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ONE BRAVE NIGHT A Benefit for A Brave New Day At Safe Harbor United Church of Christ 1345 Flowood Drive Flowood, MS

Friday Night 11.11.11 • 7-10 PM • Drag Queen Bingo! • Everybody Wins Raffle • RuPam’s Drag Race & Variety Show! Featuring World Premier Food by: Sugar Mag Takery

Grand Prize $250 Gift Card Join us for the AFTER-PARTY 11:11 PM at Bottoms UP! with a Special Benefit Show by Jackson’s Finest Entertainment For ticket information contact: A Brave New Day 601. 713. 3999 or Facebook Us A Brave New Day is a peer-driven nonprofit. We are survivors helping survivors. We sponsor a statewide HIV support network, a local HIV support group open to all HIV+ people, and a transgender support group.

The Fall Home Issue

November 9 - 15, 2011

Using Color • Adler Style • Home Ownership Dealing with Clutter • Green Cleaning Man Caves • Décor on the Cheap • When to Remodel

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Advertisement deadline: November 11, 2011 Publication date: November 16, 2011


November 9 - 15, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

10 NO. 9

contents LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

KRISTIN BRENEMEN

6 Reaching Out Jackson’s Fresh Start program is helping ex-offenders find work and reducing recidivism. R. L. NAVE

Cover photo of Craig Noone courtesy Parlor Market

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THIS ISSUE:

Republicans have long touted how great the state is for business. Is it true? Maybe not. MODENAROID

angela taylor ployment with the Department of Rehabilitation Services in Mississippi. “I have found that disabled people being unable to get work is a widespread problem (in Mississippi),” Taylor said. She helps make sure people understand their rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. She also mentors children with all types of disabilities, teaching them and using her education as a source of inspiration for the children and their parents to show that their disability doesn’t have to hold them back from getting good educations. Taylor’s primary volunteer work involves helping the elderly as a member of the Highland View Apartments Activity Council. “I try to make sure they get the supplies they need,” Taylor says. “We provide bingo, Bibles and computer labs. A lot of the residents can’t drive, and it’s the brightest spot in their day to use these computers.” Taylor also teaches classes on using the Internet, helps residents get their prescriptions and collects donations of items such as coffee, printer paper and movies for the residents. “My advice to the disabled community is to never give up,” Taylor says. “Be informed; be active; watch the news; go to the library; know the laws; know your rights. ... People should be informed and learn to stand on their own. You need to find another way to get around obstacles.” — Dustin Cardon

31 Sweet Butterfly The Mississippi Opera brings in top talent for a new production of “Madama Butterly.”

42 Layering 101 Fall is the perfect season to meld, blend and layer your wardrobe. Here’s how to do it right.

jacksonfreepress.com

Angela Taylor grew up in a family that taught her to help others and be an independent thinker. “My parents were active in the Civil Rights Movement,” she says. They helped establish an integrated hospital waiting room in Wayne County, and named each of their children after people in the movement. “My name comes from Angela Davis of the Black Panthers,” she says. Taylor’s sister, Coretta, is named after Martin Luther King Jr.’s wife, Coretta Scott King. Her brother, Dub Clayton, is named for W.E.B. Dubois and Adam Clayton Powell. Taylor, 40, is originally from Millry, Ala. In 1993, she earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Stillman College in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and in 1995, a master’s degree in vocational rehabilitation counseling from Jackson State University. Today, Taylor dedicates her time to helping the elderly and disabled live better, more active lives. She works a day job as a dispatcher for 911 in addition to her volunteer work for the disabled community. Taylor says she has encountered difficulties in seeking employment due partially to her disabilities. She has suffered from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis since age 7. Symptoms of the condition include deformity in the joints of her hands and feet, causing difficulty walking and manipulating objects with her hands. She tried unsuccessfully for years to get em-

MEREDITH SULLIVAN

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 7 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .......................... Day 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 26 ........................ Food 31 ............... Diversions 32 ..................... 8 Days 33 .............. JFP Events 34 ........................ Music 36 .......... Music Listing 38 ...................... Sports 41 ................. Astrology 41 ..................... Puzzles 42 .......... Fly Shopping

Mississippi Biz

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editor’snote

Tom Ramsey Chef Tom Ramsey (of Underground 119) also teaches private cooking lessons, writes poetry, runs with the bulls and has produced an album or two. He owns Ivy & Devine Culinary Group. He wrote the cover story about the late, great Craig Noone.

R.L. Nave Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson and joining the JFP news team this month. He wrote several news pieces. Email him story tips to rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Dustin Cardon Copy Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi from Brandon. An English major, he enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day. He wrote the Jacksonian, and edited and factchecked many stories.

Diandra Hosey A Bay Springs native, Diandra Hosey played basketball at Jones County Junior College and Mississippi College. With a degree from Mississippi College School of Law, she is an associate with the law offices of Matt Greenbaum. She wrote a sports feature.

Andrew Dunaway Food writer Andrew Dunaway knew his friends and family were tired of hearing him talk constantly about food, so he took to writing about it. He’ll do his best to keep it to a dull roar. He wrote a food feature. He is also the JFP’s Freelancer of the Month for October.

LaShanda Phillips Editorial Assistant LaShanda Phillips is a recent graduate of Jackson State University. She is the third oldest of seven children. She wrote a food piece for this issue and coordinates the food section. Send her foodie story ideas to: lashanda@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Meredith Sullivan Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She coordinated the FLY feature.

November 9 - 15, 2011

Adam Perry

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Account Executive Adam Perry is a local musician who lives in Flowood where he, his wife and daughter are herded through life by two supreme beings posing as unruly house-cats. He manages JFP and sales accounts.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

The Best We Can Be

L

ast week, I attended one of those uniquely Jackson events that national media never seem to know about when they paint us with a broad brush. It was a performance of “Defamation,” a play by a Chicago playwright that allows the audience to act as jury and decide whether a black woman or a Jewish man should win a defamation suit she brought against him because he assumed she stole a watch from him and then caused her to lose business as a result. Much like the film “Crash,” the play has all sorts of circular prejudice messages wound up in it and some powerful lessons about ingrained racism most of us never see, especially if we’re white and part of the majority culture. I enjoyed the play and the discussion, but it was a quick statement the playwright made during the Q&A afterward that stuck with me. Earlier in the week, they had performed the play for students at Lanier High School, and in a straw vote afterward, the students had split about a third for the woman, a third for the man and the third undecided. The playwright then told us, off the cuff, that Lanier had one of the best and smartest student audiences he had encountered. I was, and still am, stunned at how important a statement that was—and how seldom we hear it in this city where so many like to slam and stereotype our inner-city youth, especially those at Lanier, any chance they get. The playwright wasn’t being defensive; he wasn’t trying to paint a rosy picture; he wasn’t involved in our local race politics. He just noticed that his Lanier audience contained a lot of sharp thinkers. They were the best. His statement left me wanting to shout: BELIEVE IN OUR KIDS AND THEN WATCH WHAT THEY CAN DO. And I don’t want to just yell this at white folks and bloggers and radio-show hosts; I want to shout it at media, and their parents and teachers and professors; and at everyone who touches our young people every day. We must believe in ourselves and each other and our youth. In a recent GOOD Ideas issue about crime, our staff went deep into research about what causes crime and how to prevent it. Not surprisingly to us, the evidence is incontrovertible that young people who hear on a regular basis that they are not worthy are much more likely to (a) believe it and (b) do things that neglected children do. One result is crime, especially for kids who have economics stacked against them and are growing up with a parent or two who went through the same cycle. The deliciousness of hearing this playwright make this statement after “Defamation,” of course, was that the play was about a racist assumption cycle: that the woman of color must have done it. In the play, even the man’s accomplished black female attorney talked about how people treat her because she is black, drawing false assumptions. Not to mention, they performed the play in a state that many people make assumptions about. Because of a relatively small handful of

people with backward ideas—that we allow to control the world’s impressions of us—the world looks at Mississippi and assumes that we’re the most racist place on the planet. When national media parachute in, they are usually so busy looking for where we haven’t changed that they don’t notice the remarkable progress happening among our people (those who do notice usually remark that they never witness our kinds of frank race conversations and diversity back in their big city). But as a result of the assumptions about us (yes, granted, self-inflicted), our residents have long believed we can’t be the best—ironically proving the effect that bigotry of low expectations has on our children. I have seldom, if ever, met a Mississippian of any race that doesn’t feel the weight of growing up in a state considered such a hellhole. Yes, we all get angry at media and politicians beyond our borders who treat us like we’re all uneducated hicks, but how often do we collectively act to change it? How often do we get together and fight the good fight right here at home, challenging the people, political parties and corporate media chains that play us against each other and assume we’re dumbasses? Yes, some of us fight it more often than others. Sadly, though, we collectively give into it too often and just assume it can’t change. It doesn’t have to be this way. Mississippians have the passion, the creativity, the humor, the hubris and the diversity to be the best state in the country for our people. Sure, we have a ways to go. But considering how awful we were on “the race question” (let’s be frank: the worst and most violent in the nation) just 40 years ago, it’s remarkable the progress we’ve made to date. Let’s be proud of that. It is time to build on that progress. And

we have an incredible generation of young people now—from Lanier to Jackson Academy—who are sick and tired of the way it’s been. They have action-oriented hearts and the hubris to believe they, we, can be the best right here at home. This issue is a tribute to one of them—Craig Noone, J.A. graduate—who not only believed in Jackson’s foodie potential, but rallied all those foodies to help a local institution, Peaches Restaurant, survive. Fortunately, there are others to carry on Craig’s spirit of greatness. Many work, or have worked, right here at the JFP and BOOM Jackson. Last week at our staff meeting, we discussed how our mission at the JFP really comes down to one simple goal: to help Jackson, and Mississippi, be the best. That means that we have been looking for the best—instead of the worst—since our first issue in September 2002. We’ve believed from the start that the best is found, and cultivated, in two groups: local people and local businesses. (Our second issue in 2002 had a huge headline: “Think Global, Shop Local”: a fresh idea then.) We then asked our entire staff to identify and vote for the top ways we help find and promote the best. They chose: (1) Courageous journalism that provides research-based context to important issues; (2) Creating and building community; (3) Helping small local businesses grow; and (4) Telling readers about all the events they can support in Jackson. This week marks the official kickoff of “Best” season in our city. We ran the area’s first Best of Jackson ballot in our very first issue and announced our initial winners 10 years ago this January. We are proud to have been looking for (and expecting) the best in our city and state for 10 years. The Best of Jackson ballot is on page 17 and at bestofjackson.com.


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Driving tour of Oxford and Ole Miss with historian, Jack Mayfield. Tours include stops at two historic homes: the L.Q.C. Lamar House and Cedar Oaks Mansion. Tickets are $8 for adults and $4 for children 12 & under. Tour departs from the Skipwith Cottage Visitors Center on the Square, next door to City Hall. For more information, contact the Oxford CVB at 662-232-2477.

Sunday • November 13th 1:00pm & 2:00pm

www.oxfordcvb.com www.doubledeckerfestival.com

NOV. 17 - 20 Mississippi Coliseum jacksonfreepress.com

Tour is Scheduled for:

5


news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, Nov. 3 Cuba’s communist government announces it will allow people to buy and sell real estate for the first time in more than 50 years. … Gov. Haley Barbour says he voted in favor of the Personhood Initiative by absentee ballot after expressing concerns about the measure earlier in the week. Friday, Nov. 4 The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that unemployment was at 9 percent in October, down slightly from 9.1 percent in September. … AT&T Mississippi president Mayo Flynt defends his company’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile. Sprint and Ridgeland-based C Spire have filed a lawsuit to block the merger. Saturday, Nov. 5 A record-setting 5.6 magnitude earthquake rattles Oklahoma and is felt in six other states. … Supporters and opponents of the controversial Personhood Initiative rally at the state capitol. Sunday, Nov. 6 Vandals pull down a life-size statue of former President Ronald Reagan in a park in California. Police say the vandals might have tried to take the statue to sell as scrap metal. … The University of Missouri announces it will join the SEC.

November 9 - 15, 2011

Monday, Nov. 7 A jury finds Dr. Conrad Murray guilty of involuntary manslaughter in Michael Jackson’s death. … Ole Miss announces that head football coach Houston Nutt will resign at the end of the season after the Rebels lost 12 SEC games in a row.

6

Tuesday, Nov. 8 A federal appeals court upholds President Barack Obama’s health care law. … Mississippians go to the polls to vote for a new slate of political leaders and make decisions on three ballot initiatives. See coverage at www.jfp.ms. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Second Chances

M

ichael Williams is the man behind the movie projector at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium. He is responsible for making sure the independent art films and sky shows run on schedule without any technical glitches. The 32-year-old former Jackson State University student and music producer also served five months in jail this year for a felony drug possession charge in 2010. It was the first time he had ever been arrested. Upon his release May 12, Williams worried that he would not be able to find steady employment. That’s when he found out about Jackson’s new Fresh Start program, which helps ex-offenders find jobs and provides other services to them. Ex-offenders in the city will be able to get even more help finding jobs due to a $50,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice. The grant will help the city strengthen the Fresh Start program. During the Jackson City Council’s work session Oct. 31, Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. announced the grant for the city program. “A large majority of the crimes being committed now are being committed by people who have a record of previously committing a crime,” Johnson said. “We really need to tend to the ex-offender re-entry issue as a way of preventing crime. Cutting back on recidivism, we think, will be an offshoot of this effort.” In January, the city’s Human and Cul-

by Lacey McLaughlin tural Services Department started the groundwork for Fresh Start with $50,000 from the city’s general fund. The U.S. Department of Justice grant matches the city’s existing funds, and Johnson said he is looking for more funding. “It started off very quietly, because we were just in the planning stages, and we don’t want to build expectations until we have the resources to develop the program,” Jackson Department of Human and Cultural Services Director Michael Raff said. Fresh Start Coordi- Michael Williams is a production technician at the Russell C. nator Karen Quay helps Davis Planetarium.The city hired him through its new Fresh offenders write resumes, Start program that helps ex-offenders find work. coaches them through the interview process and he is lucky, because unlike most offenders, he then refers them to businesses for employ- had an education and job experience. ment based on their skills. To date, the city has “I don’t think my situation is representahired 10 ex-offenders and is helping a total of tive of the average situation,” he said. “I had a 70 ex-offenders find work. The program also pretty good education and background. I just reviews ex-offenders’ case files and vets them got caught up in a couple of bad decisions. before helping them find work. But a lot of guys in there don’t have that.” Before he got a job with the city, Williams Williams said that employers who are said he worried about the stigma an employer CHANCES, see page 7 would face for hiring an ex-offender. He said

LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

Wednesday, Nov. 2 A general strike in Oakland, Calif., turns violent as protesters take over a vacant building and throw rocks. Police respond with tear gas and arrest more than 100 people. … A 10-year-old boy dies after being struck by a car while walking to his school bus in Richland.

Mississippi has reduced traffic fatalities by 25 percent. In 2009, the state had 700 fatal car wrecks, according to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, down from 931 in 2005.

David Barney was homeless but not impoverished. p8

They Eat What? w

satan

“The evil dark side that exists in this world is taking hold. And they’re saying, what we want you want to be able to do is continue to extinguish innocent life. You see, if we could do that, Satan wins.” —Lt. Gov. and gubernatorial candidate Phil Bryant regarding opponents of the Personhood amendment.

Some exotic foods are just plain weird, OK? Though these delicacies are traditional aspects of a region’s culture, we can’t help but be a little grossed out. If you’re an adventurous foodie, try them—at your own risk. • Jellied Moose Nose, popular in Alaska, is said to be like tinned ham. The meat is boiled with onions and garlic and cooled overnight. • Casu Marzu is Sardinian for rotten cheese. Popular, and illegal, in Sardinia, Italy, this cheese is soft from larvae eating the fats in the cheese. The cheese is eaten with the maggots still alive. • Kopi Luwak coffee is red, ripe coffee cherries eaten and excreted by palm civet cats of Indonesia. This exotic coffee sells for $100 to $600 a pound. • Witchetty grub, moth larva, is an Australian treat. This bug is a great source for vitamins and nutrients. • Fried bee larvae and fried grasshoppers are popular in southeast Asia. Insects are abundant and rich in protein. • Eating insects, or entomophagy, is popular in the U.S., too. Folks use cricket and grasshopper salt in recipes across the country. • Pig intestines is a dish cooked all over the world. They’re called chitterlings in the U.S., “Isaw” barbecued in Asia, and mondongo in the Caribbean and Latin America.


talk

news, culture & irreverence

CHANCES, from page 6

concerned about hiring ex-offenders should not rush to judgment, but take applicants on a case-to-case basis. “That should not discount someone from being able to do the work,” he said. “Anybody can fall into a number of circumstances and find themselves in a bad situation or behind bars really easily.” During the Oct. 31 meeting, council President Frank Bluntson and Ward 7 Councilman Tony Yarber expressed concerns that the program was moving too slow. The grant only provides funding for planning, and not for actual implementation of the program. “Since January, there has been a pilot program—that’s 11 months of data that can be looked at. In this situation, it appears that the $50,000 is to just start the program when the program started almost a year ago. It seems like those funds could go to enhance the program instead of start it,” Yarber said. Yarber said he is looking into NAACP

initiative called “ban the box,” which calls for employers to remove the part of a job applications asking applicants if they have ever been convicted of a felony. “The bottom line is, when it comes to getting folks getting out of jail, their empowerment is going be to employment,” he said. Raff said that the additional funding provides resources for the program’s planning, so that it can grow its efforts and make partnerships with existing businesses in the city. He said will continue to help ex-offenders, but he is being cautious about advertising the services before having a strategic plan. “In order to get these large federal grants through the U.S. Department of Justice, you have to have a strategic plan,” Raff said. ... Once we have completed the planning progress, we are more inclined to get more money from the Department of Justice.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

‘Take Risks; Make Changes’ by Elizabeth Waibel

J

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY JIM BARKSDALE

ackson Public Schools has nine last month, and Nolan said the board plans months to hire a new superintendent to meet with them sometime this month. before interim Superintendent Jayne Carol Burger, president and CEO of Sargent’s contract expires in July. United Way of the Capital Area, is one of The district may get some financial the committee members. She plans to host help from Jim Barksdale, a series of meetings prior former president and to the search process to CEO of Netscape. Barksget input from parents dale has offered funds to and other community help find and pay a new leaders about what the superintendent. board should look for in Board President a new superintendent so Kisiah Nolan said she she can take their conreceived a letter from cerns to the board. Barksdale officially offerBurger’s top concern is ing the board financial the district’s dropout rate, help last week, but needs and she said traditional clarification before disways of keeping students Jim Barksdale has offered to cussing with the board. in school will not work. contribute toward JPS’ search JPS board mem- for a new superintendent. “I think we’ve got to find ber George Schimmel somebody who’s willing said last month that he to come in and take risks thought the board would be receptive to and make changes,” she said. “Our presBarksdale’s assistance. He said JPS offers ent system needs to be fixed, and it can’t be one of the higher salaries in the state, but he fixed by the status quo.” does not know how the district’s pay comIn 2009, JPS had a graduation rate of pares to comparable cities in other states. 74.1 percent. This year, however, the gradu“To my knowledge (the district’s sala- ation rate had dropped to 63.6 percent. ries) haven’t been a major difficulty,” he said. Susan Womack, executive director of “... On the other hand, it certainly could be the Greater Jackson chapter of Parents for an issue as we go forward.” Public Schools, is also on the committee. Nolan said the board is looking for a “I think that we really ought to be looking consultant to help with the search and is for somebody with some experience in urworking on a list of qualities needed in a ban school districts and moving an urban new superintendent. After the board hires school district forward,” she said. a consultant, it will set a more specific timeSargent has agreed to serve as superintable for hiring a new superintendent. tendent until July, or until the board hires The school board voted in September a new superintendent. The board hired her to form a Community Advisory Com- last June after voting not to renew thenmittee to get input on the superintendent Superintendent Lonnie Edwards’ contract. search from key stakeholders in the district. Sargent previously served as superintendent JPS announced the committee members of JPS from 1997 until she retired in 2002.

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povertytalk

- 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

by Lacey McLaughlin

Homeless and Boxed In LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

living the below the pover- when comparing Jackson to cities in the surty level and homeless,â€? he rounding suburbs. says. “I’m not where I want The study finds population in extremely to be, but I’m on my way.â€? poor neighborhoods (where 40 percent or Barney, who now lives more of residents live below the poverty line) in Byram, said that he sees in the country rose by one-third over the past individuals on a daily basis 10 years, and southern metro areas reported who feel like they can’t es- a 33 percent increase in growth in the numcape their situation and be- ber of poor individuals in concentrated poor come discouraged. Because areas. The Jackson metro area ranks No. 6 for they have trouble envision- its increase in concentrated poverty for the ing themselves with a job, 100 cities profiled in the Brookings report they are more prone to give with a 12.2 increase. up looking. The city of Jackson had the seventh “Some people get boxed highest increase in concentrated poverty in,â€? he says. “Some people in the country of the cities profiled at David Barney became homeless in 2010 after paying funeral are allowing themselves to be 22.4 percent. expenses for his parents. He works as a security guard at Stewpot Community Services Opportunity Center. enablers rather than reaching In the Jackson metro area, the concenfor a helping hand.â€? trated poverty rate was 22.7 percent from Individuals who live in 2005 to 2009, compared to inside the city lthough David Barney was homeless neighborhoods where 40 percent or more of limits where the rate was 35.2 percent. The for several months, he never thought residents live below the poverty line are more suburbs had a 10.6 percent rate of poverty. of himself as living in poverty. Barney, likely to face additional burdens and remain The total metro area has 20,892 poor people 43, got laid off from a construction in poverty, reports the Brookings Institution living in extremely poor neighborhoods, and job in 2010, and after both his parents died in its study, “The Re-Emergence of Concen- 4,954 of those people live in the suburbs. within months of each other, he was over- trated Poverty: Metropolitan Trends in the Nationally, the population in extremewhelmed with funeral costs. 2000s,â€? released Nov. 3. The report finds that poverty neighborhoods rose twice as fast in The New Orleans native started sleeping areas of concentrated poverty in the Jackson suburbs as in cities. Historically, pockets of in local shelters and looking for work. He sent area are on the rise, and that these areas cre- extreme poverty have occurred primarily in out several job applications, but had trouble ate additional obstacles and burdens for in- urban areas. The number of extreme-povfinding work. While at Stewpot Community dividuals such as lack of quality education, erty neighborhoods in suburban communiServices Opportunity Center, Barney asked increased crime rates, lower property values, ties grew by 54 percent, compared to cities, Opportunity Center Director Heather Ivery and lack of goods and services. Poverty also which grew at 18 percent. if she was hiring. He soon started working as strains local governments, which is evident Comment at www.jfp.ms. a security guard. “She gave me the opportunity, and I *&0)NDEX0OVERTY&ACTORSIN-ISSISSIPPI started working, and now I’m slowly climb‡+LJKVFKRROJUDGXDWLRQUDWHSHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWRWKHSHUFHQWQDWLRQDODYHUDJH ing up the ladder to the status I was before,â€? ‡3HUFHQWDJHRI\RXQJDGXOWVDJHVWRZLWKDQDVVRFLDWH¡VGHJUHHRUKLJKHUSHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWR Barney says. WKHSHUFHQWQDWLRQDODYHUDJH ‡:DJHJDSEHWZHHQPDOHDQGIHPDOHZRUNHUVFHQWVHDUQHGE\DZRPDQIRUHYHU\GROODUHDUQHGE\D Barney oversees the day shelter, which 60 PDQGRLQJWKHVDPHMREDVFRPSDUHGWRWKHFHQWVRQWKHGROODUIRUWKHQDWLRQDOUDWH to 100 people use each day. Barney also tries ‡3HUFHQWDJHRIWKHVWDWHSRSXODWLRQOLYLQJZLWKRXWKHDOWKLQVXUDQFHSHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWRWKH to encourage people who have similar stories, SHUFHQWQDWLRQDOUDWH ‡1XPEHURIELUWKVE\WHHQDJHUVELUWKVSHUFRPSDUHGWRWKHELUWKVSHUDWWKHQDWLRQDOOHYHO telling them that their situation doesn’t have ‡1XPEHURIFKLOGUHQOLYLQJLQIRVWHUFDUH to be permanent. Stewpot Community Ser‡3HUFHQWDJHRIKRXVHKROGVVWUXJJOLQJZLWKKXQJHUSHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWRSHUFHQWQDWLRQDOUDWH vices offers job training, housing referral ser‡3HUFHQWDJHRIXQHPSOR\HGZRUNHUVUHFHLYLQJXQHPSOR\PHQWLQVXUDQFHSHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWRWKH vices, employment opportunities, shelter and SHUFHQWUDWH ‡3HUFHQWDJHRISHRSOHZLWKRXWFKHFNLQJRUVDYLQJVDFFRXQWVRUÂłXQEDQNHG´SHUFHQWFRPSDUHGWRWKH meals to individuals in need. QDWLRQDOUDWH “I never let it set on my mind that I was SOURCE: HALF IN 10 CAMPAIGN

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November 9 - 15, 2011

Vote Counts 8

Be sure to fill out the Best of Jackson on pg. 17. You also can vote at www.bestofjackson.com until Dec. 15

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statetalk

by R.L. Nave

Get Today’s News

Redistricting Redux COURTESY THE MISSISSIPPI LEGISLATIVE

which would cut into the number of blackmajority districts in the House plan floated earlier this year. On the House side, Democratic leaders say the state needs an equitable number of majority-black districts to reflect the state’s high proportion of African American voters (who tend to vote for Democrats). After the Senate refused to approve the House’s second map in May, the NAACP filed a suit in federal court, asking that the court take redistricting out of the hands of the deadlocked Mississippi Legislature and institute a plan reflecting the state’s sizable black population. Every 10 years, states are required to look at their electoral boundaries and redraw the maps to reflect shifts and growth in population. Giving this power to state legislatures means the process is often highly politicized, frequently manipulated by political parties to ensure electoral smoothsailing for their candidates. Common tactics include redrawing districts to concentrate geographically dispersed voters of the same political persuasion into a single district, diluting the strength of a voting bloc by grouping them with a larger group that tends to vote the other way and redrawing the lines around incumbents to force them to run in new districts. Because of the tendency for hyper-politicization of redistricting at the state level, a number of states instead charge bi-partisan commissions with the task. Mississippi is one of 36 states in which the responsibility falls to the state Legislature. The next step for Mississippi will be determined by the outcome of the Nov. 8 election, which was underway as the Jackson Free Press went to press. Rhodes said the issue now falls back to the Legislature, which has until the end of the session to come up with a reapportionment plan. If lawmakers fails to do so by the end of the session, the task falls to a three-judge panel in Washington, D.C., Rhodes said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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M

ississippi’s ongoing battle over redisThe recent redistricting ruling is just the tricting will keep going on at least latest wrinkle in a saga that has been unfoldinto the near future. ing all year long. Last December, before the On Nov. 1, the U.S. Supreme legislative session began, many believed that Court declined to hear an appeal from the redistricting would go smoothly as the state’s Mississippi conference of the NAACP over population grew by just 120,000 individuals the matter. In doing so, between 2000 and 2010. the court affirmed a lower The incremental growth court’s decision to allow rate didn’t stop Missisthe 2011 elections to take sippi politicians from place without having a resquabbling, however. districting plan in place. Over the course of The NAACP called the year, the House, Senthe ruling “unfair,” arguate, Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, ing that allowing the elecSecretary of State Deltion to proceed violates bert Hosemann and the the constitutional prinNAACP all weighed in ciple of one-person onewith plans of their own. vote. “Some voters live in In March, the Redistricts that have twice publican-controlled the population as other Senate and the House, districts,” the NAACP which Democrats consaid in a statement about trol, each shot down the the ruling, vowing to other chamber’s rediscontinue litigating the is- The existing map of Mississippi tricting plan. That same sue, which will be costly House districts. month, the civil-rights to both the NAACP and organization asked a state taxpayers. federal court to convene Carroll Rhodes, the a three-judge panel to NAACP’s attorney, told prevent legislators from the Jackson Free Press this week that with running in their existing districts in the Authe lawsuit, the organization hopes to save gust primaries, claiming that the districts Mississippi taxpayers some money. did not represent black voters equitably. “This is at a time when revenue for the For decades, the House and Senate apstate is dwindling,” he said. If lawmakers reach proved the opposite chamber’s plan without a redistricting agreement in the coming legis- issue in a kind of “gentleman’s agreement,” lative session, Rhodes said it’s possible that a House Speaker Billy McCoy, D-Rienzi, told special election will be held in summer 2012. the Jackson Free Press earlier this year. Such an election, he estimates, could cost anyThis year, however, at Bryant’s urging, where from a couple million dollars to admin- the Senate refused to approve the House ister the election up to the tens of millions in plan multiple times. Bryant argued that the legal fees and candidate fundraising. Having House plan does not create enough new the special election coincide with federal elec- majority-Republican House districts to retions would not only be more cost effective, flect population growth in conservative disaccording to Rhodes, but it would aid African- tricts over the last 10 years. American candidates as black voter turnout is Republicans believed their party should expected to high next year when President have more GOP-tilting districts in the House Barack Obama is up for reelection. to reflect growth in majority-white districts,

9


businessbeat

by R.L. Nave

Send business news to news@jacksonfreepress.com

R.L. NAVE

State’s Biz Climate Iffy

Gov. Haley Barbour is proud of the job he has done to make the state business friendly.

November 9 - 15, 2011

E

10

l Mezquite Bar and Grill has opened for business at 4240 Robinson Road (in the former El Chico site) near Metrocenter Mall. Luther and Magda Reyna own the new restaurant and say it will be different than El Chico. The Reynas plan a grand opening in a couple of weeks. “I want the waiters to iron all the kinks out first,� Magda Renya said. The restaurant is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturdays. For information, call 769-251-0745. Best Fried Chicken A recent Yahoo Travel article named Two Sisters’ Kitchen one of the top 10 best fried-chicken restaurants in the United States. The restaurant opened in June 1989 in a his-

New Restaurant, Old Favorite

Small Business Development Centers at the University of Mississippi, gave Barbour high marks for creating a “serious but friendly environment� to do business. He hadn’t seen the CNBC’s climate rankings but said that his agency, which helps people navigate the bureaucratic minefield of setting up a business, is excited about the growth of everything from mom-and-pop stores to sophisticated high-tech firms. Where the state does appear to be holding its own—at least on CNBC’s business climate survey—is in the area of work force. For the past two years, Mississippi’s work force has come in at Nos. 20 and 21. One explanation for the strong showing in the work-force category could be that Mississippi has low participation in labor unions, which businesses consider advantageous to their profitability. Barksdale hopes that the “big hairy bodacious idea� of investment in public education will help to improve the quality of the state’s work force. Barksdale, the former chief executive officer of Netscape Inc. and a Jackson native, cited new test results that show improvement for Mississippi students in key areas, including math, but says more is needed. “A child in poverty needs an A teacher, not an average teacher,� said Barksdale, who supports early childhood education, unlike many Republican elected officials. Echoing Barksdale on the importance of education, Bryant called for the creation of new vocational opportunities so that students at risk of dropping out of high school could learn a trade. Bryant said that, if elected governor, his administration would do more to aid businesses by scrutinizing state regulations. “I’m going to look at every regulatory agency in the state and if that regulation is hurting businesses, we’re going to see if we can’t do something about it,� Bryant said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

America’s Top States for Business Mississippi Rankings, 2008-2011 9EAR  2YHUDOO  &RVWRI'RLQJ%XVLQHVV  %XVLQHVV)ULHQGOLQHVV  :RUN)RUFH  (GXFDWLRQ  &RVWRI/LYLQJ 

                    

SOURCE: CNBC.COM

by Valerie Wells

State Biz Gets $163.9 M Mississippi businesses got more than $163.9 million in federal government contracts and modifications between Oct. 1, 2010, and Sept. 30, 2011. The U. S. Juicy Drama Opens Small Business Administration’s Juicy Drama, a women’s 8(a) and HUBZone programs clothing store, opened Oct. 22 certified these businesses in an in Magnolia Marketplace in Flo- Juicy Drama has effort to allow small businesses moved to Magnolia wood, moving from Dogwood Marketplace in to receive a fair share of the proPlaza. Merchandise includes Flowood. curement pie. dresses and accessories, such as SBA’s 8(a) program helps quirky headbands and novelty small disadvantaged businesses earrings. As part of its opening, Juicy Drama compete in the marketplace. The HUBZone is searching for a model. Anyone interested program helps small businesses in urban and should submit portfolios by this Friday, Nov. rural communities gain preferential access 11. The new store is at 5352 Lakeland Drive, to federal procurement opportunities. Both Suite 300, Flowood. Call 601-672-3240. programs encourage more diversity in the toric two-story home that was built in 1902. Two Sisters’ Kitchen (707 N. Congress St.) is only open for lunch, 11a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday through Friday. For information, call 601-353-1180. COURTESY JUICY DRAMA

G

ov. Haley Barbour touted his administration’s probusiness bona fides for the last time in his role as state government’s chief executive before a throng of mostly business folks at the Mississippi Economic Council’s Hobnob event Nov. 2, perhaps engaging in a bit of legacy preservation. Eight years earlier, when the then-lobbyist was seeking the governorship, Barbour noted that he had stood before many of the same folks and said that Mississippi didn’t have to be last. “We can do better,� he recalled saying to 2003’s hob-nobbers. “And we are doing better.� Several other speakers echoed Barbour’s optimism about the direction of Mississippi’s economy, including gubernatorial candidates Johnny DuPree and Phil Bryant, as well as businessman Jim Barksdale, who keynoted the event. To be sure, the state has seen a number of high-profile economic success stories in recent years. The extent to which Mississippi is a more welcoming place to hang out one’s shingle than other states is a bigger question. By at least one metric, Mississippi remains in the bottom tier of states when it comes to business friendliness. In CNBC’s Top States for Business survey for 2011, published Oct. 31, Mississippi placed 47th. Mississippi’s ranking, just below West Virginia and ahead of Hawaii, was good enough for next to last, which was also a drop from the same study conducted in 2010 when Mississippi finished at No. 45. Going back even further, Mississippi had rather lacklus-

ter showings in CNBC’s 2009 and 2008 surveys as well with rankings of 45 and 46, respectively. The annual survey scored states on criteria including the cost of doing business, work force, transportation and infrastructure, education, technology and innovation, access to capital and cost of living. While Mississippi finished in the Top 10 in terms of low living costs, it ranked 31st for cost of doing business, tumbling from 11th place in 2010. Still, Barbour, who will be replaced as governor in January, made the case for the business-friendliness of his administration over the past eight years. He cited two other reports that show Mississippi gaining ground in terms of its conduciveness to operating businesses. The first comes from the Fraser Institute, headquartered in Canada, whose 2011 Global Petroleum Survey found Mississippi to be the most attractive place in the world for oil and gas investment (not “for doing energy projects� in general as the governor suggested in his remarks to the Hobnob). Site Selection, a magazine for economic-development officials and real-estate professionals, picked Mississippi’s business climate as 17th in the nation, ahead of larger states like California, Illinois and New York. Area Development, a magazine for facility-planning consultants, ranked Mississippi’s business climate 9th in the nation in a recent survey released in October. In the same study conducted in September 2010, Mississippi ranked 7th. Barbour touted his record on attracting energy projects, rattling off as proof projects such as the proposed—and controversial—Kemper County lignite coal mine, Chevron’s expansion of its Pascagoula refinery, KiOR bio-fuels and the Twin Creeks Technologies solar manufacturing plant. The departing governor isn’t the only one beating the drum in support of the seeming uptick in business expansion here. Johnny DuPree, the Democratic nominee for governor, bragged that he hasn’t raised taxes in his 10 years as mayor of Hattiesburg. As a result of increasing government efficiency, Hattiesburg is the only city in the state to have one of the best neighborhoods in the U.S., according to the American Planning Association. And while some areas languish from brain drain resulting from the exodus of young, educated professionals, DuPree quoted Census figures showing that the 24- to 29-year-old segment of his city’s population grew 27 percent over the past decade. Robert Forster, chief operating officer of the Mississippi

marketplace and help struggling companies succeed and learn to stand on their own. Mississippi has 47 firms in the 8(a) program and 235 certified companies in the HUBZone program. The agency wants to increase the number of firms and types of industries in these programs, according to a news release. SBA also introduced its WomenOwned Small Business certification program on Feb. 4, 2011, aimed at expanding federal contracting opportunities for women-owned small businesses and economically disadvantaged women-owned small businesses. The firm must be at least 51 percent owned and controlled by one or more women, and primarily managed by one or more women. For information, call 601-965-4378 or visit SBA’s website (sba.gov/ms).


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11


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Building Business

G

ov. Haley Barbour has long been bullish on Mississippi’s business environment, announcing every new business his administration brings into the state—large and small—and every new development with great fanfare. Like every governor in the nation, he knows that job creation is on his constituents’ minds, and he’s been busy making sure every Mississippian knows how hard he’s working to get that job done. The governor gives away lots and lots of goodies to companies who want to put down roots in the Magnolia State. Just say the word, and the state will hand your business all kinds of incentives to open or expand your business here—from infrastructure improvements to exempting your company from state income taxes to creating a legal atmosphere that is heavily skewed to favor corporations. Barbour understands that in a world where business is king and jobs are manna from heaven, this is how states play the game of business. He’s a master. But beyond Barbour’s cheerleading lies a state full of people with little to offer a modern, high-tech operation. Our prospects are not particularly bright when it comes to attracting companies that are looking for an educated, healthy and highly skilled work force. If you’re looking for factory workers, Mississippi is the place to be. If you’re looking for knowledge workers, not so much. As R.L. Nave’s story on page 10 points out, Mississippi is in the absolute bottom tier of states as far as being attractive for business. Look a little closer at what makes a state a good place to operate a thriving 21st-century business, and an educated work force is high on the list. Yet schools haven’t been high on Gov. Barbour’s list of priorities. In another story in this issue, Lacey McLaughlin looks at poverty in the Jackson area. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. announced a program to find jobs for former offenders and reduce recidivism. That program looks at individual needs to resolve larger problems of crime in the city. We think that’s the right approach: Begin with the individual to fix big societal problems, one human being at a time. It may be the only way something ever really gets accomplished, from the bottom up. As long as our leadership insists on looking at every problem from a 10,000-foot view, we’ll continue to get solutions that focus from the top down. Of course Mississippians need jobs. But like Ronald Reagan’s trickledown economics, top-down corporatism has failed to work in the long term. It’s time Mississippi puts its emphasis on building our future through early childhood education and other programs that focus on individual people. And the best time to start is now.

KEN STIGGERS

Oh Lord Have Mercy

P

November 9 - 15, 2011

sychologist Judy McBride: “Dr. Silas P. Rathbone asked me to counsel the newly unemployed and unskilled workers who use the services of the ‘Oh Lord Have Mercy I Really Need a Good Paying Job Center for Unemployment.’ He also informed me that most of you suffer from Post Traumatic Unemployed Stress Disorder. “What you are experiencing today is part of a 30-year plan to render you helpless, hopeless and compliant. A lot of you wished you saw this plan coming. But how could you be forewarned when you were too mesmerized by the greed aspect of capitalism? You waited anxiously for the money to trickle down into your consuming hands, only the government gave tax breaks to wealthy folk and too-big-to-fail corporations. You fell for that trick and are now treated like economic outcasts undeserving of a good education, job, home or life. “I realize that your current situation is hard to take, but do not be despondent. Remember that life is a period of adjustments. I suggest you adjust by becoming critical thinkers and challenging the motives of predatory capitalism. Also, think about acquiring the skills you need to get back to work and readjust your traumatized and stress-filled life. “I know it’s like a jungle sometimes, but allow me, Dr. Rathbone, and the dedicated staff of the ‘Oh Lord Have Mercy I Really Need a Good Paying Job Center for Unemployment’ show you how to keep from going 12 under. Ah huh-huh-huh!”

KAMIKAZE

Let’s Talk, Dems

H

ey, Mississippi Democratic Party: Can we talk? We’ve heard some pretty strong accusations that you aren’t as powerful as you used to be. In fact, a few folks are whispering that you’ve become a shell of your former self. You’re reeling right now and on the verge of becoming irrelevant. Unless you guys are prepared to do some innovative, out-of-the-box renovating and planning, I fear your days ahead will be more difficult. Let’s start with your most recent underwhelming performances. In 2011, Democrats failed to field a candidate in all of the state races. Can we say that not having Democratic challengers in the lieutenant governor’s, secretary of state’s or auditor’s races is a travesty? The lone Democrat in state office, Attorney General Jim Hood, faced formidable opposition that forced him to campaign much harder than he should have had to. What you are witnessing is a well-oiled machine making clearly calculated moves. At work is an obvious grooming and mentoring process and a hierarchy put in place long before an election year comes around. I defy you to tell me that it wasn’t a foregone conclusion that Lt. Gov Phil Bryant was primed to take Barbour’s place. Convince me that Tate Reeves wasn’t groomed to rise to Bryant’s old job once Bryant became governor. On your side of the aisle, Democrats appear to be getting their candidates by pure happenstance. Sure, Johnny DuPree, the first black Democratic nominee for governor, generated a lot of excitement. He ran a magnificent, history-making campaign, but methinks he excelled in spite of, and not because of, the state Democratic Party. The party rolled out celebrity names like Morgan Freeman and Bill Cosby—icons indeed, but about as politically relevant to this new generation of voters

as Howdy Doody. Then you bring Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz here to stump for DuPree. That went off with a whimper, didn’t it? In contrast, the Bryant campaign brought down the proverbial house by bringing in New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, perhaps the hottest Republican in the country. Advantage: Republicans. Over the past two years nearly 30 state Democrats have switched parties. You’ve callously taken the black vote for granted. You’ve watched the more liberal left run off the moderate Dems. Most importantly, you’ve done a poor job of mentoring and grooming new talent. The long-term viability of the state Democratic Party hinges on your ability to introduce fresh, capable faces to the political landscape. I suggest you start looking to municipalities and counties for talent and begin developing a long-term strategy (if you haven’t already) that will help you win this chess game that you’re currently losing. Out-ofthe-box thinking is in order. You may dismiss this as harsh, but it’s criticism long overdue. I was once an ardent Democrat but am now Independent. I vote person not party. I’ve lost faith in the Dems’ ability to woo voters in this state. It’s time for the old guard to go, from top to bottom. You’ve done a noble job, but it’s time for someone else to take the helm. If this were a football team, the head coach and his staff would have been fired months ago. So, state Democratic Party: good talk. I hope you were taking heed. I’m only saying what many have been secretly saying for the past year. As it stands, I see us inaugurating Tate Reeves as governor of Mississippi in 2020, or maybe sooner if you’re not careful. And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


JULIE SKIPPER

Being the Best EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Reporters R.L. Nave, Elizabeth Waibel Events Editor Latasha Willis Editorial Assistant LaShanda Phillips Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Natalie Long, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant,Tom Ramsey, Julie Skipper, Ken Stiggers, Rebecca Wright Editorial Interns Brittany Kilgore, Sadaaf Mamoon, Hannah Vick Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

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CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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first met Craig Noone at 2 a.m. in a bar. I suppose that’s not surprising. It was fall 2009, and he had recently moved back to Jackson to open his dream restaurant. A couple of months earlier, I received an email from Downtown Jackson Partners President Ben Allen introducing Craig so that he could get involved in Jackson. I had corresponded with him via email, but I didn’t meet him in person until the night he wandered into Underground 119 at closing time. As the staff cleaned up, we sat at the bar along with Matt Allen (Ben’s son), talking about our hopes for the city to which we’d all returned after leaving for a while. I went home that night without a doubt in my mind that Craig would do something big here. The next day, I started telling people, “There’s this guy opening a restaurant downtown, and it’s going to be amazing.� But beyond that, I knew this would be more than just a restaurant. Craig was someone Jackson needed, and I knew I would work with him to change this city. I told him so, and from that day until a few weeks ago, we talked every single day about just that. When Craig said Parlor Market was his dream restaurant, he wasn’t lying. He threw himself into the project with a laser focus. Watching the process—from the details of the buildout to assembling his team—was nothing short of exhilarating. As he built that restaurant, he also built a community. The excitement for what he was doing and his love of Jackson and her people was contagious. He convinced rockstar chefs to move here from other states to be a part of it. They came and grew to love this place, too, and they created a restaurant family. But Craig didn’t stop there. He helped other restaurants—through collaboration and helping them find new talent—and in doing so, helped contribute to a sense of camaraderie and community in a rather competitive industry. Craig’s spirit extended to each person he encountered. “I like to make people happy,� he said quite simply. Whether it was the highest-end customer or James, one of our neighborhood homeless people whom he invited to a birthday dinner, Craig treated each person as a special guest. He loved to make people feel comfortable and cared for; he was always doing something for someone else. That extended to his friends, his staff and strangers. Knowing that he always had the best intentions made it easy for people to believe in him and want to be a part of his efforts. As a result, he succeeded with ideas

no one had attempted in Jackson before. Craig didn’t just have vision. He had confidence that we were ready for things others might not have thought would take hold—be it fine dining downtown, pop-up restaurants or certain proteins on the menu. He taught us that doing what you love, and doing it well, makes people trust you and want to go with you on your journey. Craig was always thinking about what was next—the next pop up, the next iteration of the menu, the next restaurant, the next publication, the next event to plan. That constant movement, always striving to do more, to push to be the best and keep getting better, is something I’ll remember. It raised the bar. He expected the best of himself and of everyone around him. As anyone who has spent a late night out with him can attest, Craig did everything full throttle. From getting the perfect green suit and accessories for Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade, dressing up to go out after the restaurant closed on Cinco de Mayo or donning a Great Scott suit for a fancy occasion, he never did anything halfway. He was always late as a result, but did he ever make an entrance and an impression. Which brings me back to that bar at 2 a.m. I knew from that first night I met Craig that Jackson would never be the same as a result of his being here. None of us lucky enough to know him, even for a little while, will be the same. He gave all he had—physically, mentally, financially—for Jackson. He loved being part of something bigger than himself, and he had the ability to bring that out in others, and that’s the true mark of a visionary leader. Dining at Parlor Market is a grand culinary experience, yes, but it’s also part of a movement. Craig had a glorious full year of running his dream restaurant. For that, I am thankful. For the chance to know him, I am beyond grateful. By what he did here and for what he taught us, I am humbled. And for the diverse group of talented people he brought together, with whom I will work and play for years to come as we continue to do it all for Jackson, I am energized. May you rest in peace and be proud of your beloved Jackson, sweet friend. Julie Skipper writes the Girl About Town feature for the JFP. She is an associate at Watkins Development, LLC, and is a proud resident of downtown. Julie graduated from Millsaps College and Vanderbilt University Law School.

Craig’s spirit extended to each person he encountered.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


Unfinished Business Friends Unite to Continue Chef’s Vision by Tom Ramsey

November 9 - 15, 2011

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14

JARO VACEK

eople leave unfinished business. Sometimes ton if there was anything we could do. They were wading to town for Craig’s visitation and funeral, the King Edthey just move on to other projects. Or they through papers trying to sort out the responsibilities they ward’s chef, Nick Wallace, assembled an ad-hoc team made meet with tragedy, leaving others to complete would soon be shouldering. up of him, Chef Deon Hence (of Rust in Clarksdale) and the unfinished business. It is the living who “We’ve got a wedding to cater in New Orleans next Levi Minyard (University Club, Oxford). The Steel Chef follow through on these unfinished dreams, week, and I don’t have a clue what we are doing. Not to committee turned the competition into a “tribute exhibiplans and business. They are the tion dinner in honor of Craig Noone,” and the ones who can help define the life evening went off without a hitch. of the deceased and leave an undying legacy. The wedding that needed sorting was for It is a cruel twist of fate that those who perish Craig’s friend, fellow chef and former colleague in medio cannot see their work come to fruiPatrick Tague and his bride in New Orleans. tion or control how or by whom the end of the The PM crew was going to prep everything in symphony is written. Jackson and head down to New Orleans on When the torch of unfinished works is Halloween day to finish off the cooking and lifted and carried through to the end, much is serve the wedding guests. said about the one who fell, but much more Craig had worked it out in his head, but can be said about those who remain. had yet to share all of the details with everyone Therein also hides a trap. Those carrying else on the team. Between handwritten notes on the unfinished business must walk a fine and Facebook, Ryan, Jesse and the Parlor Marline of honoring those who have passed withket crew were able to piece it all together and out sacrificing their own dreams, goals and follow through. Sensing the difficulty, emotionplans. It can all get a bit messy. ally and logistically, for the Parlor Market staff, Two weeks ago, in an instant of tragedy, Mr. Tague and his bride-to-be offered to let the I lost a friend. My loss paled in comparison guys off the hook. But, according to Ryan, they to the loss of others—those who lost a son, felt “emotionally obligated to follow through.” a business partner, a sibling, a lover, a boss, a To make this happen, Ryan and Jesse companion, and the list goes on. But in a larger wound up packing their knives and making community sense, all of us who want to see the trek south. Since almost everything was Jackson move ahead lost an agent of change. done, they just provided a couple more sets of When Craig Noone died in a car accident early talented hands to make the reception happen Oct. 14, he left unfinished business. according to Craig’s original menu. Since Craig’s accident, many people have South Jackson native Craig Noone ran his dream restaurant for one impressive “Really, we could have let them handle it been asking “what will happen next?” This is year. He died early the morning of Oct. 14 in a car accident. Here he poses as a all,” Jesse echoed. “But it was nice seeing Craig’s BOOM Jackson Young Influential in 2010 on the roof of the King Edward. where dreams end and a legacy begins. picture on the remembrance table, and Patrick truly appreciated us being there.” Following Through On the morning of Oct. 14, I joined a group of the mention that we are supposed to compete in Steel Chef The New Helps the Old Parlor Market family and the close-knit Jackson restaurant Monday night,” Ryan answered. Parlor Market started the trend of “pop-up” restaufamily as we shared hugs, tears and disbelief. As people The Steel Chef competition was not quite as big a rants in Jackson with PM Steak on March 21. Essentially, do at these times, I asked chefs Ryan Bell and Jesse Hous- knot to unravel as the wedding. Since so many chefs came the entire restaurant (the menu, the décor and the name)


changed for one night and one night only. Parlor Market was transformed into an oldschool steak house with classic salads, simple appetizers, hearty side dishes and big-asyour-head cuts of meat. PM Burger, PM Taco and PM BBQ followed, each one more successful than the previous one. Jackson residents rapidly warmed to a national trend, and lots of people headed downtown on Monday nights with crowds swelling from 100 to 400, 600 and eventually 1,200-plus. Popups were great for business, and the idea spread. The restaurant where I work, Underground 119, launched an Italian pop-up just the month after PM Burger and did a Cuban pop-up concept on Halloween, both to great success. A few weeks before he died, Craig and I discussed other pop-up concepts we were considering and looked at different dates so as not to step on each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toes. It was then he told me about his next big project ... PM Soul. This one would be a little different and actually take place at Peaches on Farish Street instead of at Parlor Market with the proceeds from the sale of the food going toward much needed repairs on the Peaches

facility (an idea he got from Walter Zinn). Craig wanted to remain true to the pattern of the other â&#x20AC;&#x153;PMâ&#x20AC;? concepts. The idea was to take traditional soul food and ramp it up to dizzying heights. The Peaches event was scheduled for less than 30 days from the day of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, and the planning was still unfinished. When Jesse and Ryan saw all the food other restaurants were sending them that sad Friday morning (most of it comfort food), they decided it would be a great tribute to Craig to have all these different places add something to the menu and create new relationships between distinct groups of people, all of whom are connected by their choice of profession. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had all of these people coming up to us and saying â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;what can we do?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and I just came out and said it. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You can take some of this burden off of me and really help the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by being part of PM Soul,â&#x20AC;? Jesse said. When the call went out for help, it was immediately answered with a resounding â&#x20AC;&#x153;YES!â&#x20AC;? To date, 10 restaurants have agreed to donate food for the event that will be held Monday, Nov. 14. (The JFP signed on as a

Looking for Miracles Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first love was athletics, particularly baseball. He was the all-time homerun leader in the history of Jackson Academy. Before the door of Parlor Market ever opened to the public, Craig was working to bring Miracle League to Jackson. This nonprofit organization enables disabled children to participate in the sport of baseball. The Miracle League fields are constructed to allow for wheelchairs, walkers and other disability aids. Each player gets the opportunity to bat, field and score and no one, regardless of physical or mental condition, is denied the experience of participating in a team sport. Ryan Bell told me that he and Craig (both sports fanatics) talked at length about how great it would be to bring Miracle League to Mississippi. They had started the paperwork, joined the national organization and had hoped to start raising money for the construction of a field early next year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of all of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big dreams and crazy ideas, this is the one I feel most attached to,â&#x20AC;? Ryan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When people started talk-

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8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS 601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

Newspaper Delivery Drivers

UNFINISHED, see page 16

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The Jackson Free Press seeks contract delivery drivers for in-town and out-of-town newspaper delivery routes. Drivers must have clean driving record, reliable transportation and auto insurance. Routes are generally 4-5 hours per week on Wednesday afternoons and Thursday mornings. Contact: matt@jacksonfreepress.com

jacksonfreepress.com

RON BLAYLOCK

Craig Nooneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right-hand chefsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jesse Houston (front center) and Ryan Bell (right in other striped apron)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;are leading a dedicated staff trying to keep the Parlor Market dream alive.

sponsor as well.) The sale of tickets, coupled with the donated food, will have a serious impact on Peaches that no single fundraiser could accomplish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; part of this â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;soul foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quite literally,â&#x20AC;? Jesse said. This piece of unfinished business will get wrapped up neatly when the event takes place Nov. 14. The PM team will serve two meals: lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The price of admission ($15 lunch, $25 dinner) will include food and entertainment. Julie Skipper, part of the Farish Street redevelopment team, a JFP columnist and a friend of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, is pleased to see this event go on in the spirit he had envisioned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to see such an outpouring of support for one of our tenants coupled with the opportunity to showcase the Farish Street community. Peaches has been here for a long time, and we want to do whatever we can do to help them stay a vibrant part of Farish Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future,â&#x20AC;? she said.

15


Unfinished Business, from page 15

ing about giving to a charity in lieu of flowers, I immediately started thinking about Miracle League.â&#x20AC;? The project is ambitious, to say the least. They will need 4 acres of land and about $300,000 to see it through, but they have already started negotiations with different non-profit organizations to help them through the maze of grants, regulations and fundraising. When I spoke with Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, Sharon, she summed it up beautifully: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of a better way for Craig to be remembered than by helping disabled children play the game he loved. He just had a heart of gold and loved children.â&#x20AC;? An account has been established at Trustmark to receive donations, which can be mailed to: Miracle League c/o Parlor Market, 115 W. Capitol St., Jackson, MS 39201. Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; It Out Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for Jackson didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end at his own restaurant. While Parlor Market was under construction, Craig and I had the luxury of spending some evenings hanging out and talking about the culinary scene in Jackson and where we thought it was going. Over the past few years, Jackson has transformed itself into a budding foodie community. Old-guard restaurants like

Congratulations to Our Staff Award Winners Falcon Award

[Chosen by the Jackson Free Press Staff]

Lacey McLaughlin News Editor

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Montroe Headd Bookkeeper

Freelancer of the Month

November 9 - 15, 2011

[Chosen by the Editorial Staff]

16

Food Writer

Stuart Ramsey, the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son and a foodie himself, got a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock It Outâ&#x20AC;? tattoo in Craig Nooneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honor. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the only one.

such as Derek Emerson of Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Local 463, have had the opportunity to more fully explore their culinary talents in ways that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem possible 10 years ago. All of this change was occurring when

Craig arrived on the scene, and he fit right in. As he brought in his team for Parlor Market, he also helped to recruit chefs into the restaurants of his new friends. Chefs at several local restaurants such as Mint and Babalu came to Jackson as part of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort to recruit talent into the market. To continue this effort, the Mississippi Restaurant Association has established the Craig Noone â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock It Out!â&#x20AC;? Memorial Scholarship, named for a phrase he would shout when giving a toast, starting a dinner service or any other opportunity. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a phrase so associated with Craig that several service industry friends of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (including my son and me) have had it permanently affixed as tattoos. The $5,000 scholarship will assist one culinary student each year to pay for culinary school, so long as that student maintains a 3.0 GPA. Get information at www. msra.org. Tending the Store Not all unfinished business is as glamorous as building ball fields or raising money for scholarships. Some unfinished business is just, well, business. Parlor Market had just held its first anniversary party with the fourth pop-up concept, PM BBQ. By no

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Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have started a migration to newer and fresher dishes. As consumers become accustomed to new tastes, restaurateurs and chefs, TOM RAMSEY

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18

November 9 - 15, 2011


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means was the restaurant on autopilot. The idea for Parlor Market was conceived as a team effort. Although Craig was a well-trained and accomplished chef in his own right, he assembled a culinary team to carry out his vision while he transitioned from the dining room to the kitchen and back again. Craig may have been the face of Parlor Market, but the muscle and the bones were the team operating behind the scenes. Craig recruited an all-star line up from the beginning and trusted them enough to stay out of their way when things were working properly. Between Jesse and Ryan in the kitchen, Elise Erhardt and Jenny Breaux on the floor, and Robert Arender, John Ingram and Steve Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill behind the bar, Craig could afford to take a little time away from the business on occasion because the team was and is fully capable of running the show. Although his charm is missed, and he no longer weaves through the crowd â&#x20AC;&#x153;touching tablesâ&#x20AC;? as we say in the restaurant business, his team continues his vision. Jesse and Ryan recently sat down with me over a Cuba Libre and a cold Southern Pecan and talked about the origins and the future of Parlor Market. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The concept has always been and always will be to educate. That is not about to change,â&#x20AC;? Jesse told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craig put a lot of trust in people, maybe too much. And that can be both a blessing and a curse. We know his vision was to keep the menu constantly changing, but we have to do that in a way that stays true to the reasons we opened this place to begin with,â&#x20AC;? Ryan explained. In talking with them, I could feel the awesome burden they are shouldering. They have a thriving business that is missing one of its main ingredients, and they feel the need, even the obligation to make it great. And here is where that balancing act comes into play: Parlor Market was a team effort and the team is still marching on. I can say without a doubt that the food is every bit as great as it was the last dozen times Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve put my feet under their tables. This result is by design. Jesse and Ryan were in charge of the

kitchen the month, week and day before Craig died, and they still are today. They know the vision they shared, and they know how to execute it. The burden they feel is to keep it fresh without giving off the impression that they are leaving Craig out of the picture. Their entire concept is seasonal and fresh, so they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t memorialize their lost friend in the menu. They have to do it by continuing to innovate, create and educate. COURTESY PARLOR MARKET

Noone

Craig Noone (left) with Parlor Market chefs Jesse Houston and Karl Gorline (in hat).

There will be a thousand times when someone will think or say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How would Craig have done this?â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craig would have done it differently.â&#x20AC;? And they may be right, but what they should really be thinking is, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craig had the foresight to surround himself with people who shared his culinary and customer-service values.â&#x20AC;? These guys didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree on everything before Craig died. Quite the contrary: They had heated arguments about many, many things because they shared such passions. It would be almost insulting to Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory for them to now slip into some type of gastronomic memorial sacrificing the talents of those left behind to carry the torch. I think Jesse said it best when he told

me: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parlor Market has always been about pushing the boundaries of seasonal, southern, local cooking and great service. It always will be. By looking forward while not forgetting our roots, we can look our customers in the eye and say that Parlor Market will continue to honor reasons we opened the door in the first place.â&#x20AC;? I may miss my friend, but I look forward to my next meal at his restaurant. The Legacy Occasionally, the unfinished business of great people can become their legacy. Gilbert Stuartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portrait of George Washington was never finished, yet that image went on to become the most viewed face of our first president, gracing the front of the one-dollar bill. Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Requiem,â&#x20AC;? Gaudiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sagrada Familia, Schubertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 8th Symphony, Da Vinciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gran Caravelloâ&#x20AC;? and Coleridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kubla Khanâ&#x20AC;? are further examples of the great, unfinished works left behind with the question of â&#x20AC;&#x153;what if.â&#x20AC;? To me, their limbo is part of their beauty. There is so much promise in the voidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so much to dream about, so much to hope for. Janis Joplinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mercedes Benzâ&#x20AC;? was a hastily recorded â&#x20AC;&#x153;reference trackâ&#x20AC;? that her band was going to use when recording the instrumental portions of the song. When they were done, Joplin would have laid down the final vocals while listening to the recorded instruments. She never got that chance, but we got to hear raw talent and pure joy. The next time you head down to Capitol Street for whatever the team at Parlor Market are dishing out, slip the album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pearlâ&#x20AC;? into your CD player and hit track 8. As you hear that sexy, Texas twang belting out her pleas, listen closely to the background. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll hear the metronome clicking away as the only accompaniment. Keep singing it to yourself and tap the floor with the sound track in your head as you order â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Late Night Pork Bellyâ&#x20AC;? and savor each bite. Now that is some unfinished business we want to keep around for a long time. Parlor Market is at 115 W. Capitol St. Visit its website at parlormarket.com.

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hen Wilora “Peaches” Ephram opened Peaches Restaurant in 1961, she had $45 in her pocket. She took that money and cooked hotdogs for her first customers until she made enough of a profit to start buying vegetables and meats to make the restaurant’s famous soul-food plates. The restaurant, located at 327 N. Farish St., is a crucial part of Jackson’s history. During the civil rights era, Peaches fed the movement’s leaders, many of whom had offices on Farish Street. In 2008, President Barack Obama stopped at Peaches while campaigning in Jackson. Although Peaches is a simple restaurant that prides itself on treating customers like they are family, keeping its doors open for so long hasn’t been easy. On Thursday, Nov. 3, Wilora’s son Roderick, who now manages the restaurant, talked about the business’ challenges as he helped himself to a plate of fried chicken, yams and black-eyed peas. When the Farish district began to deteriorate in the early 1980s, Wilora struggled to make ends meet. She began using her Social Security check to pay the bills. She refused to raise her prices for meals, and today, customers can purchase a plate lunch for only $6. “She never thought about herself,” Roderick Ephram said. In 1996, Roderick took over the restaurant after Wilora suffered a heart attack. At 87 years old, she still comes by the restaurant most days to eat lunch and talk to customers. “When I took over, the only amount of money she was able to transfer over to me was $150,” Ephram said. “But at least she had established a very positive name. It wasn’t about the money. We have no business loans and no major equipment costs. For the last 10 years, we have been operating on the cash flow that we make day to day.” Ephram said his mother has dreamed of someday owning the property where the restaurant sits. The Jackson Redevelopment Authority owns it, and developer David Watkins sublets it to Peaches as part of the Farish Street Entertainment District. Peaches had special meaning for the late Parlor Market Executive Chef Craig Noone, who died Oct. 14 in a car accident on Capitol Street. He would often come and make soul food with Roderick in the kitchen. Noone appreciated “cooking from the gut,” which Roderick describes as using basic ingredients and elbow grease instead of machinery. “He said this is how he was trained in culinary school,” Roderick said of Noone. “He just took off with it, and said he wanted to do something for us.” In the weeks before his death, Noone

WARD SCHAEFER

bring the turke You y

Wilora “Peaches” Ephram (left) and her son Roderick Ephram have made Peaches Restaurant a Jackson staple, but it hasn’t always been easy. You can help them out.

was helping organize a pop-up restaurant at Peaches called PM Soul. The idea was that Parlor Market and Peaches staff members would come together to serve soul food and raise money for Peaches for one night. The event took on a greater sense of meaning after Craig died and is now scheduled for Nov. 14—marking the one-month anniversary of his death. “Craig had so many ideas. He walked all behind the counter and in the kitchen, talking about ways we could modernize this place,” Roderick said. “We have never had no one come down here and talk about doing a fundraiser, and we have been open 50 years.” Although the restaurant doesn’t have a lot of kitchen equipment, Roderick said he’d like to purchase coolers so that he can also serve salads. Peaches also needs roof repairs and other renovations such as upgrading its booths. Watkins has also promised to do renovations when the second block of Farish Street Entertainment District comes online. As Roderick talked about the future of Peaches, Watkins and his business partner Jason Goree emerged from a booth after finishing a lunch meeting. “We are moving and progressing, and we are going to get there. They have been patient, and I’m sure they will be for a little while longer,” Watkins said about Peaches. Renovations and repairs aside, Roderick hopes that the fundraiser will bring together the community and draw attention to Farish’s history. “I think it will generate attention and, hopefully, it will bring people back and help them realize the importance of supporting Farish Street,” he said. Peaches (327 N. Farish St.) is open Monday through Saturday at 6:30 a.m. (times vary for closing). It serves breakfast each of those days until 11 a.m. Call 601354-9267.


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21


In Memory of Our Friend

Noone

What Craig Taught Me by Jesse Houston COURTESY PARLOR MARKET

of crowds. But during Craig’s interrogation process, he made me feel comfortable, and it seemed that he genuinely cared about who I was and where I have been and what I have done with my life. He told me this was the southern way. It wasn’t long before we realized we had both moved from our homes and gone to the same culinary school in Austin, Texas: the Texas Culinary Academy, now renamed the Le Cordon Craig Noone (left) taught friend and fellow chef Jesse Bleu College of Culinary Arts Houston a valuable lesson about dealing with people. Austin. (Craig and I both hated this name change, as we were met Craig Noone the summer of 2008 proud TCA Alumni). at Stephan Pyles Restaurant in Dallas, What a small world! He graduated the Texas. I had just graduated from culi- year before me and had been working for nary school in Austin, moved back to The Ritz-Carlton in Dallas as a prep cook. Dallas and landed a dream job working for He went in at 7 a.m., cleaned lobsters, my then-culinary idol, Stephan Pyles, at peeled potatoes (he was the self-proclaimed his flagship restaurant in the arts district fastest potato peeler of all time) and credowntown. After a stage and an interview, ated lunch specials. He then was at Stephan they put me to work in the oyster and tapas Pyles by 3:30 in the afternoon to work the bar, front and center, right in the middle of ceviche station. the restaurant. Caroline Hodges Peters worked the With a mountain of ice in front of oyster bar with us as well. It wasn’t long beme and a roaring wood-burning pizza oven fore Craig was probing her with questions behind me, I had to wear a silly black hat and, before you know it, they were busy and shuck oysters for guests sitting at the talking about how they were both from counter. Every once in a while, I had to Jackson, and quickly naming their mutual turn around and check to make sure I wasn’t friends, alma maters, favorite Mississippi burning a pizza in the 700-degree oven while restaurants and chefs, and all other things answering questions about the menu. But Jackson, which might as well have been what kept me busiest was making ceviche. China to me. They were both surprised and The menu offered eight different cevi- maybe downright offended that I had never ches (nine if you included the special signa- been to Jackson, or even Mississippi. Boy, ture ceviche only available to VIP guests and did I have a lot to learn. those who purchased the expensive tasting As our months on the ceviche and menu), everything from tuna to scallops, tapas station went by, Craig and I got to shrimp to hamachi, sea bass and salmon know one another extremely well. He told and, of course, lobster. I could probably me that he couldn’t sleep after his 16-hour make them in my sleep. days and hour-long commute because he After my first week on the ceviche sta- was spending the few last precious hours tion, a new guy was hired and assigned to compiling menu ideas, saving recipes, rework with me because it was a two-man searching the country’s top restaurants and operation, sometimes three on a really busy chefs, paying very close attention to the night. He enthusiastically introduced him- James Beard Awards and planning to evenself to me as Craig Noone from Jackson, tually turn all this stuff into a restaurant of Miss., and during his training, began to ask his own in Jackson. questions about where I was from, where I He would drive to Jackson on his days went to school, who my family was and if I off to look for places to put his restaurant, played any ball. talk to potential investors and do more reI am actually pretty shy when it comes search. While mixing tiny bowls of exotic to getting to know people on an intimate ceviche, we would collaborate on ideas and basis. I get kind of nervous when introduced recipes and menu items, and I told him that to people, and I’ve often been told I can be when he was ready to open his restaurant, rude—sometimes very rude. I don’t mean I would help him do it, even though I had it, and I can’t say I was raised that way be- never been to Jackson, or Mississippi, or recause my dad loves to ask questions and get to know who you are. For some odd reason, LESSON, see page 24 I’m actually much more comfortable in front

Craig Ashton Noone August 12, 1979 - October 14, 2011

May the road rise up to meet you. May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face; the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand. ~ Ancient Irish Blessing

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LESSON, from page 22

ally much of the South. I trusted him and his vision. I believed in what he wanted to do. We left the ceviche station at Stephan Pyles at the same time. Craig returned home in the spring of 2009 to make his dream come true, and I went to work researching southern food and culture. We would always joke about how I was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;born-again southerner.â&#x20AC;? Craig sent me a business plan with blueprints and a logo, and a silly little name for his restaurant. Parlor Market? I packed my stuff up, and the first day I went to work for Craig was the first day I stepped foot in Mississippi. I brought Ryan Bell with me, a chef from Fort Worth, Texas, whom Craig had never met. When we got here, the restaurant was a construction site, all cement and pipes and beams. We began to see that space transform as we worked at a small fold-out table, jotting down notes, calling purveyors and potential employees, with nothing more than a laptop and small amount of office supplies. Plywood became hardwood floors. Beams became topped with marble and pipes became custom soda fountains. Ryan and Craig became close friends; it was hard to tell they had only just met. Fast forward to opening night, and we were standing in one of the most beautiful spaces in Jackson. Craig was extremely proud of it and would tell you about the history behind every little piece of wood, chunk of marble, type of glass and stitch of fabric. He could literally go on for hours. None of us had ever been an executive chef. None of us had been a general manager. We barely had experience having employees under our wing. For a little while, Parlor Market became an example of what not to do, of how not to open a restaurant. We should not have been successful but suddenly, we found ourselves flung to the top of the food chain, so to speak. Craig always said his greatest talent was hiring people more talented than himself. He did an incredible job. But the one thing that no one could beat Craig at was his trust and faith in others, his charming personality, and

his ability to make you feel comfortable and treat you like you were the most important person in the room. He always said he was the best maitre dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the country. Judging by the amount of people who grew to love and admire him, I think he was right. If there is anything Craig has taught me, it is that there is an area in my life in which I can strive to be more like he was. He taught me to search inside myself and learn how to express a genuine interest in the lives and details of others. Not just our guests at the restaurant, but also in my friends and family and employees. In Jackson, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost impossible to avoid someone, so why not truly get to know and love them? Craig believed in Jackson and wanted to see it grow into a major food city, a place of rich culture, diversity and history. His legacy at Parlor Market will continue to grow and push the boundaries of food in Jackson and create an atmosphere in which you can expect to feel welcomed as a part of our close family. Visit Jesse Houston and the other PM superstars at 115 W. Capitol St., 601-360-0090.

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PM Recipes Courtesy Jesse Houston

Parlor Market Chef Jesse Houston shared two of his friend Craig Nooneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite recipes, just in time for the holidays.

SATSUMA AMARILLO SHRIMP CEVICHE 1-1/2 ounces poached shrimp Juice of 1 key lime Pinch of salt 1 tablespoon satsuma juice 1 teaspoon brunoise jalapeno Pinch of minced cilantro 1/2 teaspoon Amarillo chile puree

Combine shrimp, lime juice and salt in a bowl. Mix well for 15 seconds and then add in the remaining ingredients. Mix and adjust for seasoning.

MUSSELS AND MATCHSTICKS Here is another of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original menu items, steamed mussels topped with aioli and crispy shoe-string potatoes.

Ancho Abita Broth 1 bottle Abita Amber beer 1 cup shrimp stock 1 ancho chile, toasted Sprig of thyme 4 peppercorns 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 yellow onion, diced 1 rib celery, diced 2 cloves of garlic, smashed

In a pot, sweat the onions, celery and garlic in oil over medium heat. When they are translucent and beginning to brown, deglaze with the beer and add ancho chile,

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24

COURTESY PARLOR MARKET

Noone

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thyme and peppercorns. Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer, steep for 15 minutes. Add the shrimp stock and simmer for 10 more minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer.

Creole Aioli 1/2 cup of mayonnaise 1/2 cup of Creole mustard 1 clove of garlic paste

In a bowl or food processor, mix all ingredients well.

Steamed Mussels 1 pound fresh Prince Edward Island mussels 1/2 shallot, shaved

1 clove garlic, shaved 1 tablespoon butter 1 cup Ancho Abita broth (see above) 1/4 cup Creole Aioli (see above) Shoe-string potatoes 2 tablespoons chopped parsley Salt to taste

In a pan, sweat the shallots and garlic with the butter until translucent; add in the mussels and then the Ancho Abita Broth. Cover with another pan and allow to steam for just a few minutes, or until all of the mussels have opened. Taste the broth and adjust seasoning with salt as needed. Transfer the mussels to a bowl, top with the Creole Aioli, chopped parsley and shoe-string potatoes. Serve immediately.

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Ballot on page 17, or vote at bestofjackson.com


Real Cowboys Drink Dark Horse Wine

8V]7YWLM8SHE] Saturday Specials All You Can Eat Lightweights & Selected Starters & $3 Hot Sake

11am - 3pm | $12

3100 N. State St. Ste 102 Jackson, Ms 39216 769.216.3574 fatsumosushi.com Now Open Monday Lunch Mon – Thur: Lunch: 11am-2:30pm Mon – Thur: Dinner: 5pm-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am - 10pm

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Always Drink Responsibly

25


Grit Cake

Homage to the Waters ANDREW DUNAWAY

helped me a lot. He was a really good cook when it came to meats, barbecue, that sort of thing. He helped me out with a lot of ideas and things like that. Through the years, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also enlisted other chefs in the area. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come in and helped show me some things. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken classes; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just watched a lot of cooking shows, read cookbooks and experimented.

Chef Johnny Stewart is the owner of Two Rivers restaurant in Canton.

T

he northern border of Madison County is formed by the Big Black River. The Pearl River maintains the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s southern and eastern borders. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from this geographical configuration that Carol Lynn Mead drew the title for her book on the history of Madison County, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Land Between Two Rivers,â&#x20AC;? published in 1987. Less than a decade later, in 1996, Johnny Stewart took inspiration from Meadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work and named his restaurant Two Rivers (1537 West Peace St., Canton, 601-859-9999). As a cattleman turned restaurateur, Stewart started his restaurant the hard way. Armed with an intimate knowledge of quality beef, Stewart cut and grilled every steak in the restaurant for the first seven years, and as a myriad of loyalty customers can attest, his passion and persistence have paid off. I was curious to see how Stewart has handled the transition from raising cattle to cooking them. 15 years later, do you still have ties to the cattle business? Yes. The Two Rivers Restaurant and I are both members of the Mississippi Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association. From that, I know how to get the best beef and where to get it. I also still have a few herds of my own cattle. Who inspired you to become a chef? There was one, an older friend of mine, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passed awayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;W.K. Face. He

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen your restaurant fare described as seafood and steaks. How would you describe your cooking style? I would say continental. We have all the steaks, but we also have fish that is fresh from the Gulf of Mexico. What was the first recipe you mastered for your restaurant? I think the whole smoked prime rib was one of my big calling cards. I do those a lot for banquets and catering. We offer that one night a week (at Two Rivers), and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s covered with an herb crust that I developed. I cover the outside of the whole ribeye with the herb mixture and smoke it with hickory wood. When it comes to beef, do you have a preference for wet or dry aging? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not any difference in the bite. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little difference in the flavor profile but with dry aging, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much more waste. You really canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough texture difference to justify the price, and most people canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t discern between dry aging and wet aging. So we use wet-aged beef. Two Rivers was one of the last restaurants in Madison County to go smoke-free. How did you make that decision, and did you feel any backlash? We just instituted that this past February, and it was a personal thing, but it wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been the thing to do three

November 9 - 15, 2011

H

26

2 cups of grits, cooked according to package directions for thick, creamy consistency 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 cup all-purpose flour frying oil, enough for 1/4 inch in your pan

Cook two cups of grits according to directions on package until done. You want thick, creamy grits. Add one tablespoon garlic powder. Spread into a rectangular cake pan and cool completely in the refrigerator. When grits are completely cooled, cut into desired shape with a 4-inch cookie cutter. Dredge in flour. Deep fry in hot oil over medium heat until browned. One cake per serving.

Shrimp Jumbo shrimp, peeled and de-veined 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon garlic, finely chopped 1/2 cup chardonnay (any brand) 3 tablespoons butter 1 cup fresh spinach, tightly packed 1/2 teaspoon fresh parsley salt and pepper, to taste Pico de Gallo, recipe below 1/4 cup bacon pieces, crispy Parmesan reggiano cheese, shaved, to taste

SautĂŠ shrimp over medium heat in olive oil. Once the shrimp turn pink, add garlic and chardonnay. Continue to sautĂŠ until shrimp are done, about one to two minutes. Remove from heat, and add two tablespoons butter and or four years ago. I was the only restaurant left, and I did get a lot of business because of it. But in the past few years, peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concept of smoking has changed so much. Now they act like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re putting a gun to their head if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s somebody smoking near them. I had too many non-smokers complaining they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come back, so I just made the decision to stop it. You have to choose your last meal. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in it? Beef or lamb. Definitely a red meat

by LaShanda Phillips

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swirl to emulsify. Put fried grits cake (see above) in center of large bowl. Pour sautĂŠed shrimp mixture over grits cake. SautĂŠ spinach and parsley in olive oil and one tablespoon butter over medium heat for 15 seconds. Season with salt and pepper. Add sautĂŠed spinach on top of grit cake and shrimp. Add Pico de Gallo (see below) on top of spinach. Sprinkle bacon pieces and shaved Parmesan reggiano over the entire plate. Serves one

Shrimp and Grits at Two Rivers is a popular dish.

Pico De Gallo 2 fresh jalapeĂąo peppers, finely chopped 10 roma tomatoes, seeded and diced one bunch fresh cilantro, chopped 1 small yellow onion, 1/4 diced (inch?) juice of 1 lime kosher salt, to taste

Mix all ingredients and let sit for one hour to allow flavors to meld. for sure, and it would have a rich demiglace sauce. It would be a big bone-in ribeye with plenty of fat and flavor and cooked as a bone-in prime rib. What is the most invaluable kitchen tip or trick you learned over the years? Probably the most invaluable trick Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned is the knife technique. I very rarely ever cut myself, and I try to teach that to anyone that does prep work. I teach them to use their fingers as a guide, and if they do that, they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut themselves.

Brown rice is a healthier choice than white rice.

ARRIA BELLI

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JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWO RIVERS SHRIMP AND GRITS

by Andrew Dunaway

ANDREW DUNAWAY

dining


jacksonfreepress.com

serving Mississippi since 1939

27


Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

BARBEQUE

A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977 Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

5A44 FX5X

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks..

ITALIAN

Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gourmet Burgers:

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-11PM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

-Nightly Specials$2 Domestics 2 for $5 Pitchers $3 Frozen Margaritas & Strawberry Daquiriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

-Weekly EventsTuesday & Thursday Pool League

Wednesday Pool Tournament

8MPUQ_ :UST`

NO COVER & Live DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2003-2011, Best of Jackson

Bring this ad in & get a free beer!

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

2560 Terry Rd, Jackson MS Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 3:30pm-Last Customer Standing

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ¡V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG November 9 - 15, 2011

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28

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BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic, homey, unpretentiousâ&#x20AC;? thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the regulars describe Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Mediterranean Fish & Grill (The Med- 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Now serving fried catfish & bone-in pan trout. Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment!


Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

Paid advertising section.

%*/&+BDLTPO

Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries! Wing Station (5038 Parkway Drive Suite 8, 888-769-9464) Home of the famous Janky Wings. Wing Station has an array of wings including Lemon Pepper, Honey BBQ and Blazin Bird Atomic. Delivery is available.

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

The Copper Iris Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson

Soups • Sandwiches Salads • Daily Specials Delivery for orders of 5 or more. 115 North State Street • 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com • Friend Us:

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

1IHMXIVVERIER*MWL +VMPP -RXVSHYGIW

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-5040 Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

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All You Can Eat

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

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See our full menu on our website.

Live Music Weekends

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

The Copper Iris Catering Company (115 N. State St. 601-961-7017) Fresh soups, stacked sandwiches, creative salads and daily hot lunch specials. Recently opened across from Old Capitol; available for catering and office delivery w/min. order. M-F; 11-5. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

Friday, November 11th

Saturday November 12th

8:30pm-Midnight

8:30pm-Midnight

Daniel Tate

Free

Johnny Johnson

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms 601--956-0082

BAKERY

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

“Best Barbecue in Jackson”

2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 - Jackson Free Press

Game Day Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2lbs of Pork, Beef or Chicken, 2 Pints of Beans, 2 Pints of Slaw, 5 Slices of Texas Toast Or 10 Buns)

Yo u H a n dl the Unif e orm! ndle a H l l We ’ ood! F e h t

1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson,MS | 601.956.7079

jacksonfreepress.com

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

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November 9 - 15, 2011

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PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

f there is one thing Robin DeVos Owen knows, it’s how to make the ordinary, extraordinary. A turkey sandwich is anything but ordinary at Owen’s Cookin’ Up A Storm. With a light coating of her specialty homemade sandwich sauce, you will never think of turkey the same way again. Owen always knew she wanted to do something with food and searched long and hard for the perfect spot. Enter a space Robin DeVos Owen in Canton Mart and all forks and spoons lining up to make it happen. “If I can make it in a recession, it was meant to be,” Owen says. Cookin’ Up A Storm is a dream come true for Owen, who grew up just a few miles from Canton Mart which, as she says, “houses a unique mix of specialty shops, all locally owned, that you can’t find anywhere else.” What started out as a catering business—named after a suggestion by a friend of Owen’s son Storm—blossomed into a full-service lunch when her customers kept asking for her delectable dishes that could be made to go. Cookin’ Up A Storm isn’t your ordinary lunch spot. As if the turkey sandwich wasn’t enough to convince you, one bite of the Brie and Blackberry Jam sandwich or her signature Roast Beef and Swiss with her secret sandwich sauce will have you swearing off dry toast for good! All of her sandwiches are served with a bag of chips and a drink for $8.50. Now, that’s a deal you can really sink your teeth into. Owen is always up for a challenge. Do you have a favorite recipe you’d like to have at your next event, but don’t have the time? Let Cookin’ Up A Storm at it! Not only is everything homemade daily from scratch, with no corner cutting, but with everyday items like the Chicken Spaghetti, Chicken Pot Pie, and Sausage Stuffed Pasta Shells, don’t be surprised if you get there too late and she’s sold out. If you’re thinking about what to do for the holidays, just hand things over to Owen. From five to 125, she has got you covered. So the next time you’re ready for something unique and tasty for lunch or you want to take a break from kitchen duties, hand the utensils over to Robin and Cookin’ Up A Storm and enjoy the rainbow over your dinner table.


BOOKS p 28 | 8 DAYS p 29 | MUSIC p 31 | SPORTS p 34 COURTESY MISSISSIPPI OPERA

MODENAROID

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI OPERA

Eleni Calenos is Cio-Cio San.

Corey Trahan is Goro.

N

ever was a story of more woe than that of Juliet and her Romeo, but the tragic love story of Cio-Cio San and Pinkerton comes close. Cio-Cio San and Pinkerton are the main characters in Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly,” which opens Mississippi Opera’s 67th season Nov. 12 at Thalia Mara Hall. “It’s very passionate,” conductor and artistic director Jay Dean said. “It’s got everything an opera should have.” “Madama Butterfly,” an opera in three acts, tells the story of 15-year-old Cio-Cio San, nicknamed Butterfly, who marries U.S. Naval officer B.F. Pinkerton in 1904 in Nagasaki, Japan. Cio-Cio San does not realize, though, that Pinkerton is only using her. He plans to divorce her when he finds a more suitable American bride. Pinkerton leaves Cio-Cio San soon after their wedding—the cad!—and she waits three long years for his return. Her friend, Suzuki, tries to convince her to forget him, but Cio-Cio San is a woman in love. And she has also given birth to Pinkerton’s child. Pinkerton finally returns to Nagasaki, and he has his new American wife with him. After he finds out about his secret son, he decides to go to see Cio-Cio San and take the boy away

by Robyn Jackson

from her so his new wife can raise him. He sees the way Cio-Cio San has decorated her house for his homecoming, and he realizes she really does love him. He admits that he’s a coward, so Suzuki, the American consul, Sharpless, and Pinkerton’s new wife, Kate, break the news to Cio-Cio San. Naturally, she is heartbroken, but she agrees to give up her child if Pinkerton will come to see her himself. But before he can arrive, Cio-Cio San takes her own life. Talk about a tragedy. “This is one of my favorite operas, and I’m looking forward to doing it,” said Dean, who is conducting it for the first time. “It’s probably one of the most popular operas in the repertoire.” “Madama Butterfly” ranks as No. 8 in the Operabase.com list of the most-performed operas worldwide and is a staple in the operatic repertoire of companies internationally. Puccini based “Madama Butterfly” in part on the 1898 short story “Madame Butterfly” by John Luther Long, which David Belasco dramatized into a play that inspired Puccini, as did the 1887 novel “Madame Chrysantheme” by Pierre Loti. The story is supposedly based on events that actually occurred in Nagasaki in the early 1890s, and has

inspired many other loose adaptations, from a 1920s silent film starring Anna Mae Wong to the 1990s Broadway musical “Miss Saigon.” “It’s not an uncommon scenario, which makes it relevant to real people,” Dean said. “When we have American military around the world, these things happen.” The soaring score also appeals to audiences. “The music is some of the most gorgeous music ever written,” Dean said. He conducted auditions in New York City and Jackson last spring to cast the roles for this production. “Between those three days, I heard about 150 singers, and we chose our cast from that,” Dean said. “I think it’s going to be one of the best casts of singers that’s ever been on the stage in Jackson.” New Yorkers Eleni Calenos and Daniel Snyder star as Cio-Cio San and Pinkerton, with Jacksonian James Martin as Sharpless, the American consul. Dean, who is also the music director and conductor of the University of Southern Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, has also been working with the Japanese-American Society in Jackson to ensure authenticity. The production is all new, with backdrops and sets being made in Mississippi.

It’s perhaps fitting that “Madama Butterfly” opens this opera season, as Mississippi Opera is undergoing its own metamorphosis. Dean said the guild membership grew 300 percent in the past year. The opera company also started an outreach program, CoOpera, that works with colleges to develop an appreciation of opera, and it is developing a family series. To celebrate this production of “Madama Butterfly,” Mississippi Opera commissioned a clay sculpture of Cio-Cio San from Columbia, Miss., sculptor Ben Watts. It will auction the 20-inch figure during intermission. Anyone interested can attend the Nov. 1 unveiling at 6 p.m. at Pan-Asia (720 Harbour Pointe Crossing, Ridgeland; 601.956.2958). Mezzo-soprano Lester Senter Wilson and Ben Wilson will also give a lecture at that time about the history of the opera. “It’s the only opera company that I know of that has commissioned a statue to celebrate the opening of the opera,” Dean said. Mississippi Opera presents “Madama Butterfly” Nov. 12 in Thalia Mara Hall. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Ticket prices range from $10 for children to $60 for adults. For tickets, go to 31 www.msopera.org or call (601) 960-2300. jacksonfreepress.com

These Things Happen


BEST BETS

November 9-16, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 11/9

COURTESY ARDEN BARNETT

Sen. John Horhn and Rep. Cecil Brown speak at the Jackson 2000 luncheon at 11:45 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $12; email bevelyn_ branch@att.net to RSVP. … See Bill Jackson and Vicki Carroll’s exhibit at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place) through Nov. 28. Free; call 601-982-4844. … Panelists discuss recent election results at the Robert Clark Symposium at 6:30 p.m. at Jackson State University, Student Center Theater (1400 John R. Lynch St.). Free; call 601-979-3935. … Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer performs at Fitzgerald’s. … Sherman Lee Dillon is at Underground 119. … Kathryn’s has music from Larry Brewer. … The Wild and Out Wednesday Comedy Show is at 8:45 p.m. at West Restaurant and Lounge. $2. … Beth Patterson is at Fenian’s.

FRIDAY 11/11

For Veterans Appreciation Day at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.), veterans with ID get free admission. Call 601352-2580. … One Brave Night, a fundraiser for the HIV/ AIDS nonprofit A Brave New Day, is at 7 p.m. at Safe Harbor United Church of Christ (1345 Flowood Drive, Flowood). $11 and up; call 601-713-3999. …The Orchestras and Strings Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494. … See the one-act plays “Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You” and “The Actor’s Nightmare” at 8 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1372 to RSVP. … Dreamz JXN hosts Can’t Feel My Face Friday. … The Salsa Fling kicks off at 9 p.m. at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling St.) with music from Cucho and Jesus. Saturday, the dance workshops start at 11 a.m., and the 60s salsa party is at 10 p.m. $15 workshop, $10 party, $45 full pass; call 601-2136355. … Guillermo and Hellbender perform at Ole Tavern. … Mississippi Shakedown plays at Martin’s at 10 p.m.

SATURDAY 11/12

The Step Up For Adoption Walkathon is at 9 a.m. at Smith Park (302 E. Amite St.) and benefits Mississippi Families for Kids. $25, $250 team; call 601-957-7670 or 800-241-5437. … Twenty artists exhibit their work at the “Breathe in This Place” Art Show from 2-4 p.m. at North Park Presbyterian Church (4624 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-954-4835. … The Mississippi Opera presents “Madama Butterfly” at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $45 and up; call 601-960-2300. … Belhaven University Dance Ensemble’s fall dance concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center (1400 Peachtree St.). $10, $5 seniors and students; call 601965-1400. … Furrows performs at Martin’s at 10 p.m.

SUNDAY 11/13

Raphael Semmes performs at Table 100’s jazz brunch. … Mike and Marty’s Jam Session is at Hot Shots. … The Beer and Cheese Tasting is at 4 p.m. at Sal & Mookie’s. $30; email jc@salandmookies.com to RSVP. … The Women’s Fund of Boom Chick performs Nov. 13 at 5 p.m. at Fuego.

November 9 - 15, 2011

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The reception for Lt. David Holland’s photography exhibit is at 6 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. … Claire Holley performs at the Operation Shoestring benefit concert at 7 p.m. at Brent’s Diner and Soda Fountain (655 Duling Ave.). $10-$50 suggested donation; call 601-353-6336. … The musical “Damn Yankees” is at 7:30 p.m. at Jackson State University, McCoy Auditorium (1400 John R. Lynch St.); shows through Nov. 15. $10, $5 seniors and students; call 601-979-5956. … The Carolina Chocolate Drops perform at Mississippi State University, Lee Hall (2 Hardy Blvd., Starkville). $15, $12 seniors, $8 children ages 3-12; call 662325-2930. … Chris Gill is at AJ’s on the Lake.

MONDAY 11/14

P.M. Soul is from 10 a.m.-10 p.m. at Peaches Café (327 N. Farish St.), and features local cuisine and live music. Performers include Akami Graham, Ben Payton and Jarekus Singleton. Proceeds go toward renovations at Peaches. $15 lunch (11 a.m.-3 p.m.), $25 supper (5-10 p.m.), $5 T-shirt; call 601360-0090. … The musical “My Fair Lady” is at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall; encore show Nov. 15. $25-$62.50; call 601-981-1847 or 800-745-3000.

TUESDAY 11/15

Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents “When the Line Goes Dead” at 7 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). $39.50; call 601-856-9696 to RSVP. … Poet Marc LaFrancis and the Victory Belles perform during the Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). $10; call 601-974-1130.

WEDNESDAY 11/16

Sister Paulinus Oakes speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … See the opera film “Don Giovanni: Encore” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive). $20, $18 seniors, $14 children; call 601-936-5856. … Will and Linda’s open jam is at Pelican Cove. … Meagan May performs at Irish Frog. … Hunter Gibson is at Kathryn’s. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

The Carolina Chocolate Drops perform Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at Mississippi State University’s Lee Hall. JULIE ROBERTS/NONESUCH PUBLICITY

THURSDAY 11/10

Mississippi hosts Forks and Corks at 4 p.m. at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). $30; call 601-326-3001. … See the film “Higher Ground” at 5 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $7; visit msfilm.org. … Boom Chick performs at Fuego at 5 p.m. … Adib’s Acoustic Jam is from 5:30-9:30 p.m. at Burgers and Blues. … The David Crowder Band performs at 7 p.m. at Jackson Academy (4908 Ridgewood Road). $30-$45; call 601-364-5416.


jfpevents Radio JFP on WLEZ, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is a representative from 12K’s for the Holidays. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Listen to podcasts at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Jackson 2000 Luncheon Nov. 9, 11:45 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The topic is “2012 Education Legislative Agenda: Reform or the Same Old Same Old?” Speakers include state legislators Sen. John Horhn and Rep. Cecil Davis. RSVP. $12; email bevelyn_branch@att.net. P.M. Soul Nov. 14, 10 a.m., at Peaches Cafe (327 N. Farish St.). The pop-up restaurant features food from restaurants such as Parlor Market, Babalu, BRAVO!, Mint, Underground 119, Lumpkin’s BBQ and Parker House. Music by Kerry Thomas, McAfee with Akami Graham, Jarekus Singleton, Ben Payton and more. Proceeds go toward renovations at Peaches Cafe. $15 lunch (11 a.m.3 p.m.), $25 supper (5-10 p.m.), $5 T-shirt; call 601-360-0090.

HOLIDAY Toys for Tots through Dec. 15. The United States Marine Corps Reserve hosts the annual toy drive for needy children. Toy donations are accepted through Dec. 15 at designated drop-off locations. Mail monetary donations to 4350 Officer Thomas Catchings Drive, Jackson, MS 39209, or submit online at toysfortots.org. Volunteers welcome. Call 601-8470180 to volunteer or 601-960-1084 for assistance.

COMMUNITY Events at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). • Justice Forum Nov. 12, 12:30 p.m., in room 215. Martha Bergmark, founding president and CEO of the Mississippi Center for Justice, is the speaker. Free; call 601-974-1089. • Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series Nov. 15, 7 p.m., in the recital hall. Poet Marc LaFrancis and the Victory Belles perform as a salute to veterans. $10; call 601-974-1130. Events at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Call 601-352-2580. • Veterans Appreciation Day Nov. 11. Veterans with ID receive free admission. • Critters and Crawlers. The program is for toddlers ages 2-3. Sessions are Nov. 12, Dec. 10 and Jan. 14 at 10 a.m. Discounts for members. Prices vary; call ext. 241. Conference on Technology Innovation Nov. 9, 8 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Jim Barksdale is the keynote speaker. $75; call 601-960-3610. Teaching Your Board to Fundraise Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (921 N. President St., Suite C). $60, $35 MCN members; call 601-968-0061.

music, a cash bar and networking. RSVP. $15; email zip39@madisoncountychamber.com. New Vibrations Network Gathering Nov. 10, 6:308 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). Share business cards and brochures. Email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. Speed Networking Sessions Nov. 10, 7 p.m., at The Sky Box (201 W. Capitol St., ninth floor). $5; call 601-345-0407. Free Language Class for Adults Nov. 11, 6:30 p.m., at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). The class is an introduction to Spanish, French and English in a party atmosphere. RSVP; space limited. Free; call 601-500-7700. Olde Towne Market Nov. 12, 9 a.m., in downtown Clinton. This month’s market is the fourth annual holiday market. Free admission; call 601-924-5472. Beer and Cheese Tasting Nov. 13, 4 p.m., at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St.). Enjoy pairings of cheeses from Ryals Goat Dairy with beers from Rogue Brewery. RSVP. $30; email jc@salandmookies.com. Forks and Corks Nov. 13, 4 p.m., at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). The Women’s Fund of Mississippi hosts the food and wine-tasting event. The Grits and Soul Band performs. $30; call 601-326-3001. Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable Growers Agritourism Conference and Trade Show Nov. 14, 8 a.m., at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St.). Growers and backyard gardeners hear trends in the industry from the experts and visit with exhibitors. $100; email info@msfruitandveg.com. Charity Funding Seminar Nov. 15, 7 p.m., at Fortson Insurance Agency (2348 Highway 80 W.). American Charity Assistance Network gives ways to fund charities, churches, and nonprofits at no cost. Also, learn how to become a paid volunteer. Call 769-233-6285.

WELLNESS Spirit of Healthy Living Program Nov. 12, 9 a.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Registration is at 9 a.m., the diabetes awareness program is at 10 a.m. and the wellness fair is at noon. Health screenings included. Free; call 888353-2437. Mother and Daughter Health and Wellness Symposium Nov. 12, 10 a.m., at Jackson State University, Student Center Ballroom (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The event includes health screenings, presentations and exhibitors. Free; call 601-979-1530. Alzheimer’s and Caregivers Conference Nov. 16, 8 a.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Dr. Monica Parker of Emory University School of Medicine is the keynote speaker. Free admission, $20 for 3.5 CEU credits; call 601-987-0020.

STAGE AND SCREEN “Our Town” Nov. 10-12, 7 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, North Campus (370 Old Agency Road, Ridgeland), in the Center For Performing Arts. $10, $5 students; call 601-853-6000.

Robert Clark Symposium Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m., at Jackson State University, Student Center Theater (1400 Lynch St.). The topic is election-day implications. Free; call 601-979-3935.

“Damn Yankees” Nov. 10-15, at Jackson State University, Rose E. McCoy Auditorium (1400 John R. Lynch St.). Shows are Nov. 10-12 and Nov. 14-15 at 7:30 p.m., and Nov. 13 at 3 p.m. $10, $5 seniors and students; call 601-979-5956.

Immigration Debate Nov. 10, 11:30 a.m., at Mississippi College School of Law (151 E. Griffith St.). The debate is between Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance executive director Bill Chandler and state Sen. Joey Fillingane. Light lunch included. Free; call 601-968-5182.

“Guys and Dolls” Nov. 10-20, at Black Rose Community Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Limited seating; reservation recommended. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-825-1293.

Zip39 Gives Back Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m., at Mint (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5002, Ridgeland). The charity showcase includes food,

“Sister Mary Ignatius Explains it all for You” and “The Actor’s Nightmare” Nov. 11-20, at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays

BE THE CHANGE Holiday Heroes Program through Dec. 6, at Youth Villages (Atrium Building, 805 S. Wheatley St., Suite 240, Ridgeland). Youth Villages, a nonprofit that supports children who have suffered abuse, neglect, or are dealing with mental-health issues, needs donors to sponsor children for the holidays by giving a gift no more than $75 in value or donating a check for $75. Send checks by Dec. 5, and gifts by Dec. 16. Donations welcome; call 601-572-3726. Link Up on the Links Golf Outing Nov. 10, 2 p.m., at Whisper Lake Country Club (414 Annandale Parkway, Madison). Proceeds benefit MadCAAP, a nonprofit that assists needy families in Madison County. $40, $5 mulligan (up to two); email jjeter@stdom.com. Operation Shoestring Benefit Concert Nov. 10, 7 p.m., at Brent’s Diner and Soda Fountain (655 Duling Ave.). Enjoy music from Claire Holley and refreshments. Free, suggested donation of $10-$50; call 601-353-6336. One Brave Night Nov. 11, 7 p.m., at Safe Harbor United Church of Christ (1345 Flowood Drive, Flowood). The benefit for A Brave New Day includes drag queen bingo, an everybody-wins raffle, RuPam’s Drag Race and Variety Show, and food from Sugar Mag Takery. The after-party at 11 p.m. at Bottoms Up (3911 Northview Drive) includes music from Mia Chambers and Company. $11 and up; call 601-713-3999. Step Up for Adoption Walkathon Nov. 12, 9 a.m., at Smith Park (302 Amite St.). Proceeds benefit Mississippi Families for Kids. $25, $250 team; call 601-957-7670 or 800-241-5437. at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 5 p.m. For mature audiences. RSVP recommended. $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1372. Events at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). • “Madama Butterfly” Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m. The Mississippi Opera presents Puccini’s composition. $45 and up; call 601-960-2300. • “My Fair Lady” Nov. 14-15, 7:30 p.m. $25$62.50; call 601-981-1847 or 800-745-3000. Fall Dance Concert Nov. 11-12 and Nov. 17-19, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center (1500 Peachtree St.). Bring a canned good donation for charity. $10, $5 seniors and students; call 601-965-1400. Art House Cinema Downtown Nov. 13, 5 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). This week’s feature is “Higher Ground.” Refreshments available. $7; visit msfilm.org. “When the Line Goes Dead” Dinner Theatre Nov. 15, 7 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the play. RSVP. $39.50; call 601-856-9696.

MUSIC Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Free; call 601-974-6494. • Orchestras and Strings Concert Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m. Students play songs such as “The Suite from Sleeping Beauty” and “Tubby the Tuba.” • Student Composers Concert IX Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m., in the Recital Room. Student composers perform original pieces. David Crowder Band Nov. 13, 7 p.m., at Jackson Academy (4908 Ridgewood Road), in the Performing Arts Center. Gungor, Chris August and John Mark McMillan also perform. $30$45; call 601-364-5416. Parthenia: Consort of Viols Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). The group performs in honor of the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. Free; visit ancientmusic.org.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-7619). • Nov. 9, 5 p.m., Stuart Vance signs copies of “Aviation in the Golden Triangle”; reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book. • Nov. 10, 5 p.m., Lisa Patton signs copies of “Yankee Doodle Dixie”; reading at 5:30 p.m. $24.99 book. • Nov. 11, 4 p.m., Colleen Houck signs copies of “Tiger’s Curse.” $17.95 book.

• Nov. 12, 1 p.m. Betty Press signs copies of “I Am Because We Are.” $39.95 book. • Nov. 15, 5 p.m., editor Neil White signs copies of “Mississippi’s 100 Greatest Football Players of All Time.” $45 book. Annual Book Sale Nov. 11-12, 8 a.m.-8 p.m., at Quail Ridge Press (101 Brooks Drive, Brandon). Books $1 and up; call 601-825-2063. Authors at Olde Towne Market Nov. 12, 9 a.m., in downtown Clinton. J. Moffett Walker, J.L. Mulvihill, Cynthia Leavelle and Alexander S. Brown sign copies of their books. Book prices vary; email elsielind@gmail.com. “Lost Daughter of Easa” Nov. 12, 3 p.m., at Fusion Coffeehouse (1111 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite A, Ridgeland). J.L. Mulvihill signs copies of her book. $17.06 book; email elsielind@gmail.com.

CREATIVE CLASSES Shut Up! Classes, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road). JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd teaches the Shut Up and Publish! Workshop from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 10 ($50) and the six-week Shut Up and Write! Series every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Jan. 7-March 10 ($150, $75 deposit required). Limit of 11 per class. Discounts for combined classes. Gift certificates available. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 16; email class@ jacksonfreepress.com; find Shut Up and Write on Facebook and Twitter (@shutupandwrite). Salsa Fling Nov. 11-12, at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Nov. 11, Cucho and Jesus perform at 9 p.m. Nov. 12, the dance workshops are from 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m., and the psychedelic 60s party is at 10 p.m. $15 workshop, $10 party. $45 full pass; call 601-213-6355.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS “Baghdad Beyond the Wire: Faces from the Fair Garden” Nov. 10-Dec. 2, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See Lt. David Holland’s photography exhibit. The opening reception is Nov. 10 from 6-8 p.m.. Free, books for sale at reception; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. Studio 167 Group Open House Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m., at Millet Studio and Gallery (167 Moore St., Suite F, Ridgeland). Exhibitors include Rhonda Almond, Eliza Hegwood and Kathy Warwick. Free; call 601-856-5901. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

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DIVERSIONS|music

Bring a Kleenex

by Robyn Jackson

COURTESY VICTORY BELLES

“Bring a Kleenex. Bring two.” LaFrancis writes what he calls story poems based on conversations he had with soldiers and their families. He wrote the blank verse poems in the voices of the speakers as they tell their experiences in Iraq, Afghanistan and on the homefront. Retired from the U.S. Air Force, LaFrancis is the director of public information at Copiah-Lincoln Community College’s campus in Natchez, where he also teaches journalism. “I never went to Vietnam,” he said. “My father was in World War II, and my grandfather was in World War I, so I do have a special affinity with veterans.”

The Victory Belles will perform World War II era songs Nov. 15 at Millsaps College.

S

ome writers spend a lifetime searching for their subject and voice. G. Mark LaFrancis found his in the stories of soldiers and their families. LaFrancis is the author of the series “In Their Boots: Poems Inspired by Soldiers and Their Loved Ones”(Booklocker.com, 2008, $13.95). The first book, 7 was published in 2008. “Book Two: Families,” came out Nov. 1. He is also the co-creator of the “Never Forget Tour Honoring Fisher House.” It’s a project that brings recording artists and the multi-media “In Their Boots” program to military hospitals and Fisher House homes for soldiers and their families. LaFrancis will present “In Their Boots” Tuesday, Nov. 15, at Millsaps College. The program, part of the school’s Arts and Lecture Series, pays tribute to American men and women in uniform in every war. The Victory Belles from the World War II Museum in New Orleans will perform such World War II-era favorites as “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” “Chattanooga Choo-Choo” and “I’ll Be Seeing You” in three-part harmony. “The program is deeply moving,” LaFrancis said.

Natalie’s Notes by Natalie Long

November 9 - 15, 2011

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Are all the story poems sad? Some are funny, some are sad. I don’t apologize if I move people to tears. But there are funny ones in there, too. The most popular is “Me and My MRE.” There’s humor in war, but there’s also sadness, and I bring that out. And there’s longing. I lived through that when I was stationed in the South Pacific. None of them rhyme except for “My MRE.” It had to be silly and Seuss-like. It gets the audience chuckling. Where did you get the inspiration? It all started with a student here at Co-Lin. He was a sniper with the Marines in Fallujah (Iraq). I had prayed for quite a while to find a way to do something meaningful about this war, and he walked into my office. Where do you find the soldiers to interview?

What response have you gotten to your books? Fabulous. I’ve had people who have told me they feel as if they’re walking in the shoes of the soldiers and their families. Soldiers and their families say it’s the voice they had prayed someone would hear. The war on terror isn’t like World War II when everyone sacrificed, from rationing to scrap metal drives, and felt like they were part of the war effort. Do today’s soldiers and their families feel that most Americans don’t appreciate their sacrifice? They believe that they make the sacrifice knowing full well what could happen. They also know and feel the public does not know of the sacrifices that soldiers have made. I don’t sense anger, but I sense that they feel neglected. But they’re a strong people, and they are very proud. Did you always want to be a writer? I developed a love for reading and writing when I was 8. (My family) kind of dismissed it. I come from a long line of blue-collar workers. Why self-publish? The traditional book-publishing world has shrunken, and the need to keep control over my work is important to me. I think self-publishing is great. It has been a wonderful experience. I wouldn’t trade my experience for anything. “In Their Boots” is Tuesday, Nov. 15, at Millsaps College. The event begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. For information, call 601974-1130.

Motorcar Man

Since the band broke up in 1995, Brewer has had a lucrative solo career. He performed at the Mississippi Grammy event along with B.B. King this past summer in Biloxi and also performed at this year’s Storyteller’s Ball, which benefited the Greater Jackson Arts Council. Brewer’s song “Brand New Revolution” (from the “Lucky Ever After” album), was chosen for “Songs For A Better Planet Vol. IV-Gulf Coast Edition” CD. The album compiled original songs from hundreds of submissions from artists all over the world. The proceeds from sales benefit the Gulf Coast Restoration Fund. Most recently, Brewer’s song “Motorcar,” was featured on the network pilot of “Raising Hope,” a series on Fox. You can hear this song (one of my favorites by him) on the season one DVD. Brewer is currently in the recording studio with local producer and engineer Randy Everett, putting the finishing touches on his fourth solo album. Brewer’s music is available on iTunes, Amazon.com and Cdbaby.com.

Take the time to hear this “Motorcar Man” and Guillermo with Hellbender at Sam’s when he plays Fitzgerald’s in the Hilton Lounge. on County Line Road Nov. 3; Soulshine If you’re in the Starkville area Friday, on Old Fannin Road Nov. 4; Nov. 9 at support local singer/songwriter Jason TurnKathryn’s; Nov. 15 at Pelican Cove; Nov. er as he opens for The Avett Brothers at 16 at Buffalo Wild MSU’s Bulldog Bash. Wings in Ridgeland; Saturday, hear Point and Nov. 17 at Olga’s. Blank at Reed Pierce’s Visit larrybrewer.com and Hollywood and for last-minute gigs The Way to Go Band at and schedule updates. Fenian’s. Chill out SunAnd yeah, you better day with music from request “Motorcar.” John Mora at Sombra This weekend is Mexican Kitchen and jam-packed with a great Andy Hardwick at musical lineup in the Fitzgerald’s. Both play capital city. On Thursduring brunch. day night, get your I hope you all have bluegrass on at Local Larry Brewer plays a number of a wonderful week, 463 with The Hustlers area venues in November. and if you have any or at Burgers and Blues events (or complaints) with The Delta Mounsend them to music@ tain Boys. If you’re in a rockin’ mood Friday jacksonfreepress.com. By now you should night (and celebrating Spinal Tap Day on know the drill—if you see me out and 11-11-11), catch Dazework at Time Out about, please say hello! COURTESY LARRY BREWER

I

f you’ve lived in the metro area for at least six months, then more than likely you’ve seen local singer/songwriter Larry Brewer’s name pop up frequently in the JFP’s music listings. Not only is Brewer extraordinarily talented, he is one of the sweetest guys you will ever meet. (He played at my first Singers/ Songwriters Night with Hunter Gibson.) Brewer has had great success in the area, releasing three solo records (“Traveling at the Speed of Life,” “World Going Crazy” and “Lucky Ever After”), as well as performing as the lead singer for regional rock band The Windows in the 1980s. The Windows began in 1987 in Memphis, and Brewer’s song “Motorcar” became one of the most requested songs in the South, with heavy rotation on local station Z106 (tuned in Sundays, because they always play it then.) The Windows opened for acts such as Hall and Oates, The Beach Boys, Kansas, Peter Frampton, Badfinger and Jefferson Starship.

Describe the “In Their Boots” program. The format is a PowerPoint with graphics and music. The PowerPoint displays all the poetry that’s performed. There are photos of soldiers that they have allowed me to use that were taken in Iraq and Afghanistan. It’s a complete journey. The poem stories are ones I wrote based on intimate conversations I’ve had with soldiers and their families over the last five years.

Anywhere and everywhere—bases, hospitals, airports. Most are in Mississippi and Louisiana. I’m trying to give voice to the voiceless, these young men and women and their families who have fallen underneath the public’s eye. The poem stories are first-person. That way, it gives me a way to embody them. I don’t name them or identify their circumstances.


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NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 11/09 Restaurant Open

THURSDAY 11/10

Wednesday, November 9th

SHERMAN LEE DILLION (Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, November 10th

Yancy Clegg w/ The Bailey Bros (rr) Baby Jan & All That Chaz (rest)

FRIDAY 11/11 Eric Sommer (restaurant)

SATURDAY 11/12 Jon Clark (rest) Comedy Show w/ Jason Usry (rr)

LISA MILLS

MONDAY 11/14

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover

Blues Monday with Central MS Blues Society (rest)

Friday, November 11th

TUESDAY 11/15

JOHNNY SANSONE (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

PUB QUIZ w/ Laura (restaurant)

Saturday, November 12th

Coming Soon

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

WED11.23: Big Ass Turkey Bash

Tuesday, November 15th

with Kudzu Kings, Bailey Bros, & Electric Hamhock FRI11.25: Blue Mountain FRI12.16: North MS Allstars* FRI12.1: Jimbo Mathus

JUVENATORS

JESSE ROBINSON & FRIENDS

starts at 6pm, $5 Cover, Limited Menu

Wednesday, November 16th

BABY JAN & CHALMERS (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Monday-Thursday

Thursday, November 17th

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

SWING DE PARIS

Friday, November 18th

GRADY CHAMPION (Blues) 9-1, $15 Cover

Saturday, November 19th

GRADY CHAMPION (Blues) 9-1, $15 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

37


THURSDAY, NOV. 10 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN): Virginia Tech goes to Georgia Tech in a big ACC battle and JFP Top 25 matchup. â&#x20AC;Ś NFL (7-10:30 p.m. NFL Network): San Diego hosts Oakland in a big AFC West game. FRIDAY, NOV. 11 Mississippi high school football playoffs begin in 6A, 5A, and 1A this Friday. Playoffs continue in 4A, 3A, and 2A. My Florence Eagles are alive and travel to Quitman in round two. SATURDAY, NOV. 12 College football (6:45-10 p.m. ESPN): Alabama must bounce back from LSU loss on the road against Mississippi State. â&#x20AC;Ś College football, (7-10 p.m. CBS Sports Network): USM tries to keep marching to C-USA title game at home against UCF. SUNDAY, NOV. 13 NFL (noon-3 p.m. Fox): New Orleans travels to Atlanta in a NFC South matchup that will have major playoff implications. This is the first of two matchups between the Saints and Falcons. MONDAY, NOV. 14 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): The undefeated Green Bay Packers host the Minnesota Vikings. Rookie Christian Ponder tries to out-duel early MVP favorite Aaron Rodgers. TUESDAY, NOV. 15 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN U): Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sad night in sports when Ball State at Northern Illinois is the best watch. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16 NHL (6:30-9 p.m. Versus): Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see more hockey on the slate with the NBA gone. New Jersey travels to Buffalo in an early season matchup. Who will coach the Rebels next season after Houston Nutt? Candidates might stay away from a school with unrealistic expectations and a rift in the fan base. Half of Ole Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fans want to cling to the past. Follow Bryan at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

November 9 - 15, 2011

JFP Top 25: Week 11

38

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Demystifying the NBA Lockout

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n July 1, 2011, the collective bargain- Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Table? ing agreement between the National The owners want the players to accept a Basketball Association owners and reduction in their basketball-related income, the 450 NBA players expired. Un- or BRI, included in their salaries and set at 57 happy with the terms of the CBA, the owners percent in the expired agreement. BRI is revinstituted a lockout instead of extending it. enue from tickets, concessions, merchandise A lockout is a tactic and the like. They want used by owners to cona hard salary cap like the vince players to agree NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and fewer guaranto a new CBA, which teed contracts. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also governs â&#x20AC;&#x153;all aspects of debating less contentious playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; employment.â&#x20AC;? items such as the drug polDuring a lockout, playicy, conduct and discipline ers do not receive any of rules, and pensions. Retheir basic employment portedly, they have reached benefits, such as salaries an agreement regarding an and health care. They are â&#x20AC;&#x153;amnesty clause,â&#x20AC;? which also unable to enjoy the allows teams to cancel unluxuries of being a prowanted contracts. fessional athlete, includNegotiating through the end of October, NBA ing use of team facilities, At the National Basketball Commissioner David Stern equipment and the like. Playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association, playcancelled Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s professional The owners re- basketball games. ers agreed to reduce their sorted to a lockout after BRI to about 53 percent 18 months of talks failed or half a billion dollars to produce a new CBA. This is the fourth over five years going from players to owners. lockout since the inception of the NBA. The The owners rejected the offer. They shortest was for two hours in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;96. The longest wanted a reduction to 47 percent, which rewas six months during the 1998-1999 season, portedly would amount to $8 billion less than when 464 games were cancelled. The NBA what the players received under the old CBA. only played fifty games that season. Owners proposed a 50/50 split in BRI; howWith this lockout, the owners started a ever, the players are not going that low. Their fight. The owners claim that they have suf- most recent counteroffer was 52.5 percent, fered losses in excess of $300 million since last which reportedly amounts to $1.5 billion. season, and that only eight of the 30 NBA On Nov. 6, the owners offered 51 percent of teams are actually making money, with the BRI to players with intentions to reduce that Knicks being the richest, followed by the Lak- amount to 47 percent if players do not accept ers, Bulls, Celtics, Rockets, Mavericks, Heat the offer by Nov. 9. and Suns. The players consistently refuse to alThe players dispute this claim with three low a hard salary cap, which they say would arguments: lower their salaries. The owners lightened First, they argue that the so-called losses their stance on the cap, but players are conare a product of the ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; preferred account- cerned that owners will institute an enormous ing method. This is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;it depends on how luxury tax (a fee assessed against a team for you calculate itâ&#x20AC;? argument, and is probably going above the soft cap), which would act as the playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; weakest position. a hard cap, deterring owners from spending The second argument is that if the own- big bucks on major talent. The soft cap allows ers have suffered losses, it is due to their â&#x20AC;&#x153;own teams to exceed it through certain exceptions mismanaged spending, overpaid staff, or (bad) and loopholes, like the luxury tax. decisions on rosters and personnel.â&#x20AC;? Reportedly, owners have reached agreeThe third and strongest argument is that ment amongst themselves as it relates to â&#x20AC;&#x153;if teams shared local television revenue â&#x20AC;Ś revenue sharing. The BRI issue is far from fewer (teams) would be in financial trouble.â&#x20AC;? resolved, however, and consequently, NBA This is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;revenue sharingâ&#x20AC;? argument. The Commissioner David Stern cancelled all NoNFL and Major League Baseball exercise rev- vember games. When he cancelled the games enue sharing successfully, for the most part. in late October, Stern told the media that as CODY MULCAHY

Ole Miss looks to have caved in to the faceless â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forward Rebelsâ&#x20AC;? bloggers.

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

by Diandra Hosey

by Bryan Flynn

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the lockout continues, the ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposals might now get even harsher. The players defend themselves by negotiating a new CBA. Meanwhile, an unfair labor-practices charge that they filed with the National Labor Relations Board in Mayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;alleging that the owners refuse to bargain in good faithâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is pending review. Should negotiations prove ineffective, players may launch their second defense: decertify as a union. The NBPA will then no longer represent the players, who will file a class-action antitrust lawsuit against the NBA. As players and owners fight over millions and billions, the NBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supporting castâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; ticket takers, cashiers, security guards and the likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;pray for a swift resolution so that they may resume employment and be able afford Christmas presents for their children.

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November 11

# 2 with Me & Hugh 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover November 18

Acoustic Crossroads November 25

Delta Mountain Boys

Ladies Night 2 for 1 Well Drinks Every Wed. 8pm - Close 601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson

New Blue Plate Special $8.99

November 18th

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

Sherman Lee Dillionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthday Bash!

ALL WEEKEND LONG!

live music november 09 - 15 wed | nov 09 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p thur | nov 10 Delta Mountain Boys 5:30-9:30p

Cowboy Mouth November 11

fri | nov 11 Open Road 6:30 -10:30p sat | nov 12 South Of 20 6:30-10:30p sun | nov 13 Adibs Acoustical Jam 5:30-9:30p mon | nov 14 Karaoke tue | nov 15 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p 1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

Jason Bailey

8:00 - 11:00pm

Sherman Lee Dillion & Friends

Dash Rip Rock Doors Open at 9pm Advance Tickets $15

Tickest available at Ticketmaster 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

Pre-Birthday Bash

11:00 - until

November 12 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith

8:00 - 11:00pm

Sherman Lee Dillion & Friends Official Birthday Party

11:00 - until Live Music During Lunchâ&#x20AC;˘OPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDEDâ&#x20AC;˘NO COVER UNTIL Midnight $10 Cover after midnight

8/19A=<ÂşA@3/:@=19AB/B7=<

EO\bb]aQ]`S

0751/A6

Thursday - November 10 Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free 9-11 & Karaoke

:WabS\c^T]`g]c`QVO\QS]\

Friday - November 11

BcSaROga B=>B3<

LIVE MUSIC

Saturday - November 12

A=<5AB67AE339

Pacqua io WED NOV 9 LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

THUR NOV 10

BUD LIGHT NIGHT $2 BUD LIGHTS DURING THE THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL GAME

OHIO @ CENTRAL MICHIGAN ESPNU 7:30PM VIRGINIA TECH @ GEORGIA TECH ESPNU 7:30PM

FRI NOV 11

BEER BUCKET SPECIALS

VS

Ma rquez

SAT NOV 12

SUPER SATURDAY

COLLEGE GAME NIGHT

SUN NOV 13

NFL SUNDAY TICKET

WATCH EVERY GAME!

MON NOV 14

IN-DA-BIZ 2FOR1 DRINK SPECIALS

TUE NOV 15

JACKPOT TRIVIA

LIVE MUSIC

Sunday - November 13 OPEN MIC JAM 7-11

Monday - November 14 BAR OPEN

Tuesday - November 15 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

jacksonfreepress.com

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41


Step 1 +

Layering 101

L

Vintage silk green blouse, The Green Room, $20

by Meredith W. Sullivan

ayering makes me happy, because it’s the perfect way to maximize my entire wardrobe regardless of the season. When you find a way to wear a strapless mini dress year round, it’s one less thing you have to move to your “summer closet.” Perhaps my favorite thing about layering, though, is mixing prints. The combination of swirls and stripes in this look are quirky and fun, while the fur vest and black booties add a touch of chic. On cooler days (or nights), cover up your bare legs with a pair of black tights.

Black and white bandage skirt, Posh Boutique, $68

Step 2 +

Where2Shop:

The Green Room, 3026 N. State St., 601-9819320; Maison Weiss, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 109, 601-981-4621; Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977; Posh Boutique, 4312 N.

Gray striped cardigan, Orange Peel, $8

State St., 601-364-2244.

“Clothes and jewelry should be startling,

individual.”

Model: Shirley Kyles

–Alexander McQueen

“Fur” vest, Posh Boutique, $65

Step 3 + Black suede booties, Orange Peel, $72

Wolford black opaque tights, Maison Weiss, $42

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com. If there is something you’d like to see on our FLY page, tell us on Twitter

Azul Denim (733 Lake Harbour Drive, Suite E, Ridgeland, 601-605-1066) Shop at Azul Denim during the mega-sale this week. All sale tops are $29.99, and all sale jeans are $49.99. Shop now, because items are moving fast.

Body Anew Medical Spa (113 W. Jackson St., Suite 1A, Ridgeland, 601-605-0452) November specials include the Genesis anti-aging peel with dermaplane and facial for $65 (regularly $125).

circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484) circa. celebrates its first anniversary Nov. 17, from 5-9 p.m. Five artisans will present selected pieces, accompanied by live jazz. Draw for $1,500 in art.

Treehouse Boutique (3000 N. State St., 601-982-3433) Treehouse has lots of designer dresses and sportswear on sale. Take 40 percent off selected fall merchandise, including Nanette Lepore.

November 9 - 15, 2011

Re-Runs Consignment Shoppe (1645 W. Government Cove, Brandon, 601-824-3663) Re-Runs has new fall items in. Take 50 percent off red and green dot items. Shop for coats, children’s clothing, jeans and more.

@FlyJFP.

42

Check out flyjfp.com and on Facebook or information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


You won’t believe what you can make at Plato’s Closet in Ridgeland has tons of gently used brand name jeans, tees, tanks, hoodies and shoes to fill your closet at up 70% off regular retail. Don’t forget - we pay $$$ on the spot for your gently used apparel and accessories - Check us out today!

1260 East County Line Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 601.487.8207 platosclosetridgeland.com

Come see our new inventory! 398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Intern at the JFP

Friday, Nov. 18th from 9am - 7pm Saturday, Nov. 19th from 9am-4pm Mississippi’s favorite shopping party. Shop for fine art, jewlery, gifts & more.

• Editorial/News • Photography • Cultural/Music Writing • Fashion/Style

• Arts/Writing Editing

• Internet • Graphic Design • Communications: Marketing/Events/PR

Interested? Send an e-mail to interns@jacksonfreepress.com, telling us why you want to intern with us and whatmakes you the ideal candidate.

Mississippi Trade Mart • Fairgrounds • Jackson, MS Admission $5 • Stroller-Friendly Show • www.handworksmarket.com

Tfswjoh!vq!bmm!uif!fttfoujbmt"! in in love agahair r u o y

With

Voted state’s best consignment/resale by Mississippi Magazine.

Ridgeland Location: 626 Ridgewood Road | 601.605.9393 Starkville Location: 832B Hwy 12 West | 662.324.2641

Like Us: Facebook:Repeat Street Metro Jackson | Twitter: @RepeatSt | www.repeatstreet.net

jacksonfreepress.com

Magnolia Marketplace 5352 Lakeland Dr suite 600 | Flowood, Ms 601 992-7980

We currently have openings in the following areas:

*College credit available to currently enrolled college students in select disciplines.

6 ww 01 w.m .6 ole 05 cul .4 esh 5 air. 1 com 1

WE OFFER FOILS, GREAT LENGTH HAIR EXTENSIONS AND BRAZILIAN BLOWOUTS.

Hone your skills, gain valuable experience and college credit* by interningwith the Jackson Free Press. You set your hours, and attend free training workshops.

43


%NCUUKHKGFURCIG

Full-Time Office Solutions: from $450.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Full-Time Furnished Office â&#x20AC;˘ Telephone & Telephone Services â&#x20AC;˘ High-Speed Internet â&#x20AC;˘ Reception Services â&#x20AC;˘ Use of Kitchen & Business Lounge â&#x20AC;˘ Conference Room & Meeting Space Usage Virtual Office Solutions: from $129.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Professional Business Address â&#x20AC;˘ Local Phone Number â&#x20AC;˘ Voice Mail & Call Forwarding â&#x20AC;˘ Personalized Reception Service â&#x20AC;˘ Mail & Package Receipt â&#x20AC;˘ Personal Mailbox â&#x20AC;˘ Office & Conference Room Usage

101 Brooks Dr. Brandon MS 601-825-2063

Love the Arts?

Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi 1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

Up to 90% Off Prices Start At $1

Nov. 11 &12 | 8 a.m-8 p.m.

460 Briarwood Dr. | Jackson, MS 39206 Phone: 601.709.4610 | Fax: 601.709.4611

If you know and love fine arts, books, theater, dance, music or nightlife, you may be the arts writer weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for. Send samples and story ideas to valerie@ boomjackson.com.

Annual Book Sale

www.quailridge.com

ERASE YOUR File Bankruptcy

As little as $200 down plus filing fee

Music Writing Interested in interviewing musicians, reviewing albums and networking within Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music community? The Jackson Free Press is looking for freelance writers interested in covering the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music scene. Please e-mail inquiries to

valerie@jacksonfreepress.com

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

CALL 601.342.0721 Lee Law Office â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. We are a debit relief agency.

Culberson Bail Bonds

Bail Bonds 24 hours a day 7 days a week Payment Terms Available

Fastest & Friendliest Agents in the State

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