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October 19-25, 2011


October 19 - 25, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

10 NO. 6

contents ELIZABETH WAIBEL

SADAAF MAMOON

6 Occupy Smith Park Mississippians join together in solidarity to protest America’s corporate elitism. ELIZABETH WAIBEL

Cover photo illustration by Erica Sutton

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THIS ISSUE:

At the only gubernatorial debate, the candidates put politeness ahead of the issues. VICTOR LEE

jason meeks a locksmith’s sole purpose is to unlock car doors. Meeks says it’s a diverse line of work. “One minute you can be in a hospital, the next in a dark warehouse, then in a bulldozer or a plane,” he says. “It’s a lot of fun.” Meeks’ business is neighborhood-oriented, though he enjoys the commercial end of work, too. People in the area know and trust him to keep their houses and offices safe. “It gives me great satisfaction to help protect people,” he says, “especially when they need to feel a sense of security.” Meeks says he tries to keep watch on neighborhoods, attend local cops’ meetings, and be as knowledgeable as possible about rules and regulations. He helps to teach people break-in prevention and safety habits, such as not leaving purses in cars. “You can’t be easily distracted, because that’s when criminals take advantage,” he warns. “I want to help people be safe.” Meeks lives in Brandon with his wife, Kim, and his two daughters, Tyler and Jordan, 18 and 15. He hopes to some day move into Fondren, where he can keep an even closer eye on the neighborhood. SE Lock & Key is located at 3003 N. State St. For more info, call 601-362-0541, visit singlekeys.com or the Facebook page, or follow Meeks @fondrenlock on Twitter. —Sadaaf Mamoon

41 Food on Sticks If you’re already missing the deep-fried goodies from the fair, here’s how to make them at home.

45 Best Defense When it comes to breast cancer, to stay healthy, arm yourself with facts and a plan.

jacksonfreepress.com

For a locksmith like Jason Meeks, security is everything. His work’s purpose is to keep people, their belongings and their property safe. The 36-year-old Memphis native has been working full time since he was 14 years old and has been in hardware service most of his life. Meeks moved to Jackson when he was 2 years old and has lived here ever since. He started out at the Ace Hardware store in Madison, where he quickly rose to a management position. Next, Meeks took a position at the Montgomery Ace Hardware in Fondren, working exclusively with locks for the first time. In 1997, Meeks joined Fondren’s Blackstocks Safe and Lock and worked there for five years. He and his wife, Kim, bought the business in 2001 and renamed it SE Lock & Key. SE Lock & Key works for neighborhood businesses, responding to local crime. A large part of his work is going out to houses that have been broken into, ensuring future security with his locks and systems. He also does commercial work for hospitals and prisons, setting up master-key systems. He offers everything from exact house-key replication to complete access-control solutions for businesses. Meeks says that when people think “locksmith,” they don’t always know exactly what the job entails. Many people think

FILE PHOTO

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 7 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .................... Chatter 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 32 ............... Diversions 33 ..................... 8 Days 34 .............. JFP Events 35 ........................ Music 36 .......... Music Listing 38 ...................... Sports 40 ................. Astrology 41 ........................ Food 45 ............... Body/Soul 46 .... Girl About Town

Playing Nice

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editor’snote

Kristin Brenemen Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with penchant for dystopianism. Her Zombie Survival Kit has been upgraded with three new sonic screwdrivers. She designed many pages in this issue.

Erica Sutton Design intern Erica Sutton is a senior graphic-design major at Mississippi College. She enjoys design as well as photography. She designed the cover.

Latasha Willis Events Editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a graduate of Tougaloo College and the mother of one cat. Her JFP blog is “The Bricks That Others Throw,” and she sells design pieces at zazzle. com/reasontolive. She wrote for GOOD Ideas.

Ronni Mott Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-wining writer and the JFP’s managing editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She wrote for GOOD ideas and Body Soul.

Elizabeth Waibel Reporter Elizabeth Waibel grew up in Clinton. In May, she received her journalism degree from Union University in Jackson, Tenn. She likes coffee and trying new cake recipes. She wrote for GOOD ideas and Talks.

LaShanda Phillips Editorial assistant LaShanda Phillips is a recent graduate of Jackson State University. She is the third oldest of seven children. Her motto is: “Make-up is fantastic!” She wrote for GOOD ideas and Food.

Marika Cackett Marika Cackett is the public relations manager for the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau. A Washington, D.C. native, she passes her free time chasing her German shepherd puppy, Atlas, and enjoying craft beer. She wrote for GOOD ideas.

October 19 - 25, 2011

Tom Ramsey

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Tom Ramsey is a lobbyist, former investment banker and tobacco executive who teaches private cooking lessons, writes poetry, runs with the bulls and produced an album or two. He owns Ivy & Devine Culinary Group. He wrote a Food story.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Craig Noone, Crime Fighter

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few weeks ago, Jackson State University professor Noel Didla was sitting outside Parlor Market in downtown Jackson waiting for friends. Suddenly, Craig Noone, the young visionary and chef who created the restaurant, saw her and came outside to talk to Noel. He mentioned the current issue of BOOM Jackson magazine in which Noel was photographed at her desk for a small “At Work” feature. Craig asked Noel to autograph his copy and told her how much he liked the small piece. Noel, a native of India who has only been in Jackson since 2005, told me this story in a Facebook message the night of Oct. 14, about 12 hours after most of us learned that Craig had died early that morning in a car accident next to the governor’s mansion downtown. The same night, I attended a gathering of Craig’s friends and staff at Hal & Mal’s where I heard story after story about what Craig had done and wanted to do for Jackson (like a popup benefit for Peaches Restaurant on Farish Street, which is still planned). The first time I had met Craig, girl-about-town Julie Skipper had introduced me to him on Hal & Mal’s stoop about a year and a half ago. He wants to do so much for Jackson, she told me. Craig was delightful to me since that first night I met him. I watched him and his young staff—including his down-to-earth and loveable chefs Jesse Houston and Ryan Bell who moved here to help Craig carry out his Parlor Market vision—singlehandedly take the foodies movement here to a new level. They challenged other restaurants to step it up and help lift the dining standards and tease local palates, even as they started doing everything possible to promote other restaurants through social media months before they opened just over a year ago. Once the PM guys arrived on the scene, chefs across the city suddenly became rock stars (including some who should have been already). Thinking about him Friday, as I worked on this GOOD Ideas issue focusing on crime, I tried to figure out how to explain the phenomenon that was, and is, Craig Noone. I think what made him so special was that he is one of those Jacksonians who could have gone anywhere, whether just to Madison or all the way to New York City or Portland, but decided to put down his roots, and invest his immense talents and energy right here. He opened an upscale restaurant across from a strip of abandoned storefronts on West Capitol Street even as others—and I expect some folks he knew well—declared that people won’t go out to eat in downtown Jackson at night. Right. In so doing, he lifted the burgeoning back-to-Jackson movement to a whole new level while following a philosophy I believe and preach about every day: Mississippi doesn’t just need to get off the bottom; we can be the best. We can have high standards, we can work hard and, more importantly, we can believe in our ability to be the best and make our city

stronger. We can teach and motivate others. Now, I wasn’t around Craig all the time, but I never once heard him complain about Jackson, or crime, or anything else. Nearly every time I saw him, he was stepping out to help someone: whether it was volunteering to serve food in the hot sun at our 2010 BOOM party at the zoo in west Jackson, or standing up to be auctioned as a Man of Character at the 2011 JFP Chick Ball to help fight domestic abuse. He was clearly a young man who believed deeply in the power of individuals to change the world. And he changed ours. When I got that Facebook message from Noel Friday night, I read it and cried. I knew immediately that it was the perfect story to use to explain the Craig Noone I knew a little and admired so much. He was the kind of person who took time to matter. Think about it. Craig took time to get things right. He took time to study and do research to be great at his craft. He took time to train his people well. He took time to walk through his restaurant and treat everyone like a celebrity guest. He took time to get the details right. He took time to make sure that Todd and I had delicious vegetarian meals that weren’t on the menu. He took time to give credit and help to smaller local restaurateurs. He took time to volunteer his time, his staff, his food to our community’s toughest causes. And he took time to walk outside and ask Noel Didla for her autograph. It’s Mississippians like Craig who will change our state and our city. They are the “crazy ones,” as a famous Apple commercial said of change-makers. They believe in our potential to be great, and they know—even if they don’t talk about it all the time—that our diversity is one of our more powerful strengths

if we will tap it. If it’s allowed to marinate and congeal, our diversity in age, background, ethnicity and ideas will bring our creativity and our genius to the surface. Look at Craig’s chef line-up: male, female, black, white. And, boy, can those rock stars cook. After hearing Noel’s story, I realized I couldn’t find a better call to action for our Preventing Crime issue than a tribute to what made Craig Noone such a visionary. I couldn’t help think of all the hand-wringing we’ve endured over the years from folks who can’t think of anything to do about crime but whine, the same ones who told us incessantly that exciting development would never happen in Jackson without getting rid of all the crime first (the same ones who elected a mayor who presided over a rise in crime), who argue that crime is our No. 1 issue rather than a glaring symptom. I think of the media who go on and on about Jackson’s crime to sell ads outside the city limits. I think of the politicians who just want to scare us into voting for them, not caring that they are running off our tax base with their bogus crime rankings. Then I think of someone like Craig: a native Jacksonian who left and learned to be the best and then plopped himself down in downtown to prove that we can be the best, too. His story can and should teach us all several important lessons, including the need to not get so caught up in our work and lives that we don’t take care of ourselves well enough. But frankly, if most of us accomplish a quarter of what Craig did in his too-short 32 years, Jackson will become a shining city on a hill for generations to come. Thank you, Craig Noone. May you rest in glorious peace.


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Proceeds directly benefit under served children with vision issues.

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VOTE

Tuesday, November 8th

Marshand Crisler A True Democrat

Crisler will work to ensure public safety, better highways, and support transportation projects in the central district that will create more jobs in our communities.

If we show up at the polls we win! Make your voice heard! Make your vote count! Crisler for Commissioner PO Box 59484, Jackson, Mississippi 39284 (601) 982-9388 | www.VoteCrisler.com

October 19-25, 2011

paid for by Crisler for Commissioner

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ELIZABETH WAIBEL

Protesters ‘Occupy’ Smith Park police officer told the protesters they were not allowed to sleep in the park overnight, so they moved to the sidewalks. Some tried to organize people into shifts so they could take turns sleeping. By Monday, people taking work breaks outnumbered protesters at Smith Park. But rows of signs on the Occupy Mississippi protesters marched Saturday afternoon from outdoor stage and a Smith Park to the state capitol to protest corporate greed. table of fliers weighted down with rocks spoke demonstration that began Saturday to hopes for more enthusiasm in the future. at Smith Park continued through the Gabe Porter said many people had left weekend, and supporters of Occupy to go to work, but he expected them to return Mississippi say they do not plan to later in the day. leave any time soon. Like several protesters, Porter wears About 50 people rallied downtown Sat- a Guy Fawkes mask, like the one in the urday and marched to the state capitol to pro- movie “V for Vendetta,” on the back of test corporate greed. The protest was held at his head. Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the same time as others around the world in the Houses of Parliament in England in support of the ongoing Occupy Wall Street 1605, but Porter says the masks symboldemonstration in New York City. ize standing up for one’s beliefs rather Protesters held a “general assembly” than Fawkes’ tactics. While Porter talks Saturday afternoon and voted to contin- about banks and politicians using monue the demonstration indefinitely. Some ey to control society, he places some of camped out Saturday night to “occupy” the blame on individuals for buying into the park. On Sunday night, a post to the “the system.” Occupy Mississippi Facebook page said a “Me personally, I think we need to

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by Elizabeth Waibel change as individuals; we need to do something ourselves,” he said. “We’re kind of hardwired into the system, into the society. We already want to buy the new iPhone and always go to McDonald’s, when we really need to be teaching our kids how to garden before it’s too late and that knowledge is gone. We’re kind of devolving.” People participating in Occupy Mississippi have been quick to say they are protesting a collection of issues. They eschew leaders and spokespeople and refer to themselves as facilitators or supporters. Most demonstrators are vocal in criticizing corporations for taking bailouts and laying off workers before posting healthy profits. They also place at least some of the blame on government officials who take campaign contributions from those corporations. In addition to protesting big corporations, individual protesters have brought with them a variety of grievances that their fellow occupiers may or may not agree with, advocating for more affordable college education, an end to war, doubling the size of the U.S. House of Representatives, legalizing marijuana and voting one way or another on ballot initiatives. Demonstrators said police allowed them to stay in the park Monday night. Protesters say they will occupy Smith Park indefinitely and are planning more meetings Thursday and Saturday. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Good Times

We put together a lovely word cloud containing some of the big topics in this Good Ideas issue.

science

“If a parent agrees, we can teach more science to a child so that those children understand what can go wrong.” —Mississippi gubernatorial candidate Phil Bryant during a debate Oct. 14 regarding his views of public schools teaching sex education to reduce the state’s teen pregnancy rate.

Wednesday, Oct. 12 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says an alleged plot by two Iranians to kill the Saudi Arabian ambassador to America is a “dangerous escalation” in Iran’s support for terrorism. … The Jackson Police Department receives a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to hire new officers. Thursday, Oct. 13 Gallup releases a poll that shows support for the death penalty in America is at the lowest since 1972, when a Supreme Court case led to a four-year halt to executions. … A Mississippi woman sues Facebook over allegations that the company violates wiretap laws. Friday, Oct. 14 A U.N. report says more than 3,000 people have died due to violence in Syria in the past several months. President Bashar al-Assad’s regime has been criticized for using harsh tactics against dissidents. … Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree and Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant make their appeals to voters during a debate for the governor’s race. Saturday, Oct. 15 People in cities around the world, including Jackson, hold demonstrations in support of the Occupy Wall Street protests in New York City. … Ole Miss loses to Alabama 52 to 7. Sunday, Oct. 16 Visitation services are held for Parlor Market executive chef and co-owner Craig Noone who died in a car accident Oct. 14. … Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon dies in a 15-car wreck at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway while competing in a race. Monday, Oct. 17 Anadarko Petroleum Corp. agrees to pay BP $4 billion in a settlement over the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster last year. BP operated the oil well, but Anadarko owned a 25-percent stake. The money will go into BP’s fund to settle claims with individuals and businesses. Tuesday, Oct. 18 Hamas releases an Israeli soldier it held for more than five years in exchange for the freedom of more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners held by Israel. … Parkway Properties announces that it will move its headquarters from downtown Jackson to Orlando, Fla. Get updates at jfpdaily.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

news, culture & irreverence

The National Gang Intelligence Center (nationalgangcenter. gov) reports that, as of 2008, Hinds County had fewer than 500 gang members, as did Rankin County. Adams, DeSoto, Grenada, Harrison, Jackson and Marion counties all reported more gang members than did Hinds County.

Jackson says goodbye to Craig Noone, chef and entrepreneur. p8

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citytalk

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Doing it For Jackson

I

n spring 2010, Grady Griffin received an urgent phone call from Craig Noone. A large oak tree had fallen in Greenwood Cemetery, close to Eudora Welty’s grave. “Do you think I could get that tree and make my tables out of it?” Noone asked Griffin, who is the director of education and training for the Mississippi Hospitality and Restaurant Association. For months Noone had researched the history of the building at 115 W. Capitol St. that would house the restaurant he had dreamed of opening since he was a child. The south Jackson native decided to name the restaurant Parlor Market, after a grocery store that was located in the space in 1926. It was important to Noone to incorporate Jackson’s history into the place through details such as its marble counters, wooden beams and butcher hooks. “I knew right then that there was something special about him,” Griffin said Oct. 17. “It showed how specific to every detail he wanted to be involved in. From menus to material, he wanted to be a local as possible.” Noone wasn’t satisfied with just serving food. “People in Mississippi are storytellers, and I wanted my restaurant and the food to tell a story,” he said during a September 2011 interview on the radio show “Mississippi Arts Hour” on WLEZ-FM. Around 1 a.m. Friday, Oct. 14, Noone was driving his Chevy Tahoe when he collided with a Ford Taurus at the intersection of West and Capitol streets. A witness reported that Noone was driving at a high speed when he ran a red light and collided with the Taurus. The two passengers in the Taurus suffered minor injuries, but Noone hit a light pole and was ejected from his car and killed. On Monday, Oct. 17, a few hours after his funeral, members from Jackson’s restaurant community hosted the annual “Steel Chef” event, a fundraiser for the Community Place, a nonprofit nursing home. The event was planned to be a cooking competition between Noone and Mike Roemhild of Table 100. The event became a memorial for Noone, instead. The death of the 32-year-old chef comes

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Waxing Brazilian $70 Basic Bikini $40 Teeny Bikini $55

by Lacey McLaughlin

Parlor Market executive chef and co-owner Craig Noone died Oct. 14.

weeks after the upscale restaurant celebrated its one-year anniversary. After receiving confirmation that the King Edward would reopen, Noone decided to leave his job at Fearing’s Restaurant in Dallas, Texas, and move to Jackson. Mart Lamar, a local developer who renovated the building on Capitol Street decided to invest in Parlor Market after Noone presented his business plans over dinner in New Orleans. A few days before his death, Noone had moved into a loft apartment in a building next to his restaurant, which Lamar had also renovated. “Other people didn’t have the guts to go downtown and open a restaurant like that, and Craig thought it was a no-brainer,” Lamar said. “He had so much confidence that the restaurant would work that it was unbelievable.” Noone was the first to admit that the success of Parlor Market largely hinged on his staff. When he decided to open his restaurant in Jackson, he called on his friend and chef Jesse Houston in Dallas to help out. Hous-

ton brought along fellow chef Ryan Bell from Dallas. The chefs, all 30 or younger at the time, wanted to incorporate fresh, local food, innovative menus, and most importantly, fun into the new venture. Underground 119 executive chef Tom Ramsey, also a Jackson Free Press food columnist, remembers when Noone and his righthand men came into town. “The whole point of Parlor Market was, ‘Hey, let’s do that restaurant that we have always wanted to work at,’” Ramsey said. “Craig was able to say: ‘Look. I’m going to pay you poorly, and we are going to work unbelievably long hours, but we are going to cook exactly what we want to cook, and we are going to have fun. We are going to make exactly what we want.’ And the joy of that is what translated to customers.” Ramsey said Noone’s attention to detail didn’t stop at food and décor. He was equally dedicated to empowering his staff to make decisions. Noone didn’t hire a general manager, and he weaved seamlessly between the kitchen and dining room, where he spent time interacting with guests. Parlor Market simultaneously serves as a neighborhood haunt with loyal regulars and an upscale dining place for special nights out. The restaurant also became well known for its pop-up restaurants, transforming into a burger joint, taqueria and steak house for one night each, drawing hundreds of people downtown. Noone would often to go to extreme lengths to make customers happy. Dan Blumenthal, co-owner and chef of Mangia Bene restaurants, said somehow Noone would find out when his regular customers were dining at other restaurants and would frequently call in to buy them a bottle of wine or dessert. Parlor Market closed temporarily Oct. 14, but will reopen Oct. 19 at 5:30 p.m. Lamar said Houston and Bell will take over Noone’s responsibilities. “I think it would be Craig’s desire if the people that he put in place could continue on in his memory,” Lamar said. “Craig will be there in spirit.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.


candidatedish

by Lacey McLaughlin

Damon Stevenson is running for District 4 Hinds County Justice Court judge.

T

he qualifications to run for justice court judge are pretty simple: a high-school diploma and $10 to pay the county circuit clerk to file your paperwork. You also must be a resident of the county you wish to run in for two years before the election and take a training course within six months of beginning your term in office. Perhaps this is why the race has been somewhat an unknown quantity this election season. Of the four districts in Hinds County, only two races are contested: District 1 and District 4. In District 1, “Jackson Jambalaya” blogger and Northside Sun writer James “Jimmy” Hendrix (who also goes by the name “Kingfish,” but records indicate he was born James Whitehead) is running as a Republican against incumbent Don Palmer, a Democrat. In District 4, 28-year-old Damon Stevenson is running as a Democrat against Republican incumbent Jimmy Morton. Stevenson, who owns a law firm, Stevenson Legal Group, is the only candidate who appears to have a campaign website listing his qualifications. Stevenson is a native of Brandon who currently lives in Raymond with his wife, Jessica Morris Stevenson. He graduated from Tougaloo College in 2005 with a degree in economics and received a law degree from

Mississippi College School of Law. He worked as a federal probation officer after graduation until he opened his firm in 2009. Why did you decide to run for justice court? As a practicing attorney, I have had several opportunities to have several cases in justice court in Hinds County and other parts of the state. … You notice things that you think may help the court system move a bit smoother, wiser and be a better investment for taxpayers. Can you be more specific? At this time I think it would be wonderful for the justice court to be more accessible online. If people could schedule hearings and matters online it would improve things. If people could pay fines online, perhaps they wouldn’t even need to come to court. Modernizing the system in those ways would be extremely beneficially. Also, while it’s not a requirement to be an attorney, I think the citizens of Hinds County would benefit from having a person on the bench who understands how the law is supposed to work. Tell me about the cases justice court judges oversee. Justice court handles misdemeanors in Hinds County that are prosecuted through the Hinds County Sheriff’s Department or even the Mississippi Highway Patrol—any misdemeanors such as a speeding violation, traffic ticket, or even domestic violence or a DUI. There is also a civil side of the justice court that handles matters up to $3,500. What qualities do you think a judge must posses? The guiding principle of any court, including the justice court, has to be the law. The laws that are in place deserve to be promoted. If a judge has that in mind and uses that a guiding force, he will automatically be fair. You worked as a federal probations office. What was that like? As a federal probations officer, there are

different facets to your job. … A major part of my job was advising federal judges on sentencing issues related to people who had been convicted. That was extremely eye-opening. Not only do you look at the crime that a person committed, you have an opportunity to look at their background and understand why they committed this crime. You can then tailor a sentence so that you are addressing the root issues on why they are committing the crime. In your experience, what is the best way to counter recidivism? Just locking people up does not solve problem. I think what the justice court judges need to do is take the lead working with churches and employers—different institutions in the community to ensure that when people come through the court system we can put in place things like job training and placement. As an attorney, I have been amazed at the number of people I represent who cannot read and write, and that makes it a whole lot harder to find a job. … We should have different venues for people who come through the court system where we can refer them to a job-training specialist or an education specialist who can work with them to get their GED. Based on what I have seen, people who go out and work meaningful jobs from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. are not committing crimes. Do you think your age will be a challenge for you to win this race? No. … Even though I am young, I am the only licensed attorney in the race. My qualifications alone differentiate me a great deal from my opponent. Young people are assets but at the same time our greatest liability. In the court system today, it is no secret that there is a large number of young males. I think my age will actually help me, because it will allow me to relate to them and let them know that it is possible for you as a young person to go out and make a meaningful contribution to society—work, support a family and become a taxpayer instead of becoming a tax burden. See more candidate interviews at www.jfp. ms/politics.

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COURTESY DAMON STEVENSON

Raising the Bar

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statetalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

Bryant, DuPree Play Nice

T ELIZABETH WAIBEL

he two candidates for governor in Mississippi talked up bipartisan cooperation and downplayed their differences at a debate Oct. 14. Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, and Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree, a Democrat, carefully avoided any appearance

Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree, left, and Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant stayed polite and composed at a debate Friday night.

October 19 - 25, 2011

of negative campaigning or attacks on their opponents, which resulted in a chummy atmosphere and little substantive discussion of issues that set the two men apart. DuPree and Bryant answered questions about partisan gridlock, health-care reform and teen pregnancy at the only scheduled debate between the two nominees. The Mississippi College School of Law hosted the televised debate, and AARP sponsored it. On most issues, the candidates’ views seemed to vary little. Regarding how to reduce the number of teen births in Mississippi, both emphasized the community’s role in teaching teens to wait until they are older to have children. Bryant said last year’s law requiring school districts to adopt a sex-education policy will allow schools—in some districts, at least—to teach abstinence-plus sex education. “If a parent agrees, we can teach more science to a child, so that those children understand what can go wrong,” he said. “...

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But again, I think we need to say to parents and grandparents alike: ‘I am not individually responsible for what happens to your child. Now, we all have a shared destiny, but you have to step up.’” DuPree, who said his wife and he started out as teen parents, said the church, the educational system and the community must work together to help teens, as people did when he and his wife were young parents. “This teen pregnancy issue is not something you’re going to solve overnight,” he said. “... It’s going to take education in order to do that, it’s going to take, again, the community to pull together.” Bryant and DuPree did differ on the health-care reform bill that Congress passed last year. “I’m extremely concerned with the ‘Obamacare’ health care, as some people call it,” Bryant said, adding that the act will add 400,000 Mississippians to the Medicaid roll. “You’ve got to realize, we’ve got 640,000 Mississippians now on the Medicaid roll; that’s a million people in a state of 3 million. ... That’s impossible to afford,” he said. Bryant said the state contributes 25 percent of Medicaid expenses; however, under the reform bill, the federal government would pay 100 percent for individuals at or below 133.3 percent of the federal poverty level beginning in 2013. Bryant touted a health-care exchange, nationwide tort reform and job creation as the best ways to bring down the cost of health insurance. He also criticized the act’s controversial individual insurance requirement, calling it a violation of civil liberties. DuPree said some aspects of the healthcare reform act should concern people, but it will bring in $20 million to help uninsured people in the state get insurance. He said the bill makes a health-care exchange possible. “Without the $20 million, it wouldn’t happen, and we would still be talking about what we are going to do with the half a million people in Mississippi (without insurance),” DuPree said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


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s Sonny Tillman, the founder of Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q once said, “with a little hard work, anything’s possible.” Floyd “Sonny” Tillman and his wife, Lucille, founded Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q in Gainesville, Florida, in 1968. Their goal was to offer authentic southern Bar-B-Q with a side of southern hospitality. Sonny’s Bar-B-Q Sonny knows there’s only one way to cook real southern Bar-B-Q and that means slow-cooking the meat over real hardwood for a long time. Sonny’s goes through over 500 tons of oak in all of their 129 locations to get that real smoke flavor in every bite. In fact, today, all of Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-BQ locations still use the same type of smoker that Sonny used in his first restaurant in 1968. You can’t really enjoy Bar-B-Q without the sauce. Sonny’s has got you covered with five different types, sure to please. Starting with the most popular flavor, Sweet, considered the “Gold Standard” among Bar-B-Q aficionados. If mild is your thing, Sonny’s blend of tomato, mustard, cider vinegar, and spices will treat you right. If you like your Bar-B-Q with a little kick, just pour on some of Sonny’s Sizzlin’ Sweet sauce. If want a real kick to your ’Q, give the Smokin’ flavor a try. Blended with spices and a hint of chipotle, this sauce will surely take your taste buds for a ride. Maybe you’re a fan of Carolina-style Bar-B-Q. Don’t fret; you can still get the taste of the Carolinas right here in the Magnolia state with Sonny’s Mustard sauce. This combination of mustard and Worcestershire puts the zing in your ’Q! If you’re a real Bar-B-Q traditionalist and like your ribs dry-rubbed, Sonny’s has got you covered. With so many sauces, you’re going to need some serious meat to soak up all that goodness. Fortunately, Sonny’s has plenty of options. From the pulled brisket to sliced brisket, BarB-Q chicken to smoked turkey, if it can be smoked, Sonny’s has it on the menu. Maybe you like your Bar-B-Q sauce over something from the sea. Give Sonny’s “Gone Fishin’” platter, a lightly seasoned catfish fillet with Gulf fried shrimp, a try. Feeling like a sandwich or a burger? Sonny’s has got it and more available in a combo with a side and a drink, all for a great value. Speaking of sides, what’s authentic Bar-B-Q without all the fixings? Get your fix of fixings with a baked potato, baked sweet potato, homemade macaroni and cheese, corn on the cob, original recipe Bar-B-Q beans, and fresh-made coleslaw, just to name a few. So whether you’re a Bar-B-Q novice or an aficionado, you can find what you’re looking for, with a healthy serving of great customer service every time, at Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q.

jacksonfreepress.com

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Guns for Safety?

I

t so happens that in the past few weeks, a number of people with ties to the Jackson Free Press—staff and former staff—have encountered the same piece of advice from Jackson Police Department officers. The advice: Buy a gun. Thoughtful gun advocates and detractors alike can agree on a few things. First, guns are deadly force, not human remote controls, and as such, require a willingness on the part of the gun-toting victims to kill their assailant. Second, guns require training and experience in their use; a gun in the wrong hands can be deadly to the holder and to other unintended victims. Third, situations involving crimes and guns are high-stress, highadrenaline experiences that can slow down reaction times and muddle decision-making. The Crime Lab at the University of Chicago (an academic lab making a strong case for evidence-based gun discussions) warns that guns “intensify violence” in property-crime situations leading to more homicides. Communities with widespread gun ownership correlate with an increased number of guns in the hands of youth and felons. Widespread gun ownership does not correlate with a decrease in burglaries, nor does it convey a “public benefit” in reducing property crime, in part because the presence of guns makes for valuable “loot” in a burglary. It’s your call whether you wish to purchase a legal gun, train extensively in its use and take responsibility for its safe storage (including locks that keep it secure from children and in the case your home or car is burglarized successfully). But we feel strongly that Jackson Police Department officers should not make a suggestion to Jackson citizens that lacks precision or empirical evidence that guns make a community safer as a whole. When reached for comment, Jackson Police Chief Rebecca Coleman said, however, that it is not JPD’s policy to tell residents to purchase guns for safety. The department’s Quality of Life and Crime Prevention units give safety presentations and tips on what citizens should do in potentially dangerous situations. As an alternative to guns, Coleman suggested that citizens secure their vehicles, be aware of their surroundings and park vehicles in well-lighted areas. We encourage Chief Coleman to ensure that officers under her command know and follow JPD’s policy and increase education when it comes to gun ownership and gun safety. Let’s have an empirical, evidence-based approach to this problem.

KEN STIGGERS

Quell the Anxiety

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October 19 - 25, 2011

iss Doodle Mae: “Jojo just concluded an important meeting with the Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store staff. The purpose of this meeting was to quell the anxiety of the staff regarding the Occupy Wall Street movement. The anxiety started after Nurse Tootie McBride’s speech during the Ghetto Science Community Grass Roots Occupy Wall Street Solidarity Brigade and convoy to New York. Jojo volunteered his staff to help prepare for the solidarity brigade and convoy. This morning the staff wanted to know what the Occupy movement was about. As usual Jojo had an explanation.” Jojo: “The movement that you and I support is a struggle for balance. As you know, many in our community and around this nation struggle with economic imbalance. A minimum-wage worker can barely pay bills and afford health care. A college graduate, loaded down with a large student loan, cannot find a job. Middle class couples get laid off, lose their homes and do not have enough money to feed their families. Many people suffer at the hands of some insensitive, uncaring and greedy individuals. Therefore, your non-judgmental solidarity with the poor, middle class and common folk reflects the proverb that says, ‘Whoever is kind to the needy honors God.’ “So, in the words of Bartles and Jaymes (the wine cooler guys), ‘Thank you for your support.’” Miss Doodle Mae: “Let the staff say, ‘Amen, brother Jojo.’ Now it’s time to get ready for Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store’s Double for Your Trouble Cus12 tomer Appreciation Sale.”

MY TURN

by Rev. Rob Hill

Relationships, Not Gates

I

would like to claim that Broadmeadow United Methodist Church first reached out to the neighborhood, but the truth is that the neighborhood reached out first to Broadmeadow. It began a little more than 10 years ago, when area youth showed up at the church gym and asked if they could play basketball. Faithfully, the church said “yes.” Not long after, several church members added a tutoring and mentoring component to complement the basketball, and Broadmeadow’s “Books and Basketball” program was born. It was a decision that helped transform the church into an open and inclusive community, and it was a decision that has transformed the lives of many young people. While I wish I could describe a science as to how it works, there is no science. It only requires the willingness to look around and see the potential that surrounds you. In this case, it was the willingness to recognize the potential that resides within young people all around our church. That’s exactly what happened to me one day five years ago when I looked outside my church and noticed that the young men in our program were wearing team jerseys with Broadmeadow U.M.C. emblazoned across their chests. What impressed me was that the church had not provided those jerseys. These young men had paid to have them made. I realized that while none of them had ever participated in worship at Broadmeadow, they were indeed “our” youth; they claimed the church before the church claimed them. From that point forward, church members made it a point to actively incorporate these young men, all African American, into the life of a predominately white church. The tutoring program and exposure to the broader world through educational

trips to New York City and Washington, D.C., made a difference in their lives. The church community as a whole, and its attitude, began to look different. It took a little time, but gradually these young men went from being known around the church as the “basketball boys” to being known as vital members of the church family. So often, churches and other organizations see changing neighborhoods and changing demographics as threats. Their response is not welcoming. Instead, they leave or hunker down into a defensive posture protecting everything they hold dear—including their misconceptions. The Jackson City Council has recently determined that citizens can protect themselves and prevent crime in the city by allowing neighborhoods to construct gates at their entrances. While I certainly understand the desire for people to feel secure in their homes and neighborhoods, this response saddens me. Neighborhood gates might deter some crime, but they don’t address or solve the problem. The only real way to deal with perceived threats is through building relationships, not through building fences. When you get to know someone who is different from you, you soon discover that the only thing they threaten is the dismantling of your own fears and prejudices. That’s exactly what happened at Broadmeadow. Maybe it can happen for you. Rev. Rob Hill is the pastor of Broadmeadow United Methodist Church in Jackson where he has served since June of 2005. A native of Forest, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University in 1997 and a master’s degree in divinity from Duke University in 2002.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


JED OPPENHEIM

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n Oct. 22, youth from all over Mississippi, but mostly Jackson, will gather at Metrocenter Mall for a special event: the first Art, Poetry and Justice SLAM. The event is part of National Youth Justice Awareness Month and brings together the Southern Regional Office of the Children’s Defense Fund, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU of Mississippi, the NAACP of Mississippi, The Young People’s Project and F.A.I.T.H. Inc. Young people will share perspectives on justice in their communities through art, spoken word and poetry. The young artists who present the best pieces will receive prizes. This collaboration will celebrate the enormous potential of Mississippi’s youth, prioritize the important perspectives of our young people and highlight that adults have much to learn from the voices of our youth. This event is also an opportunity to engage in some truth telling and to bust the myths that surround youth justice in Mississippi. While youth justice in Mississippi still has a long way to go, it’s important to remember that our state has made significant progress in reforming a once-brutal system—especially its two juvenile prisons, Oakley and Columbia. In 2004, Brad Schlozman, then the acting head of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, called Oakley and Columbia Training Schools “the worst the Department of Justice had seen in 20 years.� Children sent to Oakley and Columbia endured physical and sexual abuse, prolonged isolation, and denials of medical, mentalhealth and educational services. As a result of tremendous leadership from Mississippi state representatives—including Earle Banks, D-Jackson, George Flaggs, D-Vicksburg, and John Hines, DGreenville—the Columbia Training School is permanently closed. And, because of incredibly hard work from the Youth Court Judges Council, the Division of Youth Services and legislators, Oakley has made an almost complete turnaround. Youth there have positive incentives for good behavior, and recidivism rates have dropped dramatically. Over the last eight years, state legislative and policy changes have reduced the populations in our facilities and ensured that our training school, Oakley, only has youth who have committed the most serious offenses. And crime has not gone up. All over Mississippi, communitybased alternatives and preventative-based programming are beginning to take hold. Investing in community-based alternatives so that our youth can be supervised in their communities will reduce detention rates, conserve taxpayer resources and maintain our safety. Annie E. Casey’s Juvenile Detention Alternative’s Initiative (JDAI) is already in place in four Mississippi counties. These simple activities ensure that a youth does not need to be held unnecessarily between their first contact with law enforcement and their

court hearing. Pre ve n t a t i ve based programming will limit the “opportunities� for youth to come into contact with the law. This common-sense approach is really the only proven way to reduce juvenile crime. It advocates investing in vocational programs, mentorship opportunities and strong community connections through churches, sports or the arts. There is still room for more transformation. Many of our schools perpetuate the myth that some youth just don’t want to learn. This is not true. “Zero tolerance� policies—once meant for drug or weapons offenses in school—have now come to mean “habitual offender� for things like talking back, dress-code violations and tardiness. These misguided policies explicitly exclude youth whom schools believe get in the way of others’ learning. Thus, a myth is compounded by a system that pushes young people out instead of educating them. In my experience, be it in a detention center, in a regular school or in an alternative school, I have never come across a youth who says—or even implies—“I do not want to learn.� This thinking is railroading too many youth, especially black male youth in our state, into the criminal justice system. We will crack these myths when it is the youth who are speaking and the adults who are listening. We encourage youth to participate in the SLAM for just this reason. We have to re-think what we are doing and how we are doing it. Too often, we leave the media, our elected or appointed officials, advocates and the people in charge of caring for our children (in schools, detention centers or elsewhere) responsible for “being� their voice. Before we realize it, we forget the best interests of the youth. The adults at the SLAM will be asked to listen. As part of National Youth Justice Awareness Month, the partner organizations will be there to provide the platform for the youth. The young people I work for know the lies and stories told about them, and they come to me asking why people say these things. I rarely have an answer beyond a ramble about social, racial, educational or economic injustice. What I do know is that my voice isn’t the one that needs to be heard. It is the voices of the hundreds of thousands of youth in our state that are our most valuable assets. See you on Oct. 22. Come ready to listen. The Art, Poetry & Justice SLAM is 7 p.m. Oct. 22, at the Metrocenter Mall on Highway 80. For more information, see the event’s Facebook page. All are welcome. Jed Oppenheim is the Senior Advocate for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Mississippi. Everyone is responsible for ending the school-toprison pipeline that is pushing our children out of school. So what are you waiting for?

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


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Asking Why

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by Donna Ladd

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Jackson Murders

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1. Mental health: Witnessing 40 aggression causes depression, 20 anxiety, sadness, withdrawal—conditions that can lead 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 to aggression in those without self-regulation skills. 9EAR 4OTAL 2. Connectedness: Kids need   Fear: Larger Than Crime? to participate and connect     socially to stay engaged in FDUHGRIWKHLURZQVKDGRZVSHRSOHFDQÂśWHQMR\DEHWWHUOLIHLI   school. Kids who are less vicWKH\ZRUU\WKHERRJH\PDQPLJKWVWULNHDWDQ\PRPHQW)HDURI   timized like school more. FULPHFRUURGHVTXDOLW\RIOLIHDVWXG\IURPWKH86'HSDUWPHQW   RI-XVWLFHVWDWHV*DU\&RUGQHUZURWHLQWKHVWXG\Âł5HGXFLQJ)HDU 3. Absenteeism: Students who   RI&ULPH6WUDWHJLHVIRU3ROLFH´WKDWHYHQDVFULPHUDWHVIHOOOHYHOVRI   see school as physically or IHDULQFUHDVHG,WÂśVDODUJHHQRXJKJDSWRJHWWKHJRYHUQPHQWDGYLV   emotionally dangerous often LQJSROLFHGHSDUWPHQWVRQKRZWRUHGXFHIHDU&RUGQHUVXJJHVWVWKDW   avoid school and drop out. SROLFHVXUYH\UHVLGHQWVWRDVVHVVDFRPPXQLW\ÂśVIHDUVHHZZZMIS   PVFULPHIHDUWRVHHDVXUYH\DQGLGHDVIRUUHGXFLQJIHDU Schools must help chil  ²9DOHULH:HOOV   dren learn “pro-socialâ€? behav  iors, Bausch says, or as Athens plague us.â€? Tolerating brutal  advises, to teach children to engage with others as community   ization of children is “equally members, thus building empathy skills. The men argue for the   violent and equally evil, and   kinds of efforts this GOOD Ideas issue lays: life-skills training; Violent Exposure we reap what we sow.â€?   Athens’ theory complements cognitive research that finds anti-bullying programs; mentoring of at-risk children, discour  that direct exposure to aggression and violence, and indirect aging overly aggressive coaching athletes, counseling for bellig  ‘Body Bag’ Media   exposure in media, “have extreme noxious effects on develop- erent youth (and adults), smart gun control, intervention and In 1994, criminal-jus  ment and quality of life for U.S. youth,â€? as Columbia Univer- rehabilitation. Athens disagrees with conservative approaches tice researcher Susan Ruel   sity’s Charles E. Bausch writes in the October 2011 Journal of to discipline and violence, but he doesn’t sugarcoat the need for   presented a paper, “Body Bag School Health. Exposure to violence, including harsh parental harsh punishment of “ultraviolentâ€? criminals who are clearly   Journalism: Crime Cover  discipline, is particularly harmful for urban youth of color who past rehabilitation. The point, he argues, is to let fewer people age by the U.S. Mediaâ€? to   already have unequal access to good education, health care, get to that point with smart practices and interventions. the International Conference   housing and jobs: a perfect storm to cause criminality.   on Violence in the Media in Contrary to popular opinion, schools are the safest place To Whip or Not?   New York. She warned that for young people (and homes the least safe); less than 1 perAthens says the U.S. has a higher violent crime rate than U.S. media, especially TV, cent of homicides among school-age other industrial democracies because Leading Causes had become obsessed with children occur at school. However, more Americans undergo “violentizaÂł>7@HPDVVQHZVPHGLDDUHGULYHQWR of U.S. Deaths crime coverage—from the children take problems to school with tionâ€? from an early age. He criticizes +HDUWGLVHDVH SXEOLFL]HFULPHQRWUHDVVXUDQFH O.J. Simpson trial to gangs: &DQFHUV them and then threaten, assault, bulthe belief by many Christian conserEHFDXVH FULPH DWWUDFWV UHDGHUV a “shameless pandering to the $FFLGHQWV PRVWO\YHKLFOH

ly, fight—or avoid school altogether vatives that children should be punDQG YLHZHUV ZKR LQ WXUQ DWWUDFW public’s blood lust for violent 9DULRXVGLVHDVHV due to fear. Verbal aggression is a ished physically. He calls on churches 1XWULWLRQ0DOQXWULWLRQ stories.â€? TV coverage of crime DGYHUWLVLQJUHYHQXH´ huge part of violentization, especially to encourage humane punishment 6XLFLGH had doubled as crime rates re²86'HSDUWPHQWRI-XVWLFH +RPLFLGH for children of color who hear “hate among their members. “The African SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS )XOOUHSRUWZZZMISPVFULPHIHDU

mained stable. Then, as crime wordsâ€? about their race, sexual orienAmerican community, once violently rates dropped dramatically in tation, disability, religion, etc. enslaved,â€? he writes, “has depended the mid-1990s, crime coverAggressive and violent tendencies have three major cau- for its survival on conservative Christian values that encourage age, especially of youth crime, spiked dramatically, scaring the tions, per Bausch: physical punishment, and has been segregated by racial prejupublic and leading to support for harsh, counter-productive dice into impoverished turbulent and malignant minor compublic policy that actually increased crime (see page 24). munities where policing is both sporadic and more punitive.â€? “[C]itizens who are exposed to selective media reports Athens says the South, statistically the most violent region, 4 Steps of Violentization about certain types of crimes and not others are effectively cocombines poverty, violent tendencies, gun ownership, belief in erced into worrying about street crimes exclusively,â€? researcher violent punishment and social segregation. “Indeed,â€? he says, "RUTALIZATION7KH\RXQJSHUVRQLVWKUHDWHQHGRUDEXVHGLQWRVXEPLW Matthew B. Robinson wrote in Western Criminology Review. WLQJWRDQDJJUHVVLYHDXWKRULW\ÂżJXUHZLWQHVVHVVXEMXJDWLRQRILQWLPDWHV “so-called black violence may well be a subset of southern vioSuch coverage creates the perception that residents can do DQGWKXVOHDUQVWRXVHYLROHQFHWRVHWWOHGLVSXWHV lence since African American culture derives directly from the nothing to help stop crime, and that it’s up to someone else: "ELLIGERENCY7KHGLVSLULWHGVXEMHFWKHHGVKLVFRDFKDQGUHVROYHVWR southern culture in which it was originally embedded before UHVRUWWRIXUWKHUYLROHQFH a state that criminologists warn against—a problem seen often the great migration of African Americans to northern cities.â€? 6IOLENT0ERFORMANCES7KHYLROHQWUHVSRQVH in Jackson media’s misunderstanding of the role “perceptionâ€? VXFFHHGVDQGKHUHDGVUHVSHFWDQGIHDULQWKH The answer, he argues, is “personal witness.â€? He rejects plays in crime-fighting. Ruel warned that “body bag journalH\HVRIRWKHUV blaming criminal violence solely on race, poverty, culture or the ismâ€? was dangerous and said the public must direct appeals for 6IRULENCY7KHUHVSRQVHH[FLWHVWKHVXEMHFW genetics of “those people over there,â€? while giving ourselves a DQG KH GHFLGHV WR FRQWLQXH XVLQJ VHULRXV YLR change to the consciences of people with influence in the news pass on our role in forming and changing the culture that creOHQFHWRGHDOZLWKSHRSOHERQGLQJZLWKRWKHUV business, demanding accurate depictions of violence and its ZKREHOLHYHDVKHGRHV ates violence. Vulnerable children, he says, per Rhodes, “suffer SOURCE: “WHY THEY KILL,â€? RICHARD RHODES causes. This GOOD Ideas issue attempts to heed Ruel’s call. for our neglect of their welfare and return in vengeful wrath to 14

October 19 - 25, 2011

espite popular belief, violent criminals aren’t born with a moral screw loose. They’re not even turned into criminals because they grow up in single-parent homes or just from living in a crime-ridden neighborhood. Studies show that being abused, witnessing violent behavior at home and in communities, and societal influences (including media violence and crime fixations)— what criminology researcher Dr. Lonnie Athens of Seton Hall University calls “violentization�—turns people toward crime. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes details Athens’ “violentization� theory in “Why They Kill� (Knopf, 1999, $26.95). Athens, formerly of Georgetown University, found that all seriously violent people follow a four-stage violentization process that leads to “social retardation� and, thus, violence (see box).

6


Citizen Policewoman by Marika Cackett

by Marika Cackett

• If you carry a knife on your person where the stock and blade are more than four inches in length, police will consider it a concealed weapon. A screwdriver, however, can do more bodily harm and isn’t considered a weapon. • Be a “nosy neighbor.” Get to know your neighbors. If you know someone is going out of town and then see a moving van pull up, be suspicious. Don’t be afraid to call the police if you see something or someone out of the ordinary. Be an advocate for your block.

• Did you know that the average percentage of solved versus unsolved crimes in the United States is about 67 percent? Jackson’s average last year was

80 percent.

• The age of consent in Mississippi is 16. What should a parent do to protect their child? Be an active parent. Know your kids’ friends. Check their phones, ask questions, and remember that while you may strive to set the right values, you have to know and understand peer pressure and know that if you aren’t teaching your kids, their friends are. • Since Mississippi passed a law requiring a prescription for drugs containing pseudoephedrine, there has been an 85 percent decrease in meth labs, according to the JPD. The most common illegal street drug is still crack cocaine. • The Jackson police SWAT team is one of the oldest in the U.S., formed in 1971. Jackson’s SWAT team is made up of six members, and includes a sniper and a fully licensed medical doctor who had to pass the same qualifiers as the rest of the team. • Mississippi has four bomb squads, based in Jackson, Clinton, Tupelo and Biloxi. The FBI regulates each squad, and they agree to the stipulations handed down by that agency. Each squad must respond to calls 90 miles in any direction.

jacksonfreepress.com

JPD Sez …

I even had the opportunity to shoot three guns at the JPD rifle range. Considering I’ve never shot a gun before, I listened intently to my instructors and was able to shoot dead center on my targets. The thing I found most amazing about my experience was the percentage of crimes JPD solved compared to the national average. Last year, JPD’s average of solved versus unsolved crimes was 80 percent. The national average is about 67 percent. Our police department has a better crime-solving average than the U.S. as a whole. That says something. When I graduated from the JPD’s Citizen Police Academy, I received a certificate, a hat and a mini-badge that I have proudly displayed in my office. My head is full of facts and figures, information and experiences. This much is clear: We have a great police force and a mayor and police chief who are committed to keeping the streets of Jackson safe. But they can’t do it alone. We, as citizens of this city, must take an active role in preventing crime. For starters, get to know your neighbors. Be a strong advocate for a neighborhood watch. Go to your monthly COPS meetings. Report suspicious people, vehicles and activities to the police. Be a smart shopper and not only lock your car, but don’t leave valuables in plain sight. Enroll in the next Citizen’s Police Academy and learn firsthand about how our police department works. We all have a stake in a safe city, but we also need to recognize that it is the everyday citizen who sees what the police can’t. We must be the eyes and ears of our city. It is our civic responsibility to partner with the Police department to help curb crime. I was so inspired by this class that I have applied to serve on the JPD’s Citizen Reserve. This is my city. My home is here, and my life is here. I have decided to be a champion for my little piece of Fondren. What has happened to the suspicious activity happening behind my house? I called the police, and I called the mayor’s 311 line to report suspicious activity on a regular basis. And you know what? No more suspicious activity. Working together works. So the next time someone asks me about crime in Jackson, I can proudly say we fight crime in this city as a team, made up of dedicated public servants and concerned citizens who work together to prevent crime. When crime does strike, we have one of the finest police departments in the country, whose crime-solving ability is far above that of the nation as a whole. The next time you see a Jackson police officer, thank him or her for their service, and make a commitment to partner with JPD so that you may also become a champion for your city. SOPHIE MCNEIL

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’m going to be completely honest: I’d never held a gun before. I always thought guns were for thugs and hunters. I simply didn’t need one. So it may surprise you that on Saturday, Oct. 8, I spent the better part of the day at the Jackson Police Department rifle range working on my target practice. I moved to Fondren in March, renting a little duplex in the Broadmeadow neighborhood for just my dog, a German shepherd named Atlas, and me. Everything was going great until the neighborhood dogs started barking—all night long— followed by the sound of power tools at all hours and some suspicious behavior coming from the empty lot behind my house. At my landlord’s suggestion, Marika Cackett learned a lot at the Citizens Police Academy, including how to shoot a gun accurately. I decided to attend my local Community Oriented Policing Strategies meetings for Precinct 4 and address my concerns to our Precinct Commander I was the first to sign up. it that Jackson has so much crime if there Wendell Watts. At the COPS meeting, I Working for the Jackson Convention is no mention of any other city’s crime? It found out I wasn’t the only one who had a and Visitors Bureau, it is my job to bring makes sense for the local media to report on problem with the illegal business going on tourists, family reunions, meetings and crimes in their own back yard. Maybe it’s in my neighborhood. events to Jackson. Many times the JCVB easier than trekking out to the suburbs to During the meeting, a quality-of-life misses out on opportunities because of the sniff out a story. officer mentioned the Citizens Police Acad- “perception” of crime in our city. Every time I spent the week of Oct. 3 as a student emy class beginning the first week of Octo- you turn on the news, it’s as if yet another of the Jackson Police Department. Each ber. In this class, participants would have crime has been committed in Jackson. Even evening, the instructors educated us on the opportunity to shoot a police-issued our neighbors in other cities use crime per- different aspects of life as a Jackson police Glock handgun and go on a ride-along ception to win elections. officer. From dispatcher to SWAT unit, we with a JPD officer. We would also discover The Jackson Police Department is the learned to trace an incident from the first that the police department doesn’t solve a only local police department that reports 911 call to the case being delivered to a crime in 30 minutes like on TV. crime numbers; the rest don’t. So why is grand jury.

15


Crime Follows Poverty Because: by Lacey McLaughlin and Donna Ladd

Persons below poverty level, 2009: County Madison County Hinds County . . Rankin County .

Below Poverty Level . . . . 12.7% . . . . 23.3% . . . . 11.2%

City Jackson. . . Clinton . . . Hattiesburg . Meridian . . Tupelo . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. 23.5% . 8% . 28.3% . 28.6% . 12.7%

Mississippi . . . . . . . 19.9%

OSKARI KEETUNEN

SOURCE: HTTP://QUICKFACTS.CENSUS.GOV

I

f you struggle to pay your bills and don’t know where your next meal is coming from, studies show you are more likely to be incarcerated. Once you fall into that cycle, it’s difficult to break out. When people get out of jail, they usually have no money or a stable home to return to. If you are African American, the chances that you will be incarcerated are even higher. Studies show that people resort to crime only if they determine that potential benefits outweigh the cost or consequences of committing that. Therefore, people living in poverty are more likely to commit burglary, larceny or theft.

Statistics: • Lower-class youth commit four times more violent crimes than middle-class youth. • The total cost of crime in the U.S. is $2 trillion per year—$1.3 trillion comes from street crime and the remainder from economic crimes such as fraud. • The victimization costs of street crime are approximately $700 billion per year. • Poverty raises the cost of crime by at least $170 billion annually. • Fifty-three percent of people in prison earned less than $10,000 per year before incarceration.

Poverty and crime go hand in hand because:

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Poor Children ,Q0LVVLVVLSSL

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SOURCE: “THE ECONOMIC COSTS OF CHILDHOOD POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES,� THE JOURNAL OF CHILDREN AND POVERTY MARCH 2008

Blame the Burbs?

High Crime Rates Among Poor: Why

I

Pop Quiz:

16

1. Uber-wealthy 2. Middle class 3. Poor 4. People with nice cars Answer: The poor. They are also the least likely to report it. SOURCE: “DEFENSIBLE SPACE,� OSCAR NEWMAN, 1996

October 19 - 25, 2011

Who is most likely to be a victim of crime?

T

hey may be shrinking for everyone, but it was already bad for the poor. A congressional study found, prerecession, that two-thirds of all new jobs are being created in the suburbs (where many city poor do not have transportation to get to). Meanwhile, the study found that three-quarters of welfare recipients live in the inner city or urban areas. And it found that 95 percent of welfare recipients do not own a car. FILE PHOTO

t is a fact that neighborhoods where the poor are concentrated are more prone to high crime rates, and poor residents are the most common victims of crimes. Beyond a simplistic answer of “poor people want/need more stuff so they have to take it,â€? what are other, more researched answers? Oscar Newman offered several in “Creating Defensible Spaceâ€? (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1996, $15): • A one-parent household headed by a female is more vulnerable to criminal attack. • Families with only one adult present are less able to control their teenage children. • Young teenage mothers are often victimized by their boyfriends. • The criminal activity by the poor is tolerated, if not condoned, among the poor. • The poor, and particularly the poor members of racial minorities, are unable to demand as much police protection. • Committing crimes against residents in rundown and “ghettoâ€? areas requires minimal skill and risk.

D

oes white flight/suburban flight create poor communities and, thus, increase crime? The “new urbanistsâ€? who wrote “Suburban Nationâ€? (North Point Press, 2001, $19) give a resounding “yes.â€? They write: “Inevitable or not, the fact remains that the inner city is now where America’s least privileged are most concentrated, a condition exacerbated by sprawl. Two aspects of suburbanization contribute dramatically to the plight of the urban poor: • Government investment in suburb-serving highways has left many inner-city neighborhoods sundered by highspeed traffic. • Disinvestment by fleeing corporations robs city residents of adequate access to jobs.â€?

Where are the jobs?

Question of the Day:

Rich Cities, Poor Cities

M

any people, politicians and corporate media love to talk about Jackson’s placement in CQ Press’—let’s be honest, bogus—“dangerous� rankings every year. But the part they don’t always pick up on is how many poor cities tend to have more crime. The authors of “Suburban Nation� (North Point Press, 2001, $19) explain why certain cities are richer (and safer) and others are dirt-poor (and suffer the resulting effects of crime):

Rich Cities/Suburbs have:

Poor Cities have:

> Good infrastructure > More services > Better (funded) schools > More effective city management (they can afford it)

> Deteriorating physical environment > Very inadequate services > Severely limited tax base ‌ thus: > Inability to attract jobs, commerce, real estate investment > Congregations of needy in needy places, thus institutionalizing their “character of povertyâ€?


Ways to Prevent Juvenile Crime by R.L. Nave

Treat ‘Em like Adults

Treat ‘Em Like Kids

rown folks with responsibilities don’t have time to be running the streets. At least that’s the thinking behind programs designed to keep kids out of trouble by putting them to work. On a recent Tuesday afternoon at Café Reconcile in New Orleans, every table was occupied, while more patrons waited to be seated. The popular lunch spot is the cornerstone of Cafe Reconcile’s 12-week job-training program which offers young participants life-skills training and real-world experience, all aimed at breaking the generational poverty cycle and serving as an economic engine for the surrounding Central City neighborhood, which has one of the city’s highest crime rates. Expectations are set high for the 50 students participating in the program at a given time. “They’re expected to show up on time, complete their tasks, and keep their attitudes in check,” Sister Mary Lou Specha said. But the hard work often pays off. Upon completing the program, 65 to 70 percent of participants receive jobs (a case manager also follows their progress for one year), Specha noted. Similarly, Los Angeles-based Homeboy Industries employs up to 250 former and atrisk gang members who might bake muffins or screen-print the Homeboy logo onto infant onesies in one of Homeboy’s six businesses. Mona Hobson, Homeboy development director, says its solar-installation certification program touts a 70 percent employment rate upon completion. She attributes the success of Homeboy, one of the nation’s largest and most-lauded gang-intervention initiatives, to the street cred earned by founder Father Greg Boyle and to the kids motivating themselves. “They come when they’re tired of living the gang life,” she said.

About 30 years ago, Missouri figured out a way to reduce juvenile recidivism essentially by treating kids like they’re in summer camp and not in jail. This is done through the use of small group homes, treatment centers, and camps under the supervision of youth development experts instead of correctional facilities and prison guards. It was also accomplished without increasing the burden on the state’s taxpayers. Now, what has become known as the Missouri Model has been replicated around the country, including at Oakley Training School near Raymond.

G

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Change the Law While working toward reforming the juvenilejustice system in the Albuquerque, N.M., area, officials realized that existing laws made it difficult for the changes to stick. So, in 2003, youth justice advocates and officials set out to alter New Mexico’s children’s code. One of the major changes was requiring that kids demonstrate “significant” risk of danger, flight or failure to appear for court appointments to be detained in a state facility. Another was to prohibit anyone over the age of 18 to be housed in youth detention centers to increase safety for younger kids. As a result, Bernadillo County reduced its average daily population by 58 percent between 1999 and 2004 while the number of kids booked on a felony charges fell from 4,726 in 1999 to 3,892 in 2005, the Annie E. Casey Foundation reports. Also, ethnic disparities are shrinking. In 2005, 62 percent of those booked by the county were ethnic minorities, down from 72 percent in 1999.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org

Health Matters

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1. Vision problems 2. Asthma 3. Teen pregnancy 4. Witnessing aggression and violence

5. Lack of physical activity 6. No healthy breakfast 7. Inattention and hyperactivity

READ more about the correlation between low blood sugar/diet and violent crime in “Feeding the Brain: How Foods Affect Children” (C. Keith Conners, Ph.D, Da Capo Press, 2001, $21).

jacksonfreepress.com

ould cutting back on P.E. in schools lead to a more violent city and state? No doubt. The research is indisputable that healthier students learn better and act out less—which means they are less likely to get involved in crime. The October 2011 Journal of School Health reported on findings by Charles E. Basch of Columbia University’s Department of Health and Behavior Studies. He found seven “educationally relevant health disparities” that make urban minority youth fall behind:

17


Defensible Space

by Donna Ladd

Face Block =Shared Street

D

=Safer

on’t downplay the importance of street space to the formation of society. Studies show that a community hierarchy includes the shared street as a key component to a strong, and safer, neighborhood. If you live on a street where people seldom walk and commune together in shared space, you’re in the middle of a breeding ground for crime. Beware.

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an a window save a life? How about a window with no one behind it? No question, say environmental architects and security experts. A window can stop crime simply by where it is placed, even if no one is looking through it. It can and does still function as a set of “eyes,� sending the message to would-be criminals that someone might see them. It’s the most basic kind of deterrence. The doyenne of urban planning, Jane Jacobs, first used the phrase “Eyes on the Street� in her seminal 1961 book, “The Death and Life of American Cities�—which has become a bible of sorts for smart city planning. Her ideas were picked up and expanded on by Oscar Newman in his own now-classic urban-design book, “Defensible Space: Deterring Crime and Building Community,� written in 1970. These visionaries’ first piece of neighborhood advice is deceptively simply: “In order to discourage crime, a street space must be watched over by buildings with doors and windows facing it,� write Andres Duany and the other authors of “Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream,� in a section dedicated to the security ideas

of Jacobs and Newman. “Walls, fences and padlocks are all less effective at deterring crime than a simple lit window.� This sounds simple, but take a look at most streets in Jackson, especially but not only in crime-plagued neighborhoods (or those that may well soon be). Few windows actually face the streets, or even the driveway or carport where dangers might await. Or the windows are covered with blinds or heavy curtains. As a result, a would-be criminal isn’t threatened by the idea that someone just might be on the other side. Not to mention, many homes in more well-to-do areas are hidden behind walls that actually give criminals a place to hide. Thus, windows as eyes. This is only the most basic principle behind “defensible space.� In his original book and a 1996 follow-up, “Creating Defensible Space� (download free at defensiblespace.com), Newman shares research showing that similar people from the same background can behave differently in different housing and living designs. It’s really all about who controls behavior and whether the atmosphere is conducive to crime or not. That is, “Although the socioeconomic characteristics of the residents

exert a strong influence on crime rate, the physical characteristics of the buildings and the project can exert a counteracting influence. The physical form of a residential environment can, in fact, ameliorate the effect of many of the problems created by the concentration of low-income, one-parent families with teenage children,� Newman wrote in 1996. Sadly, “Defensible Space� principles are often the exact opposite of a neighborhood or a home’s reality, or what people think they need to be safer and happier. It is all about empowering individuals to make their own streets and homes safer, because police cannot do that for you. In fact, Newman’s first sentence in his original book is a blunt warning: “The crime problems facing urban America will not be answered through

“Defensible space is a model for residential environments which inhibits crime by creating the physical expression of a social fabric that defends itself.�

— Oscar Newman, 1972

increased force or firepower.� It’s up to you to take control and make your neighborhood more defensible, in small and larger ways. In fact, Newman’s principles spawned an entire new approach to security, called “Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design,� or CPTED in security circles.

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Natural Access Control

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Territorial Reinforcement

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Maintenance

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When (re)designing a community:

October 19 - 25, 2011

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DUVALL DECKER

Natural Surveillance

Walking in Circles â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a vicious circle: the less safe streets feel, the fewer people walk, and the less safe they become.â&#x20AC;?

Skinny Streets

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afe streets have lots of people on them, and people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be hit by speeding cars (neither do pets). A major way to calm traffic is with skinnier streets. The Portland, Ore., fire chief helped start a program called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skinny Streetsâ&#x20AC;? there. It recommends that new residential streets have parking on one sideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and only be 20 feet wide, which â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suburban Nationâ&#x20AC;? authors call â&#x20AC;&#x153;humane streets.â&#x20AC;? This may sound too narrow for two-way traffic, but it was designed on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing streets in â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? neighborhoods. People slow down on these streets, thus making it easier for walkers, joggers, cyclists, pet-walkers and parents with strollers. This is much more effective than speed-limit signsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and discourages criminal activity, as active streets always do.


DUVALL DECKER

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Eyes on the Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: A Case Study

by Donna Ladd

R

ebuilding a neighborhood with the challenges of midtown north into a stronger, more prosperous, safer neighborhood is â&#x20AC;&#x153;complicated,â&#x20AC;? says architect Roy Decker of Duvall Decker Architects. Before the firm made any decisions, or a single shovel broke dirt, Duvall Decker led an effort to assess the liabilities of the area, which has about 2,600 residents. And the problems are numerous, Decker says: vacancies, empty lots, declining population, not enough density, transient residents. This scenario, typical to challenged inner-city neighborhoods, â&#x20AC;&#x153;makes security a complicated thing,â&#x20AC;? Decker says. Even a quick drive through midtown north shows specific challenges: not enough street lights, few sidewalks, no exercise â&#x20AC;&#x153;circuits,â&#x20AC;? dilapidated houses. And, of course, the most important crime deterrent is missing: Not enough people out on the streets doing

positive things (like exercising and pushing strollers). In addition, the area has a lot of shotgun-type houses that can have limited â&#x20AC;&#x153;eyes on the street,â&#x20AC;? with perhaps one smallish window facing out. The firm, working with various partners including the Jackson Housing Authority and North Midtown CDC, came up with an action plan: long-term strategic recommendations of how to turn Midtown North around and make it into an area that can grow and prosper, as well as project safer perceptions (which, in turn, make an area safer). On a tour of blocks of new homes under construction this month, Decker showed some of the best â&#x20AC;&#x153;defensible spaceâ&#x20AC;? ideas coming to fruition: mod-looking housing with large windows looking out on shared spaces. Shared yards and play areas where parents have a direct view, and kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to play in

the streets. Cars and pedestrians kept separate. Secure yards and parking with court entries. Un-obscured backyards. Front doors, stoops and stairs to the street: no anonymous (and dangerous) corridors. Residents are invited to garden and beautify their front yards. The rebuilding includes outdoor exercise circuits for any resident to use. This approach to design establishes what Decker calls a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sense of special territoriality,â&#x20AC;? which isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t available in typical apartment complexes (that tend to attract high crime). Ironically, efforts to tear down abandoned homes can leave a new pernicious problem: empty, depressing, dangerous lots and too little resident density. Thus, there are fewer people to build community, share control of territory, and watch out for each other and their

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The revival of Jackson is not going to be made on singlefamily housing.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; children. The new midtown north, which currently has 2.6 houses per acre, is designed for more density in residents as well, with smart infill, community gardens and playgrounds taking the place of those scary lots. Decker is adamant about density, warning that one of the worst ways to deal with

crime is to run from it, making the city even less dense and inviting crime to follow into less dense areas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The revival of Jackson is not going to be made on single-family housing,â&#x20AC;? he warns. On the subject of policeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where many folksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; view of security begins and endsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Decker says the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;complicatedâ&#x20AC;? once again. He stresses that better-designed neighborhoods cannot take the place of a strong police presence in a neighborhood like Midtown Northâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least not initially. The policeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role, he says, is to help maintain an areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peace and prosperity, and to make people feel safe enough to fulfill their own vital role in security. Thus, he says, it takes two steps: First, the police must be clearly present for an areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turnaround, responding quickly and seriously to crime reports, providing follow-through. But police must get that Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inner-city areas have a long, distrustful history with law enforcement (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not far away from the civil-rights era,â&#x20AC;? he says). Still, the police need to be there strongly at first to help build the perception that the area is safe enough for neighbors to come outside their homes and become the vital eyes on the street.â&#x20AC;? But police canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in complete control and should start moving more into the background as the community takes more control, building neighborhood watch programs and community networks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then, police are secondary,â&#x20AC;? Decker says.

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A Safer Midtown: The Solutions

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DUVALL DECKER

Midtown Liabilities

19


Broken Windows, Fractured Hope? by Latasha Willis

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Dilapidated houses surround schools in much of Jackson. See map online for more detail.

magine two scenarios. The first scenario is a child walking to school and admiring the homes on his block. He may say to himself: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hmm, I would like to have a nice house like one of these when I grow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to do what it takes to get one.â&#x20AC;? The second scenario is a child walking to school and observing the abandoned, run-down properties on his block. He may say to himself: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is this what life is about? If so, why should I care about my future? In fact, since that window over there is already broken, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll smash the rest. No one lives there, anyway.â&#x20AC;? Is there truth to either scenario? Can something as simple as a broken window drive a minor to commit vandalism or other crimes? In 1982, George L. Kelling and James Q. Wilson wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken Windows.â&#x20AC;? The authors claimed that if a building has a broken window, the rest of the windows will eventually be broken. They based this idea on an experiment psychologist Philip Zimbardo did in 1969 in which he abandoned an unlicensed car in a low-income neighborhood in the Bronx and a more affluent neighborhood in Palo Alto, Calif. Vandals in the Bronx stripped the car in 10 minutes. On the other hand, no one touched the car

Case in Point: North Midtown

Further reading:

T

he two maps of north midtown from Duvall Decker Architects show an interesting correlation between dilapidated buildings and crime in general. If you look at the orange and red areas where the dilapidated buildings are on the first map and the locations where crimes have occurred in 2008 on the second map, you will see how closely these areas correspond to each other. Duvall-Decker not only wants the abandoned houses to come down but for smart infill to keep density, and thus safety, high in the neighborhood.

Reported Crime in Midtown

Key

October 19 - 25, 2011

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DUVALL DECKER

Condition of Midtown

20

in Palo Alto for a week, but vandals eventually destroyed it after the psychiatrist took to it with a sledgehammer. In both neighborhoods, most of the vandals were white, so assuming that only other ethnic groups would commit these acts would be a mistake. Also, if such vandalism can happen to an abandoned car, what effect does an abandoned house have on a citizen, and how more so does it affect juveniles? This is not to say that the broken-window theory is infallible, but could living near unkempt properties have a negative effect on the psyche? In addition to actual broken windows, Kelling and Wilson go on to say that situations in a neighborhood such as a drunk person sleeping on the sidewalk, panhandling or teenagers hanging out on a street corner could also be considered societal versions of broken windows. However, such situations are symptoms of bigger problems that communities should handle humanely. Is there a direct relationship between dilapidated housing and juvenile crime in Jackson? You decide: There certainly sure are a lot of abandoned houses near our schools. View the map in more detail at www.jfp. ms/crime/broken and learn how to help us identify who owns all the crumbling houses.

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21


The Dropout-Crime Connection by Elizabeth Waibel and Hannah Vick of the study, the national high-school-graduation rate was 71 percent, and Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduation rate was 62 percent.

MAKING PROGRESS

Young People due to local progress fulfilling the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key promises to young people. â&#x20AC;˘ United Way and Jackson Promise Coalitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drop Out Prevention summits. â&#x20AC;˘ Youth Leadership Jackson, a Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership (greater jacksonpartnership.com) program. â&#x20AC;˘ The Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Youth Council for teaching about city government. â&#x20AC;˘ The School Board Transition Team for assessing how policies address the needs of young people. â&#x20AC;˘ The Jackson Medical Mall (jackson medicalmall.org) for low-cost services. â&#x20AC;˘The Young Peoples Project (www.typp. org/jacksonms) for developing leaders and organizers from marginalized populations through math and media literacy, community-building and advocacy.

COURTESY OPERATION SHOESTRING

J

ackson learned this month that Colin Powellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise has named it one of the 100 Best Communities for

Holistic Healing Visit: operationshoestring.org â&#x20AC;&#x153;By teaching children and inspiring families, Operation Shoestring ensures we all rise together.â&#x20AC;? peration Shoestring focuses on holistic healing for the Midtown Lanier feeder pattern, putting a special emphasis on educating youth and helping families lift themselves up. In addition to working closely with educators in Jackson Public Schools, it provides direct outreach to children in after-school and summer camp programs through tutoring, athletics and the arts. Operation Shoestring has outlined its efforts to ameliorate specific issues in Jackson as seen here; if you want to help reverse crime in Jackson, pick one and get started changing it:

02/",%-3

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The study found, on a national level: â&#x20AC;˘ At state prisons in the U.S., 68 percent of inmates do not have a high-school diploma. â&#x20AC;˘ Participating in high-quality pre-kindergarten increases high-school graduation rates by as much as 44 percent. â&#x20AC;˘ If America could raise male graduation rates by 10 percent, the country would save almost $10 billion in reduced crime costs each year. â&#x20AC;˘ That 10 percent could also prevent over 3,400 murders and 172,000 aggravated assaults each year.

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The study also calculated the impact of raising graduation rates in Mississippi: â&#x20AC;˘ A 10-percent graduation-rate increase in Mississippi could prevent 45 murders each year. â&#x20AC;˘ It could also prevent 870 aggravated assaults each year. â&#x20AC;˘ Raising the male graduation rate by 10 percent would save Mississippi $133 million on crime-related costs each year. â&#x20AC;˘ Those graduates would also earn $52 million more each year.

JPS Graduation Rates

SOURCE: MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

100

GRADUATION RATE

W

hat if there was a way to stop people from committing crimes before they started? Fight Crime: Invest in Kids is a nonprofit organization that advocates for quality education and after-school programs as the best way to prevent crime and violence. In 2008, the group conducted a study that found high-school dropouts are more than eight times as likely as graduates to be incarcerated. The study also found that if America could raise the male graduation rate by 10 percent, the country could save almost $10 billion in crime costs each year. Raising graduation rates by 10 percentage points has been shown to reduce murder and assault rates by about 20 percent. At the time

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2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 GRADUATION YEAR

Your Presence Matters

Businesses v. Dropouts

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Promise to Stop Dropouts

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olin and Alma Powell started Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise (americapromise.org) in 1997 to help young Americans, especially those with socioeconomic challenges, by making youth five promises: â&#x20AC;˘ Ongoing relationships with caring adults, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not their own families. â&#x20AC;˘ Safe places with structured activities during non-school hours. â&#x20AC;˘ Healthy start and future, including accessible and affordable health services; good nutrition. â&#x20AC;˘ Marketable skills through effective education, including analytical skills, workplace etiquette and know how to use new technology. â&#x20AC;˘ Opportunities to give back through community service. A key focus of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise Alliance is stopping dropouts, and it offers these ways that every American can help: â&#x20AC;˘ Write an op-ed, letter to the editor, or letter to local media about education needs in Jackson. â&#x20AC;˘ Become familiar with political candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; education initiatives and vote accordingly.

â&#x20AC;˘ Draw attention to dropout problems through networks (e.g. church groups, book clubs, neighborhood associations). Pass out relevant reports and current articles (like this page). â&#x20AC;˘ Make a donation to support a school, library initiative or youthfocused nonprofit, such as DonorsChoose.org, Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise or one of the local groups on page 28 of this issue. Give books to FirstBook.org, Reading Is Fundamental, Reach out and Read or another early reading program. Get involved with Parents for Public Schools (ppsjackson. org) or Operation Shoestring (operationshoestring.org). â&#x20AC;˘ Volunteer to mentor, tutor, read with, support or coach a young person. â&#x20AC;˘ Develop formal leadership structures that engage young people in decisionmaking for your organization. â&#x20AC;˘ Host health, safety and well-being presentations for students and their families. Encourage young people to have an annual check-up.


Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s In a Gang? by Elizabeth Waibel and Donna Ladd

S

tate and local jurisdictions develop their own definitions of â&#x20AC;&#x153;gangs,â&#x20AC;? which can lead to confusion and illdefined fears of gang violence. The Jackson Police Department does not have an official definition of a gang, but the Mississippi Street Gang Act says that a gang is a group of three or more people with an established hierarchy that engages in felonious criminal activity. The National Gang Intelligence Center (nationalgangcenter.gov) says two-thirds of gang members are adults over age 18; city and suburban gangs especially have majority adult membership. Assistant Police Chief Lee Vance said that, in some ways, deciding which criminals are in a gang is inconsequential, because they are prosecuted for their crimes regardless of gang affiliation. Vance said while Jackson does have organized drug traffickers, JPD doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the types of violence associated with gangs like the Black Gangster Disciples and the Vice Lordsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;larger organizations active here in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s and early 1990s that identified themselves as gangs and fought to establish turf, but that have shrunk since the mid-1990s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see (criminals) operating under those names in the city of Jackson with the type of criminal enterprise that we saw 20 years ago,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the

drive-by shooting type of gang activity that we saw in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s. â&#x20AC;Ś We just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see these things that we automatically associate with street gang activity.â&#x20AC;? What makes a â&#x20AC;&#x153;gangâ&#x20AC;? can be subjective, Vance said, because different agencies and people have different definitions or ideas of what a gang is. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are some people who think that you get a group of kids who wear the same T-shirt to school every day and (they are a gang),â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think too many times, the whole conversation gets convoluted, because people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about.â&#x20AC;? The National Gang Intelligence Center (nationalgangcenter.gov) reports that, as of 2008, Hinds County had fewer than 500 gang members, as did Rankin County. Adams, DeSoto, Grenada, Harrison, Jackson and Marion counties reported more gang members than did Hinds County. The state as a whole had two to three gang members per 1,000 people. However, a gang out of Chicago, the Simon City Royals, has made local news in recent years for establishing itself in Mississippi, as well as Louisiana, Wisconsin and Florida. The Royals are the largest white street gang in the U.S., known for violence and prison recruitment, and specializes in the sale of methamphetamine. It has been especially strong in

Rankin County, especially Richland. In 2008, police arrested nine Royals for a variety of charges including meth possession, gang activity and aggravated assault. NGIC warned that gangs have seen a resurgence in some areas in recent years; the largest gang growth percentage is in suburban areas (up 33 percent). The NGIC defines a gang as:

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Risk Factors

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Rock, Powder, Prison

Officer Thomas Wortham IV

T

he Chicago Police Department regularly warns that Mississippi, along with neighboring Indiana, is a top source for weapons used in violent crimes there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Straw purchasersâ&#x20AC;? with no police record buy many guns legally in Mississippi that turn up on Chicago streets, reselling them on the black market there. For instance, .45-calibre handgun purchased legally at Edâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pawn Shop in Byhalia killed Chicago police officer Officer Thomas Wortham IV in 2010. The young father originally hired to buy it at Edâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had an infant daughter dying from a brain tumor and feared losing his $7.50-an-hour forklift job, The Chicago Tribune reported.

T

he United States has barely hidden some of the more discriminatory aspects of the drug war. The difference in sentencingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and who goes to prisonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for crack (rock) cocaine versus the powdered kind illustrates the inequity well. In 1986, when Congress enacted the mandatory sentencing drug laws (that have filled our prisons to the brim), it decided that crack cocaine is a distinct drug with harsher penalties than those for powder cocaine, the kind favored by more upper-crust (and white) users. Congress set the five-year mandatory sentence to kick in for the sale of 500 grams (a bit over a pound) of powder coke, but for only 5 grams (an amount the size of two pennies) for crack. That means a dealer could sell 100 times more powder before going to prison. The law ended up targeting people of color even though more whites buy and use both kinds of cocaine, both kinds of cocaine are equally addictive, and violence surrounding crack sales was only a few percentage points more than the powder version. Still, the kicker â&#x20AC;Ś

Crack Prosecution, 2000 African Americans .............. 84.7% Hispanics ............................... 9.0% Whites ................................... 5.6%

Crack Use, 2000 Whites ................ 2.4 million/64.4% African Americans .. 990,000/26.6% Hispanics .................. 348,000/9.2% Sources: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, U. S. Sentencing Commission.

Cradle-to-Prison Pipeline

7

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PUBLIC DOMAIN

Mississippi-to-Chicago Pipeline

23


Deterrence: Not What You Think by Briana Robinson and Ronni Mott

re·cid·i·vism noun \ri-sid-uh-viz-uhm\ a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior; especially: relapse into criminal behavior (Merriam-Webster)

Murder Rates in Death Penalty States and Non-Death Penalty States

O

nce a person has committed a crime and is in the prison system, what works and what doesn’t to deter ongoing criminality? Tough-on-crime policies—such as three-strike rules and truth-in-sentencing—and the war on drugs have given the United States the dubious honor of having the highest incarceration rate in the world: 743 prisoners per 100,000 people, according to 2009 Bureau of Justice statistics. As of 2008, one out of every 100 Americans was behind bars. In 2009, more than 7 million Americans were in the criminal justice system, either behind bars or on probation or parole. Research shows that as many as two-thirds of inmates will be back behind bars within three years of their release. (Source: Current Strategies for Reducing Recidivism, 2004, by Lise McKean and Charles Ransford, Center for Impact Research). Q. What lowers recidivism? Doug Hooley, a Lane County, Ore., corrections officer writes on CorrectionsOne.com that for a correctional system to be effective at reducing recidivism, it must adhere to three core concepts: 1. Collaboration between all criminal-justice partners 2. Organizational development—all organizations involved must buy into the plan. 3. All partners need to engage in evidence-based practices.

Q. Do stiffer sentences make a difference? Probably not. In 1999, Public Policy Canada looked at 50 research studies in an attempt to answer the question, “Does increasing the length of time in prison reduce the criminal behavior of offenders?” The conclusion? “Regardless of the type of analysis employed, no evidence for a crime deterrent function was found.” In 2006, Italy passed a Collective Clemency Bill. It freed all inmates with less than three years left on their sentences. The catch was that if they were convicted of any crime within the next five years, the remainder of the suspended sentence would be added to the new sentence. Officials found that: • Inmates with longer sentences were less likely to reoffend. • Small increases in the expected sentence reduced recidivism 1.3 percent. (Source: About.com) In a 2009 paper titled “Lessons Learned about Reducing Recidivism from Research on Correctional and Juvenile Delinquency Programs,” David B. Wilson of George Mason University concluded, “Overall, the current research evidence suggests that merely increasing the punitive nature of sanctions does not reduce future offending.”

Q. Do trying juveniles as adults help prevent crime? No. Research finds that sending minors to adult prisons 24 increases their risk of re-offending, joining prison-based gangs,

Q. Whom Do We Execute? • Since 1986, Mississippi has executed 15 men. Three of those men were black; however, only one of the 15, Leo Edwards, a black man, killed a black victim. One victim was Asian. All of the other victims were white. • Nationally, it is much more likely that when a black person kills a white person, he will be executed. Since 1973, 255 blacks have been executed for killing whites; 17 whites have been executed for killing blacks. Overall, 35 percent of executions since 1973 have been blacks. • Mississippi’s death row population is heavily skewed toward black men. The state has 55 men and two women on death row; 24 are white, 32 black and one Asian, according to the Mississippi Department of Corrections. Thus, 58 percent of the state’s death-row inmates are black males, while the state’s overall black population is 37 percent. • Nationwide, 41.77 percent of death row prisoners are black; 43.68 percent are white; 12.12 percent Latino; and 2.43 percent are other races. These statistics are wildly out of proportion to the general racial demographics in the U.S., where, in 2010, 63.7 percent of the population was white, 12.6 percent was black and 16.3 percent was Latino. • Since 1973, 138 death-row prisoners have been exonerated nationwide; in 17 of those cases, DNA evidence played a substantial role in establishing innocence. Three death-row inmates have been exonerated in Mississippi since 1973, one due to DNA evidence. Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Mississippi Department of Corrections, Death Penalty Information Center.

being abused or raped by adults and committing suicide. Studies, such as in Florida in 1996, started showing the recidivism risks of trying kids as adults in the mid-1990s—the same period that states started treating juvenile offenders as adults. Youth transferred to adult court in Florida were a third more likely to reoffend than those sent to the juvenile-justice system for the same crime and with similar prior records. Of those who committed new crimes, the ones sent to adult court reoffended at twice the rate of those sent to juvenile court. Over the last decade, many states (including Mississippi) have started to rethink the practice. FILE PHOTO

October 19 - 25, 2011

Those practices include: • Risk/needs assessment • Individual motivators • Target the appropriate intervention • Rewire the brain • Increase positive reinforcement • Ongoing support

SOURCE: DEATH PENALTY INFORMATION CENTER

Q. Is the death penalty a deterrent? “[G]iven the rarity with which executions are carried out in this country and the long delays in doing so, a rational criminal should not be deterred by the threat of execution. Despite increases in capital punishment in recent years,

the likelihood of being executed conditional on committing murder is still less than 1 in 200,” Steven D. Levitt wrote in “Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not,” published in the Journal of Economic Perspectives in 2004. He added: “[E]ven taking as given very large empirical estimates of the deterrent impact of the death penalty … the observed increase in the death penalty from 14 executions in 1991 to 66 in 2001 would eliminate between 300 and 400 homicides, for a reduction of 1.5 percent in the homicide rate, or less than one-twenty-fifth of the observed decline in the homicide rate over this time period. Moreover, any deterrent effect from such executions cannot explain the decline in other crimes. Given the way the death penalty is currently practiced in the United States, it is extremely unlikely that it exerts significant influence on crime rates.” • Naci Mocan, professor at the University of Colorado at Denver, co-authored a study in 2003 that found five deaths can be avoided with each execution. • The Death Penalty Information Center reports, however, that murder rate in states with the death penalty is consistently higher than in states with no death penalty. • In 2010, Mississippi was tied with Missouri for the third highest murder rate in the nation at 7 percent. Louisiana was first with 11.2 percent. • The Mississippi murder rate per 100,000 people: 2008, 8.1; 2009, 6.6 • In 2010, about 64 percent of Americans (surveyed by Gallup) are in favor of the death penalty and 29 percent are opposed to it, The New York Times reported. SOURCES: JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES, MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS, DEATH PENALTY INFORMATION CENTER, THE NEW YORK TIMES


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25


Should I Use Pepper Spray?

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Be Safe by Ronni Mott

W

hen I lived in the Washington, D.C., area, I knew a woman who was repeatedly on the receiving end of crime. She was mugged in the subway, had her purse snatched at a bar, was attacked and raped walking home. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know her well; however, it was hard not to feel badly for her. On the other hand, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but speculate on what drew criminals to her, making her a victim of crime not once, but over and over again. Personally, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had three different homes burglarized in and around D.C., always in broad daylight when I was away from home. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an awful feeling to come home to, but I learned from each incident how to better protect my home. Along the way, I also learned that criminals are opportunists: They will pick the easiest marks and avoid defenses and people who look strong, even if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not. Here are some tips for keeping from becoming the next crime statistic.

On the street or in parking lots:

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26

QUINN DOMBROWSKI

October 19 - 25, 2011

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Should I Learn Karate?

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Should I Get a Gun?

In your home:

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What about a Taser or Stun-Gun?

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Join Us For National

October 24 THE ONLY PARTICIPANT IN THE METRO AREA Learn How Eating Habits Effect:

•Disease •Fair Working Conditions

We Will Have:

•Guest Speakers •Samples

Rainbow Natural Grocery 2807 Old Canton Road 601-366-16002 at Lakeland & Old Canton www.rainbowcoop.org

jacksonfreepress.com

•The Environment

27


Many Ways to Prevent Crime by Hannah Vick

T

he best way to stop crime is to put children on a good path early, help strengthen their families and intervene as needed. These groups do just that in many ways.

Dress for Success Contact: Daphne M. Higgins 601-985-9888 Visit: dressforsuccess.org/metrojackson “The mission of Dress for Success Metro Jackson is to promote the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and the career development tools to help women thrive in work and in life.” Dress for Success helps disadvantaged women find, acquire and retain employment. While Dress for Success is most noted for providing clothing—a first suit for a client with a job interview and an additional one when she finds work—the professional support accompanying the suits is vital to these women’s success. The metro Jackson affiliate of the international organization Dress for Success has helped more than 2,500 women throughout Mississippi. And, thus, their children.

Youth Solutions Encounter Program 601-829-0323 Visit: youthsolution.net “Helping to put the pieces back together, one youth at a time” Juan K. Wilson founded the Youth Solutions Encounter Program and has worked with underrepresented adolescents, not only throughout Mississippi, but around the world including Cape Town, South Africa. Encounter encompasses a variety of prevention and intervention programs open to teenagers grades 5 though 12. They meet the first Tuesday of every month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Community Meeting Room at the Jackson Medical Mall for activities including mentoring, motivational talks, vocal talent, teen drama, live music and character development.

Broadmeadow Books and Basketball

October 19 - 25, 2011

Contact: Nan Prince, 601-503-3968 Visit: broadmeadow.org “The goal of Broadmeadow Books and Basketball is to provide a supportive study program while fostering relationships between students and volunteers as well as to encourage a fellowship among the students in order to aid them in making positive life choices.”

28

Meeting Wednesday nights at 5:45 p.m., mentors from Broadmeadow United Methodist Church and the Jackson community eat with about 10 to 15 kids before helping them with homework. Basketball practice and competition in a local league begin in the winter, and at least one night each month involves fun activities and various speakers.

ing, stage appearance and role-playing to JPS middle and high schools. It has worked with about 3,000 disadvantaged youth since January, providing them with not only free acting training but with a support system in person and on Facebook.

DREAM (Developing Resources for Education in

Contact: Diane Singleton, 601-941-3925 Visit the Jodi Models & Productions Facebook page “The Mission of Jodi is to provide quality training and assistance for each individual looking to get into the entertainment industry.” Jodi Models has been training hundreds of young men and women for more than 10 years. By improving self-esteem, modeling builds overall character, promotes positive attitudes and teaches life skills such as achieving goals through sustained commitment. The group organizes specific modeling and etiquette camps during the summer, incorporating professional modeling skills with logic, public speaking, general etiquette and community service. Some of Jodi Models’ participants have won scholarships, pageants and moved on to work with the companies Ebony Fashion Fair and L’Oreal.

America) Inc. Contact: Lea Banks, 601-933-9191 Visit: dreaminc.org “Our mission is to prevent youth substance abuse and promote healthy life styles through developing and providing effective products and services for schools, communities, and businesses.” For 30 years, DREAM has worked with disadvantaged youth in Jackson through mentoring, drug education campaigns and youth leadership development. The organization is focusing on the Hinds County Senior Transition Program, an initiative committed to transitioning Hinds County highschool seniors smoothly to work or college after graduation. Once enrolled in the program, seniors attend community volunteer-led monthly workshops on career and general life skills such as interview techniques, time management and job searching. After completing the program, students receive a certificate of completion, a portfolio and a $250 award.

Stewpot Community Services Visit: stewpot.org/services_childrensprogram.html “Faith Meeting Needs In Our Community” Seven Jackson churches representing different denominations have been working together for 30 years in the multifaceted outreach Stewpot Community Services. Stewpot’s Neighborhood Children’s Program offers an after-school program and summer camp for children and teens to provide educational help, build self-esteem and provide positive role models. Volunteers read to children, teach fine arts and help with homework, applications and resumes.

Mentoring Through Modeling Contact: Oliver Thompson, 601-213-9109 Mentoring Through Modeling works with school age children ages 6 to 19 in Jackson and the surrounding area. It teaches children and teens etiquette such as dressing for and escorting to formal events. About three times a year, Mentoring Through Modeling provides an hour-long event on model-

Jodi Models

Metro Youth Initiative Contact: Gus McCoy, 601-750-8451 Visit: metroyi.org “Youth Are Our Focus … Their Success is Our Goal” Metro Youth Initiative focuses its work on improving literacy and education, poverty, job-skills development and alternatives to youth violence in youth ages 11 to 19. MYI collaborates resources with partners bringing unique skills and perspectives to serve the Jackson community, advocating for young people and equipping them with the tools needed to succeed. MYI owns a portable laptop van to provide ACT preparation for high school students anywhere in Jackson.

Boys and Girls Club of Central Mississippi Visit: bgccm.org “Our Mission: To enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to realize their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.” Boys and Girls Club serves about 3,200 youth who spend nearly 750,000 hours at six metro-area clubs. The organization’s website says 85 percent of those children say their club helped them know the difference between right and wrong.


Hand Harvested Botanicals

BLACKWOOD’S SMALL BATCH GIN

NOW AT MCDADE’S WEDNESDAY 10/19

Shaun Patterson (Acoustic Rock)

Trunk Show Happening NOW! Tons of new merchandise in, and more on the way!

THURSDAY 10/20

Four Shillings Shorts (Traditional Irish Music)

Samhain/Halloween Concert Cele Celtic New Year with music, stori brating the es & poetry!

FRIDAY 10/21

The Chris Derrick Group (formerly known as Eleectric Co.)

(Blues)

SATURDAY 10/22

Thomas Jackson Orchestra (Rock)

SUNDAY 10/23

Ceili

(with the Jackson Irish Dancers) MONDAY 10/24

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY10/25

Open Mic hosted by Jason Bailey

Mediterranean Cuisine

20% OFF Total Bill Tues - Thur Only

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

All for only

ON SUNDAYS includes chicken strips & hamburgers excludes shrimp

-Wood Fired Brick Oven Pizzas-Hookahs on a Beautiful Patio-Now Serving Lebanese Wine-Now Serving Spirits1896 Main Street, Ste A in Madison 601-853-0876 • mezzams.com

M-Th 11-2, 4:30-9 • F-Sat 11-2, 4:30-10

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef Thursday : Chicken Diane or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or Chicken & Dumplings

Always Drink Responsibly

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

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Kids Eat Free!

$7.98

29


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The JFP’s Crime-Fighting Manifesto 1 2

We will not live in fear. We understand that hiding from the world in case something bad could happen to us means that more bad things happen to more people. We will talk back to those who believe in selling fear and crime sensationalism. We know that such fear-mongering is done for political gain, TV ratings, to sell newspapers or to just be more dramatic than the next guy. We also know that crime sensationalism creates negative perceptions that keep the public from doing what it takes to keep our homes, communities and streets more secure. We will support quality education for all at all levels, and fight for good public education every step of the way. We will resist efforts to test our kids to death while not providing basics such arts and music education that help them engage in activities and develop mind sets to keep them away from crime. We know that mentoring changes lives, and urge every adult to “each one teach one.” We will help gather and share good information about effective mentoring and how to be/find one. We will engage in respectful conversations with young people every chance we can, striving to ask more than we tell. We know that early childhood education will make our state and our city safer, and we will hold politicians accountable until they help us achieve it. We know that not every child has a solid family at home to help direct and encourage them, and we will never use that as an excuse for not helping a child build a better life. We will take responsibility every way possible for all children and urge others to do the same. We will be creative and actively brainstorm ways to help engage young people in our community and help them believe in themselves and their futures. We will talk back to people, and other media, who do not. We will look for opportunities to return to the communities we left that need us now and get others to do the same. We will speak out loudly for reproductive services and information on birth control to lower the incident of teen motherhood and fatherhood. We will do what we can to help parents get the parenting skills they need, as well as other basic services they may lack. We will teach instead of blame every chance we can. We know that sometimes other adults have to step up when parents can’t or don’t. We will always be “eyes on the streets”: We will report crimes, suspicious behavior and gunfire; we will offer our assistance, and watch out for the children on our streets. We will get involved, even as we make every effort not to profile. We will be a snitch for safety of ourselves and our neighbors whenever possible.

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We will seek diversity in every way, knowing that diversity builds understanding, trust, empathy and coalitions that change the world and make it safer. We will constantly strive to enlarge our networks. We will listen more often to people not like us. We understand that poverty is a direct cause of crime and do everything we can do stop it and teach people how to get out of poverty. We will know and teach our rights. We will demand that bad law enforcement be better trained or fired. We will make an effort to get to know our neighbors better and build stronger communities together. We will learn to observe our surroundings and know warning signs of possible criminal activity. We will vote. We will elect politicians who believe in holistic (thus, real) approaches to preventing crime. We will reject those who run campaigns based on fear and ignorance. We will demand reforms to our criminal-justice system, especially those that increase recidivism for young criminals, treat people of color harsher than whites and let domestic abusers/killers off easily. The system is upside down, and we will address it. We will demand access to leadership. We will insist that they know and use research-based practices to making our communities safer, not mythical conventional “wisdom.” We will not put ourselves in harm’s way if we can help it: We will choose safe parking; we will not leave our jobs alone after dark; we will be cautious with people we do not know well. We will deter home invasions and property crime by not creating tempting conditions for criminals, by following “defensible space” ideas. We will lock car doors, never leave valuables in view and never leave our car running with no one in it. We will urge others to do the same. We will not assume that any weapon will make us safer and only own/use weapons that we are well trained to use. We will never assume that property is more important than a human life. We will support organizations and individuals who help the community do the above and promote smart safety best practices. We will accept that preventing crime is each of our responsibility. We will adopt a new mantra: “It is up to me.” Want to adopt his manifesto? Sign here and hang on your fridge:

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Name ______________________________________ Date ___________________

Don’t Be a Victim

by Brittany Kilgore

“The Essential Guide to Date Rape Prevention: How to Avoid Dangerous Situations, Overpowering Individuals and Date Rape,” by Scott Lindquist (Sourcebooks Inc., 2007, $14.95) Arm yourselves against date rape by getting fortified with Lindquist’s advice in this book.

“Shepherding Women in Pain: Real Women, Real Issues, & What You Need to Know to Truly Help,” by Bev Hislop (Moody Publishers, 2010, $14.99) Get direct advice from a professional woman whose everyday life revolves around helping women who are victimized by various forms of abuse.

“I Said No! A Kid-to-Kid Guide to Keeping Your Private Parts Private,” by Zack and Kimberly King and Sue Rama (Boulden Publishing, 2008, $9.95) Help your son and daughter become aware of the signs of child sexual abuse, and teach them it’s OK to say no.

“A Smart Kid’s Guide to Internet Privacy,” by David J. Jakubiak (PowerKids Press, 2009, $8.25) Everyone can take tips from this handy guide to protecting your privacy. “The Con: How Scams Work, Why You’re Vulnerable, and How to Protect Yourself,” by James Munton and Jelita McLeod (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2011, $32.95) Americans are 40 times more likely to be defrauded than to have their cars stolen or their homes burgled, according to the authors. If you want to prevent crime, this book can help you focus on the most likely threats.

jacksonfreepress.com

“Travel Wise: How to Be Safe, Savvy, & Secure Abroad,” by Ray S. Leki (Nicholas Brealey Publishing, 2008, $22.95) Think of your preparation for foreign travel as a toolkit. Along with your passport, tuck this book in neatly with your camera, map and brochures. Recommended for newbies and seasoned travelers as well.

31


8 DAYS p 33 | MUSIC p 35 | SPORTS p 38

MIFF: A Cinematic Extravaganza COURTESY MISSISSIPPI FILM INSTITUTE

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dward Saint Pè and his team of organizers and volunteers commandeer the indie-film scene from Friday through Saturday with the 2011 Mississippi International Film Festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re showing 50 films all day Friday and Saturday at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium in downtown Jackson,â&#x20AC;? Saint Pè says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have films from China, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Germany, Greece and Hungary.â&#x20AC;? Saint Pè pauses to catch his breath. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And Mississippi, Alabama, North Carolina, New York, and other places ... Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot going on.â&#x20AC;? Saint Pè infuses the film festival with an eclectic and celebratory Cajun-esque vibe, which is not surprising given his epic vision, larger-than-life persona and Louisiana roots. He not only heads a film festival and movie arthouse, but he also owns a television weather station, croons a tune as beautiful as any belted out by Bing Crosby, makes movies and has performed in at least three SAG feature films. He also gets community buy-in. The festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sponsors are a corporate whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who list. MIFF puts the entire concept of indie filmmaking on its head. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bold, audacious and spectacular in scope. To paraphrase an old proverb, the proof lies in the Creole. The festival marries film and music. It features global filmmaking, regional southern films, a late-night Spook Fest, professional workshops, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first intellectual-property legal clinic sponsored by the Mississippi Barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Intellectual Property Section, a Bollywood film distributor, a Hot Rod parade, Elvis impersonators, Rockabilly headliner Al Ferrier, a Jamaican disc jockey and sitar music. The cost is affordable. In fact, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford not to go. Tickets at the door are $8 per day or $10 for both Friday and

MIFF Rocks Jackson

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ith entries from China, Australia and Greece, the 2nd Annual Mississippi International Film Festival exposes Jackson to the world this weekend. For information, go to mississippifilmfest.com. Below is a schedule of films and other events. Friday, Oct. 21

October 19 - 25, 2011

($8 all day including gala or $10 for both Friday and Saturday)

32

by Anita Modak-Truran

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Saturday. Kids 12 and under get in free for all film blocks and the street festivities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Friday night gala will have Myra Ottewell, who is the director of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mississippi Remixed,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; one of the opening nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feature films, and two Mississippi Freedom Riders,â&#x20AC;? says Saint Pè. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Myra grew up in Mississippi and then moved to Canada. With the help of Mississippi Public Broadcasting, Myra made this compelling documentary about the Deep South.â&#x20AC;? The only hitch is that Danny Glover wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak before a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freedom Song,â&#x20AC;? which he stars in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got a call from Danny last (Thursday) night,â&#x20AC;? Saint Pè. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delayed in Switzerland. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to send in a tape to show before Freedom Song and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working on arrangements to speak at the Awards Ceremony on Sunday.â&#x20AC;? Saint Pè remains optimistic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If he can be here, he will.â&#x20AC;? Saturday promises another day of diverse entertainment with competition and feature films in the Davis Planetarium screening center, acting and film-industry workshops in the lobby, and street vendors and live music on Lamar Street. The Saturday evening gala will open with Tom Lester (Eb from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green Acresâ&#x20AC;?) introducing Elvis Presleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Hawaii.â&#x20AC;? Next will be a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The One Warrior,â&#x20AC;? one of the most talked about films of the festival. Directed by Tom Stout, this film has heroes, adventures and castles. Saint Pè doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mention the bad guy. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine who that might be, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave that as another surprise for the audience. For more information on the festival and the Coup De Gras awards ceremony and brunch, visit mississippifilmfest.com.

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2 p.m.-6:35pm

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Drama, Sci-Fi and Horror; Musical Performances

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3 p.m. -5:30 p.m. Shorts and Features

11:15 p.m.-1:10 a.m.

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BEST BETS October 19 - 26, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

COURTESY LEADING EDGES ADVERTISING

Charlie Townsend performs at 11:30 a.m. during Live at Lunch at the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Art Garden (380 S. Lamar St.). Bring or buy lunch; call 601-960-1515. ... Living history actors present “The Old Capitol, Past and Present” during History Is Lunch at noon at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. ... Food Network star Paula Deen signs copies of “Southern Cooking Bible” at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). $29.99 book; call 601-366-7619. … See the play “The Life of Galileo” at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University, Blackbox Theatre (1500 Peachtree St.); shows through Oct. 22. $10, $5 seniors, students and children; call 601965-7026. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday.

call 601-696-2200. … Karen Brown performs during Centric Thursday at Dreamz JXN. … The new dance club Wendy’s Latenight Playhouse (206 W. Capitol St.) opens at 10 p.m. and includes music from DJ Patrick Duval. For ages 21 and up. $10 guys, ladies free until 11 p.m.

FRIDAY 10/21

Jacktoberfest is from 11 a.m.-11 p.m. on Congress Street. Free admission; visit jacktoberfest.com. … Tommy Scarpinato and Tammy Golden perform during lunch at Two Sisters Kitchen. … The annual Mississippi International Film Festival kicks off at 1 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) and runs through Oct. 23. Call 601-665-7737; visit msfilm.org or page 32 for a full schedule and ticket prices. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs at the High Note Jam at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Art Garden (380 S. Lamar St.). Free, food for sale; call 601-960-1515. … The UNCF Mayors’ Masked Ball is at 7 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex, Trustmark Ballroom. $65, $520 table of eight; call 601-977-7871. … The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre’s “Paranormal Inactivity” is at 7 p.m. at Parker House (104 N.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). $46; call 601-291-7444 to RSVP. Encore at Kathryn’s at 7 p.m. Oct. 25; $42.

SATURDAY 10/22

Java Ink hosts Horror Fest at 10 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-397-6292. … The Be Bold Beer Run kicks off at 4:30 p.m. in downtown Jackson and includes stops at local restaurants. Free; drink prices vary; call 262-391-9265. … The Heather Spencer Soulshine Memorial Concert is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $20; visit heatherstree.org. … The Art, Poetry and Justice Slam is at 7 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall (3645 Highway 80 W.). Free; call 877-892-2577. … See the film “Lang Lang Live in Concert” at 8:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $17, $16 seniors and students, $15 children; call 601-936-5856. … Big Al and the Heavyweights are at Underground 119. Mary Chapin Carpenter performs at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20 at MSU Riley Center.

Lemuria Books hosts Chuck Palahniuk’s “Damned” Book Night at 5:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. For ages 21 and up. Free admission; $29.99 book; call 601-366-7619. … Boo at the Zoo is from 5-8 p.m. at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.) Oct. 20-22 and Oct. 27-29. $9, $6 children under 12; members: $7, $4 children under 12; call 601-352-2580. … Fashion for a Cause is at 7 p.m. at Tougaloo College, Holmes Hall (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). $3 in advance, $6 at the door; call 601-594-8781. … Blues by Starlight is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.) and benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs. $100; call 601-9697088, ext. 25. … Mary Chapin Carpenter performs at 7 p.m. at MSU Riley Center (2200 Fifth St., Meridian.) $58, $52;

The Jackson Irish Dancers’ Mostly Monthly Ceili is at 2 p.m. at Fenian’s. Free; call 601-592-9914. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) includes the films “The Bolshoi Gala” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “Buck” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org. … The Happy HalloWINE Tasting is at 4 p.m. at BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N.). $65; email mitchelle@bravobuzz.com to RSVP. … The Generation NXT Salute to the Indies is at Dreamz JXN.

MONDAY 10/24

Film Forward Dinner and a Movie is at 6 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; visit sundance.org/filmforward. … The Mississippi Community Symphonic Band performs at 7 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). Free; call 601-605-2786. … The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at Hal & Mal’s. $5. … Pub Quiz at Ole Tavern.

TUESDAY 10/25

The play “Dracula” premieres at 7 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.); shows through Nov. 6. $25, $22 seniors and students; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222. … Mississippi Murder Mysteries presents the dinner theatre “When the Line Goes Dead” at 7 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). $39.50; call 601-856-9696 to RSVP. … Time Out hosts Openmic Night. … Fire hosts Open-Mic Comedy Night.

WEDNESDAY 10/26

Author Ellen Anne Fentress speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Call 601-576-6998. … The Epoxy Stories play at Hal & Mal’s. … Fitzgerald’s has music from Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Jesse Robinson performs at Blues by Starlight at 7 p.m. at Highland Village. COURTESY JEANNIE WALLER

THURSDAY 10/20

SUNDAY 10/23

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 10/19

33


jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Radio JFP on WLEZ, Thursdays, noon, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guest is Fischer Galleriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Marcy Nessel. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Podcasts at jfpradio.com. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Jacktoberfest Oct. 21, 11 a.m., at Congress Street. Enjoy brats, bands and beer. Free admission; visit jacktoberfest.com. Mississippi International Film Festival Oct. 21-23, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $8 one days, $10 two days; call 601-665-7737; visit msfilm.org or page 32 for a full schedule.

HOLIDAY Boo at the Zoo Oct. 20-22 and Oct. 27-29, 5-8 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Trick-or-treat at more than 30 stations. $9, $6 children 12 and under; members: $7, $4 children under 12; call 601-352-2580. Holiday Potpourri Oct. 21, 9 a.m., at the home of Kim and Mike Nichols (4203 Eastover Place). The First Presbyterian Day School fundraiser includes a silent auction and exhibits. $5; call 601-355-1731.

Snakes and Turtles Lecture Oct. 20, 7 p.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road), in Price Hall. Free; call 601-926-1104. Fall Flower and Garden Fest Oct. 21-22, 9 a.m.2 p.m., at Truck Crop Branch Experiment Station (2024 Experiment Station Road, Crystal Springs). Free; call 601-892-3731. Domestic Violence Conference Oct. 21-23, at Zion Travelers M.B. Church (925 W. Pearl St.). Call 601953-5747. UNCF Mayorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Masked Ball Oct. 21, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Proceeds benefit Tougaloo and Rust colleges. $65, $520 table of eight; call 601-977-7871. Be Bold Beer Run Oct. 22, 4:30 p.m., in downtown Jackson. Run with stops for drink specials at designated restaurants. Free; call 262-391-9265.

Horror Fest Oct. 22, 10 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Enjoy an art exhibit and a ghost hunt talk. Free; call 601-397-6292.

COMMUNITY

Power of Pink Balloon Release Oct. 24, 6 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 I-55 North). Pick up balloons from A Daisy a Day. Call 601-948-6262.

Else School of Management Fall Forum Oct. 20, 8:30 a.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Jim Barksdale speaks. $15; call 601-974-1250.

Senior Health and Wellness Fair Oct. 26, 9 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-0335.

WELLNESS FILE PHOTO

T

he Tougaloo Fashion For a Cause show starts at 7 p.m. Oct. 20 at Holmes Hall. The schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pre-Alumni Council coordinates the event every year to raise money for a cancer-related foundation. This year, the chosen foundation is Cancer for College, a group that gives scholarships to breast cancer survivors. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is a tribute to Broadway and the movies â&#x20AC;&#x153;Burlesqueâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreamgirls.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are $3 in advance and $6 at the door. For details, contact Alexis Thomas at 601-594-8781 or Danny Jones at 601-977-7870.

October 19 - 25, 2011

Cafe MIRA Oct. 20, 6:30 p.m., at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (612 N. State St.). Watch the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Salt of the Earth.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601354-9355.

Sisters Surviving Pink Gala Oct. 22, 7 p.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). $40; call 601-212-7295.

Fashion For a Cause

34

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Child Poverty in Mississippi and Its Implicationsâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 20, 6:30 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the Dollye Robinson Building. Free; call 601-979-1562.

Baptist Health Systems Events. Call 601-948-6262. â&#x20AC;˘ Free Medication Reviews Oct. 20, 11 a.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in the main lobby. â&#x20AC;˘ Lovely Legs Vein Screening Oct. 25, 5 p.m., at Baptist Medical Clinic (151 E. Metro Drive, Flowood). RSVP.

STAGE AND SCREEN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beauty and the Beastâ&#x20AC;? through Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $25-$62.50; call 601-981-1847. Events at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.). Call 601-965-7026. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Life of Galileoâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 19-22, at Blackbox Theatre. $10, $5 seniors, students and children. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I Say Goes: Musical Revue of Motherhoodâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 20-22, at the Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center. Free.

'FFMJOHBOFFEUPSFMBY EFTUSFTT DIJMM PVU HFUDMPTFUPOBUVSF Visit the Mississippi Petrified Forest. DSODFHVRPHOORZWKDWHYHQVRPHRI WKHWUHHVDUHVWRQHG soothing Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re offering a admission of ted un co dis therapeutic

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BE THE CHANGE Traffick Jam Fundraiser Oct. 20, 5 p.m., at Swell-O-Phonic (Fondren Corner, 2761 Old Canton Road, Suite 103). Sales goes toward Traffick Jam to fight child sex trafficking. Email swelljxnms@yahoo.com. Blues by Starlight Oct. 20, 7 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 I-55 North). The fundraiser featuring music, food and a silent auction benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs. $100; call 601-969-7088, ext. 25. Scarecrow Cruise and Car Show Oct. 21-22, at Madison Square Center for the Arts (2103 Main St., Madison). Proceeds benefit the Mississippi SIDS Alliance and Hope Hollow Ministries. Free, donations welcome; $25 car registration; call 601-259-5248 or 601-291-9757. Pancake Breakfast Oct. 22, 8 a.m., at Chateau Ridgeland (745 S. Pear Orchard Road). Proceeds benefit Outward Bound for Veterans, which helps veterans readjust to civilian life. $7; call 601-956-1331. Heather Spencer Soulshine Memorial Concert Oct. 22, 7 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Heatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hope Grant Program. $20; email lindaf@heatherstree.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Telling Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Storyâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 20, 6 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), at Center Stage. Free; call 601-985-9888. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paranormal Inactivity.â&#x20AC;? The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre performs. RSVP at 601-291-7444. â&#x20AC;˘ Oct. 21, 7 p.m., at The Parker House (104 N.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland). $46. â&#x20AC;˘ Oct. 25, 7 p.m., at Kathrynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6800 Old Canton Road). $42. Art House Cinema Downtown Oct. 23, 2 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bolshoi Galaâ&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m. ($16) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buckâ&#x20AC;? at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org.

Chuck Palahniukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Damnedâ&#x20AC;? Book Night Oct. 20, 5:30 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). Enjoy food, music and an art show. For ages 21 and up. $24.95 book; call 601-366-7619. Jane Austen Book Club: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Northanger Abbeyâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 25, 6 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). $40; call 601-974-1130.

CREATIVE CLASSES Thriller Hip-hop Fusion Dance Class Oct. 22, 2 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). $15; call 601-213-6355.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dracula,â&#x20AC;? at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). Show times are 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25-29 and Nov. 2-5, and 2 p.m. Oct. 30 and Nov. 6. $25, $22 seniors and students; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222.

Shut Up! Classes, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road). JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd teaches the Shut Up and Convince! Opinion Writing Workshop from 6-8 p.m. Nov. 7 and Nov. 14 ($50), the Shut Up and Publish! Workshop from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 10 ($50) and the six-week Shut Up and Write! Series every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Jan. 7-March 10 ($150, $75 deposit required). Limit of 11 per class. Discounts for combined classes. Gift certificates available. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 16; email class@ jacksonfreepress.com; find Shut Up and Write on Facebook and Twitter (@shutupandwrite).

MUSIC

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When the Line Goes Deadâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 25, 7 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Mississippi Murder Mysteries performs. RSVP. $39.50; call 601-856-9696. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talk Radioâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 25-26, 7 p.m., at Hinds Community College (501 E. Main St., Raymond), in Brooks Theatre. RSVP. For ages 10 and up. $5, $3 students; call 601-857-3266.

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the Art Garden. Free, food for sale; call 601-960-1515.

Pumpkin Adventure Oct. 19-22, at Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). $6; call 601-432-4500 or 800-844-8687.

â&#x20AC;˘ Live at Lunch Oct. 19 and Oct. 26, 11:30 a.m. Charlie Townsend performs.

Art, Poetry and Justice Slam Oct. 22, 7 p.m., at Metrocenter Mall (3645 Highway 80 W.). Giveaways included. Free; call 877-892-2577.

â&#x20AC;˘ High Note Jam Concert Series Oct. 21, 5:30 p.m. The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southern Cooking Bibleâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 19, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N.). Paula Deen signs copies. $29.99 book; call 601-366-7619.

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Jesse Gallagher Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman PAUL MITCHELL SIGNATURE SALON NOW CARRYING PAUL MITCHELL AWAPUHI

path to serenity.

775 Lake Harbour Drive #H in Ridgeland 601.856.4330 | fax: 601.856.4505


DIVERSIONS|music

E\*DUUDG/HH

2

by Valerie Wells

COURTESY KILL DEVIL HILL

J

acksonian Rex Brown brings some friends home with him Oct. 21 when Kill Devil Hill plays at Club Fire (209 Commerce St., 601-592-1000). The hometown boy, who has worked in Los Angeles for the past 15 years, is lead singer for this new heavy-metal band with some serious heritage. Veteran rockers with ties to Black Sabbath, Pantera and Ratt make up this pedigreed act. Kill Devil Hill includes Vinny Appice, who used to play with Black Sabbath, Heaven and Hell, and Dio; bassist Rex Brown, who

has played with Pantera and Down; Dewey Bragg, who sings; and Mark Zavon, who plays the guitar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like Led Zeppelin meets Alice in Chainsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with southern rock,â&#x20AC;? promoter Buck Alman said in a phone interview while somewhere between Nashville, Tenn., and Little Rock, Ark. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traveling with the touring foursome. His favorite song from the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still evolving repertoire is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voo Doo Doll,â&#x20AC;? but he also likes the tune â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drawbridge.â&#x20AC;? Kill Devil Hill started a tour Oct. 2, playing about an hour and a half in each town.

The Key of G by Garrad Lee

P

olitics is on the minds and tongues of everyone these days. We have elections coming up Nov. 8, when Mississippians will vote on two hot-button topics: personhood and voter ID. Nationally, the Occupy Wall Street movement has spread all over the country. Everyone has a kind of opinion on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, and for the first time in a while, I would argue that this country is at least beginning to engage in meaningful political discourse. With that in mind, I have created a non-exhaustive playlist of some of my favorite politically tinged tracks. â&#x20AC;˘ Gil Scott-Heron, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Revolution Will Not be Televised,â&#x20AC;? Pieces of a Man (1971). This is an obvious choice, but it does take on new meaning when you consider this statistic: Only 51 percent of Americans are even aware of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Occupyâ&#x20AC;? protests, even though similar protests are going down in almost every state. Thanks to a complicit corporate media machine, Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words are even truer now, 40 years after he released the song.

The band has signed with SPV/Steamhammer, and a debut album is tentatively scheduled for a March 2012 release. Warren Riker, who also worked with Down, Corrosion of Conformity, Sublime and Cathedral, is producing the as yet untitled release. Kill Devil Hill performs at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21, at Club Fire (209 Commerce St., 601-592-1000). Tickets are $15. Fling Hammer is the special guest. For more about Kill Devil Hill, go to killdevilhillmusic.com or spv.de. Also, check out the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s videos on YouTube.

FILE PHOTO

Kill Devil Hill includes, from left,Vinnie Appice, Dewey Bragg, Mark Zavon and Rex Brown.

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Garradâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Political Playlist

â&#x20AC;˘ Genesis, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land of Confusion,â&#x20AC;? Invisible Touch (1986). Say what you will about Phil Collins in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s (for the record, I loved him), but he sang some prophetic words in 1986: â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I can hear the marching feet/Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving into the streetâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be coming home tonight/My generation will put it right/Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not just making promises/That we know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never keep.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Bill Hicks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pro-Life,â&#x20AC;? Rant in E Minor (1997). The first comedy interlude in our playlist finds Bill Hicks talking about abortion, a topic on the minds of Mississippians with a vote looming on Initiative 26, the Personhood initiative. Hicks sums it up best: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so pro-life, do me a favor, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t block med clinics, OK? Lock arms and block cemeteries. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see how committed you are to this premise.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Steel Pulse, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Who Responsible?â&#x20AC;? True Democracy (1990). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brothers and sisters, this plight weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re facing/Get involved, problems to solve/Yourself concerning.â&#x20AC;? Steel Pulse reminds us that the problems the world faces have a personal side, which de-

mands action from individuals. Why is that strange? Because there are no â&#x20AC;˘ Lee Dorsey, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes We Can,â&#x20AC;? Yes We black people in Arizona.â&#x20AC;? Can (1970). Dorsey makes it very simple â&#x20AC;˘ The Coup, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breathing Apparatus,â&#x20AC;? for us: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make this land a better land/Than Steal This Album (1998). Lead rapper the world in which Boots Riley can best we live/And help each sum up the Coupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s man be a better man/ criticism of the medical With the kindness industry: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My medithat we give.â&#x20AC;? Seems cal plan was to not so easy, but we make it get shot.â&#x20AC;? Millions of so difficult. Americans are no betâ&#x20AC;˘ Richard Pryor, ter off. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prison,â&#x20AC;? Live in the â&#x20AC;˘ C a g e , Sunset Strip (1982). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grand Ol Party The second comedy Crash (Featuring interlude deals with Jello Biafra),â&#x20AC;? Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the biggest Garrad Lee includes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land of Winter (2005). A socio-political issues Confusionâ&#x20AC;? on his political playlist. hip-hop war-protest facing this country: song with Dead Kenthe Prison Industrial nedyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front man Jello Complex, a structure that disproportion- Biafra providing the voice of George W. ately ties up many young people of color Bush? What? The premise alone is worin the correctional system. Pryor warned thy of admiration, but Cage also delivers about this in 1982 with his visit to an Ari- with the lyrics: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the opposite of pro is zona State prison: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really strange be- a con then look beyond this/The oppocause itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 80 percent black people in there. site of Congress must be progress.â&#x20AC;?

jacksonfreepress.com

Kill Devil Hill

3ALUTETO)NDIES$AY

35


livemusic OCT. 19 - WEDNESDAY

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

10/19

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM THURSDAY 10/20

$1.50 LONGNECKS, $3 WELL DRINKS, $4 SELECT CALL DRINKS, $5 JAGERBOMBS FRIDAY

10/21

Weekly Lunch Specials

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

October 20

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday

October 21

James Justin & Co.

Saturday

October 22

JP Harris

ArchNemesis SATURDAY

10/22

Lord T & Eloise

MONDAY

10/24

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

10/25

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR WEDNESDAY 10/26

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

October 19 - 25, 2011

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT

36

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GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE CATHEAD VODKA 9-10PM

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

&TheToughChoices Monday

October 24

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

October 25

Elegant Trainwreck Presents:

KindleWood 2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

October 19

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

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NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS Wednesday, October 19th

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/19 Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lo Trio (restaurant)

THURSDAY 10/20 Chuck Palahniukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Damned Book Night w/ special guests The New Orleans Bingo! Show

FRIDAY 10/21

SOL DRIVEN TRAIN (Folk) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, October 20th

JV JAZZ LAB

Thomas Jackson Orchestra (restaurant) Stagolee w/ Kink Adore(red room)

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

SATURDAY 10/22

Friday, October 21st

Grits and Soul Band (restaurant) Heatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tree (red room/big room)

(Funk) 9-1, $15Cover

MONDAY 10/24 Blues Monday with Central MS Blues Society (rest)

FEARLESS FOUR

Saturday, October 22nd

BIG AL & THE HEAVYWEIGHTS

TUESDAY 10/25

(Blues) 9-1, $15Cover

PUB QUIZ w/ Laura and Donovan (restaurant)

Tuesday, October 25th

Coming Soon SAT10.29: Ghouls Night Out, a record release party for T.B. Ledford, Wooden Finger, and The Weeks FRI11.04: Graham Colton w/ Matthew Mayfield SAT11.05: Exposed Festival SAT11.19: Rosco Bandana FRI11.25: Blue Montain

Monday-Thursday

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

JESSE ROBINSON & FRIENDS

starts at 6pm, $5 Cover, Limited Menu

Wednesday, October 26th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, October 27h

PRYOR & THE TOMBSTONES

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover Friday, October 28th

KING EDWARD

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 29th

HOUSEROCKERS

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

37


by Bryan Flynn

by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, OCT. 20 Major League Baseball (Fox, time to be announced), Game two of the World Series between the Texas Rangers and the St. Louis Cardinals. FRIDAY, OCT. 21 College Football (ESPN2/ESPN 7-10 p.m.) two college football games on the ESPN networks featuring Big East teams: West Virginia at Syracuse and Rutgers at Louisville. USM should be calling the Big East commissioner to tell him how they could beat all four teams. SATURDAY, OCT. 22 MLB (Fox TBA), The World Series travels from St. Louis to Texas as the Rangers take on the Cardinals in game three. SUNDAY, OCT. 23 NFL (NBC 7:30-11 p.m.), New Orleans comes home for the first time in three weeks. The Saints look to bounce back after a loss to Tampa Bay against winless Indianapolis Colts. MONDAY, OCT. 24 MLB (Fox, TBA), If necessary the Cardinals and the Rangers will meet up in game five of the fall classic. TUESDAY, OCT. 25 College football (ESPN2 7-10 p.m.), Troy hits the road to take on Florida International. It is a great week for my wife, Lacey, to be out of the country, because it is the first week with football every night. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26 College football (ESPN 7-10 p.m.), More Big East football as Connecticut travels to Pittsburgh. How does one of the worst conferences in football get every team on TV?

October 19 - 25, 2011

At basically the mid-point of the college football season, only four Mississippi schools have winning records: Southern Miss (5-1), Jackson State (6-1) and Delta State (7-1) all have only one loss. Millsaps has a winning record, barely, at 4-3. Follow Bryan at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

38

T

Real Men Wear Pink BRYAN FLYNN

Basketball season starts soon for football fans whose team is already done for the season.

The Callaway High School cheerleading squad sported pink pompoms and hair ribbons Friday, Oct. 14, during the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pink Outâ&#x20AC;? game.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;B

lack Outâ&#x20AC;? games look awesome at night when fans wear black. â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Outâ&#x20AC;? games are better in the day as fans wear white. Before last Friday, though, I had never had a seen a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pink Outâ&#x20AC;? game. That is what I found as Callaway High School took on Ridgeland High School. Callaway put on a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tackle a Cureâ&#x20AC;? event for breast cancer awareness. Inside the gates was a pink tent with volunteers distributing literature and selling breast-cancer awareness T-shirts and other items. All proceeds at the tent benefitted the American Cancer Society. Russell Athletic Company provided pink apparel for the Callaway players and coaches. Players sported â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tackle a Cureâ&#x20AC;? stickers on their helmets. The cheerleaders had pink pompoms and pink ribbons in their hair, and in the stands were pockets of attendees in pink, men and women, young and old. What started with just two Jackson area schools has grown to 10 schools this year. Flowood-based Tackle a Cure has a mission to increase awareness, screenings and promote early prevention. Next year and every year thereafter, the group aims to have every high school in Mississippi, public and private, participate during one October home game. At Callaway, the Face and Body Center (2550 Flowood Drive, Flowood, 601939-9999) had doctors on hand to answer questions and provide information. Dr. Dev A. ManiSundaram presented a plaque at halftime to Barbra Alexander, a former longtime Jackson Public Schools teacher who has beaten lung, bone and colon cancer. Callaway football coach Daryl Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; life has been touched by breast cancer. He lost his mother and mother-in-law to the disease. Tackle a Cure is based on a similar NFL event. In 2009, the NFL started its campaign

for breast-cancer awareness, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crucial Catch.â&#x20AC;? One of the driving forces behind the NFL campaign is DeAngelo Williams of the Carolina Panthers. Williams has lost three aunts from breast cancer, and his mother is a breast cancer survivor. The idea of pink cleats worn by players during October was Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brainchild. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing stronger than wearing the thing that keeps you going in the National Football League, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your cleats,â&#x20AC;? Williams says on deangelowilliams34.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a firm foot in the ground, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to slip.â&#x20AC;? Williams sparked an October phenomenon in the NFL. In 2009, only a few players and coaches wore pink. Now, every player, coach and official in the NFL wears pink during October in a show of support for breastcancer awareness. Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals wide receiver, is donating $1,000 for every catch and $10,000 for every touchdown. So far this month, Fitzgerald has had 12 receptions for $12,000 in donations but no touchdowns. Fitzgerald is also giving 10 cents for every new twitter follower this month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The starting number is 935,210,â&#x20AC;? Fitzgerald stated on Twitter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want my new fans to know they are helping make a difference in the fight against Breast Cancer! Spread the word everyone & #ThinkPink!â&#x20AC;? When this article was written, @LarryFitzgerald had 1,019,048 followers. That is more than $8,000 in donations in the fight against breast cancer. Halfway through October, Fitzgerald donated $20,000 to the cause. Sometimes sports can be ugly. The NFL and NBA have had or are having labor disputes. Greed has overcome college football with teams jumping from conference to conference looking for the best deal. Scandals have dominated the college-football headlines. But there are times when guys like Williams, Fitzgerald, Coach Jones of Callaway and others show the good side of sports. These men are proof that positive things come from sports. Cancer doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see color or gender. It affects us all just the same. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just a slogan: Real men wear pink. Participate in a Tackle a Cure event this month. On Oct. 21, Madison Ridgeland Academy, Madison Central High School and Raleigh High School will all hold Pink Outs. On Oct. 28, Richland High School will fea-

ture a Pink Out. Even you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t normally go to high-school games, this is a great cause. We can make this event bigger every year. If your school didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take part in Tackle a Cure, ask that it do so next year. Follow Tackle a Cure on twitter @tackleacure. Also, visit tackleacure.com or the Facebook page. Bid on the pink items worn by NFL players at nflauction.nfl.com, and find more information about the NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crucial Catchâ&#x20AC;? campaign on the NFL website (nfl.com/pink).

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Going to Bowl?

7

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1IHMXIVVERIER*MWL +VMPP -RXVSHYGIW

live music

Now Open Early

wed | oct 19 Jesse “Guitar” Smith

This Week’s Music

october 19-25 5:30-9:30p

Wed.-Sat | 8:00 Two Shows Fri & Sat

thur | oct 20 Jason Baily

October 19 Doug Frank’s Blues Jam

fri | oct 21 Acoustic Crossroads

October 20 Juju’s Drum Circle

5:30-9:30p

6:30 -10:30p

sat | oct 22 The Amazing Lazy Boyz 6:30-10:30p

sun | oct 23 Haggard Collins 5:30-9:30p

mon | oct 24 Karaoke tue | oct 25 Jesse “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

3 Course Dinner $21

7:00pm

Hummus Appetizer Seared Redfish with salad & 2 sides Baklava Dessert (4:30-9pm Mon-Sat)

5:00-10:00 pm

Ladies Rock Night Every Wednesday Night Live music by ALL U CAN DRINK! Imran Shaw $10 (8:30p-Midnight) (Ladies Only)

Amazin’ Lazy Boi Band 11:00 - until

October 21 House Cat 8:00 - 11:00pm

thursday oct 20

Legendary House Rockers

55¢ Wings | 7-11pm

October 22 Norman Clark

Friday oct 21

11:00 - until

8:00 - 11:00pm

Norman Clark & Smoke Stack Lightenin’ 11:00 - until

Live Music During Lunch•OPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDED•NO COVER UNTIL Midnight $10 Cover after midnight

DJ Heat on 1s & 2s SATurday oct 22

Live Blues with T-Baby & Soul Survivors 1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

Music Mayhem Open Mic Thursdays

Hosted by Kenny Davis (frontman of Creep Left) (8:30-Midnight) (2 for 1 wells & Jager Bombs & $2 draft all night)

Live Music Weekends

Friday, October 21st

Saturday, October 22nd

8:30pm-Midnight

8:30pm-Midnight

Blake Thomas

Aaron Coker

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms 601--956-0082

HAGGARD COLLINS

Week 6 Winners!

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX!

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4th Annual Halloween Bash October 28, 2011

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Friday - October 21

Rowdy South Saturday - October 22

Trey Hawkins band Sunday - October 23

The Electric Hammocks & The Church Keys

Monday - October 24

Ladies Night

Tuesday - October 25

WEEK 7 STARTS NOW!

www.jfpfootball.com

2 for 1 Well Drinks Every Wed. 8pm - Close 601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

THUR OCT 20 BUD LIGHT NIGHT $2 BUD LIGHTS DURING THE THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL GAME

FRI OCT 21

3rd Place $10

sponsored by:

& KARAOKE

BEER BUCKET SPECIALS

9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

Greg Flynn

WED OCT 19 LADIES NIGHT

UCLA @ ARIZONA 8PM

Michael McDuff

Live Performances by

- BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

OPEN MIC JAM 7-11 BAR OPEN 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

SAT OCT 22

MEAT & 3 VEGGIES INCLUDES BREAD & FRESH BAKED COOKIE

SUPER SATURDAY

COLLEGE GAME NIGHT

SUN OCT 23

NFL SUNDAY TICKET

WATCH EVERY GAME!

MON OCT 24 IN-DA-BIZ 2FOR1 DRINK SPECIALS

TUE OCT 25

JACKPOT TRIVIA

jacksonfreepress.com

October 21

Thursday - October 20

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X Y N A


dining

STICK-FOOD

by Tom Ramsey

VICTOR LEE

Everything’s Better On a Stick

Your choice of meat (steak, chick, etc.) cut into 1-1/2 inch cubes Yellow onions, cut into eighths Dill-pickles, sliced thick Salt and Pepper

Batter

2 cups all-purpose flour 3 cups club soda 1 tablespoon creole seasoning

Food-on-a-stick’s appeal remain a delicious mystery to us all.

W

hat is it about the simple act of putting something on a stick that just makes it irresistible? Is it the convenience of having an easy way to transport food from plate to mouth? Is it some childhood remembrance of popsicles long past? I’ll leave those questions for the world’s philosophers. I just know I love it. With the Mississippi State Fair having just passed, no doubt many Mississippians will get their fill of stick-skewered and deepfried delights. Personally, I prefer to eat my stick-centered treats in the company of chainsmoking, overly made up, face-sucking, hickey-laden teenagers in impossibly tight jeans,

but if this is not your bag, you can revel in the joys of “(insert meat here) on a stick” in the privacy of your own home. You just need to know some basics. First, you’ll need a good batter recipe. Actually, first you’ll need a stick, but I figured you already knew that. Secondly, you’ll need oil with a high smoke point. Peanut oil never lets me down. Thirdly, you’ll need either a home deepfryer, or a heavy stock pot or Dutch oven. Lastly, I would recommend a good homeowners policy just in case it all goes horribly, horribly wrong. Once you have your gorgeous, golden goodies in your hand and ready to eat, I sus-

Mix all ingredients in a large mixing bowl until all flour is fully incorporated and the mixture is thick enough to adhere to the food. If it is too thick, add more soda. Too thin, add more flour. You’ll eventually get it just right. Heat the oil to 350 degrees. Take your preferred meat, some yellow onions and some thick dill-pickle slices, dried with a paper towel. Season everything liberally with salt and pepper. Alternate the meat, onions and pickles as you slide them onto the stick, leaving enough room to use the leftover stick as a handle. Dip everything into the batter and shake off the excess. Slowly lower the batter-dipped goodness into the hot oil and let it cook until deep golden brown. Remove from the heat and allow to drain and cool for about five minutes.

pect that the aroma will cause you to have a sudden yearning for the midway. If this happens, don’t jump in your car. Just turn on MTV’s “Jersey Shore” and eat your stick-food with the volume way up. You’ll get just about the same effect.

$9 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Mu s i c L i s t i n g s

OCT 19 | Brian Jones 9:30p OCT 20 | Shaun Patterson 9:30p OCT 21 | DoubleShotz 9:30p OCT 22 | Evan Williams 9:30p OCT 25 | Open Mic w/ Kenny Davis & Brandon Latham 9p

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

5A44 FX5X

Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gourmet Burgers:

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

Salad Bowl Diversity

Healthy salads can be interesting and colorful.

A

good salad can go far beyond the traditional iceberg-lettuce blend. You can mix together almost anything you have in your fridge and end up with a treat. Sometimes, however, unhealthy, fatty dressings and toppings can find its way into a bowl. Here are a few ingredients to keep your salad healthy but interesting.

• Salsa is a great alternative to salad dressing. A hearty salsa has less sodium than some dressings and no added fats. It adds pizzazz to your salad with its flavors, yet remains a healthy topping made with vegetables and fruits. • Yogurt and honey, lemon juice, olive oil or vinegar can also substitute the traditional dressing and is healthier than ranch or other calorically high dressings. • Tuna is a great addition because it is low in fat, contains omega-3 fatty acids and is high in protein. • Whole-wheat couscous, barley, wheat germ or quinoa adds fiber, protein and a grainy texture to your salad. • Beans add different color and mood to your salad while providing nutritional value. • Seeds add a delicious crunch with every bite. Though nuts are similar, you get more seeds in a tablespoon serving and seeds have more zinc. Pumpkin seeds are high in iron. Sunflower seeds are great for vitamin E. • Citrus fruit like oranges or grapefruit bring a tangy flavor to salads without being high in calories. Pineapples bring an exotic taste to your bowl of greens. • Artichokes add an unusual taste to your plate but fits right in with its low-carb and low-calorie qualities. • Applesauce, known more as a snack, can top off your salad without the fats and cholesterol • Homemade croutons made from garlic-flavored whole wheat bread are definitely better than boxed croutons or crackers that can have a lot of hidden fat.

jacksonfreepress.com

DIANA HOUSE

by LaShanda Phillips

41


6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-5040 Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

The Copper Iris

All You Can Eat

Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977 Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

Delivery for orders of 5 or more.

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

115 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friend Us:

Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille

VASILIOS

Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

â&#x20AC;˘ Fresh Seafood Daily

ď&#x2122;&#x2030;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;.ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2020;.ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; | ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; Hď?ˇď?šď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x201E; Mď?Ąď?¤ď?Šď?łď?Żď?Ž

CRAB LEGS DINNER

Soups â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Specials

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

M-F ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď?Ą-ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď?°, ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Sď?Ąď?´ ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Cď?Ąď?˛ď?˛ď?šď?Żď?ľď?´ Aď?śď?Ąď?Šď?Źď?Ąď?˘ď?Źď?Ľ

Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

Will deliver orders over $50.

Let us cater YOUR next event!

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

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Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Try The

1351 Bailey Avenue Jackson, MS

769-220-3185 Check out our new menu at

www.jacksonfreepress.com/menus

(a very high-class pig stand)

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Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.8538

voted best coffeeshop in jackson

October 19-25, 2011

2003-2011

42

Historic Fondren Art District www.cupsespressocafe.com


Capital City Beverages M I S S I S S I P P I â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S C O M P L E T E B E E R S O U RC E

Ask for these beers at stores and restaurants in Central Mississippi. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find these beers? Call 601-956-2224 for more information.

jacksonfreepress.com

distributed by

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October 19-25, 2011


read more Body&Soul stories and the blog at jacksonfreepress.com

by Ronni Mott

The Best Defense and help us pave the way toward a cancerfree future. Fear of breast cancer is not your friend. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re afraid of developing cancer, your best defense is (at the risk of using a clichĂŠ) a good offense. In other words, understand

the risks and know your options. And by all means, get professional medical advice regarding breast cancer or any health-related condition. This article (or any article) is not meant to be a replacement for your doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations.

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1

+NOW9OUR2ISK

Having risk factors doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get breast cancer, but it can help you determine a course of action. Breast cancer risks include: â&#x20AC;˘ Age: The risk increases after about age 50, or menopause, and continues to rise through age 70. Other age-related risks include: â&#x20AC;˘ Early onset of puberty, before age 12. â&#x20AC;˘ Late menopause, after age 55. â&#x20AC;˘ Late first full-term pregnancy, after age 30, or no full-term pregnancies. â&#x20AC;˘ Genetics: Experts estimate that about 5 percent to 10 percent of breast cancers stem from genetic mutations: â&#x20AC;˘ If you have a family history of breast cancer, especially in a mother, sister, daughter, father or brother (yes, men can get it, too), your risk is about 1.8 times higher than those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. The risk increases with the number of firstdegree relatives diagnosed; with three or more relatives, your risk is four times higher than the general population. â&#x20AC;˘ Personal history of breast cancer or certain other cancers. â&#x20AC;˘ Obesity, especially after menopause. â&#x20AC;˘ Recent hormone replacement therapy or recent oral contraceptive use.

2

+NOWTHE7ARNING3IGNS

Not every symptom is a sure sign of breast cancer; some symptoms can happen with other conditions including completely benign cysts. If you have signs that worry you, see your doctor as soon as possible. â&#x20AC;˘ A new lump in the breast or underarm â&#x20AC;˘ Thickening or swelling of part of the breast â&#x20AC;˘ Irritation or dimpling of breast skin â&#x20AC;˘ Redness or flaky skin in the nipple area or the breast â&#x20AC;˘ Pulling in of the nipple or pain in the nipple area â&#x20AC;˘ Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood â&#x20AC;˘ Any change in the size or shape of the breast â&#x20AC;˘ Pain in any area of the breast ([DPSOHVRIZDUQLQJVLJQVLQFOXGHDQHZOXPSLQWKH EUHDVW DERYH DQGGLPSOLQJLQWKHEUHDVWVNLQ EHORZ 

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3CREENAND0REVENT

Get to know your breasts and whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s normal for you and your cycle. Dr. Susan Love, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Susan Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breast Book,â&#x20AC;? advises: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just be comfortable and be aware of your body, and if you feel something that feels abnormal, get it checked out. â&#x20AC;Ś If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funny, and if the doctor doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to pursue it, then get another doctor.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Get screened regularly. Talk with your doctor about the best types of screening given your risk factors. Early cancers respond much better to treatment than those diagnosed late. â&#x20AC;˘ Control your weight and exercise. Learn how to eat healthy and stay active. â&#x20AC;˘ Know your family history. See No. 1. â&#x20AC;˘ If you are post-menopausal, find out the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy. â&#x20AC;˘ Limit your alcohol intake.

4

&IND/UT-ORE

The amount of good information on the Internet is amazing. Here are a few of the expert resources used in this article, which represents only a small amount of the data available to you. â&#x20AC;˘ The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (cdc.gov) have numerous pages dedicated to breast cancer, accessible through a quick search. â&#x20AC;˘ Breastcancer.org features comprehensive, easily digested information on everything from risk to managing your medical records. â&#x20AC;˘ The American Cancer Society (cancer.org) provides a comprehensive â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breast Cancer Overviewâ&#x20AC;? document on its site, and, just for data wonks, has released a new study, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breast Cancer Facts & Figures, 2011-2012,â&#x20AC;? available as a PDF from the website. â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi State Department of Health (msdh.ms.gov) provides information specifically for state residents and health-care providers. Find out the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs for low-income women here, including Medicaid and Medicare assistance. â&#x20AC;˘ Kaiser State Health Facts (statehealthfacts.org) provides some of the most recent statistics and demographics on breast cancer and a host of other health issues, conveniently sorted by state. â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation (dslrf.org). Love is a physician and researcher in breast health and issues of aging women. Health-care providers consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Susan Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breast Bookâ&#x20AC;? (Da Capo Press; 5th edition, 2010, $22) the bible of breast-health books. 45 jacksonfreepress.com

W

hen it comes to supporting breast-cancer research, even professional football players are getting in on the act. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a fan, no doubt youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen all the pink out there on the field. Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald (@LarryFitzgerald), whose mother, Carol, passed away from the disease in 2003, is going the extra mile for the cause: He has promised to donate $1,000 per catch, $10,000 per touchdown and 10 cents for every new Twitter follower he gets in October. Last year, he donated $33,000. Carolina Panthers running back DeAngelo Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mother, Sandra, is a breast cancer survivor, but he lost four aunts to breast cancer. Williams was instrumental in getting the NFL on board with the pink awareness campaign. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a lady stop me and said just because of what I saw during the game, meaning the color, (she) was going to get examined,â&#x20AC;? he told The Herald in South Carolina. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like not to present you with a bunch of scary statistics, but statistics paint a picture of where we are right now,


Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

1260 East County Line Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 601.487.8207 platosclosetridgeland.com

by Julie Skipper

Sequins and Livestock

L ACE Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S S

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Hair & Ac

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601.906.2253 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

50% off select Etnia Barcelona frames

661 DULING AVE. â&#x20AC;˘ JACKSON, MS 601.362.6675â&#x20AC;˘TRISH HAMMONS, ABOC

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I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really no secret that I love shiny things and a good show. My childhood included playing dress up, thanks to an extensive wardrobe of old dance-recital costumes and treasures from the Junior Auxiliaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thrift store. Then the general rule was the more sequins, the better. On the opposite end of that spectrum, however, I also profoundly loved the book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web.â&#x20AC;? This, coupled with growing up with friends who lived on land with horses and cows, gets credit for my otherwise inexplicable affinity for farm animals. I was sent into a whirlwind of excitement from Jackson State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homecoming parade falling the same week as the Mississippi State Fair. This represented a perfect storm of sequins and livestock. Despite living downtown for almost five years, I still turn into a little kid at the prospect of a parade outside my window. The JSU parade is a big one with bands and floats. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just any marching bands but the Sonic Boom of the South and the Prancing J-Settes! Friday evening before the parade, I ran into friends who live at Electric 308, and we made plans to watch from the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balcony. Saturday morning, I made my way through the crowds along Capitol Street and headed to the balcony, welcomed with mimosas (of course). A few minutes later, another neighbor joined, bearing a basket full of homemade pumpkin-chocolate chip muffinsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re no amateur spectators. Properly fed and hydrated, we settled in. The parade was all that it should beâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; lots of bands, sequins and royalty. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll confess, I found myself critiquing (and being a little jealous of) the dance teamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; knee-high boots and lots of sequins and practicing the sashay that they have down pat. Of course, the highlight was the Sonic Boom at the end. Our vantage point was perfect. They stopped right in front of the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mansion.

Now selling Votivo Candles

October 19 - 25, 2011

The Sonic Boom makes any Saturday better.

What could follow a parade? Fun at the state fair, naturally. Underground 119 (119 S. President St., 601-352-2322) prepared me for fair excitement earlier in the week by offering any menu item â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair styleâ&#x20AC;? (fried and on a stick). On top of that, my mother understands my love of farm animals, so when she heard the State Fair includes pig races, she immediately asked if I wanted to go, and I immediately said yes. So after the parade, she and I and my dad headed to the fairgrounds. Bypassing donut burgers and chocolatedipped corn dogs, I hightailed it straight to the livestock, because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a girl with priorities. Let me tell you, spas and beauty salons have nothing on the grooming taking place on the cows, bulls and sheep. The patience of their caretakers, as well as the patience of the animals, is quite something. Sheep judging was underway while we were there, but my favorites were the sheep in their stalls waitingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shorn to show, they wear what I can only describe as mock-turtleneck unitards to keep them warm. One groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turtlenecks were all bright neon colors; they looked like an â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s pop group. Of course, I loved the pig races, too, and the petting zoo. The fall fun will just keep coming with Lemuriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Damned Night with Chuck Palahniuk (5:30 p.m. Oct. 20 at Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 200 Commerce St., 601-948-0888) and several Halloween parties on the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure there will be more sequins to come in the next few weeks. That makes me happy. Julie Skipper submitted this column before learning of Craig Nooneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death Oct. 14.

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL LSO 7EA R CATE

46

JULIE SKIPPER

Platoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closet in Ridgeland has tons of gently used brand name jeans, tees, tanks, hoodies and shoes to fill your closet at up 70% off regular retail. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget - we pay $$$ on the spot for your gently used apparel and accessories - Check us out today!

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Best Pizza 2009-2011 Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

(in the former Fabricare Building, between Kat’s & Fenian’s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com

jacksonfreepress.com

2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

47


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Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi 1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

Full-Time Office Solutions: from $450.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Full-Time Furnished Office â&#x20AC;˘ Telephone & Telephone Services â&#x20AC;˘ High-Speed Internet â&#x20AC;˘ Reception Services â&#x20AC;˘ Use of Kitchen & Business Lounge â&#x20AC;˘ Conference Room & Meeting Space Usage Virtual Office Solutions: from $129.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Professional Business Address â&#x20AC;˘ Local Phone Number â&#x20AC;˘ Voice Mail & Call Forwarding â&#x20AC;˘ Personalized Reception Service â&#x20AC;˘ Mail & Package Receipt â&#x20AC;˘ Personal Mailbox â&#x20AC;˘ Office & Conference Room Usage

460 Briarwood Dr. | Jackson, MS 39206 Phone: 601.709.4610 | Fax: 601.709.4611

Culberson Bail Bonds

Bail Bonds 24 hours a day 7 days a week Payment Terms Available

Fastest & Friendliest Agents in the State

601-824-3254 friend us on facebook

culbersonbonding@gmail.com


v10n06 - Good Ideas: CRIME: What Causes It & How to Prevent It