20AC;˘ Do not waste time on social media and texting friends. Seriously. Tell your friends youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re â&#x20AC;&#x153;at workâ&#x20AC;? and unavailable. â&#x20AC;˘ Take yourself seriously so others will. Set personal goals and learn to manage your time and plan for deadlines. â&#x20AC;˘ Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be allergic to the telephone. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a vital business tool. â&#x20AC;˘ Be the kind of intern who enjoys being around a variety of people of all ages. The most successful employees are not weird about age, theirs or anyone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Diversity means age, too. â&#x20AC;˘ To make a great impression, offer to solve problems.

:

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7HATTHE"OSS7ANTS 4OP7ORK6ALUES%MPLOYERS3EEK 1. Strong Work Ethic. 2. Dependable and Responsible. 3. Positive Attitude. 4. Adaptable. 5. Honest. 6. SelfMotivated. 7. Motivated to Grow and Learn. 8. Strong Self-Confidence. 9. Professional Behavior. 10. Loyal. SOURCE AND MORE TIPS: INTERNSHIPS.ABOUT.COM

â&#x20AC;˘ If the internship isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t teaching you anything or is all demeaning work, look for another one. Leave well, though. â&#x20AC;˘ Meet and greet everyone you meet on the job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hi, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m _______â&#x20AC;? followed by a firm handshake. Smile a lot. â&#x20AC;˘ After you leave, write personal thank-you notes to staffers who mentored you. That one note may get you a job at some point. Stay in touch and send the employer other interns.

ANDREA THOMAS

December 21 - 27, 2011

&ORTHE)NTERN

$ONNA´S!DVICETO$EPARTING)NTERNS


&ACTS!BOUT$RESS&OR3UCCESS7ORLDWIDE

Preparing for Success by LaShanda Phillips

T

hough most women may have the desire to be successful, some need a handâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a suit. Dress for Success prepares disadvantaged women to enter or re-enter the work force. The international non-profit organization provides women with clothing, training and helps them maintain a positive attitude. Founded in 1997 by Nancy Lublin, Dress For Success now has more than 110 affiliates in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Ireland, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, the United Kingdom and the West Indies. The volunteerbased affiliates fulfill the mission of promoting independence for women on a local level. Pat Chambliss and her sister Earnestine Alexander started the Metro Ja c k s o n

affiliate in 2002 because of a desire to help women in the area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They always wanted to empower women; it was a dream of theirs,â&#x20AC;? Daphne Higgins, program director of DFSMJ said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After researching about the organization, they decided this was the one they wanted to be a part of.â&#x20AC;? The non-profit offers each client a complete professional suit for job interviews once she has landed an interview. After the client is employed for 30 days, she receives a second suit. DFS also offers three programs: Professional Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group, Going Places Network by Walmart and the Career Center. The invitation-only Professional Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group, or PWG, provides women with information to help them develop skills and to advance in the workplace. The support group includes monthly meetings, and programs that cover topics such as communication skills, child care issues and financial planning. PWG is open to DFS clients who have successfully gained employment. Peer mentoring, free exercise and fitness classes, product discounts, and vouchers are also available to the members. The Going Places Network, or GPN, is designed and supported through the Wa l m a r t

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Foundation. The new component offers weekly training sessions and one-on-one coaching in a supportive environment. The Career Center gives Jacksonarea clients free access to develop computer skills, update their resumes and research employment opportunities. Homeless shelters, immigration programs, educational institutions and domesticviolence shelters must refer women to Dress for Success for them to get help. More than 36 local government agencies, social organizations and faith-based organizations direct women to the Dress For Success Metro Jackson affiliate. Dress for Success Metro Jackson provided services to more than 300 women in 2011, tripling the number of women they served in 2009. The Metro Jackson affiliate was recently awarded the Jackson Medical Mallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s M-Power Communities Award. The award, a $10,000 grant, can be used as needed by the organization. Their annual fundraiser, Little Black Dress with a Tie, was a success this year. They raised an estimated $25,000 from the event. The fundraiser, which includes food and live entertainment, includes a live and silent auction of black dresses and neckties donated by local and national celebrities. BOOM Jackson, owned by Jackson Free Press Inc., donates proceeds from a new yearly fashion show to the local group as well.

Higgins, a former board member and volunteer, says Dress for Success changes lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of it as helping one client at a time; we are helping the community, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cycle. As women better themselves and their families, they are bettering their communities,â&#x20AC;? she said. The non-profit affiliate can always use donations. You can give monetary donations; goods and services such as copier paper and printing services; and dry-cleaned, fairly new clothing that is appropriate for job interviews. You can also donate clothing to Repeat Street on behalf of Dress for Success. Repeat Street (626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland, 601-605-9393) is a DFS sponsor, and all proceeds from donations made on behalf of the non-profit go to the organization. Job-interview-appropriate clothing in sizes 14 and up are especially needed. The next BOOM fashion show will take place March 2, 2012 at Duling Hall. For more information on how to become a sponsor or more about the event, email Events Coordinator Shannon Barbour at shannon@boomjackson.com To refer women through your work force program, contact DFSMJ at 601-985-9888. For more information or to make a donation, visit dressforsuccess/metrojackson.org. Donations can be mailed to Dress for Success Metro Jackson, 2519 Robinson St., 2nd Floor, Jackson, Miss., 39209, or call Daphne Higgins at the DFSMJ office for an appointment.

(ELP7HEN9OU.EED)TE\/D6KDQGD3KLOOLSV

-RE &RUSV (multiple locations, jobcorp. org) provides help with education, computer fluency to help job-search skills, industry-related technical and academic skills, and personal management and social skills. The student becomes a Job Corps graduate when he or she has successfully found a job, has living accommodations, transportation and responds to periodic surveys. Minact Inc. (5220 Keele St., 601-362-

1631) is the operating center for Job Corps and also offers on-site job training. &DUHHU'HYHORSPHQW&HQWHU (2703 First Ave., 601-960-5322, cdc.jpsms.org) offers Jackson high-school students technical education in the fields of cosmetology, computer systems, carpentry and other vocational training. 6WHZSRW &RPPXQLW\ 6HUYLFHV (1100 W. Capitol St., 601-353-2759 and 845 W. Amite St., 601-949-3540, stewpot.org) has a free computer lab for the public, especially children. It offers free job training, GED classes, Internet training and educational

software. Tutors help the members learn how to navigate the system and write resumes.

662-254-9911, cnatrainingcenter.com) is a minority-owned non-profit that offers a six-week training program for applicants *RRGZLOO ,QGXVWULHV ,QWHUQDWLRQDO ,QF who want to become certified nursing as(104 E. State St., 601-853-8110, goodwill. sistants. Mississippi Department of Health org) offers job training in various fields such approved, the Center provides classroom as health care, information technology, retail and clinical training that prepares students and food services. At its career center, mem- for employment. bers can learn to build a resume, practice for job interviews, learn to dress and network. &RPSXWHU&RRS (2807 Old Canton Road, Goodwill can also place people in temporary Rainbow Plaza, 601-981-6925 and 601jobs while they wait for full employment. 982-4471, computercoop.com) provides free Internet access. &1$7UDLQLQJ &HQWHU (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Suite 3620, 601-364-1188 Please add other job assistance services online and 40100 Highway 82 W., Suite 10, at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

A

re you jobless, or do you feel limited in your current job? Several local organizations can help you get the skills and assistance you need to move up in the working world.

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FILMS p 38 | 8 DAYS p 39 | MUSIC p 41 | SPORTS p 44

Documenting Mississippi by Sharon Dunten

P

December 21 - 27, 2011

SUZI ALTMAN

hotographer Suzi Altman didn’t glance back when she left New York City after years working for prestigious news outlets such as the Associated Press and Rolling Stone magazine. When she moved to Mississippi 12 years ago, the Delta made her heart sing, she said. She embraced a more casual lifestyle compared to the convention of East Coast living. The resettlement, Altman said, led her to produce more substantial work than she had ever created in New York City. This winter, her work is hanging at the Mississippi Museum of Art. Los Angeles-based curator Franklin Sirmans recently included Altman in the 2011 Mississippi Invitational. “(Sirmans) has respect in the field for recognizing artists,” Altman said. Sirmans looked at the work blindly with no connection to the artist name. The Mississippi Invitational, initiated in 1997, asks a guest curator each year to survey recent developments by contemporary visual artists living and working across Mississippi. Out of 161 submissions in 2011, Sirmans narrowed a list to the final 13 in the exhibit. Although Altman, 42, continSuzi Altman’s photo, “Wildwood Plantation, Outside Greenwood, 2008,” is on display at the Mississippi Museum of Art. ues to accept assignments outside the state, the artist’s immersed passion for the Mississippi Delta mixed well with her expertise in 1964. “Ya know, it was about the Klan,” she said, “It was a The artistic quality of Suzi as a photographic social documentarian. Her portfolio in- story that needed to be told.” cludes work chronicling the destruction of the Gulf Coast Freedom Summer was a 1964 U.S. campaign to register as Altman’s photojournalism landed after Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill. Her photos also many African American voters as possible in Mississippi, which her an invitation to exhibit art. take a hard look at white supremacy’s deadly mark. historically excluded blacks from voting. More than 1,000 volAltman flew in with the Mississippi Emergency Manage- unteers, mostly college students and young adults, from all over ment Agency to the Gulf Coast immediately after Hurricane the country descended on Mississippi to work. On the first With her goal to photograph a 100-year-old tradition, an Katrina in 2005. “I went into a Huey (military helicopter) with day of Freedom Summer, a Neshoba County deputy arrested African American baptism, Altman said she attended four SunGov. Haley Barbour,” she said. She startled the governor by Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. day church services before she brought in her camera. leaning out the open helicopter door to photograph the dev- The sheriff later released the three, only to have members of “I had to ask whose land I was on and make connections astation. “There were no landmarks, no containment like 9- White Knights of the Ku Klux Kan shoot them to death. As with the preacher and parishioners,” she said. 11,” Altman said. She also recalled a search and rescue trip in a photojournalist, Altman covered the 2005 trial of Edgar Ray She studied art and photography at the University of AriWaveland, where she photographed and walked in muck over Killen, a Klansman indicted for manslaughter in the case and zona, but she says her real education was the on-the-job trainher knees with snakes and alligators sighted in the area. found guilty. ing she got as a Rolling Stone magazine intern. That led to as“There were bodies in the water,” Altman said. Her photographic catalog also touched the region’s heart signments with AP. But no matter where her work takes her, But Altman said one experience that unnerved her was with storytelling on the preservation of Vicksburg’s Miss Mar- she said she is connected with the Mississippi Delta. the inequality and racism she saw in Mississippi. Raised in garet’s Grocery and a visual narration of an African American “The Delta is beautiful, and I call it home,” Altman said. Youngstown, Ohio, Altman said she grew up in a place where baptism. Altman photographed Rev. Dennis’ Castle in Vicks- “I have it all—a great job, a great cost of living—and I love the there was little inequality. burg, a folk icon in need of repair. Its colorful grocery exterior New Orleans Saints.” “One of the scariest places I have been to is Burrage Road and interior is decorated with beads and Christmas lights. The Mississippi Invitational continues through Feb. 5 at the in Philadelphia, Miss.,” she said. Altman said she was the first Altman recognized the need for showing respect and hon- Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515). photojournalist in 41 years to venture onto the Burrage Road oring the culture of the Delta as she photographed. “You have Admission is $5 adults, $4 seniors, $3 students. For information, 36 property where three murdered civil-rights workers were buried to get to know the people before shooting them,” she said. visit msmuseumart.org.


Save The Date ;d]RW1d]RW 0UcTa3PaZ

9P]dPah!#cWk%?< Join us for Lunch Bunch After Dark, a community forum discussing how we can each be a part of the future of Jackson Public Schools. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a parent, student, teacher, school administrator, business owner, and/or community member, please plan to join us & bring your voice to this working conversation! 1st Place: TomTom GPS + $25 Dining 2nd Place: Golf Bag + $25 Dining 3rd Place: Beer Cooler + $25 Dining sponsored by

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DIVERSIONS|film

by Anita Modak-Truran

The Holiday Playlist

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol PG13 Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

R

The Sitter

R

The Descendants R Arthur Christmas (non 3-D) PG (last day 12/24)

3-D Adventures Of Tintin PG

Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Pt.1 PG13

Adventures Of Tintin (non 3-D) PG

Happy Feet Two (non 3-D) PG

Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows PG13

Opens Sunday 12/25

Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked

G

War Horse

PG13

3-D The Darkest Hour PG13

New Years Eve PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law go for a second round as the famous Holmes-Watson detective team. Swaddled in Victorian clothes, drizzled in droll humor and mirroring the successful formula of the first movie, Holmes and his sidekick battle wits with the villainous Moriarty (Jared Harris), who embodies in one persona the evil nature of Grinch, Scrooge and greedy Wall Street power grabbers. Holmes and Watson bring out an arsenal of guns, gadgets and explosives for this bromance adventure.

‘Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol’ When you think it couldn’t get any bigger and better, along comes movie four in the “Mission Impossible” franchise. Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is invincible in this extravagant picture involving an ever-changing mission requiring high-tech suction cups to scale the world’s tallest building, fantastical ops to infiltrate the Kremlin and implosive strategies to abort a nuclear warhead. It’s all part of the job for Hunt and his team, whose actions pulsate to a riveting score. Don’t expect the U.S. government to cover their backs if they are caught. Ghost protocols apply.

‘Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked’

December 21 - 27, 2011

FOX 2000

Dave’s (Jason Lee) parental shriek defines the entire 50 years of squirrelly chipmunks who speak in helium squeals. In this third motion picture, Alvin and his brothers carry on as world-famous rock stars embarking on a luxury cruise. Misbehavior and other flights of incredible fancy lead to the ‘munks finding themselves marooned on an island. The shrill, pop music will appeal to the under pretween crowd.

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‘We Bought a Zoo’ Based on a true story, Cameron Crowe (“Jerry Maguire,” “Almost Famous”) directs this feel-good movie about a single dad (Matt Damon) who changes his family’s life by buying a dilapidated zoo. The film begins six months after Benjamin’s wife (Stephanie Szosak) has died from a brain tumor. When his son Dylan (Colin Ford) is expelled from school, Benjamin quits his job at a Los Angeles newspaper and, against the advice of his older brother (Thomas Haden Church), buys a sorry-looking zoo that has long been closed to the public. With 200 animals to feed, a motley group of unpaid workers and a zookeeper (Scarlett Johansson), Benjamin and his children have a long, hard road to making things work.

‘War Horse’ The commercials for “War Horse” promise something regal, beautiful and sustaining. Directed by Steven Spielberg, this movie tells a tale about a horse named Joey whose owner sells him to the English cavalry for service in WWI. Then Albert (Jeremy Irvine), the kid who loves and trained Joey, follows into battle.

DREAMWORKS

Movieline: 355-9311

‘Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows’ WARNER BROS.

We Bought A Zoo PG

David Fincher (“Se7en,” “Zodiac”) directs the English-language version of Steig Larsson’s bestselling novel. Ardent Larsson fans worried about a Hollywood version when there was already an outstanding Swedish film can relax. Fincher delivers a suspenseful, beautifully acted and mesmerizing film. The girl with the auspicious dragon tattoo, as well as a slew of body piercings, is Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara). She redefines the concept of hero, much like Clint Eastwood has done for westerns. This antisocial, highly sexual criminal and hacker heroine helps investigative journalist Mikael Blomvist (Daniel Craig) solve a mind-blowing serial crime. 20TH CENTURY FOX

Listings for Fri., Dec. 23- Thurs. Dec. 29 2011

PARAMOUNT

6A0=3E84F

‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ COLUMBIA PICTURES

D

efining when the holiday season begins gets more complicated every year. A growing number of retailers pull out the Christmas garlands and ornamentation around Halloween. Black Friday and cyberspace Monday overshadow the annual homage to pilgrims and turkey feasts. Not wanting to be left behind, movie distributors have grabbed onto the premature rush of holiday consumerism. “Arthur’s Christmas,” “The Muppets” and “Hugo” (a triumvirate of family fare) opened before Thanksgiving, and may not be around in December given the flood of new product. “New Year’s Eve,” a haberdashery of glitteratzi and schmaltz, opened weeks before the ball will drop. What I have gleaned from intense analysis over a cup of cappuccino is that anything remotely holiday-like hits the movie theaters long before the actual holiday. What does come out during the Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa season is big-budget escapism. So if you have had your fill of “It’s A Wonderful Life,” “White Christmas” and other classics, think about a family escape to the movie theater where the holiday playlist guarantees adventure, intrigue and some last-minute Oscar contenders.

Other notable films to see include Oscar contender “The Descendants,” which opened earlier this month and stars George Clooney; “The Iron Lady,” starring Meryl Streep as the formidable Margaret Thatcher; and “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close,” which tells the story of a boy (Thomas Horn) searching to answer a hidden message from his father (Tom Hanks) who died in the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.


BEST BETS

December 21-28, 2011 by Latasha Willis (happy birthday!) events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

Photographer Josh Hailey’s PhotAmerica Party and KickStarter Countdown is at 5 p.m. at North Midtown Arts Center and includes food and karaoke. Costumes encouraged. Free; visit the event Facebook page. … See the Mozart opera film “The Magic Flute” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. … The King Taylor Duo plays at Hal & Mal’s. … … The Wild and Out Wednesday Comedy Show is at 8:45 p.m. at West Restaurant and Lounge. $2 beers. … Anna Kline and the Grits and Soul Band perform at Fenian’s. … Virgil Brawley and Steve Chester are at Underground 119. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike. … Barry Leach performs at Kathryn’s. … Mark Whittington is at Irish Frog.

FRIDAY 12/23

Vocalist Mary Margaret May signs copies of her CD “Upon a Winter Night” at 11 a.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). $14.95 CD; call 601-366-7619. … Dreamz JXN hosts Can’t Feel My Face Friday. … Dain Edwards performs at 7 p.m. at Soulshine, Old Fannin. … Heroes and Dreams (5352 Highway 25, Suite 1650, Flowood) hosts Game Night every Friday from 7:30-11:30 p.m. Free; call 601-992-3100. … Eddie Cotton performs tonight and tomorrow at 9 p.m. at Mediterranean Fish and Grill. … Renegade plays at Kathryn’s. … Larry Brewer is at McB’s. … The Legendary Houserockers play at F. Jones Corner. … Chris Gill and the Sole Shakers are at Reed Pierce’s. … Fenian’s has music by Furrows.

COURTESY PENNY KEMP

SATURDAY 12/24

The “Find Fonzy the Reindeer” contest ends today. Find him in Fondren and enter for a chance to win a $500 gift certificate at fondren.org. … Old Fannin Road Farmers Market (1307 Old Fannin Road, Brandon) closes for the season today. Shop for fresh produce and other items from 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Call 601-919-1690. … The Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.) is open Christmas Eve. Enjoy a 50 percent discount on admission, effective through February. Call 601-352-2580. … Martini Room hosts Soulful Saturday at 6 p.m.

SUNDAY 12/25

The Christmas musical at The Church Triumphant (Odyssey North, 731 S, Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland) is at 10 a.m. Free; call 601-977-0007. … The Christmas Show at 9 p.m. at Martin’s features music by Boy, Dent May and Dead Gaze. … Jason Turner is at Fenian’s.

MONDAY 12/26

The “FROGS! Beyond Green” exhibit at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive) shows through Jan. 9. $6, $5 seniors, $4 children ages 3-18,

Eddie Cotton performs Fridays and Saturdays at 9 p.m. at Mediterranean Fish and Grill.

Amazin’ Lazy Boi performs during F. Jones Corner’s blues lunch. … Whitney Miller signs her cookbook “Modern Hospitality: Simple Recipes with Southern Charm” at 1 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). $23.99 book; call 601-366-7619. … Fondren’s Four Fabulous Thursdays continues with Fondren businesses staying open until 7:30 p.m. Call 601981-9606. … “The Best Artisan Gift Gathering” is at 5 p.m. at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-362-8484. … See the opera film “Hansel and Gretel” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children; call 601-936-5856. … The D’lo Trio is at Cherokee Inn.

TUESDAY 12/27

Winter Break Zoo Camp for children ages 6-12 kicks off today at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.) and runs through Dec. 30. Hours are 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $35 one day, $115 four days; discounts for zoo members; call 601352-2580. … Fire has Open-mic Comedy Night. … John Mora performs at Margarita’s (1625 E. County Line Road, Suite 120) from 6-9 p.m. … Hunter and Rick perform at Fitzgerald’s … Live Jazz and Blues Night at Old School 101 is from 7-10 p.m., and includes open-mic poetry and door prizes. Call 601-919-7111 or 601-331-8496. … Pub Quiz at Hal & Mal’s. … Ole Tavern has open-mic.

WEDNESDAY 12/28

Rick Anderson and Bill Bannister’s art exhibit at the Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive) closes today. Free; call 601-432-4056. … Natalie Long and Clinton Kirby perform at Hal & Mal’s. … Larry Brewer is at Kathryn’s. … The Boardwalk has a pool tournament and Ladies Night with live deejays. No cover. … The Amazin’ Lazy Boi Band plays at Underground 119. More events and details at jfpevents.com. Meet the artisans behind the eclectic inventory at circa. Urban Artisan Living Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. COURTESY CRAIG ESCUDE

THURSDAY 12/22

members and babies free; call 601-354-7303. … The December Art Show at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place) hangs through Dec. 31. Open 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. Free; call 601-982-4844. … The Farish Street Kwanzaa Celebration is at 3 p.m. at Farish Street Park (Farish St.). Free; call 601-941-3230 or 202-256-6021. … The annual Community Kwanzaa Celebration kicks off at 6 p.m. at Medgar Evers Community Center (3159 Edwards Ave.) and runs through Jan. 1. Free; call 601-608-8327. … Pub Quiz at Ole Tavern. … The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $5. … Martin’s hosts an open-mic free jam. … Burgers and Blues has karaoke.

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 12/21

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jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Radio JFP on WLEZ, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is a representative from LABA-Link to discuss the upcoming New Year’s Fiesta. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Podcasts at jfpradio.com. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Fondren After 5 Extra Dec. 22, 5 p.m. Fondren businesses extend their hours until 7:30 p.m. for holiday shoppers. Free; call 601-981-9606. Mississippi HeARTS Against AIDS Benefit Feb. 11, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The benefit is a huge live and silent auction of Mississippi’s best-known artists with live entertainment and cuisine from local restaurants. $30 in advance, $35 at the door; call 601-750-5883. Ignite the Night Gala Feb. 11, 6:30 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The adults-only event features themed food in each gallery, cocktails and child-like activities. $100; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-KIDS. Yoga for Non-violence - 108 Sun Salutations Feb 18, 9 a.m., location TBA. All levels of ability and endurance are welcome to participate in the yoga mala. Free sun salutation classes given at many Jackson yoga studios; stay tuned for class schedules. Proceeds benefit the Center for Violence Prevention. $25, donations welcome; call 601-500-0337 or 601-932-4198.

HOLIDAY Find Fonzy the Reindeer through Dec. 24. Look for Fonzy, a life-sized reindeer statue, at Fondren businesses to become eligible to win a $500 gift certificate. Enter daily at fondren.org. The winner is announced Dec. 24. Free; call 601-981-9606. Winter Holidays Exhibit through Dec. 29, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Enjoy the 1940s train town of Possum Ridge, historic Christmas trees and vintage toys. Hours are noon–4 p.m. Mondays, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Tuesdays–Fridays, and 8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Saturdays excluding Dec. 23-26. Tours for school groups available. Free; call 601-576-6800. Thursdays in December through Dec. 29, at Fondren Art Gallery (601 Duling Ave.). The gallery extends its hours until 8 p.m. to feature a guest artist, serve holiday appetizers and drinks, and give a ten-percent discount on merchandise. Free admission; call 601-981-9222. Global Tree Display through Dec. 31, at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). See trees with decorations inspired by different cultures. Free with paid admission; call 601-352-2580. Wonderland of Lights through Dec. 31, at Freedom Ridge Park (235 W. School St., Ridgeland). Enjoy the festive lights and holiday activities from 5-9 p.m. nightly. Free; visit ridgelandms.org.

December 21 - 27, 2011

Christmas Musical Dec. 25, 10 a.m., at The Church Triumphant (Odyssey North, 731 S. Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland). The annual event includes singing, drama and dance. Free; call 601-977-0007.

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Kwanzaa Celebration Dec. 26, 3 p.m., at Farish Street Park (Farish St.). The program highlights the accomplishments of the Farish Street Historic District. Call 601-941-3230 or 202-256-6021. Community Kwanzaa Celebration Dec. 26, 6 p.m., at Medgar Evers Community Center (3159 Edwards Ave.). The program that includes panels, entertainment, presentations and literature is from 6-9 p.m. nightly. Refreshments served. Free; call 601-608-8327. Greater Jackson Arts Council Christmas Tree Festival through Dec. 31, at Arts Center of Mississippi

(201 E. Pascagoula St.). See trees decorated by artists and community organizations. Call 601-960-1557.

COMMUNITY PhotAmerica Party and Kickstarter Countdown Getdown Dec. 21, 5 p.m., at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). The purpose of the part is to promote photographer Josh Hailey’s project “PhotAmerica: 50 States in 50 Weeks.” Enjoy food, music and karaoke. Costumes encouraged. Free; visit facebook.com/events/143499845756293/. Computer Class For Adults Dec. 22 10 a.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Learn how to use Microsoft Word. Free; call 601-932-2562. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting Dec. 22, 6 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0004. Winter Break Zoo Camp Dec. 27-30, at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Children ages 6-12 go on zoo hikes, take behind-the-scenes tours, have animal encounters, and enjoy games and crafts. Hours are 8 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Discounts for zoo members. $35 one day, $115 four days; call 601-352-2580. Jackson 2000 Call for Nonprofit Proposals through Dec. 30. Local organizations who wish to receive funds from the proceeds of the 2012 Friendship Ball should complete a Request for Proposal Form and submit it by Dec. 30. Include a copy of an IRS 501(c)(3) determination letter. Email bevelyn_branch@att.net. Networking Social Thursdays, 7 p.m., at Locker Room Lounge (205 W. Capitol St.). The purpose of this event is to bring together professionals and entrepreneurs from different fields to exchange leads, build rapport and make meaningful connections. $10; call 601-345-0407. Power APAC Call for Alumni, at Power Academic and Performing Arts Complex (1120 Riverside Drive). The school seeks alumni to participate in their 30th anniversary celebration Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Call 601-960-5387. Game Night, at Heroes and Dreams (5352 Highway 25, Suite 1650, Flowood). Play video, board and card games Fridays from 7:30-11:30 p.m. Free; call 601-992-3100.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) through Dec. 31. Call 601960-1552. • “The Alien Who Stole Christmas” Sky Show. The film is about an alien who kidnaps St. Nicholas. Shows are Monday-Saturday at 1 p.m. $5.50 adults, $4.50 seniors, $3 children. • “Season of Light” Sky Show. Explore the origins of the Star of Bethlehem, winter traditions and celebrations around the world. Shows are Monday-Saturday at 3 p.m. $5.50 adults, $4.50 seniors, $3 children. “Hey, I Want to be Discovered!” Call for Auditions. ATL-NYC Productions in association with UnXpected Development, LLC, is in pre-production with the upcoming reality show, “Hey, I Want to be Discovered!” They are accepting online video submissions up to three minutes long; all kinds of talent welcome. Visit iwant2bdiscoveredonline.com. Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “The Magic Flute” Dec. 21, 6:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera presents the Mozart opera film about a hero who teams up with a bird catcher to win the hand of a princess. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children.

BE THE CHANGE Christmas Wish List Drive through Dec. 23, at Jackson Street Gallery (500 Highway 51, Suite E, Ridgeland). The gallery is collecting specific donated items for The Home Place, a senior citizens home in Madison. Donate Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 601-853-1880 for an item list. Food for Thought through Dec. 31, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Donate books and nonperishable foods. Call 601-576-6920.

• “Hansel and Gretel” Dec. 22, 6:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera presents an encore screening of Humperdinck’s opera. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. “Land” Movie Screening Dec. 21, 6:30 p.m., at Delta Cinema (11 Third St., Clarksdale). Clarksdale native Will Goss’ movie is about a farmer who sells his soul to the devil for power to control the weather. $5; call 662-627-6733.

MUSIC “Upon a Winter Night” CD Signing Dec. 23, 11 a.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Mary Margaret May signs copies. $14.95 CD; call 601-366-7619. Live Jazz and Blues Night, at Old School 101 (2460 Terry Road). Enjoy local music, open-mic poetry and door prizes Tuesdays from 7-10 p.m. Call 601-919-7111 or 601-331-8496. Mississippi Happening. Guaqueta Productions presents a mix of videos, photos, podcasts and interviews that highlight Mississippi’s music scene. Visit mississippihappening.com.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • Dec. 21, 11 a.m., Melody Golding signs “Panther Tract: Wild Boar Hunting in the Mississippi Delta.” $40 book. • Dec. 21, 1 p.m., Randy Pierce signs “Pain Unforgiven.” $24.95 book. • Dec. 21, 4:30 p.m., Mac Gordon signs “Hometown: A Remembrance.” $24.95 book. • Dec. 22, 11 a.m., Suzanne Marrs signs “What There Is to Say We Have Said” ($35 book), and Susan Haltam and Jane Roy Brown sign “One Writer’s Garden: Eudora Welty’s Home Place” ($35 book). • Dec. 22, 1 p.m., Whitney Miller signs “Modern Hospitality: Simple Recipes with Southern Charm.” $23.99 book. • Dec. 22, 4:30 p.m., Robin O’Bryant signs “Ketchup Is A Vegetable: And Other Lies Moms Tell Themselves.” $15 book. • Dec. 23, 1 p.m., Forrest Lamar Cooper signs “Looking Back Mississippi: Towns and Places.” $40 book.

CREATIVE CLASSES Shut Up and Write! Jan. 7-March 10, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for the workshop series of JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd’s popular non-fiction and creative writing classes. Sessions are from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. every other Saturday. Limit of 11 students. Gift certificates available. $150 (including materials), $75 non-refundable deposit required; call 601-3626121, ext. 16. Mississippi Magnolia Tatters Dec. 27, 6 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). The class is open to all interested in learning the art of lace making. No materials fee. Free; call 601-932-2562. New Year’s Celebration Cooking Class Dec. 28, 6 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Topics include learning to flambé, mak-

ing a creamy cheese sauce, working with lobster, grilling asparagus and making herb biscuits. For ages 16 and up. Additional classes taught nightly through Dec. 31. $119; call 601-898-8345.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Best Artisan Gift Gathering Dec. 22, 5 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Meet some of the artisans whose work is for sale. Free, items for sale; call 601-362-8484. Rick Anderson and Bill Bannister Art Exhibit through Dec. 28, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See Anderson’s landscape paintings and Bannister’s creations from wood. Hours are 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-432-4056. December Art Show through Dec. 31, at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place). See small works from all of the gallery’s exhibitors. Hours are 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.4 p.m. Saturdays. Free; call 601-982-4844. Playful Patchwork Traveling Exhibit through Dec. 31, at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). See Muriel Feldshuh’s quilts in celebration of literacy and children’s books. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 1-6 p.m. Sunday. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-5437. The Nautilus Project through Jan. 5. This project is an invitation to visual artists and writers to create new work inspired by the music from the upcoming CD “Nautilus” by Laurel Isbister Irby. The deadline for submissions is Jan. 5. Submission will be shared at the CD release party Jan. 21 at 6 p.m. at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). Call 601-918-0474. FROGS! Beyond Green through Jan. 9, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). See exotic frogs and toads 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. Sundays. $6, $5 seniors, $4 children ages 3-18, members and babies free; call 601-354-7303. LEGO Jackson Exhibit through Jan. 15, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See Scott Crawford’s rendition of the city of Jackson in LEGO blocks 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and noon-5 p.m. Sundays. Free; call 601-960-1557. Exhibits at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdaySaturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Call 601960-1515. • Mississippi Watercolor Society Grand National Watercolor Exhibition through Jan. 1, in the public corridor. This annual presentation includes works from across the country in various waterbased mediums, organized in conjunction with the Mississippi Watercolor Society. $3-$5, children under 5 and museum members free. • Bethlehem Tree: Younger Foundation Creche Collection through Jan. 8, in Trustmark Grand Hall. See Jewell Younger Graeber’s collection of more than 150 18th-century nativity figures. Free. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS|music

by Valerie Wells

10 Things About

2.

You better like the blues, because this issue doesn’t bleed red. True, not every article and not every song belongs to the blues, but it’s the inescapable roux in this collection. This examination of Mississippi music is nostalgic, and most of the songs on the CD are older tunes. But the lines blur. Listen to Bo Diddley’s “Heart-O-Matic Love,” and you hear it all—the blues, some pop, some rock, some pre-Clash singing and something that sounds a little fresh all these years later. The album includes a disco song, a Hilltops tune and some early country music.

3.

The $10.95 cost is steep for most of us who are in the 99 percent, but the long stories and context of how all these pieces fit together might be worth the expense. Plus, the 27 songs on the free CD bundled with the music issue make it a sweet deal. Heck, this could be your PawPaw’s Christmas present. He’ll love it.

4.

Two headlines arousing our literary interest are “Barry Hannah’s Mixtape” and “Tuning Miss Welty.” Tying these prominent Mississippi authors to our state’s musical heritage is intriguing, but not surprising. Mississippi’s music influenced all its writers and some from other places as well. At the end of the magazine is an essay reviewing a John Hurt biography and a new John Hurt CD compilation.

5.

Several celebrities wrote for this issue, including Roy Blount Jr., Nick Hornby and Rosanne Cash. Of the 37 contributors listed in the front of the book, only Pat Cochran claims in his bio to live in Mississippi. Another contributor, David Shirley, has a bio that says he “shares his heart between Oxford, Miss., and Brooklyn, N.Y.” The magazine also included shorter articles from Mississippians Roger Stolle, Gayle Dean Wardlow, Lisa Howorth and Pat Cochran.

6.

Besides long, first-person navel gazing about the blues, its influences on some of the narcissistic writers and the complicated emotional history of the whole state, this issue also has some cool lists, such as the “Top 12 Rarest Blues Records from Mississippi.” We saw some poems, too, but they were not about cats.

Natalie’s Notes

7.

Cary Hudson of Blue Mountain is named one of the “Top 11 Most Underrated Guitarists from Mississippi.” The man from Sumrall is talented, rocking and “loud,” we read. He also knows his roots music and his south Mississippi history. Pat Cochran puts him as No. 11 of the 11.

8.

The CD and the magazine complement each other nicely. The CD is not just an extra goodie, it’s part of the experience. Each song has an article in the magazine. Those articles make up a good section of the book. Perhaps ninth graders can use this issue as a Mississippi Studies textbook.

9.

To supplement the issue, The Oxford American has a rich variety of articles online at oxfordamerican.org/articles/online-exclusive. The magazine posted a lot of these before the December issue hit the stands. Also, the Oxford American posted an online CD with 30 additional tracks at oxfordamerican.org/articles/2011/dec/07/oas-mississippi-mix-2/. One song you can hear is “If Jesus Had to Pray” by Robert Anderson (1954). The online articles and music are free. Start posting these things on your

The December issue of the Oxford American focuses on Mississippi music.The special issue comes with a 27-song CD.

Facebook wall and educate the world about Mississippi talent.

10.

You may not agree with all the editors who made these choices, but here’s something interesting the world is reading about Mississippi right now, and it’s not ugly for a change. Soak it in. If you want to buy a copy, visit Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-7619). You can find copies to borrow or read at your public library branch. Or buy the issue directly from the Arkansasbased quarterly publication at its website, oxfordamerican.org.

Ring in the New Year

by Natalie Long

from Los Angeles, Calif., for the holidays, so please come join us t’s been a blast attending great parties along with local celebrity and piano man and concerts, but I’m ready for the hol- Michael Kennedy at JC’s (425 N. Mart iday hustle and bustle to be done and Plaza) Christmas Party Thursday night. to get back to the normality of life. BeFriday night FlowTribe plays at Martween your own holiday parties and writ- tin’s. Also, Soulshine at Old Fannin hosts ing those New Year’s Dain Edwards, The resolutions, make plans Med Bar and Grill hosts to hear awesome music Eddie Cotton every in the capital city. Friday (so mark your On Wednesday, calendars), and Dreamz Mark Whittington JXN presents Can’t Feel performs at The Irish My Face Friday (and Frog, Barry Leach is after the week marathon at Kathryn’s, and good of last minute shopping friends Anna Kline and and prepping for the Scott Anderson perannual family Christform as the Grits and mas, I think we’ll ALL Soul Band at Fenian’s need it). Reed Pierce’s Pub. Thursday night, Anna Kline and the Grits and has Chris Gill and the Band perform Wednesday, local bluegrass favorites Soul Sole Shakers. Dec. 21 at Fenian’s Pub. D’lo Trio play at The Saturday night is Cherokee Inn. AJ’s on Christmas Eve, so if the Lake has Hunter Gibson, and Amazin’ you’ve already had your annual Christmas Lazy Boi performs at F. Jones Corner’s blues present swap and family fight or fallout lunch. I’m so excited to have my one-man and need to get out of the house to blow band Clinton Kirby and his family back off some holiday steam, head on over to

I

FILE PHOTO

The Martini Room for Soulful Saturdays or The Boardwalk for karaoke. Christmas Day is the time to celebrate the season with friends and family. After you’ve had round two of present opening and siblings or parents altercation, head over to Fenian’s to hear Jason Turner. Martin’s Christmas Show features Jackson natives Jakob and Joshua Clark and Mischa Hercules in the band Boy, along with Dent May and Dead Gaze. Please support this great lineup of music for the holidays. Between now and New Year’s Eve, we’re still rocking out, so jam at Open Mic Night at Ole Tavern or Fenian’s on Tuesdays, and live blues, jazz and open poetry mic at Jackson’s newest venue, Old School 101 (2640 Terry Road, 601-940-6559). On Dec. 28, Clinton and I will play at the first venue we ever performed at (Hal and Mal’s), so come hear us acoustically accost you. Dec. 29, Mississippi native and Grammy nominee Jimbo Mathus and his band, The Tri-State Coalition, perform in the Red Room at Hal and Mal’s. Kenny Davis performs at The Med Bar and Grill. Martin’s and Ole Tavern host Ladies Night. I’m looking forward to New Year’s

Eve when my best friend Silky Jane rolls into town (you’ve been warned.) Make plans that night to attend Underground 119 with The Fearless Four, Fenian’s for The Bailey Brothers, The King Edward Hotel’s New Year’s Eve celebration with the Patrick Harkins Band, Duling Hall with The Crackerjacks, Pop’s Saloon for Hillbilly Deluxe, and the Martini Room has its New Year’s Eve bash with DJ Finesse. I strongly encourage you to call these venues beforehand so that they can tell you more details about cover charges and reserved seating. I plan on filling up on the traditional New Year’s Day specials (greens and blackeyed peas) and hope you will try to hear John Mora at Sombra Mexican Kitchen, Knight Bruce at Sophia’s in the Fairview Inn and Andy Hardwick at Fitzgerald’s. Merry Christmahannakwanzaa to you and your family! Remember, musicians, I am your Elf on the Shelf, so I hope you’re on the nice list this holiday season. I wish all of you a wonderful holiday and a sensational New Year, too. And, remember, if you see me out and about, please say hello!

jacksonfreepress.com

1.

The December issue of the Oxford American is the magazine’s 13th annual southern music issue. This year, Mississippi music is the theme, and Howlin’ Wolf is on the cover. The 194-page issue has so much Magnolia State in it, we are proud and embarrassed at the same time.

OXFORD AMERICAN

the Oxford American Southern Music Issue

41


livemusic

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(Acoustic Blues) 8-12, No Cover

Thursday, December 22nd

HOWARD JONES

(Jazz) 8-12, No Cover

Friday, December 23rd

Restaurant Open As Usual

FRIDAY 12/23 - MONDAY 12/26 Closed for the Holiday

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CLOSED Tuesday, December 27th

THU12.29: Jimbo Mathus & The Tri State Coalition

(Blues) 8-12, $5 Cover

JESSE ROBINSON

SAT12.31: The Krystal Ball (for more info call Hal & Malโ€™s)

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WED12.28: Natalie Long & Clinton Kirby

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25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

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GRADY CHAMPION

43


by Bryan Flynn

by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. NFL Network): The Indianapolis Colts will try to tie a record for going 0-16, when they take on the AFC South Champion Houston Texans. FRIDAY, DEC. 23 College Basketball (8-10 p.m. ESPN): Two good college basketball programs face off when West Virginia travels to Baylor. SATURDAY, DEC. 24 NFL (noon-3 p.m. CBS): The Tim Tebow show travels to Buffalo as the Broncos take on the Bills. SUNDAY, DEC. 25 NBA (1:30-3 p.m. ABC): The NBA returns with five games on Christmas Day. A rematch of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final between the Miami Heat and Dallas Mavericks highlight the action. MONDAY, DEC. 26 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): The New Orleans Saints might wrap up the NFC South and a first round bye if they can defeat the Atlanta Falcons in the Superdome. TUESDAY, DEC. 27 NBA (7-9:30 p.m. TNT): The Boston Celtics travel to South Beach to face off against the Miami Heat in a battle of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big 3s.â&#x20AC;? WEDNESDAY, DEC. 28 College Basketball (7-9 p.m. ESPN 2): No. 16 Mississippi State takes on No. 7 Baylor in what would be a major step to the Big Dance with a victory for the Bulldogs. Have a very Merry Christmas, everyone. I am going to use some of my time off to reflect on a wonderful year and be thankful for all the good things I have. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

Mississippi Teams Go Bowling COURTESY MSU; COURTESY USM

The Christmas holiday features bowl games, the NFL and the return of the NBA. Ho, ho, ho!

The Golden Eagles and Bulldogs are headed to bowl games to finish out their seasons.

T

wo Mississippi college football teams are going bowling this year: Mississippi State University and the University of Southern Mississippi. Both the Bulldogs and the Golden Eagles fell short of expectations, but they are getting an extra month of practice time. 3HERATON(AWAII"OWL Southern Miss stunned Houston in the Conference-USA title game, winning 49-28. USM lobbied to be included into the Bowl Championship Series, but its losses to Marshall and Alabama-Birmingham ended any BCS hopes. The Liberty Bowl was out of the question, too. Instead, USM is headed to Hawaii. Southern Miss will face the Nevada Wolf Pack on Christmas Eve. Nevada runs the pistol offense (think of the shotgun but with the quarterback lining up halfway between the center and a true shotgun position). The Wolf Pack is a potent offensive team. Averaging 251.8 rushing yards per game, Nevada has the eighth best rushing attack in the nation. Nevada is not too shabby in the passing game, either, averaging 271 yards per game. Overall, Nevada has the fifth best offense in the national compiling 522.8 yards per contest. The Wolf Pack finished the season 7-5, but their only loss to a team not going to a bowl game was to Texas Tech. Nevada lost four of five games on the road with their only home loss to Louisiana Tech. This team is accustomed to playing ranked teams, having played Oregon and Boise State. Expect an offensive game in Hawaii. Both teams average more than 30 points per game. Nevada averages 32.9 points per game, and USM averages 37.9 points an outing. Southern Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense is not bad, either. The Golden Eagles pass for 271.5 yards and rush for 207.8 yards per game. USM is No. 13 on offense, with 471 yards a game.

In what could be a shoot-out, defense could save the day for one team. Nevada is allowing 25.3 points per game, and Southern Miss is only allowing 21.1 a game. This will be the final USM game for coach Larry Fedora (He took a job with the University of North Carolina Tar Heels) and quarterback Austin Davis. Watch Dec. 24 at 7 p.m. on ESPN. &LYNN´S0ICK53- -USIC#ITY"OWL The Bulldogs (6-6) will face the Wake Forest Demon Deacons (6-6) in Nashville. MSU needed to beat in-state rival Ole Miss to get bowl eligible. Wake Forest is one of the smaller schools enrollment-wise to play Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football. The team ended its regular season with a spanking from Vanderbilt. The Demon Deacons were inconsistent this season. Wake won four games in a row at one point but also had a three-game losing streak. Neither team lights up the scoreboard offensively. Neither MSU (No. 87) nor Wake Forest (No. 76) broke into the national top 50 (or even the top 75, for that matter) on offense or with points scored. The Bulldogs struggle to get to 25.5 points a game, and Wake only musters 26.8 points a contest. MSU has the edge in rushing with 168.8 yards to Wake Forestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 118.9 yards per game. The Demon Deacons have the upper hand passing with 273.8 yards to the Bulldogs 200.2 yards a game. Deacons quarterback Tanner Price passed for more yards (2,803 yards) than MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chris Relf (1,083 yards) and Tyler Russell (1,034 yards) combined. The Bulldogs were just as inconsistent as the Demon Deacons were this season. MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest winning â&#x20AC;&#x153;streakâ&#x20AC;? was two games, and they had a two-game losing streak twice. This is the first time Wake Forest has been to a bowl game since 2008. That year, the Demon Deacons defeated Navy in the EagleBank Bowl. Mississippi State defeated Michigan in the Gator Bowl last season. MSU is making back-to-back bowl appearances for the first time since 1998-99. The Bulldogs are on a four-game bowl-winning streak. This is the first matchup in a bowl game

JFP Bowl Schedule: Week 2

7

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SATURDAY, DEC. 24

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between MSU and Wake Forest. Just like the USM/Nevada game, defense could end up being the key to a victory. Wake Forest is allowing 27.8 points a game and MSU is only giving up 19.9 points per game. MSU has the defense to win this game and should finally get healthy on offense. Stopping the Wake Forest passing game is the key. The Bulldogs can shorten the game with their running game and keep Wakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterback Tanner Price on the sideline. Watch Dec. 30 at 5:45 p.m. on ESPN. 0ICK-35

December 21 - 27, 2011

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant â&#x20AC;˘ Favre for JSU?

44

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Mediterranean Fish & Grill presents

Every Friday & Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ 9:00pm Open Mic Night Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 8:30pm with Kenny Davis

Free

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms medfishgrill.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601--956-0082

$2 Domestics $2.50 Smirnoff 2 for $5 Pitchers $3 Frozen Margaritas & Strawberry Daquiriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bring this ad in & get a free beer!

-Weekly EventsTuesday & Thursday Pool League

Wednesday

$9 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Dec.19-23 Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Mon | Chicken Alfredo or Meatloaf Pie Tue | PepperSteak & Rice or Shrimp Scampi Wed | Smoked Pork Loin or Country Fried Steak Thu | Hot Tamales or Chicken Bowtie Pasta Fri | Catfish Parmesan or Beef Brisket

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

10% off O PW JVIIHVMR PYRGLWTIGME R WS IV T IV T  [MXLXLMWEHÂ&#x2C6;

1SRHE]&S[PMRK 'LMPHVIRYRHIVFS[PJSVJVII

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Pool Tournament

8MPUQ_ :UST` NO COVER & Live DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Friday Karaoke with Rhonda NO COVER! 2560 Terry Rd, Jackson MS Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 3:30pm-Last Customer Standing

Plate Lunches--$7.98

Served with cronbread, or a roll, and tea Add $.40 for To-Go Orders

Monday

Tuesday

Beef Tips or Meatloaf Rice & Gravy or Mashed Potatoes Fried Okra & Lima Beans

Wednesday

Fried, BBQ, or Baked Chicken or Beef w/ Liver & Onions Mashed Potatoes, Turnip Greens, & Black-Eyed Peas

Thursday

Roast Beef Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, & Salad

Friday

Country Fried Steak Rice & Gravy, Field Peas w/ Snaps $ Corn

-Voted 2011 Best Of JacksonGood Showing: Red Beans & Rice

601-487-8710

1st: Best Hangover Food 3rd: Best Plate Lunch

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

OPEN EVERYDAY 4 PM - UNTIL

Now Open Early

Wednesday - December 21 KARAOKE

Thursday - December 22

Thur.-Sat | 8:00 Two Shows Fri & Sat

Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free

This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music

Friday - December 23

December 23

Brian Barefoot

Amazinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lazy Boi Legendary HouseRockers

Saturday - December 24

*VMHE](MRI-R QYWXFVMRKMREH TIVTIVWSR

9 Ball Tournament

;SVXL3J8SOIRW*SV

2:00pm â&#x20AC;˘ $500 Prize

7YRHE]8LMVWX]7YRHE]W

New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Event Tickets On Sale Now

3PH7UYEVI6SEHÂ&#x2C6;.EGOWSR17 Â&#x2C6;LXXTWXVMOIIRXIVXEMRQIRXRIX

â&#x20AC;˘ Dinner: 5-10 Tuesday-Saturday â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday Night: Ladies Night & Karaoke in The Jazz Bar â&#x20AC;˘ $5 Fridays: Dance All Night â&#x20AC;˘ Happy Hour in The Jazz Bar Tuesday - Friday 4-7pm 2 -4 -1 Wells, Calls, & Domestics, PLUS $5 appetizers If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in booking a Christmas Party for your company, please call

a ne s & o a ery ev tm

 SJJ(MRMRKMRVIWXEYVERX

*VII(VMROW*SV%PP'LMPHVIRYRHIV 3JJIV)RHW

Live | Sat. Dec. 24th

Hamburger Steak w/ Rice and Gravy Purple Hull Peas & Cabbage Chicken & Dumplings w/ Salad

Â&#x2026;;MRKW JSV(SQIWXMG4MXGLIVW

7EXYVHE]/MHW(E]

DVDJ Reign

New Havin & Hillbilly Deluxe $15 In Advance â&#x20AC;˘ $20 At The Door

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

h is wis hr e C W y

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Yes, we will be OPEN on Christmas from 5pm - 2am.

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

December 24 & 25 Sorry Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Closed

Happy

Holidays! Live Music During Lunchâ&#x20AC;˘ OPEN LATE SECURITY PROVIDED

jacksonfreepress.com

Eddie Cotton

-Nightly Specials

45


dining

by Crawford Grabowski

Serve It Forth: Gifts for Your Kitchen

A

whiz it up for a few seconds. Want it extra creamy? Blend for a few seconds longer. The Viking Hand Blender ($120) is The Everyday Gourmetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best seller. FILE PHOTO

re you struggling to find the gift for the cook who has everything? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not as hard as it seems, and it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be pricey. I tend to give others either what I want for myself or what I find particularly useful. For me, these gifts seem to fall into three distinct groups: â&#x20AC;&#x153;tools you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever use,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;kicked-up basicsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;splurges.â&#x20AC;?

1

The first items fall into the category of â&#x20AC;&#x153;tools you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever useâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do without once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used them. These gadgets appear to be drawer clutterers but are actually indispensable. Both can be found at The Everyday Gourmet (1625 E. County Line Road, Suite 500, 601-977-9258). The Microplane It zests; it grates; it even makes julienne fries! OK, scratch that last part, but this food â&#x20AC;&#x153;raspâ&#x20AC;? really does make adding a touch of freshly shaved Parmesan directly onto your pasta much easier. (Microplane, $19.95) The Immersion Blender This handheld blender allows you to easily puree or whip items without having to drag out the traditional blender. You just â&#x20AC;&#x153;whizâ&#x20AC;? the blender in whatever container youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already using, thus creating less mess. Make a single-serving milk shake in a glass versus making a batch in the blender. Your kitchen stays cleaner, and you avoid that unavoidable feeling of obligation to eat all the sweet, creamy leftovers. An immersion blender makes pureeing soups a painless task. No more burning yourself when pouring hot soup into a traditional blender. Just stick the immersion blender in the pot and push the button. This gadget makes it easier to control the soupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end texture. Want it to still have some chunks? Just

The Immersion Blender, a convenient hand blender, can make an excellent gift.

2

My second category of kitchen gifts is â&#x20AC;&#x153;kicked-up basics.â&#x20AC;? These are those boring kitchen tools that everyone already has in some form. Why not give fancier or more personalized versions? Handcrafted wooden spoons Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used a hand-carved wooden spoon, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hooked. The spoons, smooth with a good grip size, have heft but are lightweight. They just feel good in your hand. You can find a variety of wooden spoons from different craftsmen at the Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland, 601856-7546) ranging from $12 to $18. Herbs and spices Last year, one of my favorite gifts was saffron brought to me from Egypt. Foreign spices are a simple and inexpensive way to play with new flavors, and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to

leave the country to get them. Every cook I know would appreciate a package of a few out-of-the-ordinary herbs, spices, sauces or condiments. Find these items easily at any of our areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local ethnic grocery stores. My two favorites are Patel Grocery (6965 Old Canton Road, 601-952-0332) and Van Hung Asian Market (637 Highway 51, Suite P, Ridgeland, 601-856-9638). The staff at both stores is always willing to answer even my most ridiculous questions. Personalized kitchen items While I am a huge proponent of homemade gifts, I also am a fan of practical gifts. Unfortunately, the two donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always meet. One way to create useful gifts for the home cook is to visit a local ceramics studio. Fat Cat Ceramics (1149 Old Fannin Road, Suite 11, Brandon, 601-992-6553) has numerous kitchen-related gifts ready for you to personalize. These range from simple measuring cups ($17) and batter pouring bowls ($21), to serving bowls ($15-$28) and margarita glasses ($10.) This is also a perfect way for children to create practical gifts for the home chefs in their lives. Family recipes An inexpensive and sentimental gift for your favorite cook is shared family recipes. This could be as simple as passing down a loved cookbook or typing up a few recipe cards. If you want to get more elaborate, you can compile your own family cookbook.

3

My final gift category is simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;splurges.â&#x20AC;? These are awesome to have but arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessary for kitchen survival. I have included only one item in this group, in hopes that Santa might get the hint. Cooking Classes Those who love to cook love to expand

by LaShanda Phillips and Tam Curley

December 21 - 27, 2011

I

46

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CHEATERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLACK BEAN SOUP 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 2-3 cloves garlic, minced 2-3 cans (15 ounces) black beans 1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes 1/2 cup to 1 cup salsa 3-4 cups stock 1-2 teaspoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoons salt handful of cilantro, chopped sour cream, optional

SautĂŠ onion and garlic in olive oil over medium heat until onions are soft. Add black beans, tomatoes, salsa and enough stock to reach desired thickness. Stir in coriander, cumin and salt. Simmer for 20-30 minutes. Puree (using your new immersion blender, of course). Top with cilantro and a dollop of sour cream, and dig in! Serves 4. NIALL KENNEDY

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their knowledge of new techniques and cuisines. Once these new skills are used, the gift giver benefits as well. The Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601-898-8345) offers a variety of classes. Demonstration classes range from $59 to $89, while hands-on classes are $89 to $119. The Date Night and Girls-NightOut classes are some of the most popular. You can view a full class schedule online at vikingcookingschool.com. Gift certificates are available, and can be used for any class offering. Of course, combining the above items into a gift is also simple. Here is a family recipe that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to give along with an immersion blender to one of my loved ones.

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Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs and cats. Beware.


5A44 FX5X Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

The Copper Iris Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gourmet Burgers:

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson

Soups â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Specials Delivery for orders of 5 or more. 115 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friend Us:

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music december 21 - 27 wed | dec 21 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p thur | dec 22 ADIBS ACOUSTIC JAM 5:30-9:30p fri | dec 23 LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND 6:30-10:30p sat | dec 24 CLOSED

Happy Holidays

sun | dec 25 CLOSED

Best Fried Chicken In Town & Best Fried Chicken in the USA

mon | dec 26 Karaoke tue | dec 27 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

-Food & Wine Magazine-

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Barbecue in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;?

2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 â&#x20AC;˘ 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011

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Game Day Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2lbs of Pork, Beef or Chicken, 2 Pints of Beans, 2 Pints of Slaw, 5 Slices of Texas Toast Or 10 Buns)

Yo u H a n dl the Unif e orm! ndle a H l l We â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ood! F e h t

1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson,MS | 601.956.7079

jacksonfreepress.com

12:23(1

- Jackson Free Press

47


December 21 - 27, 2011

Beauty Isn’t Just Skin Deep

48

Rainbow Natural Grocery Capital City Beverages distributed by

M I S S I S S I P P I ’ S C O M P L E T E B E E R S O U RC E

Ask for these beers at stores and restaurants in Central Mississippi. Can’t find these beers? Call 601-956-2224 for more information.

2807 Old Canton Road 601-366-1602 at Lakeland & Old Canton www.rainbowcoop.org


#!02)#/2.$EC *AN

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49


For the Little Angels and Demons by Meredith W. Sullivan and LaShanda Phillips

S

ometimes shopping for the kids can be tough, especially when you don’t know what the young ones are into these days. This year, it doesn’t have to be hard, because we’ve found a few items around town that will make any kid light up with excitement. Royal and Langnickel Acrylic Artist Set for Beginners, Art Supply Headquarters, $44.95

Tooth Fairy Pillow, Monogram Express, $18.95

Santa squeeze toy, N.U.T.S., $1 TOMS Tiny Corduroy Shoes, Monogram Express, $29

Snake Plush, Dragonfly Shoppe at the Natural Science Museum, $10.99

“Jack and the Beanstalk: The Play,” Bridgette’s Monograms & Gifts, $16.99 eeBoo Assorted Sketchbooks, Pentimento Books, $6

Jonathan Adler Junior Nightlight, The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $44 Blu Gertrude Leopard Fedora, Gingersnaps, $59.95

Holiday Cookies, Nandy’s Candy, $4.95

Hot Chocolate and White Hot Chocolate, Cups Espresso Café, $8.50

Screen Print Toddler T-shirt, Swell-o-phonic, $20

Kimochi Feelings Pillows, The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, $28

Polka Dot Piggy Bank, Bridgette’s Monograms & Gifts, $24 Screen print onesie, Swell-o-phonic, $20

Graphite drawing instrument, circa. Urban Artisan Living, $18

Where2Shop:

December 21 - 27, 2011

Art Supply Headquarters, 707 Monroe St., 601-948-4141; Bridgette’s Monograms & Gifts, 2725 N. State St., 601-362-9947; circa. Urban Artisan Living, 2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484; Cups Espresso Café (multiple locations); Dragonfly Shoppe at the Natural Science Museum, 2148 Riverside Drive, 601354-7303; Gingersnaps, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 120, 601-981-4311; Kay McCrimon, kjamesmccrimonprojects.com; Learning Express of Ridgeland, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, 601-607-3300; Monogram Express, 131

Gateway Drive, Suite A, Brandon, 601-825-1248;

50

State St., Suite 103, 601-366-9955

The Museum Store at the Mississippi Museum of Art, 380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515; Nandy’s Candy, 1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 380, 601362-9553; N.U.T.S., 114 Millsaps Ave., 601-3556276; Pentimento Bookstore, 302 Jefferson St., Clinton, 601-925-4662; Swell-o-Phonic, 2906 N.

Pretty Moon “The Queen Within” Necklace, Gingersnaps, $12.95

Individual LEGOs, Learning Express of Ridgeland, $5.99 “Good Night, Lil’ Darlin’,” Kay McCrimon, $20 Steven Joseph Monkey Rainboots, Bridgette’s Monograms & Gifts, $29

Schleich Deer and Fawn, Dragonfly Shoppe at the Natural Science Museum, $2.99-6.99

Flying Squirrel Hand Puppet, Dragonfly Shoppe at the Natural Science Museum, $16


Last Minute holiday sale This Holiday Season, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget The Batteries!

10% OFF on any cell phone or camera battery

Expires 12/31/11

601.932.2250 4220 Lakeland Dr. Flowood, MS 39232

located at the intersection of Airport Rd. & Lakeland Dr. www.batteryworldonline.com

15% off

Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet in Ridgeland has tons of gently used brand name jeans, tees, tanks, hoodies and shoes to fill your closet at up 70% off regular retail. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget - we pay $$$ on the spot for your gently used apparel and accessories - Check us out today!

1000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of batteries for everything in the worldâ&#x20AC;Ś

1260 East County Line Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 601.487.8207 platosclosetridgeland.com

CLOTHESONLY

/FFERVALID 

-ITCHELL!VE\ #ORNEROF/XFORD-ITCHELL0ARKINGON/XFORD -ON \4UE &RI \3AT 

7XMPP7IEVGLMRK*SV 8LEX4IVJIGX+MJX#

Shop Bargain Boutique For

Your Christmas Gifts Bargain Boutique recently received fabulous home items from two Jackson area boutiques. Items include china, stemware, platters, stationery and more. Find that perfect last minute gift with easy convenient storefront parking.

s p a n s r e g n i

G Come check out our new inventory!

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ www.villagebeads.com

consignment store

s CardGGIWWSV]

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to check out our fall and winter clothing. We receive new merchandise daily, so check back frequently.

G[Ei]fWt8LI4IVJIGX%

5070 Parkway Drive, Jackson | 601.991.0500 Mon-Fri 9:30am-6pm | Sat 9:30am-5pm FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

P %VI%

,MKLPERH:MPPEKI 

Brocks Gift Center A Touch of Mississippi

Brockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gift Center custom wraps all gift baskets!

1220 East Northside Drive â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.366.9343

2012 â&#x20AC;&#x153;HITCHEDâ&#x20AC;? WEDDINGS ISSUE IS COMING! Street date: 1/11/12 | Ad Deadline: 1/5/12 Call 601-362-6121 x11 or write ads@jacksonfreepress.com to discuss reserving ad space in this popular issue aimed at couples planning their weddings in the New Year!

jacksonfreepress.com

!!! !!!

51


v10n15 - Good Ideas: Work  

It's About Jobs: Getting, Giving, Changing and Keeping Them. Be The Best Employee or Boss, Ever. p.14-35 Top Year-End Movies p38 Favre for J...

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