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October 5-11, 2011


October 5 - 11, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

10 NO. 4

contents WARD SCHAEFER

LISA PYRON

6 Investigation Hinds County Supervisor Robert Graham is under scrutiny for his JPD days. COURTESY ANDERSON FAMILY

Cover photo by Aaron Phillips

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THIS ISSUE:

A defensive Brandon copes with the implications of an alleged hate crime in Jackson. H.C. PORTER

andrea jones they were different learners. Adapting to learning styles is the biggest key to teaching children.” Jones started Toot, Teach and Roll in March to cater to all learning styles such as musical, kinetic, interpersonal and logistic to better teach not only children, but to help teachers, parents and communities learn as well. The Toot, Teach and Roll bus is filled with tables bolted to the floors in place of seats, which are covered in craft and activity materials designed to ensure that students of any learning style can be given activities that best suit their own style. The bus also plays host to birthday parties and fitness programs. Jones’ decision to find innovative ways to teach is partly inspired by a quote from philosopher John Dewey: “If we teach today as we taught yesterday we rob our children of tomorrow.” She believes a hands-on approach is essential to teaching. “We used to just sit and lecture, but lecturing won’t do it anymore,” she said. Jones’ mobile learning lab style can reach anyone—child, parent, or teacher—who needs it. “Our target market is anyone who wants to learn.” For information on Toot, Teach and Roll, contact the office at 769-257-0944 or visit the website at tootandroll.com. - Dustin Cardon

24 River Life Composer Eve Beglarian visits Jackson to discuss kayaking on the Mississippi River.

41 Down There The pros and cons, and wheres, of birth-control options.

jacksonfreepress.com

Andrea Jones has always enjoyed teaching. “I’ve always been some type of educator. I like to gain knowledge then share it,” she said. Jones is the founder of Toot, Teach and Roll, an innovative mobile-learning lab inside a bright blue modified school bus. It’s a setup that allows Jones and her staff to bring a hands-on learning environment they created wherever it is needed. Toot, Teach and Roll integrates arts and crafts with laptops and SmartBoards in communities all over Jackson and the surrounding area. Jones, 37, has lived in Jackson for 33 years after moving from Grenada at age 4. She attended Murrah High School and later graduated from Jackson State University with a degree in marketing. She then attended Mississippi College, where she got a master’s in secondary education. She graduates from Mississippi College in December as a specialist in education leadership. A single mom, Jones has two children: a 19-year-old son, Andre, who is a bio-medical engineering major at Mississippi State, and a 12-year-old daughter, Coralyn, who is a 7th grader at Chastain Middle School. “They are part of the reason behind the bus,” Jones said. “I learned early on

FILE PHOTO

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 14 ............. Cover Story 24 ............... Diversions 26 ....................... Books 28 ..................... 8 Days 29 .............. JFP Events 31 ........................ Music 32 .......... Music Listing 36 ................. Astrology 37 ........................ Food 41 ............... Body/Soul 42 .... Girl About Town

Aftermath of Death

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Lacey McLaughlin News editor Lacey McLaughlin is a Florida native who enjoys riding her bike around Jackson. She is always on the hunt for news tips. Email Lacey@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601.362.6121 x. 22. She wrote the cover story.

Aaron Phillips Originally from Texas, Aaron Phillips has lived in Mississippi for more than a decade. He works for a local graphic-design firm and is a freelance photographer.

Megan Stewart Megan Stewart, the JFP’s web developer, works best by being unpredictable and catching everyone off guard. She graduated from Ole Miss with a bachelor’s degree in computer science last fall and lives in Jackson.

Crawford Grabowski A veteran public-school teacher who recently earned her master’s, Crawford Grabowski lives with her husband, Jim, daughter, Daise, and too many damn cats. She wrote a food feature.

Briana Robinson Deputy editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a sophomore at Millsaps College. She wrote the Body/Soul story.

Tom Allin Former editorial intern Tom Allin is native Jacksonian with a Tar Heel streak in him. He teaches in Clarksdale through Teach for America. He reviewed a book for this issue.

Dustin Cardon New copy editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi from Brandon. An English major, he enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day.

October 5 - 11, 2011

Erica Sutton

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Design intern Erica Sutton is a senior graphic-design major at Mississippi College. She enjoys design as well as photography. She worked on design in this issue.

editor’snote

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Hate Is As Hate Does

“S

o when is the Southern Poverty Law Center going to file a lawsuit against the man who killed Mr. Patel?” This was only one of many comments I’ve seen since James Anderson died under the wheels of a big truck. I want to say, “When we find out that his murderer was looking to kill an Indian or was shouting ‘white power!’ when he committed the tragic murder.” Some folks are very upset over, and confused by, the notion that some violent crimes are “hate crimes” and, thus, require an extra level of attention than other kinds of crimes. This confusion is remarkable in the state of Mississippi—one that still suffers every day in myriad ways from our violent race past. It has caused continuing racial distrust and made the world stereotype us. It has kept us on the bottom of most indicators and contributes to our poverty, and our poor self-image. Words matter. Let’s consider the meaning of “hate.” In “hate crimes,” it has a specific meaning, as SPLC Research Director Heidi Beirich explains to Lacey McLaughlin in this week’s cover story. It is a distinctive kind of crime, an attack on someone based on believing they are a member of a specific group that the perpetrator “hates.” When you attack that person, you are attacking every member of that group. It could have been any of them. And you are attacking the entire community. I think of my hometown of Philadelphia, Miss., a town that was broken for so long due not only to the murders of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner, but the fact that so few people in the town cared enough to do anything about it (until the multiracial Philadelphia Coalition formed a few years back and helped get Edgar Ray Killen tried and convicted). Hate crimes are devastating to communities. They are a form of domestic terrorism, usually meant to send a larger message of violent supremacy. The attacker flexes his muscle and targets a member of a despised group because he can. He needs to prove something. This is no way to run a society; that is why hate crimes should be treated with an extra level of legal response and community outrage. That does not mean that a different heinous crime, such as that committed against Mr. Patel or anyone else, should be treated in a lesser fashion than the law already allows. It shows a complete misunderstanding of hate crimes to argue that it means such a thing. Society must send an additional message that our society does not tolerate group terrorism. Ironically, many people who want us to hunt down global terrorists don’t believe the same scrutiny should be applied when victims are African Americans, homosexuals or other targeted groups right on our own soil. It is even more absurd to argue that every crime is motivated by “hate.” Even if you don’t understand the meaning of the word as applied to hate crimes, this is a patently false argument. Many domestic murders and other kinds are motivated by passion or even drug or

alcohol abuse. Many crimes are motivated by greed or the need to knock off a competitor. Many things, other than hate of some group, motivate violent crimes. So why the resistance to treating hate crimes like hate crimes and speaking out on behalf of communities that don’t want to go through what so many towns in our state went through in the past? What could possibly be wrong with using the criminal-justice system to try to prevent hate crimes? This is especially true for young people coming out of households and schools where some family and friends think that, somehow, it is cool to be racist or homophobic. If the family and peers of a teenager aren’t going to teach those lessons, society has to step in and send the message that such rhetoric and violence are unacceptable. Of course, people who make the argument against hate-crime legislation are usually presenting a false dilemma: They make it sound like we must trade off prosecuting hate crimes with prosecuting other kinds of violent crimes. Ironically, it is often law-and-orderlock-em-up types who say that; somehow this kind of crime seems to deserve less scrutiny, to their thinking, because other kinds of crimes (such as those committed by black people, let’s just be honest) aren’t prosecuted enough. In so doing, they are making it a race issue when it doesn’t have to be. The truth is that many people of all races right here in Jackson and Rankin County do not want to see hate crimes destroy our community. If evidence surfaces that the man accused of killing Mr. Patel did it because he is Indian, then it should be treated as a hate crime. And considering that the SPLC has also targeted black nationalist groups as hate groups, in addition to groups like the Sons of Confederate Veterans,

the Council of Conservative Citizens and the American Family Association (due to its vicious anti-gay stances), it could bring a lawsuit against people targeting Indian people. Good. But whether it would or not, the issue here is how each of us respond to a hate crime individually and collectively. What kind of city and state do we wish to live in? I remember growing up in Neshoba County and constantly hearing racist or hateful rhetoric, sometimes uttered by people I knew. In fact, of late it’s remarkable how much I hear against our African American president, usually hidden inside urban myths being spread by anonymous bloggers and emailers, spreading (false) rumors that he attended Muslim prayers or stopped the National Day of Prayer (please run such rumors through snopes.com. It was not easy then, and it is not easy now, to tell people you care about that this kind of rhetoric is offensive (yes, to white people, too) and unacceptable in a civilized society. But free speech flows both ways, and we must talk back. I’ve talked back and walked out of many hate-filled rooms over the years, and I can sleep at night as a result. I urge each of you to speak up each and every time you hear hate and to not believe the liars who try to convince you that prosecuting hate crimes is somehow excusing other kinds. Nothing could be more stupid. Don’t forget: Troubled people, regardless of age, need to feel superior to something. They take this kind of rhetoric and use it to justify their actions. They did it back in Neshoba County in 1964, and they do it across the U.S. today. Don’t let another James Anderson or James Byrd or Matthew Shepard die before you find the courage to call such rhetoric and violence exactly what it is. Hate.


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news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, Sept. 29 China launches an unmanned spacecraft in the first step toward constructing a space station. “America the Beautiful” played during the live gala broadcast of the launch on Chinese TV, but officials did not say why. … A study predicts that the number of Mississippi jobs in environmentally friendly sectors, such as recycling and renewable energy, will grow in the coming years. Friday, Sept. 30 Economists from the Economic Cycle Research Institute say the U.S. is heading toward a another recession. … Deryl Dedmon pleads not guilty to the capital murder of James Craig Anderson. Saturday, Oct. 1 Police in New York arrest about 500 protesters for shutting off a lane of traffic on the Brooklyn Bridge for several hours. … Airplanes show off acrobatics at an air show at Hawkins Field. Sunday, Oct. 2 Syrian dissidents officially form a national council to overthrow President Bashar Assad. … Former Vice President Dick Cheney says the CIA’s drone strike against al-Qaeda operative Anwar Awlaki validates the Bush administration’s terrorist-fighting strategy.

October 5 - 11, 2011

Monday, Oct. 3 Glenn Beck’s TV station launches a children’s program called “Liberty Treehouse” to appeal to children ages 8 to 14. The first program included segments on straw polls and debates. … JATRAN cuts routes and reduces the number of buses on the streets in an effort to save money.

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Tuesday, Oct. 4 Apple unveils the iPhone 4S, disappointing some fans who had expected the company to release an iPhone 5 with more changes. … Phyliss Anderson becomes the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians’ first female chief. Get daily breaking news at jfpdaily.com.

More to Graham Investigation?

by Lacey McLaughlin

C

harles Carter, president of the National Emergency Communications Institute, says that there is more to state Auditor Stacey Pickering’s investigation of Hinds County Supervisor Robert Graham than the state has presented. Pickering served a demand on Graham in May for $45,736 for wages Graham and other city employees received from the city of Jackson between 2003 and 2006 while he was conducting dispatcher certification classes. Graham taught the courses, Pickering alleged, during regular work hours when Graham—then a city employee—indicated on his time sheet that he had been on the job as a spokesman for the Jackson Police Department. Lisa Shoemaker, spokeswoman for the auditor’s office, said that Graham did not pay the demand within 30 days of its issuance and the state attorney general’s office is now taking over the investigation. Carter instigated the investigation when he sent an October 2007 complaint to Pickering’s office, but Carter’s letter focused on Graham’s alleged unauthorized use of the company’s copyrighted manuals for training classes. Graham worked for NECI as a contract instructor. Emergency-response agencies such as fire departments and American Response Ambulance service paid Graham $495 each for their employees to take his course. The

WARD SCHAEFER

Wednesday, Sept. 28 The Obama Administration asks the Supreme Court to hear its appeal of a ruling against the minimum insurance coverage provision in the 2010 Affordable Care Act. … Mississippi and 25 other states ask the Supreme Court to rule on the health care law, saying the court should strike down the entire law, not just the individual requirement.

Reporting under the federal hate crime act is voluntary, and more than one-third of police jurisdictions do not report hate crimes to the Federal Bureau of Investigations.

Supt. Tom Burnham says Mississippi schools will need $300 million more in 2013. P 11

An investigation of Hinds County Supervisor Robert Graham, a former police officer, for teaching dispatcher classes during his city work hours is headed to the attorney general.

course included a $95 emergency response manual and, upon completion, a NECI certificate. Students could then submit their certificate to the state’s Board of Emergency Telecommunications Standards and Training for approval, and the board reimburses all agencies for the cost of the class. “The state office would look at class rosters turned in by Graham, and if they saw that there was a certificate from NECI, then the

state would reimburse the agency $495 plus the student’s salary while they were at their training and travel expenses, Carter said.” In 2006, Carter received a phone call from a member of the state’s Board of Emergency Telecommunications Standards and Training asking if he had changed the design of his company’s certificates. He had not. GRAHAM, see page 7

Show Some Initiative

Bet you haven’t heard about these lesser-known ballot initiatives that failed in Mississippi over the years: w

fight “We don’t need to get into a mud fight,” Attorney General Jim Hood said during a debate in Jackson Monday against his opponent Steve Simpson. “People don’t want to see their attorney general and top law enforcement officer in that kind of discussion.”

1/ Build a border fence around the city of Jackson. 2/ Put pants on the Pink Pony. 3/ All politicians must supply documentation of facts with any public statement. 4/ Manhood Initiative: Blustering male politicians must go on and lay their business on the table early in the legislative session. 5/ Any new state government building must look like a brick bank. 6/ Mississippians can have free air to breathe or free Internet access, but they may not have both. 7/ The capital shall move to Hattiesburg to reflect the importance of south Mississippi. 8/ Registered voters will not be allowed to vote unless they drive themselves to the precinct in a Ford vehicle. 9/ The state shall require DNA testing of all residents and make the results public record. Instead of “resident,” Mississippi shall informally refer to its denizens as “cousins.” 10/ The state shall cede any property in its possession that was ancestral land back to the Choctaws.


talk

news, culture & irreverence

GRAHAM, from page 6

Then when students began calling asking for additional copies of their certificates, NECI had no records that the students had been enrolled in Graham’s course. Carter determined that Graham was copying manuals and printing his own certificates instead of paying for them. Carter reported his findings to the attorney general’s office Aug. 8, 2006. A year later he took the complaint the state auditor’s office. NECI revoked Graham’s certification as an emergency-response trainer after Carter issued the 2007 letter to the state auditor. The city of Jackson gave Graham $2,500 to buy manuals that he never purchased, Carter claimed. “We never complained that he was double dipping,” Carter said. “We complained that he was using our training materials without our knowledge. And making copies without our knowledge rather than purchasing our materials.” Carter estimates that his company lost from $20,000 to $25,000 from Graham not paying for materials. He said that he held off on filing a civil suit against Graham because he did not want to interfere with the state’s impending investigation. Shoemaker said the state auditor’s office looked into all of Carter’s claims but could

only serve a demand for Graham’s time-clock infractions. “Back when we first started looking into this (the Board of Emergency Telecommunications Standards and Training) determined that they were going to honor all of the certifications that were issued by Graham to those people even though they didn’t have valid certificates,” Shoemaker said. “We don’t have any issues with seeking recovery because the people did not suffer any losses as a result of taking those courses.” Carter said he alerted all emergency response agencies to let them know that some of their employees may not be certified under state law to respond to emergency calls. He said he is disappointed the state board agreed to accept the certificates even though they weren’t valid. “I sent a letter to all 9-1-1 directors, chiefs and sheriffs in the state letting them know that a lot of people that they thought were certified were in violation of state law,” Carter said. Carter said he has no plans to file a civil suit because of the time and expense it would involve. Graham did not return calls for this story. His attorney, Lisa Ross, said nothing has changed since May, and that her client disagrees with the auditor’s demand. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

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Revote for Hinds Race by Lacey McLaughlin FILE PHOTO

Hinds County election dispute, ruled in favor of Polk. Anyone who voted in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary can cast their vote again Oct. 18. Polk needs approximately 112 votes to be named the democratic challenger against RepubVoters in Terry’s Dry Grove precinct will have the chance to cast their voters again for the Democratic candidates in lican incumbent Jim the House of Represenatives race for district 73. Ellington in the Nov. 8 general election. Polk said she has conoters in Terry’s Dry Grove precinct tinued to campaign and inform voters will have the chance to cast their about her platform despite unknowns of ballots again for the Democratic the election. candidates in the Mississippi House of “I have worked diligently everyday Representative’s District 73 race. since the election for this to be corrected Gay Polk ran for the seat, but official so I have not been in limbo,” she said. “I totals show that she lost to Brad Ober- have talked to voters in all precincts not housen by 90 votes. The Hinds County only in the dry grove precinct.” Democratic Executive Committee certiOberhousen said he is disappointed fied the final results showing Oberhou- about the ruling but will continue to sen received 2,103 votes, or 51.09 per- gather support from voters. cent, to Polk’s 2,013, or 48.91 percent. “The judge did what we thought Polk filed a formal election chal- was fair, and we have got to move forlenge in August after reports surfaced ward with campaigning to get this peothat she had been left off the ballot at ple out to revote on Oct. 18,” he said. the Wynndale and Dry Grove precincts. I believe it is going to be difficult to get Yesterday, Leake Circuit Court Judge people out for this race since there is a Vernon Cotton, whom the Mississippi general election on Nov. 8.” Supreme Court appointed to oversee the Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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high number of job openings in “green jobs” such as renewable energy and recycling means many opportunities for employment exist in green industries, according to a recent study. Although the number of jobs in environmentally friendly industries is rising in Mississippi, employers may be having trouble finding workers with the skills they need. The Mississippi Department of Employment Security released findings from a survey on “greening Mississippi’s economy” at a conference Sept. 29. The survey looked in part at the number of workers who spend more than half their time working in categories such as renewable energy, pollution reduction, recycling and conservation. Dek Terrell, director of Louisiana State University’s Division of Economic Development, worked on the study. “One of the things that you see is a gradual greening of the economy, both in Mississippi and the U.S. as a whole,” Terrell said. “... When I look out over a period of 30 to 40 years, the idea of ‘green’ is not a fad.” The number of “green jobs” in Mississippi will grow by 18.5 percent over the next 10 years and add 9,000 new jobs to the state, if the study is correct. Mississippi’s overall employment is expected to grow 12 percent during that time. Officials from Mississippi and Louisiana partnered to survey businesses about green jobs last year as part of a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. About 20 other agencies conducted similar surveys. Terrell said the survey should provide a baseline for understanding how much the green economy impacts employment, as well as studying the potential for job growth and what skills employers need in new hires. Government policy alone does not make the green economy grow, Terrell said. As people in a society overall get wealthier, they typically devote a greater percentage of the economy to improving the environment and their quality of life. New technology and innovations also reduce the cost of “going green.” Terrell said that the percentage of Missis-

KIOR

Growing Green Jobs

KiOR, a biofuels company that expects to open a plant in Mississippi next year, will become part of the state’s growing “green economy.”

sippi jobs in renewable energy was significantly higher than in Louisiana. Mississippi also has a leg up on the biofuels industry because of its natural resources, Terrell said, making the state competitive in the renewable energy market. “One of the great pieces of news for Mississippi from this is that Mississippi is not running 50th in (renewable energy),” he said. Sumesh Arora, director of Strategic Biomass Solutions, attended the conference and said the study is helpful in showing how strong the green jobs sector is in Mississippi. “It may not be large percentage-wise, but it’s comparable to other states,” he said. “Mississippi really is leading the charge when it comes to attracting new renewable energy companies.” Strategic Biomass Solutions is a program of the Mississippi Technology Alliance, a nonprofit organization. The program provides resources and training for entrepreneurs, new renewable energy companies, economic developers and investors. Arora said he is looking forward to analyzing the data from the study to use in some of the program’s reports. At the time of the survey, the vacancy rate for green jobs was 6.9 percent, with more than 1,000 job openings—much higher than the typical rate, which is about 2 percent. Ter-

rell said the highest job vacancy rate ever observed in a state as a whole was 6.5 percent in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina. Mary Allen, work force coordinator for the Central Mississippi Planning and Development District, which includes Hinds County, said workers in the area need more training and education to fill prospective employers’ needs. Allen said work-force development and economic development must work hand-in-hand. “Once we have identified those occupations and industries that we need to focus on ... we can bring the community college system into play and work together to provide the training that we need,” she said. Allen’s agency offers programs to fund on-the-job training and community college classes, among others, through the WIN job centers. MDES has also released a website with more detailed findings from the study about the green jobs market in Mississippi, as well as how much the study predicts various green industries and jobs will grow over the next 10 years. The website also has listings of green jobs and resources for finding training for the green jobs sector. Visit the Mississippi Green Jobs website at greenjobs.mdes.ms.gov. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


citytalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

KENYA HUDSON

Questions Dog Convention Hotel Deal ‘The horse is out of the barn and … we don’t have any answers.’ – Margaret Barrett-Simon

Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said she needs more details about the city’s deal with developers to build a convention center hotel.

Council members saw a map from TCI of the property downtown that the city will buy, but some council members said the printing quality made it difficult to read. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said he could not determine how many acres are in the parcel the city will buy, but he thought it would be nine to 10 acres, most of which is currently vacant. “The public doesn’t know how many acres we’re acquiring,” Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell said. “Help me help you. I can’t argue something back to the public if I don’t know. It can’t be that complicated.” Whitwell also questioned how much TCI had initially paid for the land in 2007 and how much of the $14 million the city will pay for the land would go to the purchase price and how much to costs associated costs. City financial consultant Bob Swerdling of Swerdling and Associates told the council members that they will get more details shortly. In 2007, TCI got a $7 million loan from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to finance part of the property

purchase. The JFP reported in August that Brookins said TCI was behind on its HUD loan payments. Brookins could not comment this morning on whether the company is still behind on its payments, but said Jeff Wagner, the lawyer who is overseeing TCI’s compliance on the HUD loan, will present more details to the council at a later date. Brookins told the Jackson Free Press that the hotel’s future revenue would pay off the loans TCI currently has on the land. “If we float a bond to purchase the land and develop the hotel, then hopefully the hotel will pay off the debt,” he said. Also in August, JRA hired a financial consulting firm to conduct a feasibility study for the convention center hotel. JRA board members received a draft of the study last Wednesday, and the Jackson Free Press requested a copy of the study. At the time the Jackson Free Press made its request, JRA said it was not able to release the study to the public, but said it will comply with open-records laws when it receives the study. See www.jfp.ms/hotel for history.

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espite approving a financing agreement to build a convention center hotel downtown, Jackson City Council members want more details about paying $14 million for the land purchase. The city will purchase land from TCI, the company that will develop the hotel, but at a work session earlier this week, council members were frustrated by the lack of information about the land purchase. Currently, TCI owns the land, purchased in a deal brokered by former Mayor Frank Melton with friends from Texas who started TCI. The land, across from the convention center, has stood undeveloped since the last administration with the company’s finances and ability to complete the proposed development in limbo. Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said she cannot explain the deal to people when she does not have all the details herself. “It’s very difficult politically to be dealing with something like that if we are just getting details in ripples,” she said. “The horse is out of the barn and … we don’t have any answers.”

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COURTESY MMUP

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braham Jonathan Ramirez went out with friends to El Jardin, a Jackson nightclub off Gallatin Street, a couple of years ago. He was 21 then, had a new pick-up truck and wore cowboy boots. He lived in Pearl and had lived there for at least a couple of years where he worked in construction for his girlAbraham Jonathan Ramirez has been missing since Sept. 5, friend’s brother. He hadn’t 2009, his family reports. been getting along too well with her that week, so he went out with his buddies. He was surprised to run into his girlfriend, The Jackson Police Department began Mayra Ibarra, at the club that night. paperwork for the Ramirez missing-person “Why are you here?” Ramirez asked case in September 2009. JPD Det. Ella her. “Where’s our baby at?” Small took over the case about one year ago. The couple argued during the early No new information has surfaced. Small morning at the club. The last time anyone said the only real lead is Mayra Ibarra, who remembers seeing Ramirez was about 3:30 moved to south Texas with the couple’s a.m., Sept. 5, 2009. baby soon after Ramirez disappeared. “I’ve His black truck was found later, been trying to find her,” Small said. “If she’s wrecked on the side of Interstate 20, only in Mexico, there’s nothing we can do.” about a mile from the club near the State Small also said that the family Street exit. Amy Ramirez, Abraham’s step- should have filed the case in Pearl, where mother, told the Jackson Free Press in Au- the missing man lived. Townsend says that gust that police never searched his vehicle. is wrong. The missing man’s family is worried Ramirez is from Mexico. He moved to that police have not given his case much the Jackson area around 2007. Small didn’t attention because he is Hispanic. The step- know if he was a documented worker or mother of Abraham Jonathan Ramirez says the name of the construction company he when she tried to file a missing-person’s was working for. Amy Ramirez said her report in 2009, Pearl police dismissed her stepson was a documented worker. concerns. Amy Ramirez said she believes the Lt. Butch Townsend, spokesman for case hasn’t been handled properly since the Pearl Police Department, said because the beginning. Ramirez was last seen in Jackson, JPD “He’s a great kid—reserved, very polite needed to investigate his disappearance. and well-mannered,” she said. “He came “This hints strongly at foul play,” to have the American dream. He had a ton Townsend told the JFP. “And the foul play of friends.” wasn’t in Pearl.” Ramirez was wearing a black shirt Ramirez’s stepmother and father live in with brown stripes and a cross on the back St. Louis, Mo. Ibarra called about 10 a.m. of the shirt, blue jeans and white cowboy Sept. 5, 2009, to tell them their son was boots the last time people remember seemissing. They came to Jackson to look for ing him. He’s 5 foot 8, has black hair and him, file missing-person reports and ask brown eyes. He weighed about 180 pounds questions. They didn’t get too many an- then. He’d be 23 now. He didn’t have any swers. They went back and forth between tattoos then, but he did have an earring in the Jackson and Pearl police departments, his left ear. He and Ibarra’s young son was trying to get the process started but found born May 28, 2009. stumbling blocks everywhere they turned. Authorities have entered the case in “A police officer in Pearl told us: ‘He’s the National Crime Information Center Hispanic. We have problems with Hispan- database. Several missing person websites ics. He’ll turn up.’ It’s like he said he didn’t have posted the sketchy details of his disapmatter,” Amy Ramirez said. pearance. Mississippi Missing and UnidenTownsend said he needed to hear the tified Persons is one organization that conpolice officer’s side, but that the sentiment tinues to reach out to the public, remindwas “definitely wrong.” He also said Pearl ing people that this young father is missing police had an arrest warrant on file for an with no explanations. Abraham Ramirez dated June 2009. The If you have any information, you can warrant was for failure to appear in court call Det. Small with the Jackson Police Deregarding having an open container and an partment at 601-960-1318. expired license. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


educationtalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

Scrapping for Funds

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“For the last several years, K-12 (education) has taken a larger cut percentage-wise than the state budget in general,” Loome said. If legislators recognize how much education funding has been cut, maybe they will make funding it more of a priority, she added. “K-12 has done far more than its share of belt tightening,” she said. Each year, the state budget should, by law, allocate $20 million for a school building fund and about $18 million from sales taxes for teachers to buy classroom supplies. Loome said that since before the current recession hit, the Legislature has transferred that money to help fund MAEP. The Board of Education has asked the Legislature to restore that money for 2013 instead of using it to fund MAEP. The board is also asking for $3 million to train staff to implement the Common Core State Standards. The Common Core State Standards Initiative is an effort of government leaders and educators from different states to develop common expectations in English language arts and math curricula. The standards should help put Mississippi’s education on par with the rest of the country. Schools are already starting to

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phase in the standards, which should be in place in all grades by the 2014-2015 school year. Mississippi also needs a “superintendents academy,” the board says, to provide training for aspiring superintendents. The budget request includes $2.5 million to start one. The board is asking the Legislature to make early childhood education a priority, citing concerns that the state does not have a comprehensive effort to develop and implement a program. The budget request says that about one-third of students begin kindergarten without the necessary skills. Some research has shown that pre-kindergarten education is especially helpful for low-income children, who are more likely to come to school with smaller vocabularies than their peers. Although some entities and schools have pre-kindergarten programs, the board says Mississippi needs a statewide approach. Another of the board’s priorities for the next legislative session is moving from elected superintendents to appointed ones. Mississippi is one of only three states that allow school districts to elect superintendents, according to the board’s budget request. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

heckers & Rally’s restaurants were founded on the idea that a bland and flavorless burger was downright bad and that Americans everywhere deserved something bigger, better, and juicier—one that was unexpectedly bold, made-to-order, and priced at a value that was hard to beat. Founded by experienced foodies with a renegade spirit, both the Checkers & Rally’s unique double drivethru concept, with its over-the-top checkerboard squares, chrome styling, red neon signs, and of course the food, was an instant hit. These two new burger experiences were hot, fresh, and served with a smile. People were hooked, and the world of cookie-cutter corporate burger establishments was about to change. Checkers Drive-In Restaurants, Inc. burst onto the burger scene with their over-the-top flavors in 1986 in Mobile, Alabama. Rally’s Drive-In Restaurants, Inc. first fired up the grill and started cooking in 1985 in Louisville, Kentucky. After successfully opening and maintaining 200+ restaurant chain businesses in several Midwestern and Southeastern states, in 1999 Checkers & Rally’s brought their passion for big flavor together. This successful merger made Checkers & Rally’s the largest double drive-thru restaurant chain in the country. Which, in turn, only helped bolster both the Checkers & Rally’s brands on all fronts. Today, Checkers & Rally’s have more than 800 restaurants open in the United States. From seared and seasoned burgers to wings and seasoned fries, your food is always served fresh and piping hot. What makes Rally’s burgers so great? Every burger is made to order with a perfect blend of spices sprinkled on each and every burger and then grilled to perfection. On the run or on the go, Rally’s new Chicken Bites and Chicken Bites Box with Fries come at a great low price. Portable so you can take ’em with you. Poppable so you can toss them back. No matter the craving, you’ll steer your mouth to juicy, irresistible flavor. From chicken to fish, burgers to fries, hotdogs to wings, Rally’s has you covered with full flavor and freshness at every turn. Don’t forget to leave room for dessert, the hand-spun milkshake or fresh, hot apple pie is a great way to finish your meal. So the next time you have a craving for hot and fresh, make your way to Rally’s.

jacksonfreepress.com

FILE PHOTO

cal year 2013, which begins July 1, 2012, to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee. The board is asking for a $300 million increase, but most of that—about $250 million—will go to fully funding the Mississippi Adequate Education Program. Although law requires the Legislature to fund the program, it rarely does. Many of the board’s budget requests for 2013 are similar to the ones they made this year. The 2011 budget left MAEP underfunded by $243 million. The board asked for a 12-percent funding increase for 2012, but did not get it. In The Mississippi Board of Education and Superintendent Tom Burnham say schools need 2012, the Legislature underfunded $300 million more in the 2013 budget, in part MAEP by $237 million. because they are not fully funded for 2012. Nancy Loome, executive director of The Parents’ Campaign, said fully funding MAEP is a big he Mississippi Department of Edu- hill to climb, and she does not think it is cation says it needs a 13-percent likely that the Legislature will close the gap funding increase in 2013, but most between current and full funding in the of the increase includes funding that next legislative session. She sees hopeful the department was legally entitled to in signs, however, in responses her organizaprevious years, but did not get. tion has collected from candidates who On Sept. 22, the state Board of Edu- say they will make giving schools more cation presented its budget request for fis- money a priority.

11


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Melton’s Last Laugh

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he sudden and extremely belated concern about TCI doing a conventioncenter hotel deal with the city would be amusing if it weren’t so frustrating to realize how little some people pay attention to vital city business. The JFP journalists has reported since 2006 about the various controversies surrounding the man who started it all: Gene Phillips. They range rom bribery allegations in Oklahoma that sent an insurance commissioner to prison, to the acquittal of Phillips himself less than a decade ago in after he was indicted in 2000 in a mafia scheme to bribe union officials in a proposed sale of preferred stock shares. And then there’s his involvement in the high-profile savings-and loan-scandal that tainted many officials including President Ronald Reagan. Phillips-related drama has been only an Internet and Nexis search away since Mayor Frank Melton started pushing his offspring companies to develop here in 2006. (Thankfully, they didn’t get the King Edward, as Melton wanted.) We’ve warned for years, and especially before Melton helped sell key property across from the Jackson Convention Center to TCI, that this path to a hotel development was not a good one. Of course, Melton didn’t listen. Neither did many of his supporters, many of whom have long led cheers in favor of the TCI deal as recently as this summer. This land sale to TCI left the city between a rock and a hard place. They own the land that is sitting ugly and vacant across from the shiny convention center. We desperately need a hotel there to make the convention center a success, and we need to get the land back. Somehow. Meantime, as Lacey has reported, TCI and friends have faced all sorts of financial struggles, and have just let the property sit vacant and, at times, haven’t even paid the property taxes on schedule. Any fool who has paid attention knows the difficult spot the city, and its taxpayers, are in on this one. So it’s surprising to see some council members act as if all of TCI’s history is news. More likely, some folks suddenly are trying to position the city’s deal to buy the land for $14 million politically against the mayor. This is the wrong response on this one. The mayor has made it no secret, as the JFP has reported, that he is virtually holding his nose to make a deal with TCI, and we’ve seen little that makes him grumpier than the Hobson’s choice Melton left the city saddled with. The city should be more transparent on every aspect of the deal, but we also suspect they worry that any provocation will make TCI take its title to the land and hightail it home to Texas. And then we’re left with an empty lot and no hotel. This situation has never been pretty, folks. The late Frank Melton getting the last laugh on this mess he created for us. See www.jfp.ms/hotel for links to the JFP’s TCI/Phillips coverage.

KEN STIGGERS

A Jobs Plan

October 5 - 11, 2011

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iss Doodle Mae: “Jojo, our fearless leader, is such a shrewd business person. He keeps up with the latest business trends and provides more employment opportunities through creative innovation. For example, instead of laying off people, cutting back on services and raising prices, Jojo decided to promote senior employees and provide more part-time and full-time jobs for many of the unemployed members of the Ghetto Science Community. “Today, I’m proud to announce my new position as assistant store manager at Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store. My promotion from head cashier and part-time security guard will provide openings for two new jobs. Jojo also promoted Chief Crazy Brotha to store operations manager. Now, Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store has a job opening for a manager of the Arts and Crafts section at aisle 7 ½. It’s a new day for the Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store staff, because they have just experienced positive and creative corporate restructuring. “But wait, there’s more. Jojo needs a couple of computer-savvy people to develop and manage his ‘Online Discount Dollar Store’ business. Also, Jojo wants to hire more security personnel, especially those individuals who completed Officer ‘Beatdown’ Lipscomb’s three-week security training course. And, finally, Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store has part-time job openings for stock clerks and store custodians. “The massive hirings will not affect the prices at Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store. Jojo hopes that his positive and creative corporate restructuring will inspire hope and confidence in the spirits of today’s extremely financially challenged consumers.”

CHATTER

Noise from the blogs @jacksonfreepress.com

The following were the first of many comments to Donna Ladd’s Editor’s Note, “Eye of the Needle” (Sept. 21, 2011). Sadly, we don’t have even an option to vote for someone who is willing to stand up and do the right things to get us off the bottom of the National Barrel. DuPree will be a lot better than Bryant for Mississippi, but he is still a politician with political solutions instead of real, sustainable improvement. I suppose the think that if everything is going good, they will have nothing to attack each other with in the campaigns. - Bobby Kearan Bravo once again Donna, bravo! Where did you get the information about the poverty rate of blacks in Mississippi? That is truly sickening, especially in the so-called “most religious state in the Union.” - Blackwatch Anyone who actually runs a business understands the huge albatross of uncertainty that has been forced onto us by Obamacare. Oh, wait, I can get a one-time tax credit for “creating” a job? Never mind that the credit is negligible compared to the Obamacare penalty, or that there is no work for the new employee to accomplish, or that most of these new hires will be back on the streets as soon as the tax credit expires—we won’t worry about that until after the next election, just like the scores of provisions of Obamacare, which are not scheduled to be enacted until then! “Reform health care”? I am rarely speechless, but a reply to this would be an insult to reason. - notmuch

I own a small business, notmore. My company benefits from what you call “Obamacare,” as do my employees. Now, we’re able to offer our health insurance plan to those who work 30 hours, not just full-time salaried people. We will also benefit from the president’s jobs plan, both as hard-working individuals and business owners. ... My company is growing; we hire every chance we get, both to help our own company’s growth, give some relief to our hard-working employees and to do our part to grow the economy. We even spend a few extra dollars whenever we can to support local businesses and suppliers. – Donna Ladd I have to admit, I see a point on all sides, but these well to do folks want to enjoy all the perks they get being famous, yet expect to get it handed to them on a silver platter, seems like i heard someone say something to the effect on “the TALK” just a few weeks ago. – wataworld If you haven’t seen it yet, Elizabeth Warren’s discussion of how we’re all in this together—even the fabulously wealthy—is very interesting listening (as is her alternative discussion of the deficit and reminder of how we go where we are economically). –Todd Stauffer Join the online conversation at www.jfp.ms.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


LORI GREGORY-GARROTT

One Caring Adult EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Reporter Elizabeth Waibel Events Editor Latasha Willis Editorial Assistant LaShanda Phillips Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Natalie Long, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant,Tom Ramsey, Julie Skipper, Ken Stiggers, Rebecca Wright Editorial Interns Brittany Kilgore, Sadaaf Mamoon, Hannah Vick Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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know murderers. I’ve eaten dinner with them. I’ve watched them giggle while they shoot hoops in the backyard and bicker over shoes in the living room. I’ve debated music with them and laughed at their jokes. Before the act of “murdering,� they act like any other child. They complain about going to school. They want to watch DVDs and go bowling on the weekends. Surprisingly, there is no stamp on their forehead that says, “This one will kill.� There are often other, smaller signs. They have a tendency to get angry and have difficulty managing that emotion because they’ve never learned how to appropriately express it. If I contact their family because they need something, often someone will not answer that call. I can plot their address on a map and see their neighborhood is full of crime. I’ve learned in more than a dozen years working with mentally ill and behaviorally challenging children that the same three predictors of negative outcomes are, as John Coie, professor of psychiatry at Duke University and an expert in the field of children who become violent, states: low family involvement, community violence and a history of early trauma. These kids hurt because they see hurt. They were hurt. Most people know the phrase “Hurt people hurt people.� Omar stayed with me for two months. He was the only child at our facility during the 2004 Christmas holidays. We bought him presents, but that never made up for no family calling Christmas Eve. There was no place he could wake up to breakfast and a loving family. His family was scattered. An aunt was located in January 2005, and Omar was discharged. His parting words, “Ms. Lori, if I go to that house, I will end up back on the streets,� would haunt me. Two months later, I woke up and turned on the news to hear Omar’s prediction come true. Omar had carjacked someone. In response, JPD Officer Thomas Catchings chased Omar, who drove the stolen car in a ditch. Omar shot Catchings. Then Catchings shot Omar. That day was the end of both of their stories. Somehow, the one starting with a kid who never received enough love and attention bled onto the grown man’s story and whose kids will never know more of his love and attention. And that is why we are all responsible for the “Omars� of the world—because their stories will never stop bleeding onto ours in the most reprehensible way if we do not help change them. I tell that story and people’s first ques-

tion is, “What do we do?� But then they don’t like the answers because they aren’t short or simple. People want these children’s parents—often unequipped to deal with a life where money is always short, jobs are hard to keep due to parenting obligations and few community supports exist—to become the parents they were never ready to be in the first place. To be honest, the “community� part is the only part in the process where the rest of us can have an effect. This means supporting these kids in their own community with programs that provide the services they and their parents require. Resiliency studies of at-risk youth concluded years ago that “one caring adult� in a kid’s life can make the difference between jails or a productive existence—one caring adult. Doesn’t sound that difficult, does it? And when that child’s parent is unable to be the caring adult in their life—despite how much we may want them to be—we, as a society, have an obligation to ensure someone does. We should take that obligation seriously, as it will affect our very own children and families if we don’t. I’m not going to pine for Omar. I can’t. There are too many other children that we can save. I can tell his story. I can hold his likeness in my head so I remember there are precious few things we do in life that make a difference except holding a child’s hand. Holding a child’s hand is an investment we make in our own children, in our own community, and in our own hearts. The lesson I take from Omar’s story can be confusing and difficult for me. I want to be angry at what he did. I want to hate him for it. But Omar was a child I saw sleepy with that straight-out-of-bed hair asking for some juice. He was a child whom I saw laugh and cry and ask for more from us. When we didn’t give it to him, he took it from someone else. After Omar, I learned that each of us deals every day with youth where we can do as Gandhi asks of us: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.� It is in that obligation that I stand firm. I’ve eaten dinner with murderers. But maybe one day, if we all wake up, I will not have to eat breakfast with them. Lori Gregory-Garrott, LMSW, is director of Hope Haven Adolescent Crisis Center operating in south Jackson for the past 16 years. If you are or know a family in crisis who needs support or help with a mentally ill teenager, contact the Hope Haven Crisis Line 601-376-0500.

Before the act of ‘murdering,’ they act like any other child.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


Divided

We Fall:

The Aftermath of a Killing

AARON PHILIPS

by Lacey McLaughlin

Tami Dean (left front) and Carol Hill (right) attended a vigil for James Craig Anderson on Aug. 12, 2011.

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October 5 - 11, 2011

ordan Richardson was fishing at Cornerstone Lake in Brandon in 2009 when a pickup truck pulled up. Three teenagers got out of their trucks and started walking toward him, and he knew he was in trouble. Deryl Dedmon, his peer at Brandon High School, had called him names and threatened him with violence for months, and now he and two of his friends had come to pick a fight, Richardson says. “You little wuss, you won’t even defend yourself,” Dedmon said, according to Richardson’s account. Richardson had gone fishing with a friend, who was on the other side of the lake. Instead of taking his chances against the three teens, he pulled out his phone and called the police. Richardson knew Dedmon and his friends kept shotguns and deer knives in their trucks, and he didn’t know what they might do to him. Soon the police came to the scene and 14 broke up the altercation. Although Richardson

did not file any charges, he said the Brandon Police Department and school-district officials were quick to address the situation and protect him from future encounters. The next time Richardson saw Dedmon was July 6, 2011, during a Hinds County Circuit Court hearing, in which Judge Ali ShamshidDeen raised Dedmon’s bond from $50,000 to $800,000 for his alleged murder of James Craig Anderson, a black man, two weeks before in south Jackson. “I knew the hate he had in his heart for people who were not like him,” Richardson said. “Deryl bullied and terrorized me my freshman year. He would never do it by himself. ... I just felt that it could have been me in that casket instead of (James) Craig Anderson.” ‘It Could Have Been Me’ Around 5 a.m. on June 26, Dedmon, who graduated from Brandon High School in 2010, and six other teens left a party in Rankin County and headed to Jackson on Interstate 20 in two vehicles: a Ford

F-250 and a white SUV, according to court records. A witness said Dedmon claimed he was on a mission to “mess with people” and led the teens off the Ellis Avenue exit into Jackson. A witness told police that Dedmon pulled into the Wendy’s on Ellis Avenue where he saw 49year-old Anderson beating on the window of an orange Chevy Avalanche. The police report does not state if this was Anderson’s car. Anderson, a witness later claimed, was drunk and looking for his car keys when Dedmon saw him and perhaps thought Anderson was trying to steal the vehicle. Dedmon and Anderson began fighting as several teens ran back and forth to their cars. It’s unclear how much the other teens participated in the beating, but a witness claims that one of them yelled “white power” during the attack. After Anderson’s beating, 18-year-old John Aaron Rice and some of the other teens then got back into the white SUV. Dedmon, with two female passengers, followed behind his friends as he took a right on Ellis Avenue.

His green F-250 truck suddenly backed up and then lurched forward as Anderson stumbled along the curb on Ellis Avenue and disappeared under the vehicle. Dedmon then pulled into a nearby McDonald’s to meet up with the rest of the group stating he had just “ran that n*gger over,” according to court records. The district attorney said that Dedmon then laughed about what he had done. Rice’s defensive attorney, Samuel Martin, says that his client had no plans that night to attack a black man. In June at Dedmon’s bond hearing, JPD Det. Eric Smith testified that a black man had robbed Dedmon weeks before the attack and that the teen was looking for revenge. Defense attorneys say the teens came to Jackson with the intention of buying alcohol and that Rice was trying to help Anderson who was locked out of his car. They claim an altercation took between Dedmon and Anderson at that point. West Jackson resident Cassandra Welchlin and her husband, Kass Welchlin, helped organize a vigil for Anderson Aug. 12 near the Metro Inn. The mixed-race couple—he’s white, and she’s black—stood side-by-side with their 3-year-old daughter, Zia Brooke Welchlin, and wore red shirts with the slogan “Not in My City.” Cassandra, who is a member of west Jackson’s Capitol Neighborhood Association, started making shirts and organizing the vigil the week after an Aug. 8 CNN report aired, publicly revealing video of Anderson’s murder for the first time. She said the slogan caught on quickly, and other community members made their own shirts to wear. During the vigil, about 500 area residents of various ages and races marched from New Horizon Church along Ellis Avenue to the Metro Inn and laid a wreath where Anderson was killed. Community members sat in back of the truck singing gospel songs such as “This Little Light of Mine.” The vigil drew members from several metro congregations including Beth Israel synagogue and Pinelake Baptist Church in Brandon. “We are here to unify and to share openness and to teach ourselves and our children and everyone out there that there is a better


involving black teens, in similar circumstances to Dedmon’s mob, have been immediately arrested and charged in connection to the crime.” Jackson State University NAACP President Michael Teasley is a member of the coalition. During a community crime meeting on Aug. 30 at JSU, he expressed his frustration to the district attorney that no other teens had been charged in connection to the crime. “Our office never likes to rush an investigation,” Smith responded. “I understand your frustration, but it really has not been a long time. ... Given the magnitude of this case, given the number of investigators on the ground, my opinion is that it coming together very well, and you will be pleased with the results very soon.” Teasley, who is white, grew up in Rankin County and said he was racist until he moved to Selma, Ala., and attended a predominately black high school. He remembers using the nword when he was younger, but he began to change his mindset when he was exposed to a different race. He spoke to a Brandon Civitan International group on Aug. 17 about the crime, and several members asked him whether the crime was drug-related. “It’s much easier for Rankin County to blame the black man than take responsibility for this crime. Right now the problem is in their churches, homes and schools,” Teasley said. “This doesn’t have anything to do with a drug deal gone bad. They are looking for an excuse to make themselves feel better.” Teasley said he grew up with progressive-minded parents, but it was his grandparents who had trouble seeing blacks as equals.

This monument honoring Confederate soldiers in the Civil War is located in the center of Brandon’s downtown.

“They would say things like: ‘Bluebirds stay with bluebirds,’ and ‘blackbirds stay with blackbirds’ and then right after than they will say: ‘But I’m not racist, though.’” On Sept. 6, Jackson attorney Winston Thompson III of the Cochran Law Firm in Jackson along with the Southern Poverty Law Center, based in Montgomery, Ala., filed a DIVIDED, see page 16

jacksonfreepress.com

“There are different types of people— those who are wealthy and have more stuff than others and those who don’t have that much, and sometimes they kind of clash,” Watson said. Watson said he knew of Dedmon and was shocked when he saw news reports about Anderson’s murder.

CASEY HOLLOWAY

shame it happened. We have never had anything happen like this.” Dedmon should be punished, Kaminsky added, but said the death penalty is too harsh. She does not believe the crime against Anderson was racially motivated. Brandi Henson, a mixed-race senior wearing an “I’m For Phil” sticker, said her brother was friends with Dedmon. The week before the incident, Dedmon was at her house eating pizza with friends. “Deryl was always sweet to me,” she said. “I never saw any sign of racism.” A handful of teens interviewed at the game sounded on script as they offered similar theories about what happened that night. The teens seemed to agree that Dedmon violated the law, but refused to believe that he attacked Anderson because of race. The next week at McLaurin High School’s home game against Florence, students had little to say about the crime. Rice had graduated from the rural high school last year. One student agreed to speak on the record about the incident. The student ‘Aren’t What People Think’ spoke in defense of Rice and said she On Aug. 19 groups of teens and doesn’t believe he or Dedmon participarents packed the Brandon Middle pated in a hate crime. However, she apSchool stadium for the Brandon vs. proached this reporter later that night Pearl football game, one of the big- Deryl Dedmon, 19, faces capital-murder charges for allegedly with a friend and said she changed her gest events in Brandon each year. Only killing James Craig Anderson in what Hinds County District mind about being interviewed for the those who arrived hours ahead of time Attorney Robert Smith calls a hate crime. story. Later, her fiancé also demanded were able to get a view of the field. that her name not appear in this story. Last year Richardson tried out to In the aftermath of the crime, Facebe the school mascot, Bully the Bulldog, and “He didn’t seem racist to me at all,” Wat- book pages sprouted in support of Dedmon made the cut. He likes to keep his identity son said of Dedmon. “We have some people and the other teens, while other pages called quiet so that he doesn’t ruin Bully’s mystique. who don’t like other races, but it’s not a really, for the death penalty. Although the page “DerThe Rankin County School District has near- really big deal.” yl Dedmon Should Go to Prison for LIFE” ly doubled in size over the past 10 years, and After the game, the couple was going to specifically states that the page “is not meant several parents eagerly passed out stickers and Brandon High School’s “rave” with techno to spread hate,” several people called for retaliflyers in support of a $169.5 million school music and glow sticks in its auditorium. ation against the teens with comments such bond to build new three new schools and a Other students stood by the refreshment as “execute the trash” and “Why waste time? new athletics facility—that failed on Sept. 13. stand. Some had facial piercings and head- Take his a** out back and run him over.” Swarms of teenagers gathered in groups phones, and others dressed in school colors. On the other side of the argument, Lisa and stood behind the bleachers. The teens Hannah Kaminsky, a blue-eyed senior with Smith Seale Erwin defended her nephew on a proudly wore their school colors and talked braids and a red bandana wrapped around her page titled “Pray for John Aaron Rice.” among themselves—mildly paying attention head, spoke passionately about Brandon. “He is not a racist or a murderer,” she to the game below. Brandon High School’s “We are very down-to-earth people,” Ka- wrote. “If anything he is being tried by the racial mix is 26 percent black and 71 percent minsky said. “We aren’t what people think we media suffering from reverse racism. … I am white. White and black students interacted are.” Kaminsky said she knew Dedmon per- sick of the race card.” and talked at the game, while older generations sonally and believes there is more to the story Another supporter defended Rice on sat among people of their own race. White than the media have presented. She said she July 1: “JPD Sucks. If this was the other way families predominately sat on the left side, and believes Dedmon was bi-polar and that she around and a black guy ran over a white boy it black families primarily sat on the right side. had heard that Dedmon could have bought would not be a hate crime.” Before the game began, U.S. Congress- drugs from Anderson. man Gregg Harper and Lt. Gov. and guberna“They didn’t just randomly meet up. ‘Two Systems of Justice’? torial hopeful Phil Bryant worked the crowds They had gotten into a couple of quarrels (beAs the result of the crime, a group of citiamong a steady stream of supporters. During fore), and something happened that day that zens and organizations have come together and a ceremony before the game, the crowd ap- set him off,” Kaminsky theorized. “Deryl did formed “Mississippians Together,” a coalition plauded wildly as the intercom speaker intro- drugs because he was going through a rough for racial reconciliation. The groups include duced the two Republican politicians. time, and Anderson had drugs on him.” the Mississippi ACLU, NAACP, New HoriLagarrin Watson, a black 11th-grader and Authorities have not released or indicated zon Church, the Children’s Defense Fund and his girlfriend, Hannah Edwards, a white 10th- evidence of drug use or sales by Anderson. several citizens. grader, held hands as they sat on the bleachKaminsky is worried that the incident In a Sept. 12 letter to local law enforceers during the game’s first quarter. They said will perpetuate negative and untrue stereo- ment agencies, members of the Anderson they’ve gotten some negative feedback from a types about Brandon. family and the coalition wrote that they were few teachers and peers for being an interracial “It’s hard to say I was one of his friends “outraged” that no other individuals have been couple, but for the most part they haven’t had because I don’t want people to think I was just charged with the murder or as accessories to any big problems. like him,” she said about Dedmon. “We aren’t the murder. The couple insisted that Brandon is a all white. If you look at Brandon’s classes, we “There is a perception in the community good school with good teachers, but said that have colored people in our class. Brandon is that there are two systems of justice, one for sometimes students from different neighbor- one of the top places to live in the country. people of color and one for whites,” the letter hoods fight with each other. There is nothing bad about Brandon. It’s a stated. “Previous cases have shown that crimes COURTESY JPD

way to live, and love is a better way to live,” Beth Israel Rabbi Valerie Cohen said as attendees lit their candles. “We are here to get beyond hatred.” Jordan Richardson, who attended the vigil with his father, said he doesn’t defend his hometown, but he also worries that the incident will scar Brandon and propel negative stereotypes. Even good places can produce bad people, says Richardson, who is white. “There is that aspect of things that people don’t talk about, and (the alleged murder) one of those things,” Richardson said. “When asked about it, people are trying to make Brandon a good place.” Richardson and several others at the vigil shared the same sentiment: “It could have been me.” Welchlin said the fact that Dedmon appeared to randomly attack the first black person he saw means that it could have just as easily been her or someone she knew. That realization seems to be a unifying factor for many concerned residents.

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what has happened. He touted Brandon’s close-knit community and quality of living. “Sometimes it takes one little skunk to stink it up for everyone, and that’s what has happened,” Moore said. Around 10 p.m. that evening, students pulled into the parking lot of Brandon High School for the homecoming dance. Some girls wore high heels and sparkly long dresses, while others wore flip flops and less formal attire. They paused to take pictures or reapply their makeup before walking in with their dates. A parent volunteer said media was not allowed into the dance and told this reporter to immediately leave campus. Two Brandon police officers followed this reporter to the parking lot. “This is a special night for them, and they don’t need anyone coming up and asking them questions,” one of the officers said.

University of Mississippi in 1962, leading to riots and one murder, the Rankin County Press ran an article about the Council’s annual banquet in which Lt. Gov. Paul Johnson was the guest speaker. His speech, though, was restricted due to the tear gas he ingested at Ole Miss during the Meredith riots. Citizens Council Executive Secretary Robert “Tut” Patterson compared the Ole Miss showdown to Pearl Harbor. “We came through with flying colors,” Patterson told the Rankin County Press. “… The future of our state is in good hands.” But after John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963, the racial rhetoric in the paper’s editorials quieted down and started advising residents to surrender to an integrated society. For many, Anderson’s murder is reminiscent of that darker time in Mississippi’s history and has raised questions about how much ‘Racist Because It’s Cool’ progress the state had made since the tumulOn Aug. 20 at McAlister’s Deli in Brantuous civil rights era. The murder coincided don—between play practice and a church with the release of the film “The Help” in late event—Richardson explained why he believes summer, based on Jackson native Kathryn his peers are offering different versions of what Stockett’s 1960s-era novel about black maids happened the night of June 26. and their relationship with white families. The “I think people’s defense of Deryl is a timing of the two events sparked conversadefense of Brandon,” he said. “There is that tions and news articles, nationally and locally, aspect of things that people don’t talk about, about how far Mississippi has really come. and this is one of those things. When asked That past includes the 1955 murder of about it, people are trying to make Brandon a Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy who algood place.” legedly whistled at a white women in Money, Earlier this year, CNN Money named Miss., prompting two white men to kidnap Brandon 89th of 100 best small towns to live and kill him and dump his mangled body in the country, citing high-performing schools, into the Tallahatchie River. An all-white jury low cost of living and low crime. “Residents of acquitted those men, even though they later this Jackson suburb often admitted to the murders leave their doors unlocked, in Look Magazine. for crime is rare,” the CNN It also includes the Money article stated. 1964 murders of two Rankin County is a 19-year-old black men, dry county—no bars or Charles Eddie Moore restaurants in Brandon and Henry Hezekiah serve liquor or wine, alDee in Roxie, Miss. though beer is available. Klansmen, led by James Options for churches, Ford Seale and Charles however, are plenty. If you Marcus Edwards, tied are a newcomer in BranDee and Moore to a tree, don, one of the first quesbeat them and later tied tions people will ask you them to Jeep engine parts is what church you belong and dumped them into to. If someone doesn’t go to the Ole River near Talchurch, they are likely cutlulah, La., to drown. The ting themselves off from same summer, a gang an entire social network, of Ku Klux Klansmen, Richardson said. including police officers Richardson said that Southern Poverty Law Center Founder Morris Dees (right) and Anderson family and sheriff’s deputies, outside church, teens have attorney Winston Thompson (left) announced Sept. 12 a wrongful death suit abducted and murdered few opportunities for social against all teens involved in Anderson’s death. James Chaney, Andrew interaction. And it was at a Goodman and Michael church event where DedSchwerner on Father’s mon threatened to hurt Richardson. Haunting History Day in Neshoba County because they were Dedmon was a member of Grace Brandon isn’t that much different from trying to register blacks to vote. Baptist Church and, in December 2008, many other Mississippi towns as far as racial Rankin County has had its own inciarea youth groups came together for a dis- history is concerned. Rankin County experi- dents of racial violence. In 1970, civil-rights cipleship conference. At the event, Dedmon enced a tremendous economic boost resulting activist John Perkins and three other men were called him gay and tried to get physical, in flight from Jackson after the federal govern- arrested in Brandon when they attempted to Richardson said. A friend, however, inter- ment forced an end to segregation. The Citi- get a group of Tougaloo students out of Branvened before things got violent. zens Council, a white supremacist organiza- don’s jail. Authorities had picked them up on Even though blacks and whites mingled tion, had a strong presence in the county. a reckless-driving charge in Plain, Miss., while freely at the football games, Richardson said In the months after James Meredith be- they were trying to return to Jackson from a that Brandon’s neighborhoods are largely seg- came the first black student to enroll at the boycott march. JERRICK SMITH

wrongful-death lawsuit on behalf of Anderson’s family against Deryl Dedmon, John Aaron Rice, Sarah Graves, Shelbie Richards, William Kirk Montgomery and Dylan Butler, all of whom are 18 or 19. One 17-year-old minor defendant is included as well. The lawsuit states that on June 26 the group of teens took turns beating Anderson in the parking lot of the Metro Inn hotel in Jackson and accuses all the teens of doing nothing to stop the attack, help Anderson or notify police. That same day, national and local media outlets flooded the Hinds County Court Judge Houston Patton’s chambers for Dedmon’s pretrial hearing. Officers escorted Dedmon, wearing a blue jumpsuit, into the court’s chambers. The curly locks he sported in his mugshot photos were gone, and his small frame seemed unthreatening. Upon request from the attorneys, Patton agreed to reschedule the hearing for Sept. 26. On Sept. 21, however, a grand jury indicted Dedmon on capital murder charges. On Sept. 30, during his arraignment hearing, Dedmon pleaded not guilty to the capital-murder charges in Anderson’s death. Hinds County Circuit Judge Jeff Weill then set a Jan. 9, 2012, trial date. Dedmon’s attorney, Lee Agnew, refused to speak with the media and instead presented a written statement: “Considering the very serious nature of these allegations and subsequent charges, it is not surprising that this matter has quickly gained a great deal of negative attention; however, let us not forget the fundamental principles which lies at the base of our criminal justice system: due process of law, the right to counsel; the right to a fair trial and the presumption of innocence for every person and until otherwise proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a presence of a jury of their peers.” A few hours later, the excitement in the air at Brandon Middle School’s stadium was palpable as students attended Brandon High School’s homecoming game against south Jackson’s Forest Hill High School—located less than five miles from the scene of Anderson’s murder. A group of tents, modeled after Ole Miss’s grove, were grouped together on a grassy area beside the field. A group of predominately white, well-dressed Brandon parents and students tailgated and mingled as the game took place. Parents paid extra for a spot in the VIP area, and all proceeds go to the school’s booster club. Jordan Richardson wore his mascot uniform, which consisted of a large bulldog head, paws and a tuxedo in honor of homecoming. Small children and students giggled and waved at Richardson as he reached over the bleacher fence to give high fives. When he wasn’t greeting fans, Richardson cheered on the sidelines, challenging Forest Hill’s Patrick the Patriot mascot to a dance off, or joining the school’s cheerleading squad. The game and homecoming festivities went on as normal with no mention of Dedmon or any other teen involvement in the crime. Rep. John Moore, R-Brandon, who was at the game, told the Jackson Free Press 16 that the community is “embarrassed” over

regated, and it’s common for his peers to use the n-word or make fun of homosexuals. “You will find people who are racist because it’s cool,” Richardson said. “They will claim to be racist, but they really aren’t. They will use the n-word around their white friends but then hang out with black people.” Richardson remembers the first time he met Dedmon. It was Richardson’s freshman year, and he was in the school bathroom. He turned around and saw Dedmon staring at him with a group of friends. “Watch out for that fag,” Dedmon said. Richardson doesn’t know specifically why Dedmon targeted him, but his father, Brian Richardson, suspects it was because his son was involved in the school’s theater. Richardson says that Dedmon never operated alone—he always had several other guys with him. His father said that school officials and the Brandon Police Department handled the warning signs of Dedmon’s violence the best way they could. They notified his parents and acted quickly to diffuse altercations between the two young men. Jordan Richardson said Dedmon and his friends didn’t appear to operate as an organized gang, but that they were just a group of guys who like to “drink beer and smoke dope.” He says he has heard of teens taking trips into Jackson to “mess with homeless people,” or what they call “rolling.” Brandon is a small town, Richardson said, and it’s hard to cause trouble without getting caught. But Jackson is much bigger than Brandon.


guard on duty at all times. “Many families have lived here a year,” Patel said as he walked over to the hotel’s indoor pool, pointing to several children playing nearby. “A school bus comes here every day and picks up 10 to 15 kids.” But the hotel is in a blighted area, resulting from suburban flight that followed

Zia Brooke Welchlin stood by her parents Cassandra and Kass Welchlin, who helped organize James Anderson’s vigil Aug. 12, 2011.

hotel security guards woke up Metro Inn owner Val Patel from his room at the Metro Inn. Patel, a former IBM executive with a doctorate in engineering from New York University, ran to the curb outside the hotel and found Anderson lying on the ground. About that time police and ambulance came to the scene. Patel said he turned over the surveillance video to law enforcement and CNN, but disputes rumors that he sold the video to CNN. “If there wasn’t a video, no one would have known who had run over him, and nobody would have ever known it was a racially motivated hate crime,” he told the Jackson Free Press. “I formally believe in the right cause, and there is not one penny that was involved—other than the money that has killed me from a business point of view.” Patel became visibly upset when he spoke about the media’s coverage of the crime. He maintains that the crime did not happen on his property but started in the adjacent Wendy’s parking lot. He said Dedmon hit Anderson as he was walking along Ellis Avenue. He feels that the media has unfairly characterized the Metro Inn. “The crime happened on the street. It had nothing to do with property, except we are why anyone even knows about it,” Patel said. In July, Ward 3 Councilman Kenneth Stokes publicly called for the closing of the Metro Inn, calling it a “public nuisance” citing drug use and prostitution at the hotel. Patel said the Metro Inn provides a service to low-income families who have trouble finding affordable housing in the area. The Atlanta, Ga., resident said he works seven days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight and stays at the hotel between trips back home to Atlanta. He said the hotel has a security

integration. Police regularly respond to a high volume of calls in the area. Despite the hotel’s reputation, it’s unclear why Anderson was at the hotel at 5 a.m. on June 26. Southern Poverty Law Center founder Morris Dees said the case was still under investigation and could not provide specifics. Anderson, 49, had worked at Nissan for seven years. He was gay and had a partner of 17 years, James Bradfield, and helped his partner raise the 4-year-old of whom Bradfield had legal custody. Anderson was a member of his choir at First Hyde Park Baptist Church. His partner told The New York Times that Anderson may have been at a party near the hotel the morning of his death. District Attorney Robert Smith has told media that Anderson had been robbed that night and his cell phone and wallet were taken. “If you met him, the first thing you were going to see was that grand-piano smile,” Anderson’s oldest sister Barbara Anderson Young told The New York Times Aug. 22. His family could not be reached for this story. The Times also reported that Dedmon had sent his sister a letter from his jail cell stating that he had committed himself to Jesus after the crime and blaming others for his situation. “I want you to take the Bible for real,” he wrote his sister. “I don’t want you to end up like this. I thought drinking was fun, but look where it got me. And seriously choose your friends wisely, Tiff. My so-called friends got me here.” The Anderson family has made few public appearances since the crime, and on Sept. 13 asked Smith not to seek the death penalty for Dedmon. “Those responsible for James’ death not only ended the life of a talented and wonderful

man,” Barbara Anderson Young wrote to Smith about her brother. “They also have caused our family unspeakable pain and grief. As Coretta Scott King stated in explaining her opposition to the death penalty: ‘An evil deed is not redeemed by an evil deed of retaliation. Justice is never advanced in the taking of human life.’ “Our opposition to the death penalty is deeply rooted in our religious faith, a faith that was central in James’ life as well. Our Savior Jesus Christ rejected the old way of an eye for an eye and taught us instead to turn the other cheek.” Smith said he would consider the family’s request as he proceeds with the prosecution. Hate Crime, Defined Morris Dees says he is not singling out Mississippi in his organization’s efforts to seek justice for Anderson’s death. During a Sept. 12 press conference at the Hinds County Courthouse, the founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center said his organization has filed similar lawsuits in Long Island, N.Y., and Linden, Texas. In 2008, a group of teenagers in Long Island, N.Y., beat Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero, and one of the teens, Jeffrey Conroy, stabbed him to death. A judge sentenced Conroy to 25 years in prison for manslaughter as a hate crime, but acquitted him of the hate-crime charge for murder. In Texas, the organization helped Billy Ray Johnson, a disabled black man, receive $9 million in damages after four white men beat him in 2003. “I think in Mississippi, this isn’t something that happens every day,” Dees said. “Obviously, there is systemic racism built into this state. We want to make sure that you know we aren’t picking on Mississippi. ... But we want to make sure the whole story gets out.” In 1994 Mississippi passed its first hatecrime law. The statute says that if the prosecution can prove that the crime was committed “because of the actual or perceived race, color, ancestry, ethnicity, religion, national origin or gender of the victim,” then it can be considered a hate crime. Only one known crime, however, has been tried under Mississippi’s hate-crime statute. In 2005, Brandon resident Jonathan Jones walked into Pops Around the Corner in Jackson and told the bartender that some “n*gger” had thrown a beer bottle through his window and that he was “going to kill” the n*gger.” He then asked the bartender if he could use the phone to call his insurance company so he could replace the window. Jones, however, had already killed 18year-old Reginald Daniels after the teenager threw a rock at his car. Hinds County Judge Swan Yerger handed Jones a two-year prison sentence for killing Daniels, saying that the victim and his friends were planning to carjack Jones. Yerger charged him with manslaughter, a lesser charge than murder, and gave Jones eight years in prison with two of those years suspended. “Those three young men were looking DIVIDED, see page 19

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‘The Other Cheek’ Before his arrest, Deryl Dedmon lived with his mother, stepsister and stepfather at 1011 Orchardview Cove in Brandon located off Highway 471. The one-story brick home looks identical to all the homes in the subdivision with an immaculate yard and a garage door left wide open on Sept. 7, although no one appeared to be home. His neighbors recalled seeing Dedmon ride his bike around the neighborhood as a small boy, but said the family was very private and mostly kept to themselves. Former convenience-store manager and current South Jackson Square Promenade Leasing Manager Kenneth Johnson remembered Dedmon and his friends because they used to hang out at the stores he managed at Crossgates and in downtown Brandon. Johnson is gay and said Dedmon and his friends frequently came into the store and used hateful language toward gays and blacks. He recounted an incident in which a group of Jackson State University fans were in the store getting drinks. Dedmon walked in and said, “Wow, looks like ‘n*ggers’ are taking over Brandon.” “When I heard that part, it offended me, and I said: ‘Hey guys, you have a history of doing this in Brandon and need to stop,’” Johnson recalled. “Dedmon made it well known that he didn’t like gay or black people. Throughout the whole three years I spent at the store and the on-and-off two years I knew them as customers, he talked about Obama and the Jackson City Council and the mayor in a bad way. He talked about Jackson being a predominately black city and said his parents grew up and moved away because of all these black people.” Dedmon’s crew frequented the Sonic Drive-In on Highway 80 in Brandon, where a group of white teens can be found most Friday nights smoking cigarettes and displaying their large trucks. It is so far unclear if Dedmon and the other teens intentionally went to the Metro

Inn. The motel, located directly off Interstate 20, offers weekly rates of $149 and nightly rates of $34, an affordable rate for many lowincome travelers or residents who can’t afford permanent housing. The hotel has security cameras at its front entrance and TV monitors in its back office. Early the morning of June 26, one of the AARON PHILIPS

Rankin County Sheriff Jonathan Edwards, his son Jonathan Edwards Jr. and deputies then beat the three men, leaving Perkins unconscious. They also stuck a fork, with two metal prongs bent down, through Perkins’ nose, and forced him to clean up his own blood. Twothirds of Perkins’ stomach had to be removed because of the beating. He also suffered a mild heart attack shortly after the beating. Perkins is now the internationally renowned leader of the John M. Perkins Foundation, a Christian ministry based in west Jackson. He and his wife, Vera Mae, also founded Voice of Calvary Ministries in 1962. Mississippi has also made significant progress, as evidenced by black gubernatorial candidate Johnny DuPree’s win in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary. DuPree is the first black to win the Democratic Party’s nomination. Still, Mississippi voters have elected no statewide African American official since Reconstruction.

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DividedWe Fall from page 17 the Ellis Avenue exit from Interstate 20 on her way to classes at Jackson State University. Whenever she passes by the now windbattered wreath memorial on the overgrown patch of grass in front of the Metro Inn, she thinks about Anderson’s death. The Florence resident and mother of three can’t see how the alleged murder could be an accident. Paajanen, a petite 40year-old blonde, attended a predominately black high school in Vicksburg and said she always had a strong sense of right and wrong. When she noticed that her high school boyfriend was missing the Kerry Paajanen commutes from Rankin County to Jackson stone from his class ring to attend Jackson State University. Her daughter, Paige, is a because he had use it to student at Brandon High School. strike his classmates, she broke up with him. The on whether the crime was racially motivated, it movie “Mississippi Burning,” a fictional accan lead to even more divisions in the commu- count of the 1964 Klan murders in Philadelnities, Beirich said. phia, Miss., makes her cry, and she feels more “That’s the real tragedy of hate crimes: comfortable at a largely black college campus When the victim’s class are the only ones con- than most other places. cerned about violence and the larger populaHer 15-year-old daughter Paige Ramtion doesn’t give it any credence, it’s devastat- age is a sophomore at Brandon High School. ing and divisive,” she said. “I think people in Paajanen said her daughter believes that general are very quick to diminish hate crime what Dedmon did was wrong but has a difespecially in places where there have been ra- ficult time understanding why the other teens cial tensions or other issues.” should be held accountable for the crime. Because the data on hate crimes are un- Since the crime, Paajanen said she has stressed reliable, Beirich said it is difficult to determine the importance to her daughter of standing up the ongoing racial struggles in America and for what’s right. Paajanen has also been bringthe South. ing her daughter and 5-year-old son to JSU’s Beirich added that only about 10 per- campus to expose them to different races and cent of hate crimes are tied to racist groups areas outside their community. Paajanen said such as the Ku Klux Klan. “You have a high- that in a small community like Brandon, it er number of people influenced by racist, se- can be difficult for people to speak out against mantic or anti-gay ideology but (who) aren’t something their friends were involved in. actually members of groups,” she said. “I don’t think it’s so much the white-black thing,” she said last week. “They don’t want to A Time to Change Kerry Paajanen commutes from Rankin DIVIDED, see page 21 County to Jackson five days a week and takes

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backs, 2003, $14). As national media descended on the town, the community used similar talking points defending race relations in their town. The town also tried to reconcile through symbolic acts such as wrapping yellow ribbons around trees and tearing down a fence in the community’s segregated cemetery. But, overall, Temple-Raston said that little changed in the town in the long run. “Among themselves, white Jasperites said the problem of race relations in Jasper in 2001 was mostly the minds of the black community,” she wrote. “Blacks said that whites shrugged off their concerns because they could forget race; blacks could not.” Her book ends, however, with the reflection of Jasper Sheriff Billy Rowles. Rowles recounted the story of how he saw a black mother and child in town and waved to them as a friendly gesture. But suddenly, he felt that was not enough of a kind gesture after everything the town had been through. He then approached the mother and child and sat down to chat with them. “What he realized was that just saying you aren’t racist isn’t enough, particularly if you are white,” Temple-Raston told the Jackson Free Press Sept. 30. “… You might say you are not racist, but you have to do something more overt. He was one of the few people in Jasper who couldn’t just say: ‘I am not racist. I don’t agree with Bill King. I don’t think what was done to James Byrd was right.’ That’s not enough. You have to go further.” Opponents to hate-crime legislation say hate drives all crimes and that it’s unfair to distinguish one crime from another. Still others argue that hate crimes could limit free speech. Southern Poverty Law Center Research Director Heidi Beirich said hate crimes carry more weight because of the impact they have on communities. “Hate crimes aren’t the same as other crimes,” she said. “In a hate crime, you attack somebody based on your perception that this person is a member of group. It’s not a personal attack. It’s one in which you target all Jews or blacks. … When there is a hate crime, whatever group the victim was from, every member of that group lives in fear. You make that entire community and fearful. It’s a crime that rips communities apart.” When two different racial groups disagree

CASEY HOLLOWAY

for trouble,” Yerger argued at the trial. “Jones was not looking for trouble, we was on his way home.” Former Hinds County Assistant District Attorney Stanley Alexander said at the time he was dismayed by Yerger’s sentence. For this story, he said it had been so long and could not give specifics. Southern Poverty Law Center President Richard Cohen told the Jackson Free Press that hate-crime laws are meant to increase penalties for certain kinds of crimes. “Mississippi’s hate-crime law is not unusual. It’s a penalty enhancement law. It means that the penalty for the violation for the law is increased if the illegal act was committed because of the actual or perceived race, ethnicity, national origin or gender of the victim,” he said. The Federal Bureau of Investigations collects hate-crime data, but local law enforcement submit the information on a voluntary basis, and many of them do not participate in any hate-crime reporting. In 2009, the last year that the FBI published hate-crime data, only 61 counties and municipalities in the state participated. In 2009, only two hate crimes were reported for the entire state of Mississippi. “In every state in the nation including Mississippi, the data is at best impressionistic and at worse misleading,” he said. “FBI data would tell you that between 7,000 to 10,000 hate crimes are committed nationally each year. The Bureau of Justice Statistics estimated that there are actually 200,000 hate crimes committed every year.” In 1998, Jasper, Texas, became known for one of the most heinous modern-day racial crimes in the country when white supremacist gang member Lawrence Russell Brewer and two other men chained James Byrd Jr., who was black, to their truck and dragged him 10 miles down an isolated road. Police discovered Byrd’s head and limbs detached from his body along a trail of blood down the road. On Sept. 22, 2011, the state of Texas executed Brewer. John William King is on death row and a third man, Shawn Berry, received life. NPR correspondent and journalist Dina Temple-Raston explored the impact of the crime on Jasper’s community in “A Death in Texas: A Story of Race, Murder and a Small Town’s Struggle for Redemption” (Holt Paper-

19


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COURTESY RICHARDSON FAMILY

DividedWe Fall from page 19

speak out against their friends. My daughter doesn’t think it’s right, but she knows those kids, so she feels empathetic and is not fully comprehending that what those kids did— whether they were in the car or not—that’s still bad. They went along with it and didn’t say stop.” Paajanen believes all teens involved should be charged in the murder as accessories. People in Rankin County might not be speaking out publicly, but a majority of her neighbors believe that the teens did something wrong, she said. She sees Rankin County as a place where law enforcement frequently stop outsiders and where white teens may get away with more than black teens, but it’s also a community where people take care of each other. Paajanen recalls earlier this spring when the infamous Westboro (Kan.) Baptist Church (of “God Hates Fags” notoriety) attempted to protest the funeral of fallen Marine Staff Sgt. Jason Rogers. The entire town shut down, and the community and law enforcement effectively blockaded the protesters. Instead of angry protesters, the shoulder of U.S. Highway 80 was filled with residents waving American flags and saluting the fallen soldier. Paajanen wishes the community of Brandon would come together in the same way against Anderson’s murder. “Why isn’t Brandon standing up? I don’t understand why people don’t think that we aren’t connected,” Paajanen said. “The income and the economy are all related, and unless we realize that if we don’t help Jackson out, it’s going to continue to fall.” On July 2, Jordan Richardson and his father were among the few whites who crowded into the small First Hyde Park Baptist Church off Medgar Evers Boulevard to attend Anderson’s funeral. During his sermon, the pastor made no mention of the hate. Instead of anger, the family focused on celebrating Anderson’s life. Sitting by his father before the ceremony began, Jordan thought about the years he endured Dedmon’s bullying and realized that he

could have just as easily been a victim. Overcome with emotions, Jordan broke down and began to cry in heavy sobs. Despite her own grief, Barbara Anderson Young came over and embraced Jordan in her arms as she comforted him. Young Anderson then spoke at the service about her brother, remembering his love for cooking, sense of fashion, and humor. She called his death “untimely” but did not speak out against about the murder suspects. She acknowledged Jordan at the end of her speech. “Jordan, we love you. Thank you, and be strong,” she said. The experience has matured Jordan Richardson and given him a greater sense of justice, he said. He has fully embraced his last year of high school. When he isn’t being the mascot, he hangs out with his girlfriend, studies and is currently directing a school play. He is applying to several colleges where he hopes to major in journalism and continue to be a mascot. Rarely does a day go by when he doesn’t think about James Craig Anderson. “From observing the grace of the Anderson Young family and watching them endure this and extending grace, I believe that it has had a profound affect on (Jordan),” Brian Richardson said. “He has become more forgiving.” Jordan Richardson said that although what happened is horrible, he hopes the alleged murder can serve as a catalyst for the two communities to overcome racial barriers and build common ground. “I would really like this to serve as a complete eradicating and erasing of all stereotypes—of Brandon, Rankin County and Jackson,” he said. “ The stereotype that anywhere you go in Jackson, you better be looking over your shoulder and in Brandon anywhere you go you are going to find Rednecks. “The only way that can happen is through a response of love for one community to the other.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Castlewood Baptist Church Pastor Brian Richardson and his son, Jordan Richardson, said Deryl Dedmon had a history of bullying for at least several years.

21


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BOOKS p 27 | 8 DAYS p 28 | MUSIC p 31 | SPORTS p 34 by Robyn Jackson H.C. PORTER

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Life on the Mississippi

Composer Eve Beglarian kayaked down the Mississippi River for inspiration.

E

October 5 - 11, 2011

ve Beglarian is a modern-day, female version of Huckleberry Finn, but instead of exploring the mighty Mississippi River on a raft, she did it by kayak and bicycle. Beglarian, a musical composer who divides her time between New York City and Vermont, dipped her paddle into the headwaters of the river in Lake Itasca, Minn., on Aug. 1, 2009, and steered her bright red, 17-foot kayak downstream for 2,300 miles or so, arriving in New Orleans a bit more than four months later. A desire to discover the real America inspired her trip. “Sometime in the fall of 2008, the combination of the economic meltdown and the presidential election made me want to go out and see what was happening in the country,” Beglarian says. “The Mississippi River is the spine of the country. For the first half of the river, to Cairo (Ill.), I mostly kayaked, and the second half was mostly biking. It’s like a super highway. Once the Ohio River joins it, the current gets much faster, and there’s a lot of boat traffic. It’s not really safe to be in a kayak.” Beglarian alternated days kayaking, biking and driving the support vehicle with several friends who accompanied her during much of the trip. Along the way, she collected memories, snippets of sounds, images and history from the river and her excursions into nearby towns, and she is now writing music that reflects her experiences on the Big Muddy. She shares memories and reflections of her trip on her blog at evbvd.com/riverblog/. Beglarian will speak about her adventures at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11, at Millsaps College, and her band, Brim, will perform some of the music her watery journey inspired.

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You spent a lot of time in Mississippi. What was your impression of the state? I think it’s more complicated than I thought it was. Coming there really made it clear to me. I think it’s really hard for a northerner to really understand the complexity. In a way, it is like a foreign country. There’s a kind of poverty in Mississippi that I’d never seen before. Especially if you’re biking through these towns in the Delta, you really see it. In Natchez, you can’t go grocery shopping without passing the slave-auction block. For me, that’s a new experience. To make sense of that history day after day (for black and white residents) is hard.

Beglarian’s band, Brim, will perform Oct. 11 at Millsaps College. The photo above is a cover from the band’s promotional material and website. There was a lot that was mythological to me. I got stuck in Mississippi. I met a boat pilot, David Greer, at a launch in Memphis and he gave me a lot of advice about what to experience in Mississippi. I had to go to Friar’s Point. I had to go to Rodney. I had to go to Jackson. The river is this giant, and fierce. It’ll kill you. But people love this river like a person. I felt very often that people were sharing their experiences of the river the way they would tell you about a person. Did you have much experience as a kayaker when you started your journey? Only recreationally. It starts out as this little nothing river, but as you go, you develop skills. The river grows to meet you, or you grow to meet it. I wasn’t pushing to try to go quickly. My whole goal was to engage with people along the river. It didn’t require me to start out really strong. We started out doing about 15 miles a day, and by the end we were doing about 40.

What will stick with you about your trip? It was really a life-changing experience. It was really intimate. I really felt like I was making contact with the country in a way I didn’t think was possible. What type of music do you compose? I write mostly concert music, classical. I also write for theater and dance, but mostly concert music. How did your trip down the Mississippi inspire your newest compositions? It’s hard to answer that question because different things I heard and saw are becoming the inspiration for music I am writing. I ended up making a piece that’s inspired by a Eudora Welty story about (the Mississippi ghost town) Rodney. Everything that I saw and heard has inspired me. I’ve started a band called Brim that was inspired by the journey, and it will be performing at Millsaps. Check out Eve Beglarian’s River Blog at evbvd.com/riverblog/.


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ny discussion of Charles Frazier or his books is inevitably prefaced with a comment such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;You knowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the guy who wrote â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cold Mountain.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? And while the novel has certainly garnered much acclaim, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold Mountainâ&#x20AC;? has also doomed Frazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future work to a lifetime of disappointed comparisons, sounding something like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as good as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cold Mountain.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Particularly for a talented writer like Frazier, this is bound to be frustrating. After all, the great artists and musicians and writers are not those who reproduce the same work ad nauseam but those who constantly evolve and never settle in one place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoodsâ&#x20AC;? (Random House, 2011, $26.00) is Frazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third novel, and it breaks from his past works in two ways. First, his protagonist is a woman. Frazier, who could be categorized as a rugged manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writer, introduces Luce, a fiercely independent tenant of an abandoned lodge in North Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Appalachian Mountains. Second, Frazier, who in his past two books has told stories about grand odysseys, centers his narrative around a single town in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoods.â&#x20AC;? In the story, Luce is a seemingly anti-Frazier hero. She is apparently comfortable in her place and timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with little ambition to press beyond her unnamed mountain town, where she is responsible for taking care of the lodge that sits unused on a lake several miles away from the town, or anyone else. Comparisons to Stephen Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shiningâ&#x20AC;? seem fair, particularly when Frazier writes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yet the fading spirit world touched her imagination pretty strong when she was awake at three in the morning, alone in the big place.â&#x20AC;? My fears were compounded when a violent man named Bud, Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former brother-in-law, shows up in the town to find Luce. Early in the book, we learn that Bud murdered Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister, Lily, the mother of two children by her first husband. Budâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shortsighted, pleasure-seeking deviant (â&#x20AC;&#x153;villainâ&#x20AC;? just

doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem like the right word). He murders Lily after she hides a large sum of money from him that he has stolen. Luce has inherited Lilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank and Doloresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from the state. They are mute and bizarre twins who, like mischievous mimes, set fire to and try to destroy everything in their sights for most of the story. Indeed, the book opens with the following lines: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new stranger children were small and beautiful and violent. She learned early that it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t smart to leave them unattended in the yard with the chickens. Later sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d find feathers, a scaled yellow foot with its toes clenched.â&#x20AC;? Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s child-rearing problems become more complicated when Bud, found not guilty in court, sets out to find the children whom he believes have his lost money. From there, the story becomes a plodding cat-and-mouse game, as Frazier alternates chapters between describing Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s struggles with the children and Budâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preparations for reparation. The pace is deliberate and slowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; almost to a fault. I found myself longing for adventure, only to have it denied. In fact, Frazier seems to let that same tensionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;between staying or goingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;come out in Luceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conversations with Stubblefield, her eventual love interest. While Luce shows interest in the world beyond her mountain, she knows she cannot leave town. Frazier writes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until recently, it had been theoretically possible to throw clothes in a bag and get in the car and go. By tomorrow, be sitting on the beach, at sunset drinking a beer. In the new reality, though, the children.â&#x20AC;? And here lies both the greatest strength and weakness of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoods.â&#x20AC;? In his past two novels, Frazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characters seemingly had no tiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or if they did, the ties were the reason to get up and go somewhere. And, as is the case with journeys, surprises constantly lurked around every bend in the trail; however, here, in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoods,â&#x20AC;? the story is of the familiar, of a single place and of the ties that do bind. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a story where change comes slow and conflict even slower. Yet, the two are magnified because of the care and time taken to get there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoodsâ&#x20AC;? may not be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold Mountain,â&#x20AC;? but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to be. Frazier, instead, writes of the Appalachian Mountains as Faulkner did about Mississippi and Joyce about Dublin. They are his. As Frazier writes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;These mountains are no wilderness. They have been lived in for thousands of years.â&#x20AC;? And then later, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everywhere Luce looks, the ground lies webbed with lines of passage, a maze for the children to get lost inside and never come out.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoodsâ&#x20AC;? is not a novel for those looking to the horizon but one for those who find their greatest adventures at home. Charles Frazier will sign and read excerpts from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoodsâ&#x20AC;? starting at 5 p.m Oct. 11 at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-7619).


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BEST BETS October 5 - 12, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 10/5

JERRY MORAN

Celebrate Archaeology Month during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Call 601-576-6998. … The Mississippi State Fair kicks off at 5 p.m. at the Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.) and runs through Oct. 16. $5 admission, children under 6 free, food and ride prices vary, parking $5 and up; call 601-961-4000; visit msfair.net. … The weekly Wild and Out Wednesday comedy show is from 8:4510 p.m. at West Restaurant and Lounge. $2 cover. … Shaun Patterson is at Buffalo Wild Wings. … Tommy Scarpinato and Tammy Golden perform at 9 p.m. at Fenian’s. … Shane and Frazier are at Underground 119. … Ole Tavern and Pop’s have karaoke. … The open jam with Will and Linda is at Pelican Cove. … Sean Bruce is at Hal & Mal’s.

FRIDAY 10/7

The Reunion Open Charity Golf Tournament kicks off at 8 a.m. at The Refuge (2100 Refuge Blvd., Flowood). $80, $160 team of two; visit reunionevent.com. … The JSU Alumni’s TGIF Day Party is from 1-6 p.m. at Freelon’s. Ages 25 and up. Free. … Doug Frank’s Blues Jam is at the High Note Concert Jam Series at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the Art Garden. Free, food for sale; call 601-960-1515. … Power APAC’s An Evening of the Arts is at 5:30 p.m. at The Commons. $2 admission, $5 food; call 601960-5387. … The Millsaps Singers’ fall concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) at the Ford Academic Complex. Free, suggested donation of $10 ($5 children); call 601-974-1422. … The “Best of Both Worlds” Que and Kappa Party is at 9 p.m. at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Ages 25 and up; chic attire. $20. … Cyril Neville performs from 9 p.m.-1 a.m. at Underground 119. $10 cover.

SATURDAY 10/8

The Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk is at 9 a.m. at the Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Donations welcome; call 601-321-5500. … The Craft Fair and Bake Sale is at 9 a.m. at Nativity Lutheran Church (495 Crossgates Blvd.) and benefits local charities. Free admission; call 601825-5125. … JSU’s homecoming celebration wraps up with a parade at 9 a.m. on Capitol St. and a football game against the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff at 4 p.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium. Visit jsums.com/homecoming. … BlocktoberFeast is at 3 p.m. on Montbrook St. in Broadmeadow. Free admission, food for sale; call 769-233-3062. … The Jackson Symphony League Mandarin Ball is at 6:30 p.m. at the Country Club of Jackson (345 Saint Andrews Drive). $150; call 601-960-1565 to RSVP. … “Once Upon a Time… There Was a Storybook Ball” is at 6:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). $35, $25 children 12 and under, $150 family package (includes 2 adults); call 601-709-8971. … The Post Game Show: Homecoming Edition is at Dreamz JXN. Free admission until 10:30 p.m.; visit jacksonncrowd.com. … The J-Settes Reunion Party is at 9 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. For ages 25 and up; wear chic attire. $30, $100 VIP; visit reunionevent.com. Louisiana bluesman Cyril Neville performs Oct. 7 at Underground 119.

October 5 - 11, 2011

Fondren After 5 is from 5-8 p.m. Stops to make include the Celebrate the Strip Party at Kolb’s Cleaners (2933 N. State St.), Charles Carraway’s art show at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St.), the art reception for Alexander Brown and Robin Smith at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road), and the free dance classes and swing after-party at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave., $5 party). … The Mississippi Boychoir’s MINIT 2 WINIT fundraiser is at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). $40; call 601-665-7374. … Young Leaders in Philanthropy’s spellBOUND SPELLdown adult spelling bee is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Proceeds benefit the Imagination Library literacy 28 program. $5; email sharla@youngleadersinphilanthropy.com.

Andy Hardwick performs during Fitzgerald’s 11 a.m. brunch. … See the opera film “Faust” at 2 p.m. at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). $16; visit msfilm. org. … The film “LA Phil Live: Dudamel Conducts Mendelssohn” shows at 4 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive). $19, $17 seniors and students, $15 children; call 601936-5856. … Benjamin Cone III and Worship perform at 5:30 p.m. at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). $10; find the group on Facebook.

MONDAY 10/10

Magic Morgan’s World Deaf Magicians Tour is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi School for the Deaf (1253 Eastover Drive). $10 in advance, $15 day of show; visit magicmorgan.com/tour. … The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $5. … Pub Quiz at Ole Tavern.

TUESDAY 10/11

Eve Beglarian performs at the Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). $10; call 601-974-1130. … The “Sing. Out. Loud.” Broadway cabaret with James Martin is at 7:30 p.m. at Underground 119. $15. … The African Drum Jam Session is at 8 p.m. at The Commons. $5, $1 with a drum; call 917-628-7050 or 601-352-3399. … Bryan Adams performs at 8 p.m. at Vicksburg Auditorium (901 Monroe St., Vicksburg). $35-$75; call 800-745-3000.

WEDNESDAY 10/12

Tougaloo College’s Golf-A-Thon is at 8:30 a.m. at Eagle Ridge Golf Course (1500 Raymond Lake Road, Raymond). Donations welcome; call 703-624-2257. … Enjoy “Speak Now: Memories of the Civil Rights Era” during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Call 601-576-6998. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Tommy Scarpinato and Tammy Golden play classic rock Oct. 5 at Fenian’s CHARLES SMITH

THURSDAY 10/6

SUNDAY 10/9


jfpevents Radio JFP on WLEZ, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is Audri Ingram with the Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Listen to podcasts at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Fondren After 5 Oct. 6, 5-8 p.m. This monthly event showcases the local shops, galleries and restaurants of the Fondren neighborhood. Come spin the JFP wheel at the Fondren Corner building. Free; call 601-981-9606. Jackson Restaurant Week through Oct. 8. Dine at participating restaurants and cast a ballot for one of the following charities to receive $10,000: Friends of Children’s Hospital, Community Animal Rescue and Adoption, Parents for Public Schools’ Ask for More Arts program, Mississippi Firefighters Memorial Burn Association and the Alzheimer’s Association. Visit jacksonrestaurantweek.com. spellBOUND SPELLdown Challenge Oct. 6, 7 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The adult spelling bee is a fundraiser for Imaginary Library, a program that provides free books to children in the Jackson Area. $5; email sharla@youngleadersinphilanthropy.com.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), in the Community Meeting Room. • Personal Finance and Credit Workshop Oct. 5, 6 p.m. Learn how to improve your credit score and build wealth. The first 20 attendees get their credit score for free. Free; call 601-982-8467. • Parents for Public Schools Lunch Bunch Oct. 5, 11:45 a.m. The topic is “Great Expectations for Healthy Schools: The Facts on Statemandated Sex Education.” Please RSVP. $5 lunch; call 601-969-6015, ext 320. • Dropout Prevention Town Hall Meeting Oct. 6, 6 p.m. Participants discuss strategies to keep children in school. Dinner included. Free; call 601-948-4725. Events at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Call 601-352-2580. • Feast with the Beasts Oct. 7, 4 p.m. The members-only event features presentations, keeper chats, food, and train and carousel rides. Free. • Teacher Training Workshop Oct. 8, 9 a.m. Kindergarten through second-grade teachers get lesson plans and activity ideas for students in the classroom and on a visit to the zoo. $15, $5 for 0.5 CEU credits optional. “History Is Lunch” Oct. 5, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Staff members share their favorite archaeological artifacts. Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. Mississippi State Fair Oct. 5-16, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). The annual event includes food, livestock shows, rides and free concerts in the Budweiser Pavilion. Parking is $5 for cars, and $10 for buses with $4 per passenger. $5 admission, children under 6 free, food and ride prices vary; call 601-961-4000. Hispanic Presence Seminar Oct. 5, 6 p.m., at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Leticia Gassaway is the speaker. Businesses learn more about the diverse Hispanic market. Refreshments included. Free; visit labalink.com. Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Symposium Oct. 5-6, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the Dollye E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building. The theme is “We Are Not Afraid: Youth Activism and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle.” Free; call 601-979-1562. Celebrate the Strip Party Oct. 6, 5 p.m., at Kolb’s

Grand Cleaners, Fondren (2933 N. State St.). Save the Strip Fondren promotes the preservation of the section of Fondren buildings on North State Street known as the Strip. Refreshments and music included. Visit savethestripfondren.blogspot.com. MINIT 2 WINIT Fall Fundraiser Oct. 6, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Watch local celebrities compete in 60-second rounds of games of skill. Enjoy dinner, a cash bar and music. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Boychoir. $40; call 601-6657374. Raymond Fall Pilgrimage Oct. 6-15. The Evening at St. Mark’s programs are at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Oct. 8 and Oct. 13 at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church (205 W. Main St., Raymond; $20, $10 children under 10 Oct. 8, other programs free). The Presence with the Past cemetery strolls are at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 7 and Oct. 14 at Raymond Cemetery (Port Gibson St., Raymond; $10, $5 children under 10). The Lawn Chair Film Festival at 6:30 p.m. at Raymond City Hall (Raymond Square; free, food for sale). Call 601-573-4486. Precinct 1 COPS Meeting Oct. 6, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 1 (810 Cooper Road). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0001. Jackson State University Homecoming Celebration through Oct. 8, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). “Celebrating the Legacy of JSU” is the theme. Highlights include a comedy show Oct. 5 featuring Lavell Crawford, and a Greek step show Oct. 6. Oct. 8, the homecoming parade is at 9 a.m. on Capitol St., and the football game against the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.) is at 4 p.m. Visit jsums.com/homecoming for specifics. Admission varies; call 601-979-0289. JSU Alumni Reunion Weekend Oct. 7-8. Oct. 7, the Reunion Open Charity Golf Tournament is at 8 a.m. at The Refuge (2100 Refuge Blvd., Flowood; $80, $160 two players), and the TGIF Day Party is from 1-6 p.m. at Freelon’s (440 N. Mill St., free), and the “Best of Both Worlds” Que and Kappa Party is at 9 p.m. at the Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St., $20). Oct. 8, the J-Settes Reunion Party is at 9 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St., $30, $100 VIP). Enjoy music from DJ Phil, DJ Mailman and Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer. Parties are for ages 25 and up; wear chic attire. Visit reunionevent.com. Kids’ Fiesta Fun Event Oct. 7-Dec. 31, at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). On first Fridays from 6-8 p.m. children ages 5-11 learn basic Spanish in a party atmosphere. Limited space; pre-registration required. $15 per child; call 601-500-7700. Jackson Audubon Society Birding Field Trip Oct. 8, 8 a.m., at Sky Lake Boardwalk (Highway 7, Belzoni). Carpoolers depart from Renaissance Hotel (Interstate 55 N. and E. County Line Road) at 7 a.m. WMA permit required ($15 at any sporting good store). Free; call 601-956-7444. Olde Towne Market Oct. 8, 9 a.m., in downtown Clinton. Vendors sell produce and crafts on the brick streets of Olde Towne Clinton. Free admission; call 601-924-5472. Homebuyers Workshop Oct. 8, 9 a.m., at Medgar Evers Library (4215 Medgar Evers Blvd.). Mississippi Home of Your Own empowers people with disabilities to become homeowners. Residents with and without disabilities in Hinds and surrounding counties are welcome. Free; call 601-432-6876 or 866-883-4474. Monarch Tagging Program Oct. 8, 10 a.m., at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). Dr. Bill Stark discusses monarch butterfly migration and life stages. Monarchs rescued earlier as eggs are tagged and released. Eggs

BE THE CHANGE Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk Oct. 8, 9 a.m., at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Registration is at 7:30 a.m., and the opening ceremony is at 8 a.m. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Donations welcome; call 601-321-5500. Parent/Guardian Education Advocacy Training Oct. 8, 11 a.m., at Lumpkin’s BBQ (182 Raymond Road). Sessions are held the second Saturday of each month, and the topic varies. Lunch provided. Please RSVP. Free; call 877-892-2577. Craft Fair and Bake Sale Oct. 8, 9 a.m., at Nativity Lutheran Church (495 Crossgates Blvd., Brandon). Purchase crafts, baked goods and hot dogs. Proceeds benefit local charities. Free admission; call 601-825-5125. NAMIWalks Registration through Nov. 5, at NAMI Mississippi (411 Briarwood Drive, Suite 401). The fundraiser is for the local branch of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Raise at least $100 to receive a T-shirt. Donations welcome; call 601-899-9058. Join JFP’s team at nami.org/namiwalks11/MIS/jfp2011. and larva available for adoption. Free, donations welcome; call 601-926-1104. Heroes and Dreams Birthday Bash Oct. 8, 11 a.m., at Heroes and Dreams (5352 Hwy 25 Suite 1650). The comic book store celebrates five years in business. Call 601-992-3100. BlocktoberFeast Oct. 8, 3 p.m., on Montbrook St. Broadmeadow Neighborhood Association is the host. The event features food, children’s activities including a bounce house and face painting, and live music. Free, food for sale; call 769-233-3062. Once Upon a Fall Festival…There Was a Storybook Ball Oct. 8, 6:30 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The event includes children’s activities, food and dancing. RSVP; advance tickets only. Space limited. $35, $25 children 12 and under, $150 family package (includes two adults); call 601-709-8971. Jackson Symphony League Mandarin Ball Oct. 8, 6:30 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 Saint Andrews Drive). The black-tie fundraiser for the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra includes auctions, food and music. RSVP. $150; call 601-960-1565. Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 10, 6 p.m., at River Hills Country Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). Southern Miss head football coach Larry Fedora is the speaker. $280 individual membership, $1200 corporate membership; call 601-506-3186. Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series Oct. 11, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Musician and photographer Eve Beglarian performs music inspired by a Mississippi River kayaking trip. $10; call 601-974-1130. Golf-a-Thon Scholarship Fundraiser Oct. 12, 8:30 a.m., at Eagle Ridge Golf Course (1500 Raymond Lake Road, Raymond). Participants play as many holes as they can, and donors pledge an amount per hole. The suggested goal per golfer is $1,000 in pledges. Awards given. Proceeds benefit Tougaloo College’s general scholarship fund. Donations welcome; call 703-624-2257. College and Career Readiness Workshop Oct. 12, 8:30 a.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond). The workshop provides school counselors with ACT test updates and information on measuring readiness. Lunch included; registration required. Free; visit act.org/ccrw. Creating a Strong Development Program in Uncertain Economic Times Oct. 12, 9 a.m., at River Hills Country Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). The Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Mississippi Center for Nonprofits are the hosts. Lunch included. $15 for MCN and AFP members and their guests; call 601-968-0061. On Location TV, on Comcast channel 18. Host and producer Phyllis “Peaches” Robinson spotlights people and places in Jackson. The variety talk show airs at 8:30 p.m. Sundays and 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Send story ideas to onlocationtv@yahoo.com.

WELLNESS Events at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262. • Think Pink Seminar Oct. 11, 11:45 a.m. Get an overview of ways to prevent, detect and treat breast cancer. • “Remember You, Remember Me” Seminar Oct. 12, 11:45 a.m. Dr. Mark Rester discusses the early signs of dementia and treatment options. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, October Session Oct. 7, by appointment, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children on first Fridays through Dec. 2. Free; call 601-707-7355. Health Disparities Conference Oct. 7, 9 a.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The theme is “Winning the War Against Obesity.” Limited seating. Registration is required for the luncheon at 12:15 p.m. Free; call 601-979-1102. Shoulder Replacement Surgery Seminar Oct. 10, 11:45 a.m., at Baptist Healthplex, Clinton (102 Clinton Parkway, Clinton). Dr. Rhett Hobgood explains new surgery techniques. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-9486262 or 800-948-6262.

STAGE AND SCREEN Power APAC’s An Evening of the Arts Oct. 7, 5:30 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). Students in grades 4-12 showcase their talents in the areas of visual art, dance, theater and music. $2 admission, $5 food; call 601-960-5387. “LA Phil Live: Dudamel Conducts Mendelssohn” Oct. 9, 4 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The film is of Dudamel conducting in Walt Disney Concert Hall and in Caracas, Venezuela. $19, $17 seniors and students, $15 children; call 601-936-5856. “It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Show” Auditions Oct. 10-11, 7-9 p.m., at Madison Square Center for the Arts (2103 Main St.). The Center Players are looking for 10-12 people ages 15 and up. Call 601-454-4404.

MUSIC

Millsaps Singers Fall Concert Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

More EVENTS, see page 30

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High Note Jam Concert Series Oct. 7, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy music from Doug Frank’s Blues Jam in the Art Garden. Free, food for sale; call 601-960-1515.


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Friday, Oct. 07 - Thursday Oct. 13 2011 Real Steel

PG13

Killer Elite

R

The Ides of March R

Dolphin Tale 3-D PG

50 / 50

Abduction

R

PG13

Dream House PG13

Drive

Courageous PG13

3-D The Lion King G

What’s Your Number? Moneyball

R PG13

R

Contagion

PG13

The Help

PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

jfpevents from page 29 (1701 N. State St.). The theme is “Voices and Strings.” Free, suggested donation of $10 ($5 children); call 601-974-1422. Benjamin Cone III and Worship Oct. 9, 5:30 p.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). The choir celebrates its 14th anniversary. $10; find the group on Facebook. Sing. Out. Loud. Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). James Martin performs as part of the Opera Underground Series. $15, food for sale; call 601-960-2300. African Drum Jam Session Oct. 11, 8:30 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). New York percussionists Jeremy Noller and Mangue Sylla facilitate the program. Dancers welcome. $5, $1 if you bring a drum; call 917-628-7050 or 601-352-3399. African Drumming Demonstration and Clinic Oct. 12, 10 a.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the F.D. Hall Music Center Recital Hall. Jeremy Noller holds a jazz drumming master class at 10 a.m., the main clinic is at noon and Mangue Sylla facilitates an open African drumming jam session at 2 p.m. Free; call 601-979-2148. Calling All Musicians, at The Church Triumphant (731 S. Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland). Drummers, guitarists and keyboardists are needed. Call 601-977-0007; email solutions@ thechurchtriumphant.info.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • Oct. 5, 5 p.m. Karl Marlantes signs copies of “What It Is Like to Go to War”; reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. • Oct. 8, 11 a.m., Susan Haltom and Jane Roy Brown sign copies of “One Writer’s Garden: Eudora Welty’s Home Place.” $35 book. • Oct. 8, 1 p.m., B.J. Hollars signs copies of “Thirteen Loops: Race, Violence, and the Last Lynching in America.” $24.95 book. • Oct. 8, 3 p.m., David and Yvonne Segrave sign copies of “Go on with the Wine.” $19.95 book. • Oct. 11, 5 p.m., Charles Frazier signs copies of “Nightwoods”; reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. “The Autobiography of a Freedom Rider: My Life as a Foot Soldier for Civil Rights.” Oct. 10, 10 a.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo), in the Bennie G. Thompson Center. Freedom Rider Thomas Armstrong and Natalie Bell discuss and sign copies of the book. Free, $14.95 book; call 601-977-7871.

CREATIVE CLASSES

October 5 - 11, 2011

Shut Up! Classes, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road). JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd teaches the Shut Up and Convince! Opinion Writing Workshop from 6-8 p.m. Nov. 7 and Nov. 14 ($50), the Shut Up and Publish! Workshop from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 10 ($50) and the six-week Shut Up and Write! Series every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Jan. 7-March 10 ($150, $75 deposit required). Limit of 11 per class. Combine classes and receive a discount. Gift certificates available. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 16; email class@ jacksonfreepress.com; find Shut Up and Write on Facebook and Twitter (@shutupandwrite).

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Free Dance Classes and Swing After-party Oct. 6, 5:30 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Classes are taught every half-hour. The after-party is from 8-10 p.m. Free classes, $5 party; call 601-213-6355. Production Assistant and Craft Services for the Film Industry Oct. 7-8, at Hinds Community College, Rankin Campus (3805 Highway 80 E., Pearl). Sessions are 6-9 p.m. Oct. 7 and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 8. $50; call 601-359-3297.

Introduction to Ballroom Dancing Oct. 10-31, at Dance Connection (306 N. Bierdeman Road, Pearl). Mike and Lisa Day teach the basics of the cha-cha, the fox trot and more from 7-8 p.m. Mondays. $100; call 601-974-1130. Fall Portrait Drawing Class Oct. 12-Nov. 2, at Nunnery’s at Gallery 119—Fine Art & Framing (119 S. President St.). Jerrod Partridge teaches the classes from 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays. Learn to draw the head as a solid volume and different aspects of the face. $150; call 601-668-5408.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Exhibits at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. $5, $4 seniors, $3 students; call 601-960-1515. • “Skating: An Artist’s Book” Exhibition Oct. 8-Feb. 5. • “Rembrandt: Beyond the Brush” Oct. 8-Dec. 11. • Mississippi Invitational Oct. 8-Feb. 5. • Mississippi Watercolor Society Grand National Watercolor Exhibition through Jan. 1. Midtown Debris Organization through Oct. 8, at the old Cultural Expressions building (147 Millsaps Ave.). The interactive performance art exhibit includes items collected from the Midtown area. View times are 6-9 a.m. and 3-6 p.m. Oct. 7, and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 8. The block party is from 3-7 p.m. Oct. 8. Free; call 601-497-7454. “A Time for Sharing” Exhibit through Oct. 28, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See works from Mary Lynn Dunaway, Bob Dunaway and Larry Smith. The opening reception is from 5-7 p.m Oct. 6. Free; call 601-432-4056. The Mummy Returns Oct. 1-31, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The famous “Mummy” returns to the museum. Hours are Tuesday–Saturday from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sunday from 1–5 p.m. Free; call 601-576-6920. Craft Exhibit through Oct. 31, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). See Patti Henson’s artwork. The reception is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Oct. 11. Free; call 601-856-7546. Charles Carraway Art Show Oct. 6, 5 p.m., at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). The Terry artist’s exhibit includes Impressionist landscapes and still lifes. Free; call 601-291-9115. Artisan Double Header Oct. 6, 5 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). See Alexander Brown’s wood sculptures and Robin Smith’s jewelry. Free; call 601-362-8484. Style Your Life Brunch Oct. 8, 10 a.m., at Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St.). Carol Stewart presents the latest Stella & Dot fall jewelry collection. Refreshments served. Free; call 601-609-4622. Two Dog Night at the Underwoods Oct. 8, 7 p.m., at the home of Stacy and Jay Underwood (732 Arlington St.). Artists Bill Dunlap and Ed McGowan discuss their works in the Underwoods’ art collection. Chef Luis Bruno prepares heavy hors d’oeuvres and dessert. Limit 30; RSVP with credit card. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Museum of Art. $125; call 601-960-1515. Pumpkin Adventure Oct. 12-15, at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Hours are 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday-Friday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Reservations required for groups. $6; call 601-432-4500. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS|music

From Ashes to Art

More Than Ready

by Briana Robinson

icky Adams used to watch and listen to his cousin, Ray Adams, and then mock everything he did, from making beats to rapping. He was only 8, but Ricky quickly turned into Prep, a rapper who would later become an industry player in Jackson and Mississippi hip-hop circles. “It just came pretty natural,” said Prep, known informally as Drumma Boi. Back then, Prep rapped about what he knew: candy, school and friends. “Drug Free American,” an original song he wrote, was the first one he rapped in front of people, and it was at church. After he graduated from Jim Hill High School in 1995, Prep stayed with his passion and kept rapping until his early 20s. Later, he learned engineering from spending time in studios and watching professionals work on tracks. He opened his own facility,

by Garrad Lee

I

Wilco, ‘The Whole Love’

Lies Down on Broadway” or “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.” It isn’t happening again, but that doesn’t mean everything after it isn’t good on its own merits. Wilco’s eighth studio effort, “The Whole Love,” is four albums removed from “Foxtrot,” and in many ways the separation is perfect. The band seems more at ease with this release, with fewer instances of trying to push the issue of experimentation. Case in point: Producer Tom Schick found a way to corral the energy and avant-garde madness of lead guitarist Nels Cline, whose guitar work previously had a tendency to sound jarring on occasion. Schick navigates new spaces within the landscape of songs like “Dawned on Me” and “Born Alone” for Cline’s play. Experimentation is a way of life for Wilco, and not an afterthought. “The Whole Love” opens with “Art of Almost,” a song with occasional stabs of dub-reggae guitar. It sounds like the love child of a Lee Scratch Perry track and 1960s John Cage electronics if that child grew up listening to ’90s guitar-

drenched indie rock like Superchunk. Tweedy’s vocals hold the cacophonous mix of loops and effects together into a cohesive pop song that glides into an ocean of strings, negative space and Sonic Youth-like noisy guitar rock. “Art of Almost” opens a record that, like the band’s previous releases, must be taken in as a whole; Wilco is one of COURTESY WILCO

t should be evident to those of you who read my column that I am not a rock ‘n’ roll aficionado. I do not dislike the genre; I just need very little to sustain myself. I get all the rock I need from about a dozen bands taken in small doses. Of those few bands, Chicago’s Wilco is one of my favorites. I cannot explain it. I typically hate dudes like front man, Jeff Tweedy. You know, the flannel-shirted slacker with perfectly downplayed good looks that writes the kind of sad songs that make you think: “Jesus, man, get over it. She wants to sleep with someone else.” I know a whole bunch of guys cut from this mold, and none of them are musical geniuses. Jeff Tweedy is. A new Wilco record excites me and worries me at the same time. I get worried because I know that the cries of “It’s not as good as ‘Yankee Hotel Foxtrot’” are soon coming. And you know what? They haven’t made an album as good as that since then, and why would we expect that?. 2002’s “Foxtrot” was a once-in-alifetime achievement, like “The Lamb

ince June 1, Travis Pinkston and daniel johnson have explored the Midtown community, picking up bits and pieces along the way. As part of the Midtown Debris Organization, the two collect and organize old bottles, brushes, leaves and cigarette butts. Then they sort what others call trash by aesthetic categories and symbolic association. Saturday, Oct. 8, is the Midtown Debris Organization‘s Final Organization Block Party from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Pinkston and johnson (who does not capitalize his name) will display sculptures of their own and of volunteer organizers from the past few months. Visitors will be able to take home their own sculptures and art for free and buy other pieces. The Midtown Debris Organization is at 147 Millsaps Ave. at the Old Cultural Building. Contact daniel johnson at 601-497-7454 or midtowndebrisorganization@yahoo.com for more information.

Wilco has released a new album.

the ever-decreasing number of bands that still understands the art of producing an entire album as a singular piece of art. The acoustic guitar-driven psych pop of “I Might” tempers the wildness of the opening track, while the steel-guitar and atmospheric vocals of “Black Moon” remind you why you started listening to this band in the first place, way back when they were alt-country pacesetters. The kitschy pop of “Capitol City” will keep the song in your head for days if you let it, a risk you run with any Wilco record. In its entirety, “The Whole Love” finds Wilco moving even further away from the alt-country label and into its own as a legitimate forward-thinking American rock band that is producing music as important as anything done by other left-field acts such as Radiohead, despite disparities in sales. “The Whole Love” probably isn’t going to make Wilco a household name, but it should satisfy fans of the band who love to see progression as a form of creativity.

jacksonfreepress.com

The Key of G

TraXtar, in 2002. Now, at age 34, he is a music-industry veteran, but he said he never sought glory. “I have recorded probably the whole city,” he said. “Anybody who’s serious about doing music around here, I’ve worked with.” Indeed, Prep is the Oz figure behind many Jackson artists. He engineered beats for Ray-J, Lil’ Boosie, Jazze Pha, Bushwick Bill, Pimp C and David Banner. He is also a father of two. One lead solo artist Prep is working with right now is Shadein Mars, known by TraXtar Records as London Marz. “Sweat” is another Prep project featuring Flawless da Rich Kid. The song “Main Attraction,” featuring London Marz, represents Prep’s perspective on life as a motion picture, he said. Its lyrics talk about humility and compassion. “Take the camera off me; this movie ain’t about me,” he said. After 26 years of making music, Prep has no plans to retire from hip-hop any time soon. It still reflects what is happening in his life, he said: “My music is based on how I’m feeling. Being that I’m 34, I have been in relationships, some good, some bad. If you listen to my music, you’ll be able to see that.” But the paternal side of him makes him sometimes want to leave the music industry. He has had to rethink a few things along the way. He says everything he does now is for his kids. “Music is an expression of life,” he said. “As an artist, I’m kind of at the point where I want to venture away. I still love to do music, I still love to entertain, but my mind-set is more or less now behind the scenes.” Prep wants to create a better music-oriented environment in Jackson to keep artists from leaving the area to get the exposure they need. He says the Internet really can help keep artists in the area. “You can promote yourself on a world-wide scale without leaving the city,” he said.

FILEP HOTO

COURTESY PREP

Prep, a.k.a. Ricky Adams, is a Jackson-based musician.

R

S

by Brittany Kilgore

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livemusic OCT. 5 - WEDNESDAY

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

10/05

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE TIL 10PM THURSDAY

10/06

$1.50 LONGNECKS, $3 WELL DRINKS, $4 SELECT CALL DRINKS, $5 JAGERBOMBS FRIDAY

10/07

SATURDAY

10/08

The Iron Feathers

Weekly Lunch Specials

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

October 06

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache

LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday

October 07

Wicked Gentlemen Saturday

October 08

George McConnell

Glasgow w/ Wild Card Charlies

Monday

October 10

PUB QUIZ & the Nonchalants MONDAY

10/10

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

10/11

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

Tuesday

October 11

Elegant Trainwreck Presents:

Horse Opera 2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

October 12

KARAOKE

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

October 5 - 11, 2011

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR WEDNESDAY 10/12

2-for-1 Drafts

w/ DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

LADIES NIGHT GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE TIL 10PM

Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

32

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

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THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/05 Sean Bruce (rest)

THURSDAY 10/06 Fulkerson & Pace (rest)

FRIDAY 10/07 Swing de Paris (rest) The Belts (rr)

NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS Wednesday, October 5th

SHANE & FRAZIER

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, October 6th

BOOKER WALKER

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover Friday, October 7th

SATURDAY 10/08 Horse Opera (rest)

MONDAY 10/10

CYRIL NEVILLE

Blues Monday with MS Central Blues Society (rest)

(Louisiana Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

TUESDAY 10/11

Saturday, October 8th

PUB QUIZ w/ Laura and Donovan (restaurant)

Coming Soon FRI10.14: JJ Grey and MOFRO (big)* TH10.20: Chuck Palahniukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Damned Book Night w/ Special Guests New Orleans Bingo FRI10.21: Stagolee w/ JTran (rr) SAT10.22: Heatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tree

Monday-Thursday

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

$8

25

JUVENATORS

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover Tuesday, October 11th

MS OPERA

starts at 6:30pm, $15 Cover, Limited Menu

Wednesday, October 12th

BABY JAN & CHALMERS DAVIS (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, October 13th

DENNY BURKES QUARTET (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, October 14th & Saturday, October 15th

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

GRADY CHAMPION JOIN US FOR HIS BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION! (Blues) 9-1, $15Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

33


THURSDAY, OCT. 6 College Football (8-11 p.m. ESPN), California travels to Oregon as the Ducks try to keep winning before their showdown against Stanford in November. FRIDAY, OCT. 7 College Football (8-11 p.m. ESPN), Boise State and Heisman candidate Kellen Moore host Fresno State Friday night. Catch the second half after a local high school football game. SATURDAY, OCT. 8 College Football (2:30-6 p.m. CBS Sports Network) Southern Miss travels to Annapolis, Md., to take on the Naval Academy, or watch Mississippi State travel to UAB (11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fox Sports South) and watch Bulldog fans really panic if the game is close. SUNDAY, OCT. 9 NFL (12-3 p.m. Fox), New Orleans travels to Carolina to take on Cam Newton. Somewhere Greg Williams is smiling at getting rookie quarterbacks in back-to-back weeks. MONDAY, OCT. 10 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN), If you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe me, you do now as Chicago travels to undefeated Detroit to take on the Lions. An old-school NFL matchup between two teams that are finally good again. TUESDAY, OCT. 11 MLB Playoffs (TBA TBS/Fox) The American League Championship Series and the National League Championship Series are starting. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12 MLB Playoffs (TBA TBS/Fox) The American League Championship Series and the National League Championship Series keep going.

by Bryan Flynn

Celebrating JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legacy

I

Standardized missed who said the dumbest thing I heard this weekend, or I would be ranting about that idiot. Instead, I must rant about what was said. While watching a game, the topic of conference expansion came up. In passing, I heard one of the talking heads at ESPN discussing how the Big Ten lowered their academic standards by allowing Nebraska to join the conference. What? Academic standards in a sports conference is the dumbest thing I have ever heard of. Are both teams going to work on physics problems before the game? Academic standards in sports conferences are an excuse to keep out teams conferences believe are inferior by using academics as an excuse. I can see it now. Folks, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play Boise State in football because of their low academic standards. The real reason is we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want Boise State to kick our butts all over the field. I guess when Syracuse leaves the Big East to the ACC, the reason will be because Syracuse felt the need to challenge the Duke basketball team in the classroom. It couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t because of money. Nope, it was because the teams in the Big East didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t challenge Syracuse enough academically. I am sure when athletes pick their future university, the first thing they notice is the academic standards. That must be why Mississippi and Mississippi State wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play Southern Miss every year. The Golden Eagles donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the same academic standards the Rebels and Bulldogs do. Yep, USM canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep up with the big boys in the classroom, so why play them? Or it could be MSU and UM are scared to play a team in this state that has 16 straight winning seasons, nine straight bowl appearances, and four conference championships? Academic standards are a joke of a reason for not allowing a team to join an athletic conference. Just be honest, and say we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get our butts kicked by team A, so we will keep them out and play cupcakes in our non-conference games. If you are scared, say you are scared. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hide behind academic standards in athletics.

I

n 1875, black ministers of the Mississippi Baptist Convention collaborated with white northerners of the American Baptist Home Mission Society to institute what is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jackson State University. The founders said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;your work and our work is done.â&#x20AC;? The 1875 collaborators aimed to produce an educational establishment. Yet, as JSU celebrates its Casey Therriault leads the JSU Tigers. legacy, the upcoming homecoming celebration will show that their vision became so much more. 8 record from 2010, this season has actuOn Oct. 2, Jackson State will begin ally kicked off much better than projected its 2011 homecoming festivities, themed for the Lions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrating the Legacy of JSU.â&#x20AC;? On the other hand, the JSU Tigers The festivities include a stage play, slaughtered Arkansas-Pine Bluff with a fashion show, street party, and a comedy 52-30 finish last year. In 2009, the Lions show featuring JJ Williams, Lavell Craw- were victors in the match-up, but JSU ford and Steve Brown. Mea Ashley receives didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have Casey Therriault, the fierce her Miss JSU crown Thursday, Oct. 6, quarterback who played in the 2010 seaand Terrence J of BETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 106 & Park will son and who returned to lead the team host a Greek Show Friday. The homecom- this year. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team is a far cry from ing parade steps off at 9 a.m. Saturday, that â&#x20AC;&#x2122;09 team. Oct. 8, in downtown Jackson. Finally, the In â&#x20AC;&#x2122;09, the Tigers finished the season highlight of the week-long festivities will 3-7, averaging 75.2 rushing yardage per be the homecoming football game. game compared to 105.2 rushing yardage JSU has a history of winning its per game for their opponents. The JSU homecoming game, and this year should defense outnumbered their opponents be no different. In 2008, the Tigers de- with 632 tackles for the season, but the feated Mississippi Valley State, 29-27 passing yardage was lacking. in the homecoming game. In â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09, JSU For the 2010 season, the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rushplayed Alabama State in the homecom- ing yardage improved to 98.6 per game, ing match-up and defeated them with a but their opponents still fared better score of 19-7. Similarly, in 2010, Prairie at 165.3 rushing yards per game. They View fell victim to the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homecom- whipped their opponents in passing, avering bite and was defeated with a score aging 314 yards. of 30-13. JSU started the season this year For homecoming this year, JSU takes with a great start; they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lose their on the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff first game until the fourth week of the Golden Lions at 4 p.m. Oct. 8 at Veterans season. And even though their 3-1 reMemorial Stadium. The Golden Lions en- cord mirrors Arkansas-Pine Bluff, they joy a 3-1 record, and are 2-0 in the confer- are sure to win this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecomence. In the third week of play, the team ing game. The football pride that fills barely squeezed out a victory against JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the city of Jackson during homecoming struggling in-state rival, Alcorn State Uni- week will continue to grow, pound-byversity, where they came from behind in a pound, touchdown-by-touchdown, and 10-20 half-time score to finish the game tackle-by-tackle. with a 27-20 victory. Considering their 4My prediction is 30-17 JSU.

FILE PHOTO

Southern Miss Golden Eagles and Mississippi State Bulldogs are on the road this week.

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

by Diandra Hosey

by Bryan Flynn

JFP Top 25: Week 6

October 5 - 11, 2011

/

34

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35


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dining

by Crawford Grabowski

I

come from a frugal family. Jan, my stepmother, saves everything that can be re-usedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;seriously, everything. When Jan and my father moved a few years ago, my father put his foot down and said there was no way he was moving used Ziploc bags or twisty ties across the country. Ditto for the large collection of soy-sauce packets from their local Chinese restaurant. Jan didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind much; she already had collections started at their house in Minnesota. The fact that she even considered it, though, shows exactly how frugal she is. I know she has little notes for me saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Save this; it will be valuable somedayâ&#x20AC;? in all sorts of boxes of junk in her basement. If plastic sour-cream containers or used wrapping paper ever become valuable, I will one day retire a millionaire. Jan isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only one. My momma is prone to â&#x20AC;&#x153;rescuingâ&#x20AC;? items from the trash. I grew up in a house filled with mannequin parts. We had an almost leafless fake palm tree once as a Christmas tree, and at another time a broken crab trap. Most of her finds followed a set path: garbage, Mommaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s van, front room, store room and, finally, back to the curb. I also married into a frugal family. Ann, my mother-in-law whom I love dearly, claims that she â&#x20AC;&#x153;tricksâ&#x20AC;? the cat every day. Her cat is a picky eater and will only eat cat food thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s straight out of the bag; the cat has to see it being put into the bowl or it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get eaten. Ann combats this by putting any leftover cat food back into the bag and pouring it â&#x20AC;&#x153;freshâ&#x20AC;? the next day.

This in no way compares to my father-inlaw, however. He squeezes leftover ketchup packets into the ketchup bottle and jelly packets into the jelly jar in the fridge. He saves money by his weekly thrift-store shopping route where he always finds great bargains. He recently bought two bikes for my daughter from Goodwill. One was for her to ride, and the other he purchased simply for its reflectors. His bargain hunting is like my Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Salvage problem; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always â&#x20AC;&#x153;look how much I savedâ&#x20AC;? without considering whether I needed the item in the first place. (We needed the bike! Thank you!) With this lineage, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no surprise that I am cheap. I love digging through bins at Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the shelves at Big Lots or the sale racks at Belkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. I, too, save things. I have a closet full of used gift bags and a shelf in the kitchen dedicated to empty jars. I also collect anything that I might use in my classroom. Apparently, my students need Styrofoam packaging, old game pieces, and lots and lots of straws. Keeping with my frugal roots, I try to feed my family well but as cheaply as possible. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a problem when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just my husband, my daughter and me. It is a concern, however, when helping cook for my husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family (think â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Big Fat Greek Weddingâ&#x20AC;? with a southern drawl). For our last gathering, I decided that coleslaw would be the most economical item to make. This would make perfect sense if I actually liked coleslaw, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. In fact, the only times I remember purposefully eating it was on pulled pork sandwiches at Gridleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which shows how long itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been. Then, last summer, my stepmother, Jan, served up a new slaw recipe. Hers isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the typical mayo and cabbage slaw. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cool, sweet-and-sour mix of cabbage, ramen noodles and almonds. The tang of the sugar and vinegar blends with the soy sauce to build a deep, hearty flavor.

The cabbage combined with the almonds and noodles creates a mixture of textures that crunch with every bite. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember the recipe before the family get-together, so I winged it. I added more veggies and left a few spices out. The dish got five stars from everyone, including the 7-year-old who subsists primarily on Pop-Tarts and cereal. This slaw is not only a tasty crowd-pleaser, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incredibly cheap. I mean, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheaper than cabbage and ramen noodles?

CRUNCHY COLESLAW 6 cups thinly sliced cabbage (or one 10-ounce package of finely sliced cabbage if you want to be lazy) 12-ounce package â&#x20AC;&#x153;rainbow mixâ&#x20AC;? slaw (a combo of sliced broccoli, carrots, cauliflower and red cabbage) 1/2 to 1 cup slivered almonds 1 bunch green onions including the tops, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 to 2 packages ramen noodles (You will not need the flavoring packets from the ramen noodles; save them to use later.) 1/4 cup olive or canola oil 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 3 to 4 tablespoons sugar 4 tablespoons soy sauce 1 large jar with a lid, which of course you kept from the last time you had spaghetti.

Toss cabbage, rainbow-mix veggies and onions in a large bowl. In a small skillet, brown almonds in butter or margarine. Add to the veggies when cool. While waiting for the almonds to cool, put oil, red wine vinegar, sugar and soy sauce into the large lidded jar. Shake until sugar has dissolved. Pour emulsion over the veggies and mix until dressing is distributed evenly. Chill in fridge for at least an hour. Right before serving, crumble up the ramen noodles and mix into the slaw.

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october 5 - 11

wed | oct 05 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Smith 5:30-9:30p

thur | oct 06 Almost Awesome 5:30-9:30p

fri | oct 07 Deebs Blues 6:30 -10:30p

sat | oct 08 Lucky Hand Blues Band

Budget-Friendly Meal Ideas :KDWÂśVDKXQJU\SHU VRQWRGRZKHQERWK EXGJHWDQGEHOO\DUHORZ" :HDVNHGIULHQGVRQ)DFHERRNDQG7ZLWWHU DQGJRWWKHVHVXJJHVWLRQVIURPSHQQ\SLQFKHUV ZKRVWLOOHQMR\ULFKDQGGHOLFLRXVIRRG

live music

6:30-10:30p

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sun | oct 09 Jason Turner 5:30-9:30p

mon | oct 10 Karaoke tue | oct 11 Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

HAGGARD COLLINS

jacksonfreepress.com

JACKIE SOBON

My Big, Fat, Cheap Family

37


5A44 FX5X

%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977 Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gourmet Burgers:

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

1IHMXIVVERIER*MWL +VMPP -RXVSHYGIW

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks..

ITALIAN

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

3 Course Dinner $21

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

The Copper Iris Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson

Soups â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches Salads â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Specials Delivery for orders of 5 or more. 115 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friend Us:

Hummus Appetizer Seared Redfish with salad & 2 sides Baklava Dessert (4:30-9pm Mon-Sat)

Ladies Rock Night Every Wednesday Night Live music by Aaron Coker (8:30p-Midnight)

ALL U CAN DRINK! $10 (Ladies Only)

Music Mayhem Open Mic Thursdays

Hosted by Kenny Davis (frontman of Creep Left) (8:30-Midnight) (2 for 1 mixed drinks all night)

Live Music Weekends

Friday, October 7th Mark Whittington 8:30pm-Midnight

Saturday, October 8th Daniel Tate 8:30pm-Midnight

6550 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland, Ms 601--956-0082

7KDLDQG-DSDQHVH)RRG OLNH-DFNVRQ¡V1HYHU([SHULHQFHG

October 5-11, 2011

12:23(1

38

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BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic, homey, unpretentiousâ&#x20AC;? thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the regulars describe Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

The Med (formerly Mediterranean Fish and Grill; 6550 Old Canton Rd./601-956-0082) Serving a fabulous selection of fish, gyros, and heart-healthy vegetarian food for over 10 years. Stop by to see what new creation Chef John has added to the menu! Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment!


Paid advertising section.

%*/&+BDLTPO

Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries! Wing Station (5038 Parkway Drive Suite 8, 888-769-9464) Home of the famous Janky Wings. Wing Station has an array of wings including Lemon Pepper, Honey BBQ and Blazin Bird Atomic. Delivery is available.

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-5040 Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

All You Can Eat

Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

VASILIOS AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

• Fresh Seafood Daily

Daily Lunch Specials - $9 $9 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Mu s i c L i s t i n g s

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

The Copper Iris Catering Company (115 N. State St. 601-961-7017) Fresh soups, stacked sandwiches, creative salads and daily hot lunch specials. Recently opened across from Old Capitol; available for catering and office delivery w/min. order. M-F; 11-5. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

Eslava’s Grille

M-F -, - S - C A

.. |  H M

OCT 05 | Brian Jones 9:30p OCT 06 | Shaun Patterson 9:30p OCT 07 | Jarekus Singleton 9:30p OCT 08 | Jarekus Singleton 9:30p OCT 11 | Open Mic w/ Kenny Davis & Brandon Latham 9p

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

BAKERY

Try The

(a very high-class pig stand)

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

jacksonfreepress.com

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

39


October 5-11, 2011

Love the Arts?

40

If you know and love fine arts, books, theater, dance, music or nightlife, you may be the arts writer weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for. Send samples and story ideas to valerie@boomjackson.com. And if you have passion for Jackson arts and are willing to learn, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll train you in creative non-fiction workshops.


read more Body&Soul stories and the blog at jacksonfreepress.com

by Briana Robinson

FILE PHOTO

The Down There Blues

T

he waiting room at the Hinds Comprehensive Health Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinic was full. Women of all ages and races sat, some silent and some on the phone, anxious to go back to one of the examination rooms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are you here for?â&#x20AC;? the lady be-

hind the sliding glass window asked softly, in case it was something extra personal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birth control,â&#x20AC;? I replied. When my name was finally called to go to the back, I followed a young nurse into a private room where she asked me a series of uncomfortable questions about my previous

sexual activities. Finally, she got to the point of my visit and asked what type of birth control I wanted. How would I know? I was 18 and had not been introduced to the world of the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clinic, yet. The nurse told me that I would have to take â&#x20AC;&#x153;the pillâ&#x20AC;? every day and that I would only have to get â&#x20AC;&#x153;the shotâ&#x20AC;? every few months. I chose the shot. The only other warnings I received after that was â&#x20AC;&#x153;this might sting a little.â&#x20AC;? Six months later, I could not fit in half my clothes, although I was eating way less that I had before. My boyfriend and I were fighting almost every day. I had no idea what was going on. After talking to some other girls who had gone through the same thing, we concluded that it was because of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the shot.â&#x20AC;? My cousin told me that she went up three dress sizes because of birth control and that the weight didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just â&#x20AC;&#x153;fall offâ&#x20AC;? after she stopped. Another person told me that she ended up losing friends because of her mood swings while on birth control. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What should I do then?â&#x20AC;? I wondered. I had no idea how much more weight I

would gain, and if I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do something then I might have ended up killing someone. I still have not chosen an alternative. I have decided, however, to learn all that I can about the different types before making a final decision. Doctors recommend learning about each type of contraceptive to find out whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for you before committing. #LINICSWITHFREEANDINCOME BASED BIRTH CONTROLOPTIONS Â&#x2021;+LQGV&RXQW\+HDOWK'HSDUWPHQWLQ WKH-DFNVRQ0HGLFDO0DOO ::RRGURZ:LOVRQ6XLWH  Â&#x2021;-DFNVRQ+LQGV&RPSUHKHQVLYH +HDOWK&HQWHU :1RUWKVLGH'ULYH  #LINICSWITHREDUCED PRICE DOCTORVISITS Â&#x2021;)DPLO\+HDOWK&DUH&OLQLF +LJKZD\(3HDUO  Â&#x2021;-DFNVRQ+LQGV&RPSUHKHQVLYH +HDOWK&HQWHU :1RUWKVLGH'ULYH  Â&#x2021;&HQWUDO0LVVLVVLSSL+HDOWK6HUYLFHV 5RELQVRQ5RDG([WHQVLRQ 

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hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feeling in the air â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? So starts a favorite Better than Ezra song that reminds me of fall. Lately, that feeling has made me want to get outside and enjoy the great weather that this time of year brings. But beyond football fields, I found myself drawn to water this fall. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll confess: Joining the yacht club isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily the first thing I personally think of doing when moving to a new city. But, then, unlike my friend Erin Kelly, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow up in Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sailing capital (Annapolis, Md.). A relatively new Jacksonian, Erin is a card-carrying member of the Jackson Yacht Club (700 Yacht Club Road, Ridgeland, 601-856-8844), and I recently joined her for a Saturday beercan race. I grew up sailing with my grandfather, who built several boats, so I have what amounts to a borderline romantic relationship with the idea of sailing. However, it had been a while since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d actually been on the water. So while Erin confidently skippered, and the guys we were with crewed, my assigned duty was to man the iPod. Since I remain fully committed to having a good life soundtrack, I was perfectly fine with that and sat back to just enjoy the day. We missed the start, so decided to just take the â&#x20AC;&#x153;sailing our own raceâ&#x20AC;? approach to thingsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which is a good approach in life, when you think about it. We had a great time, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what really matters. Sailors tend to be fun people who are happy to have new faces around, so afterward, we joined the rest of the racers at the club for a drink. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll definitely be back, and with enough practice thanks to opportunities for Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday races, maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll actually live up to my last name. Back on dry land, later that week, a friend who works in Ridgeland asked if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to journey to the suburbs to enjoy the

JULIE SKIPPER

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It was hard not to take off my shoes and join the kids in the fountain at the Art Garden.

poolside patio at The Parker House (104 S.E. Madison Drive, Ridgeland, 601-8560043). We went on a Wednesday, and in addition to the pretty patio, Chris Gill played live music, and we enjoyed halfprice bottles of wine. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really excited that, these days, getting outside to enjoy some pretty green space and water doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to mean leaving downtown. The new Art Garden at the Mississippi Museum of Art (201 E. Pascagoula St., 601-960-1515) will easily become one of my favorite spaces. Not only is there a stage for outdoor performances, green areas on which to sprawl and plenty of seating areas, but kids (and the young at heart) can play in the mosaic fountains. On a hot day, I may very well join them in cooling off in the water. This fall, get out and enjoy the great outdoorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether your activity of choice involves more active pursuits or just a good cocktail on a patio, Jackson has plenty to enjoy.

October 5 - 11, 2011

JULIE SKIPPER

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v10n04 - Divided We Fall: The Aftermath of James Anderson's Death  

Divided We Fall: The Aftermath of James Anderson's Death Investigating Grahm JFP Sports: JSU Homecoming Girl About Town: Sailing Our Own Rac...

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