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September 28 - October 4 2011


September 28 - October 4, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

10 NO. 3

contents FILE PHOTO

LISA PYRON

7 Panic over PERS Speculation is rampant over what will happen with the Public Employees’ Retirement System. NATALIE MAYNOR

Cover illustration by Kristin Brenemen

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THIS ISSUE:

The JFP presents everything (well, almost) that you ever wanted to know about food. COURTESY LAVELL CRAWFORD

angela grayson having them at different functions and would ask me, ‘Where are the cake pops?’” she says. A single mother, Grayson says her two daughters, Taimya, 5, and Takira, 3, are her inspirations. “I was just doing it for get-togethers for my kids,” Grayson says. Her oldest daughter, Taimya, has especially taken a liking to the cake pops and Cake Pop Cuties. “She tries to hand out business cards at school and at drivethroughs,” Grayson says. Grayson grew up in west Jackson and graduated from Lanier High School in 2004. Although she works as an account executive at Comcast, she is attending Holmes Community College to earn a degree in elementary education. “I’m big on family,” she says. “That’s where this actually came from. I will bribe (relatives) and say: ‘Come on over. Bring the kids. I’ll cook.’” She hopes that her business will help the west Jackson business district. She also hopes that one day she will have a bricks-and-mortar shop for Cake Pop Cuties. Grayson says that she wants her two girls to one day be able to say: “That’s what my mama accomplished. She owns that shop.” “This is a dream of mine,” Grayson says. For ordering information and to see some of Grayson’s creations, visit the Cake Pop Cuties website at cakepopcuties.net. You can also call 601-209-6112. – Briana Robinson

33 Big Love Comedian Lavell Crawford is bigger than life, and we’re not talking about his stage presence.

38 New Orleans, Not The band Glasgow makes a point to diverge from its Louisiana roots for its classic and rock sound.

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Angela Grayson has been baking since she was a teenager. “How long does that take?” and “what are you going to put in that?” were among the many questions she would ask her grandparents when they were in the kitchen together. She is now putting that knowledge to work. In January, Grayson started Cake Pop Cuties, her home-based baking company that specializes in cake pops, which are balls of cake, usually on a stick, dipped in chocolate. While local bakeries such as Campbell’s might sell cake pops, the closest specialty shop, according to Grayson, is located in Tennessee. “Everybody has cupcakes,” Grayson, 25, says about why she started making cake pops. “Plus, it’s something new and different.” She first heard of cake pops while exploring the Bakerella blog within the past year. “They’re not hard to make, but they are time-consuming,” says Grayson, whose pops were a hit at the 2011 JFP Chick Ball. She developed a technique for dipping the cake balls. “I want them to look cute and polished. I want them to look like they are time-consuming, and that I put the effort in them. I have a technique for how to dip them in the chocolate and how to let them sit so they don’t come out sloppy,” Grayson says. All of this started for Grayson when she was making baskets of cake pops for her friends and family. “Everybody got used to

COURTESY GLASGOW

6 ............. Editor’s Note 6 ................... Slowpoke 7 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .................... Stiggers 13 .................. Opinion 14 ......................... Food 33 ............... Diversions 34 ....................... Books 35 ..................... 8 Days 36 .............. JFP Events 38 ....................... Music 39 ......... Music Listings 41 ................. Astrology 41 ..................... Puzzles 42 ...................... Sports 46 .......... Fly/Shopping

Food Power!

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September 28 - October 4 2011


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editor’snote

LaShanda Phillips Editorial assistant LaShanda Phillips is a recent graduate of Jackson State University. She is the third oldest of seven children. Her motto is: “Make-up is fantastic!” She coordinated and wrote for the Food section.

Kristin Breneman Art director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with penchant for dystopianism. Her Zombie Survival Kit has been upgraded with a new sonic screwdriver. She illustrated and designed the cover and many pages in this issue.

Terry Sullivan Terry Sullivan is owner of liveRIGHTnow, LLC, and is a resident of Fondren. He runs ultramarathons broken up into smaller segments and spread out over several months. Well, maybe they aren’t ultra-marathons, but he does run a lot. He wrote a Food feature.

Pamela Hosey Pamela Hosey is originally from West Point, Miss. She loves to write, read James Patterson novels and spend time with her family. She wrote a Food feature.

Andrew Dunaway Andrew Dunaway knew his friends and family were tired of hearing him talk constantly about food, so he took to writing about it. He’ll do his best to keep it to a dull roar. He wrote a Food feaure.

Anita Modak-Truran Anita Modak-Truran is a southern convert, having moved here from Chicago more than a decade ago with her husband and son. She loves the culture, cuisine and arts in these parts. She wrote a Food feature.

Briana Robinson Deputy editor Briana Robinson is a 2010 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Her hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a sophomore at Millsaps College. She wrote the Jacksonian.

September 28 -October 4, 2011

Megan Stewart

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Megan Stewart, the JFP’s web developer, works best by being unpredictable and catching everyone off guard. She graduated from Ole Miss with a bachelor’s degree in computer science last fall and lives in Jackson.

by Valerie Wells, Assistant Editor

Primitive Power

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y husband balanced a lumpy, orange sweet potato in one hand. His other hand was poised on the juicer. He arched an eyebrow while I tried to keep my mind open. The sweet potato was way too large to fit in the juicer, so he cut it in chunks and fed it into the slender cylinder. I watched, knowing I would have to drink the juice and not react in any negative way. The juicer pulverized and liquidated the sweet potatoes in mere seconds. He threw in an entire lemon, an apple or two and part of a cucumber. The lemon-zest aroma filled the room and opened my mind a little more. I think he added carrots to this concoction. I’m pretty sure he started it out with a large bunch of dark green and curly kale. He poured me a glass of the rich, earthy mix and watched me take my first sip. I honestly and surprisingly liked it. It was sweet and tangy and intriguingly different, although the starchy aftertaste from the sweet potato was odd. I wanted more of the lemony freshness. And then I got a surging buzz that seemed to make me feel more energetic than an oversized cup of strong, bold coffee. So, of course, I wanted more. Ever since he bought the juicer a few months ago, I have considered going on an ill-advised, crackpot, last-ditch, all-juice diet. I haven’t had the nerve, yet. Three days into any new regimen, I tend to get headaches. If I cut all caffeine or reduce carbohydrates, my head rebels. The first day, I am full of hope and optimism. The second day, I am proud of the discipline it took to make it this far. (Yes, you are correct—it is pathetic, but 24 hours of good behavior is a big deal for me.) By the third day, my head hurts. I’ve tried different diets, from the insane ones in my 20s, to the extreme costcutting budgeting to feed my family in my 30s, to the “I-just-want-to-feel-a-little-better” realistic attempts to eat healthier that I am aiming for at the end of my 40s. The power food holds over us is primitive. We are all just animals, but sometimes when we remember that, the simple truth astounds us. The first time you lock eyes with your nursing newborn, you suddenly remember the obvious. Like a newly zealous teenager taking communion wine and crackers with religion exploding in his temporal lobe, the epiphany of the simple truth hits you at pivotal moments in life. From our family feasts to our first dates, our rites of passage revolve around food rituals that shape the way we think and feel. When we need comfort or love or good vibes, we remember what fed us in the past. Food has that power over us. How many times in just the past 20 years have we read about starving people in Africa and then learned that warlords blocked logistical efforts at every road to deliver food? These men controlled basic

human sustenance to gain political power. Corporations have controlled access to food so their shareholders could realize a larger profit. More than 30 years ago, Nestle taught breast-feeding mothers in Africa to give up that animal habit and instead use a powdered replacement. Unfortunately, the tainted water the mothers used in some cases created toxic baby formula. But that’s not the only instance in history where corporations put profit before basic human survival needs. Monsanto’s control over who can own and buy its patented, genetically modified corn seeds, for example, has destroyed the lives of some farmers and has left many of us wondering if genetically altered food is going to destroy us all. Yet, we keep buying, cooking and eating those foods. Well, maybe you don’t, but I sure do. My scientific understanding of a lot of things is limited. But I know this simple truth: If I keep eating processed, packaged, corporate, altered and unhealthy food, I’ll die a lot sooner than I should. That’s the kind of power food holds over us. As the African warlord knows all too well, food is a resource that can control economics. And it’s not just foreigners who deal with the effects of people who manipulate this resource. In 2010, about 15 percent, or 17.2 million American households experienced “food insecurity,” or did not have enough food to sustain an active, healthy life for all household members, reports the United States Department of Agriculture. The power food has over our economy shows up in the medical industry, too. A rise in diabetes, heart disease and other

metabolic problems has improved profits for some pharmaceutical companies while stressing health-care systems and burdening taxpayers. The answers seem so simple. Why can’t we all have gardens or barter with small farmers? Why can’t we drink more water and eat less junk food? Why have we complicated the simple act of grabbing an apple from a tree or catching a fish for dinner? I remember an archaeologist telling me once that the first French settlers in Biloxi didn’t starve because mountains of oyster beds littered the Coast. But then later, when University of Southern Mississippi archaeologists examined the remains of those first European settlers, their bones made it clear these people died of starvation. It’s a riddle I want to solve as well as my own confusion about the simple act of eating well. Part of my problem is that eating is sensual. The smells, the textures, the sensations that accompany the different tastes are sometimes addictive beyond the complicated internal chemistry. Food comforts us and makes us feel loved. Or it invigorates us with energy to get things done. Or it makes us feel successful when we treat ourselves to a special delicacy. I love it when my husband makes me juice. I think it’s a healthy thing, but I’m no expert. I just feel better when I drink the juices he creates. But he’s also offered to grill me chicken every day when he retires. That appeals to me on so many levels. I do love chicken, and I do love his grilling. The most appealing thing about it, though, is that he would want to do that for me. It’s simple and powerful, and I think I’d like to live a long time so he can do it.


news, culture & irreverence

Friday, Sept. 23 The Democratically controlled U.S. Senate blocks a House bill to provide disaster aid and keep federal agencies open by cutting technology loan programs. … Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s estate files suit against Jackson television news anchor Howard Ballou over historic documents his mother owned. Saturday, Sept. 24 New York police arrest about 80 demonstrators from a group called Occupy Wall Street. … Georgia beats Ole Miss 27 to 13. Sunday, Sept. 25 Patrick Makau, a runner from Kenya, sets a new world record for running the Berlin Marathon in 2 hours, 3 minutes and 38 seconds, beating the old record by 21 seconds. … A 2-year-old boy dies after a drive-by shooting in Jackson. The boy’s father is taken to the hospital in critical condition. Monday, Sept. 26 U.S. legislators reach an agreement to avoid a government shutdown after arguing over extra funding for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. … The Jackson City Council approves a cost-sharing agreement with developers of a convention center hotel. Tuesday, Sept. 27 Engineers begin inspecting the Washington Monument for damage from an earthquake that occurred more than a month ago. … Special agents in Jackson’s FBI office find LaTonya King, who had been missing since Saturday. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

“review the financial, investment and management structure of PERS to ensure its long-term sustainability” and make recommendations for improvement. But lawmakers and retirees alike seem uncertain about what the commission is looking for and what changes it will ultimately recommend. Brenda Scott, president of the Mississippi Alliance of State Employees, said she is suspicious of the commission because many of its members are businessmen without a vested interest in the system. “I just don’t think it’s fair that a group of people who are profitdriven would be the best group of people to advise people who are service driven,” she said. Scott said PERS is transparent and already has a board elected by Brenda Scott, president of the Mississippi Alliance of the system’s beneficiaries. State Employees, is wary of the recommendations the “The fact that the governor PERS Study Commission will make. felt the need to study the system and to have the report coming out peculation has been running ram- after the elections are over is very suspicious,” pant since August, when Gov. Haley she said. Scott said she is trying to convince Barbour appointed a commission to state employees to elect people this November study the Public Employees’ Retire- who will protect their retirement. ment System. Scott said she has heard concerns about Barbour’s executive order establishing taxpayers contributing to PERS, “as if these the 12-member commission states it will city and municipal workers are not taxpayers.”

S

by Elizabeth Waibel

She added that people in the private sector do not realize or appreciate how much they depend on services provided by public servants. On Sept. 22, during budget hearings for fiscal year 2013, PERS Executive Director Pat Robertson said she has tried to allay the fears of members by reminding them that only the state Legislature has the authority to change their benefits. “Study is not necessarily a negative,” Robertson said. Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian, had a word of warning about making changes to state retirement plans. “Charlton Heston said it would be very hard to get the gun out of his hand unless he was dead,” Peranich said. “That’s how it’ll be if they come after state retirement.” Rep. George Flaggs, D-Vicksburg, sent a letter to Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant Monday, asking him to schedule a presentation from the commission for the budget committee before Nov. 8. If not, Flaggs asked Bryant to join him in asking the commission to present its findings before the election. Members of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee tried to calm fears that the commission might recommend changes to the socalled “13th check,” or cost-of-living adjustments for retirees. PERS, see page 8

Fun Things B TTU

d a de

“Charlton Heston said it would be very hard to get the gun out of his hand unless he was dead. That’s how it’ll be if they come after state retirement.” —Rep. Diane Peranich, DPass Christian, regarding potential changes to the state’s Public Employees Retirement System.

To Do with Nuts G

et your mind out of the gutter. We asked our staff and readers what fun things they would do with nuts. Here are some of the responses. We take no responsibility. “Juggle ‘em, throw ‘em on the floor at the Roadhouse, make peanut butter, then sing ‘The Peanut Butter Jelly Time’ song.” “Eat them to get smarter.” “Hire them.” “Add them to your salads or cookies.” “Take one with you for guaranteed fun.” “Put them in your mouth and crack them.” “Bake them with maple syrup for nut candy.” “Start a nut warfare with the squirrels in my backyard.” “Mash ‘em and make butter.” “Throw a nut-crackin’ party.” “Go nut-picking with your family.” “Make granola or trail-mix.” “Talk politics with one.”

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Thursday, Sept. 22 During a state budget hearing, the Mississippi Department of Education asks for a 13 percent budget increase for elementary and secondary schools in the coming year. … The Obama administration rolls back components of the Bushera No Child Left Behind Law.

Outcome of PERS Study Uncertain FILE PHOTO

Wednesday, Sept. 21 Georgia executes Troy Davis for the murder of an off-duty police officer and sparks national attention from supporters who claim he was innocent. … A grand jury indicts Brandon teenager Deryl Dedmon on a capital-murder charge in the alleged hate-crime death of James Craig Anderson in Jackson.

The scientific term for the tomato is lycopersicon lycopersicum, which means “wolf peach.” It’s in the nightshade family of plants, which include the highly toxic belladonna.

Jim Ellington hates government and loves guns. And wants your vote. p 11

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talk

news, culture & irreverence

PERS, from page 7

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

FONDREN WHITE ELEPHANT SALE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 FONDREN HALL (FORMER PRIMOS NORTHGATE) 4330 NORTH STATE STREET

EARLY BIRD SHOPPING 7:00AM – 8:00AM $5.00 per person admission REGULAR SHOPPING HOURS 8:00AM – 2:00PM $2.00 per person admission Giant indoor thrift sale with new and gently use items. Fondren shops and local interior designers offering sale clearance items for pennies on the dollar.

www.fondren.org

The “13th check” is money state retirees get each year to account for the rising cost of living. It is called the 13th check because it used to be paid out in a lump sum each year, although retirees can now collect it along with their monthly check. Robertson said the 13th check is intended to maintain an individual’s purchasing power once he or she retires. Sen. Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport, said he doesn’t think anyone wants to change the costof-living adjustment. “Hopefully after this discussion we can put to rest the fear mongering about the 13th check,” he said. Rep. Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, said he doesn’t know why the governor thought a study committee was necessary, but employees have a right to be concerned about the future of their benefits plan. Other states, such as Colorado and Minnesota, have reduced costof-living increases for retirees. “I don’t think it’s panic; I don’t think it’s fear mongering,” Brown said. “... I think (employees) have every right to be concerned.” Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl, a non-voting member of the study commission, said that at the last commission meeting, Chairman George Schloegel said commissioners have no intention of changing anything about the 13th check. Kirby did say that in a letter from Schloegel, handed out to the budget committee, the chairman said he would be surprised of the commission made any recommendations that would prohibit an individual from receiving their cost-of-living adjustment as a lump sum payment, but did not address people who receive the 13th check on a monthly basis. “I look forward to seeing the recommen-

dations,” Kirby said. “Recommendations— that’s all it is.” In a video from an earlier hearing, Schloegel said the commission should look at the 13th check. Schloegel was not immediately available for comment. The budget committee voted unanimously to say they would not support any changes to the 13th check. When Hewes questioned the program’s sustainability, Robertson said PERS is sustainable, with more than $20 billion in assets to keep the system stable. The biggest cost contributing to the problems the system faces today, she said, stems from legislation passed more than a decade ago to increase benefits for some people who had already retired. “Benefit increases were given in 1999 that I would argue weren’t sustainable,” she said. “... We bought benefits on credit.” In a Sept. 14 letter to commission members summarizing his official opinion regarding the state’s ability to make changes to PERS, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood wrote that the state cannot after the fact impair contractual rights employees received when they joined PERS. “I would like to remind you that, whatever changes might be considered or recommended by the PERS Study Commission, the law requires the state to honor the commitment it has made to hundreds of thousands of retirees, employees and their dependents,” the letter stated. The state cannot reduce existing benefits without increasing benefits elsewhere, Hood wrote. The commission will present its analysis and recommendations Nov. 15. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Census News

Income Down; Poverty Up by Elizabeth Waibel

September 28 - October 4, 2011

America’s income and poverty in 2010, the first full year since the recession “officially” ended: Median household income: . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,445, 2.3 percent less than in 2009 Poverty rate: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.1 percent, the highest since 1993 People living in poverty: . . . . . . . . . . . . 46.2 million, 2.6 million more than in 2009 People without health insurance: . . . . . . . . 49.9 million, or 16.3 percent, similar to 2009 figures Children under 18 without health insurance:. . . 7.3 million, or 9.8 percent, about the same as in 2009

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Poverty rates vary by race, background and region: Overall: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.1 percent White, not Hispanic: . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.9 percent Black: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27.4 percent Hispanic origin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.6 percent In the South: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.9 percent Native-born: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.4 percent Not U.S. citizens: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.7 percent SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU


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adults in the Jackson metro read us in print or online. Our multimedia promotion offers aggressive rates on a combination of print, web and JFP Daily advertising.

For more information, call 601-362-6121 x11 or write ads@jacksonfreepress.com!

by Lacey McLaughlin

Out with the Old

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rad Oberhousen, Democratic candidate for Mississippi House of Representatives in Hinds County’s District 73, is the kind of guy you could meet and easily have a three-hour conversation with. He is easy going, agreeable and is slow to make campaign promises. Oberhousen, 33, is an attorney and owner of the Oberhousen Law Firm in Jackson. The Terry resident earned his bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University in 2000 and his law degree from Mississippi College in 2002. The candidates for the District 73 race are still a bit up in the air. His opponent in the Democratic primary, Gay Polk, filed an election challenge last month with the Hinds County Democratic Executive Committee after reports surfaced that voters received the wrong ballots in the district’s split precincts. The Democratic Committee ruled in Oberhousen’s favor, and Polk has since filed a suit against the committee in Hinds County Circuit Court. For now, Oberhousen is the Democratic candidate and faces incumbent Republican Jim Ellington in the Nov. 8 elections. District 73 includes Terry, Byram, Raymond and Wynndale. Why do you want to be elected? I have lived in that part of Hinds County all my life. I’m from Raymond. The leadership was been stagnant as far as economic development, the help that law enforcement gets and the schools. I want to try and help that and move it in a better direction. What is your opinion of how the Hinds County Executive Committee handled the primary? Overall, I think they did a thorough job. I’m not going to say it was a perfect job. They had a lot of eyes watching them at the time. They were under a lot of pressure from the sheriff’s race and supervisor’s race. I watched them counting the absentee and affidavit ballots, and everything I saw was done properly. … The only thing that bothers me was that the certification was done, and there was still a lingering challenge by my opponent. But I’ve

LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

69,500

candidatedish

can help Byram, Terry and Raymond in generating the needs of the community as far as economic development—restaurants and that kind of stuff.

Brad Oberhousen is the Democratic candidate for the District 73 Mississippi House of Representatives seat.

been told I’m the primary winner, and I will move forward to the Nov. 8 election. What will be your priorities? I want to maintain our justice system and keep it intact and our criminal-justice system. What legislation would you introduce or sponsor? One thing would be to protect the Public Employees Retirement system and keep it intact with state retirees. Do you think future state hires should be entitled to the same benefits people have now? I guess you have to look at it with the standpoint of what it is funding now, and what’s coming in, and what can we do to go forward. It’s just going to be a sticky situation to fix it from this point forward. But I don’t think you can go back and change benefits for current retirees and people that are already in their state positions banking on their retirement. Are there any other issues you would work for or against? I really want to help the economic development in southern Hinds County. So we

You represent Matthew Norwood who spent 12 years in prison after being wrongfully charged with an armed carjacking in Jackson. Tell me more about that. He was 16 and ran through the justice system, interviewed by the FBI and ended up pleading guilty to the crime. He had some learning disabilities and didn’t understand the process. In an effort to get him out of jail, his attorney gave him advice to plead guilty, and he was sentenced to a six-month regional inmate-discipline program—basically a boot camp for offenders. Five months into it he was kicked out of the program (for bad behavior). After being kicked out his sentenced was revoked, and he came back before the judge, and that’s when he was given a 15-year sentence for the crime he pled guilty to. He had served 12 years of that before the investigators of the current (Hinds County) DA’s office found some discrepancies in some statements, and some other people had (confessed) to the crime he was sentenced to, and they released him, and that’s how it came to us. We were able to get the conviction set vacated and we are pursuing the wrongful conviction for Mr. Norwood. We were denied that by a Hinds Circuit judge, and now it’s on appeal to the Mississippi Supreme Court. What does this say about our state’s criminal-justice system? There are a large number of cases that go through a system of people who are not perfect and may not have the time to spend on every case. I don’t think it’s widespread; I don’t think it’s a high number. But it does happen. It’s just a mistake that happened. ... But the only reason Norwood’s lawyer advised him to plead guilty was to get out of jail. ... The system forced him into a corner, and he made a 16-year-old’s decision. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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candidatedish

by Lacey McLaughlin

Mississippi has the highest rate of illegal gun trafficking. What can be done to solve that? It’s already against the law. You have to have a permit to carry a concealed weapon. It’s very difficult to enforce the illegal gun trafficking. … I can go to a gun show and buy a gun from an individual, and I don’t have to have a permit. But If I wanted to have that concealed on my person I would have to have a permit. Do you think that should change? No. I think that’s fine. You need a permit to carry a gun. NRA supports that. There is no problem there.

Jim Ellington, R-Raymond, doesn’t want government regulation to cramp his style.

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istrict 73 Rep. Jim Ellington was busy getting ready for a fundraiser for the Central Mississippi National Rifle Association on Sept. 22 when he gave this interview. The Raymond resident has kept his seat in the Mississippi House for the past 24 years, and like most Mississippi Republicans, Ellington is in favor of the least government intervention possible. He graduated from Mississippi State University in 1966 with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and worked as a mechanical engineer before getting into politics. The 67-year-old is a partner in Louisianabased Traffic Control Products, which sells items such as traffic controls, signs and barricades. Ellington faces Democrat Brad Oberhousen in the Nov. 8 elections. How long have you been a member of the NRA? I’m not a member; they just endorse me and support my candidacy. You are a proponent of gun rights? I am very much so.

Do a lot of bills come up in the Legislature to regulate guns? No. Just about one or two. I think it was (Texas Gov.) Rick Perry who said he believes in gun control. Sometimes you have to put two hands on the gun. What does that mean? (Laughs) Hold the gun with two hands instead of one. Oh, that must be a joke. Of all the bills you have sponsored or introduced, what are you most proud of? I am most proud of raising the age-ofconsent law from 14 to 16. That was 12 years ago. We were trying to do that, and it was difficult. We couldn’t get it out of committee. Fourteen? That’s young. That’s what I said. We were the only state that had a 14-year-old age to consent. Should it be raised to 18? I think we were lucky to get it to 16, so I think you quit while you are ahead. Jackson often feels snubbed by the Legislature, especially when it comes to getting state bonds. What do you think of that? There are some certain economic advantages the city of Jackson gets from being the

capital city. But there are economic disadvantages such as Jackson having so many government buildings that aren’t on the tax rolls. I am not saying that it balances out, but there is a disadvantage when you don’t have a lot of buildings on the tax rolls. In terms of the city getting a fair shake when it requests bonds, do you think that’s an issue? The state does not need to take over the financing for the infrastructure of the city. We can have revolving loan funds available and that sort of thing that actually direct the payment of the bonds for infrastructure for the cities. Where do you stop? What about Hattiesburg? Do they deserve for the state to fund their infrastructure? What about Gulfport or Vicksburg?

Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table

In tough budget times, what should the state do to generate revenue? Create more jobs. We just had a special session to create the potential—over a period of time—to create 3,000 to 4,000 jobs. Those people will pay taxes into the state and buy things and pay sales tax, which helps the cities and state.

9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages

But some of those jobs that the Legislature signed off on are still several years away. So is there anything that can happen sooner? You don’t want to increase taxes—if that’s what you are going for. That will slow things down. You might get a bump in income, but over time it slows things down.

Televised on WAPT

Do you have any changes you would recommend for the Public Employees Retirement System? I would not recommend any changes to the existing employees. I think (Mississippi Attorney General) Jim Hood even said that’s a contract. When they got hired it said: You work for this many years, and this is what you get. But on new hires, if they want to tweak it and change it for them, we could look at that. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS 601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

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COURTESY MISSISSIPPI LEGISLATURE

Aiming Against Government

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Eat to Help Mississippi

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es, you heard that right. We urge all of our readers to start eating and feeding your family well—not only for selfish reasons, but because Mississippi needs you. It needs you to be fit, energetic and have a fully functioning brain because we have many challenges ahead in our city and state. We need all hands on deck and healthy. Working on this “Power of Food” issue really brought home in a dramatic fashion just how important our everyday food choices really are. We talk on page 16 about the brand-new study that ranked Mississippi 51st— not even 50th this time—in brain health. The reason isn’t hard to figure out just as it isn’t with our obesity, which in turn creates economic headaches as we try to pay for health care in a poor state. We’re not only neglecting our bodies in our state, but too many Mississippians are also ignoring the health of our brains. And worse, in too many cases, we’re feeding children the wrong kinds of food if we want them to be successful, smart, educated and make a good living some day. It used to be that we thought that some people are born smart and others dumb. Recent neuroscience has shown, though, just how wrong this “conventional wisdom” was. In fact, starting in the cradle and then toddlerhood, the kinds of nurturing, foods and even words children hear can determine what becomes of them. And in a city where many are concerned about crime, this lack of access to fresh food and good dietary information is directly correlated with the choices many young people ultimately make. Not to mention the backward decisions many of our adults bring to the table. We call on everyone reading this issue to vow to eat better. We call on parents to stop assuming that children will only eat unhealthy junk; it’s not true, and research shows it isn’t. But if you assume it’s true, just as assuming that certain kids can’t learn and be smart, then it likely will be. This kind of defeatist attitude is what keeps our state on the bottom—and no one can change it but ourselves. We must choose to, starting at the dinner table. Even if you’re used to eating unhealthy, fat-laden Sunday dinners every single day—which first lady Michelle Obama warned against—you can still change, regardless of your age. Get in touch with Beneta Burt at the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity Project, visit a farmers market this weekend, start reading labels. And just decide that you’re never too busy to sit down to a family dinner. As we report in this issue on page 19, those dinners alone can change your child’s future.

KEN STIGGERS

Operation Backlash

September 28 - October 4, 2011

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r. Announcement: “In the ghetto criminal justice system, the people are represented by two members of the McBride family: police officer and part-time security guard at the Funky Ghetto Mall Dudley ‘Do-Right’ McBride and attorney Cootie McBride of the law firm McBride, Myself and I. This is their story.” Dudley: “We got a call to investigate a possible disturbance. Scooby ‘Angry Black Man’ Rastus, Tipsy Lee the wino and a large group from the Ghetto Science Community are hanging out across the street from the Operation Corporate Backlash headquarters building.” (Cootie and Dudley drive to Operation Corporate Backlash headquarters in their Law ‘n’ Order SUV.) Cootie: “Brother Scooby, I presume that you, Tipsy Lee and the Ghetto Science Community are exercising your First Amendment rights.” Scooby Rastus: “Yep, the right of the unemployed people to peaceably assemble.” Cootie: “And I presume that you all are demonstrating against corporations and businesses who are not hiring?” Scooby Rastus: “That’s right, brother lawyer.” Dudley: “I don’t get it, Scooby.” Scooby Rastus: “The ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protesters inspired us to hang out at Operation Corporate Backlash. Also, the president’s address to the Congressional Black Caucus motivated us to lounge around the corporate offices. We took off our bedroom slippers, put on our marching boots and are making a stand.”

KAMIKAZE

Address Causes, not Symptoms

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hen is enough going to be enough? When will be fed up? No, better yet, when will we get mad? It’s these times that challenge the passion in positive Jacksonians. Over the weekend, death visited our city too often. It seemed as if when one fatality was announced, there was another right behind it. My head began to spin out of control as it became increasingly harder to make heads or tails of what prompted such violence. Black people, gunned down indiscriminately. One of them a 2-yearold boy, killed as he sat with his father seemingly minding their own business. Becoming numb to violence and tuning out lead stories on the local news is one thing. But I think we can all agree that when innocent children are killed, somewhere, somehow, Jackson, we’ve missed something. As a father my heart cries out. That could have been me sitting in my vehicle with my 18month-old, or my 14-year-old at a drive-through or red light. The two men killed in their apartment could have just as easily been me and Queen sitting in our living room watching TV. For some reason, after this weekend it has hit too close to home, and I don’t like it. I’ve talked about the randomness of crime. I’ve talked about true crime statistics and the propagandists who want to trump up the frequency of such occurrences. I still believe this city on a whole is safe. But now I’m concerned with the cavalier attitude that exists in those who do commit crime. When houses are robbed in broad daylight, when folks are shot sitting in their cars with no regard for women and children, we all have a problem.

Now is not the time to be apologists. Nor is it time to place blame. Especially if you’re going to do like most folks do when talking about black-on-black violence and blame the “parents.” What it is time for now is an immediate, allinclusive, frank discussion on how we can curb these occurrences in our city. This past weekend we received statements from our mayor and police chief. That should satisfy those of us who needed to hear from our city leaders. Now what we need is a plan—a substantive plan that will address not just the actions, but address the symptoms of crime. Not just the “what” but the “why.” If you really want solutions—which means not pontificating based on racial stereotypes that you call “truth”—you’ll know that no one is born inherently bad. If you’re truly interested in fixing the problem, you know that if presented with an alternative, most wayward souls will choose the straight and narrow. What we have to grasp is that we have glaring joblessness, homelessness and drug problems in our city, symptoms that fester into crime. And until we begin to adequately address those, we’re not trying hard enough. Add 100 more policemen, levy heavier punishments, all the like. Those will help, sure. But as long people are hungry, as long as there are Jacksonians living in crippling poverty, as long as there are pushers and addicts roaming our streets, we could be in for more of the same. I for one, am mad as hell and don’t want to take it anymore. What are you prepared to do? And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


RONNI MOTT

I Surrender EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Reporter Elizabeth Waibel Events Editor Latasha Willis Editorial Assistant LaShanda Phillips Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editor Dustin Cardon Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Diandra Hosey, Pamela Hosey, Robyn Jackson, Garrad Lee, Natalie Long, Larry Morrisey, Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant,Tom Ramsey, Doctor S, Julie Skipper, Ken Stiggers, Rebecca Wright Editorial Interns Matthew Cockrell, Brittany Kilgore, Sadaaf Mamoon, Hannah Vick Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Graphic Design Intern Erica Sutton Editorial Cartoonists Mike Day, Chris Zuga Photographers Christina Cannon, Jert-rutha Crawford, Tate K. Nations, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson, William Patrick Butler

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. Firstclass subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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y sister Inga was a Diet Coke junkie. She kept spare quart bottles of the stuff in reserve so she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run out. If you saw her out and about, chances are she had a Diet Coke in her hand; it was a fixture, like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weedsâ&#x20AC;? Nancy Botwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ubiquitous Starbucks iced coffee. Once upon a time, Inga read that sugar is bad, so she stopped drinking sugary soft drinksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a good decisionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and substituted drinks sweetened artificially. Then came the bad news: In December 2009, the Journal of the American Medical Association published â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artificially Sweetened Beverages: Cause for Concern.â&#x20AC;? Turns out, sweeteners like aspartame may be worse than sugar, especially for people trying to control their weight. Constantly changing information on what foods are good or bad is enough to make us crazy (although categorizing soft drinks as â&#x20AC;&#x153;foodâ&#x20AC;? is a stretch, I admit). One day, eggs are OK; the next theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re devil spawn. Should we stop eating meat or center our diets on bacon? Is it the carbs piling on pounds? Is organic and free-range better, or is it all a hippie conspiracy? Combine the scientific communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shifting landscape of nutritional research with the American obsession with body image, and we set ourselves up for anxiety, food phobias, and eating disorders such as anorexia, binge eating and yo-yo dieting. I should know. I have a love/hate relationship with food. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve struggled with weight and self-image forever; my mother put me in a girdle when I was 11. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried dozens of diets that left me nauseous or gaseous or worse, including a medically supervised, ultra-low-calorie, zero-carb liquid nightmare. I lost 50 pounds in six months on that one, only to watch in helpless horror as my weight steadily crept back up, despite obsessing over every bite and every drop of sweat that dripped off the end of my nose in daily yoga classes. Eighteen months later, I was limber, strongerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and fat. Wanting to improve our eating habits is a good thingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;after all, obesity is a huge health problem in America. The weight-loss market is enormous: Estimates are that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth between $55 billion and $60 billion annually. With a third of Americans overweight or obese, companies like Medifast, Weight Watchers and NutriSystem are raking it in. Lately, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been reading about alternatives to dieting based on mindfulness, which derives from Buddhist teachings. These approaches emphasize that as long as food is the enemy, it will be a problem. Mindful eating suggests that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not food (or not all of it, anyway) thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the issue. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how we think about it, or as in my case, how we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think about it at all. I rarely

take the time to really taste and enjoy food, I notice, and I certainly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow my body to guide what and how much I eat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Learn to eat slowly, consciously,â&#x20AC;? writes Barbara L. Holtzman, a Rhode Island psychotherapist and author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conscious Eating, Conscious Living: A Practical Guide to Making Peace with Food & Your Bodyâ&#x20AC;? (barbaraholtzman.net, $29.95). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let yourself enjoy every bite. Learn to eat from physical hunger, not emotional hunger.â&#x20AC;? Intuitive Eating (intuitiveeating.org), developed by dietician Evelyn Tribole and nutrition therapist Elyse Resch, takes a similar approach: Eat when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hungry; stop eating when full; know that food isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an adversary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you make peace with food, you will feel more in control of your choices,â&#x20AC;? writes IE counselor Christie Inge on her website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we eat small amounts slowly, with mindful attention, we experience increased pleasure and satisfaction,â&#x20AC;? wrote Dr. Jan Chozen Bays, Zen master, physician and author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mindful Eating: A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Foodâ&#x20AC;? (Shambhala, 2009, $18.95) in the February 2010 issue of Psychology Today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as if mindfulness makes a small amount of food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;largerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and very filling.â&#x20AC;? Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, in his introduction to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savor: Mindful Eating, Mindful Lifeâ&#x20AC;? (HarperCollins, 2011, $15.99) by Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Lilian Cheung, writes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many distractions in daily life reinforce the mindless ingestion of food, and mindless eating is a strong driver of weight gain and obesity.â&#x20AC;? Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;With awareness and practice, it is possible to become more mindful in our eatingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and in our lives.â&#x20AC;? Mindful eating is, at its heart, a practice to uncover our authentic selves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spiritually, your wanting to lose weight is not a desire to become less of yourself, but rather a desire to become more of your true self,â&#x20AC;? writes Marianne Williamson in â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Course in Weight Loss: 21 Spiritual Lessons for Surrendering Your Weight Foreverâ&#x20AC;? (Hay House, 2010, $24.95). Instead of fighting battles with food, the authors of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savorâ&#x20AC;? tell us that mindful approaches to weight management train us to â&#x20AC;&#x153;make friends with our hardships and challenges. â&#x20AC;Ś They are natural opportunities for deeper understanding and transformation, bringing us more joy and peace as we learn to work with them.â&#x20AC;? After a lifetime of waging war with food, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready to call a truce. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll let you know how it goes.

CORRECTIONS: In Vol. 10, Issue 2 (Sept. 21-27, 2011), â&#x20AC;&#x153;A New Face for Chinese Cuisineâ&#x20AC;? author Andrew Dunaway incorrectly stated that Ding How was Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Chinese buffet. That spot was actually held by the Golden Dragon (now at 1029 Highway 51, Madison, 601-605-0930), which opened on State Street in 1969 or 1970. Also, the photo accompanying â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fear and Loathing at Sneaky Festâ&#x20AC;? was incorrectly credited. The photographer was Dane Austin Carney. The Jackson Free Press apologizes for the errors.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


Food has immense power. It can do you good, or it can kill you. It can make you smarter, or leave you antisocial or even worse. It can bring more love to your life, and it can make your family stronger. It can change your life, your community and your state. Eat wise, friends. It matters.

Power Choices

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ood is powerful, very powerful. In short supply, it causes starvation and war; in over-abundance, it causes obesity and gluttony. Food has the ability to both help cure and cause disease, and politicians and businessmen use it to create and destroy cultures (as recently as the invention of the TV dinner). Food is our most basic connection to the sun. If we could produce our own power supply through solar energy—like plants do through photosynthesis—then we would have no use for what we now consider food. Only squirrels would eat nuts, and domesticated cattle might be unheard of. Unfortunately, we were not born with solar panels on our heads, and we have always needed food to fuel our bodies. Over the millions of years of human evolution, our food has evolved with us. As our eyesight became sharper, we were able to pick out the brightest fruits, which contain the most antioxidants. As our taste buds developed, we were able to quickly taste the bitterness of poison and spit it out before we took a fatal gulp, and as our minds developed, we learned how to master the beasts and fields around us and domesticate livestock and plants. The transition from gatherers to hunter/ gatherers to agriculturalists shaped everything about us, including our language, family structure, art and technology.

PAMELA HOSEY

Foods That Heal

Blueberry bread pudding’s star ingredient has healing properties.

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September 28 - October 4 2011

aving a healthy immune system through proper nutrition is a key to combating illnesses. Supplementing your diets with foods high in nutrients like antioxidants, phytochemicals and enzymes will have a direct effect on your health. These foods are often called “power foods” or “healing foods.” Some, like cranberries, cinnamon, garlic, carrots and apples, are beneficial to our health. • Blueberries: I often bake these into my meatloaf and used them to add sweetness in a marinade for steaks (before becoming a vegetarian), and still use them in ice cream and pies. Blueberries are linked to lowering cholesterol, reducing the risk of diabetes, slowing the aging process, helping with circulation, increasing brain activity and maintaining healthy vision. Anthocynanin gives blueberries their color and is a component of its antioxi14 dant and anti-inflammatory properties.

This transition is still happening. Evolution, whether biological or cultural, never stops. Our relationship with food is changing faster now than it ever has at any point in human history. In America, we are quickly losing our connection with food; children grow up not knowing where food comes from. Instead of learning to select food based on color, smell or texture, we now pick it out based on packaging or advertising. This shift has greatly benefited large food manufacturers, but is creating a culture of obesity and illness and a population that is becoming more and more dependant on those manufacturers for sustenance. When we lose our ability to get food from the earth rather than the grocery store, then we have lost a basic human right. It’s our “right” to get food from the earth. What should we do to re-harness the power of food for our benefit? Start by making good decisions as consumers. Spend more time in the produce section or better yet, the farmer’s market. Get to know a local farmer and learn where your food comes from. Spend more time in the kitchen than the fast-food line. No one will prepare as healthy a meal for you or your family as you will. Make cooking and eating fun and social. Teach your children that beef comes from a cow and

NATALIE MAYNOR

by Terry Sullivan

Spend time at a farmers market and learn to appreciate where your food comes from (nearby, hopefully).

not the meat section of Kroger. Teach them that cows are living creatures that need to be treated humanely up until their death. At its most basic level, culture exists within the home and the community. By making the right choices, you can be in control of the food culture around you, and that is power.

by Pamela Hosey

• Acai: Pronounced “Ah-Sigh-EE,” this berry-like fruit from South America has more antioxidant activity than red wine, strawberries and blueberries combined. It contains anthocyanins, the potent pigment that gives it its deep purple color and helps battle illnesses like cancer, heart disease, obesity and inflammation. When I want a change from blueberries, I normally throw some acai into my smoothies. When sweetened, they taste similar to blueberries, but with a hint of cocoa. • Coffee: Studies show that up to five cups of coffee a day may reduce the risks of Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases. Java is also known to reduce certain cancers like breast, liver and colon. Researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that coffee drinkers are the least likely to develop type 2 diabetes. How’s that for your morning pick-me-up? • Ginger: Fresh ginger contains antiinflammatories that reduce pain associated with headaches, cramps, arthritis, cold and flu symptoms without the side effects of an ibuprofen. This sweet hot spice also helps keep ovarian and gastrointestinal-tract cancer at bay. Ginger can also relieve nausea. • Cayenne: Cayenne has the healing power to soothe a sore throat better than any lozenges on the market. A small drop of this fiery pepper can release fluid in the mouth, throat and nasal passages to thin mucus, break up congestion and flush out irritants. Cayenne can also be used to soothe muscle and joint pain when used topically in an ointment.

• Oats: Studies show that oatmeal isn’t just a comfort food; it’s a power food. Oatmeal improves brain function and stimulates serotonin in the brain to improve your mood. Oats are a good source of energy, vitamins B and E, iron and calcium. • Papaya: Papayas are the only food source of papain, an anti-inflammatory that helps digestion, heals stings, burns and other wounds and improves blood circulation. This tropical fruit is also rich in folate and Vitamins A and E. They have 33 percent more vitamin C than oranges. Papayas also aid in fighting hypertension and obesity. • Turmeric: Turmeric is an Indian

BLUEBERRY BREAD PUDDING 4 cups bread cubes 1/4 cup butter or margarine, cut in pieces 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 3 cups fresh or frozen blueberries, rinsed well and drained 1/4 cup water 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

In a mixing bowl, combine bread, butter, sugar, salt, blueberries, water and lemon juice. Pack mixture into a generously buttered 1-1/2-quart baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes or until set. Serve hot or cold with cream or a bourbon sauce. Serves 8.

spice that has powerful anti-inflammatory benefits. Researchers proved that turmeric is highly effective in curing dyspepsia and ulcerative colitis and helps age-related cognitive impairment, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

ISLAND SUMMER RICE Serves 4

1 clove or 1 teaspoon minced garlic 3-1/2 inch cinnamon stick 1 cup of light coconut milk 2 teaspoon unsalted butter 2 teaspoon minced ginger 1 teaspoon sugar 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1/2 teaspoon lime zest 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut, toasted and shredded 1-1/4 cup of jasmine rice, rinsed and drained

Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat. Add cinnamon stick, ginger and garlic. Cook for about a minute. Stir in rice and sauté for two and a half minutes. Add coconut milk, sugar, salt, white pepper, lime zest, along with 3/4 cup of water. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat.. Stir and cover. Reduce heat to low temperature and simmer for 15 minutes. Rice should be light and fluffy. Cover and let sit for seven minutes. Garnish with toasted coconut.


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hat gives? They drink wine, they eat baguette after baguette, they love rich sauces and pasta, they inhale cheese like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s air. Yet, French women tend to look fabulous, and thin, every time you see one out in public. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe me? Go get lost on the subway in Paris and just observe; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m speaking from experience here. Are they really skinny? Maybe. The truth is that the French (and, frankly, the Italians while weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at it) have perfected the art of attitude. Imagine this scene in a Parisian cafĂŠ, related by Debra Ollivier in her book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What French Women Knowâ&#x20AC;? (Putnam, 2009, $24.95): â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gams out to here. Infuriating lack of body fat. An alarming air of insouciance. The whole French package. One sultry look, and legions would follow her to battle.â&#x20AC;? Then this chick eats a huge chunk of bread with a slather of brie, and you can hang your head in despair. Truth is, she just might not be as skinny as you think. Her Ăźberchic outfit (is that vintage Chanel?!) and her attitudeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;what the French call bien dans sa peau (comfortable in your own skin)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;might hide some of her flab. You just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t notice it because she believes sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so fabulous (regardless of age), and therefore so do you. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be honest: A lot of the French do seem very fit with minimum body fat. How does that make sense? Ollivier says that French women know how to â&#x20AC;&#x153;atoneâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;they

may have an amazing and large dinner one night and â&#x20AC;&#x153;eat like a bird the following week to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;deflate.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re great at having small portions of high-fat foodsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and choose quality over the American preference of quantity and super-sized servings. They nibble a small piece of dark Swiss chocolate instead of inhaling half a bag of Oreos. Or they order a divine dessert with two (or more) spoons. A few years back, Marie Claire magazine ran a feature called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wine, Chocolate and Cheese dietâ&#x20AC;? to explore the power of a French diet. In it, dietitian Jackie Newgent and French-diet expert Will Clower, Ph.D., offered variations of these tips: 1. Start believing you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to suffer to be healthy. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to taste awful to be healthy. In fact, French diets donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just help with weight loss; they reduce cholesterol and other risk factors. 2. Know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eating. Slow down and appreciate the spices and other ingredients inside. (And choose foods with ingredients with known names, not long chemical constructions.) 3. Eat â&#x20AC;&#x153;daintily.â&#x20AC;? They advise: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bend the first joint of your thumb. Open your mouth so your top and bottom teeth touch the top of your thumb and that first joint; your bite shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be any larger than this. â&#x20AC;Ś You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taste food well when your mouth is jammed full.â&#x20AC;? 4. Train yourself to be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;serial taster.â&#x20AC;? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat like

some immature people have sex for the first timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by gulping down the food in minutes. Focus on the experience, savor and enjoy. Go the distance. 5. Let your tongue taste the food. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bite into great food like chocolate and cheese; let it melt on your tongue. 6. Spread your calories around the day; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dump most of it into dinner. Healthy snacksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a bit of Camembert and sesame crackers anyone?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;mid-afternoon can make you less famished at night and help keep your energy level high. Stock delicious, healthy snacks at the office. Just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t snack on junk constantly. Not the same thing. 7. Combine carbs and fats, and avoid trendy diets that overload you on one or the otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like the Atkins lunacy. (Think a smallish chunk of good bread and a touch of real sweet butter.) 8. Make red meat a treat. The French tend to eat it only once or twice a month. Then you can use the money you save on good fruit and cheese to eat in smaller amounts. And good wine, of course. 9. Most importantly: Enjoy good meals and stimulating company. And involve the kids in dinner conversation and teach them these French habits early. The mercis will come later.

You might be a foodie if â&#x20AC;Ś

Eating for Heart

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JILL MOTTS

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by LaShanda Phillips

FROM OUR ROASTERY, TO YOUR CUP. voted best coffeeshop in jackson 2003-2011

jacksonfreepress.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel guilt. Whatever I wish to do, I do.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeanne Moreau

by Donna Ladd COURTESY PUTNAM

What Is It About the French?

15


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by Donna Ladd

September 28 - October 4, 2011

16

You need to minimize sugar as well because it â&#x20AC;&#x153;wears on the hippocampus,â&#x20AC;? which is bad (read the book to see why) and leads to cognitive impairment. Avoid refined (white) sugar, sodas and other sugary drinks and refined flour. Choose 100 percent whole grains for your breads, pastas, cookies, etc., instead. Food allergens also hurt your brain: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chronic inflammation, even if relatively mild, is an enemy of the brain.â&#x20AC;? The book advises you to try giving up foods made from gluten, dairy and soy one at a time for a week or two and monitor whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking more clearly. You can also get a formal allergy test through a lab or your doctor. Good, natural supplements can really help brain health as well. You need a high-quality multi-vitamin containing B-12, B-6 and folic acid especially, which helps create those vital neurotransmitters. Everyone should take Omega-3 Fatty Acids, such as a good fish-oil supplement; the DHA is vital for brain development. Vegetarians can take a tablespoon of flaxseed oil daily instead (perhaps with some algae for enough DHA). You also need quality vitamin E in the form of gamma-tocopherol. Check the label; not all E is created equal. The following foods are ideal for improved brain health, Doctors Health Press reports. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scrimp. 1. Berries, especially blueberries (the hippocampus loves them!), strawberries, black currants and boysenberries are fruit for the intellect. 2. Love your Fatty Fish, and all that Omega-3 goodness inside the gills. 3. Green Tea is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s healthiest beverage,â&#x20AC;? and it can wake you up. Try the Japanese Bancha variety if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it to stimulate you too much. 4. Dark chocolate. The good stuff, not Snickers bars. OK, scrimp a little. 5. Grape juice helps with short-term memory (a problem often mistaken for ADHD or that makes you surf the Web

7

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instead of make your dang deadline). It also increases dopamine, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;happiness hormone.â&#x20AC;? 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;An apple a day could keep Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s away,â&#x20AC;? advises Doctors Health Press. And they increase neuroplasticity. (A very good thing.) Organic are best. 7. Leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, turnip greens and collards help improve memory. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cook them to death. Put them in salads; sautĂŠ in pasta and rice. 8. Avocados have 14 minerals, including anti-aging antioxidants, not to mention good fat. Slice and enjoy.

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9. Curry adds spice and intelligence and contains brain-loving curcumin that can reverse brain damage. 10. Coffee, with caffeine (is there any other kind?), contains antioxidants and is good for the brain in moderation. 11. Olive oil helps you score better on mental tests and helps stave off Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 12. Barley seems antiquated, but has improved memory dramatically in studies. Barley flour is a good substitute for wheat. 13. Walnuts will help you feel like anything but a nut.

Feed Your Brainâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;And Your Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FILE PHOTO

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es, Mississippi is the most obese state. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too sedate, and our diets suck. No news there. Last week, though, we learned that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re No. 51 on Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brain Health Index. This is disturbing news. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard about all the neuroscience discoveries of the last two decades, you know how important our brains are to our well-being and happinessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and contrary to convention wisdom, they can keep improving over our entire lifetimes. Or, they can atrophy, leaving us with a disease like Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, or at the least confused, unhappy and mad at the world. But brain health is important for the young, tooâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and can even keep a kid from turning to crime, and it sure can make a difference in the overall status of our state. Put simply: We need smart people to stay here, and we need the people who stay to be smart. The good news is that brain health can be improved through four lifestyle factors, according to the National Center for Creative Aging: physical activity, strong mental health efforts, social well-being and, yes, through a smart diet. (All these factors help reduce obesity and all sorts of other diseases, too; talk about useful multi-tasking.) The book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdomâ&#x20AC;? (New Harbinger, 2009, $17.95) goes into great detail about all the exciting brain discoveries of late and about how meditation and mindfulness can help your brain grow and expand. But it also gives specific advice on what you can eat to help your brain grow stronger in an appendix called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutritional Neurochemistry.â&#x20AC;? There are not a lot of surprises: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat well every dayâ&#x20AC;? is the first point. That means at least three cups of vegetables, or more, of differentcolored veggies. (Each color means a different nutrient.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ideally, half of your plate at each meal will be covered by vegetables of all kinds and colors,â&#x20AC;? the authors write. Fruits are important, too, especially berries of various kinds.

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by Donna Ladd

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Juice vegetables and fruits for a refreshing and healthy beverage.

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y wife looked incredulously at the glass before her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green,â&#x20AC;? she said. This was not the typical cup of coffee I usually bring her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that green lemonade we saw them do on YouTube. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really good,â&#x20AC;? I told her. The ingredients in the plastic cup looked like what is commonly termed â&#x20AC;&#x153;pond scum.â&#x20AC;? The juice was room temperature on a crisp February morning. She sat on the couch looking at my outstretched hand, inspecting the liquid that resembled nothing near what lemonade should look like. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kale,â&#x20AC;? I said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a half bunch of kale, two lemons, two apples and a slice of ginger root. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicious.â&#x20AC;? I had taken a part of the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax refund and splurged on a juicer. It was to be my newest hobby and help fulfill our New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resolution of eating healthier and, hopefully, living longer. We both had friends and relatives who have battled cancer, diabetes and other debilitating diseases. As we tried to learn more about the diseases and causes, we kept returning to the importance of diet and how it affects health. We watched documentaries on Netflix and YouTube on how nutrition plays an important role in health. We learned how making your own juice is a way of delivering the raw foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s micronutrients more

effectively through juicing raw vegetables. Juicing allows them to easily pass into the digestive system and be absorbed by the cells. I grew up on a farm, so the philosophy of eating raw food, uncooked, unprocessed and â&#x20AC;&#x153;nakedâ&#x20AC;? without all the chemicals made sense. Since my first effort with green lemonade, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve expanded and started adding other vegetables to my juicing list: cucumbers, carrots, celery and one of my favorites, sweet potato. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve even added chili and peppers as I experiment, trying to find that perfect morning blend. After some experimentation, this is what I find tastes best to me. And taste is what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about. Blueberries, spinach, cucumbers, carrots, try anything. A lot of the fun is just experimenting with different raw fruits and vegetables and coming up with a flavor that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;yours.â&#x20AC;? While I like the sweetness apple brings to a lemonade, you may like it more sour.

BRETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GREEN LEMONADE 1 bunch of kale, rinsed 2 large lemons (add more if you like it tart) 3 medium Red Delicious apples 2 large cucumbers Ginger root, to taste

Run the ingredients through your juicer, according to instructions. I just put them in without having to peel or cut into pieces because my juicer has a nice wide feed tube. If the pulp from your juicer is too â&#x20AC;&#x153;wet,â&#x20AC;? pass it through again. This will help you get more juice. Rather than discarding the pulp, use it for soup stock or add to the garden as compost. Refrigerate and enjoy a refreshingly healthy juice. Serves 2-3

Donnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Power Smoothie

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by Brett Benson

by Donna Ladd

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17


12:23(1

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Curry is a Techniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ANITA MODAK-TRURAN

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September 28 - October 4, 2011

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With proper gear on, Daddy Modak is ready to cook his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traditional meal.

G

randma Modak, a quiet, kind woman who wore simple white saris, gave my mother a wonderful gift. She taught her how to make mouth-watering curry chicken from West Bengal. Although the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;modakâ&#x20AC;? refers to a sweet dumpling favored by the Hindu god Ganesh, curry chicken defines the Modak side of the hyphen. Making it is a Modak family event that transforms eating into cherished memories of aromatic spices, assigned chopping stations, my dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety goggles (which he defensively says he wears to protect his eyes from splattering oil) and leisurely dinner times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Indian cooking, curry is a technique,â&#x20AC;? says Mama Jacqueline, the family foodie, matriarch and chef extraordinaire. She has passed on Grandma Modakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recipe to my father, who loves to fry anything if he has the proper gear on, who passed it to my brother and me. We, in turn, have passed on this rec-

by Anita Modak-Truran

ipe to our spouses and children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After you fry the potatoes and chicken in the aromatics, you prepare the curry,â&#x20AC;? Mama Jacqueline adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The curry is composed of finely chopped onions, minced garlic, turmeric powder, ginger powder, cumin powder and coriander powder. You also need an acid, such as tomatoes, yogurt or lime juice. I put in lime juice and tomatoes. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need much, though.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The secret is frying the chicken well,â&#x20AC;? she says. She cautions you to balance the potatoes and the chicken. If you are making chicken curry for four people, then use four small potatoes or two big ones.â&#x20AC;? The active ingredient in turmeric, used for over 2,500 years in India, is curcumin. Medical research shows that curcumin is a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent. When combined with cauliflower, it helps prevent prostate cancer. It also may help prevent melanoma and reduce the risk of childhood leukemia, and slow the progression of Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease by removing amyloyd plaque buildup in the brain. Curcumin is a natural painkiller, and it may aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management. This spice also speeds up wound healing, and because of its anti-inflammatory properties, is a natural treatment for inflammatory conditions. Cumin, or Cuminum Cyminum, belongs to family Apiaceae, which has a multitude of reported health benefits, such as aiding digestion, alleviating insomnia, helping to fight viral infections and boosting the immune system. And capsaicin, a potent chemical in hot chili peppers, triggers endorphins,

MODAKSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CURRY CHICKEN Aromatics

1 cinnamon stick 4 to 6 cloves 4 to 6 cardamom seeds, crushed 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed 2 bay leaves

Spices

1 teaspoon turmeric powder 2 teaspoon coriander powder 1 tablespoon cumin powder 1 teaspoon ginger powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1/4 cup or so of peanut oil 1 whole chicken, 3 to 4 pounds 4 small potatoes or 2 large potatoes, peeled and cut in chunks 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 to 3 cloves of garlic, minced 2 to 4 chili peppers (depending on the level of heat you can tolerate) 1 medium tomato, coarsely chopped 1/4 cup of water 1 lime basmati rice

Combine aromatics in small bowl. Combine spices in separate small bowl. In a large pot, add peanut oil to cover

bottom. Heat oil on medium high, then add aromatics and reduce heat to low. As soon as you can smell aromatics, add potatoes, raise heat to medium high and fry until potatoes are lightly browned, which is approximately 10 minutes. Remove potatoes and add chicken. If chicken is sticking to pan, add more peanut oil. Fry chicken over medium high heat until evenly browned, which is approximately 10 minutes. Remove chicken from the pot. Lower heat to medium and scrape the bottom of pan to prevent burning. Fry onions, garlic and peppers until onions are translucent. Add spices and mix. Add chopped tomato and the juice of the lime. Add chicken and potatoes back into pot and carefully mix. Add a quarter cup of water, and bring mixture to boil over medium high heat for approximately 3 to 5 minutes. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until chicken is tender for approximately 40 minutes. Serve over basmati rice. Serves four.


The 10-Day Food Challenge PAUL MARTIN

by Crawford Grabowski

A quick stir-fry with brown rice is a simple â&#x20AC;&#x153;processed-freeâ&#x20AC;? meal.

caused by my struggling to figure out what I was going to eat each day. Somewhere around mid-afternoon during my first â&#x20AC;&#x153;processed food-free day,â&#x20AC;? the headache and major irritability set in. Other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perkiness caused me enormous amounts of distress. Well, OK, perkiness always bothers me, and I guess Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always irritable. My lovely 4-year-old daughter informed me she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like the breakfast cookies I attempted to make. She dubbed them â&#x20AC;&#x153;cat vomitâ&#x20AC;? cookies. I thought her description was quite accurate. I also made whole-wheat blueberry muffins, or rather I made fruitfilled doorstops. The family informed me these were awful, which of course they were.

,

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'

(Serves 4)

2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1-1/2 tablespoon cornstarch (nice, but not necessary) 1 cup water About 1 inch of raw ginger, peeled and grated 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 to 3 tablespoon canola oil 1 small onion, chopped 2 to 3 red or yellow peppers, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 head broccoli, cut into â&#x20AC;&#x153;treesâ&#x20AC;?

In a small bowl, mix together the soy sauce, sesame oil, cornstarch and water to make the sauce. Set aside. Heat oil in a wok or a large skillet. Add ginger and garlic, sautĂŠ for about 30 seconds. Add onions and cook until almost soft. Add remaining veggies; cook, stirring frequently, for another five minutes. Add sauce and toss until the mixture has thickened. This should take about a minute. If you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use cornstarch, cook until the sauce has reduced to about half. The cornstarch thickens the sauce faster and also creates that fancy â&#x20AC;&#x153;shinyâ&#x20AC;? look in the stir-fry. Serve over rice or noodles.

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by Adriane Louie

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FILE PHOTO

The Power of the Family Dinner

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QUICK AND EASY STIR-FRY

Armchair Farmingby Donna Ladd COURTESY SEAL PRESS

F

ood rules? Really? Really. After finding the website 100daysofrealfood.com, which led me to Michael Pollanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food Rules: An Eaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Manualâ&#x20AC;? (Penguin, 2009, $11), I finally got it. While I profess to eat well, a large portion of the time I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. I decided to take the websiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenge and give up all processed foods for 10 days. The general idea was to consume no refined sugars or artificial sweeteners, no refined grains, and nothing pre-packaged containing more than five ingredients. In my world, this translated into no Coca-Cola, no cinnamon rolls and no Cheetos. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had some experience with personal food guidelines; prior to this self-imposed moratorium on processed goods, my â&#x20AC;&#x153;food rulesâ&#x20AC;? consisted of â&#x20AC;&#x153;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat any land animalsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drink anything blue.â&#x20AC;? The second rule was formed in elementary school after a nasty incident involving a blue Icee and a Tilt-a-Whirl. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve managed to avoid most meat-eating and most blue liquids for almost 20 years. I eat lots of vegetables, and I know how to cook. How hard could it really be to go without a few foods for a week and half? I discovered it could be incredibly hard. This experience forced me to realize exactly how much sugar and how many foods with unpronounceable ingredients my family regularly eats. I also discovered that, apparently, my body is rather fond of processed foods. I had a whopper of a headache for about three days. Of course, that pain could have been

Once again, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been reminded that my baking skills are limited. On a positive note, I remembered how easy it is to make a simple stir-fry, which I served over brown rice. Typically, I forgot the lengthier cooking time for brown rice and ended up cooking the plain old white version. I used my home-canned tomatoes another night to whip up a batch of spaghetti sauce filled with red peppers and roasted garlic. The Man even said he could deal with the whole-wheat pasta. I plan to continue with the majority of the dietary changes made the past 10 days. My family likes honey whole-wheat bread (as long as I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it) and is perfectly happy eating brown rice and whole-grain pasta. I think I may have finally kicked the Coca-Cola habit, and I lost weight, too. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, however, think I will stick with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;five ingredients or lessâ&#x20AC;? rule for packaged foods, but I will keep reading labels and pay more attention to ingredients. I also am firmly convinced that some foods taste better with just a tiny amount of sugar. Finally, I think that everyone at my house will be happy to know that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;cat vomitâ&#x20AC;? cookies are a thing of the past. Here is a basic stir-fry recipe that you can adapt to suit your tastes. While I have included specific vegetables in the recipe, I typically use whichever ones I happen to find in the fridge. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also good with shrimp or scallops.

19


Reginaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Solutions

by Andrew Dunaway

ANDREW DUNAWAY

sity. There were several chefs invited, and I was invited to talk about American southern cuisine. We had several events, and almost immediately, I felt very isolated, like no one would sit with me or spend time with me. But the real example was with the taping of our segments. As a courtesy, we were going to each personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taping, but when it came for mine, no one came, and I really got mad, and I left. I complained to everyone that put it together. Looking back, it was really interesting, and I think everyone in life should experience that feeling of being shunned, because it will make you think twice about not being all-inclusive.

Regina Charboneau has returned to Natchez after 20 years honing her culinary skills.

W

ith centuries of history, stories and legends, the stately antebellum homes and ageless oaks of Natchez create a wonderland of southern romanticism. Situated in the middle of it all is the bed and breakfast Twin Oaks (71 Homochitto St., Natchez, 601-445-0038) a classic Greek Revival home. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there that Regina Charboneau, a seventh-generation Natchezian hangs her hat. Like her B&B, Charboneau is full of fascinating stories. After carving a path from Natchez to the wilds of Alaska to La Varenne culinary school in Paris, she opened her own San Francisco restaurants and made stops in Minneapolis, Minn., and New York City for good measure. Charboneau has solidified herself as a revered name in the American culinary landscape. With Alaska, Paris, San Francisco, Natchez and Minneapolis in your background, how would you describe your cooking style? My cooking style was really developed and solidified in San Francisco. I would call it contemporary southern cooking because I always came back to the ingredients I grew up with, like crawfish, shrimp, corn, wild rice,

eggplant and artichokes. I may put a more modern twist on them than what I grew up with, but I started finding that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do the same as everyone else in San Francisco. Would you say that cooking has opened a lot of doors for you? Yes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given me opportunities to meet people like Walter Cronkite and have personal discussions with him. Not only have I met celebrities like Shirley MacLaine, Bob Hope (and) Lily Tomlin but also chefs like Thomas Keller. Name a chef, and I know them at least on a professional level. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looking for these opportunities, but my restaurant, Reginaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at the Regis (in San Francisco), brought them in. Through food, these people came into my restaurant, and coming into my restaurant was like coming into my home. I was not just a chef stuck in the kitchen. I worked every table, and I talked to every guest. Were there any examples of gender bias that you had to overcome in the culinary world? There definitely were, and I have a few examples. In the culinary field, especially in Europe, it was totally male-dominated. I had one bad experience at Oxford Univer-

September 28 - October 4, 2011

Where In The World Is Mimiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s?

20

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The Monterey Bay Aquarium awarded you the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cooking for Solutionsâ&#x20AC;? award for your advocacy in sustainable seafood. How did you come to be such an advocate for that cause? My father (a Louisiana cook) was always seeking the best ingredients, and I got that from him. But being in Alaska, I had the opportunity to experience the freshest seafood possible. That and having a love of being by the water kept me yearning for the best product. But seeing how the popularity of something like redfish or Chilean sea bass has decimated the population helped form my opinion. Does your advocacy for seafood carry over into advocacy for healthy food and organics? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m for organic for lots of reasons, but one is the prevalence of cancer in my family. I know there are some genetic (causes), but there are also some environmental issues. I love organic because I think of not using chemicals. Also, if you look at the dead zone in the gulf, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largely a result of the nitrogen runoff from agricultural chemicals. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve obviously traveled and cooked extensively. Do you have a favorite restaurant in the U.S. or Jackson? What comes to mind when you say that is Union Square CafĂŠ (21 E. 16th St., New York, N.Y., 212-243-4020). â&#x20AC;Ś In Jackson, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parlor Market (15 W. Capitol St,, 601-360-

0090), hands down. Craig Noone is so passionate about his food, and it shows. Through your cookbooks and your articles in The Atlantic Monthly, which is your favorite recipe? My eggplant stuffed with crab meat and my meatloaf, but I got more comments on my meatloaf sandwich article than anything else.

PAN-SEARED SALMON WITH BACON-MOLASSES VINAIGRETTE 8 salmon filets, fresh, 6 to 7 ounces each 2 teaspoons smoked sea salt 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper 4 slices hickory smoked bacon, thickly sliced

Vinaigrette

4 tablespoons aged balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons molasses 1 teaspoon garlic 1 tablespoon minced shallot 1 tablespoon chopped basil 4 tablespoons cracked black pepper 4 tablespoons olive oil

Season salmon filets with smoked sea salt and cracked black pepper. Dice and cook bacon until crisp. Remove cooked bacon and drain on paper towel. Heat the bacon grease over high heat for one minute or until it just begins to smoke. You want the bacon grease hot enough to sear the salmon. Place salmon top-side down for one minute, then turn to other side. The salmon should be crusty on the outside but moist on the inside. Continue this until you have the salmon cooked to your liking, although three minutes is usually perfect. For the vinaigrette, add the ingredients in a blender, and blend until smooth. Place salmon on a bed of greens, drizzle vinaigrette and garnish with crisp bacon. Serves eight.

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Sales experience is great, but not as important as a love for local business, a strong customer service orientation and a desire to be an invaluable part of JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and BOOM Jackson magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success. Commission-driven compensation with serious $$ potential! Send resume and cover letter to

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Hot Home Cookin’ McDade’s offers you Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. Plus whole smoked chickens and ribs daily!

NATURAL GROCERY It’s Not Just What You Eat

Cool Gathering Catering a business meeting? Having friends and family over? Call ahead for a variety of party trays to make your get together a success!

Maywood Mart 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-8486 Woodland Hills Shopping Center Fondren 601-366-5273 English Village 904 E. Fortification St. 601-355-9668 Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089

NOW IN YAZOO CITY!

Rainbow Natur al Grocer y

2807 Old Canton Rd • 366-1602 at Lakeland & Old Canton www.rainbowcoop.org

jacksonfreepress.com

It’s Also What You Cook It In

21


Just In Time For Fall

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ALWAYS FRESH in the

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t isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t common around Jackson for restaurants to change their menus or have seasonal dishes. Below are the exceptions to the rule. Check out these local restaurants already planning fall foods or with changes coming soon. (If no changes are listed, keep an eye out.)

Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | 601-362-9553 www.nandyscandy.com

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â&#x20AC;˘ Amerigo Restaurant (6592 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-977-0563) will have nightly fall specials. â&#x20AC;˘ Basilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (904 E. Fortification St., Suite B, 601-352-2002; 2906 N. State St., 601-

982-2100; 120 N. Congress St., 601944-9888) â&#x20AC;˘ Biaggiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ristorante Italiano (970 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601354-6600) â&#x20AC;˘ Cool Water CafĂŠ (1011 Lake Harbor Drive, Ridgeland, 601-956-6332) order traditional fall favorites like smoked or baked turkey, dressing, cakes and casseroles. â&#x20AC;˘ Local 463 (121-A Colony Crossing, Madison, 601-707-7684) â&#x20AC;˘ Mimiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family and Friends (3139 N. State St., 601-366-6111) â&#x20AC;˘ Mint (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, 601-898-6468) â&#x20AC;˘ Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (3000 Old Canton Road, 601981-8017) is adding duck confit and goat cheese ravioli, made with hickory smoked duck, caramelized onions, butternut squash puree and toasted pumpkin seed oil. â&#x20AC;˘ Underground 119 (119 S. President St., 601-352-2322) â&#x20AC;˘ Parlor Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (115 W. Capitol St., 601-360-0090) menu will have spaghetti squash soup, whole grilled Mississippi bass, and hot and cold foie gras. â&#x20AC;˘ Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In (3016 N. State St., 601-982-2633) â&#x20AC;˘ Que Sera Sera (2801 N. State St., 601981-2520) will have fall comfort foods like bread pudding, red chili, and corn and crab bisque starting in October. Add more fall menu changes and updates at www.jfp.ms.

@JxnRestaurantWk

September 28 - October 4, 2011

Guys, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your favorite part of being a chef in Jackson? #chefchat

22

@steakchef601 #chefchat Jackson has some amazing talent in its restaurants in its chefs and even cooks! Being a part of this great scene is amazing!

@steakchef601 #chefchat The people of Jackson have to embrace change and progression in the food world, Hang with us, Jackson and allow us to play.

@ChefAndyCook Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great place to be a chef, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to engage w/ your customers and to make friends w/ them.

@JxnRestaurantWk Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the most rewarding thing about being a chef, or is there one? ;) #chefchat

@JxnRestaurantWk Do yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all do much farm-to-table menu items? #chefchat

@steakchef601 #chefchat Rewards are usually small wins amongst the major stresses, but to walk in to the dining room and see smiles ... thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the true reward. To make people happy.

@ChefAndyCook Love farm-2-table & feature as many local products as possible: pork, lamb, honey, produce, milk, butter, etc. #ChefChat @hnrsupply What can Jackson do to continue to improve its food scene? #chefchat

@ChefAndyCook Most rewarding thing about being a chef is creating memories. I love being part of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special occasions. Follow @jfpbiteclub for the JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foodie tweets and JFP Bite Club on Facebook.


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

*ACKSON2ESTAURANT7EEK /CTOBER  

Greetings!

for the 2-8, 2011, is the first event of its kind Jackson Restaurant Week, October ll all come we’ k, Wee ant taur Res gural Jackson Jackson Metro area. During this inau food and we hold dear here in Mississippi: our together to celebrate a couple things ark on a s, you’ll have the opportunity to emb our charities. During those seven day out! do good for others by simply eating culinary trail like none other--and to g tWeek.com, review the participatin We hope you’ll visit JacksonRestauran those with son Restaurant Week menus, along restaurant list and their special Jack r Afte l. wel search by price and location as displayed here in this section. You can vote may tastiest dining establishments, you enjoying a meal at one of Jackson’s sissippi nalists: Alzheimer’s Association - Mis for your top charity from our five fi ldren’s Chi of nds & Adoptions (CARA), Frie Chapter, Community Animal Rescue orial Mem rs ghte Hospital), Mississippi Firefi Hospital (Blair E. Batson Children’s . Arts lic Schools - Ask for More Burn Association, and Parents for Pub n as you for the charity of your choice as ofte Unlike most elections, you can vote r favorite you help and n, Week. So eat out ofte can eat out during Jackson Restaurant week! the of end the at up the check for $10,000 charity get the most votes and pick

Happy Eating!

jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press (JFP.ms) - Eat Jackson (EatJackson.com) and

M23


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

JOIN US FOR RESTAURANT WEEK

Lunch Prixe Fixe Menu $15 Course 1: Yam Pak Vegetarian Salad (Fruit and Vegetable Salad with hints of Mint, Basil and Lemon Grass served with a tangy Tamarind Dressing)

Course 2: Choice of Gapow Gai (Minced Chicken Stir-Fry with Spicy Basil served with Jasmine Rice topped with a Fried Egg)

Fried Panko Breaded Pangasius with Sweet Potato Fries, Fuji Apple Slaw and Cilantro Lime Hush Puppies

Course 3: Chai Rice Pudding topped with Chocolate Sprinkles

Dinner Prixe Fixe Menu $25 Course 1: Cucumber Tuna Boat (Tuna Tartar served in a Cucumber Boat)

Course 2: Choice of Asian Ten Spice Salmon with Shitake Risotto and Grilled Asparagus topped with Kaffir Lime Butter Sauce

Wasabi Tournedos served with Cauliflower Mash and Hoisin Glazed French Carrots

Course 3: Fried Banana Fritters

September 28 - October 4, 2011

and Ice Cream with Burnt Honey

M24


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

We invite you to join us for Jackson Restaurant Week.

601-977-0563 6592 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland MS 39157

Char Prix Fixe Dinner Menu $35

Prix Fixe Dinner Menu $25 Appetizer Choices: CHEESE FRITTER

Salad Choices: CAESAR SALAD

Traditional Caesar with Parmesan cheese

SPRING MIX

With roasted bell peppers & red onions

Entreé Choices: CHICKEN ACUTO

Flame grilled chicken topped with a spicy sauce of olive oil, cilantro lemon juice and seasoning server over black bean salsa

LASAGNA

Ricotta, mozzarella, sautéed ground beef layered between fresh pasta

SHRIMP SCAMPI

Over angel hair, white wine garlic butter, scallions and tomatoes

CHICKEN PICATTA

Finished with white wine lemon butter, mushrooms and capers served over angel hair

FLAMED GRILLED SALMON FILET

Topped w/ sun-dried tomato butter over black bean salsa & green beans

Appetizer Choices: BBQ SHRIMP Over grits with mushrooms and spicy creole gasrlic butter sauce SPINACH CRISP Crisp flour tortilla with spinach, bacon & mozzarella with baby greens and tomato basil relish Salad Choices: CHAR SALAD Greens, bacon, egg, cheddar and tomato with your choice of dressing CEASAR SALAD Crisp romaine with Parmesan, croutons and roasted garlic dressing Entree´ Choices CHICKEN Roasted Ashley Farms free range breast over garlic mashed potatoes with asparagus, pearl onions and spring peas in a lemon and herb butter CHI-TOWN SIRLOIN 14 ounce prime sirloin pepper crusted with maitre d’ butter and a loaded baked potato BLACKFISH Pecan encrusted over garlic mashed potatoes with jumbo lump crab and Worcestershire butter sauce SALMON Seared and served over couscous with sautéed shiitake mushrooms, arugula and lemon and tarragon butter sauce Dessert Choices DOUBLE CUT FUDGE BROWNIE PECAN CARAMEL BUTTER CRUNCH

Dessert Choice: TIRAMISU Vanilla cream and Kahlua chocolate

CHAR now caters! 601-956-9562

450001-55 North, Highland Village Jackson, MS 39211

Lunch Prix Fixe Menus also available.

Jackson Restaurant Week Prix Fixe Menu Lunch

Both include choice of Miso Soup or Edamame, Beverage

Lightweight Roll $9 Two Lightweight Rolls $11

Dinner

Both include choice of Miso Soup or Edamame for two and one starter

One Lightweight and one Middleweight roll for $19 Three Half Grand Champion Roll Combo $24 3100 N. State St. Ste 102 | Jackson, Ms 39216 769.216.3574 | fatsumosushi.com

Now Open Monday Lunch

Mon – Thur: Lunch: 11am-2:30pm | Dinner: 5pm-10pm Fri and Sat: 11am - 10pm | Live Music: 9pm-11pm

(a very high-class pig stand)

Best BBQ In Madison Jackson Restaurant Week Fixed Price Menu

$10 Menu (Includes Drink)

“The Sandwich Platter” Includes one sandwich. Your choice of:

Choose two sides:

Smoked Chicken

Slaw

Smoked Pork Shoulder

Potato Salad

Smoked Beef Brisket

American Fries

Smoked Ham

Baked Beans

Smoked Turkey Breast

Sweet Potato Fries

Loaded Hamburger

Baked Potato

Grilled Cheese

Onion Rings

856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

jacksonrestaurantweek.com

Garden Salad

M25


Jackson Restaurant Week menu guide - paid advertising section

Jackson Restaurant Week Prix Fixe Menu $35 Appetizer Choices: Fried Boudin w/ Creole Honey Mustard & house made pickles

NOLA BBQ Shrimp w/ a cornbread Johnny cake and blackened tomato

Sweet Potato Ravioli w/ house made Andouille, pecans, dried cranberries and imported Parmesan.

Entreé Choices: Shrimp & Grits w/ roasted cherry tomatoes, house made bacon, mushrooms, and green peas in Creole Meunière sauce over spicy cheese grits. (SPICY)

Smoked Pork Chop w/ Bourbon-Pear Mostarda, sweet potatoonion gratin, braised greens and fried onions.

Steak “Frites” 10 oz. Hereford Sirloin w/ house cut fries, topped w/ caramelized shallots & sauce Béarnaise.

Redfish Parmesan Parmesan-herb crust, topped w/ Lemon Beurre Blanc. Served w/ roasted garlic mashed potatoes and sautéed broccolini. (also available grilled)

Dessert Choices: White Chocolate & Cranberry Bread Pudding w/ Rum Crème Anglaise.

Lavender Crème Brulee Lavender infused custard w/ caramelized Turbinado sugar crust.

Sweet Potato Beignets w/ MS Bees local honey, powdered sugar and mango compote.

Parker House

September 28 - October 4, 2011

1 0 4 Ea s t Ma d i s o n Dr. Ri d g e l a n d , MS 601.856.0043 www. t h e pa r k e r h o u s e . c o m friend us on facebook & twitter @ParkerHse

M26


Best Pizza 2009-2011 Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily

THURSDAY 9/29

Happy Hour 5:00-6:30PM Daily

Jil Chambless & Scooter

Follow Us 2 Find Out Our 2fer Tuesday Special

The Juvenators

(Traditional Irish Music) FRIDAY 9/30 (Blues)

SATURDAY 10/01

NEW BELHAVEN LOCATION: 925 East Fortification

(in the former Fabricare Building, between Katâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com 2nd Location Now Open Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm |Fri - Sat:11am-10pm | Sun:11am - 7pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

Wine Down Wednesday! Enjoy our new menu of half OFF Bottles! A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977 Lunch: Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Jason Turner Band (Blues Rock)

SUNDAY 10/02

OPEN

MONDAY 10/03

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY10/04

Open Mic hosted by A Guy Named George

ST0LACE

7INGSIN*ACKSON





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Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef Thursday : Chicken Diane or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or Chicken & Dumplings

1896 Main Street, Ste A in Madison

jacksonfreepress.com

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www.thepizzashackjackson.com

601-853-0876 â&#x20AC;˘ mezzams.com

27

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Pescatarian, Thank You

P

eople ask me all the time why I pass up the pork loin. Simply put: I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it. No iota of my palate wants a hot dog, having been denied them nine years and counting. Why I stopped eating meat is more convoluted to answer. As post-industrial consumers, we are more removed from our food sources than earlier generations. I think to eat an animal, you should first know about and accept its life. Livestock that end up in TV dinners have short lives in overcrowded, diseased environments. Not only does this raise serious health concerns, including bacteria, but it holds ethical problems for me. So what about free-range animals? After approving of the conditions in which animals are raised, I think an omnivore should be able to slaughter an animal and gratefully eat it, realizing the sacrifice made for his or her nourishment. I cannot slaughter animals, so I choose not to eat them. Fish are another story. I eat no meat except occasional fish, therefore, I am a â&#x20AC;&#x153;pescatarian.â&#x20AC;? Beans, eggs and soy products are my dietary best friends. Nuts, seeds and whole grains are also vital as vegetarians can quickly encounter a protein deficiency unless they eat these protein-rich foods. Vegetarians who eat a well balanced diet high in protein, dark leafy greens and incorporating some dairy products can receive all the nutrients they need through their food. However, picky eaters and those avoiding all animal productsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;vegansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;can accumulate iron, calcium and vitamin D, vitamin B12 and zinc deficiencies if they are not careful. Because I eat fish, I consume omega-3 fatty acids, an essential nutrient that helps the brain to function and aids FILE PHOTO

by Donna Ladd

Eat Right for Nutrients

by Hannah Vick

normal growth and development. Traditional vegetarians and vegans should consider supplementing this and the other vitamins and minerals with a multivitamin. Red meat has high cholesterol and fat content, and eliminating it can result in health benefits, if people supplement for possible deficiencies. Eating out can be difficult, though many restaurants have vegetarian options other than house salads. I frequently eat at High Noon CafĂŠ (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1513) and Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (4654 McWillie Drive, 601-713-3020) for its veggie burgers. Indian cuisine also has a plethora of delicious vegetarian dishes. Here are a few more of my favorites: for Mediterranean vegetarian options, try Aladdinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (730 Lakeland Drive, 601-3666033; 163 Ridgeway, Suite E, Flowood, 601-992-7340), Petra CafĂŠ (2741 Old Canton Road 601- 366-0161) and Keiferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (705 Poplar Blvd., 601-355-6825; 120 N. Congress St., 601-3534976). For Asian food, try Thai House (1405 Old Square Road, 601-982-9991) and Spice Avenue (4711 Interstate 55 N., 601-982-0890). For pizza try Pizza Shack (1220 N. State St., 601-352-2001; 5046 Parkway Drive, Suite 6, 601-9571975) and Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919) For Mexican, try Babalu Tacos and Tapas (622 Duling Avenue, 601-366-5757). Also, check out Beagle Bagel (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 145, 769-251-1892; 898 Avery Blvd. N. Ridgeland, 601-956-1773); Broad Street (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 101, 601-362-2900) and BRAVO! Italian Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 224, 601982-8111). Visit jacksonfreepress.com/menus for even more

by LaShanda Phillips

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A Content Veggie Life

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Power of Love

by Donna Ladd

L

etâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just be honest. Science frowns on the idea that certain foods have the power to, you know, increase your libido. (If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what that is, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be reading this anyway. Next story.) But many people swear by aphrodisiacs, named in honor of the Greek goddess Aphrodite who, they tell us, knew how to please and be pleased. So even if eating that dark chocolate-dipped strawberry just causes an, uh, rising placebo effect, then the mission is accomplished. And many of these foods also make you smarter and healthier, so you might as well believe. Try these on for size. (So to speak ... ) â&#x20AC;˘ Chocolate (dark with natural ingredients) â&#x20AC;˘ Bananas (especially for men; yes, ironic) â&#x20AC;˘ Oysters (even better delivered with a long string of pearls)

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COURTESY BOOK PUBLISHERS NETWORK

Voted the Best Vegetarian Option Best of Jackson 2011 <5 )"P\!)_\ !&'>[S2P]c^]A^PS % "%% %! 0c;PZT[P]SP]S>[S2P]c^]

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Food Porn by Donna Ladd

2

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jacksonfreepress.com

Chamomile tea has a calming effect.

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;^RP[Ă?>aVP]XRĂ?ETVTcPaXP]

by Valerie Wells

CHINWEI

Mood Food

â&#x20AC;˘ Basil (some people even think they look like a Georgia Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe painting if you get my drift. Each to his own.) â&#x20AC;˘ Figs (maybe this is Eveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fault; she was naked, after all. Until she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.) â&#x20AC;˘ Champagne (well, duh ... Brut, please) â&#x20AC;˘ Cinnamon (better yet, delivered straight to your bed on a breakfast tray) â&#x20AC;˘ Chili pepper (ohh, la, la) â&#x20AC;˘ Mango (messy; remove clothes before peeling) â&#x20AC;˘ Pumpkin (au naturel jack-o-lantern carving anyone?) â&#x20AC;˘ Coconut water (especially if you bathe in it; choose the big tub) â&#x20AC;˘ Honey (you figure out the best recipe for success, and deliver, here) â&#x20AC;˘ Cherries (nuff said) â&#x20AC;˘ Vanilla (as in ice cream made from real vanilla beans; drizzle however you see fit) See more at libido-increasing-food.com.

29


Let There Be Apples

A Food Army COURTESY MISSISSIPPI ROADMAP TO HEALTH EQUITY

children about healthy eating, instruct fitness classes and grow community gardens. Beneta Burt is the executive director of the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity Project. The project started in 2006 as a community initiative to combat obesity with a $1.5 million grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Since FoodCorps volunteers came to Jackson this summer to help us eat better. From left to right is Graham Downey, Abigail Phillips, then, Burt has expanded the organization to proFoodCorps Director Willie Nash, Alex Sligar, Lauren Cioffi. vide a fitness program for ississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fight against obesity got residents, a farmers market with local produce a boost this summer when four and health programs for elementary schools. young volunteers from the New The project also provides free fitness instrucYork City-based nonprofit Food- tors for food-service workers in elementary Corps program chose to come to Mississippi schools, making a huge impact on the stuto promote healthy living. In Jackson, the dents the workers interact with. Mississippi Road Map to Health Equity, a Burt says that adding three members nonprofit located near the Jackson Medical to her team (the other volunteer works with Mall, serves as a host site for the program. the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi) This year, FoodCorps sent 50 volun- has been a tremendous boost to her organiteersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most in their 20sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;-to work at 41 sites zationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts. in 10 states. Four volunteers will spend a year â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has really expanded the mission we in Jackson, working with elementary schools have been trying to accomplish for the past and early childhood education centers to teach year,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is so in sync with our work;

M

by Lacey McLaughlin itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like having a major expansion because we really want and hope we can challenge all schools and urban schools to do a garden. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascinating for kids to see that.â&#x20AC;? FoodCorps is currently working with seven Jackson schools: Lanier High School, Brinkley Middle School and Dawson, Pecan Park, John Hopkins, Brown, Raines and elementary schools. Burt says the program will be in Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early development center by mid-October, and next year, Burt said the program will expand into the Delta. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They will be going into the classroom and actually talking about nutrition education in fun ways for the kids,â&#x20AC;? Burt says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A major part of what they are doing is building and tending school gardens. We are in the process of developing 10 school gardens in the fall, and we will have at least that many for the new school year.â&#x20AC;? The program will also develop compost sites at the schools to enrich the garden soils. Burt says that FoodCorps and the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity are aligned in their missions. The goal is to start with children while they are young and help them develop a passion for healthy eating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to get parents to start cooking a wide variety of vegetables, (serve) fruit and get children accustomed to eating real food,â&#x20AC;? Burt says.

by Donna Ladd

,

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PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

September 28 - October 4, 2011

D

30

o you speak Hospitaliano? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Olive Garden speak for passion for 100% guest delight. Olive Garden is inspired by the Italian culture. That inspiration plus a passion for all things Italian lead them to establish the Olive Garden Culinary Institute of Tuscany, Olive Garden located on the grounds of the Rocca delle Macie winery. In addition, the Italian Chef Council was formed and is a group of chefs based in Italy who meet and collaborate with the Olive Garden executive chefs. Olive Garden even sends a select group of employees each year to the Culinary Institute to become immersed in the culture, gain inspiration, and learn the fundamentals of Italian cooking. To date, more than 1,200 Olive Garden team members have traveled to Tuscany to participate in this experience. What do these chefs bring to the table? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mussels di Napoliâ&#x20AC;? featuring Mussels in the shell, simmered with wine, garlic-butter and onions, Smoked Mozzarella Fonduta, oven-baked smoked mozzarella, provolone, parmesan, and romano cheeseâ&#x20AC;Śand those are just appetizers! Dive in to hearty Italian classics like Lasagna Classico, Linguine alla Marinara, Fettuccine Alfredo and Eggplant Parmigiana. Feeling like something from the Aegean Sea? Give the Shrimp Primavera, Seafood Alfredo, Capellini di Mare, or Grilled Shrimp Caprese a try. Of course, Olive Garden is famous for their unlimited soup, salad, and breadsticks, but with five different, hearty soups to choose from, your meal will be anything but ordinary. Any great Italian meal just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be complete without dessert, or as the Italians say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dolci.â&#x20AC;? Choose from favorites like Tiramisu, the classic Italian dessert featuring a layer of creamy custard set atop espresso-soaked ladyfingers, or Zeppoli, soft, traditional Italian doughnuts dusted with powdered sugar, served with chocolate sauce for dipping. Try something new with options like White Chocolate Raspberry Cheesecake, Lemon Cream Cake, or Black Tie Mousse Cake. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pick just one? Choose the Piccoli Dolci, â&#x20AC;&#x153;little dessert treatsâ&#x20AC;?, layered with cake, mousse, pastry creams, and berries, the best of both worlds! Olive Garden believes that part of the Hospitaliano experience is being immersed and involved in the local communities. A company-wide community relations program called Olive Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasta for Pennies benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. There is even an essaywriting contest, Pasta Tales, to inspire young students. So, the next time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re craving a taste of Italy in Mississippi, say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Caio!â&#x20AC;? to the old standby fast food and say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buongiornoâ&#x20AC;? to Olive Garden!


Eslava’s Grille Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkin’s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011’s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks..

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesi’s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) “Authentic, homey, unpretentious” that’s how the regulars describe Fratesi’s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Petra Café (2741 Old Canton Road, 601-925-0016) Mediterranean and Lebanese Cuisine. Everything from Stuffed Grape Leaves, to Spinach Pie, Shrimp Kabobs, Greek Salads, Hummus and more. Now Open in Fondren! Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

J R W P F M

 C M



(N       )

 - N, J, MS

--

.

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

VASILIOS

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

601-956-5040

• Fresh Seafood Daily

Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

All You Can Eat

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

M-F -, - S - C A

.. |  H M

The Copper Iris Catering Company Inc.

Now Open

For Lunch Downtown Jackson

Soups • Sandwiches Salads • Daily Specials Delivery for orders of 5 or more. 115 North State Street • 601-961-7017 www.thecopperiris.com • Friend Us:

Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

jacksonfreepress.com

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Al’s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment!

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5A44 FX5X

Wings Philly Cheesesteak Gormet Burgers:

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

Turkey, Veggie & Beef

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

Paid advertising section.

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707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries! Wing Station (5038 Parkway Drive Suite 8, 888-769-9464) Home of the famous Janky Wings. Wing Station has an array of wings including Lemon Pepper, Honey BBQ and Blazin Bird Atomic. Delivery is available.

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

The Copper Iris Catering Company (115 N. State St. 601-961-7017) Fresh soups, stacked sandwiches, creative salads and daily hot lunch specials. Recently opened across from Old Capitol; available for catering and office delivery w/min. order. M-F; 11-5. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

September 28 - October 4 2011

BAKERY

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Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.


BOOKS p 34 | 8 DAYS p 35 | MUSIC p 38 | SPORTS p 42

Lavell Crawford’s first full-length album is “Can a Brother Get Some Love?” where he can relax and enjoy himself. But his brutal tour schedule is evidence that, while he’s fully enjoying it, relaxation will not happen anytime soon. Crawford’s 2011 tour includes stops in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Florida, Alabama, Missouri, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, California and Mississippi. And that’s all before New Year’s. Despite his now-lavish road digs, Crawford has a sense of humor about where he came from—the very premise of his new special. “Can a Brother Get Some Love” features

some fantastically self-deprecating sketches, where Crawford walks around his hometown of St. Louis saying “hi” to people while no one recognizes him, or cares to try. “The guy at the rental car place said, ‘I’m gonna hook you up,’ and gave me a ratty old Crown Victoria,” Crawford said, smiling. “I went to my old barbershop. He claimed I owed him money.” Every comedian knows that the proverbial road to success is long and wrought with set backs and disappointments. Crawford is an example of a comedian keeping his nose

down, his head up and his eyes focused on the big time. And no one knows big better than Lavell Crawford. See Lavell Crawford perform Oct. 5 at Jackson State University. To buy tickets ($15 in advance; $20 at the door), visit www.jsums. edu/homecoming. Steve Hofstetter is an internationally touring comedian who has been featured on “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and “E! True Hollywood Story,” among others. To book Steve for your next event, visit PickSteve.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he phrase “larger than life” usually describes an entertainer’s persona on stage, not his physical appearance. For Lavell Crawford, it’s the other way around. Physically, Crawford is a tremendously large man—large enough that I don’t have to describe how large he is. But his voice is calm, reserved and almost small. It’s an incredible experience to sit with someone who could clearly project if he wanted to, but instead keeps fairly quiet and lets his career do the talking. With an hour-long Comedy Central special that aired Aug. 12, coupled with sales of his CD/DVD everywhere from iTunes to Walmart, Crawford’s career has now gotten bigger than the man himself. “Can a Brother Get Some Love?” is Crawford’s first full-length album. The title is appropriate, as Crawford has spent the better part of the last two decades pursuing love from his fans. It’s been 19 years since Crawford’s debut on BET’s “Comicview,” and four years since he came inches away from winning on “Last Comic Standing.” In that time, he has been the definition of a working comic. In between his role on “Breaking Bad” and his multiple appearances on “Comicview,” “Laffapalooza,” “Comics Unleashed” and “Chelsea Lately,” he’s played every dive bar, comedy club and theater across the country. “It’s a nice road,” Crawford said of the long journey from open mics to theaters. “I just stepped out on faith, and it worked.” Well, not right away. Crawford described his salad days (though they were still filled with barbecue). He often slept in his Ford Escort, and he carried a gun for protection. One night, a woman knocked on the glass to see if he was OK. The half-asleep comedian thought he was being robbed, so he took out his .380 and aimed it at her. When he realized what was actually happening, he apologized, thanked the woman and went back to sleep. Crawford started his professional career at the Comedy Caravan in Louisville, Ky., after the club owner saw and liked him and offered him two weeks of roadwork. At the time, Crawford was already familiar with the road—he was working as a crossing guard. “They could definitely see me,” Crawford said, joking about his stature. He referred to himself as “a sweet potato in the middle of the road.” When I caught up with him in Baltimore, Crawford and his entourage were staying in four suites in a four-star hotel. It’s a luxury he has earned, having steadily climbed the ladder from MC to road dog to special event. Crawford is finally at the point in his career

by Steve Hofstetter

COURTESY LAVELL CRAWFORD

Lavell Crawford’s Big Day

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DIVERSIONS|books

by Donna Ladd

Many Kinds of Magic Wednesday, October 5 |11:45 am Jackson Medical Mall Community Room

Great Expectations for Healthy Schools: The Facts on State mandated Sex Education The Mississippi State Legislature passed a mandate this year that requires all public school districts in the state to adopt either an Abstinence ONLY sex education program or an Abstinence PLUS program and they must choose by the end of June 2012. If you are confused about the mandate or concerned about the difference in the programs, join us for Lunch Bunch. Sanford Johnson of Mississippi First will present the facts about the mandate and why it is important that school districts consider the Abstinence PLUS program. Mississippi has the highest teen birth rate in the nation and has staggering sexually transmitted disease statistics among teenagers. Come get information and join this discussion.

Reserve a $5 lunch by calling 601.969.6015 ext 301 or e-mail lcockrell@parents4publicschools.org

September 28 - October 4, 2011

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201 www.ppsjackson.org

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I

COURTESY DOUBLEDAY

LUNCH BUNCH LUNCH

t’s not every day that I pick up a novel that surprises me on every level and sets all my senses on fire. But this happened with “The Night Circus” (Doubleday, 2011, $26.95), the first novel by Erin Morgenstern, a quirky and inventive writer who lives in Salem, Mass. (yes, of witch fame), who studied theater and studio art at Smith College. Maybe all that explains this spellbinding, inventive tale. It opens with sensual mystery: “The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.” From there, the circus becomes the main character in a novel where the human characters are seldom what they seem. This circus, you quickly discover, is propelled by magic. Yes, it has contortionists, magicians, fire-eaters and the like—but the kind who actually have to pretend to be pretending. I first devoured the book due to its ability to create a remarkable virtual world that stimulates on all fronts: visual, smell, sound and, ultimately, a deep, abiding sensuality between a couple who compete through much of the novel in a game that never quite makes sense. It doesn’t matter. It’s the journey and the process that matter in this book—or so you think. I got three-quarters through it simply enjoying this ride in an alternative universe filled with painful love: a delightful carnival where two opponents with remarkable powers develop a passion for each other by constantly creating a new circus spectacle more impossible than the last. The depth of “The Night Circus” snuck up on me as the game it chronicles comes to a climax. I was enjoying the imaginative ride so much that I didn’t really need the book to matter. I just wanted to know what was next; it felt like a pageturner dotted with chocolate and caramel and smelling of hot buttered popcorn. But as the couple locked in a game of someone else’s design became more intertwined in each other’s fate, I started to get it on a visceral level. It was a story about story: the deep and sometimes dark power of compelling narrative to affect lives and effect change. The book almost ends up begging the reader to “interfere” in others’ stories, even as the rules of the circus game say to stay in your own place. Near the end of the novel, the contortionist-with-a-past, Tsukiko, tells one of the competitors: “Old stories have a habit of being told and retold and changed. Each subsequent storyteller puts his or her mark upon it. Whatever truth the story once had is buried in bias and embellishment. The reasons do not matter as much as the story itself.”

I caught my breath as I read those sentences, feeling it more than understanding it. This is a story that earns its moral lessons through, well, pure story. Through its dark appeal, “Night Circus” ends up helping shine a light on the lunacy of wasting one’s life and time in search of immortality: “a terrible thing to seek.” And, we learn, the circus’ magic isn’t all one might hope—not compared to the kind we each possess if we believe we do. “They want to believe that magic is nothing but clever deception, because to think it real would keep them up at night, afraid of their own existence,” a man in a grey suit proclaims just before encouraging a young character, Widget, to consider his own particular magic: his talent. “What is it that you do with that talent?” the man asked. “I tell stories,” Widget answers. The magic, the man responds, is in the stories, leading into a passion that made this storyteller cry as I read it. “It’s in the listener, and for each and every ear it will be different, and it will affect them in ways they can never predict. From the mundane to the profound. You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift.” “There are many kinds of magic, after all,” he adds. And then I knew what was special about this crazy circus and its supernatural characters. It was a damn fine story, and that was everything it needed to be. Erin Morgenstern signs and reads from “The Night Circus” starting at 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 3 at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., 601-3667619). Call ahead to reserve your copy.


BEST BETS Sept. 21 - Oct. 5, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

STERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

Historian Gene Dattel speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Call 601-576-6998. … See art from regular contributors such as Tony Davenport and Christy Henderson at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-362-8484. … Doug Frank’s Blues Jam is at 7 p.m. at F. Jones Corner. … Leon Redbone performs at 7:30 p.m. at Saenger Theater (201 Forrest St., Hattiesburg). $20; call 800-638-6877. … Crooked Creek is at Underground 119. … Ole Tavern and Pop’s have karaoke. … Snazz is at Fuego. … The open jam with Will and Linda is at Pelican Cove. … Barry Leach is at Hal & Mal’s. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike.

FRIDAY 9/30

Jill Connor Browne hosts the Purple for Peace luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). $25 includes raffle entry; call 601-981-9196. … Jackson Bike Advocates’ Community Bike Ride kicks off at 6 p.m. at Rainbow Whole Foods Co-operative Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; visit facebook.com/jacksonbikeadvocates. … Jazz Night Live is at 7 p.m. at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Jazz Beautiful with Pam Confer performs. $12; call 601-362-8484. … The weekly Arabian dance party is at 7:30 p.m. at Petra Cafe (2741 Old Canton Road). No cover. … Dreamz JXN hosts Can’t Feel My Face Friday. … The Molly Ringwalds play at Fire. … The Juvenators are at Fenian’s. … Pelican Cove has music from Fides. … Matt Gilmer performs at Fatsumo (3100 N. State St.).

SATURDAY 10/1

The Fondren Renaissance Foundation hosts a White Elephant Sale at 8 a.m. at Fondren Hall (Northwood Shopping Center, 4436 N. State St.). $2, $5 for 7 a.m. admission; call 601-981-9606. … The 4 the Record Swap Meet is at 10 a.m. at North Midtown Arts Center. $4, children under 12 free, $20 vendors; call 601-376-9404. … The Town Creek Arts Festival kicks off at 10 a.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. … The Jackson Air Show is at 11:30 a.m. at Hawkins Field (Industrial Drive). Free; call 601-644-3544. … The PM BBQ Birthday Bash at Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St.) is at noon. $10, $15 with T-shirt; call 601-360-0090. … At Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.), the swing workshop is at noon ($15), and Burn the Dance Floor is at 7 p.m. ($10, $5 with college ID). Call 601213-6355. … The Spencers: Theatre of Illusion is at Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center (4908 Ridgewood Road). $20-$30; call 601-364-5416. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents Chamber I: Baroque Gems at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). $15 and up; call 601-960-1565. … Scott H. Biram and Hank Overkill perform at the Duling Hall Concert Series at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Doors open at 7 p.m. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601-316-4243. J. Lee Productions (Jimmie Lee pictured) presents the play “Everyone Plays the Fool” at 7 p.m. Oct. 2 at Jackson State University.

VIP Grand Events hosts the Fall Tasting Event at 4 p.m. at Plantation Commons (105 Plantation Drive, Madison). Free; call 601-713-4040. … The annual Conversation About Community is at 6 p.m. at the King Edward Hotel in the Grand Ballroom. JFP editor Donna Ladd moderates the talk featuring Glenda Glover and Jim Barksdale. Proceeds benefit Operation Shoestring. $50; call 601-353-6336. Limited tickets. … The Latin American Independence Celebration is at 6 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Proceeds benefit Holy Child Jesus School. Free, donations welcome; call 601-906-1736 or 443786-7047. … The Art Garden Opening Gala is at 7 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). $150; call 601-960-1515. … Last Call hosts Cigars Under the Stars.

The benefit concert for Terry’s Cabins flood victims is at noon at Shucker’s. $10, food prices vary; call 601-853-0105. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) includes the films “The Barber of Seville” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “Beats, Rhythms and Life” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfim.org. … The Oktoberfest Beer Tasting is at 3 p.m. at Sal & Mookie’s. $25; call 601-368-1919. … Little Big Town performs at 6 p.m. at MSU Riley Center (2200 5th St., Meridian). $58, $52; call 601-696-2200. … Jackson State University’s homecoming celebration kicks off with the play “Everyone Plays the Fool” at 7 p.m. at Jackson State University, Rose E. McCoy Auditorium (1400 John R. Lynch St.). $15 in advance, $20 at the door, $5 student discount with ID; call 601-706-9152; visit jleeplays.com. More homecoming events at jsums.edu/homecoming.

MONDAY 10/3

The HeARTS Against AIDS RED Party is at 5 p.m. at BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 244) and includes free wine, a cash bar and a silent auction. $40, $75 couple; call 601259-6768; visit mississippihearts.org. … Caravan of Thieves performs at 7 p.m. at Fuego. $5.

TUESDAY 10/4

Jesse Robinson and Friends are at Underground 119 at 6 p.m. $5. … The “Expose Yourself to Craft” Calendar Reveal Party is at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Craft Center (350 Rice Road, Ridgeland). $40; call 601-856-7546.

WEDNESDAY 10/5

Celebrate Archaeology Month during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Call 601-576-6998. … Shaun Patterson is at Buffalo Wild Wings. More events and details at jfpevents.com. Caravan of Thieves performs at 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at Fuego. COURTESY ARDEN BARNETT

THURSDAY 9/29

SUNDAY 10/2

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 9/28

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jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Radio JFP on WLEZ, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is Julian Rankin of the Town Creek Arts Festival. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Listen to podcasts at jfpradio. com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Latin American Independence Celebration Sept. 29, 6 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The event includes networking, food, a silent auction and dance demonstrations. Proceeds benefit Holy Child Jesus School. Free, donations welcome; call 601-906-1736 or 443-786-7047. Town Creek Arts Festival Oct. 1, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). See works by 40 Mississippi artists and craftsmen. Children’s activities, food vendors and music included. Free; call 601-960-1515. Conversation About Community Sept. 29, 6 p.m., at King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.), in the Grand Ballroom. Enjoy dinner, drinks, music, video segments and a panel discussion. JFP editor-in-chief Donna Ladd is the moderator, and panelists include Jim Barksdale and Dr. Glenda Glover. Proceeds benefit Operation Shoestring. Wear business attire. Limited tickets. $50; call 601-353-6336.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). • Homecoming Celebration Oct. 2-8. Highlights include the stage play “Everyone Plays the Fool” Oct. 2; a fashion show Oct. 3 with Keshia Knight-Pulliam (“The Cosby Show”) as the host; a street jam Oct. 4; a comedy show Oct. 5 and a Greek step show Oct. 6. Oct. 8, the homecoming parade is at 9 a.m. on Capitol St., and the football game against the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.) is at 4 p.m. Visit jsums.com/ homecoming for specifics. Admission varies, some events free; call 601-979-0289. • Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Symposium Oct. 5-6, in the Dollye E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building. The theme is “We Are Not Afraid: Youth Activism and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle.” Free; call 601-979-1562. Power Up Speaker Series Sept. 28, 11:30 a.m., at University Club (210 E. Capitol St. Suite 2200). Cornelius Lindsey speaks on the topic “Brand New You: How to Create, Develop and Market Your Personal Brand.” RSVP; limited seating. $12 (cash only), $10 members; call 601-969-4011, ext. 235. Jobs for Jacksonians Job Fair and Business Engagement Summit Sept. 28, noon, at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Learn more about job openings and get job hunting tips. Call 601-982-8467 or 601-960-0326.

September 28 - October 4, 2011

“History Is Lunch” Sept. 28, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Historian Gene Dattel discusses Kathryn Stockett’s novel “The Help.” Bring a lunch; coffee and water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998.

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Women’s Fund Annual Meeting Sept. 28, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free appetizers included. RSVP. Free; email promise@womensfundms.org. “The Right Way to Start a Nonprofit” Workshop Sept. 29, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (921 N. President St., Suite C). Learn how to legally solicit funds. $100; call 601-968-0061. Naturalization Workshop Sept. 29, 2 p.m., at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (612 N. State St.). Applicants must be lawful permanent residents for the last five years, or three years if married to and living with a U.S. citizen. $60 MIRA membership, $140 N-400 application; call 601-968-5182.

Fall Tasting Event Sept. 29, 4 p.m., at Plantation Commons (105 Plantation Cove, Madison). VIP Grand Events hosts the event. Sample menus and get entertaining advice. Free; call 601-713-4040. Generation “TEXT”: Your Kids On Technology Sept. 29, 5:30 p.m., at Hinds Behavioral Health Services (3450 Highway 80 W.), in the conference center. Learn how to protect your children from excessive texting and gaming, cyberbullying and “sexting.” Free; call 601-321-2400. “Privacy, Publicity and Intellectual Property: Issues Underlying ‘The Help’ Controversy” Sept. 29, 5:30 p.m., at Butler Snow (1020 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). $15, free for members; call 601-355-9226. Purple for Peace Sept. 30, 11:30 a.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). Jill Conner Browne hosts the luncheon. Anti-violence advocate Tony Porter is the speaker. Pat Flynn is the honoree. $25 (includes raffle entry); call 601-981-9196. Community Bike Ride Sept. 30, 6 p.m., at Rainbow Whole Foods Co-operative Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road). Jackson Bike Advocates is the sponsor. Visit facebook.com/jacksonbikeadvocates. Mississippi Minority Business Alliance Awards Gala Sept. 30, 6 p.m., at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Proceeds go toward college scholarships for disadvantaged youth. $100; call 601-965-0365.

BE THE CHANGE Events at Renaissance (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). • Fur Ball Sept. 29, 7 p.m. Enjoy food, a silent auction and music from The Chill. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Animal Rescue League. $60, $110 per couple; call 601-896-5157. • Walk to End Alzheimer’s Oct. 1, 9 a.m. Walkers who raise at least $100 receive a T-shirt. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. Free, donations welcome; call 601-987-0020. Zumbathon Fundraiser Sept. 30, 6 p.m., at Courthouse Racquet and Fitness Club, Brandon (255 MarLyn Drive, Brandon). Proceeds from the Zumba fitness party benefit Butterflies By Grace Defined by Faith, an organization that supports domestic violence victims. $15; call 601-209-7566. Flood Victims Benefit Concert Oct. 2, noon, at Shucker’s Oyster Bar (116 Conestoga Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy music, raffles, beer specials and food. Proceeds benefit residents at Terry’s Cabins. Donations welcome, food prices vary; call 601-853-0105. Walk for Diabetes Oct. 2. 2 p.m., at Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance (1401 Livingston Lane). Registration starts at 1 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi. $20 minimum donation; call 601-957-7878. HeARTS Against AIDS RED Party Oct. 3, 5 p.m., at BRAVO! Restaurant (4500 Interstate 55 N., suite 244). The fundraiser includes a cocktail hour, music and a silent auction. Advance ticket purchase recommended. $40, $75 couple; call 601-259-6768. Habitat for Humanity-Metro Jackson 25th Anniversary Gala Oct. 4, 6:30 p.m., at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). The organization honors board member and former Mississippi First Lady Elise Winter. Proceeds go toward the construction of the 501st Habitat home. $100; call 601-940-4950. • Women’s Health Day. Sign up for health screenings, and attend a breast cancer seminar at 11:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. ($5 optional lunch). Free; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262.

White Elephant Sale Oct. 1, 8 a.m., at Fondren Hall (Northwood Shopping Center, 4436 N. State St.). Purchase unique merchandise from local merchants. $2, $5 for 7 a.m. admission; call 601-981-9606.

Open House Sept. 28, 5 p.m., at The Healing Arts Group (2626 Southerland St.). Learn more about the group’s alternative heath services. Call 601-6136040 or 601-500-0337.

Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk Oct. 1, 8 a.m., at Mayes Lake at LeFleur’s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Adults must accompany children. Free, $3 car entrance; call 601-956-7444.

Wellness Walk Oct. 1, 8 a.m., at Rogers Park (George Washington St., Canton). Cyclists welcome. Free; email joycehamme@comcast.net.

Jackson Air Show Oct. 1-2, at Hawkins Field (Industrial Drive). Watch aerobatic performances. Lawn chairs welcome. No coolers, tents or pets allowed. Free; call 601-644-3544.

“A Healthier You” Workshop Oct. 1, 10:30 a.m., at Butterfly Yoga (3025 N. State St.). Learn about yoga and power foods. Raw food lunch. $90; visit liverightnowonline.com/workshop-a-healthier-you.

PM BBQ Birthday Bash Oct. 1, noon-midnight, at Parlor Market (115 W. Capitol St.). The restaurant celebrates its first birthday with a dinner and music. $10, $15 with T-shirt; call 601-360-0090.

SMHART Institute Mental Health Conference Oct. 5-7, at Golden Moon (Highway 16 W., Choctaw). Judge Lynn Toler (“Divorce Court”) is the keynote speaker. $50, $75 with CEU credits, $25 students; call 601-979-1531.

Bailey Magnet High School Car Wash Oct. 1, noon, at Kolb’s Grand Cleaners, Fondren (2933 N. State St.). The Senior Class Booster Club is raising funds for their class trip. Donations welcome; call 601-960-5343.

STAGE AND SCREEN

Oktoberfest Beer Tasting Oct. 2, 3 p.m., at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St.). Enjoy autumn beer samples and snacks. $25; call 601-368-1919. Blessing of the Animals Oct. 2, 4 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). Pets should be on leashes. Bring pet food donations for local shelters. Call 601-354-1535. Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Oct. 3, 6 p.m., at River Hills Country Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). This week’s speaker is Ole Miss athletic director Pete Boone. $280 individual membership, $1200 corporate membership; call 601-506-3186. First Tuesday Lecture Oct. 4, noon, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Dr. Ruth Carmichael is the speaker. $4-$6, children under 3 and members free; call 601-354-7303. National Night Out Oct. 4, 6 p.m., at Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers Market (2548 Livingston Road). The block party is part of a national campaign to fight neighborhood crime. Free; call 601-982-8467.

WELLNESS Events at Baptist for Women (1225 N. State St.) Sept. 30, by appointment. • Operation Bloom Free Breast Cancer Screenings. Participants receive a free clinical breast exam and recommendations for follow-up care. Insurance not required. Free; call 601-939-9778.

“Annie” Dog Auditions Sept. 22, 6 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.), in the parking lot. The dog must follow commands, be well-behaved and be on a leash. Call 601-948-3533, ext. 224. The Spencers: Theatre of Illusion Oct. 1, 7 p.m., at Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center (4908 Ridgewood Road). The Spencers levitate and walk through walls. $20-$30; call 601-364-5416. “Phantom of the Opera 25th Anniversary Live” Oct. 2, 1 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $20, $19 seniors and students, $18 children; call 601-936-5856. Art House Cinema Downtown Oct. 2, 2 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Films include the opera “The Barber of Seville” at 2 p.m. ($16) and the musical “Beats, Rhythms and Life” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org. Film Forward Film Screenings Oct. 2-6, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) and Mississippi e-Center at JSU (1230 Raymond Road). Free; visit sundance.org/filmforward/ticket-info. “Everyone Plays The Fool” Oct. 2, 7 p.m., at Jackson State University, Rose E. McCoy Auditorium (1400 John R. Lynch St.).Student tickets sold at the Student Center. $15 in advance, $20 at the door, $5 student discount with ID; visit jleeplays.com.

MUSIC Jazz Night Live Sept. 30, 7 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Enjoy the

sounds of Jazz Beautiful featuring Pam Confer, a cash bar and light snacks. $12; call 601-362-8484. 4 the Record Swap Meet Oct. 1, 10 a.m., at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). Buy, sell or trade records, and enjoy music. $4, children under 12 free, $20 vendors; call 601-376-9404. Chamber I: Baroque Gems Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol Street). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs. $15 and up; call 601-960-1565. Duling Hall Concert Series Oct. 1, 9 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Scott H. Biram and Hank Overkill perform. $10 in advance, $15 day of show; call 601-353-0603 or 800-745-3000. Music in the City Oct. 4, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. Tom Lowe and John Paul perform. Free, donations welcome; call 601-354-1533.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Book Signings at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Readings at 5:30 p.m. Call 601-366-7619. • Sept. 29, 5 p.m., Christina Hellmich signs copies of “Al-Qaeda: From Global Network to Local Franchise.” $19.95 book. • Oct. 3, 5 p.m., Erin Morgenstern signs copies of “The Night Circus.” $26.95 book. • Oct. 4, 5 p.m., Joe Lee sign copies of “The Long Road Home.” $22.95 book.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Art Garden Opening Gala Sept. 29, 7 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Executive chef Luis Bruno prepares dinner, and the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs. $150; call 601-960-1515. “Expose Yourself to Craft” 2012 Calendar Reveal Party Oct. 4, 7 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). $40 (includes calendar); call 601-856-7546. October Art Show Oct. 1-31, at Brown’s Fine Art (630 Fondren Place). See works by Dick Ford and Michelle Allee 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. Free; call 601-982-4844. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Friday, Sept. 30 - Thursday Oct. 06 2011 50 / 50 Dream House

R PG13

Courageous PG13 What’s Your Number?

$9 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Mu s i c L i s t i n g s

SEP 28 | Brian Jones 9:30p SEP 29 | Chad Perry 9:30p SEP 30 | Open Road 9:30p OCT 01 | Dazework 9:30p OCT 04 | Open Mic w/ Kenny Davis & Brandon Latham 9p

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

Moneyball

PG13

Killer Elite

R

Dolphin Tale 3-D PG Abduction Straw Dogs

PG13

R

I Don’t Know How She Does It PG13 3-D The Lion King G The Lion King (non 3-D)

G

Contagion

PG13

Warrior

PG13

Colombiana PG13 The Help

PG13

R

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

Daily Lunch Specials - $9

R

Drive

37


DIVERSIONS|music

Glasgow: Classic(al) Rock

S

Natalie’s Notes by Natalie Long

September 28 - October 4, 2011

38

Glasgow is, from left, Jack Craft, Alexis Marceaux, Sam Craft, Jon Arceneaux and George Elizondo.

agency hiring headliners for conventions and events. Sam Craft is frontman, manager and janitor of Glasgow. Oct. 8 will be Glasgow’s second appearance at Ole Tavern. “We just love the Jackson audience: always ready to dance, always ready to listen…if people are ready to have a good time, we are ready to bring it,” Sam Craft said. The band generally plays a majority of original music, with covers mixed in the set sparsely.

Glasgow may self-promote to labels, instead of using a publishing company, after it completes its ambitious acoustic rock opera, “1986.” The large-scale, continuous album intends to realize the marriage of hallowed classical tradition with the band’s contemporary rock flavor. Set in 1986 America, the opera follows the redemptive tale of politically involved Joseph and prostitute Mary. “1986” promises to diversely address contemporary issues of politics, religion and relationships in longstanding, academic genre. Glasgow recently released a preview EP but is taking its time to complete the opera and to do it right. Marketing this “nerdy and erudite” style to live gigs can be challenging. “Glasgow’s hard to find a niche for,” Sam Craft said. “We don’t look at it as a challenge or work,” Craft adds, even though the members put much time and energy into the band. “… We feel gross when we’re not doing something with the band … (and) can’t sleep at night. It’s not a matter of trying to balance different things going on in your life, because we’ll find the energy to make the band work.” Craft equated Glasgow to a child, saying: “It doesn’t matter if he’s a failure, you still love him, you’d still do anything for him. It will always exist in some way shape or form, because we’ll always keep it going out of love.” The hard work is paying woff. Glasgow performed at New Orleans’ Voodoo Music Experience in 2009 and at Austin, Texas, festival South by Southwest in 2010. Next ambition: Carnegie Hall. Check out Glasgow at 10 p.m. Oct. 8 at Ole Tavern (416 George St., 601-960-2700). Cover is $5. For more info, visit glasgowband.net. Glasgow’s music is available for download on iTunes.

Back Roads of Righteousness

Oakes and Brady Bagwell as vocalists, the late Don Hull on bass and David Johnson on drums. Once the lineup was intact, the band successfully collaborated on their 2009 debut album, “Mississippi Nights,” recorded at Route One Recording in Monticello, and co-produced by indie-music engineer Chris Hudson, co-owner of Black Dog Records. Hardcore outlaw-country and southern-rock enthusiasts graciously received the album, and it continues to climb the charts on CDBaby and iTunes. When “Mississippi Nights” was released to the public, The 484 South Band had the opportunity of opening for the Eli Young Band, performing for the thousands of marathon runners at the New Orleans Rock and Roll Marathon, and being the headlining band of the Atwood Music Festival in Monticello. The band is headlining the Rockin’ Railroad Festival in Hazlehurst Oct. 1, and its highly anticipated sophomore album, “The Backroads,” has a tentative release date in December of this year.

COURTESY THE 484 SOUTH BAND

W

hile The 484 South Band claims to have started in 2005, it really began 20-something years ago in the small paper-mill town of Monticello, Miss. There, two local boys, Jim Oakes and Keith Schultz, roamed the high-school halls doing what many south Mississippi teens do at that age: flirt with girls, ditch class, and drive on the back roads with classic rock and country blaring from the car stereo. Oakes went on to raise a family in Monticello, becoming a teacher and artist (he designed CD covers for bands such as The Juvenators, Cary Hudson and John Stirrat of Wilco fame). Schultz became a successful chemical engineer and musician in Baton Rouge, La. But their childhood friendship and their love of music never waivered. Schultz and former south Mississippian Twain Pigott started the band in 2005, and they performed in various venues in the Baton Rouge area. With their popularity growing, the band did, too. Pigott and Schultz, both guitarists, added

inspirations. The TV show “Seinfeld” and the board game “Catchphrase” also influenced the band members. While Arceneaux and Elizonbo balance working odd jobs and gigs, they also study jazz and psychology at the University of New Orleans. Marceaux files for law firms by day before swinging musically between Glasgow and her solo endeavors by night. Jack Craft works for a talent COURTESY GLASGOW

itting with a guitar in lap and notepad on the ground awaiting inspiration is a luxury foreign to Sam Craft. Instead, an idea will hit him while driving down the freeway or when he’s in a complicated social setting. When he is finally able to rush home, Craft struggles to remember the elusive idea. He characterizes his creative process as 5 percent divine, 95 percent hard work. “I have this tiny popsicle stick of an idea, and it’s my duty then to build up more of these popsicle sticks until I’ve built a ‘house,’ that’s (actually) a song, … whittle it away and work until it’s built up into something significant,” he says. Craft’s band, Glasgow, began with Sam Craft, 24, making music with his brother, Jack Craft, 25. The brothers followed their mother’s musical tradition when they graduated from Loyola University in 2009 with degrees in cello and violin performance, respectively. The Crafts joined drummer Jon Arceneaux and bassist George Elizonbo, both 21, who were serendipitously between bands. Vocalist Alexis Marceaux, 22, trained at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts along with the Crafts and Arceneaux and completes the current Glasgow configuration, which is two years old. Though all members are New Orleans born and bred—except Elizonbo, who is from Nicaragua—Glasgow’s musical style markedly veers from the music that surrounds the band. Refusing to trumpet (literally) their Louisiana heritage sets Glasgow apart from its contemporaries. Glasgow is musically universal, though other collaborations between band members clearly embrace Cajun and folk influences. The members of Glasgow all cite Electric Light Orchestra, and Emerson, Lake and Palmer as musical

by Hannah Vick

The 484 South Band performs at Hal & Mal’s Friday, Sept. 30, in the Red Room.

While The 484 South Band’s lineup has made some major adjustments (in 2010, Pigott and Bagwell left to spend more time with their families, and Hull died unexpectedly), the band has never faltered or tried to call it quits. With fresh, new “best-kept-secret” kinds of talent like Phil Cangelosi on vocals and guitar, Sidney Babin on bass and Andrew Price on rhythm guitar, The 484 South Band is barreling down the back roads of righteousness, preaching the verses of the artists who

inspired them to make real music—and, of course, a dash of south Mississippi hell raising for good measure. The 484 South Band performs in the Red Room at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888) Friday, Sept. 30, with Jon Clark opening. And don’t forget to check out my Pine Belt peeps, The Thomas Jackson Orchestra, performing in Hal & Mal’s restaurant the same night. For more info about The 484 South Band, order a CD, check out the band’s gig schedule and more, visit 484southband.com. Please come out to support Mississippi homemade music and musicians (who are incredibly talented and the nicest guys ever). Visit jfpmusic.com for more acts playing in and around Jackson. And please continue to send your music listings as far in advance as you can to music@jacksonfreepress.com. The more notice I have for your performances, the better chance you have for being chosen in our “Eight Days” section. Stay classy, Jackson, and if you see me out and about, please say hello!


SEPT. 28 - WEDNESDAY )-RQHV&RUQHU*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH EOXHVOXQFK $OUG &RANK´S"LUES*AMSP 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE )LW]JHUDOG¶V*AZZ"EAUTIFULW 0AM#ONFER 3HOLFDQ&RYH/PEN*AMW7ILL ,INDA 8QGHUJURXQG#ROOKED #REEK ,ULVK)URJ-EAGAN-AY SP )XHJR¶V3NAZZ +DO 0DO¶V"ARRY,EACH 2OJD¶V*ASON4URNER .DWKU\Q¶V2ENEGADE 6DHQJHU7KHDWHU+DWWLHVEXUJ ,EON2EDBONESP

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OCT. 1 - SATURDAY

060XVHXPRI$UW4OWN#REEK !RTS&ESTIVAL 0DUWLQL5RRP5HJHQF\3OULFUL 3ATURDAYSSP &KDXWDXTXD3DUN&U\VWDO 6SULQJV062OCK4HE 0ARKPRESENTS-USIC7ITHA -ISSION4OUR&IREFLIGHTW 3UPERCHICK 1RUWK0LGWRZQ$UWV&HQWHU 4HE2ECORD6INYL3WAP WKHUHFRUGVZDSFRP +RW6KRWV%\UDP+ARAOKE SP )-RQHV&RUQHU#HAD7ESLEY "ANDSP 'XOLQJ+DOO$XGLWRULXP)RQGUHQ 3COTT("IRAMW(ANK /VERKILLSPDGY GRRU 0DUWLQ¶V-OON4AXI 6KXFNHU¶V#UCHO4HE,EADING %DGE"ANDSP 5HHG3LHUFH¶V4RADEMARK SEPT. 30 - FRIDAY (OHFWULF&RZER\(ILLCREST +LOWRQ-DFNVRQ-3#OALITION 2OH7DYHUQ,IGHTNIN-ALCOLM !GAINST$OMESTIC6IOLENCE´S 6DP¶V"AILEY"ROTHERS 0URPLEFOR0EACEFEATTHE )HQLDQ¶V*ASON4URNER"AND -AGNOLIA3TRING1UARTET +DO 0DO¶V3OUL4RACK-IND DPSP 55

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OCT. 2 - SUNDAY +RW6KRWV%\UDP-IKEAND -ARTY´S*AM3ESSION 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ+NIGHT "RUCEDP EUXQFK

.LQJ(GZDUG+RWHO(OWARD *ONES*AZZDP EUXQFK

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LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

9/28

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE

OCT. 3 - MONDAY +DODQG0DO¶V#ENTRAL-3 "LUES3OCIETYSP 0DUWLQ¶V/PEN-IC&REE*AM )HQLDQ¶V+ARAOKE %XUJHUV %OXHV+ARAOKE 2OH7DYHUQ0UB1UIZ )XHJR#ARAVANOF4HIEVES SP

THURSDAY

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

September 29

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache

LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday

September 30

9/29

$1.50 LONGNECKS, $3 WELL DRINKS, $4 SELECT CALL DRINKS, $5 JAGERBOMBS

OCT. 4 - TUESDAY )-RQHV&RUQHU(OUSECAT EOXHV OXQFK  +DO 0DO¶V0UB1UIZ 2OH7DYHUQ/PEN-IC )HQLDQ¶V/PEN-IC %XUJHUV %OXHV*ESSE±'UITAR² 3MITH 8QGHUJURXQG*ESSE 2OBINSON&RIENDS EOXHV  SP 7LPH2XW/PEN-IC.IGHT )LUH/PEN-IC#OMEDY.IGHT 3LJ6KDN3HAUN0ATTERSON ,ULVK)URJ+ARAOKE

FRIDAY

9/30

Purpertrator SATURDAY

10/1

Moon

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Callooh! Callay! w/ The Underhill Family Orchestra

Saturday

OCT. 5 - WEDNESDAY 2OH7DYHUQ+ARAOKE 3RS¶V6DORRQ+ARAOKE 3KLOLS¶VRQWKH5H]+ARAOKEW $*-IKE )LW]JHUDOG¶V*AZZ"EAUTIFULW 0AM#ONFER 3HOLFDQ&RYH/PEN*AMW7ILL ,INDA 8QGHUJURXQG3HANE &RAZIER %XIIDOR:LOG:LQJV3HAUN 0ATTERSON )HQLDQ¶V4OMMY3CARPINATO 4AMMY'OLDEN +DO 0DO¶V3EAN"RUCE )XHJR3NAZZ

-EAT0UPPETS 4HE7EEKS±%RWWOH7UHH%LUPLQJKDP 3CHEIDT-USIC3CHOOLWITH!ARON.EVILLE±&DQQRQ&HQWHUIRUWKH3HUIRUPLQJ$UWV 0HPSKLV 7IDESPREAD0ANIC±)HG([)RUXP0HPSKLV 2OCK0RESENTS./,!2OCKS±+RXVHRI%OXHV1HZ2UOHDQV $EATH#ABFOR#UTIE±0XG,VODQG$PSKLWKHDWUH0HPSKLV

Weekly Lunch Specials

Taxi

MONDAY

10/3

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

10/4

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR WEDNESDAY 10/5

October 1

Lightning Malcolm Monday

October 3

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

October 4

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

October 5

KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

w/ DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE

Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

LADIES NIGHT 214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

39


venuelist

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 9/28 Barry Leach (rest)

NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS

THURSDAY 9/29

Wednesday, September 28th

Restaurant & Bar Open with

CROOKED CREEK

Extended Happy Hour

(Bluegrass) 8-11, No Cover

FRIDAY 9/30

Thursday, September 29th

Thomas Jackson Orchestra (rest) The 484 South Band w/ special guest Jon Clark (rr)

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

BARRY LEACH

Friday, September 30th

SATURDAY 10/01 Soul Track Mind (rr)

MONDAY 10/03 Blues Monday with MS Central Blues Society (restaurant)

TUESDAY 10/04

KING EDWARD

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

PUB QUIZ w/ Laura and Donovan (restaurant)

Saturday, October 1st

Coming Soon

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

WED10.05:Sean Bruce (rest)

Tuesday, October 4th

FRI10.07:The Belts (rr)

BILL PERRY TRIO

JESSE ROBINSON & FRIENDS

FRI10.14: JJ Grey and MOFRO (big)*

starts at 6pm, $5 Cover, Limited Menu

TH10.20: Chuck Palahniukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Damned Book Night w/ Special Guests New Orleans Bingo

Wednesday, October 5th

FRI10.21: Stagolee w/ JTran (rr) SAT10.22: Heatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tree

SHANE & FRAZIER

(Americana) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, October 6th

BOOKER WALKER

Monday-Thursday

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

Friday, October 7th

$825

September 28 - October 4, 2011

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

40

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

CYRIL NEVILLE

(Louisiana Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 8th

JUVENATORS

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

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41


by Bryan Flynn

by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, SEPT. 29 College Football, (6:30-9:30 p.m. ESPN U) Jackson State looks to bounce back after their first loss of the season against Alabama A&M. The Tigers host Texas Southern on national television. FRIDAY, SEPT. 30 College Football, (7-10 p.m. ESPN) Utah State travels to Brigham Young University in an in-state rivalry. Best bet would be going out and catching a local high-school football game. SATURDAY, OCT. 1 College Football, (11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fox Sports Network) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dogfight as Mississippi State dawgs go head to head with the bulldogs at the University of Georgia. MSU looks to go above .500 for the first time since beating Memphis in the first game of the season. â&#x20AC;Ś Southern Miss Golden Eagles host the Owls of Rice University (7:30-10:30 p.m. CSS) â&#x20AC;Ś Ole Miss travels to Fresno State (8:15-10 p.m. ESPN 2) as the noose begins to tighten around Houston Nuttâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neck. SUNDAY, OCT. 2 NFL, (noon-3 p.m. Fox) New Orleans should get another win against a bad Jacksonville team. Jaguars get the Saints at home but plan to start rookie quarterback Blaine Gabbert. MONDAY, OCT. 3 NFL, (7:30-10:30 p.m. ESPN) Tampa Bay should get another win as they host the Indianapolis Colts. This might have been a great match up when the schedule first came out but now? Not so much.

September 28 - October 4, 2011

TUESDAY, OCT. 4 Major League Baseball Playoffs started Friday with the American and National Division Series. Check listings for teams and times on TBS. Will the Boston Red Sox or the Atlanta Braves make the playoffs as wild card teams or will they continue their epic collapses in September?

42

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5 Major League Baseball Playoffs, (TBA on TBS) Check mlb.mlb.com/ mlb/schedule/ps.jsp for times and teams. It is a great time to be a sports fan as the NFL and college football ramps up. Plus the Major League Baseball playoffs start this week as well. MLB will come to an end at some point. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com and @jfpsports.

Lies and Damn Lies COURTESY TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

Brett Favre fans: The old gunslinger sits in the broadcast booth when Southern Miss meets Rice.

Advanced stats are all the rage, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell the whole story on players like Buccaneer QB Josh Freeman.

A

s movies shift from mindless summer action adventures to more award-worthy releases, you may hear a lot about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moneyball,â&#x20AC;? starring Brad Pitt. The book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Gameâ&#x20AC;? (W. W. Norton & Company, 2003, $24.95) by Michael Lewis, is based on Oakland Athleticsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; general manager Billy Beaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of statistics to build a team. It details Oaklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2002 season, as the Athletics tried to compete with a smaller payroll than other teams with more money to spend. Since the release of the book, the hot word in sports is â&#x20AC;&#x153;sabermetrics,â&#x20AC;? sometimes called advanced stats. Sabermetrics is the analysis of baseball (or any other sport) through objective, empirical evidence. Sabermetrics has produced a whole generation of stats nerds, slinging around acronyms such as WAR (wins above replacement) and VORP (value over replacement player) on TV and websites. (Google sabermetrics to learn more.) The Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2002 season ended in the American League Division Series with a loss to the Minnesota Twins. The Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s would repeat their success in 2003 (losing in the ALDS) and in 2006 (losing in American League Championship Series). Oakland will miss the playoffs this season as it has seven of the 10 years since the 2002 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moneyballâ&#x20AC;? season. Sabermetrics is sure to become more popular with the movie, so letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see if it works. Since 2002, here are the American League teams with the top five payrolls the most: New York Yankees (10), Boston Red Sox (10), Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (9), Seattle Mariners (7) and the Chicago White Sox (7). Other teams appearing in the top five payroll list are the Minnesota Twins (3),

,

Cleveland Indians (once) and the Minnesota Twins (once). The Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have been to the playoffs three times since 2002, with a small payroll based on sabermetrics. And the top five spending teams trips to the playoffs? Yankees (8), Red Sox (6), Angels (6), White Sox (2) and Mariners (0). Every team on the top-five list but the Mariners has won a World Series title between 2002 and 2011. So what do these numbers mean to sabermetrics? It means numbers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell the whole story. Numbers are abstract and will never completely quantify how good a player or a team really is. Statistics canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t measure things like heart and desire. But we use numbers to justify and prove everything in sports. Look at this article: I just made the point that the Yankees, Red Sox, and Angels spend more money and win more than the Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which uses sabermetrics to win. It is not always how you spend money but what you spend your money on. Football is into advanced stats, too. Need more proof that numbers lie? Last season, the San Diego Chargers finished the season ranked first in both total offense and defense. Those stats are the standard-bearers for how good teams are offensively and defensively, so you would think the Chargers were a good

Bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rant

by Bryan Flynn

Give â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Em a Break

,

team last season, right? Instead, San Diego finished 9-7 and out of the playoffs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, Bryan,â&#x20AC;? youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll scream, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Chargers had terrible special teams, and they lost games because of them.â&#x20AC;? Maybe. Poor special teams didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help, but special teams are just one-third of the game, and San Diego was supposedly the best at the other two-thirds. Sabermetrics guys will start screaming: â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, Bryan, sabermetrics is better at individual performance than team performance.â&#x20AC;? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look at the advanced-stats darling of football: Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback, Josh Freeman. Since the 2009 draft, Freeman has posted respectable numbers. He led Tampa Bay to a 10-6 record last season. But what has Freeman done against the best teams? Freeman started in the eighth game of the 2009 season as the Buccaneers full-time quarterback. That means he started 25 NFL games and has 14-13 record as a starter. Look closer, and you see Freeman has only beaten two teams with winning records. In his first season he beat the Green Bay Packers, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defeated the New Orleans Saints twice. Super Bowl-winning coach Bill Parcells is famous for saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You are what your record says you are.â&#x20AC;? Stats and numbers can be used to prove a point, but be careful. They can lie.

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JFP Top 25: Week 5

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Thursday, Sept 29

October 7, 2011

Moss 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover October 21

Old Memphis Kings

4th Annual Halloween Bash October 31, 2011 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover Live Performances by

The Electric Hammocks & The Church Keys

HAPPY HOUR

Ladies Night

$1.00 off Well Drinks 2 for 1 Well Drinks Weekdays 4pm - 7pm Every Wed. 8pm - Close

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road โ€ข Jackson

Ladies Night

DJ Clover on the 1s & 2s

Ladies drink free until midnight well drinks only Guys drink 2-4-1 well drinks and domestic beer until 10:00

Friday, Sept 30

DVDJ Reign & DJ RPM

Now Open Early

Wed.-Sat | 8:00 | Full Kitchen Two Shows Fri & Sat

This Weekโ€™s Music

September 28 Doug Frankโ€™s Blues Jam 7:00pm

September 29 Jujuโ€™s Drum Circle 5:00-10:00 pm

Amazinโ€™ Lazy Boi Band 11:00 - until

September 30 Jessie Smith 8:00 - 11:00pm

Stevie J & The Blues Eruption

Saturday, Oct 01

11:00 - until

October 01 Virgil Brawley

HillCrest

8:00 - 11:00pm

6107 Ridgewood Rd Jackson, Ms www.electriccowboy18.com

Chad Wesley Band 11:00 - until

Live Music During Lunchโ€ขOPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDEDโ€ขNO COVER UNTIL Midnight $10 Cover after midnight

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

8/19A=<ยบA@3/:@=19AB/B7=< Thursday - September 29 Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free 9-11 & Karaoke

Friday - September 30

faze 4

Saturday - October 1

- BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

THUR SEP 29 BUD LIGHT NIGHT $2 BUD LIGHTS DURING THE THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL GAME

FRI SEP 30

Backroads

BcSaROga B=>B3<

& KARAOKE

BEER BUCKET SPECIALS

SAT OCT 01

SUPER SATURDAY

MEAT & 3 VEGGIES INCLUDES BREAD & FRESH BAKED COOKIE

SAT OCT 08

Sunday - October 2

COLLEGE GAME NIGHT

OPEN MIC JAM 7-11

SUN OCT 02

COLLEGE GAME NIGHT!

WATCH EVERY GAME!

THREE DOORS DOWN

Monday - October 3 BAR OPEN

Tuesday - October 4 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

NFL SUNDAY TICKET

MON OCT 03

SUPER SATURDAY

IN-DA-BIZ 2FOR1 DRINK SPECIALS

20 TICKETS GIVEAWAY

TUE OCT 04

FOR 0CT 15 CONCERT

JACKPOT TRIVIA

0751/A6

:WabS\c^T]`g]c`QVO\QS]\

WED SEP 28 LADIES NIGHT

SOUTH FLORIDA @ PITTSBURGH

EO\bb]aQ]`S

A=<5AB67AE339

 @326=B167:7>3>>3@ABVS/RdS\bc`Sa]T @OW\2O\QS;OUUWS AB/7<2<]b/UOW\ ! A33B63@B]\WUVb " 0@3/97<503<8/;7<0Z]e;S/eOg # 47D347<53@23/B6>C<16C\RS`=dS`7b $ 3D/<3A13<13EVObG]cEO\b % 0CA6BVSA]c\R]TEW\bS` 0:/19AB=<3163@@G0ZO[S7b=\BVS & 0]][0]][ ' /@B=42G7<55SbBV`cBVWa  >=>3D7:;]abS`G]c;ORS

live music september 21-27

wed | sep 28 Jesse โ€œGuitarโ€ Smith 5:30-9:30p

thur | sept 29 Jason Bailey 5:30-9:30p

fri | sept 30 Lucky Hand Blues Band 6:30 -10:30p

sat | oct 01 DBL Shots 6:30-10:30p

sun | oct 02 Dain Edwards Solo 5:30-9:30p

mon | oct 03 Karaoke tue | oct 04 Jesse โ€œGuitarโ€œ Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

HAGGARD COLLINS

jacksonfreepress.com

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX!

43


N I K S G I P PLAY OUR ! T U O PLAYAN JFP PRO FOOTBALL D N I DF PICK’EM AND YOU MAY WIN! www.jfpfootball.com

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» WIN GREAT PRIZES! Week 3 Winners:

First place: Gregory Terry $50 gift certificate

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Third place: Robert Herr $10 gift certificate Adam Perry (Best Score: JFP Staff)

September 28 - October 4 2011

sponsored by:

44


most local singles

meet real women tonight try for

free

 More Local Numbers: 1.800.210.1010 18+

www.livelinks.com

Ahora en Español

Pouring Perfection For over 600 years www.stellaartois.com

Capital City Beverages M I S S I S S I P P I ’ S C O M P L E T E B E E R S O U RC E

Ask for this beer at stores and restaurants in Central Mississippi. Can’t find this beer?

Call 601-956-2224 for more information.

jacksonfreepress.com

distributed by

45


Armed and Dangerous by Meredith W. Sullivan; photos by Lisa Pyron

L

eandra Medine, a New York City blogger also known as The Man Repeller, has termed the recent bracelet craze as an “arm party.” And being that I’m a huge fan of both (over) accessorizing and The Man Repeller, I had to gather up some guests for a party on my arm—well, both arms! Gold cuff, Orange Peel, $5 Blue Viking knit bracelet, Links Jewelry, $20 Multicolored friendship bracelet, Shaggy’s Far-Outlet, $1 Gold lace bracelet, Links Jewelry, $35 Silver and turquoise cuff, Material Girls, $38.95 Blue and white scarf, Repeat Street, $2 Rope bracelet, Blithe & Vine, $98 Chan Luu wrap bracelet, High Cotton, $175 Gold European weave bracelet, Links Jewelry, $40 Michael Kors men’s oversized watch, stylists’ own. Multicolored Ettika braided bracelets, Material Girls, $24.95 each Multicolored friendship bracelet, Shaggy’s Far-Outlet, $2

Alex and Ani gold bangle, Material Girls, $21.99 Beaded cuff, High Cotton, $80 Green horse-bit wrap bracelet, Material Girls, $72.95 Three-toned braided bracelet, Links Jewelry, $140 Lauren G. Adams rose-gold bracelet, Material Girls, $72.95 Ivory doorknocker cuff, Material Girls, $29.95 Ettika rhinestone bracelet, Material Girls, $29.95 Gold nugget bracelet, High Cotton, $64 Black studded Vita Fede wrap bracelet, Red August, $55

Where2Shop:

Blithe and Vine, 2906 N. State St., 601-427-3322; High Cotton, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 188, 601-981-3280; Links Jewelry, linksjewelry.etsy. com; Material Girls, 182 Promenade Blvd., Flowood, 601-992-4533; Orange Peel, 422 Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977; Red August, www.shopredaugust. com; Repeat Street, 626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland, 601-605-9393; Shaggy’s Far-Outlet, 5417 Highway 25, Suite E, Flowood, 601-919-3470

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com. If there is something you’d like to see on our FLY page, tell us on Twitter

Mint the Restaurant (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5002, Ridgeland, 601-898-6468) Join Mint and The Face and Body Center at The Pink Party Oct. 3 benefiting the American Cancer Society. $50; $85 per couple.

Patty Peck Honda (555 Sunnybrook Road, Ridgeland, 601-957-3400) Every Wednesday, ladies receive a free Mary Kay gift from consultant Melinda Kennedy while waiting for their car to be serviced.

Coattails (111 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-853-1313) Looking to refresh or change your beauty routine? Stop in and check out our newest beauty line: Per-Fekt.

Taylor Collection (2082 Main St., Madison, 601-605-0236) Take your pick of Hanky Panky original, low rise or v-kini style undergarments. Taylor collection has received a huge shipment in brights and neutrals.

September 28 - October 4, 2011

Arco Avenue (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 107, Ridgeland 662803-1610) Find your perfect pair of shoes, from fabulous flats to haute heels, at this new footwear and accessories boutique.

@FlyJFP.

46

Check out flyjfp.com and on Facebook or information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

Full-service salon dedicated to providing great customer service. We offer excellent services using products of the highest quality. Our mission is to promote healthy hair at an affordable price! Stylist Needed Call and schedule an appointment. 1775 Lelia Drive, Ste F | 601-982-7772

New

!

Plato’s Closet in Ridgeland has tons of gently used brand name jeans, tees, tanks, hoodies and shoes to fill your closet at up 70% off regular retail. Don’t forget - we pay $$$ on the spot for your gently used apparel and accessories - Check us out today!

1260 East County Line Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 601.487.8207 platosclosetridgeland.com

Silly Billy’s consignment shop

This year.....

Dare to be BARE Waxing Brazilian $70 Basic Bikini $40 Teeny Bikini $55 601-862-5537

L ACE Y ’S S

A

L

Hair & Ac

O

N

ce ss orie

s

601.906.2253 | 1935 Lakeland Dr.

Linda Whitaker Professional Esthetician at the Sun Gallery 6712 Old Canton Rd Ridgeland, MS

Make $3000$5000 per month! The Jackson Free Press and BOOM Jackson magazine seek TOP PERFORMERS for advertising sales positions.

New Items In Weekly

We need client-driven candidates ready to hit the streets to prospect new accounts, listen to client needs and follow up every week with world-class customer service.

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Bring your love of local business and your willingness to wake up every morning to improve your customers’ bottom line. Young or old, if you have the stuff, we’ll know!

The Funkiest Clothes in Fondren! WE OFFER FOILS, GREAT LENGTH HAIR EXTENSIONS AND BRAZILIAN BLOWOUTS. Magnolia Marketplace 5352 Lakeland Dr suite 600 | Flowood, Ms 601 992-7980

Tue. - Sat. | 10 - 6:30 in the Duling Building

Contact publisher Todd Stauffer at todd@ jacksonfreepress.com to make your pitch!

622 Duling Ave Suite 205 B

601-672-6693 601-665-3820

We Want Your Bras! Entire store will 20%off for this three hour event! WHEN: Sunday, October 2nd TIME: 1:00 -4:00 pm ADMISSION: 1 bra or $1.00 to be donated to American Cancer Society For Details: Check Our Twitter & Facebook Voted state’s best consignment/resale by Mississippi Magazine.

Ridgeland Location: 626 Ridgewood Road | 601.605.9393 Starkville Location: 832B Hwy 12 West | 662.324.2641

Like Us: Facebook:Repeat Street Metro Jackson | Twitter: @RepeatSt | www.repeatstreet.net

Still Going - Bring Those Cans!

jacksonfreepress.com

Big Ole Bra Collecting Kick-Off Event!!!

47


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460 Briarwood Dr. | Jackson, MS 39206 Phone: 601.709.4610 | Fax: 601.709.4611

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FEATURES

The Mumford Firm: Where justice begins!

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Gerald A. Mumford, Attorney-At-Law 601-944-1888 | 601-594-4975 www.themumfordfirm.com

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v10n03 - Fall Food Issue: Super Foods