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November 16 - 22, 2011


November 16 - 22, 2011

jacksonian

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contents COURTESY FARISH STREET GROUP

AMILE WILSON

6 Pretty Please The Farish Street Group is the latest to ask the city to fund development with public money. COURTESY JOHNNY DUPREE CAMPAIGN

Cover design by Kristin Brenemen

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THIS ISSUE:

With Republicans in charge of Mississippi’s executive and legislative branches, what’s next for the Dems? COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

thomas roots The UNCF Ball isn’t the only big-name event Roots has worked. Roots recently coordinated the 4th annual White Party, a benefit and fashion show for the National AIDS Association. He also organized events for celebrities such as Danny Glover, Morgan Freeman and Oprah Winfrey, whom he met when he planned a party for her in 1993 and has worked with several times since. Roots says he does everything from setting up and decorating to hiring the caterers and selecting the food. As an interior designer, Roots’ work includes the offices of the Federal Courthouse in Jackson, Judges James Graves and Carton Reeves, and Herbert and Sharon Lee of the Lee and Associates law firm. He’s preparing to host an upcoming holiday trunk show to promote his store’s fall collection. Roots’ commitment to quality and helping the community has earned him great word-of-mouth recognition. It is being able to give back that makes him enjoy his work. “It’s something I like to do, so it’s not like work all the time, but it is still hard work,” Roots says. “I enjoy getting to help people whether it’s through charity or fashion.” The Savoy is located at 4956 Old Canton Road. Contact Thomas Roots by cell at 601-5067545, in his store at 769-233-7776 or at his home office at 769-251-5919. —Dustin Cardon

29 Best in State The annual Mississippi Invitational exhibit features top artists selected from more than 200 applicants.

38 T-Day Assist Don’t face Thanksgiving and your hungry clan alone. Jackson-area restaurants have goodies you need.

jacksonfreepress.com

From the time he was elected Mr. Best Dressed in both middle and high school,Thomas Wayne Roots knew he had a future in fashion and design. “I’ve always liked clothing, design and all-around beautiful things,” Roots says. “(In school) I gravitated to that kind of thing, and it eventually turned to the design aspect.” The 40-year-old Jackson native runs a clothing and interior-decorating business called Thomas by Design and owns an exclusive women’s boutique named The Savoy. He attended Lanier High School and later went on to Hinds Community College and Belhaven University. He graduated from Belhaven in 1994 with a degree in marketing and business. Roots worked at McRae’s department store, now Belk, while in school, where he was in charge of visual merchandising and men’s accessories, ties and suits. He says this experience made the transition into running his own clothing business much easier. Roots started his business in 1991 and opened The Savoy a year ago. He started out doing freelance work from his home office and by appointment, which is how he still conducts most of his business today. “I started by working parties as an event planner,” Roots says. He said he still plans events from weddings and graduations to receptions and charity events, such as the United Negro College Fund Ball at the Jackson Convention Center.

FILE PHOTO

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .......................... Day 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 29 ............... Diversions 30 ..................... 8 Days 31 .............. JFP Events 32 ........................ Music 33 .......... Music Listing 35 ................. Astrology 36 ...................... Sports 38 ........................ Food 41 . Best of Jackson Ballot 42 .... Girl About Town

Dems’ Demise?

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LaShanda Phillips Editorial assistant LaShanda Phillips is a recent graduate of Jackson State University. She is the third oldest of seven children. Her motto is: “Make-up is fantastic!” She coordinated and wrote for the Home section.

Gretchen Cook Gretchen Cook lives in Belhaven, which she believes is about as close to heaven as you can get short of the actual afterlife. She is the publisher and editor of Parents & Kids Magazine, a Kindle user and a sometimes runner. She wrote for the Home section.

Jeff Seabold Jeff Seabold is the principal architect at Seabold Architectural Studio in Jackson and the chairman of the Mississippi Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. He can be reached at Jeff@seabold-studio.com. He wrote for the Home section.

Adriane Louie Adriane Louie is a Jackson native and Millsaps College grad who volunteers for many local auxiliaries. She loves watching the Food Network. Her favorite time of the year is fall because of Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. She wrote for the Home section.

Kelly Bryan Smith Kelly Bryan Smith is a Virginia native and a Mississippian by marriage. Kelly spends her days chasing her sweet little boy, cooking eco-friendly vegetarian meals for her family, and pursuing her doctoral studies in English literature. She wrote for the Home section.

Casey Purvis Casey Purvis is a Fondrenite who loves flowers and watching birds. She is a sucker for a suspenseful movie or thought-provoking documentary. She is owned by Phoebe, a 9-year-old Lhasa apso. She works as a nurse at a local hospital. She wrote for the Home section.

Bryan Flynn Sports writer Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippi native who resides in Richland. When not writing for the JFP, he writes a national blog, playtowinthegame. com. He lives with his wife and their four cats. He wrote the Sports page and about a man cave.

November 16 - 22, 2011

Andrea Thomas

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Advertising designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland and is a recent Antonelli College graduate. She loves to sing, dance and write poetry in her free time.

editor’snote

by Ronni Mott, Managing Editor

Home at Last?

W

hen I was small, my parents seemed to think that moving to a new city to give my dad better job opportunities was a pretty cool thing to do. In retrospect, it was definitely the right thing to do; however, from a little-kid standpoint, entering a second-grade (or third-grade or fifth-grade) class in January or March was a lot like torture. I was forever the new kid. I didn’t know the in-crowd lingo; I didn’t even know who the in-crowd was. My funky glasses and homemade clothes didn’t help. And bringing friends home to my heavily accented parents and bizarre “un-American” food was just out of the question. I didn’t eat a PB&J at home until I was in high school, and my mom managed some pretty strange hamburgers loaded with things like capers and eggs and who-knowswhat spices, all thoroughly mixed by hand. The kids who didn’t pick on me tended to shun me. The ones who were friendly were among the others who were a little odd or too smart or too shy to fit in with the cool kids. My mother, who grew up in Hitler’s Austria, freaked out when I wanted to join a Brownie troop. No little brown uniform for her newly American daughter. She didn’t tell me why I couldn’t be a Brownie, and not understanding why, I tearfully watched from a distance while my classmates played in their little brown dresses and beanies. At some point, I stopped trying to fit in. I remember playing alone a lot and finding things to do—like reading or climbing trees or singing or dancing—that didn’t require an audience or playmates. Always shy, life was just easier on my own. Of course, the minute I stopped trying, people seemed more attracted to me. When, eventually, I did fit in, it was with the freaks. My answers to “Where are you from?” became elaborate over time. I was born in Germany to Austrian parents, moved to Manhattan as an infant, to Brooklyn as a toddler and spent summers in the Catskills. After my parents moved to the Washington, D.C., suburbs when I was about 7 or 8, we must have moved a half-dozen times until I graduated from high school, which added another half-dozen towns to my list. I kept up the pattern once I was on my own. I even bragged at one point that I moved once a year whether I needed to or not. “It keeps things light,” I’d say, because I never moved anything I hadn’t used since last year’s move. Truth is, not having a sense of what or where “home” was, the roofs over my head never had great importance to me, and in my younger, relatively stuff-free days, it was easy to just pack up the car and go. These days, I know my experience isn’t all that unusual. Plenty of Americans move over the course of their lives—37.5 million just last year, according the U.S. Census Bureau—and my experience pales to those of some Army brats I’ve met. People move for a variety of reasons, but most, one in four, do it for housing

upgrades—bigger, better homes. People also move for family-related reasons, whether that’s a change in status, such as marriage or divorce; additions to the family; and more and more, moving back home to care for aging parents. Only 16.4 percent of movers did so for employment needs. Nearly 70 percent of movers stayed in the same county, while 11.5 percent moved to a different state. If you were 16 or older, poor, black and unemployed, you were more likely to move. Also, if you lived in the west or south, you moved more often than folks in other regions. Chances are high that you moved from a city into a suburb; suburbs had a net gain of 2.5 million last year. So in an era where millions of us pack up our junk every year and find a new roof, what does “home” mean? In Mississippi, where it seems nine out of 10 people I meet were born and raised within the borders of the state, home seems to be either where your football team is or where your mama (or grandma) lives, or both, regardless of where your actual roof is located. I’ve met people who retained life-long friendships with their first-grade classmates, having moved up the academic ladder together from kindergarten through college. I never dreamed such relationships were possible. Going home is every bit as strong an American tradition as moving from home to attend school or find a job. Hollywood bets that people who travel home have lots of interesting stories to share. How else to explain the popularity of homecoming movies from “It’s a Wonderful Life” to “Christmas Vacation” and “Home Alone.” All you have to do is check out an airport the days before Thanksgiving to witness the many people keeping strong ties to the family homestead.

So is home where your family is? At 41, I came to Mississippi for a betterpaying job with greater career-advancement opportunities—sound familiar? Two years later, my dad retired (at 78, bless his heart), and my parents followed me to a warmer climate and a lower cost of living, and a year after that, I bought a house. It still didn’t feel like home. The older I get, the more I’m convinced that “home is where the heart is.” Like all clichés, truth lies in the well-worn words. My heart may just be in a city I barely know: Vienna, Austria. My mom and dad were born there, as were my grandparents, and now they’re all buried in the city. The one time I visited Vienna (that I can remember—I was there as an infant), it felt like home, from the historic castles and churches to the horsedrawn carriages to the trolleys and numerous parks and outdoor cafés. My sisters and I picked a particularly virile-looking statue on the grounds of Schönbrunn Palace to name as our ancestor purely on the basis of family lore. His wife, so the story goes, was appalled that a royal sculptor used her husband’s nude figure as a model, forbidding him to ever reveal which sculpture was modeled on his athletic physique. Maybe it’s all just wishful thinking. Perhaps my faraway home just sounds a little more exotic than saying my home is in Mississippi, where my roof has been for going on 15 years now. Ultimately, I believe home is where we decide our hearts are, for whatever reason. With both feet and a roof in the Magnolia State, maybe it’s time for me to decide that I’ll give her my heart and stick around for a while longer. There’s a chance I’ve come home after all, even if I will never quite get football.


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In 2009, the estimated median house or condo value in Jackson was $93,700, up from $64,200 in 2000.

State Sen. Gray Tollison abandoned his party two days after his re-election. p 11

SOURCE: CITY-DATA.COM

news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, Nov. 10 The Nixon Presidential Library releases transcripts of former President Richard Nixon’s secret grand jury testimony from 1975. … State Sen. Gray Tollison of Oxford announces he is switching to the Republican Party. Friday, Nov. 11 Americans mark Veterans Day and the 93rd anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I on the Western Front. … The host and crew of The Travel Channel’s “Man V. Food” is in the Jackson area to tape an episode at Burgers & Blues. Saturday, Nov. 12 The Arab League votes to suspend Syria’s membership until the government implements a deal to end the violent crackdown on protesters. … Silvio Berlusconi resigns after 17 years as Italy’s prime minister. Though he survived numerous sex scandals and lapses in tact, Berlusconi was finally undone by the Eurozone debt crisis. Sunday, Nov. 13 Venezuelan police arrest suspects in the kidnapping of Wilson Ramos, a baseball player who was taken from outside his family’s house in Venezuela. Ramos was rescued two days after the kidnapping. … Rescue workers recover the body of a fisherman who fell out of his boat into the Ross Barnett Reservoir.

November 16 - 22, 2011

Monday, Nov. 14 The U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear arguments in challenges over President Obama’s Affordable Care Act. … Republicans select state Rep. Philip Gunn, R-Clinton, as their pick for speaker of the House. Republicans have a majority in the House for the first time since Reconstruction.

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Tuesday, Nov. 15 New York City police clear Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park so that sanitation crews can clean the site. Protesters have been camped at the part for about two months. … An economist tells legislators that the state’s economic growth appears to be at a standstill. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com

Lots of Mouths to Feed

L

ast week, the Farish Street Group became the latest developers to ask for public funds to finance high-priced downtown Jackson developments. Jackson developer David Watkins is requesting $8 million in urban renewal bonds from the Jackson Redevelopment Authority, a quasi-governmental agency that assists the city with developments. The JRA board is also considering allocating $27 million in urban renewal bonds to Old Capitol Green developers for a parking garage with adjoining commercial space, and $96 million for a convention center hotel. The board has discussed issuing $3.5 million in urban renewal bonds for a Jackson Visitors and Convention Center welcome center at the corner of Pascagoula and Jefferson Streets. With so many project mouths to feed, all the requests for public financing present the question: How much risk would the city assume by approving funds for all the projects asking for them? Procedurally, to allocate bonds for any of the projects, both JRA and the Jackson City Council must vote on resolutions. In the event that a developer defaults on bond payments, the city—or the city’s taxpayers—would be responsible for making payments from its general fund. “Technically, there is no limit to our capacity (for allocating bonds),” JRA Executive Director Jason Brookins said. “… There is a limit as it relates to what the city can pay back if the projects didn’t pay for themselves.”

by Lacey McLaughlin

So far the Farish Street Group has invested $9.2 million in cash and loans into the Farish Street Entertainment District, but in a Nov. 3 letter to JRA, Watkins said the process for using New Market Tax Credits and historic tax credits was going to be complex and lengthy. To stay on schedule and open venues by summer 2012, The Farish Street Group joined several other developers last the development needs an week in seeking public financing. additional $10.2 million, Watkins wrote. Zach Taylor, Jackson Redevelopment located $20 million in state bonds for the gaAuthority board attorney, said that on a 20- rage, but the city and county must first enter year amortization schedule, the Farish Street into an agreement to co-sponsor the bonds, Group would need to pay about $600,000 and the likelihood of that happening is unto $800,000 to JRA per year to cover debt certain. In May, Hinds County Supervisor service and interest on an $8 million bond, Doug Anderson said the county did not have though the exact amount will vary depending enough resources to commit to the project. on the interest rate. Board members requested TCI, developer of the proposed condetailed revenue projections, leases and de- vention center hotel, has requested $96 tailed financial reports from the Farish Street million in bonds from JRA. The developGroup before making a final decision. ers are working on details of a financial arJRA is considering establishing a special rangement with the city, including who will tax district to create a finance structure to pay own the land that the hotel will occupy. The back the bonds for Old Capitol Green’s park- hotel equates to the highest risk for the city ing garage. Full Spectrum South has said that because it is the most money. the garage would have revenue from tenants To date, the Farish Street Group has not and from leasing parking spaces in addition MOUTHS, see page 7 to visitor parking. In 2009, the Legislature al-

COURTESY FARISH STREET GROUP

Wednesday, Nov. 9 Rick Perry forgets which federal agencies he wants to abolish during a CNBC televised Republican presidential debate. … Penn State University football coach Joe Paterno resigns following a child sex-abuse scandal involving former coach Jerry Sandusky at the school.

Paper doll furniture Get to decoratin’! w

genocide

“A far-right government would be genocide for public policy.” —Mississippi Rep. Steve Holland, D-Plantersville, regarding the GOP’s control over the executive and legislative branches of state government come 2012.


talk

news, culture & irreverence

MOUTHS, from page 6

obtained public money from the city for the project. The Jackson Redevelopment Authority, however, entered an agreement with the Farish Street Group several years ago, allowing for the developers to lease the Farish property from JRA but did not require the developers to pay rent until September. “We are extremely confident that the debt service and these bonds can be paid by these projected revenues, or we wouldn’t have asked for it,” Watkins Partners Vice President Jason Goree said. Jackson Redevelopment Authority board member John Reeves questioned Taylor and Goree about the financial details during the meeting Nov. 9. Reeves said needed more information about the development’s projected revenue to be confident. “I don’t have enough info to know if this is a good investment,” he said. “You have to get past the build out, past the lease, and ask

yourself: Is the public going to come down here and spend money? And I don’t know.” When it comes to deciding which projects get funded, Brookins said that is up to the JRA board and the Jackson City Council. “We have board members who have financial backgrounds and can offer their assistance and understanding. We’ve got other board members who are business leaders. But ultimately it comes down to what kind of economic impact can we expect from those projects, and typically, the folks who are doing those projects provide us with that information,” he said. Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell said he needed more information before commenting, but he doubted that the city would be able to fund all three major projects. “It’s going to be very difficult for me to imagine that all of this debt is a good thing,” he said. Comment at www. jfp.ms.

State Wants NCLB Relief by Elizabeth Waibel

on the state’s standardized tests. The possible rankings are minimal, basic, proficient and advanced. Each state makes its own standardized tests, so there is no national definition of “proficiency.” FILE PHOTO

Mississippi—along with 38 other states, D.C. and Puerto Rico—is applying for a flexibility waiver from some No Child Left Behind requirements.

The waivers should also allow states to recognize schools that are making progress, even if they have not yet reached benchmark test scores. NCLB has been criticized in the past for identifying schools as “failing” if their scores are low, even if they are making progress year to year. Womack said the NCLB waivers might help some, but she doesn’t think they go far enough. Lawmakers need to overhaul the law and make more changes, she said. Politicians and government officials have debated how to fix NCLB for years, but have not yet come to an agreement to put through Congress. The Mississippi Department of Education plans to submit its waiver request in February 2012 for review in the spring. The department will hold a series of town hall meetings within the next month to seek input on its submission. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he Mississippi Board of Education voted last month to apply for a waiver in hopes of getting relief from some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind. The Obama administration unveiled a plan in September to give states waivers from some of the more unrealistic and controversial aspects of the 2001 act, including the requirement that all students be proficient by 2014—the next school year. Susan Womack, executive director of Parents for Public Schools of Greater Jackson, told the Jackson Free Press last month that the law has led to schools emphasizing standardized testing and “skill-and-drill” learning in targeted subjects while other areas suffered. “When No Child Left Behind was adopted, and we began to place such strong emphasis in the early grades on reading and math scores—performance scores—we saw a lot of narrowing of the curriculum, so that a lot more emphasis was being placed on reading and math, a lot less emphasis was placed on science and social studies,” Womack said. “… We’ve seen schools eliminate music and recess to give teachers more classroom time to prep children for tests, and this is not good for children.” The buzzword for the waiver program is flexibility—states must still show their students are making progress in the spirit of NCLB, but they can get relief from some of the most unpopular requirements of the law. Whereas NCLB required all students to score as “proficient” by 2014, the waiver program should allow states to set more achievable goals for improvement, even if 100 percent of students are not proficient. This is good news for Mississippi, since only about 50 to 65 percent of students currently score proficient or higher

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politicsbeat

by Robbie S. Ward

Send political news to news@jacksonfreepress.com

Measuring the Democratic Mess COURTESY JOHNNY DUPREE CAMPAIGN

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Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree’s campaign held out until his landslide loss in the governor’s race was clear.

nce again, election night last week revealed a grim reality for Mississippi Democrats and the Mississippi Democratic Party. Just minutes after polls closed statewide, the Associated Press began delivering dismal news for Democrats, calling the races of state auditor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state for Republicans. In these races, the GOP didn’t even have token Democratic opposition. While incumbency often increases a candidate’s chances for reelection—the case for secretary of state and state auditor—the Mississippi Democratic Party failed to field a candidate for the open seat of lieutenant governor. In Hattiesburg, the atmosphere for the city’s mayor and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Johnny DuPree made for an evening of defiance until the inevitable loomed. “We know for a fact that Jackson and Hinds County haven’t even reported,” John Brown, DuPree’s assistant, said from the stage at Hattiesburg’s Lake Terrace Convention Center. Then he led the crowd in chants of “Believe.” When the AP called the race early with results from about half the precincts statewide, DuPree’s supporters held out optimism until even the longest of long shot possibilities faded. The avalanche of GOP support proved too much for three-term Mayor DuPree, who lost 60 of the state’s

82 counties, amounting to a landslide loss by about 39 percent to Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant’s 61 percent. Most of DuPree’s support came from the Delta and the Jackson area. Bryant earned the title of governor-elect by receiving close to 200,000 more votes than DuPree. Other Democratic candidates, including Ocean Springs Mayor Connie Moran in the race for state treasurer, saw similar results as DuPree. Moran received even fewer votes in the race for state treasurer against Republican Lynn Fitch, director of the state’s personnel board. But the punch that knocked the wind out of state Democrats came later in the week, when a sprinkling of legislative races showed a likely Republican majority in the state House of Representatives for the first time since Reconstruction, albeit a likely slim majority of 64 to 58. This gives the GOP control of the House, the Senate and the Governor’s mansion. A Republican will even fill the seat held by northeast Mississippi Yellow Dog Democrat Billy McCoy, the current speaker of the House who chose not to seek reelection. For the third consecutive election cycle for statewide offices, only Attorney General Jim Hood managed to provide a singular bright spot for Democrats in Mississippi.

Dems Lick Wounds, Prep for Battle

November 16 - 22, 2011

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ississippi Republicans are still painting the state red in celebration of the party’s recent electoral successes. The GOP is maintaining control of the governor’s mansion, the lieutenant governorship, the state Senate and every statewide constitutional office except one. To add insult to an injured—if not mortally wounded—state Democratic Party, Republicans not only wrested the Mississippi House majority from Democrats, who held power there since the dismantling of slavery in the late 19th century, but even enticed a couple of Dems to switch parties last week. Members of both parties credit the election of Gov. Haley Barbour eight years ago with spurring the Republican tsunami. What Democrats might do to stem the tide is mostly unknown. What is known is that rebuilding the party will not be easy. Speaking before a gathering of the civic organization Jackson 2000 last week, state Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson, said that Democratic members of the House and Senate would need to change their strategy in the event of a Republican-controlled Legislature by becoming more combative and using the rules to cause gridlock if necessary. “In a two-party system, the party that’s in the minority serves as a check for those that are in the majority. It’s their job to keep the other side honest,” said Rickey Cole, executive director of Mississippi Democratic Party. Tactics that minority parties employ to slow legislation include insisting on recorded roll-call votes instead of voice votes or asking the clerk to read a bill in its entirety.

State Rep. Kelvin Buck, a Democrat from Holly Springs, doesn’t believe that becoming more combative is necessarily in Democrats’ best interests. “I don’t see how much more contentious it could be,” Buck said of the party’s relationship with its Republican colleagues. Some evidence exists that the working relationship between the parties might not be as acrimonious as many people anticipate. Democratic State Rep. Steve Holland, D-Plantersville, sees opportunities for building coalitions around key issues, as long as Republicans don’t overstep their bounds, and will even support a moderate House Speaker. “I’m going to support the majority party, but I’m not going to support one of these far-right kooks. A far-right government would be genocide for public policy,” Holland said. Progressive-minded Mississippians fear that such a far-right agenda would include redrawing a more GOP-friendly electoral map when the Legislature takes up redistricting again next year, consolidation of school districts and expanding charter schools. Before Republicans captured the House, split majorities in the Legislature seemed to ensure that no redistricting deal could be struck, which would force a three-judge panel in Washington, D.C., to decide the issue. Education is a theme around which collaboration seems possible. Gov.-elect Phil

Bryant recently spoke to business leaders about pursuing partnerships with Mississippi’s colleges and universities to create vocationaltechnical programs for high school dropouts, which could draw Democratic support. State Sen. Gray Tollison, one of two Democratic legislators to switch parties in the past week (Rep. Donnie Bell of Fulton was the other), named education as one of the

reasons for his defection. He said he was impressed by the work Senate Republicans were doing on the issue as well as by the ideas of incoming Republican senators Brice Wiggins of Pascagoula, Josh Harkins of Flowood and Chris Massey of Nesbit. And despite his departure from the Democratic Party, Tollison has championed progressive causes such as clean energy and could prove a valuable ally to his former party on some legislation.

MESS, see page 9

by R.L. Nave If the parties don’t learn to cooperate, it will be a long four years, and the uphill struggle against Republicans may not be the Democrats’ most vexing. The state party has little money and great difficulty raising it, nor is it likely that Democrat-friendly groups will pour much money into the state. “We have to get organized; our party is in shambles right now,” said Horhn, adding that the Democratic National Committee “wrote off” Mississippi in the recent election, declining to support Democratic office seekers. Just as important as raising money and getting help from outside groups is attracting young people to the party, said state Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson. “Republicans are good at attracting young people,” Brown said. “We don’t have a very good farm team.” Hope might lie in grooming young Democratic mayors in the mold of Johnny DuPree of Hattiesburg and Connie Moran of Ocean Springs, Hohrn said. Both mayors lost their bids for statewide offices to Republican foes last week, DuPree to Bryant in the race for the governor’s mansion and Moran to Lynn Fitch for the treasurer’s job. In the meantime, Democrats will have to focus on moving forward with an agenda regardless of the Legislature’s political makeup. “We know that when the Legislature convenes, there will be 80 or more members who are Democrats,” Cole said. “We will be speaking up loudly and clearly for the hundreds of thousands of citizens who voted for Democrats.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.


He easily won a third term with about 61 percent of the vote against Republican candidate Steve Simpson. ‘Not a Big Surprise” For many observers of southern politics, election-night losses for Mississippi didn’t come as a surprise. Similar situations have happened throughout the South. Just last month, voters in Louisiana re-elected incumbent Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal to office by about two-thirds of the vote in a field of nine candidates. Steve Shaffer, a professor in Mississippi State University’s Department of Political Science and Public Administration, has studied southern politics for more than 30 years, focusing on polling. Based on trends in recent elections, last week’s election results didn’t surprise him. “Democrats really have a problem,” he said, reviewing his data from elections in 11 southern states in recent decades. “It’s not a big surprise— it’s the whole region.” Shaffer said Mississippi’s election results add to the longtime switch of southern whites to the Republican Party. “They look at the national Democratic Party and say ‘they’re too liberal,’” Shaffer said. “This is part of the nationalization of politics on the state level.” Republicans in southern states—identified by Shaffer as Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia—have held the majority of U.S. House of Representatives and Senate seats and governors offices in the region since 1994. This reaffirms the transition of the south to a national base for the GOP. While DuPree made history as the first African American to earn the gubernatorial nomination of a major party in the Magnolia State, Shaffer didn’t see that race as a

major factor to the dismal Democratic outcome. Lack of financial resources factored into the election and contributed to the outcome with Bryant outspending DuPree by $5 million. “It’s hard to win if you’ve got no money,” he said. “It’s even harder if you’re not an incumbent, because you have to build up name recognition.” Sam Hall, DuPree’s campaign manager and executive director of the Mississippi Democratic Party from April 2009 to

Bryant earned the title of governor-elect by receiving close to 200,000 more votes than DuPree. July 2010, disagreed. He said Republican support in tight legislative races hurt DuPree. Hall also said strong Republican turnout for the three initiatives on the ballot also hurt DuPree. Hall said larger forces worked against DuPree and other Democrats in the state, saying voters seem to significantly favor Republicans. He said the state’s trend toward Republican candidates has hurt Democrats. “We have seen right now that Mississippi right now is a 60/40 state,” Hall said. “I don’t think there’s any one thing to indicate why this race didn’t go the way it did. While the campaign manager of the losing side may be reluctant to criticize his team’s game plan, others did. Jere Nash, a Democratic political consultant, declined to comment for this story, saying he needed more time to digest the

results. However, he posted Nov. 10 on Red/Blue, his former Clarion-Ledger blog, that two factors influenced election—the three voter initiatives on the ballot and Johnny DuPree. The initiatives—proposed amendments to the state constitution on voter ID, eminent domain and “personhood”—drove GOP supporters to the polls, Nash blogged. Compared to the voters who cast ballots for initiatives with those who voted for governor, totals are almost identical. Nash said DuPree’s campaign failed to generate excitement among the Democratic base, hurting key legislative races in the process. “The folks coming out to vote on Tuesday were not coming out to vote for Johnny DuPree,” Nash wrote. “The voter tail wind created by the 61-39 Bryant/DuPree spread brought plenty of other Republican candidates across the finish line on election night and no doubt made the difference in many close elections that were down the ballot.” Whatever the cause for Democratic Election Day woes, systemic problems remain in fundraising, fielding strong candidates and improving the state party’s image. Rickey Cole, who accepted the position of state Democratic Party executive director a few months ago, said he and others are up for the task. Cole said he isn’t shocked by the result of the recent statewide elections, however. “Frankly, we Democrats didn’t prepare sufficiently for Nov. 8 and the results reflect that,” he said. “Organization matters. Money matters.” One thing remains certain—as Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree resumes his focus to the citizens of his city, state Democratic leaders will try to figure out how large a broom they’ll need to clean up their mess. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Tollison also gave $200 to the cam- as the party’s chairperson, said she mistrusts paign of New Hampshire Democratic U.S. Tollison and believes he should resign. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen in 2002. In 2008, Bell “We all feel cheated. We feel hurt. We contributed to the congressional campaign feel betrayed,” Nordstrom said. of Democratic state Rep. Steve Holland of Plantersville, records indicate. Political leaders at the county level can have tremendous sway in elections. A strong county chairperson can motivate loyal precinct captains to get the party faithful to the polls on election day, which is as much about numbers and turnout as Gov. Haley Barbour (left) and Lt. Gov.-elect Tate Reeves welcome it is about character state Sen. Gray Tollison (center), who switched parties last week. and ideas. That might help to explain why the Neither lawmaker could be reached people who have held those position in for comment as of press time Tuesday. Lafayette County, where Oxford is located, Pete Perry, chairman of the Hinds are so miffed with Tollison. County Republican Party, doesn’t anticiMax Hill, who chaired the Democrat- pate that the men, both longtime legislaic executive committee in Lafayette County tors, will run into difficulty working with until the Nov. 8 election, sent a seething a members of either caucus. letter to the Oxford Eagle. “Working with them is not going to be “Gray, you are not a man of charac- anything hard or unusual,” Perry said. “Both ter,” Hill wrote. “At best your party switch are good legislators and good people.” is political opportunism. It shows that you Even though he says he talked to Gov. are nothing more than a pawn in the po- Haley Barbour about joining the Republilitical game that is played every day in the cans in February 2011 and Lt. Gov.-elect political arenas across our nation.” Reeves and Gov.-elect Phil Bryant in the Hill, who said he was a high-school weeks leading up to the recent election, classmate of Tollison’s and supported him Tollison said he didn’t make an announcein past elections, said the move surprised ment before Election Day because he was him, given Tollison’s voting record. unopposed in his re-election bid. “He expressed having many of the He added that earlier in the week, he same Democratic ideas as myself and other returned a $1,000 campaign contribution local Democrats and progressives,” Hill to the Lafayette County Democratic Party said. In addition to facing a Democrat in because “it wouldn’t have been right” to the next election, Hill added, “If he con- keep the money. tinues to vote as he did as a Democrat, I Hill and Nordstrom said they received would image he would face a Republican the check Friday, Nov. 11, a day after Tolliprimary challenger.” son’s press conference. Merrill Nordstrom, who replaced Hill Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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lanked by Gov. Haley Barbour and incoming Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, state Sen. Gray Tollison announced that his becoming a member of the Republican Party was the best thing for his constituents. The next day, and with far less fanfare, the Mississippi Republican Party welcomed state Rep. Donnie Bell of Fulton as the latest legislator to jettison the Democratic caucus for the Republican side of the aisle. By most accounts, neither man’s defection greatly stirred the balance of power. Republicans hold a majority in the state Senate and appear to be heading toward one in the House as well. Reeves and Mississippi Republican Party Chairman Arnie Hederman have said they look forward to the Legislature passing conservative legislation when lawmakers reconvene in January. Between the two newest Republicans, Bell will have the easier time falling in line. As a Democrat, he campaigned as a pro-life, conservative Christian who earned a National Rifle Association endorsement. But judging by some of the stances Tollison has taken in the past, it’s hard to see much evidence of good, strong, conservative values. In January 2011, Tollison sought to create the state’s first electricity net-metering buy-back program through which residents with solar arrays or home wind turbines could sell their excess electricity back to the utility. Then, when the Mississippi Senate passed a bill allowing law enforcement officials to check the immigration status of people they suspect of being in the country without documentation, Tollison expressed misgivings, telling the Associated Press that innocent people could be jailed and that police officers could subject themselves to legal action. Tollison and Bell have given money to Democratic candidates. At the federal level, each has contributed to former U.S. Rep. Travis Childers, a Democrat who lost a re-election bid in 2010 to Republican Alan Nunnelee. According to information from the Center for Responsive Politics, Tollison donated $500 to the Childers campaign in 2008; Bell gave $300 the same year.

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by Lacey McLaughlin

The Lone Democrat LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

fice, even though the Mississippi Department lican House and Senate, lieutenant governor, of Finance and Administration had already and governor to try and limit the office of the spent $28 million to design office space spe- attorney general’s influence,” he said. cifically for the AG’s cyber-crime unit. After Wisemann pointed out that the framers local media outlets reported on the cost of the building, Barbour backed off his plans. The two officials disagreed on whether the state should have joined a lawsuit challenging the federal Affordable Care Act, known as “Obamacare” to its detractors. Barbour urged Hood to file suit, but in April 2010, Hood wrote a letter to Barbour stating that because only the U.S. Supreme Court can decide the issues in the multistate suit, “there is no hurry to join the suit,” and it would be cheaper Attorney General Jim Hood won reelection to his for Mississippi to wait. Barbour then third term by 60 percent of the state’s votes last hired attorney Michael B. Wallace of week. He may experience new challenges in next year’s legislative session. Wise, Carter, Child and Caraway in Jackson to represent him in the lawsuit at no cost to the state. Marty Wiseman, director of the Stennis of the 1890 Mississippi Constitution wanted Institute of Government, said Barbour and the governor to have limited power and deHood may not have always agreed on poli- cided to make statewide offices independently cies, but they were, for the most part, polite elected from the governor. But the trend has to each other. Wiseman predicted that Hood been to reverse that, he said. may face changes next year, however. “I would “Hood is kind of out on an island by anticipate some effort of the part of a Repub- himself, but he is a fairly conservative guy

T

himself,” Wiseman said. “… He certainly is not a flaming liberal, so there will be positions when he gets along with Republicans just fine. But there will be others where that is not the case. But now, he doesn’t have the luxury of having any legislative backing, unless he can develop a relationship with Republicans who can cross the line, and that’s not likely.” Over the past several legislative sessions, the state Senate passed a “Sunshine” bill that would have required Hood to conduct bidding for outside counsel receiving cases from the state. The bill died in the House, but this session could be different. Hood has said that if more entities were involved in the process, it would become politicized. He also said that disclosing potential lawsuits against corporations could threaten their outcomes, and that lawyers would fail to bring suits to the AG’s attention if they thought they could not benefit. Jackson attorney Philip Thomas, author of the blog Mississippi Litigation Review, said bidding out contracts for attorneys is not the same as bidding out other types of contracts. “Your lawyer is not something you want to pick by the lowest bidder. It’s not a construction contract,” Thomas said. “It shouldn’t be the cheapest lawyer, because that’s not going to be best lawyer.”

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

his ancient African country of Ethiopia is called the land of 13 months of sunshine. The Ethiopian calendar has 12 months of 30 days and an extra month of five days called Pagume. In the African nation where the Queen of Sheba once ruled, both primitive and modern cultures exist side by side. In Addis Ababa, the open-air market of Addis is the largest in Africa, stretching out for miles. The food of this far-off land is known worldwide for the intricately spiced stews or “Wat” as they are called. You can now Robin DeVos Owen experience firsthand the most exotic dishes fit for a queen right here in the City with Soul at Jackson’s newest restaurant, Abeba. Owner and chef, Molley Woldtnsea, came to the United States from Addis Ababa with a dream to open his own Ethiopian restaurant. Beginning with his formal training at a culinary school in Dallas, Woldtnsea had an opportunity to open a restaurant in Jackson and jumped at the chance. Dining at Abeba is unlike anything you’ve ever experienced. Ethiopian dishes are served with “injera,” a spongy flatbread made from the flour of teff, an ancient grass grain similar to millet or quinoa. Essentially the table bread, injera serves as your silverware and part of the meal. Yes, you eat with your hands. Prepared dishes are served atop the injera and it is customary to use torn pieces of injera to pick up the food and soak up the rich, spicy sauces. Silverware is available, and would be useful to try one of 40 soups that Woldtnsea simmers up in his kitchen. For the novice palate, give the vegetarian combination a try. A deluxe sampling of vegetarian dishes including Ataklet Wat, a spicy preparation of cabbage, carrot, and potatoes simmered with onions, garlic ginger, and turmeric. The Ethiopian take on collard greens is also available. Gomen Wat, served hot or cold, is mild collard greens simmered in a delicate sauce of onions and herbs. Woldtnsea’s favorite dishes are the Doro and Beg Wat. The Doro Wat is a slow-cooked chicken simmered in a buttery, spicy berbee sauce. The Beg Wat is prepared using slow-cooked lamb. Both dishes are traditionally served with a hardboiled egg and of course with plenty of injera. If spicy isn’t your thing, you can give the Beg Alicha or Doro Alicha a try—both dishes are milder versions of Woldtnsea’s favorites and just as flavorful. With full-service catering and party space available, transform your next get-together into a party fit for the Queen of Sheba herself. Abeba is located off the Lakeland Drive exit off I55 on the north frontage road. The next time you are looking to escape your mundane food blues, step into an exotic culinary paradise right here in Jackson at Abeba.

jacksonfreepress.com

M

ississippi Attorney General Jim Hood celebrated a large victory last Tuesday when he won his third reelection term against Republican challenger Steve Simpson, winning 60 percent of the vote. But Hood’s real uphill battle may lie in next year’s legislative session with Gov.elect Phil Bryant and a Republican-controlled House and Senate. The attorney general serves as the chief legal officer and adviser for the state on civil and criminal matters. His office issues legal opinions and interprets state laws, advising state leaders and government agencies. The AG has the power to bring suit on the state’s behalf against corporations or individuals and is one of three members of the state bond commission, along with the governor and state treasurer, which decides what projects receive state bonds. The governor, on the other hand, is the chief executive officer of the state. He presents a budget to the state Legislature, has the ability to call special sessions and has full veto power over bills passed by state lawmakers. Gov. Haley Barbour and Hood had their share of differences. In 2006, Barbour announced plans to move state agencies into the Sillers Building in downtown Jackson. His plans did not include the attorney general’s of-

11


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Vote ‘Yes’ on the Tollison-Bell Amendment

T

he worst dirty trick we saw this last election wasn’t a campaign ad, a robocall or an “astroturf” campaign from a shadowy coalition of instigators and carpetbaggers. (Of course, all three happened.) In fact, this dirty trick didn’t happen in the lead-up to the election at all. It happened afterward—when Sen. Gray Tollison switched from being a Democrat to being a Republican, after he ran unopposed—and even after accepting money from the Democratic Party. Soon after, Rep. Donnie Bell of Fulton, who defeated another Republican candidate while campaigning with a D after his name, undertook the same cowardly act, and arguably tipped the House with his political philandering. Some readers might ask—why the bellyaching? Candidates switch parties frequently, particularly in the south and particularly, these days, from Democratic to Republican, as the great 40-year shift of the southern strategy is finalizing itself in the land of magnolias and palmettos. But switching parties within 48 hours of being re-elected—and acting like you’re joining a new country club instead of tossing your supporters under a bus—makes you more than a selfish politician, a scheming opportunist or a conniving tactician. It makes you a con artist. Tollison himself says he’s been mulling the change for “more than a year,” but, apparently, he only got around to finally making this heart-wrenching decision after people had gone to the ballot box and put a check next to “Gray Tollison (D).” More than a year ago was exactly the right time to make this decision. How many of his constituents and supporters assumed that Tollison was the person he said he was? How many voted for Bell because they wanted the Democrats to retain control of the House or because they thought a Democratic candidate would be better for Mississippi? We disagree with the excuse that the only thing constituents want is for their representative to be a member of the majority. Some voters appreciate a candidate with actual principles. If these men were slowly having this epiphany about themselves or their constituencies, why not have the intestinal fortitude to reveal that before the election and run on the merits of their beliefs and those of their new party? Why not allow Democrats to field a candidate in opposition to these newly minted Republicans, instead of running as a faux Democrat all the way to the end? Some people vote straight-party ticket; some people vote in certain races for certain parties (like the House); some people vote because they know and respect who they think you are. To these people, these men lied. Even worse is the righteous posture that suggests they did it for their constituents. Gentlemen, at least show enough character to admit that you acted out the charade in your own interests, not those of your voters. Voters who saw the potential of initiatives to alter the landscape in this last election should consider another one: Let’s add the ability to recall elected officials to Mississippi’s constitution. We can call it the Tollison-Bell amendment.

KEN STIGGERS

Spinning Your Favorites

November 16 - 22, 2011

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.J. Larry “Loose Booty” McBride: “Are you tired of hearing the news about the politician who allegedly violated four women? Are you disgusted with the other politician who forgot the name of the third government agency during the recent presidential candidate debate? I know the news about the football coach and child sex scandal at that university in Pennsylvania just makes you sick. “Don’t let the bad, sad and terrible news mess with your mood. Come on down to Clubb Chicken Wing’s ‘Mid-Week After Hours Job Fair, Networking Session and Disco’ and do the ‘loose booty’ with me and the Unemployed Dee Jays. We’ll spin your favorite old school tunes to help you get rid of the blues. “Big Roscoe’s momma will have plenty of free hot wings ready for the happy hour. Brother Hustle will keep the libations flowing at the new ‘Grown Folks Juicy Juice Bar.’ Network with potential employers and consult with resume-writing specialists from Hair Did University School of Cosmetology and Cootie Creek County Community College. “Back by popular demand is the Battle of the Unemployed Old School Dee Jays, featuring D.J. Itch Gotta Scratch versus Old School Pete. The Sausage Sandwich Sisters will conduct the Ghetto Science Community electric-slide line dance to the music of Sly and the Family Stone’s ‘Loose Booty.’ Spend some time away from commercial, corporate-sponsored media constantly feeding you with nonsense at your mind’s expense. Come shake that loose booty. Let it go.”

CHATTER

Noise from the blogs @jacksonfreepress.com

Tollison: Being a Republican Best for My District I guess the obvious question is, how do you reconcile doing this the day after the election? What kind of horses’ ass does that and then has the gall to tell people he did it for his constituents’ own good? That’s why there was an election—for the constituents to decide what is in their own interests. I know people who live on his block who voted for him because they thought he was a Democrat, not because they thought he was lying to them for their own good. This dude deserves to get booed in church. If you want to change parties, change before the election and then run on you and your new party’s merits. Otherwise you’re a con artist. If he’s really that conflicted and spineless, I think Tollison should step down and allow his district to have a fair election. —Todd Stauffer

could the liberal darling defect at a time like this? Oh, because the GOP basically said, “either join us or we’ll beat you in the next election.” Wonder why Todd Wade got ditched? Contact Delbert and ask what he knew and when he knew it. —jbreland

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOW! How in the world can he face himself every day?! It’s trickery at it’s best. LOW DOWN! —Queen601

I mean, is anyone really shocked behind this? C’mon, let’s be honest. People vote blind in this state, and it is what it is. I can see if his constituents were up in arms over this, but they are not. The governor, lieutenant governor, treasurer, auditor, agriculture commissioner, insurance commissioner, Senate and the House are Republican-run now. I just hope the JFP uses its podium to point this out and hold them accountable for any shortcomings that happen during their tenure. Because it’s obvious—the majority in this state don’t see it. —Duan C.

I have written Eric Holder (federal attorney general) and Jim Hood requesting prosecution for voter fraud. If misleading voters to get elected is criminal—this is the definition of it. —BobbyKearan One word: survival. Plus, dude parties hard in Jackson. Gotta love him—a true Kennedy. But how

I dislike office-holding party jumpers on either side, but this case is especially egregious given that he pulled the switch days after being re-elected. Doesn’t matter that he was unopposed, if he wanted to be in the GOP he should have switched earlier in the year to run in the GOP primary. I’ve said for years there should be an automatic recall for elected officials who switch parties within 18 months after an election. This would make people like Tollison think twice before betraying the people who voted for him based on party affiliation. —Jeff Lucas

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


Home on the Ranch Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

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eel free to judge, but I’ve lived in eight different places since 2004. Yes, I’m aware that makes me sound like a Gypsy, but I can defend myself. Justin and I talked about home ownership the way some heterosexual couples talk about having kids—one day, just not today. I never had to worry about fallen trees on my roof, exploding water heaters, termite contracts or Jehovah’s Witnesses, and that was fine with me. But then, for the first time in a long time, I drove by a house that felt like home. Justin and I met nine years ago in Memphis, Tenn. Both fresh out of four-year relationships, we were itching to start the next phase of our lives. This, for me, is a recurring theme: the “what’s next?� Having spent a good deal of time, energy and money chasing the “American Dream,� I had a good income, a German car and owned a cute little ’40s house with my former partner. I wanted a new dishwasher; he wanted to move up the corporate ladder. That’s pretty much how we grew apart. Justin abandoned his coupling after a string of indiscretions on his partner’s end. He had quit his job to become a “stay-home gay,� and busied himself by nesting. His partner, who was in the restaurant business, was also consumed with moving up. Eventually, Justin had enough and moved on. I had just finished moving the last of my possessions into a tiny studio across the street from AutoZone Park, home of the Memphis Redbirds in downtown Memphis. The apartment was just a couple of blocks from bars and eateries where I would step out of my shell and meet new people. I imagined myself to be something like a gay, male Carrie Bradshaw—full of optimism, with a love for shoes and cute boys. I vowed to be bold in my quest for the next phase of my life. It was almost lunchtime, so I popped into the Peabody Hotel to see if my gal-pal Kirsten was at work. She was off Mondays, a cute boy behind the front desk informed me, but he would tell her I stopped by. Halfway home, it occurred to me that I should’ve asked him out. “So much for the ‘bold new’ Eddie,� I thought. Later, Kirsten rang me to see if I wanted to meet for a drink or two. I caught up with her and her man-friend, Gene, at Huey’s. We chatted about my new life and what I hoped for my future. “I’m giving Memphis a year to make me stay,� I said defiantly, and then asked, “Tell me about that boy behind the front desk.� On our walk back to my apartment, Kirsten shared with me what little she knew about Justin and his previous relationship. He

was full of passion for life, kind as anyone she’d ever met and funny. “Equally as inappropriate as we can be,� she said. It was then I announced, “I’m going to ask that boy out.� “I think you should,� Kirsten said assuredly. So, I did. Turns out, J had called her immediately after I left the Peabody earlier that day, demanding to know who “that man� was who had come calling. One year in Memphis turned into two, and he and I were sharing a loft on the top floor of the old YMCA building on Madison Street. We loved that loft and loved entertaining there. In fact, we hosted a couple of birthday parties for people we didn’t even know. Crazy I know, but when you know how to throw a wingding, and you don’t use that talent, somewhere in the world a child is born cross-eyed. Eventually, we made the decision to come to Jackson and gave up the loft. We lived in the King Edward for two years. It was a 20-year dream realized for me, but lugging groceries from the elevator to the other end of the building a few hundred times will slowly make a mortgage-phobic person consider the convenience of whipping into a carport. One evening, while celebrating our ninth anniversary at Parlor Market, I confessed that I couldn’t wait to buy a house. J, looking as if he had been keeping a terrible family secret from me, immediately confessed the same. Three weeks later, I found myself standing in the middle of a ‘50s ranch in need of a couple of gays. “I do believe this is our home,� I said to Justin. Lately, I’ve listened as he gushes about the refinished wood floors, the enormous closets and the deck that’s bigger than a Broadway stage. I informed everyone that Halloween was to be spent with me, and I filled the front yard with my jack-o’-lanterns—all carved free hand. (I’m going on record to say that Halloween is the only day of the year when I openly welcome children into my world.) I’ve also laid claim to Thanksgiving, as we’ll finally have plenty of room to feed the misfits in my life. Three beds, three baths and a two-car garage are about as close as we can get to marriage, for now. That’s what’s next, after all. Eddie Outlaw is co-owner of the William Wallace Salon in Fondren and spends most of his time trying not to embarrass his sweet Delta mother on eddieoutlaw.com.

Lugging groceries from the elevator will slowly make a mortgage-phobic person consider whipping into a carport.

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jacksonfreepress.com

BY EDDIE OUTLAW

13


by Donna Ladd

â&#x20AC;&#x153;To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labor tends, and of which every desire prompts the prosecution.â&#x20AC;?

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â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Samuel Johnson

ou could call me an armchair decorator. No, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that I spend my spare time decorating armchairs; I mean I like little more than plopping into a big comfy chair, or propping up in bed, and reading about domestic bliss. I love funky and colorful home-dĂŠcor books (Jonathan Adlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are among my favorites) and magazines (may Domino rest in peace; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still in mourning). I used to take home care fairly seriously: puttering and organizing and traipsing from flea market to thrift store to home stores. Since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become a busy newspaper woman though, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spend nearly as much time on my home, though, and tend to entertain in other venues. It also means my home isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as visitor-ready as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like it to be. I admit it: I have some really cool local art I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hung, yet; and a backlog of organizing projectsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which I love more than youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d believe. I used to spend my Sundaysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;my only day at homeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;exhausting myself, trying to read, organize, decorate, and tackle a long list of projects. And if I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t doing them, I was fretting

about not doing them. I clearly needed a bit of home therapy. Turns out, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apartment Therapyâ&#x20AC;? is one of my favorite home-porn websites. So Todd went looking for Maxwell Gillingham-Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dĂŠcor book for me for Christmas (I always get at least one new dĂŠcor book; delicious). He found two, though, and bought them both to be sure he got the right one. The smaller paperback, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apartment Therapy: The Eight-Step Home Cureâ&#x20AC;? (Bantam Dell, 2006, $15) was just the shot of domestic Zen I needed. Call it a therapeutic kick in the butt. It really is therapy. You have to start out answering questions about what you really want out of your homeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Todd and I both did itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and he also asks you to consider your favorite actors, music, TV shows, clothing and more. Then you have to get honest about the problems with your home, including needed repairs and organization. And you must ask what your home would say back to you: â&#x20AC;&#x153;When will Nancy pay attention to me?â&#x20AC;? (Ours would say: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you spend more time with me?â&#x20AC;?) Done mindfully, this exercise was actually fun and enlightening. Once itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done, Gillingham-Ryan sends you on a gradual eight-week journeyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which he promises will be good for the spiritâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to get your home (a) cleaned up, (b) repaired and (c) meeting your needs. Be ready: This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all about hanging pictures and buying flowers (although thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s included, too, even for you dudes). Each week includes a â&#x20AC;&#x153;deep treatment,â&#x20AC;? cleaning and de-cluttering. You start with a complete list of repairs and must get rid of at least one item. You get to focus on one room and take it slowly. By the eighth week, you will have purged all your clutter and be throwing a party. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked the chunk theory; you know, do a chunk at a time. Maybe a whole shelf is too much commitment; may-

be just do a corner of it. Then another and another. You can even take a whole year if eight weeks is too daunting and focus on one room of your home at a time. When one is completely finished, move to the next (while keeping the first one organized; this is key and difficult). If you need longer than eight weeks, just read â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Year to An Organized Lifeâ&#x20AC;? by Regina Leeds (Da Capo Press, 2008, $16.95). The best part of the book is its focus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zen organizingâ&#x20AC;? (talking my language there). Leeds focuses on â&#x20AC;&#x153;the creation of a calm, peace-filled and joyous environmentâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;rooms that feel restful and happy, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just about lining items up at right angles. Zen organizing is also about carving out time to enjoy getting your life in orderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found that I truly enjoy the times when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in that kind of domestic â&#x20AC;&#x153;flowâ&#x20AC;? (a neuroscience word for being mindful). I just need to schedule more time for it: every month, perhaps? For now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m determined to figure out how to use both books at once. Maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just go fret about it a little. Namaste.

7EEKBY#ALM7EEK

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by Bret Kenyon

November 16 - 22, 2011

no insulation in the attic, and I would have to squeeze myself (and loads of fiberglass) through a square-foot hole during the hottest months of the summer. This was before I knew that the front wall of the house was so rotten, the wood now had the consistency of toothpaste. This was before I knew that if your dog runs into the backporch support pillar hard enough, it dislocates. There were uninsulated pipes, a junkyard in the crawl space, poison ivy all through the back yard and parts of the stairwell that broke loose like a scene from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Wonderful Life.â&#x20AC;? We even found a grill, a full sandbox and a complete load of bricks buried in the backyard. Of course, there was no way of knowing about some of these things pre-purchase. And maybe thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing. Maybe a house, like a marriage or having a child, is supposed to look easier than it is. If we knew all the work ahead of us, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d all be single, childless and

ROBERT BENNER

H

ome owners are idiots. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say that in a negative sense, but buying a house takes an ignorance and an outlook that can only be defined by the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;idiot.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m allowed to say this because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m one of these idiots. For the past 18 months, I have belonged to that exclusive club known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;home owners,â&#x20AC;? and let me tell you, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a ride. The moment you sign the papers and the keys become yours, the education begins. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so much the information youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re learning about the house or equity or basic maintenance; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an education in how much you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. When I first looked at my house-to-be, I saw plenty of projects. This will need fixing, that will need replacing, those will need to be painted. But these were all things I knew how to do. I was confident, as most men foolishly are, in my ability as a handyman to conquer all problems. 14 This was before I learned that there was

Discovering poison ivy in the backyard is one of the many homeownership joys.

living in apartment complexes. If we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have those moments of idiotic optimism, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d

miss out on some of the most difficult, but the most rewarding, aspects of life. If I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been an idiot, I might not have experienced the pain of hitting a poison-ivy patch with a weed eater, but I also wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the satisfaction of building a privacy fence for the first time. I might not have an air conditioner that makes noises like a slamming door, but I also wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to look at the front wall of the house and say: â&#x20AC;&#x153;See that? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mine. I made that.â&#x20AC;? If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been smarter then, I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know half the things I know now. I may work every weekend the rest of my life (without pay), and I may see every other dollar going to Loweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Home Depot, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than worth it. I may be an idiot, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a happy idiot, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d do it again in a heartbeat. I would probably ask for an insulated attic as part of the deal, though. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an idiot, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not stupid.


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(OWTO$E CLUTTER

GRETCHEN COOK

by Gretchen Cook

Open shelving with lots of different-sized pieces looks calm, organized and stylish with color control.

of its major principles to create a harmonious environment. These tips will help you to create a positive energy flow in your home. â&#x20AC;˘ The foyer is the first focus area. Because the foyer welcomes visitors into your home, ensure that the area has positive energy. Make the front door accessible. If there is clutter in the way, get rid of it. Install lighting so that visitors can see clearly if the area isn't well lit. Paint your foyer a soft yellow or peach to invite sunny dispositions. â&#x20AC;˘ Use colors appropriate to a roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s function. Use a soothing blue in your bedroom, and save the energetic, bright yellow for the kitchen. â&#x20AC;˘ Bring vital things into your environment such as light, water, green plants and flowers. Get rid of anything dead such as dried flowers and taxidermy. â&#x20AC;˘ Add motion to outdoor spaces with wind chimes, flags, gazing balls and even a pond with a waterfall or fish. â&#x20AC;˘ Surround yourself with items that make you feel good. If an item evokes bad memories, toss it or give it away. Imagine ridding yourself of the bad experience along with the item. â&#x20AC;˘ A comfortable living room invites warmth and encourages friendships. Arrange furni-

Use living plants and flowers in your home to enhance your life energy.

ture so that everyone faces each other to encourage conversation. Do not block doorways with large pieces of furniture. This allows everyone to

move around from space to space without feeling confined. â&#x20AC;˘ The kitchen provides nourishment for our bodies and souls. Organize kitchens so that they are clean and efficient. Check your appliances to make sure they are operating correctly. If not, replace or repair them to eliminate frustration. Omitting clutter helps prevent accidents. In addition, adequate lighting will ensure that you are operating and cooking safely. â&#x20AC;˘ The bedroom can promote peace and happiness. Make it comfortable because this is where you spend a third of your life. Position your bed away from the door so that noises outside of your door will not disturb you. Omit needless clutter and dust collectors. A dimmer switch to control bedroom lighting is a great addition. â&#x20AC;˘ Finally, keep bathrooms clean and neat. Leaky shower heads or faucets create waste so repair these items immediately. Organize medicine cabinets and storage areas neatly. Throw away any bathroom products that are no longer used. For more Feng Shui tips, pick up â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clearing the Clutter for Good Feng Shui â&#x20AC;&#x153;by Mary Lambert. (Sterling Publishing, 2001, $9.98). The book is filled with tips and beautiful motivational photos.

jacksonfreepress.com

F

eng (wind) Shui (water) is an ancient Chinese art that promotes peace and balance in your personal space by strategically placing items and omitting clutter. The Chinese believe that luck, when created, can enhance wealth and happiness in your life. Châ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i, one of the most important aspects of Feng Shui, is the energy force in Feng Shui and is in constant flow. Practitioners eliminate obstructions to flow, such as clutter or blocked doors and windows, and ensure easy movement in and between living spaces. You can also alter the flow of energy to maximize good fortune. The Chinese believe the movement of Châ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i creates blessings in our lives. The goal of Feng Shui is to promote movement throughout everything. Organization, adequate lighting and eliminating clutter are the basic fundamentals of Feng Shui. Feng Shui assigns characteristics elements (fire, earth, metal, water and wood) and compass directions, often tied to color. Fire, for example, is passion and energy. Its direction is south, and its colors range from strong yellow to red. Although Feng Shui is a complex practice with many schools, you can easily take advantage

0

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by Adriane Louie and Ronni Mott FILE PHOTO

I

f home is where the heart is, some people probably have heart disease. Just like we sometimes show our worst selves to the people we love the most, we often let our homes become reflections of the worst parts of ourselves. Messy. Disorganized. Even disheartening. Underlying many design problems is a different problem: chronic disorganization. Spending Saturday reorganizing a house is not nearly as fun as time spent pondering color schemes and redecorating. Everyone loves a fresh new look. Here are some design tips that are really basic organization tips in disguise. Whenever possible, use color to direct the eye while keeping the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bonesâ&#x20AC;? of your home static. You may not want your home to have a basically (boring) neutral color scheme, and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

have to. Instead, pick your base colorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;neutral or notâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and then use other colors as accents. These spots of contrast move the eye around the room and add visual order. Go for simple abundance. This is the contrast of simple with many. Think of an inexpensive glass cylinder filled with a lot of single, simple objects. Blue marbles. Gold Christmas ornaments. This juxtaposition of a simple container and an abundance of contents is usually attractive. Your main living space will look more pleasing with a single color couch covered in many colorful pillows than a space filled with four pieces of upholstered furniture competing for attention. Use color for organization whenever possible: blue towels for guest bathroom and brown towels for the master bathroom. By designating colors for areas of your home, the spaces look more harmonious and you know where things go. Create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;stash pointâ&#x20AC;? in every room. This is a place where current projects or work can be neatly stowed out of sight but retrieved quickly when work resumes. Neat square baskets work well. Pay your bills on the kitchen table, and then stash the file, checkbook, stamps and statements in the basket at mealtime. This sort of â&#x20AC;&#x153;stash pointâ&#x20AC;? is not to be mistaken for permanent storage, however. Avoid recreational shopping. When you get a case of the living-space blues, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shop to assuage it. Instead, go through your home and look for things that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t belong there. Return items you have borrowed from friends and family. Gather up unused items for Goodwill donations. This will free up some space. Only then should you begin shopping. Shop really local. When actually shopping for your home dĂŠcor, first start in your own home. Things you like but have stashed in closets, in the attic and in the back of the cabinet are the best bargains. Those things made you happy when you acquired them. See if they still do. If not, think of Salvation Army. As for acquiring new items, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to ask around. Your blessing may be someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burden.

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15


CASEY PURVIS

by Casey Purvis

D

ecorating a home can be intimidating. Couple the intimidation factor with budgets so tight that Abraham Lincoln is squealing for mercy in our wallets, and the situation could turn into a crisis in which the would-be decorator is lying in the middle of the living-room floor, staring at the ceiling in defeat. The purpose of this article is to restore hope to the color- and checkbook-challenged. Decorating is a process. You don’t have to do everything at once. Do what you can, when you can. Hammer out a realistic budget for yourself and be patient. I’m not a professional decorator. I simply enjoy an appealing environment. I have a lot to do on limited funds, and I have learned through trial, error and the sheer joy of experimentation. Here are some simple and inexpensive ways to decorate while maintaining your sanity. • Clean the clutter and get organized first. Organization is the necessary first step to creating a beckoning environment. Don’t know how to organize? I recommend reading “Eliminate Chaos: The 10-Step Process to Organize Your Home & Life” (Sasquatch Books, 2006, $19.95) by Laura Leist. • Identify your personal style. What colors make you

u

feel good? What type of furniture do you gravitate to? Figure this out and go with it. Paint is the cheapest way to repurpose an outdated piece of furniture. Take it a step further and put new knobs and drawer pulls on your repainted masterpiece. Questions? Most paint stores have experts who can walk you through the process. I have loved the results of my furniture painting experiments. If in the end you hate the color, you can easily repaint. Love vintage items, but hate the price tag? Think consignment! Consignment stores often carry a little or a lot of everything and are a blast to browse. It’s like having visitation privileges for every era of the 20th century. I have bought lamps, furniture and ceramics at these stores. I’ll bet there’s at least one in your neighborhood. Go online to find a store in your area. Repaint boring walls. If you are confused over color schemes, many paint stores offer color palettes that flow well together. Get a sample size of several paints and try out the colors in a particular area before making a commitment. The experts at the paint stores can point out different decorative painting techniques once you’ve gotten comfortable with the basics. Keep an open mind on road trips. I’ve bought adorable kitchen kitsch at a New Orleans French Market booth for $12. Flea markets can be amazing idea banks, too. I’ve seen old doors repurposed into tables for sale at a local flea market. What a great way to recycle! Decorating, like life, should be a journey. Make it fun. Make it about you. Godspeed, and happy (bargain) hunting!

Recommended Consignment Stores (by no means exhaustive):

Repeat Street – 626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland 601-605-9393 repeatstreet.net The Orange Peel – 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-3649977 From Our House to Yours – 830 Wilson Drive, Suite E, Ridgeland, 601-956-1818 From Me to You – 6080 Old Brandon Road, Suite B, Brandon, 601-939-2326 Forget Me Nots – 204 E. Government St., Brandon, 601-824-9766 Old House Depot – 639 Monroe St., 601-592-6200 Also try thriftstores N.U.T.S (114 Millsaps Ave., 601-355-7458), Salvation Army (110 Presto Lane, 601982-4881), as well as garage sales.

SHERRY-LOIS WALLACE

by Sherry-Lois Wallace

November 16 - 22, 2011

A candle-lit bath can help you relax and unwind from a stress-filled day.

16

B

etween traveling for work, phone calls, emails and a personal life, my day usually ends with me sitting in bed with a laptop attempting to catch up. The most relaxing thing to me is going to the spa and having a massage and

pedicure. My sister is an esthetician, so her specialty is spa services such as facials, manicures and pedicures. I don’t bother her to perform any of her services on me, and my busy schedule sometimes doesn’t allow the time to let someone else pamper

me. So I have created a spa atmosphere in my home. It is possible to transform your bathroom into an oasis of peace and tranquility. Some people feel that between work, family obligations, after-school projects and life in general, there is no way to squeeze in a spa moment at home, especially if you have children or spouses eagerly waiting for you outside the door every time you go into the bathroom. It starts with blocking at least 30 minutes or an hour in your week to have a “spa day.” After you’ve selected your spa day, decorate your bathroom with scented candles that will help make a relaxing setting. I usually turn the lights off in the bathroom, close the door and soak in the tub by candlelight. Lavender, jasmine or clean linen are soothing scents, as well as citrusscented candles such as pink grapefruit. Pick scented shower gels that will blend well with your scented candles. If you don’t have a radio in your bath-

room, legally download some soft music to your phone and listen to relaxing music while you soak. If you don’t have a garden tub with jets, invest in a jetted bath mat that goes in the bottom of your tub and provides massaging bubbles. Also, golfball-sized bath balls produce a nice fizz in your bathwater and release a light scent. Purchase a manicure/pedicure set and pumice stones to do a mani-pedi while you’re in the tub. You can buff your feet and heels while they are softened from soaking in the water. If you don’t have time to dedicate 30 to 60 minutes to yourself once a week, then use your bath time as a mini-spa time. Even in 10 minutes, you can bathe by candlelight. A flickering candle flame and calming aroma will relax you whether you’re hopping in the shower to start your day, or unwinding after you come home. During that small window of time, you can enjoy the hot water hitting your body, the smell of your candle and a mind free from clutter and stress.


by Jessica Mizell

by Ronni Mott

Done mindfully, washing dishes can satisfy. Pay close attention to the task at hand without thinking about something else.

It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be drudgery or filled with anxiety. Done mindfully, even washing dishes can be a satisfying, even joyful experience.

KELLY BRYANT SMITH

10 Easy Green Cleaning Tips

Line-drying your clothes saves energy

M

aybe I am a little too sensitive. Or maybe I am just weird. But the smell of bleach and other strong cleaning agents makes me want to run far, far away. Each year, we discover more and more about how synthetic chemicals can harm our bodies. In a hospital, harsh cleaning agents are necessary to prevent the spread of infection, but those chemicals do not have a place in my home. I make it a priority to pick green cleaning supplies in addition to a

1. When you see a sale or a coupon, stock up on your favorite green cleaning brands. 2. Purchase refill-sized bottles. You will save money and help the environment if you can find larger bottles to refill your smaller cleaning solution containers. 3. Reduce waste by using fewer cleaners. An all-purpose cleaning spray can get you pretty far, rather than purchasing a cleaner for each surface type. 4. If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford organic cleaners, pick an unscented version of a standard cleaning product, and it will be much more eco-friendly than its bright, smelly counterpart. 5. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave the water running when you are washing dishes or doing other cleaning tasks.

6. Choose to use cold water to wash your laundry, and as much as possible, line dry your clothes rather than turning on the energy-hog dryer. 7. When it is practical, use wash cloths rather than paper towels for your cleaning tasks to reduce paper waste. 8. Use less soap. Gradually reduce the amount you use of any cleaning produce by diluting it or just using less. In many cases, we use much more than we need. 9. In general, avoid antibacterial cleaning products. Research has shown that these products can actually contribute to the growth of resistant bacterial strains. 10. Take off your shoes as soon as you enter your home. You can save a lot of time and energy by simply removing your shoes and leaving dirt and germs by the door, rather than tracking public-restroom-at-the-grocery-store cooties around your kitchen floor. For more cleaning tips, read â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Naturally Clean Home: 150 Super-Easy Herbal Formulas for Green Cleaningâ&#x20AC;? by Karyn Siegel-Maier (Storey Publishing, LLC, 2008, $10.95); â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better Basics for the Home: Simple Solutions for Less Toxic Livingâ&#x20AC;? by Annie Berthold-Bond (Clarkson Potter, 1999, $18.95); â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green Housekeepingâ&#x20AC;? by Ellen Sandbeck (Scribner, 2008, $17).

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Cleaning baseboards are not usually a part of regular cleaning routines, so expect to pay more.

by Kelly Bryant Smith few other eco-friendly necessities. Some crafty people make their own green-cleaning supplies with not-so-fancy, not-so-expensive ingredients such as vinegar, baking soda and lemon juice. I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to find the time, energy or inclination for such DIY cleaning shenanigans. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough if I scrub the tub every now and again. But even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a reluctant house cleaner like me, here are a few easy tips to making your cleaning a little greener.

 7KHUHODWLRQVKLSEHWZHHQ\RXDQG\RXU KRXVHNHHSHULVDVSHFLDORQH:KHWKHU\RXXVH DORFDOFOHDQLQJFRPSDQ\RUKDYHRQHUHJXODU KRXVHNHHSHU\RXPXVWSXWDFHUWDLQDPRXQW RIWUXVWLQWRWKLVSHUVRQ<RXWUXVWWKHPZLWK \RXUPRVWSULYDWHSRVVHVVLRQVWRGXVWWKHWRS VKHOYHVRIWKHERRNFDVHDQGJHWEHKLQGWKH FRXFKVWUDLJKWHQXS\RXUSDSHUVDQGFOHDQ BILL HUTCHISON

washing it. The warm, soapy water surrounds your hands, and the clean scent fills your nostrils. Dishes clean, you wipe your kitchen counters and enjoy the gleam of your healthy, clean environment. Doing one thing at a time with full attention is the heart of mindful living. Meditation teachers often begin by having students just notice their breath. The next step is to notice that your breath is moving in when you inhale and out when you exhale. If that sounds easy, close your eyes now, and try it for just five minutes without thinking about or doing anything else. Were you able to only be with your breath for five minutes? Did you notice your mind flitting from thought to thought like a monkey jumping from branch to branch? Did you peek at your clock every 30 seconds, amazed at what an interminable about of time five minutes can be? Bringing mindfulness to your home environment is a lot like that. Cleaning, organizing and decorating can all be as simple and gratifying as doing one small thing at a time with full attention.

FILE PHOTO

I

n one of Zen Buddhismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous stories, a new monk approaches his teacher after a meal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Please teach me,â&#x20AC;? he asks the master. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have you eaten your food?â&#x20AC;? the master asks the novice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then wash your bowl,â&#x20AC;? Joshua says. In typically cryptic Zen style, Joshua teaches a profound lesson: Do one thing, and then do the next. All too often, we get caught up in what we think we should be doing (or anxious about the things we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do) instead of simply focusing on what there is to do right now. Not content to simply eat a meal, we chatter or work or watch TV. Then, barely having tasted our food, we mindlessly dump the dirty dishes in the sink, forgetting to put away the leftovers or clean the counters. Say hello to the beginning of your messy, cluttered, stressful house. Imagine instead that you have fully enjoyed your meal, noticing the varied textures and flavors, eating slowly enough to recognize when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re full. Satisfied, you take your dish to the sink and engage fully in the task of

17


GRETCHEN COOK

by LaShanda Phillips

A

s a new homeowner or someone looking for a new home project, painting and decorating can be fun but frustrating when trying to decide on the colors and schemes to use. Knowing the basics about colors and using the color wheel can help the process. There are three primary colors: red, yellow and blue. From the combinations of these three colors, the secondary colors, orange, green and purple, are made. The actual color achieved depends on the proportions and specific color used. Mixing secondary and primary colors or mixing the three primaries creates tertiary or intermediate colors. These colors are yellow-green, yellow-orange, red-purple, redorange, blue-purple and blue-green. Usually, home designers want a harmonious color scheme. Too much of the primary colors can be too intense and even

cause anxiety, aggression or give a perception of coldness. Using complementary or analogous color schemes can create a good balance of colors that are pleasing to the eye. Complementary colors oppose each other on the color wheel. Yellow and purple are complementary or opposite of each other. Analogous colors are next to each other on the color wheel. Blue, blue-violet and violet are next to each other, which means they have the same base color. Other groups that are helpful to know about are warm, cool and neutral colors. Warm colors are red, yellow and orange. Cool colors are blue, green and violet. Neutrals are black, white and brown. With these in mind, designers can make painting and décor decisions that won’t result in a chaotic, unbalanced mess. Whether it’s a dramatic or simple approach, a good understanding of how col-

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November 16 - 22, 2011

18

warm accent color still offers a balance that isn’t completely boring. You can still have creative color schemes with different shades and tints of colors that flow well. Source: About.com.

by LaShanda Phillips

love color. I don’t always wear a lot of it—I learned in New York City that black (and chocolate brown) makes you look skinnier, more chic and shows less dirt. But I love to surround myself with color, as anyone who has seen my lime green/orange/ pink/blue office can attest. And it keeps me awake. That’s why I have a love affair with Jonathan Adler (not that type; his partner Simon Doonan wouldn’t approve). And I love his eye for quirk. This past Christmas, Todd gave me two of Adler’s latest “Happy Chic” décor books: one about color and the other accessorizing (with lots of color, of course). His partner, Doonan, writes in the foreward of the “Colors” book: “Jonathan’s waking life has always been a nonstop tussle with swatches and chips, a veritable col-

Chocolate Lavender Teal

ors are made and what complements what can help make choices that won’t result in unhappiness and eventual money lost. Keep in mind that a pop of warm color in a cool palette or vice versa isn’t undoable. A cool or neutral palette with a bright,

Tomato Neutral Beige

or cage fight. He is always on the hunt for the next improbable color combo, the next mad magenta, the ultimate olive.” Magenta+olive? Yum. Adler’s a designer after my own heart. Adler’s “Colors” book can open your eyes to color combos you haven’t considered: like orange/ pink/red/olive or forest green/lime/turquoise or lemon yellow/royal blue/ lime. (He and both adore lime.) Or how about that wonderful combo of bronze/chocolate/beige. Or the heaven that is lavender/chocolate/teal. The point is to get creative—and that might mean all your color is in the accessories (great idea for renters) or that you’re painting every wall a different color (study Adler a bit before you try this). Let color make you happy. And keep you awake. Try these combos to get started:

Blue Lemon Lime

C

olors attract or give off certain energies. They have symbolism, can represent or follow a trend and even heal, according to chromotherapy. It is important to choose the right colors because colors are powerful and can help create the atmosphere you want to achieve. Below are some universal meanings of colors that can MJIPHOTOS

by Donna Ladd

Spots of color—from some painted walls to tomatoes lined up on the counter, or even a fire extinguisher—can take a room from dull to exciting in no time, even against a light canvas.

Blue, a cool color, can create a feeling of calm and tranquility.

help in determining what mood you want to set within your home. Warm Colors are active colors that are better for large areas. They make the room feel cozy and inviting. Red is stimulating and passionate. This color can be used to increase self-confidence. A deeper red should be used to removed emotional blocks. Orange is great for removing darkness. It is sociable and cheerful. Orange increases creativity and is mentally stimulating.

Yellow, another bright color that is great for removing darkness. It enhances concentration and is emotionally stimulating. Cool Colors are calming colors that can give a sense of peace. Green represents birth and newness. This relaxing color is inspiring and stimulating to conversation. Use this color to promote wellness and health. Blue is calming and soothing. The world’s most popular color increases spirituality and creates a feeling of trust and peace. Aqua is great when there is difficulty sleeping or dreaming. Light blue brings ease into the home. Violet, also represents spirituality, is known as a royal and dignified color. It is soothing and calming. Use light purple to enhance compassion. Neutrals can tone down or play up other colors. They can be cool or warm. Black symbolizes sophistication, power and modernity. Black can make a room appear smaller. White represents cleanliness and clarity. White, which symbolizes openness, can make a room appear more spacious. Brown is motherly, grounding and reliable. This color can create a feeling of warmth and honesty. Brown as well as taupe and beige can make other colors appear brighter and richer. More information: www.tigercolor.com.


With the Holiday Season approaching, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got enough on your plate. Let Grout Works get your tile ready for holiday crowd! 6T__:ebhgJbe^f GB74LTaWTf^ TUbhgbhe;B?<74L FC86<4?F

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19


by LaShanda Phillips

I

f you want to spark up your home or youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for the perfect housewarming gift, look to local businesses for bright and vibrant home accessories. Accenting neutral colors with a pop of red, yellow, turquiose or orange shifts your color scheme from boring to exciting without overdoing it. Bright colors are wonderful mood enhancers and can attract the right kind of energy to the home. Below are some of the colorful items found in your local shops. Indulge in the happiness of color. Happy Spoons, The Everday Gourmet, $7.50 each

Bird Planter Whisper Blue, The Everyday Gourmet, $33

Brushing Beauty, The Everyday Gourmet, $12 Lemon Juicer, Organizers, $13.99

52-ounce Red Baker, The Everyday Gourmet, $16.95

Jonathan Adler Bargello Zig Zag, Summerhouse, $190 Jonathan Adler Bargello Diamonds pillow, Summerhouse, $121

Jonathan Adler Selene Bud vase, Summerhouse, $68 Jonathan Adler Electra vase, Summerhouse, $150

Large Glass Bulb vase, Glo Design, $69 Medium Glass bulb vase, Glo Design, $39

November 16 - 22, 2011

Bronze ball, Glo Design, $19

20

Where2Shop:

Jonathan Adler Orange zigzag throw, Summerhouse, $410

The Everyday Gourmet (1625 E. County Line Road, Suite 500, 601-977-9258) Glo Design Studio (2951 Old Canton Road, 601-362-9755) NunoErin (533 Commerce St., 601-944-0023) Organizers (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 174, 601-981-1973) Summerhouse (1109 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite D, Ridgeland, 601-853-4445)

Extra Hands, Organizers, $10.99

Swamp Stools, NunoErin, price upon request

Garbage Can, Organizers, $13.99


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Don Potts

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Best Pizza 2009-2011 Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily

November 16 - 22, 2011

NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

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(in the former Fabricare Building, between Kat’s & Fenian’s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975


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EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR AN AMAZING THANKSGIVING

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PO O R

G O O D

JEFF SEABOLD

by Jeff Seabold

The improperly installed Batt Insulation has wrinkles that allow air infiltration and negate insulating properties. Cellulose Fiber Insulation, made from old newspaper and some chemicals added to keep bugs out and make it fire retardant, is a better insulation choice.

I

think about my retirement often and how great it has the potential of being. Then I panic thinking about whether weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have enough, about the best strategy for saving and about where our hardearned money will be the safest. We are running out of space in the backyard with all the mason jars full of nickels weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve buried. But wait: I shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be telling you this. I recently ran across an article that asked the question: Is it better to invest in energy upgrades or a 401K? This caught my attention. To summarize the article, as you might be able to guess, energy efficiencies make sense. Energy costs have increased on average 6.33 percent since 1974, while Social Security benefits have only increased on average 1.54 percent based on the consumer price index. On the other hand, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t counting on

Social Security. Instead, you are banking on a 10 percent return on investment with your 401K. Is this a safe strategy? I think over the long haul it is. You are savvy, and you have something that you know is increasing 6 percent a year or something that may increase 10 percent a year. Which is the safer bet? What if you could make your home more comfortable while making an energy investment? What if you could make this investment without having to change your lifestyle and without having to walk around in January in a snowsuit to conserve on your heating bill? Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all that make more sense? So what is the best approach for making an energy investment? The first rule of an energy retrofit is to work with licensed and respected professionals

that understand an energy-efficient retrofit. If you start this process off with the statement, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know a guy,â&#x20AC;? ask yourself: Is it the right guy? Be prepared and have lots of questions ready for them. Questions to keep in mind are what tests will be performed, what equipment will be used and are references available. The greenhomeguide.com has local professionals that can help. The second thing you will need is an energy audit to know what you are dealing with. This audit should include a test on your ductwork and a test to see where the air in your house is leaking to the outside. Auditors should also look at several years of your power bills to know what you have been spending. A licensed home energy rating system (HERS) professional can perform the tests. Once you complete an energy audit, you can use the next three steps to move forward with the most economical approach. The first step is to address the basic building fundamentals. How much insulation is installed in my house? How much do my ducts leak? How much do my walls, windows and doors leak? Is my house too humid? What kind of lighting do I have installed? Are my appliances efficient? What is my basic plug load? Addressing these areas first can save you as much as 20 percent on your utilities, according to energy-auditing professionals. The older your home, the higher the chances are that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough insulation. Even if you do, it may be installed incorrectly. Small defects in insulation amount to huge reductions in its efficiency. An error of 5 percent can mean a reduction of almost 50 percent in the insulationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value. Installing five compact fluorescent bulbs on the five most used lights in your house can save as much as $100 per year. Look for Energy Star appliances when you buy new ones. An Energy Star refrigerator saves $250 a year on average. The term â&#x20AC;&#x153;plug loadâ&#x20AC;? sounds complicated, and it can be, but the simple rule is

anything with a box that plugs into the wall will cost you about a $1 a month. (Think hair dryers, cell phone chargers and computer peripherals.) These can add up quickly. The next step is to look at the major systems in your home, such as heating and air conditioning equipment, and water heating. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do this step first because these items are expensive and you want them to be sized correctly for your house. If the air-conditioner repair person walks in and asks how big your house is and then tells you how big the new equipment needs to be without picking up a pencil, please escort them out the door. Look for a higher seasonal energy efficient ratio number. Thirteen SEER on air conditioners is the minimum standard. Fourteen and higher is much better. If you addressed the first step right, then your home will be tighter to the outside air. You need to make sure it gets fresh air on your terms. The average family of four wastes 12,000 gallons of hot water a year just waiting for hot water to arrive at the faucet. That amounts to about $270 a year. If you can shorten that time, you will save water and money. You can start by insulating your hot water pipers with a thermal resistant insulation, such as R-4. The final step is to look at renewable energy sources. This will include solar power, solar water heating and wind and water catchment. You save this step for last because this is the most expensive step. You want to first reduce your energy demand as much as possible, so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy more solar panels than you need. At the moment, if Tennessee Valley Authority provides your power, they will pay you a lot more money than Entergy for the excess power you may produce and shorten the pay-back period of the renewables. If you make it to through the third step, you may reduce your utility demand by 80 percent or more. While it can be expensive to go that far, if it is done right, it can guarantee you a nice dividend that pays off each month.

by Sherry-Lois Wallace

November 16 - 22, 2011

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A patio can be a place for relaxation and comfort.


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jacksonfreepress.com


Jesse Gallagher Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman PAUL MITCHELL SIGNATURE SALON NOW CARRYING PAUL MITCHELL AWAPUHI

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November 16 - 22, 2011

775 Lake Harbour Drive #H in Ridgeland 601.856.4330 | fax: 601.856.4505

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8 DAYS p 30 | MUSIC p 32 | SPORTS p 36 COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

Seven Furies, 2010, by Rod Moorhead; pit-fired clay; 30-by-12-by-12 inches each; overall width 100 inches.

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“They don’t need arms,” Moorhead said. And then Sirmans said nothing for a long time, but looked at the statues. It was an awkward silence for Moorhead. “I have a hard time talking about my art in way that is not inarticulate,” Moorhead said. “I didn’t know what he’d pick.” Sirmans selected two entries from Moorhead’s studio. One is a collection of seven small figures that Moorhead calls “Furies.” The other entry is a single, larger figure he calls “Restoration.” It is electric blue, wingless and reminiscent of classic armless statues like “Nike.” Moorhead nicknamed this sculpture “Neo Nike.” Moorhead, 47, grew up in the Oxford area and got dual bachelor’s degrees in math and English from the University of Mississippi. He is one of 13 working artists Sirmans chose for the Mississippi Invitational exhibit. The exhibit opened in October and continues through Feb. 5. The other artists are: Suzi Altman of Brandon; Duncan Baird of Cleveland; Critz Campbell of West Point; Causey Cato of Yazoo City and Starkville; Marcus C. Frazier of Natchez; Tammy McGrew of Port Gibson; Susa Nawrocki of Columbus; the pair H. C. Porter and Gretchen Haien of Vicksburg and Jackson; David Jason Pressgrove of Jackson; Steve Shepard of Gautier; and Evert Witte of Bay St. Louis. The 13 artists chosen for the Mississippi

Invitational are eligible to apply for The Jane Crater Hiatt Artist Fellowship in the year their work is featured. Jane and Wood Hiatt created the fellowship in 2005 in response to the need to nurture and invigorate the arts. One of the exhibiting artists gets a grant of up to $15,000 and may use it for study with an individual artist or in a studio, workshop or residency setting; to purchase supplies and equipment; to conduct research; and to

travel. The artist is then required to donate one original work of art to the museum from at least five works created during the twoyear period. The exhibit is in the Donna and Jim Barksdale Galleries for Changing Exhibitions in the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601-960-1515). Admission is $5 adults, $4 seniors and $3 students. For information, visit msmuseumart.org. COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

ranklin Sirmans, the curator of contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, was out of his element a few months ago in the woods outside Oxford. He had visited about 50 different art studios based on more than 200 photographic applications. His mission was to find a dozen of the state’s best contemporary artists for the Mississippi Invitational exhibit at Mississippi Museum of Art. He was near the end of his visit, but finding sculptor Rod Moorhead was not going to be easy. “GPS won’t quite get you here,” Moorhead said from his home outside Oxford. The sculptor met Moorhead in town, and the curator and his entourage followed Moorhead back to the reclusive studio. Moorhead’s wife of seven years, Younok Chong, fixed the visitors a Korean dish of vegetables and rice with a sesame sauce and served it with wine. Sirmans told everyone at the table it was the highlight of his day and how happy he was not to be eating junk food again. “He’s a fairly big-deal guy,” Moorhead said. He showed the esteemed curator his work and watched him look at it. Long pauses and blank looks left Moorhead not sure what Sirmans thought of his work. The curator from California looked at the classical human shapes that filled the studio. “Why don’t they have arms?” Sirmans asked him.

by Valerie Wells

jacksonfreepress.com

Invitational Delights

CritzCampbell, one of the 13 artists in the exhibit, created “Mother is a Fish.”

29


BEST BETS

November 16-23, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 11/16

JAN BENGTEN/FLICKR

Sister Paulinus Oakes speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Mary Margaret May signs copies of her CD “Upon a Winter Night” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.) $14.95 CD; call 601-366-7619. … The Bababrew Beer Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.) in the auditorium. $35; call 601-366-5757. … See the opera film “Don Giovanni: Encore” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive). $20, $18 seniors, $14 children; call 601-936-5856. … The Supa Kidz host Wasted Wednesday at Dreamz JXN. … Will and Linda’s open jam is at Pelican Cove. … Meagan May performs at Irish Frog. … Welch/McCann performs at Fenian’s.

FRIDAY 11/18

The Handworks Holiday Market is from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.); continues Nov. 19 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $5, children under 12 free; call 205-991-9840. … Food Network’s Patrick and Gina Neely sign copies of “The Neelys Celebration Cookbook” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.) $28.95 book; call 601-366-7619. … The Belhaven Street Arts Festival is from 5-9 p.m. between Belhaven University (1400 Peachtree St.) and North State Street. Free admission; call 601-813-4084. … Chefs and the City is at 6 p.m. at Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.), and includes gourmet dishes and music by Jimmy Keys. Proceeds benefit the Simon Sharp Eagle Fund. $150 (limit of 200 tickets); call 601-948-3429, ext. 314. … Ace Up Productions hosts The Kick Off at Dreamz JXN. … Cowboy Mouth and Dash Rip Rock play at Club Magoo’s at 7:30 p.m. $15; call 800-745-3000. … Will Downing and Karen Brown perform at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $30-$50; call 800-745-3000. … Grady Champion performs tonight and tomorrow at 9 p.m. at Underground 119. … DJ Phil spins hits at the Classy Classic Affair at 10 p.m. at Union Station (300 W. Capitol St.) in the ballroom. $10 in advance, $50 VIP; visit classy classicaffair.eventbrite.com.

SATURDAY 11/19

The 12K’s for the Holidays race benefiting the Good Samaritan Center starts at 7:30 a.m. in Fondren. $30 in advance, $35 day of race, free fun run; call 601-355-6276. … Simon’s Walk is at 9 a.m. at Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.), and benefits Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital and the Andrew Jackson Council of Boy Scouts. Donations welcome; call 601-421-0001. … The Capital City Classic is at 11 a.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). $20 in advance, $25 game day, free for children 5 and under; call 601-354-6021 or 800-745-3000. … The Metropolitan Opera’s simulcast of “Satyagraha” is at 11:55 a.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $22, $20 seniors, $15 children; call 601-936-5856. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents “Pops I: Another Opening, Another The 12K’s for the Holidays charity race for the Good Samaritan Center is Nov. 19 at 7:30 a.m. in Fondren.

November 16 - 22, 2011

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The Midtown Arts District (near Millsaps Ave. and Wilson St.) hosts the Artist Studio Holiday Open House from 4-10 p.m. Johnny Bertram, Travis Pinkston and Jamie Weems perform. After-party at CS’s Restaurant (1359 N. West St.). Visit midtownjackson.com. … Fondren Unwrapped is from 5-8 p.m. Free; call 601-981-9606. … Jazz, Art and Friends is at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). $7, $5 members; call 601-960-1515. … Chic Bang Theory performs at Centric Thursday at Dreamz JXN. … The Brew U Beer School is at 6:30 p.m. at Table 100. $35; call 601-420-4202. … “Disney on Ice: Mickey and Minnie’s Magical Journey” is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Coliseum. $15-$45; call 800-745-3000.

SUNDAY 11/20

Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) includes the films “Tosca” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “El Bully” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org. … The Jackson Irish Dancers’ Mostly Monthly Ceili is at 2 p.m. at Fenian’s. Free; call 601-592-9914. … The Blind Boys of Alabama perform at 6 p.m. at MSU Riley Center (2200 Fifth St., Meridian). $42, $36; call 601-696-2200.

MONDAY 11/21

The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $7. … Music students perform at Best of Belhaven I at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494.

TUESDAY 11/22

Bring your kids to Turkey Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). $4-$6, children under 3 and members free; call 601354-7303. … Jesse Robinson and Friends perform at 6 p.m. at Underground 119. … Time Out has open-mic night.

WEDNESDAY 11/23

The Big Ass Turkey Bash is at 8 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Performers include the Bailey Brothers, the Kudzu Kings, Buddy and the Squids, and Electric Hamhock. $15 in advance; call 601-291-7121. … E Company plays at Martin’s. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Robert Croft (center) portrays Gandhi in a simulcast of the opera “Satyagraha” Nov. 19 at 11:55 a.m. at Tinseltown. KEN HOWARD/METROPOLITAN OPERA

THURSDAY 11/17

Show” at 7:30 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $15 and up; call 601-960-1565. … The Revelations featuring Tre Williams and Jackie Bell perform at 8 p.m. at Flood’s Bar and Grill. $15 in advance, $30 VIP; call 601-832-7663. … Happy Talk Band and The Passing Parade perform at Ole Tavern. … Nero Denaro and Upscale Nightlife host the Post Game Show at Dreamz JXN. Free until 10:30 p.m.


jfpevents Radio JFP on WLEZ, Tursdays, noon, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. This week’s guest is Lauren Fairburn with Simon’s Walk. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 17; visit jfpradio.com. Artist Studio Holiday Open House Nov. 17, 4 p.m., at Midtown Arts District (near Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy Christmas shopping, studio tours, food and music by Johnny Bertram, Travis Pinkston and Jamie Weems. Free; visit midtownjackson.com. Fondren Unwrapped Nov. 17, 5-8 p.m.. Enjoy an evening of holiday shopping, music and cuisine. The Market in Fondren is at Duling Ave. and Old Canton Road. Free; call 601-981-9606.

HOLIDAY Greater Jackson Arts Council Christmas Tree Festival Nov. 14-Dec. 31, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Artists, nonprofits and individuals may decorate up to two pre-lit Christmas trees by Nov. 27, and the trees are on display through Dec. 31. Call 601-960-1557. Find Fonzy the Reindeer Nov. 18-Dec. 24, in Fondren. Look for Fonzy, a life-sized reindeer statue, at local businesses to become eligible to win a $500 gift certificate. Free; call 601-981-9606. Handworks Holiday Market Nov. 18-19, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Shop for gifts and gourmet food Nov. 18 from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Nov. 19 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $5, children under 12 free; call 205-991-9840.

COMMUNITY MIRA Advocacy Meeting Nov. 16, noon, at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (612 N. State St.). Lunch included. RSVP. Free; call 601-968-5182.

Magnolia Speech School Annual Drawdown Nov. 17, 7 p.m., at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). Limit of 250 tickets. $125 (individuals and couples); call 601-922-5530. Capital City Classic Nov. 19, 11 a.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N State St.). Jackson State University takes on Alcorn State University in the football game. Students get a $5 discount, and JSU and Alcorn students get in free with ID. $20 in advance, $25 game day, free for children 5 and under; call 601-354-6021 or 800-745-3000. Spiritual Pilgrimage to the Mississippi Delta Nov. 22, 7:30 a.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). The caravan leaves at 8 a.m. for stops at historic Civil Rights sites. Participants cover their own food, admission and transportation costs. Call 601-353-4455 or 601-957-2969.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Don Giovanni: Encore” Nov. 16, 6:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera presents Mozart’s classic opera. $20, $18 seniors, $14 children. • “Satyagraha” Nov. 19, 11:55 a.m. The Metropolitan Opera presents Philip Glass’ piece about Gandhi. $22, $20 seniors, $15 children. “Guys and Dolls” through Nov. 20, at Black Rose Community Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Shows are Nov. 17-19 at 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 20 at 2 p.m. RSVP. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-825-1293. “Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You” and “The Actor’s Nightmare,” at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215. Shows are Nov. 18-19 at 8 p.m., and Nov. 20 at 5 p.m. For mature audiences. RSVP recommended. $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1372.

“History Is Lunch” Nov. 16, noon, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Sister Paulinus Oakes talks about her book, “The Sisters of Mercy in Mississippi During the Civil War and Yellow Fever.” Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998.

Fall Dance Concert, at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center (1500 Peachtree St.). The Belhaven University Dance Ensemble performs Nov. 11-12 and Nov. 17-19 at 7:30 p.m. Bring a canned good donation. $10, $5 seniors and students; call 601-965-1400.

Bababrew Beer Dinner Nov. 16, 6:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.), in the auditorium. Enjoy dishes from Babalu paired with beers from Tallgrass Brewing. $35; call 601-366-5757.

“Disney on Ice: Mickey and Minnie’s Magical Journey” Nov. 17-20, at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). $15-$45; call 601-353-0603 or 800-745-3000.

circa.’s First Anniversary Celebration Nov. 17, 5 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Enjoy music, refreshments and giveaways. Visit circaliving.com to print free tickets for the drawings. Free; call 601-362-8484.

Tweet&Meet: Nov. 19, 8:45 a.m., at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). Enjoy a private viewing of “Twilight: Breaking Dawn.” $21.49; call 601-212-7295.

Brew U Beer School Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Sample beers from Tallgrass Brewing Company. Fish and chips included. $35; call 601-420-4202.

Art House Cinema Downtown Nov. 20, 2 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include “Tosca” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “El Bully” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org.

BE THE CHANGE Events at Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.). • Chefs and the City Nov. 18, 6 p.m. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, a five-course dinner with wine pairings, and live and silent auctions. Proceeds benefit the Simon Sharp Eagle Fund. Limit of 200 tickets. $150; call 601-948-3429, ext. 314. • Simon’s Walk Nov. 19, 9 a.m. The 5K run and walk is in memory of Simon Sharp, the son of Fairview Inn owner Peter Sharp. Proceeds benefit Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital and the Andrew Jackson Council of Boy Scouts. Donate $25 or more to receive a T-shirt. Call 601-421-0001. 12K’s for the Holidays Nov. 19, 7:30 a.m., in Fondren. On-site registration is at 6 a.m. The race includes a 12K run, a 5K run/walk and a one-mile kids’ fun run. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. $30 in advance, $35 day of race, free fun run; call 601-355-6276. Networking Social, Thursdays, 7 p.m., at Locker Room Lounge (205 W. Capitol St.). Professionals and entrepreneurs exchange leads, build rapport and connect. Proceeds benefit the second annual Pretty Christmas Toy Drive. $10; call 601-345-0407.

MUSIC “Upon a Winter Night” CD Signing Nov. 16, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Mary Margaret May signs copies. $14.95 CD; call 601-366-7619. Jazz, Art and Friends Nov. 17, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the Art Garden. $7, $5 members; call 601-960-1515. Imaginary Museum Music Series Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Millsaps associate professor of music Lynn Raley performs Brahms’ “Sonata No. 3. Op. 5.” Free; call 601-974-1089. Will Downing Nov. 11, 8 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The R&B and jazz singer performs. After 7 and Karen Brown also perform. $30-$50; call 800-745-3000. Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Free; call 601-974-6494. • “The Art of the Spiritual: Moses Hogan Remembered (1957-2003)” Nov. 19-20, 7:30 p.m. Enjoy music by the late composer. • Best of Belhaven I Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m. Music Department students perform. “Pops I: Another Opening, Another Show” Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs with Sherri Seiden and Daniel Narducci. $15 and up; call 601-960-1565. The Revelations Featuring Tre Williams Nov. 19, 8 p.m., at Floods Bar and Grill (2460 Bailey Ave.). Jackie Bell also performs. $15 in advance, $30 VIP; call 601-832-7663.

CREATIVE CLASSES Shut Up! Classes, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road). JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd teaches the Shut Up and Publish! Workshop from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 10 ($50) and the six-week

Shut Up and Write! Series every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Jan. 7-March 10 ($150, $75 deposit required). Limit of 11 per class. Discounts for combined classes. Gift certificates available. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 16; email class@ jacksonfreepress.com; find Shut Up and Write on Facebook and Twitter (@shutupandwrite). Stocking Design Studio Nov. 17, 10 a.m., at Easely Amused, Ridgeland (Trace Harbor Village, 7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Learn to make Christmas stockings. A seamstress will stitch them, and the stockings will be returned by Dec. 7. Supply list given after registration. $24 per stocking; call 769-251-5574.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Votivo Trunk Show Nov. 16, 11 a.m., at B. Liles Studio (215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland). Lunch and door prizes included. Free; call 601-607-7741. November Art Show Nov. 17, 5 p.m., at Fondren Art Gallery (601 Duling Ave.). Exhibitors include Pat Marbury and Thomas Wilson. Refreshments included. Free; call 601-981-9222. Belhaven Street Arts Festival Nov. 18, 5 p.m., between Belhaven University and North State Street. Buy local art, accessories, clothing and handmade gift items. Free refreshments. Free admission; call 601-813-4084. Studio Open House Nov. 19, 10 a.m., at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road). Block prints, screen prints, nativity sets, Christmas ornaments and ceramic birds are for sale. Enjoy free refreshments and gift wrapping. Free; call 601-366-1844. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

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Come On, Get Happy by Valerie Wells COURTESY HAPPY TALK BAND

The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music is all over the place, just like the traveling band, but The Happy Talk Band is at the Ole Tavern on George Street in Jackson Nov. 19. Members are Luke Spurr Allen, Alex McMurray, Bailey Smith, Steve Calandra, Mike Andrepont, Casey McAllister and Helen Gillet. Formed in 2001, the band won two Big Easy Awards from Gambit, a New Orleans alternative weekly publication, for best roots rock in 2007 and 2008. In a self-deprecating quip on the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, the band says the memThe Happy Talk Band plays Nov. 19 at Ole Tavern Grocery. bers didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let their awards go to their heads, â&#x20AC;&#x153;mostly because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not entirely sure what â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roots rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is.â&#x20AC;? ew Orleans-based The Happy Talk Band sings If you want to investigate this to get the root of about all sorts of things, but mostly they sing their overall style, listen to the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Happy happy love songs. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s style shifts from Talk has released three full-length recordings: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Total folk to country to rock to punk. The lyrics Death Benefitâ&#x20AC;? (2004), â&#x20AC;&#x153;There Thereâ&#x20AC;? (2007) and cover space monkeys, bank robbers, aliens, Romanian â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starve A Feverâ&#x20AC;? (2010). junkies, anesthesiologists, murderers, veterans of war, The Happy Talk Band performs Nov. 19 at alcoholic bike riders, scary giants, suicides, muggers, Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St., 601strippers and Jesus. You could say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stuff that makes 960-2700). To find out more about the band, visit them happy. happytalkband.com.

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No One is to Blame

by Garrad Lee

November 16 - 22, 2011

32

the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s break up. Like other fans, I had ally leave you asking too many more, either. always wondered what exactly could have As I think the film shows, A Tribe Called forced the perfect hip-hop group to break Quest shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be reduced to an argument up. I wanted to know over whom to blame for a whose side, Tip or Phife, less-than-amicable break I needed to spend the rest up. Instead, a group this of my life defending. important should be reThe film does not ofmembered for what they fer such easy distinctions. did while together. You learn that Phifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deThe best scene in the bilitating battle with diafilm shows Q-Tip playing betes as well as Q-Tipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ego the record with the origiwere both contributing nal drum beat sample for factors. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost imposâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Can I Kick It?â&#x20AC;? Even 20 sible to take sides, because years after the songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reyou can blame and, more lease, Tipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes still light importantly, sympathize up like a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The look with each man. For his This documentary examines on his face in hearing the first film and being an ad- the demise of the 1990s rap perfect break beat is pricemittedly big fan of ATCQ, group, A Tribe Called Quest. less. That is how I will Rappaport did a great job always remember A Tribe showing both sides and being respectful to Called Quest. I am just glad I could join in the group. on the ride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats, Rhymes and Lifeâ&#x20AC;? will not anVisit sonyclassics.com/beatsrhymesandlife swer all of your questions, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t re- to watch a film trailer. COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSIC

I

can trace my entire life as a music lover back to one group that I first heard in 8th grade: A Tribe Called Quest. Of course, I had heard other music before that. When I was 8, I thought that Bon Jovi ruled the world. At 11, I listened to the group N.W.A. after school with my friends; and by the time I was 12, I was well aware of Public Enemy. But it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until the first time that I heard Q-Tip, Phife, Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Jarobi that I became consciously aware of music to the point that it would become a defining factor in my life. Even with such a close relationship to the music, I lacked a detailed understanding of the group, like many other fans, especially the behind the scenes tensions. ATCQ is one of those groups who seemed to transcend everything because of the passion and emotion that their fans put into themâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not necessarily as the people in ATCQ, but as a movement. Tribe represented everything that the left field of

hip-hop embodied and, as such, the fans viewed the members in almost cult-like status. For many, they could do no wrong. Looking back, I now understand why this is dangerous, not just as a fan, but also to a group that unwillingly comes to carry the abstract ideals of an entire fan base. That is why I was so excited to hear earlier this year that actor Michael Rappaport was producing a documentary film on Tribe, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats, Rhymes and Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest.â&#x20AC;? After a run on the film festival and independent cinema circuit (The Mississippi Film Institute featured the film as part of its Arthouse Cinema series at Davis Planetarium Oct. 2), â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats, Rhymes and Lifeâ&#x20AC;? was finally available on DVD and Blu-Ray Oct. 18. I have seen the film several times since screeners began to pop up this summer, and every viewing is as inspiring and sad as the previous. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats, Rhymes and Lifeâ&#x20AC;? is part career retrospective and history and part psychological analysis of


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Weekly Lunch Specials

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

11/16

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM FRIDAY

11/18

GOOD ENOUGH

FOR GOOD TIMES SATURDAY

11/19

,UKE"RYAN ,EE"RICE *OSH4HOMPSON #HAUNCIE.EAL±'H6RWR&LYLF&HQWHU6RXWKDYHQ $RIVIN´³N´#RYIN´±+L7RQH&DIH0HPSKLV 2EBA-C%NTIRE±%DQFRUS6RXWK$UHQD7XSHOR 4RACY,AWRENCE±*ROG6WLNH&DVLQR7XQLFD $EMI,OVATO±0DKDOLD-DFNVRQ7KHDWHUIRUWKH3HUIRUPLQJ$UWV1HZ2UOHDQV

Thursday

November 17

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday

November 18

Rooster Blues w/Jonny Bertram & The Golden Bicycles

Saturday

Elliot Lipp MONDAY

11/21

TUESDAY

11/22

OPEN MIC JAM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR

November 19

Happy Talk Band w/The Passing Parade

Monday

November 21

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

November 22

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

November 23

KARAOKE

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget To Stop By Our

w/ DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

Serving Lunch 11-2!

Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

MID DAY CAFE     

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

33


NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS Wednesday, November 16th

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 11/16 Restaurant Open

BABY JAN & CHALMERS (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Thursday, November 17th

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

SWING DE PARIS

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989

THURSDAY 11/17 Kira Small (restaurant)

FRIDAY 11/18 Bill & Temperance (restaurant)

SATURDAY 11/19 Jason Turner (restaurant)

MONDAY 11/21 Blues Monday with Central MS Blues Society (restaurant)

TUESDAY 11/22 PUB QUIZ w/ Laura (restaurant)

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover Friday, November 18th

Coming Soon

GRADY CHAMPION

WED11.23: Big Ass Turkey Bash

Saturday, November 19th

(Blues) 9-1, $15 Cover

with Kudzu Kings, Bailey Bros, & Electric Hamhock FRI11.25: Blue Mountain FRI12.16: North MS Allstars* FRI12.1: Jimbo Mathus

Monday-Thursday

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

GRADY CHAMPION (Blues) 9-1, $15 Cover

Tuesday, November 22nd

JESSE ROBINSON

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover Friday, November 25th

MS CADILLAC BLUES BAND (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, November 26th

November 16 - 22, 2011

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

34

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org


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THURSDAY, NOV. 17 College football (7-10 p.m. CBS College Sports Network): USM can clinch the C-USA East division (up two games with one to go) with a win against UAB. â&#x20AC;Ś NFL, (7:30-11 p.m. NFL Network): Tim Tebow leads the Denver Broncos against the New York Jets at home. FRIDAY, NOV. 18 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN): Oklahoma State looks to stay one of three unbeaten teams in college football when they travel to face Iowa State. SATURDAY, NOV. 19 College football (2:30-6 p.m. CBS): MSU gets a big game on TV on the road against Arkansas looking for an upset. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN): Topranked LSU travels to Ole Miss to take on the Rebels in what could be a slaughter. SUNDAY, NOV. 20 NFL (12-3 p.m. FOX): Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look now, but Tony Romo and the Dallas Cowboys are back in the hunt and get the offensively challenged Washington Redskins on the road. MONDAY, NOV. 21 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): the Kansas City Chiefs visit the New England Patriots and Tom Brady in a big game for both teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playoff hopes. TUESDAY, NOV. 22 College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN 2): The other Miami, the one in Ohio, travels to Ohio University in a Mid-American Conference East division clash. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23 College basketball (all day, ESPN networks): Fill up on hoops before you fill up on turkey the next day. The ESPN networks have college basketball all day long. New Orleans Saints fans can take a breath as the team has reached the bye week. Delta State fans get a week off before they play their first playoff game. JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successful season will come to an end after the Capital City Classic Nov. 20 against Alcorn State. Follow Bryan at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

Who Will Win the Conerly?

A

ll 10 of the athletic departments at Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four-year colleges and universities each nominated one football player for the 2011 Conerly Trophy. More than 40 statewide media members (myself not included) will vote on the 10 nominees to select the winner. This will be the 16th time the award has been handed out since 1996, and the winner will be announced Nov. 29 at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame. In the JFP College football preview last August, I wrote about some pre-season players to watch. I totally whiffed on all but two of the nominees. Feel free to go back and read that article to see how badly I blew it. Three of the new 10 Conerly nominees are, in my opinion, head and shoulders above the other seven. Here are those three, in alphabetical order by school: Delta State University Micah Davis, quarterback, senior, Wesson Davis has led Delta State to a 9-2 record this season and a No. 1 ranking in the Division II top 25 poll. For the 2011 season, Davis has thrown for 2,993 yards while completing 253 passes on 413 attempts. The single caller for the Statesmen has thrown 19 touchdown passes with 16 interceptions. While completing 61.3 percent of his passes, Davis averages 272.1 yards per game. On the ground, Davis is fifth on the team for rushing with 180 yards and 11 touchdowns. Davis has even punted the ball five times this year with three punts being downed inside the 20 yard line. Davis is a two-year starter at Delta State after starting for Copiah-Lincoln Community College for two years. He also owns several passing records for the Statesmen. The Statesmen will win the Gulf South Conference and earn a berth into the Division II playoffs. Delta State will try to return to the championship game for the second season in a row. If Davis wins the trophy, he will be the third player from Delta State to win and the second Statesmen quarterback to win. Jackson State University Casey Therriault, quarterback, senior, Wyoming, Mich. Therriault has made the most of the second chance JSU has given him. He has helped Jackson State to a 8-2 record in a season the Tigers couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complete in the SWAC cham-

November 16 - 22, 2011

JFP Top 25: Week 12

36

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COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY.

No NBA, yet, but college basketball has begun.

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

by Bryan Flynn

by Bryan Flynn

Jackson Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Tiger,â&#x20AC;? quarterback Casey Therriault, is on Bryan Flynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s short list for the 2011 Conerly.

pionship. This season Therriault climbed up the JSU record books. He has thrown for 3,252 yards on 239 completions in 408 attempts. Therriault completes 58.9 percent of his passes and averages 325.2 yards per game. Affectionately known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Tigerâ&#x20AC;? by JSU fans, Therriault has thrown 23 touchdowns with 13 interceptions. He has also rushed 125 yards and nine touchdowns. Jackson State is ineligible for a post season due to poor academics. Therriaultâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior season will end in the Capital City Classic against Alcorn State. If Therriault wins the Conerly Trophy, he will be the first player from Jackson State to win. Therriault was a finalist for the 2010 Conerly Trophy. University of Southern Mississippi Austin Davis, quarterback, senior, Meridian This season has seen Austin Davis break every passing record at Southern Miss. Davis has gained national attention for his recordbreaking performances because of whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s records he broke. When a quarterback breaks every one of Brett Favreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s records, it is going to make news, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to see why Davis is getting the interest. The Golden Eagle quarterback has led USM to an 9-1 record and a ranking in just about every top-25 football poll. Davis has Southern Miss on pace to play in their first Conference USA title game since 2006. Davis is a four-year starter at quarterback for USM, and his final season for the Golden Eagles has been one of his best. Davis has thrown for 2,511 yards on 217 completions off of 298 attempts. This season, he has                        

           

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thrown for 20 touchdowns and just 8 interceptions. He is completing 62.7 percent of his passes and averaging 238.6 yards per game. In the rushing attack, Davis has rushed for 251.1 yards with two touchdowns. Davis is also one of 10 finalists for the Loweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Senior Class Award, ARA Sportsmanship Award and earned the Manning Award Player of the Week Oct. 13. He was a finalist for the 2010 Conerly. He would be the fourth player from Southern Miss to win the Conerly Award. Davis would be just the second offensive player from USM to win and the first USM quarterback to win. Weigh in on my selections now, and check back after Nov. 29.    0LFKLJDQ:ROYHULQHV 

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New Blue Plate Special $8.99

November 18

Acoustic Crossroads

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music november 16 - 22 wed | nov 16 Jesse โ€œGuitarโ€ Smith 5:30-9:30p

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

thur | nov 17 Aaron Coker 5:30-9:30p

November 25

Cowboy Mouth

Delta Mountain Boys

fri | nov 18 Will and Linda 6:30 -10:30p

December 2

sat | nov 19 Jesse Smith & 3 Man Blues 6:30-10:30p

MOSS

-2011 Best Of Jackson-

sun | nov 20 Acoustic Crossroads 5:30-9:30p

Voted Best Hangover Food, 3rd Best Plate Lunch & Good Showing: Red Beans and Rice

mon | nov 21 Karaoke

Ladies Night

tue | nov 22 Dane Edwards 5:30-9:30p 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

November 18th

Dash Rip Rock Doors Open at 9pm Advance Tickets $15

2 for 1 Well Drinks Every Wed. 8pm - Close

Tickets available at Ticketmaster

601-362-6388

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

1410 Old Square Road โ€ข Jackson

Now Open Early

Thursday - November 17

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Thur.-Sat | 8:00 Two Shows Fri & Sat

BcSaROga This Weekโ€™s Music B=>B3< November 18 A=<5AB67AE339

 /23:7B/AE/G1]ZZO^aS >=>3D7:;]abS`G]c;ORS ! 0CA6BVSA]c\R]TEW\bS` " 3D/<3A13<13EVObG]cEO\b # @7A3/5/7<AB;OYS7bAb]^ $ >/>/@=/16<];ObbS`EVOb % <7193:0/190]bb][aC^ & 163D3::34OQSB]BVS4Z]]` ' /@B=42G7<55SbBV`cBVWa  9=@<4A9@7::3F97::B63<=7A3 <O`QWaaWabWQ1O\\WPOZ

Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free 9-11 & Karaoke

Friday - November 18

LIVE MUSIC

Saturday - November 19

Nathan Bankston

8:00 - 11:00pm

Legendary HouseRockers 11:00 - until

November 19 Virgil Brawley

Hillbilly Deluxe Sunday - November 20 OPEN MIC JAM 7-11

Monday - November 21 BAR OPEN

8:00 - 11:00pm

Tuesday - November 22

2Xtreme

2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10

11:00 - until Live Music During Lunchโ€ข OPEN LATE SECURITY PROVIDED

2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

WED NOV 16 LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

THUR NOV 17 BUD LIGHT NIGHT $2 BUD LIGHTS DURING THE THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL GAME

JETS VS BRONCOS N CAROLINA VS VIRGINIA TECH

FRI NOV 18 BEER BUCKET SPECIALS

SAT NOV 19

OTIS LOTUS A GRATEFUL DEAD ODYSSEY

SUN NOV 20

NFL SUNDAY TICKET

WATCH EVERY GAME!

MON NOV 21 IN-DA-BIZ 2FOR1 DRINK SPECIALS

TUE NOV 22

JACKPOT TRIVIA

jacksonfreepress.com

EO\bb]aQ]`S

37


6A0=3E84F

dining

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Friday, Nov. 18- Thursday Nov. 24 2011 Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Pt.1 PG13 3-D Happy Feet Two PG Happy Feet Two (non 3-D) PG 3-D Immortals

R

Immortals (non 3-D)

R

J. Edgar

R

Jack and Jill

PG

Tower Heist PG13 In Time

PG13

3-D Puss In Boots PG

Puss In Boots (non 3-D) Paranormal Activity 3

PG R

Footloose

PG13

Real Steel

PG13

This Thanksgiving, Eat Local

T

hanksgiving is the perfect time to spend time with family, give thanks for all that is loved and cherished and, of course, eat. When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your turn to prepare the feastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or bring everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite side dishâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re strapped for time and need help, Jackson area restaurants are here to help.

Courageous PG13

#ATERING

Moneyball

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PG13

Opening Wednesday 11/23 Arthur Christmas PG The Muppets

PG

Hugo

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GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

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November 16 - 22, 2011

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South of Walmart in Madison

by Dustin Cardon, Briana Robinson and LaShanda Phillips

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Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille Wine Down Wednesdays 1/2 Off Bottled Wine

Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-5040 Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

All You Can Eat

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2011 Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

$9 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Mu s i c L i s t i n g s

NOV 16 | Live Music 9:30p NOV 17 | Live Music 9:30p NOV 18 | Live Music 9:30p NOV 19 | Live Music 9:30p NOV 22 | Open Mic w/ Kenny Davis & Brandon Latham 9p

601.978.1839

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211 1IHMXIVVERIER*MWL +VMPP -RXVSHYGIW

5A44 FX5X

The Copper Iris Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson

Soups â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Specials Delivery for orders of 5 or more. 115 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friend Us:

Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gourmet Burgers:

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

at we o see wh ur latest t in p o r D ro p with fo receive u e m o c have nu items and me

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-11PM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

fursdfay) o % h 10r Entrees (Monday-T y!

Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

ne

on all Din

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See our full menu on our website.

Live Music Weekends

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

Friday, November 18th

Saturday November 19th

8:30pm-Midnight

8:30pm-Midnight

Open Road

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

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Free

Try The

Johnnie Johnson

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms 601--956-0082

(a very high-class pig stand)

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Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.8538

jacksonfreepress.com

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

39


Chocolate Advent Calendars While supplies last!

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the

November 16 - 22, 2011

1220 E Northside Drive #380 Jackson, MS Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | 601-362-9553 WWW.NANDYSCANDY.COM

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most local singles

meet real women tonight try for

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 More Local Numbers: 1.800.210.1010 18+

www.livelinks.com

Ahora en Espa単ol

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Rainbow Natural Grocery 2807 Old Canton Road 601-366-16002 at Lakeland & Old Canton www.rainbowcoop.org

jacksonfreepress.com

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