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Our Our main main campus campus located located at at CLINTON CLINTON Our campus located at 200 200 S Capital Smain Capital St,St, Clinton Clinton MS* MS* Accounting Our main OurSmain campus campus located located at MS* at 200 Capital St, Clinton Finance Finance Accounting Accounting Finance 200 S200 Capital SFLOWOOD Capital St, Clinton St, Clinton MS* MS* FLOWOOD Business Business Administration Administration Finance Finance FLOWOOD Located Located at at 115 115 Laurel Laurel Park Park Cove Cove near near thethe Business Administration FLOWOOD FLOWOOD Located at 115 Laurel Park Cove near the Marketing Marketing Business Business Administration Administration Dogwood Dogwood shopping shopping center. center. Marketing Located Located at 115 atLaurel 115 Laurel Park Cove Park Cove near the near the Dogwood shopping center. Communication Communication Marketing Marketing Dogwood Dogwood shopping shopping center. center. *DAY *DAY &&NIGHT NIGHT COURSES COURSES Communication &campus NIGHT COURSES Sociology Sociology at*DAY at ourour main main campus in in Clinton, Clinton, MSMS Communication Communication Sociology *DAY *DAY & NIGHT COURSES at & ourNIGHT main campus inCOURSES Clinton, MS 2 January - February 2014 // The City’s Business Lifestyle Magazine Sociology Sociology at and ourat main our main campus campus in Clinton, in Clinton, MS MS

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RN/BSN | Homeland Security RN/BSN RN/BSN |Paralegal Homeland | Homeland Security Security Paralegal Studies Studies Paralegal Studies Paralegal Paralegal Studies Studies Communication Communication Generalist Generalist Communication Generalist Communication Communication Generalist Master Master inGeneralist in Health Health Master in Health Services Services Administration Administration Master Master in Health in Health Services Administration Services Services Administration Administration Master Master of of Science Science in in Master of Science in Applied Applied Communication Communication Master Master of Science of Science in in Applied Communication boomjackson.com Applied Applied Communication Communication


BIG FIRM EXPERIENCE. SMALL FIRM PERSONAL SERVICE.

Dorsey Carson has spent most of his nearly 18 years of law practice at big firms across the Southeast, where he has been recognized as a top construction lawyer and commercial litigator by Chambers USA, the Best Lawyers in America, SuperLawyers, and the Mississippi Business Journal, among others. Now Dorsey has established the Carson Law Group, a small boutique law firm located in downtown Jackson that is committed to serving its business clients with solutions-based legal experience.

601-709-3443 | CARSON LAW GROUP, PLLC CAPITAL TOWERS 125 SOUTH CONGRESS ST., SUITE 1336 JACKSON, MS 39201 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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“Marriage is about serving together.” —Rashida Walker 9 JXN Millennium City The City with Soul makes waves as the place to be for young artists. 11 Conquer 2014 Deirdre Danahar wants you to keep your 2014 resolutions. 12 Military Mama Meet Margarett Barnes, Mississippi’s first African American female major general. 13 Pop Bottles Sip Champagne all year round.

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16 Progress Iron Horse rides again among new downtown development. 18 BIZ Lucky Midtown Hopheads rejoice! Jackson’s first brewery opens this year. 20 Cat’s Meow Meet the crew behind Cathead Vodka. 23 If the Ring Fits Brian Beckham’s custom baubles shine. 24 WEDDING BELLS SELL Weddings are big business these days, thanks to this generation’s access to inspiration far and wide. 27 Peekaboo Packing light: Stephen Barnette shares the tools of his trade. 28 Wedding Vendor Guide Paid advertising section. 33 Hitched Announcements

24 23

62 36

36 POWER COUPLES Great things are better in pairs. 48 BITES Cater Waiter The devil’s in the details when it comes to catering events. 50 Crazy Tasty Cool The rock is for listening. The roll is for eating. 52 ARTS Color and Craft Elizabeth Robinson’s glassworks are becoming a hot-ticket item nationwide. 54 MELODIES Spiral Sound The Nautilus Project connects JXN and PDX. 56 COOL TOO Blue State Explore Cleveland and the Mississippi Blues Trail. 58 EVENTS Don’t know what to do when it’s sweater weather? We’ve got you covered.

16 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

62 LOCAL LIST Will Sterling knows a photoworthy location when he sees one—and he’s sharing.

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editor’s note

Love, Love, Love Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Managing Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Art Director Kristin Brenemen

ELIZABETH RAY PHOTOGRAPHY

//by Kathleen M. Mitchell

Assistant Editors Amber Helsel // Briana Robinson Editorial Writers Nneka Ayozie // Tyler Cleveland // Deirdre Danahar Molly Lehmuller // R.L. Nave Julie Skipper // Jessica Wei Listings Editor // Latasha Willis Stylist // Nicole Wyatt Interns Justin Hosemann // Mo Wilson Photography Staff Photographer // Trip Burns Photographer // Tate K. Nations Ad Design Zilpha Young Business and Sales Advertising Director // Kimberly Griffin Account Executives // Gina Haug // David Rahaim Director of Operations // David Joseph Distribution Manager // Richard Laswell Bookkeeper // Aprile Smith Operations Assistant // Caroline Lacy-Crawford Publisher Todd Stauffer CONTACT US Letters to the Editor // editor@boomjackson.com Story ideas and pitches // editor@boomjackson.com Ad Sales // ads@boomjackson.com BOOM Jackson P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296 p 601.362.6121 f 601.510.9019 Would you like copies of BOOM Jackson for recruiting, welcome packets or other corporate, institutional or educational uses? Call 601.362.6121 x16 or email davidjoseph@jacksonfreepress.com. BOOM Jackson is a publication of Jackson Free Press Inc. BOOM Jackson, which publishes every other month, focuses on the urban experience in Jackson, Miss., emphasizing entrepreneurship, economic growth, culture, style and city life. © 2014 Jackson Free Press Inc.

Cover photo of Chris and Rachel Myers by Tate K. Nations Fashion info is on page 46 6

Managing Editor Kathleen Mitchell and her husband, Brian, on their wedding day.

W

eddings, man. Weddings are the best. The best memories from the last three or four years include many of my loved ones’ weddings, each with their own feel and flavor. Big, raucous affairs. Small backyard ceremonies. Religious rituals. Semi-agnostic celebrations. And my own wedding, a friend-filled party at the Mississippi Museum of Art. That was a little more than a year and a half ago. I put on a long, white dress and a pair of gold glitter shoes, cried my way through my vows, and said “I do” to spending the rest of my life with a man that I love. Since that day, I’ve been learning how to be a wife and a partner. We were together for five years before that Big Day, so I figured it wouldn’t be all that different from our dating and engaged life. But it is different, in a thousand ways, some tiny and some big. I’ve learned a lot in this year and a half, but I know it is only the tip of a huge, hidden iceberg of knowledge and experience that will take the rest of my life to unearth. If I sound zen and wise and self-aware, don’t be too impressed. I am temperamental, short-fused, reluctant to let go and quite possibly the only person in the world more stubborn than my husband. I set impossibly high standards and am easily frustrated when life cannot measure up. I’m harder on myself than anyone else could be on me. All of these things make me a challenging wife to live with and love. These are the things I work on (or try to work on) daily. Maintaining a healthy, happy relationship—whether it’s with your partner, spouse, family member, friend or someone else—requires different things from different people. Spending the day with our 2014 Power Couples was a great reminder of some of the qualities that make a great relationship. It was a privilege to see what binds these couples, from Rachel and Chris’ sense of fun, to the steady respect between Ramina and Arash, to the teamwork of Meredith and Terry. And everywhere, love. (See pages 36-46 to read more about these and all the rest of our amazing Power Couples.) This time of year is rife with resolutions, and mine are very simple for 2014. Let love in. Let love win. Indulge in the beautiful, wonderful, lovely parts of life. I resolve to pay attention to the examples of great love I see around me, whether that be love for family, friends, one’s city or significant other—or even love for one’s self, I need to work on that as well. I hope to learn from the exemplary folks around me, and work to make their habits a part of my own life. Here’s to the new year, and to love.

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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contributors

Bringing The Community Together: Promoting Racial Harmony and Facilitating Understanding

••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2014 Friendship Ball Gala April 19, 2014, Mississippi Museum of Art Join the board of directors and membership for our 25th Anniversary celebration! Companies and organizations are encouraged to sponsor, purchase tables and participate in this milestone occasion.

••••••••••••••••••••••••• Monthly Discussion Luncheons Second Wednesday, 11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Jackson 2000 invites you to join us to “lunch and learn” with provocative speakers and discussions held at the Mississippi Arts Center in downtown Jackson. (On January 8, 2014, join us and Parents for Public Schools of Jackson for a joint program at the Medical Mall in Jackson.)

••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2014 Dialogue Circles Ongoing for adults and youth - see website

1. Zilpha Young DSU grad Zilpha Young is the new ad designer for the JFP and BOOM Jackson. When she’s not designing things, she can usually be found watching Netflix or drawing cephalopods. She designed many of the ads.

Jackson 2000 presents dialogue circles, a series of facilitated, curriculum-based discussion sessions that can open minds, change hearts and build lasting friendships.

More information: www.jackson2000.org

4. Briana Robinson Jackson Free Press Music Editor Briana Robinson wants to become an expert on all things music. Her other passions include dance and photography. She wrote a melodies story and a Power Couples feature.

3. R.L. Nave R.L. Nave, native Missourian and Jackson Free Press news editor, roots for St. Louis—and for Jackson. Send him news tips at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. He wrote a Power Couples feature.

4. Tate K. Nations Tate is a husband, father of two, photographer, videographer, skateboarder, golfer and baseball fan who embraces being “the guy who always has his camera.” He photographed the Power Couples.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

2014 Best of Jackson Finalist Best Salon | Best Stylist 419 Mitchell Ave. | Jackson | 601.982.5575 | Tuesday - Friday 9:00 - 6:00 | Saturday 9:00 - 2:00 Walk-Ins Welcome. Appointments are preferred. 7


Best of

In 2014, there are three ways for the metro’s best businesses to celebrate the Best of Jackson with the Jackson Free Press. 1.) Best of Jackson issue. (Ad Deadline 1/15/14). Advertise in the JFP’s most popular issue of the year. 2.) Best of Jackson party. Sign up at jfpdaily.com to get “on the list” for an invitation. Or, have your business sponsor the party — call us at 601-362-6121 x17 to discuss it! 3.) Best of Jackson magazine. (Ad Deadline 4/25/14). Put your message in our glossy special edition of BOOM Jackson cover the Best of Jackson for locals, visitors and business travelers. Visit www.boomjackson.com/advertise. www.boomjackson.com/advertise.html or call 601-362-6121 for more information!

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January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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COURTESY JOSH HAILY STUDIO

City Resolutions p 10 // Army Woman p 12 // Sukkot on Film p 14 Sip Sparkles p 13 // Progress p 16

Calling all Twentysomethings // by Kathleen M. Mitchell

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s 2013 wound down, several national news sources ran articles exploring what we at BOOM Jackson (and the Jackson Free Press) have known for years: Jackson is a great city for young creatives. The Atlantic Cities website published a series called “Where Millenials Can Make it Now.” The author, Nona Willis Aronowitz, traveled the country looking for the best cities for twentysomethings. She wrote that she avoided “cities already deemed magnets for young, creative people—places like New Orleans, Austin or Detroit.” In the end she chose nine cities, including Jackson. She puts Jackson into the category “Small Ponds for Big Fish” (Omaha, Neb., also makes this category), and describes our city thus: “These are cities where creativity and entrepreneurship are on the rise, even as the rents remain reasonable. Chances are, small ponds have DIY art scenes: … Jackson’s Fondren and Midtown neighborhoods have sparked a local

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

art community. Yet even in the gentrified corners of town, the price points remain low by necessity, since most people aren’t making much money. And since there isn’t a shortage of space, local politicos are practically begging young people to take abandoned buildings and empty lots off their hands. Many of the twentysomethings I spoke with in these towns were on a first-name basis with the mayor or city council. One Jackson native was even running for office. These cities have a growing population of young people who would rather start something from the ground up and live cheaply than scramble anonymously in huge cities.” Projects such as last year’s “subSIPPI” documentary, Josh Hailey’s HeARTalot pop-up art school/gallery space, the potential midtown “Hatch” creative live/work space (see page 17), and even the “Look Up Fondren” event, which lit the Entergy substation with changing colors for Fondren Unwrapped, are living proof that Jackson is teeming with creative energy. We can’t wait to see what pops up next.

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JXN // promises, promises

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Resolute City //by Tyler Cleveland

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ach Jackson and metro area neighborhood has its own personality and its own challenges. This is the perfect time of year to confront some of those challenges, so we put together a list of New Year’s resolutions based on where you live in the city.

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Resolutions: What Works, What Doesn’t // by Deirdre Danahar

Root in “Why.” If you cannot answer, “Why I am I doing this?” in personal terms, you’ll struggle to stay focused. If you want to lose weight, your motivation will be stronger if it is to be able to keep up with your kids rather than because your doctor told you to do so. Your internal motivation is more powerful and lasting then an external one. Less is More When it Comes to “What.” The shorter your list of resolutions, the more likely you will be able to achieve everything on it. A resolution means you want to start doing something. That will take extra attention and resources. Don’t spread yourself thin. Three to five resolutions are enough.

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Make Your “What” a Non-negotiable Project. A project is an endeavor that, by definition, unfolds over time. You can always make progress on a project, and you can adjust it over the year as needed.

COURTESY DEIRDRE DANAHAR

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once loved resolutions. Not now. Resolutions are a declaration of your end goals: get in shape, learn Spanish, find a new job. Declaring something is the start of making it real, but does not actually make it real. The root of resolution is a verb, resolve. It requires action. Most people are giving too little thought to what is driving them to want a resolution to be true, and what it will take to make their resolutions a reality. Here’s what I know works to back up your declarations with action and increase your level of success.

Focus on Habits to Grow. The habits you develop are what make your resolutions become real or not. What habits would you need to develop or use to be able to keep up with your kid, land a new job, or learn to make pasta? Unleash Your Strengths. You have a unique collection of innate traits, plus experiences and skills you developed overtime. Take time to inventory and draw on your best traits, most rich experiences and robust skills. These point to and support habits you want to grow. Be Patient. Habits take time. At least 21 tries are needed for a habit begin to take shape. Your brain needs to create a clear, deep and strong path to a new habit, in order to supersede previous habits. Be patient with yourself.

Deirdre Danahar wants folks to rethink the way they make resolutions.

Hooray for Failure. Developing a habit virtually guarantees that you’ll fail at some point. Most likely that will not be a catastrophe. Just pause, and view it as an opportunity to recalibrate and ask, “What is useful for me to take from this?” Then go back to your root “why” and keep nurturing your habits.

Fertilize, Prune and Weed. Set a quarterly check-in time on your calendar to review your resolutions, the progress you made to date, what you have learned and tweak as needed. This helps you stay motivated and increases your chance of success.

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JXN // expat

All She Can Be // by Nneka Ayozie

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in public administration in 1989. Throughout her academic pursuits she maintained a position in the army. But after receiving her master’s degree, she wanted more. “When I moved to the coast, I said that if I was going to be in the army reserve that I was going to be all that I could be and become an offi-

to brigadier general in November 2011. Currently, Barnes serves as the deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Human Resources Command in Fort Knox, Ky., although she still has a home in Byram, Miss. She values her position there, because she is making a difference in the lives of others. “The army’s human COURTESY US ARMY

Margarett Barnes (center) became a brigadier general in 2011. cer,” says Barnes. She applied for and received a direct commission as a second lieutenant in 1984. Twenty years later, Barnes had not only continued up the ranks in the military, but also achieved marital bliss the second time around. On Valentine’s Day, 2004, Barnes married Col. Robert L. Barnes. The pair met while participating in an exercise at Fort Bliss, Texas. Seven years later, the couple celebrated her promotion

resource command touches the lives of all the army’s soldiers from the minute they come in to the army until they retire, and even after retirement and beyond,” Barnes says. She encourages others to consider carefully a commitment to the Army. “The military has a lot of different options, so take a good look at what you want to do with your life and know that plans might change,” she says. “Do your research before you jump in.”

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eing all that you can be” takes on a real meaning for this deputy commanding general. Brigadier General Margarett E. Barnes of the United States Army is one of five brigadier generals and the first African American female brigadier general from Mississippi. But this wasn’t exactly what Barnes planned after graduating from Waynesboro Central High School in 1972. A Waynesboro, Miss., native with aspirations of becoming a lawyer, Barnes entered the University of Southern Mississippi and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science and history in 1975. After completing her first year at the University of Mississippi Law School the following summer of ’76, she was burned out. “I was tired of going to school. … I went to school every summer (at USM) so that I could finish in two and a half years,” Barnes says. She was broke, tired and without an appealing incentive to continue law school. Her escape came in the form of the United States Army. After seeing an army ad, Barnes thought that it would be a great opportunity for her to get a break from school, travel and make money during the summer. She was right on all counts, and the army became a part of her life. In 1977, Barnes married, and she and her then-husband relocated from Oxford to Pascagoula. There, they had two children, James, now 34, and Jessica, now 32. After 13 years of family life in Pascagoula, Barnes thought that it was time to finally go back to law school. The university told her that she would have to start over completely because she had remained out of school over six years. Leaving law behind, Barnes ended up graduating from South Alabama University with a master’s degree

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Pop, Clink, Fizz

// by Kathleen M. Mitchell keep swilling the sparkly stuff well after your Happy 2014 balloons have deflated:

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It’s multinational. Of course Francophiles can feel superior by sticking to true Champagne from the Champagne region of France, but many countries produce sparkling wine, from Italian Prosecco to sweet Sonoma Sparklers in California. Those that tend to shun white or rose wine can even find a bubbly for them: Try red sparkling Shiraz from Australia or Brachetto from Italy. With what other food or drink receptacle is it appropriate to open with a small sword? One traditional way to open a Champagne

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bottle is called sabrage, which involves rapidly sliding a sabre (the aforementioned small sword) along the bottle and hitting the lip, causing the cork to shoot out. It is a dramatic, ceremonial way to pop bottles, but have glasses on hand—when done properly, sabrage breaks the top of the bottle. On that note, with what other food or drink receptacle is it appropriate to smash against the side of boats, homes and the like? It’s healthy(ish). A glass of Champagne runs about 90 calories, which is much less than many alcoholic drinks of similar sweetness. And it’s full of many of the same antioxidants as unsparkling wine.

3 4

LICKR/BASHEERTOME

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hampagne’s reputation as a party drink isn’t wrong—bubbly just seems required at events ranging from wedding receptions to bridal showers to, of course, New Year’s Eve parties. But Champagne is a more versatile beverage than many realize. It can fit it at a variety of imbibe-able occasions, from family meals to tailgating (yes, even tailgating). If you are looking to quench the masses, shoot for a mid-price ’pagne. At a blind taste test of Champagne and sparkling wine last year, most tasters preferred the middle option, which rang in around $10 to $12 a bottle. (See jfp.ms/bubbly for more on that blind tasting.) Here are five reasons to

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Sparkling wine doesn’t have to stand alone. It is an ingredient in many sophisticated cocktails. Beyond mimosas are poinsettias (Champagne and cranberry juice), Kir Royale (Champagne and Chambord liqueur with a lemon twist garnish), French 76 bubbly martini (vodka, sweet & sour, grenadine splash and topped with Champagne).

Make Sure all your wedding gue t are comfortable. Not to mention the bride. S S

The natural charm and luxury of the Cabot Lodge offers the perfect night after your big day. Wonderfully appointed rooms feature pillow-top bedding and cloud-soft down comforters. Complimentary full breakfast and a nightly hospitality reception entertain your guests between events. And our special wedding room block rates – including free room for the bride and groom – will keep your wedding planner happy.

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JXN // naches

Jewish Heritage Through Film // by Amber Helsel

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In 2004, ISJL and Beth Israel partnered with the Jewish Culture Organization at Millsaps to create the Jackson Jewish Film Festival, now called Jewish Cinema Mississippi, as part of Jewish Cinema South.

the south. Sukkot, often referred to as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Season of Our Rejoicing,â&#x20AC;? commemorates the 40-year period when Jewish people wandered the desert, as well as Thanksgiving and the harvest season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Sukkot) is a handbook for how to live, breathe and act as a truly free people,â&#x20AC;? says the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page description. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about realizing the fragility of life and living fully in the moment.â&#x20AC;? The film shows Jan. 26 at 2 p.m. The Jewish Cinema Mississippi festival is Jan. 22-23 and 25-26 at Malco Grandview Cinema (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison, 601.898.7819). Find Jewish Cinema Missisâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Footnoteâ&#x20AC;? shows Jan. 23 sippi on Facebook, and visit at the Jewish Cinema Mississippi festival. jewishcinemams.com for ticket prices and festival passes. COURTESY MOVIE PLUS

ilm is an incredible medium of art. It makes you feel things that other media may have a hard time conveying. Film puts you in the middle of the action. It crosses barriers of gender, race, nationality and other aspects, bringing different cultures together. Mississippi gets to experience a little bit of another culture each January through the Jewish Cinema Mississippi film festival. The Beth Israel Congregation and the Goldring/ Woldenberg Institute for Southern Jewish Life began the Jewish Cinema South in 2002 to highlight the Jewish experience and culture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While the films are not usually historical, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not usually documentaries, they almost always highlight something peculiar or particular to Jewish life somewhere,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. James Bowley, a professor of religious studies at Millsaps College and co-chairman of the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jewish history and Jewish culture has its peculiarities, like all subcultures do, and so that often provides a lot of opportunity for looking at lives in interesting waysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and maybe laughing or maybe realizing that your neighbors are different than you are, and that it would be different to be them. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not all one flavor, shall we say.â&#x20AC;?

Members of the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committee choose four to seven films to show each year, ending with a grand finale film on Sunday. Bowley says that film buffs will enjoy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonders,â&#x20AC;? which shows on Friday. This screening will be one of the very first in the country for the film, and it has gotten rave reviews in Israel. This year, the finale film is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Road to Eden: Rock & Roll Sukkot,â&#x20AC;? a documentary about prolific Jewish musician Dan Nichols. The film follows Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; journey touring across

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14

The 2013 bash.

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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‘Paying Your Dues’: All About Building Craft // by Donna Ladd

K

FILE PHOTO

now anyone who went to work in the Millennials. Many of them were taught to think field they studied and trained for, but success should be easy and quick—and, as a then got bored or result, may have trouble comdiscouraged bemitting themselves to doing cause they had to work what it takes to build the harder than they imagcraft that will ultimately ined? Watched someone make them successful job-hop from field to field and happy. Craft. That is actually the in search of the Holy Grail job where they can instantly get rich withGrail we should all pursue. The brain sciout having to constantly improve? Seen entists tell us: to be great (or “genius”)at someone who is discouraged because something, we need to practice it for they didn’t stick with what they loved 10,000 hours (1,250 eight-hour days, years ago (perhaps because not including texting, tweeting they didn’t realize it would be and surfing time). And to conhard work to get good at it)? tinue being happy in a career Of course you know those choice, you must dedicate yourfolks. This is an epidemic in toself to continually developing day’s working world—probably your skills and building craft; exacerbated by the “everyone otherwise, you get bored and Instead of searching for gets a trophy” style of helicop- the Holy Grail of jobs, work make bad career choices. on your craft. If you’re bored or impatient ter parenting that raised today’s

in your job, but it’s something you believed you really wanted to do, take a breath and ask yourself how you can be better at your job, or even brilliant. Stop focusing on what you’re already good at, and start asking yourself where your weaknesses lie. What do you need to practice? What classes do you need to take? Then go make it happen. You don’t have to wait for your employer to do it for you; impress them with your zeal for excellence. The Red Lemon Club blog has an excellent post about craft (jfp.ms/redlemon): “Craft is your technique; your brain’s neural connections, sculpted over hours of practice. … Being kept motivated through constant growth and improvement, is the very essence of what craft is about.” Are you continually trying to improve your craft? Be patient, learn the skills and be mentored (also called “paying your dues”). You’re not supposed to be rich and successful overnight; do the hard work of craft-building now, and watch it pay off down the road.

D I S C O V E R

P R OVISION S

california inspired southern rooted opening mid-january 734 fairview street | jackson, ms 39202 601.948.3429 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

15


JXN // progress

Streets, Eats and Downtown Suites // by Tyler Cleveland IRON HORSE GRILL

16

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

In September 2011, Hinds County received $1.2 million from the Federal Highway Administration to develop the Byram-Clinton Corridor. The funds will help connect Interstate 20 to Sam Herring Road and provide access to the John Bell Williams Airport and Industrial Park in Bolton. The supervisors voted in 2010 to earmark $2 million for the project out of $14 million remaining from a 2007 bond issue. Calhoun added that two congressmen, Democratic U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson and Republican U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, support the idea. The board already paid $1.4 million to Brunini, Grantham, Grower & Hewes for legal work related to Bryam-Clinton corridor land acquisition. Hobson-Calhoun said that federal guidelines require construction on the second phase to begin by June 2014. TRIP BURNS

ary, opening up one of the city’s precious-few A Jackson mainstay is back in business afnorth-south corridors. ter a 14-year hiatus. The Iron Horse Grill, located The construction began in June, and forced, off Pearl Street near Gallatin Street, reopened its at first, the closure of both southbound lanes doors Nov. 25. from Woodrow Wilson Avenue to Millsaps Av“Well, it’s just our second week, but it’s been enue, and one northbound lane in the same area. amazing,” General Manager Andy Nesenson said Traffic was detoured to State Street. In the final in early December. “We had over 4,000 guests stages, all four lanes of the road closed, which put and two live performances last week—Southern the hurt on the remaining businesses in the area. Komfort Brass Band and the Sofa Kings—they were good crowds.” The rebuilt Iron Horse features multilevel dining within its 12,000-square-foot space and has enough seating for more than 300 guests, not including private dining. The menu incorporates a number of the favorite items guests enjoyed in the past, such as chicken enchiladas, fajitas, chips and salsa, and the Iron Horse Burger. The restaurant offers signature items such as smoked catfish dip, fried chicken cob salad, crawfish and crab enchiladas, Mexican lasaThe Iron Horse Grill reopened in late 2013 after 14 years. gna, and roasted poblano macaroni and cheese. Also available are fresh West Street sidewalks also remain closed, seafood and steaks at dinner and desserts such but they are also being replaced in the process. as Mississippi praline cheesecake and bananas Neighborhood streets along the construcfoster. All the food at the Iron Horse is made from scratch daily. tion area received new underground piping and, The restaurant features live entertainment so far, none has been closed for construction. three nights a week, with a mixture of local and regional talent from the Jackson area, mainly BYRAM-CLINTON PARKWAY booked by promoter Arden Barnett. Proponents of the Byram-Clinton Parkway “People are really enjoying some of the development say the project is ready to move to old menu items, like the fajitas and the old Iron the second phase. Horse chips and salsa,” Nesenson said. “We’re Peggy Hobson-Calhoun, who represents really having fun, and it’s great to see the people District 3 on the Hinds County Board of Supervicome back and see the new space and hear them sors, said the county has acquired all the necesreminisce about the old restaurant.” sary land to commence work on a second segment of the parkway. The 18-mile multi-lane route runs from ByWEST STREET IMPROVEMENTS Construction to replace a 90-year-old water ram at Interstate 55 South, extending northwest to the Norrell Road interchange at Interstate 20 line and three feet of Yazoo clay is soon to be completed on West Street between Woodrow in Clinton. Plans call for the parkway to be built in five sections. Wilson Avenue and Marshall Street. Work crews have completed one segment Both the north and southbound lanes are still closed as of press time, but the city expects on the corridor that will consist of retail, residenthe construction to be finished by early Februtial and commercial development.

EAST VILLAGE ESTATES A housing development planned for west Jackson before it met community opposition is moving ahead in a new location downtown. Calling the East Village Estates an example of an “intelligent urban-renewal program” that Jackson needs more of, Mayor Chokwe Lumumba said the development means “Jackson is open for business.” Originally, the project developers—Oxfordbased Chartre Consulting Ltd., Mid-America Development Foundation and Roscoe Word— planned to build what they tout as market-rate, low-income houses along the Jackson State University Parkway, but citizens and neighborhood groups fought it. “Since the neighborhood felt that they didn’t want that type of housing and those kinds of people in their community, we chose to go someplace else,” Chartre marketing consultant David Kelly told the Jackson Free Press. Firms such as Chartre apply for tax credits, which they use to build houses for people who don’t make a lot of money. Companies own and lease the townhouses for 15 years. At the end of the 15 years, tenants would have the option to boomjackson.com


buy the townhouses from Chartre at 8-percent interest with no down payment. Tenants would be able to buy the townhouses at a reduced rate. The longer they leased the property, the less they would have to pay to purchase it. The townhouses would be worth between $150,000 and $170,000 and, if a tenant leased a low-income property for the full 15 years, they could buy it for about $50,000.

HELP FUND THE HATCH The warehouse at 143 Keener Ave. in Midtown has a new name and new direction. Midtown Partners’ Whitney Grant has started an Indigogo campaign, an online crowd-funding mechanism, to finally develop the building into a creative live/work space that will complete the Midtown Cluster of Creative Economies. “The Hatch” is one of two facilities Midtown Partners owns and Millsaps College’s Entrepreneurship Initiative co-manages. Together, the two entities operate the Midtown Cluster of Creative Economies with The Hatch and The Hangar. The Hangar is home to four art studios and a demolition business and warehouse that hosts various

DUVALL DECKER A R C H I T E C T S , P. A .

events, such as the Stray at Home Art Market and the Priced to Move art sale. With space fully occupied at The Hangar, Midtown Partners said it needs more room at the second location. The Indigogo campaign, which can be found on the site (indiegogo.com/projects/fundthe-hatch), aims to raise $25,000 to kick-start construction that is needed to renovate and modernize the building. Midtown Partners has already successfully fixed the roof, replaced one of the front corners of the building, removed moldy walls and ceilings, scrapped old tile and completed the schematic architectural designs. Once completed, it will include up to 12 studios and offices for individual businesses or entrepreneurs, shared commission-free gallery space, a conference room, a classroom for community workshops, a ceramics studio, a kitchenette and warehouse space.

FOUR MORE RESTAURANTS Jackson is welcoming a few other new restaurants besides Iron Horse Grill—one downtown, one in Belhaven and two in Fondren. Former Underground 119 Manager Tom Ramsey

opened his first restaurant, La Finestra, in the Plaza Building at 120 N. Congress St. The Italian eatery is open, and has been packed for lunch almost every day. “This came together real fast,” Ramsey said Oct. 16. “I got a call that this place was available. I came down and met the owner, and within a week, we had a deal struck. I got the keys on Oct. 1, and we’re turning it around in 30 days.” The Manship Wood Fired Kitchen, an upscale restaurant in Belhaven offering a Mediterranean and southern European fare, opened its doors Oct. 31. Steven O’Neill, 32, is the managing owner of the restaurant and holds a level-one sommelier’s certificate. He is the former general manager of Parlor Market in Jackson. Renovations continue on the Pig and Pint at 3139 N. State St. in Fondren. Owner Grant Hutcheson hopes to open the barbecue restaurant within two months. Also in Fondren will be Saltine Oysters and Brew. Chef Jesse Houston, another Parlor Market alum, hopes to have the restaurant open in the west end of the Duling School by the end of May 2014.

ARCHITECTURE . PLANNING . INTERIORS

2915 NORTH STATE STREET . JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39216 . PHONE 601.713.1128 . FAX 601.713.1168 W W W. D U VA L L D E C K E R .C O M . R O Y T. D E C K E R , A I A . A N N E M A R I E D E C K E R , A I A

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17


// brew, baby, brew

TRIP BURNS

BIZ

// by Mo Wilson

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hree years ago, before Lucky Town Brewery changed Jackson’s drinkscape, Lucas Simmons and Brandon Blacklidge were just homebrewers when Chip Jones approached them and asked what they thought about starting a brewery. “Lucas said, ‘Well, I’ve actually thought about it—I just haven’t had anyone else to push me over the edge,’” Jones recalls. “Here I am,” Jones remembers saying. Jones, Simmons and Blacklidge dove in to start Lucky Town Brewery, eventually bringing in Angela Blackburn as a partner. The business background of the members was slim. The most experienced of them is Jones, who was a co-owner of White Rhino Fabrications, a metal fabrication company. Simmons and Blackburn’s college background prepared them for setting up shop. Simmons graduated from Mississippi State University with a mechanical-engineering degree, and is currently getting his master’s in industrial engineering. Blackburn also majored in industrial engineering. The guys don’t really have a typical work18

day. Since all the members have day jobs, they fit in time to plan events, chase new accounts and track down ingredients on their off hours. In the years since, Lucky Town’s brewskies have become staples at various Jackson establishments, and its brewmasters regularly bring home prizes from area brewing competitions and festivals such as Jacktoberfest and the Keg and Barrel Outlaw Homebrew Competition in Hattiesburg. In October 2013, the Jackson City Council granted Lucky Town permission to build its own brewing site in the heart of the midtown district at 1710 N. Mill St. Lucky Town has always brewed its own beer, but in the past it had to do so out of state, renting out a brewery in Alabama. Those expecting their Jackson location to spring up overnight will be sorely disappointed, though. Jones says renovating the place will be easy enough, estimating two to three months to overhaul the building. It’s the six-month wait on brewery equipment that is slowing down the

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

process. “The equipment we’ve ordered will take a long wait time, just because the industry is growing so rapidly,” Jones says. We can see that rapid growth of craft-beer culture here in Jackson. Restaurants such as Fondren Public, Sal & Mookie’s and the upcoming Pig and Pint are catering to the public’s growing desire for locally crafted beer. That kind of local pushback against nationwide beer companies has been overdue in Jones’ eye. “There’s really no other industry, from a consumer standpoint, that has been dominated by a few companies for so long, “ he says. Lucky Town is embracing its new midtown identity. The brewery’s beer was sold during the Midtown Holiday Studio Tours in December. That beer comes in several varieties. The award-winning Oatmeal Stout, known as the Flare Incident, is made with maple syrup and brown sugar. It’s a nice full-bodied beer that goes great with barbecue and a football game. The Ballistic Blonde is a Belgian-style Blonde Ale that tastes great with a salad on a warm Mississippi night but is full enough to stand up to heartier fare as well. Rounding out the trio of Lucky Town beers is the Pub Ale, an English Mild-style beer made with Mississippi honey. The equipment is scheduled to arrive in Jackson in May. After taking three to four weeks to set up the equipment the Lucky Town team will make a few test batches of the beer to ensure quality. “Obviously, we will be brewing on a different system, so there might be some changers or tweaks that need to be made,” Jones says. The brewery starts doing tours in July. But with a lot of work and a little luck, Jackson’s first city brewery will be up and at ’em just in time for porch weather this summer. Visit luckytownbrewing.com for more info. boomjackson.com


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Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

In 2014, Resolve to Order Office Supplies From a Local, Independent Dealer... With next-day delivery! Call to set up an account. 19


BIZ // meow

The Cats Behind

Cathead // by Justin Hosemann

T

he word vodka is a diminutive of the Slavic word voda, a term that means “water” in Russian. This distilled liquor was, and still is, part of the lifeblood of a vast region of northern, central and eastern Europe known as the “vodka belt,” and though it’s not used for its medicinal qualities anymore, it has become a sort of “social medicine”—a fine base for any social gathering. Austin Evans, 33, and Richard Patrick, 30, have been in the process of expanding that belt into the southeastern United States since 2010 when they opened their own distillery in Madison. Their first product: Cathead Vodka, a distinctly southern rendition that begins with a corn base and ends with the translucent, charcoal-filtered liquor that Cathead has come to be known by. Evans, a native of Jackson, met Patrick, originally from Alpharetta, Ga., at the University of Alabama over a decade ago while in school there. They both became interested in the spirits business, and each held several jobs in alcohol distribution before deciding to start a distillery of their own.

“Growing up in Jackson was one of those things that led me to go off and get a trade set up to figure out how I could do what I wanted to do,” Evans says. “I always knew we wanted to start our own business, so it was a matter of getting experience and bringing it home to Jackson to do it.” The revelation came to Patrick and Evans at the Sunflower River Blues and Gospel Festival in Clarksdale several years ago after having held a variety of alcohol distribution and sales jobs in Charleston, S.C. “It was there (in Clarksdale) that we made the determination that we wanted to start a distillery together,” Patrick says. Both Patrick and Evans are passionate about the blues and folk heritage of the Mississippi Delta, which inspired the Cathead name and logo. “The name ‘cathead’ had such a blues heritage and meaning behind it,” Patrick says. “It was basically used as a term of friendship and respect for a fellow musician and, over time, it became both a literal term and a piece of folk art from the Delta coined by musicians like Son Thomas and Muddy Waters.” Thomas (1926-1993), a musician/sculptor born in Eden, Miss., was the original creator of the “cathead” folk art made from un-fired Yazoo clay, which inspired the distinctive Cathead vodka logo the distillers use on their labels. Thomas was famous for his clay skulls he sold for supplemental income, often making busts of blues greats that he himself knew personally, hence the endearing “cathead” term of respect among the artists. Patrick and Evans have done an exceptional job at marketing their beverage as a markedly Mississippi product, but the proof is in the product. They’ve ventured into flavored vodkas, including rare ones for the industry such as honeysuckle and pecan. These reflect regional tastes TRIP BURNS

Each label on a Cathead bottle promotes supporting local music.

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January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


TRIP BURNS

WELCOME TO JACKTOWN.

The team behind Cathead includes (from left) Baxter Hartness, Phillip Ladner, Conway Craig, Austin Evans and Richard Patrick.

and use local, natural flavors to help boost cocktail options (their pecans come from Bass Pecan Co. in Madison). As the only distillery of any liquor in Mississippi, Evans and Patrick have also ventured beyond vodka, making their own original Bristow Gin, Hoodoo Liqueur (a chicory-flavored liqueur) and an upcoming un-aged “white whiskey” that could reach shelves by 2014. Cathead previously released a limited-run white whiskey titled “Gold Coast.” They credit their head distiller, Phillip Ladner, for bringing his vast knowledge of alcohol production to Cathead. Ladner is a native of Long Beach, Miss., whom Evans and Patrick had met in San Francisco while attending Ladner’s class on distilling. “We were lucky enough to bring Phil here,” Patrick says. “He’s got a wealth of knowledge on the production side, well more than us. He’s improved a lot of our process and quality.” “Process and quality” start and end at the distillery in Madison. Fermentation, distilling, bottling, labeling, and boxing are all carried out at that one location before landing in bars and liquor stores across the country. Though these distillers love sending their product as far as they can get it, they’ve had the greatest impact on the places close to home. “We’ve had overwhelming support from locally owned businesses,” Evans says. He credits several local restaurants, bars and liquor stores that have gone out of their way to support a local product. This is a favor these owners are willing to return. They have a “support local music” stamp on all their boxes and encourage more support for local businesses, artisans and entrepreneurs. “The more local breweries and distilleries that people have offered in their hometown, the more local products become integrated into the roots of that community,” Patrick says. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

JACKTOWN is the JFP’s new iPhone and Android app —put music, events and entertainment listings right in your pocket, convenient at any time! • “Best Bets” recommended listings in a variety of categories • Bookmarks to remember events you want to attend • Invite Your Friends via the app or SMS text • Group chat about upcoming events with invited friends • Venue maps, ticket links, special deals and discounts • Access to full music, events and headlines of Jackson Free Press • Special venue and festival channels

Text ‘Jackson’ to 77948 to get download links for JACKTOWN!

21


BIZ // network

Businesswomen Who Lunch // by Julie Skipper

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he phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;ladies who lunchâ&#x20AC;? brings up certain ideas. For me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a retro one: a prim crowd in pearls nibbling fancy little crustless sandwiches and sipping white wine. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not part of my personal experience, nor that of most of my contemporaries. These days, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about businesswomen who lunch. One such young professional is Shawna Davie, 30, director of education initiatives at the United Way of the Capital Area. One of Davieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite spots is Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adobo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eating there allows me to support downtown, where I live and work, and I like that their options are healthy and at a good price so I can treat a colleague,â&#x20AC;? she says. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a good spot for networking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a high chance Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see someone I need to talk to, or that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll run into someone with whom I need to reconnect,â&#x20AC;? she says. Another place for â&#x20AC;&#x153;see and be seenâ&#x20AC;? lunches is Koinonia Coffee House, where Davie enjoys a chicken salad sandwich or veggie panini and community atmosphere. Sometimes, though, a meeting calls for a quieter place for more serious conversation. Davie turns to Julep and High Noon CafĂŠ, which have quiet nooks, for a meal with someone high-profile. For larger gatherings, Char and Parlor

Shawna Davie makes the most of her time by combining lunch and business.

Market offer group spaces, both in the restaurants proper and in private event rooms. Reynolds Boykin, sous chef at Parlor Market, understands the importance of the businesslunch crowd, and women in particular. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom is a lobbyist, and I always remember how she balanced being a businesswoman with remaining a lady when she ate out,â&#x20AC;? he says. With that in mind, Boykin ensures

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that lunch dishes are â&#x20AC;&#x153;intellectual, but not greasy,â&#x20AC;? and include lighter options of salad and fish in addition to blue-plate specials. The Penguinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Hardy recognizes the need for encouraging business at his restaurant and is focused on making The Penguin â&#x20AC;&#x153;a destination, not just a restaurant.â&#x20AC;? By ensuring it appeals to a diverse crowd, he offers not just a menu and atmosphere that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;upscale, but not uppity,â&#x20AC;? but also a place for conversation and networking. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power-lunching ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; options are wide open. And my image of the whitewine-swilling ladies? Well, it can adapt, too. Like Boykin says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here, you can also have a glass of wine with lunch to lighten the mood, but still remain professional.â&#x20AC;?

Look Good Feel Good

Do Good Topâ&#x20AC;ŠBrandsâ&#x20AC;Šinâ&#x20AC;ŠStockâ&#x20AC;Š likeâ&#x20AC;ŠCarharttâ&#x20AC;Šandâ&#x20AC;ŠWonderwink 3500â&#x20AC;ŠLakelandâ&#x20AC;ŠDriveâ&#x20AC;Šinâ&#x20AC;ŠFlowood,â&#x20AC;ŠMSâ&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;ŠMon-Friâ&#x20AC;Š10-6â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;ŠSatâ&#x20AC;Š10-2â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘ 601.790.9003 22

January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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BIZ

// band of gold

All That Sparkles

// by Julie Skipper

A

s a younger man, Brian Beckham, now 40, saw one career for himself, but an offer he couldn’t refuse led him down a different path. Beckham’s mother owned a jewelry store, Evon’s Jewelry, in Carthage, Miss., where he apprenticed on the jeweler’s bench. He never saw himself pursuing the jewelry craft; he intended to go to law school. However, when his mother offered to cover his costs of living if he took a semester off to work at the store, he accepted. That semester changed his mind, and Beckham headed to Santa Monica, Calif., to attend the Gemological Institute of America. He furthered his studies at the Asian Institute of Gemological Sciences in Bangkok, Thailand, learning about mining and how to facilitate gemstone trade from mine to manufacturer. After training staff and opening new stores for an international diamond company, Beckham worked for a jeweler in Kansas City that planted the seed for opening his own store—a place that would sell all custom pieces in an open environment. A few more moves later, the time was right to return to Mississippi, first to his mother’s store, where he grew that business and opened a second location in Forest. Finally, he felt the time was right to take a chance and open his own shop. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

At his namesake jewelry store, Brian Beckham likes to create jewelry using “old school” processes such as hand-drawing and using molds for custom designs. Beckham Jewelry, which opened in October 2013, is the culmination of Beckham’s journey and vision. Walking into the store feels like entering an art gallery rather than a retail space, and that’s intentional. His concept centers on creativity and accessibility: pieces are displayed at eye level in cases that open from the front, and the open workbench is front and center. Much like an open kitchen in a restaurant, this highlights the creative process and lets customers feel a part of it. “I want everything to be transparent,” Beckham says. While Beckham offers three lines of his own designs, he also enjoys collaborating with clients to create custom pieces, particularly incorporating old jewelry that’s broken, mismatched or passed down from family members. “I like to recycle those (old) sentiments into a new design, and it doesn’t have to break the

bank,” he says. In addition to reusing materials, Beckham likes old-school techniques in-house rather than outsourcing the work. He practices the “lost-wax process,” where he handdraws designs, then uses wax carving to create molds. “It’s a fun process, and I like customers to be involved in it (through design collaboration). That sentimental value makes it all worthwhile.” Often his custom pieces use diamonds, but in his own work he likes color and texture. One line features a river rock design; another uses recycled silver that looks like lizard skin; a third, made of recycled gold, looks like leaves. As for the long run, Beckham says, “(I would) love to be known as a designer of my own work, each seen as a separate art piece, and to become purely a custom house.” Beckham also offers full-service repair and harbors a vast knowledge of luxury watches, another market he’d like to expand. Regardless of how his business grows, Beckham intends to keep creativity and community at the heart of it. “It’s about connecting with people,” he says. Beckham Jewelry is in LeFleur’s Gallery (4800 Interstate 55 N., 601.665.4642). Visit beckhamjewelry.com for more. 23


Weddings, Millennials Style

// by Molly Lehmuller

24

ing reception in a hotel, which provided a buffet, wedding cake, dance floor, table wine and hotel suite for the happy couple ($4,942.50), fourpiece band ($750) and gown with veil and shoes ($915). The total cost for the moderate wedding—including the $1,762 honeymoon to Maui—was $11,006.50, or $19,667.36 today. The extravagant wedding, with 16 in the wedding party and 300 guests—was ritzy to the extreme, and had luxuries such CHRISTINA CANNON

E

ssentially, all a wedding needs are two folks in love and a witness. That’s how it’s been in the U.S. (with a few exceptions … looking at you, “Sister Wives”) for the past century or so. But to compare the wedding process—and the wedding industry—from one generation to the next would be to find remarkable cultural changes and technological advances that have reshaped expectations for an entire generation of brides and grooms. In 1990, The Los Angeles Times tallied the varying costs of putting on three fictional weddings: the “simple,” the “moderate” and the “extravagant.” The Times set the simple wedding and its reception, which was “based on a wedding party of six and about 50 guests,” in a private home. It included a two-tier white cake ($50), DJ ($275), catering services featuring items such as cold-cut trays and lasagna ($400), and a $300 wedding gown. The sum total was $2,622.90 (just over $4,686 in today’s dollars). The moderate wedding—150 guests and a wedding party of 12—took place in a community church, and the follow-

Cakes, like this one from Cakes by Iris can be elaborate affairs.

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

as a stretch limousine with cellular phone and compact-disc player, a 16-piece band, two videographers and a $3,720 wedding dress. It ran, without a honeymoon, to $64,521.25 in 1990 dollars, or $115,292.21 today.

The Cost of Coozies Nearly 25 years and a whole generation later, the means to the end are very different, but the basics remain the same. According to the Wedding Report, a datacompilation site, the average American couple married in 2012 spent $25,656 on their wedding. While not far from the Times’ “moderate” wedding, adjusted for inflation, the 2012 figure can vary wildly depending on a variety of elements, from geographic location of the nuptials to personal tastes reflected in the party favors. CostofWedding.com, which gives the average of surveyants’ wedding costs by zip code or county, states that most couples in the tri-county Jackson metro area are likely to spend less than $10,000 on their weddings, including nearly half

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the little things (like) stamps and coozies and napkins.” The Wedding Report reports that the price of weddings peaked in 2007 at an average $28,730 per ceremony, and dropped significantly during the financial crisis in 2008 to $21,810, declining to $19,580 in 2009. Since then, the outlay for “I dos” has slowly crept back up.

‘Civic-minded,’ Experiential

Deborah Simmons, owner of Signature Occasions Wedding & Event Coordination, says married couples-to-be in Jackson have changed their spending habits since the financial crisis. There’s a new focus on “pinching pennies and putting the money where it makes an impact,” and, often, relying on event coordinators like herself to find the Couples deals and steals. these days have “I think that brides (in more options than 2014) are a little more aware ever for customizing of what they’re spending,” their big day, from location Simmons says. “The econto flowers to all the reception details. omy has been such that people are taking a second look at it. You don’t see as many just elaborate weddings in The cost of preour area as we probably once did. cious metals has risen I think the weddings that we do have “tremendously” in the last two decades, are really nice weddings—brides would says John Albriton, owner of Albriton’s like to have a very nice wedding for 150 Jewelry in Jackson, leading to increased people rather than an average wedding for initial outlay for engagement rings. Albri- 300 people.” ton estimates that the cost of raw materiMembers of the “Millennial” generaals has risen “four- or five-fold” in the last tion, those 80 million Americans born be20 years. In December 2013, an ounce of tween 1983 and the early 2000—also called gold was $1,230.70, up from $384 in 1994. Generation Y—are the ones goin’ to the This is in part due to recent economic figurative or literal chapel in 2014, as the policy that pushes up the price of com- average age of first marriage for American modities, which includes precious met- men is 28.9 and 26.9 for women, according als. The price has “affected both design to a 2011 Census Bureau survey. of the rings and metals purchased” for The Millennial generation, as exthem, he says, but “nobody thinks it’s an plained by the Strauss-Howe generational inexpensive proposition.” theory, has several defining cultural quali“One of the hardest things people ties that permeate its members’ lives. The ask me is, ‘How much does a wedding socially and financially stable members cost?’” Poole says. “There are a lot of are considered “civic-minded,” expeparameters, so we ask questions—what riential, optimistic and team-oriented. your favorite flower, what is your favorite They’re also tech savvy—Millennials kind of beer … It’s all the little things that are referred to as “digital natives”—and get you. When I sit down and talk about have the means to share ideas and expebudget with a client, we factor in a lot of riences, collect feedback, and network,

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

COURTESY ELIZABETH RAY PHOTOGRAPHY

of Hinds County’s couples. This is a fitting statistic, given that many residents of the metro fall beneath the poverty line. However, 17 percent of Madison County’s couples, 15 percent of Rankin’s, and 13 percent of Hinds’ spend more than $30,000 on their weddings. “A lot of times people are very shocked by the cost of a wedding,” says Kendall Poole, owner of Kendall Poole Event Planning. “It’s not the caterer just showing up with food.” These nuptials, more often than not, are preceded by presentation of an engagement ring from one party to another.

all without getting up from the couch. Twenty-five years ago, when the tail end of Baby Boomers and the older members of Generation X were planning weddings, there simply weren’t as many options, and most wedding accoutrements were standardized. “Years ago, planning a wedding you had a cake, nuts and punch at the church. The worst thing you had to do was get the guest list together. It wasn’t a big party, it was a church reception,” Simmons says. More importantly, the means for navigating the existing options were restrictive and time-consuming, and often required a bit of legwork. A bride- or groom-to-be in 1988 in need of a catered wedding would cut out recipes and flower arrangements from women’s magazines or cookbook, finger-walk through the Yellow Pages to find possible vendors, and rely heavily on relatives for filtering through venues or service providers in the area.

Planners and Pinterest In the early 1990s, weddings moved from family-planned and -orchestrated to more streamlined affairs, conducted through multiple vendors and, more often as years passed, supervised by an event coordinator. Texas Christian University Magazine cites one wedding planner who believes, that the trend was precipitated by the early ’90s popularity of Martha Stewart and her ilk, who “espouse gracious living that brought about people’s awareness of events and entertaining, wedding parties and food.’” In the same article, a TCU sociology professor commented that as some weddings move beyond casual or familial organization, a “demonstration effect” occurs. This sociological concept suggests that certain behaviors and decisions can beget similar behaviors and decisions (e.g. grander-scale ceremonies or non-church receptions) in large populations. The expectation of complex, highly personalized wedding ceremonies created, as TCU Magazine states, “business … conducted in the fulfillment of a social ritual.” That Millennials are more attuned to one another’s ideas and behaviors isn’t surprising, since they’ve got the

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Weddings,

from page 25

TRIP BURNS

mediate representations of their upcoming commitment, as well as unique favors that are meaningful for the guests and the newlyweds. “One of the big things that Kendall Poole Event Planning loves is to help brand a wedding,” Poole says. “We take that ‘logo,’ that one look, through the save the date, the invitations, the programs, the wedding … the whole look of the wedding has a cohesive invitation suite,” so people can associate a certain color, font or image with a couple and their upcoming exchange of vows (and the resultant party). Kendall Poole often creates inspiration boards for the events she plans. Many brides do the Popular take-home same thing using the online image-curation site Pinterest. treats include homemade jam or local honey; fun novmeans to see an incredible magnitude of on a budget, but she encourages them not elty items like photo-booth original content at their fingertips. Mod- to overcommit time and create stress in print-outs, coozies and sunglasses; or gifts ern couples make use of technology, es- the final stretch of their engagement. with utility, like program fans for summer pecially social media, to create unique and Wedding-specific online directories, weddings, disposable dance-floor flip-flops memorable experiences for themselves such as Premier Bride, EnGAYged or pashminas for chilly venues. One and their guests. While personalized wed- Weddings and BridePop procouple Poole worked with gave ding websites, online registries and Face- vide couples with listings Milk Bones to attendees book updates have become de rigueur of regional vendors and with a note detailing for newlyweds-to-be, Pinterest is more service providers. that in lieu of wedWedding than likely to be at the top of any engaged TheKnot.com and dings favors, they and event couple’s search history. Pinterest is an im- Wedding Wire were donating the planner Kendall Poole age-sharing site that allows users to create are a step above, funds to Jackson’s has seen first themed “pinboards” on which to save pho- providing those Community Anihand the big tos, poems, recipes, videos and the like. same resources mal Rescue Assochanges in “Pinterest is fantastic,” says Iris along with arciation (CARA) in the wedding Smith, of Cakes by Iris in Richland. By us- ticles, forums the name of their business over the ing it, brides and grooms can better “give and ceremony guests. (There’s past two us an idea of the direction they want to go ideas. TheKnot that Strauss-Howe decades. … Sometimes Pinterest gives them unre- even has financial civic-mindedness.) alistic expectations,” but vendors can work and organizational Despite the with the desired concept, Smith says, cit- wedding planning economic, social and ing an intricately designed Pinterest cake tools for couples to cultural expectations made entirely of fondant that could be use, in desktop versions changing from one generreplicated in buttercream for a more pal- and mobile applications. ation to the next, and the inate-pleasing result. Do-it-yourself projects, Unified, curated ceremodubitable shift in the same factors such as wedding favors or decorations, are nies are important to Millennial couples. that will occur when 21st-century babies popular pinned items. Simmons believes Beyond the typical two-color accent col- hit 2025, the rudiments of every wedding DIY elements can save money for clients ors, they’re looking for personal and im- will hopefully remain the same.

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January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Time For A Change

Stephen Barnette

Peekaboo

A

TRIP BURNS

lthough most people concern themselves with the dress, the rings, the cake and other details when putting on a wedding, Stephen Barnette plays an integralâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if sometimes overlookedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;role in putting the perfect event together. As the owner of Davaine Lighting, Barnette is many wedding plannersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; go-to man for making sure the bride is perfectly lit as she takes her stroll down the aisle and the guests can get down on the dance floor in the perfect amount of light. Davaine Lighting provides lighting for a wide range of events, from backyard celebrations to the seven-event, three-day spectacle of Mistletoe Marketplace 2013. Visit davainelighting.com for more information. Barnette, who also helped found the Jackson Free Press, let us peek inside one of his crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toolboxes to see some of the essential tools of his trade.

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Hitched Guide

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Hitched Guide Let us cater your next event.

The possibilities are endless at Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. We can outfit any occasion or any mood. Catering - Fund Raiser Events Rehearsal Dinners Let us be your next event space provider!

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Hitched Guide

Duling Hall FOR CONCERTS AND SPECIAL EVENTS IN THE HEART OF HISTORIC FONDREN indoor & outdoor event space spectacular sound, lights & video full catering kitchen & bar services entertainment services THE PERFECT INTIMATE VENUE TO HOST: weddings holiday parties luncheons fundraisers or any special occasion FOR RENTAL INFO: www.dulinghall.com 601.292.7121

Catering For All Occasions

Whether it’s a party for 600 or six we can can design and create a menu to fit your needs. We can create a scrumptious feast or delightful appetizers. You decide. 127 S Roach St. | Standard Life Bldg. | Downtown Jackson 601.944.9501 Monday - Friday | 11:00 am - 6:30 pm 30

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Hitched Guide Mosaics by Teresa Haygood Creative Minds Glass Studio commissions, classes, installations Gallery representation: Mississippi Craft Center Gallery - Ridgeland and Attic Gallery-Vicksburg

601-503-7944 teresahaygood@comcast.net

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Hitched Guide

Stylists: Nikki Henry, Brock Freeman, Griff Howard Lori Scroggins, Liz Torres, and Ginger Rankin.

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www.sterlingpics.net 601-982-3032

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January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Hitched Announcements

Harriett & Jed

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n April 5, 2014, Harriett Faychelle Johnson and Jed Hoffman Oppenheim will formally commit to spending their living days together. Harriett is from Jackson and is a graduate of Wingfield High School and JSU. Jed is from Los Angeles, Calif.—though he hasn’t called LA home for many years. Harriett and Jed first met in early 2010 on a street corner in Meridian, Miss., while they were both working for local civil-rights organizations. Jed had organized a community meeting and Harriett came representing her organization at the time. The meeting fell flat as only two elderly ladies showed up, but that first date ended up being a sign of things to come— minus the two elderly ladies and the juice and cookies for 50. It was still more than two years after meeting in Meridian before they started dating seriously, but it was clear they came together for a reason. Harriett’s vibrant energy, brilliant mind and inherent beauty were too hard to resist for Jed, and Jed’s horrible sense of humor and his uncanny ability to never say “no” managed to not run Harriett off. They have enriched each other’s lives, and hopefully the lives of those around them, through a common purpose to see a better future for each other, Jackson and Mississippi. Harriett has lupus and, at the time of writing, is in need of kidney— which means that she and Jed have the “In sickness…” part down and are utterly excited about the “…and in health” part. If you have type-o blood and are interested in being a kidney donor, please call Jed at 310.994.1841.

David & Emily

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mily Mathis, of Memphis, Tenn., and David Rahaim, of Jackson, Miss., met one autumn day at a downtown Jackson coffee shop in 2006. It wasn’t until the summer of 2012,

though, that they both realized the true depths of their friendship. With one long look between them, they decided to jump right in. Emily, a University of Mississippi and University of Memphis alumna, works as a counselor for IQH Tobacco Quitline while David, a Belhaven alumnus, works in marketing/sales for the Jackson Free Press. Now Emily, daughter of Bill and Marcia Mathis, and David, son of Robert and Linda Rahaim, are pleased to announce their engagement to be married June 2014.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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DEREK CHAD PHOTOGRAPHY

The Next Chapter // by Eddie Outlaw

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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W

DEREK CHAD PHOTOGRAPHY

e stood in the kitchen waiting for our cue to appear mato gravy, blackeyed peas in shot glasses with cornbread crouon the back porch. As Justin worked me over with tons, and real homemade pimento-cheese finger sandwiches, just the lint roller, I leaned over the sink for one last look to name a few. at the guests gathered to witness our union. Here As if everything the McPhersons had done so far wasn’t we were, after two months of planning, on the verge of starting enough, they had more up their sleeves. the next chapter of our life together. So many emotions welling up Donna, a lover of sweets, surprised us with a wedding cake inside, so much to express to each other as we waited to take our made with raspberry and lemon curd, finished with royal icing and place in front of Shari, our officiant. So many potatoes still in the a topper with two groomsmen. Bill, a collector of antique watches, oven at risk of filling the house with acrid smoke. had two from his collection restored and engraved for each of us. “The potatoes!” I barked, bolting for the oven. Justin instinc- The pair had also printed out their favorite of our pictures from tively reached for the assigned serving piece, and the last item of Facebook to display, and every guest got a copy of my “I Do” colfood made it safely to the table just in time for us to appear before umn for the Jackson Free Press (see jfp.ms/Ido). our guests, as unruffled and polished as new pennies. Any number of things could’ve gone horribly wrong, wedding It had never occurred to us to think about planning a wed- disasters being as commonplace as mints and salted nuts at these ding. In the days after the U.S. things, but everything came Supreme Court’s decisions together as planned because came down in June 2013, we’d our soon-to-be-joined families talked about paying a visit to worked as one. Our wedding the Justice of the Peace while wasn’t so much about making visiting Justin’s father, Bill our relationship “more real” or McPherson, and stepmother, about the “next chapter.” Donna, in Long Beach, Calif. It was, as our officiant But his father thought it was pointed out, about recognizing important that we should have the work we’d done as a couple some sort of celebration, that in the previous 11 years. And, we deserved it. no matter one’s views on the “I’ll handle everything,” subject of marriage equality, the he said. “All you have to do is truth is, it’s about family—the show up.” one into which you’re born and While Bill researched the one you choose to create everything we needed to do for yourself. on our end, his wife, Donna, I was warned that the cereturned her attention to readymony would be a blur, so I did my ing their home for the event. level best to remain grounded The landscaping was touched in the moment. As Shari spoke up, the pool was serviced, and about love and commitment, our Opposite page: Eddie Outlaw (in tan suit) and Justin the decking scrubbed. On past 11 years and the promise of McPherson married in California after the DOMA decision. weekends, she mapped out esa happy future together, I felt as Bill (far left in bottom photo) and Donna McPherson (far tate sales and swap meets, colif Justin and I were locked in an right) helped plan the nuptials. lecting crystal, silver and milk epic staring contest, broken only glass that could decorate our by impish grins and giggles. wedding. She also ordered billions of tiny LED lights that would We had prepared our own vows. Justin recited his first out of be strung hither and yon so that everything would be washed in fear that he’d be too emotional to speak when I was done. I spoke the most flattering light after sunset. They hired a bartender and a of love and our future, of course, but my main intent was this: I harpist, the latter at Bill’s insistence. knew the very instant we met that I was meant to love Justin. In The catering company, hell-bent on charging for a minimum fact, I believe I had to move to Memphis just to find him. Now, I’m that would feed three times the number of guests that were invited, not sure I believe in fate, but, as the old song says, “A dream is a was relieved of its obligation, and I stepped up. After all, it’s nothing wish your heart makes.” for Justin and me to feed 15 people Sunday brunch, so how difficult Surely my heart had wished for a love like ours. could it be to put together finger food for one’s own wedding? My previous guess about if I’d feel differently once married If I’d had a personal assistant, and a few more hours in a day, became a concrete reality: In joining ourselves together in a very I’d have shipped Simmons catfish (2628 Erickson Road, Yazoo real and purposeful way, we strengthened that love and commitCity, 662.746.5687), tamales from Doe’s Eat Place (502 Nelson St., ment we share. What had kept us together in work, life and love Greenville, 662.334.3345) and Indianola pecans (1013 U.S. 82, In- would hold us to each other in the future. dianola, 662.887.5420) out to the west coast. Instead, as Justin put Filmmaker Lauren Cioffi chronicled some of Eddie and Justin’s the finishing touches on the tabletops, I finished off some treats relationship in an upcoming documentary, “A Mississippi Love Stowith a southern flare—cheese grits and flank steak bites with to- ry.” See the trailer at jfp.ms/eddiejustin.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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2014

POWER

COUPLES

Photographer: Tate K. Nations Stylist: Nicole Wyatt Makeup Artist: Antoinette Anderson Location: The Ice House Alley Warehouses (251 W. South St., icehousealleywarehouses.com)

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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POWER COUPLE:

MEREDITH AND TERRY SULLIVAN

M

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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POWER COUPLE:

RACHEL AND CHRIS MYERS

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)DVKLRQLQIRUPDWLRQSDJH 45


2014 COUPLES

POWER

MEREDITH and TERRY, from page 36-37 Meredith is wearing a peplum top ($44) from Free People, sequin skirt ($268) from Libby Story, necklace ($48) from Free People, leopard booties ($58) from Libby Story. Terry is wearing a shirt ($135), tie ($75), suit ($195) and Cole Haan Lenox Hill shoes ($198), all from from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. RASHIDA and FELIX, from page 38 Rashida is wearing a red jumpsuit ($48.50) from Posh Btq, a black and white sweater ($10) from Bargain Boutique, a brass necklace ($48) from Free People and her own shoes. Felix is wearing a shirt ($135), tie ($75), suit ($195) and Cole Haan Lenox Hill shoes ($198) from Cole Haan Air Stanton shoes ($198), all from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. ERIC and ROBERT, from page 40 Eric is wearing a plaid shirt ($89.95), wool pants ($95), vest ($), Cole Haan Air Stanton shoes ($198) from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Robert is wearing shirt ($89.95), sweater ($110), pants ($165), and Cole Haan Air Madison shoes ($248) from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; coat ($450) from Orvis. RAMINA and ARASH, from page 41 Ramina is wearing a black and gold dress ($47) from Style Revel, a floral dress ($128) from Mulberry Dreams, shoes ($32) from Libby

Story, blazer ($10) from the Orange Peel, tights belonging to the stylist, chain necklace ($38) from Free People, wood pendant necklace ($44) from Mulberry Dreams. Arash is wearing a shirt ($135), tie ($75), pants ($174), and Johnston and Murphy shoes ($165), all from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

RACHEL and CHRIS, from page 45 Rachel is wearing a dress ($39.99) from Posh Btq; scarf ($18), boots ($98) and hat ($24) from Libby Story; and tights, socks and leather jacket belonging to the stylist. Chris is wearing a flannel shirt ($98) and corduroy pants ($129) from Orvis; a coat ($695) from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; and his own shoes and belt.

JEANNIE and BEN, from page 42 Jeannie is wearing a slip ($88), dress ($98), jeans ($168) from Free People, tights and socks belonging to the stylist, gold shoes ($138) from Libby Story, bracelets ($28) from Free People, bullet case necklace ($62) from Mulberry Dreams, bird pendant necklace ($38) from Lo Lady Fashion, a kimono ($34) from Style Revel. Ben is wearing a shirt ($135), tie ($75), pants ($175), Johnston and Murphy shoes ($165) from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; and a sweater ($98) from Orvis. SHIVON and JEFFREY, from page 44 Shivon is wearing a white leather dress ($89.99) from Posh Btq; a paisley shirt ($6) from N.U.T.S.; a jacket ($143) from Mulberry Dreams; bracelets ($28 for a set of three and $28 for a set of two with gemstones), and a necklace ($48) from Free People; patterned tights and socks belonging to the stylist; and her own shoes. Jeffrey is wearing a shirt ($135), tie ($85), pants ($95), plaid jacket ($395) and Cole Haan Lenox Hill shoes ($198), all from from Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Nicole Wyatt (left) styled the power couples. Special thanks to Amber Helsel, Marvin Jeter, W. C. McClendon, Susie Morgan and Ice House Alley Warehouses.

WHERE2SHOP:

Bargain Boutique (5070 Parkway Drive, 601.991.0500); Free People (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5018, Ridgeland, 601.605.0406); Kinkadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (120 W. Jackson St., Suite 2B, Ridgeland, 601.898.0513); Libby Story (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5003, Ridgeland; 601.717.3300; libbystory.com); LoLady Fashion (loladyfashion.com); Mulberry Dreams (3026 N, State St., 601.559.7074); N.U.T.S. (3011 N. State St. and 114 Millsaps Ave., 601.355.7458); The Orange Peel (422 E. Mitchell Ave., 601.364.9977); Orvis (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 9019, Ridgeland; 601.856.5347); Posh Btq (4312 N. State St., 601.364.2244); StyleRevel (stylerevel.com)

"EST OF*ACKSON &INALIST &INDUSATOURNEWLOCATIONAT -ARKET3TIN&LOWOOD -ONDAY 4HURSDAY PMÂ&#x201E;&RIDAY3ATURDAY PMÂ&#x201E;3UNDAY PMÂ&#x201E;Â&#x201E; 3HOE"AR0IECESÂ&#x201E; 3HOE"AR 0IECES 46

January - February 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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2906 North State St Ste.101-B located inside of Fondren Corner

n i y k n u f t Keeping i

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HAIR Shampoo/BlowDry $10 Shampoo/Set $15 Scalp Treatment $5 Call for Complete Press/Curl $20 List and Monthly Flat Iron Style $20 Specials. French Roll/Set $20 Deep Condition $5 Hair Cut $7 Hair Cut w/ Shampoo $13 Mens Haircut w/ Facial Hair $10

Educating Motivating Demonstrating

istory ia and h lg ta s o n e enjoy th visit and a r fo come in Stylists: Elisa Acey-Shelly Burns Bob Smith-Kacy Whitty 3015 North State Street Jackson 601.937.7754 like us on facebook

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BRAIDS AND WEAVING Full Head Twist Style $25 Goddess Braid $30 Cornrows Full Head $30 & Up Cornrows w/ Design $40 & Up Twist & Lock Full Head $40

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Relaxer Retouch $30 Permanent Wave $30 & Up Permanent Color $30 & Up Highlights/Foiling $35 & Up

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Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

ITALIAN FRAMES. NO PASSPORT REQUIRED. JEA Optical Boutique is proud to be the exclusive carrier of Salvatore Ferragamo glasses and sunglasses in the Jackson area! Ferragamo is one of the best-known Italian luxury brands, and we are thrilled to offer these high-end frames locally. Come by and see our complete selection of designer and luxury eyewear.

JACKSON 601.352.0025 | CLINTON 601.924.9750 | MADISON 601.853.2020 | WWW.JACKSONEYE.COM | ©2013 Jackson Eye Associates

47


BITES

// behind the scenes

The Backstage Man // photo and story by Amber Helsel

P

icture this: You walk into a wedding reception, and you see tables upon tables of food. Sweet stuff, spicy stuff, fun little party snacks. The food is there suddenly, and you wonder exactly how it got there. You occasionally see a member of the catering staff walk by and check on the temperatures of the food or refill a dwindling Peter James dish, but other than that, you carefully lays see no indication as to how out the buffet in preparation of the food arrived. an event he is Or maybe you go to catering. a luncheon, and you see a buffet line of delicious food, but no catering staff in sight. Sometimes we don’t think about how much effort goes into getting the food ready for an event. Even an event as small as a luncheon requires a lot of effort and a great attention to detail. But it’s about more than just setting the food up. A caterer works a day ahead. He has to if he wants to be successful and build great rapport with the client. It’s all about easing the customer’s mind and guiding her to hosting a great event. “The less they have to worry, the better they are,” says Peter James, a catering trainer at Catering by George’s. “With customer relations, the most important thing is to establish rapport.” James accomplishes this by connecting with the customer. He says the first step in establishing a good relationship is to talk to the person in charge of the event. “You have to make your presence known,” James says. “You’re there. They know why you’re there.” The second way is to always stay ahead of the game. This means working a day ahead, no matter what. Chris George, co-owner of the Catering by George’s, says it’s important to do all of the set-ups the day before. A good caterer is prepared if anything pops up randomly. The third way to build rapport is probably the most obvious: Follow through with everything. “It takes the same amount of time to talk 48

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

your way out of something,” James says. That’s why consistency and having a forward-looking eye is always best. James demonstrates a day in the life of a caterer. He starts by getting ready for the day’s orders, checking the order’s ticket, writing notes next to everything. His instincts kick in as he scribbles on the sheet of paper, sometimes writing so much that it would look like a jumbled mess to an untrained eye. For example, he knows that more than 35 people require five gallons of sweet tea. George’s uses a 5-gallon drum and two gallons of unsweet tea. If he’s catering for 60 or more people, he needs two 5-gallon drums and three unsweet jugs. He knows not to make the tea until the day of the event, as tea can be considered a hot item. James’ instincts are keen because he has been in the business for years. He moved to Mississippi after his daughter Delores Anne got a job as the director of marketing at the Mississippi Natural Science Museum. This particular day, James is training a future caterer at an event for the Mississippi Hospital Association in Madison (116 Woodgreen Drive, Madison, 601-9823251). George’s caters for the organization at least two or three times a week, so he’s well-versed in this type of event. As he looks at their ticket, James begins loading his truck with the set-ups, food and linen he’ll use. When everything is loaded up, and he has checked his list two and three times, James departs Reservoir Pointe, always 15 minutes ahead of when he’s supposed to leave. For example, for a job at noon, he leaves at 11:15 a.m. instead of 11:30 a.m. During these extra few minutes, he can account for any backedup traffic, tire blowouts or anything else that may slow him down. At the catering site, he wheels out the cold items—ice, lemons, salad dressings, crackers, etc.—the linen, plates, cups, napkins and cutlery and the hot food, which is kept in giant hot boxes with tight locks. That food will be dropped last. boomjackson.com


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The first part of catererâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job is table set-up, both at the buffet table and the regular tables. Sometimes, he or she has the option of setting up a day before for this particular luncheon, so everything is ready when he or she arrives on event day. For the buffet table, James lays down a colored tablecloth, based on the color scheme the client wants. He carefully places linens, chafing dishes (metal pans with outer pans filled with hot water), condiment plates, tongs, spoons and fuel for the chafing dishes. Though the food table takes a while to set up, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require as much attention to detail as the main tables. For these, a caterer has to have a keen eye for detail. Even a skewed fork can mess up the look of a table layout. From lining up the chairs correctly to avoiding dinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legs hitting things under the table, to placing tablecloths with the seams in exactly the right spot, to setting dishes and utensils in the proper place, James is extremely detailed. About 15 minutes before people eat, James drops the hot food into chafing dishes, so the food will be hot when guests get it. When the event starts, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a waiting game for James. He waits to hear from the organizer on how the food is going. He waits for them to tell him they need ice. He waits. Then the organizer tells him they are done. James cleans up and slips out as inconspicuously as he came in. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

49


BITES // raw

Little Bit Rock ‘n’ Roll // by Amber Helsel

TRIP BURNS

U

sh ia tC raz y Ninja .

pon walking into Crazy Ninja (2530 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601.420.4058), you get the feeling that this isn’t a regular Japanese steakhouse. For one thing, what used to be a fountain at the front is now a stage for a drum kit. When the host pulls the sushi menus from the host stand, they aren’t just any old menus. They’re made of vinyl-record sleeves, with each part of the menu glued to the inside. The sushi side is filled with rock ‘n’ roll memorabilia such as framed concert posters and promotional photos for rock ‘n’ roll musicians, including The Beatles, Mick Jagger, and plenty of others. The hibachi side is fairly normal compared to the sushi side, but it’s the chefs who make the environment. They do the standard hibachi like throw rice and eggs at you, but they also beat their spatulas on the grill, making some cool music as they work. It’s all part of the vision of owners Emrick Immanuel, 26, and Ashley Bouttavong, 25. The couple opened Crazy Ninja’s doors Sept. 21, 2012. From the moment their investor found the empty location, to creating the floor plan, to Ashley Bouttavong and Emrick the week they spent training the staff, it took about a year Immanuel infused Crazy Ninja with and a half to see their dream come to fruition. rock ‘n’ roll influences. “We love the location. We love the area,” Bouttavong says. “We wanted to find a good, traditional location. Then we went in there and flipped house.” The restaurant is painted crimson with all the memorabilia a music fan could ever want. make-your-own sushi rolls. Bouttavong and Immanuel say the menu is They got the record sleeves for their sushi menus from a man who had very popular, describing one customer’s “Fatty Cakes Roll.” The roll been collecting since he was 18. “We had a lot of fun making those,” included carrots, cream cheese, panko-fried lobster and chicken, baked Bouttavong says. scallops, three different sauces—and the customer had it deep-fried. “It’s a perfect place because of the com“I think we had to wrap it in two things of seaweed paper,” Boutpetition,” Immanuel says. tavong says with a laugh. “It was so big.” Immanuel and Bouttavong agree Another signature roll the restaurant plans to unveil in the future that the hardest part of opening is a country-fried steak roll with mashed potatoes, green beans and Crazy Ninja was developing the homemade country gravy wrapped in soy paper. menu, specifically the sushi “We like to think outside the box,” Bouttavong says. “And there menu. While the regular are so many things you can do with (sushi).” menu items have standard In the future, Immanuel and Bouttavong hope to become more innames, their sushi menu volved in the community, and also open more Crazy Ninja locations. is vastly different. For “(We want) one on every corner in Jackson,” Immanuel jokes. the variety of items on While the couple’s main focus is getting Crazy Ninja to where it that menu, Immanuel and needs to be, they hope to open a smaller version in Madison at some Bouttavong came up with point. But in the near future? Within the next two months, Crazy Ninja many different combina- will have a “reverse happy hour,” which means that along with the 2 p.m. tions and incorporated names to 5 p.m. happy hour, the restaurant will host happy hour from 8 p.m. to su wn and famous lines from songs close. This year, Crazy Ninja will have acoustic sets once a week. o r Invent you into fishy names for sushi. Crazy Ninja’s full menu is available on the hibachi and sushi side of The restaurant also has a menu the restaurant. Visit crazyninjausa.com or find Crazy Ninja on Facebook called “You Rock, We Roll,” for name-and- for more information. 50

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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When we say LOCAL, we mean LOCAL! At McDade’s Market we pride ourselves on giving back to the community by offering quality products, buying from local Mississippi producers and supporting hundreds of community events and organizations each year. The people of McDade’s Market -- its owners, managers and 350 employees -- are proud to serve our customers with a truly local grocery store! MAYWOOD MART 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-8486 WESTLAND PLAZA 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089 WOODLAND HILLS Shopping Center Fondren 601-366-5273 YAZOO CITY 734 East 15th St. 662-746-1144 BELHAVEN ENGLISH VILLAGE 904 E. Fortification St. 601-355-9668

Local Products and Gifts

Party Trays Available for Order (call ahead)

Best Beer Selection in Jackson

USDA Choice and Prime Beef

Fresh Local Produce from Mississippi Growers

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Also Stop By Maywood Mart Shopping Center (Next door to McDades Market Extra)

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51


ARTS // spirit TRIP BURNS

Life in a Glass House

// by Kathleen M. Mitchell

E

lizabeth Robinson spends much of her days raising birds. Her birds are colorful, brilliantly patterned and grow up in flocks before flying to new homes. They are also made of glass. Although now a visual artist, Robinson started out in a different thread of the arts. She went to Mississippi University for Women on a music scholarship, and graduated with two degrees, one in psychology and the other in health, physical education and recreation. She moved to Jackson, working off and on as a musician. But when she wanted a more steady job, she found it at Andy Young’s Pearl River Glass Studio in Midtown. Although she originally came on as more of a businesswoman, she began learning glass from Young and Susan Ford, and eventually branched out into her own form of glassworking. “That was back in the early ’80s,” Robinson says. “It was the beginning of the Millsaps Avenue Midtown, and I was there for 15 years. … The form of glass I took on was not even being addressed at that point—Andy as doing beautiful stained glass with that German style, and Susan Ford was doing hot glass from a furnace, and nobody was working in kiln-fired glass, because there just wasn’t that much interest in it.” But Robinson was interested, and got a pottery kiln to teach herself. Her method is considered a “warm-worked” technique, somewhere between hot furnace glass and cold stained glass. Robinson, 59, hand-cuts shapes from large sheets of glass and fires them in a kiln. Robinson, who also is a co-owner of Professional Staffing Group, left Pearl River and set up her own glass studio in the 1980s in Fondren. “I loved Midtown, but Fondren was 52

In addition to birds and fish, Elizabeth Robinson makes glass fleurs-delis, catfish, pieces in the shape of Mississippi, and much more.

an ideal choice for me,” she says. “I was able to really be a part of this artist community that led the way for Fondren becoming Fondren.” Her first signature pieces she called “spirit houses,” medium-sized structures of glass and light, which led to her naming her business Spirit House Glass. “The spirit houses are fun to me when I can get them done because they are whatever the viewer sees in them,” Robinson says. “They are not representative of anything but light and glass, and I like that people see something in them that may not have necessarily been in my mind when I was doing them.” Last year, Robinson took her art and her business to a new level by partnering with two national art websites, growing her reach and sales to an unprecedented level. The first, ArtfulHome.com, offers her birds and fish to a national audience. The response to her works was

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

encouraging, as Robinson and her team produced flock after flock of birds and fish to keep up with demand. In December, Robinson found out she was a top-10 seller for 2013. The other site, artcommission.com, helps people find her to order custom and commission work. Robinson is the only artist from the state represented, but she hopes to change that. “Being the only Mississippian is odd, so we’ve got to fix that,” she says. “I’m very active in the Craftsmen’s Guild, and there are members right there that … are ideal. I’m hoping to lay a little path to have other people walk along with me on it.” When Robinson talks about her art, she comes across part creative and part mad scientist, tossing in words like formula and technology and experiment. The process she works in is a rare one, especially in Jackson, but she loves sharing it with others. boomjackson.com


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12/9/13 4:42 PM 53


MELODIES // stately mansions

To Portland, With Love // by Briana Robinson

A

fter the success of her “Nautilus” CD release event in early 2012, singer and songwriter Laurel Isbister Irby began planning for the second installment of “The Nautilus Project,” a series of hybrid concerts and art shows. The first event featured a live music concert and a visual art show at the Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace. Guest musicians from “Nautilus” performed at the event, including Rhonda Richmond, Jamie Weems, Wes Hughes and Loye Ashton. The artwork all had some sort of relationship to three of the albums songs: “Jackson,” “Gold” and the title track, “Nautilus.” Professional visual artists such as Tony Davenport,

TOM BECK

BeBe Wolfe and David Rae Morris participated as well as up-and-coming artists Akiko Sekihata and Dimitrus Williams. After the first installment of “The Nautilus Project,” Isbister Irby started thinking about a second phase. Last summer, she traveled to Portland, Ore., to meet with potential collaborators. “If you think of how a nautilus shell spins out and grows outward, this is how I’m envisioning this project,” she says. “Instead of just staying in Jackson, we’re picking a new city, and we’re adding an art form.” Isbister Irby discovered several ties between Jackson and Portland. Her two co-creators for the Portland installment, Brandi Katherine Herrera and Lisa Kislingbury Anderson, both have lived in Jackson (Anderson as an intern at the Jackson Free Press). In the past year, she has also met several Portland natives who now live in Jackson. “Jackson is just a hometown kind of place for me. I know so many nice people. I like the idea of then taking that to another city and trying to make that loop go around,” Isbister Irby says. “We’ll learn from them, and they’ll learn from us.” She wanted the event to include a larger city more nationally known for its art and music culture, while not ignoring the importance of Jackson’s community-driven arts and music scenes. “There’s something authentic to me and about life in the south,” she says. “Everywhere else I’ve lived, the energy around creativity has been competition. … I find that that energy is not very conducive Singer/songwriter Laurel Isbister Irby’s long-term endeavor, to good work for me.” “The Nautilus Project,” will connect Portland and Jackson. 54

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

The next installment of “The Nautilus Project” is an ongoing collaboration between Portland and Jackson artists, and Isbister Irby plans to have a conclusive music and art show in May. One of her many goals is to include as many artists as possible. The Jackson event will focus more on musical performances and might include participatory dance and yoga sessions. In keeping with promoting interdisciplinary artistic dialogue, Isbister Irby is also planning a written-word event. She wants to set up a Google+ Hangout during the events and have stations for FaceTime to allow participants to see what’s happening across the country and discuss their experiences. The installment, dubbed “The Nautilus Project – PDX” (named after the Portland, Ore., airport code), features a variety of writing genres. In July 2013, Irbister Irby, Kislingbury and Herrera launched a Tumblr blog, which features pieces from various writers in Portland about how living in Jackson has influenced their work. The second phase of the blog will have work from Jacksonians with connections to Portland or Portlanders. Isbister Irby first conceived of “The Nautilus Project” during the summer of 2011. “I got caught up with this form of haiku that blends poetry with wood-block printing,” she says. “I don’t know why, I just thought it was really neat to learn it was a fusion.” From there, she contemplated the traditional concept of a CD release, which is commercialized, aimed at selling as many discs as possible. “What if I could take the whole idea of what a CD release party is and just question it?,” she says. “Why not say, ‘Is there another way to do this with a different goal?’ ... The community of artists and art lovers is what has helped me to create more music here. So what if the goal of this is to strengthen that community for others and for myself?” “The Nautilus Project” will have two more installments: in 2016 between Jackson and Brooklyn focusing on teaching and food; and in 2018 between Jackson and Nashville focusing on gardening and love. Both will also incorporate visual art, music and dance. Visit Isbister Irby’s blog at laurelisbister. wordpress.com, and hear samples of her music at soundcloud.com/laurel-isbister. Visit “The Nautilus Project” blog at nautilusprojectpdx.tumblr.com. boomjackson.com


            

        

 

  

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55


COOL TOO // cleveland

Stop for the Blues, Stay for Everything Else // by Jessica Wei FLICKR/TINKERBRAD

F

FLICKR/NATALIE_MAYNOR

Explore how Cleveland’s history is entwined with the railroad industry at The Martin & Sue King Railroad Heritage Museum.

Visit Dockery Farms to experience the birthplace of the blues. 56

rom the outset, Cleveland, Miss., truly Highway 61 and along the Mississippi Blues belies its rich and colorful history as Trail. Discover the birthplaces of American folk the birthplace of the Delta Blues, what music, the rich history of the poorest class and with the box-sized stores and strip the music that resonated warmly above the slow, malls that hug Highway 61, the legendary Blues painfully muted social upheaval. When you need to stop for sustenance, forHighway. Welcome to the Mississippi Delta, lazily stretched along the Mississippi River, the capiget Jude—you’ll be singing “Hey, Joe” after tasttal of cotton growing, widely hailed, for better or ing one of the burgers at Hey Joe’s, an eclectic worse, as “The Most Southern Place on Earth.” burger joint and music venue just a few blocks If there is anything that you east of Delta State University. Joe’s have to remember about the Misoffers draft beers, themed menu Chase the ghosts sissippi Delta, it is that it is blues of Charley Patton, items (Kevin Bacon Burger or country. On the Mississippi Blues Elvis Presley, Soundgarden Salad, anyone? How Whiskey Red, Trail, visitors can learn about the about a Knuckle Sandwich, made B.B. King, Howlin’ rich history of the influential musiwith grilled chicken, smoked Wolf, Bo Diddley cal genre, some of which took place and the rest of the turkey and applewood smoked bluesmen down in Cleveland itself. bacon?), and a huge outdoor proHighway 61 ... Also in the area: a heritage mujector for movie screenings and seum that boasts one of the more college games. Every month, the eatery releases a new impressive model-train sets in the world. Decent eats. Remarkably good music. Highway stretchburger innovation named after the month— es that remind you of country tunes, and fields Mister October, for example, is a half-pound that haven’t changed since the birth of America. brisket burger with house dry rub topped with Explore the history of blues and the days of cheddar, balsamic coleslaw, fried onions and cotton at Dockery Farms. The idea that a musijalapenos, and mosquito burrito chipotle BBQ cal sound that has become an inarguably promisauce on a pretzel roll. Another can’t-miss attraction? The chance nent aspect of modern music even has a traceable birthplace and real names of real founders to take a train to Anywhere, USA, at the Martin is somewhat unthinkable. But a century is not all & Sue King Railroad Heritage Museum. It’s hard that long, and buildings last as long as legacies to say what the Mississippi Delta would look like when they’re valued as such. Dockery Farms is without the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas by no means Versailles or some opulent palazzo Railroad. The Martin & Sue King Railroad Heriwhere the first operatic aria reverberated down tage Museum seeks to promote the history and marble hallways. In the context of New World culture of the railroad and its role in Cleveland. A 70-by-17-foot model train originally built history and pop music, however, this 10,000-acre former cotton plantation with its rusty collection by James Wiggins is a huge draw for children of peeling wooden sidings, painted signs and and adults alike and the main centerpiece of the corrugated tin roofs is more important. museum. While the train track doesn’t technicalThe stark setting adequately reflects the ly adhere to a scale model of any particular town, starkness of the songs Charley Patton, the father it is representative of Anywhere, USA, possibly of the iconic Delta Blues, strummed and sang the most important destination in all of Ameriunder the tutelage of Harry Sloan. It was a musican history. As well, visitors can see artifacts cal farm, rich in soil but poor in income, one of from early America, listen to early blues music the few that offered fair contracts to its laborers and learn about the cotton and timber industry and allowed the sound to prosper on its grounds. that also formed the Mississippi Delta. Chase the ghosts of Charley Patton, Elvis This article originally appeared on Presley, Whiskey Red, B.B. King, Howlin’ Wolf, Hopper.com, a Boston-based travel startup webBo Diddley and the rest of the bluesmen down site. Jessica Wei is a staff travel writer for the site.

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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57


january

25 - “Goodnight Moon,” 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The musical is about a young bunny’s struggle to stay awake and enjoy the wonders of his room. Additional dates: Jan. 31, 7 p.m., and Feb. 2, 2 p.m. $15, $10 ages 12 and under; call 601.948.3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com. 17 - 45th Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation, Convocation 10 a.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in McCoy Auditorium. The keynote speaker is former NAACP Chairman Julian Bond. Free; call 601.979.7036; jsums.edu.

9 - The Blast Downtown: Winter Series, 9 p.m., at Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 S. State St.). The house-music event features hits from DJ Scrap Dirty, The Nastysho, DJ Sketch and DJ Spirituals. $5 cover; theblastmidtown.com.

18 - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration Parade,, 9 a.m.-noon, at Freedom Corner (Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Medgar Evers Boulevard). The annual parade features bands, performers and local celebrities. Participants must RSVP and line up at Brinkley Middle School (3535 Albermarle Road) by 8:30 a.m. Free; call 601.960.1090. 26 - Best of Jackson Party Jan. 26, 6-11 p.m., location TBA. Save the date for the JFP’s annual celebration of all things Jackson. By invitation only; JFP daily subscribers should check their inboxes for details. Finalists can email party@jacksonfreepress.com to get on the list. bestofjackson.com.

10 - Gungor, 9 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Michael and Lisa Gungor perform songs in several genres with an experimental style. Doors open at 8 p.m. $18 in advance, $22 at the door, $30-$35 VIP, $3 surcharge for those under 21; call 601.292.7121; ardenland.net.

11 Mississippi Blues Marathon and Half Marathon, 7 a.m., in downtown Jackson. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi sponsors a full marathon, a half-marathon, a one-mile kids race and relays. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Mississippi Blues Commission. msbluesmarathon.com.

12 - Premier Bridal Show: Weddings and Celebrations, 1-5 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The event includes door prizes, samples and consultations with wedding professionals. No strollers allowed. $27 in advance, $30 at the door; call 601.957.1050; thepremierbridalshow.com.

30 (through Feb. 9) “M*A*S*H,” at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). The play is based on the popular film about an Army medical unit serving during the Korean war. $15, $10 students, military and seniors (cash or check); call 601.825.1293; blackrosetheatre.org.

20 - Opera Underground, 7:30 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). The Mississippi Opera hosts the series. Matt Daniels sings Cole Porter’s songs. Doors open at 6 p.m. $20; call 601.960.2300; msopera.org.

23 - Mystery Happened Here: An Evening of Intrigue at the Old Capitol, 5:30-8 p.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre performs. Also enjoy a wine and heavy hors d’oeuvres reception before and after the show. $40; call 601.576.6920; oldcapitolmuseum.com.

31 - Jackson Heart Ball, 6-10:30 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). The black-tie event includes a cocktail party, seated dinner, live and silent auctions, and entertainment. Proceeds benefit the American Heart Association. $250, $3,500 table of 10; call 601-321-1214; email michelle. alexander@heart.org; w

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

58

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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COURTESY THE BLAST; COURTESY GUNGOR; PEDRO J PEREZ; FILE PHOTO; FLICKR/ANGELA_N; FILE PHOTO; FILE PHOTO; FILE PHOTO; BEST OF JACKSON; FILE PHOTO; COURTESY JACKSON HEART BALL

Events // sassy


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Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

59


february 1 - “Chamber III: Mozart by Candlelight,” 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs Mozart. $16; call 601.960.1565; msorchestra.com.

4 - Music in the City, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), 5:45 p.m. in Trustmark Grand Hall. Enjoy a cash bar and music from Taylis Fernandez and John Paul. Free; call 601.960.1515; msmuseumart.org. 5 - “Platanos and Collard Greens,” 7 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in McCoy Auditorium. The comedy is about the relationship between African Americans and Latinos in NYC. Call 601.979.7036; jsums.edu/arts. 7 - National Wear Red Day. Wear red to promote awareness of heart disease in women, and look for local American Heart Association events in your area. Free; goredforwomen.org/ wearredday.

8 - Ignite the Night, 7-10 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The theme of the annual adultsonly fundraiser is “Jazzin’ It Up, N’awlins Style.” Sponsorships available. Tickets go on sale Dec.30;call601.981.5469; mschildrensmuseum.com.

60

13 - “Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys,” 6-7:30 p.m., at Jackson State University’s Margaret Walker Center (Ayer Hall, 1400 John R. Lynch St.). Dr. Loye Ashton leads the discussion on Leila Ahmed’s book “A Quiet Revolution.” Free; call 601. 979.2055; jsums.edu/ margaretwalkercenter.

21 (through March 2) - “Man of La Mancha,” at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). The play within a play depicts author Miguel de Cervantes performing scenes from his book “Don Quixote” with fellow prisoners during the time of the Spanish Inquisition. Ticket prices vary; call 601.636.0471; vicksburgtheatreguild. com for more.

13-23 - “Curtains: A Musical,” at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). In Blackbox Theatre. The musical based on Peter Stone’s book is about a police detective’s investigation of the murder of an actress. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for Belhaven students and employees; call 601.965.7026; belhaven.edu.

22-23 - Gem, Mineral, Fossil and Jewelry Show, at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Purchase from gem and fossil dealers, and enjoy lapidary art demonstrations such as faceting, flint knapping and wire wrapping. $5, $3 students; missgems. org.

17 - Jazz, Justice and the Journey of Tradition, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). The Theodicy Jazz Collective performs in conjunction with the Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series. $10, $5 students; call 601.974.1130; millsaps.edu/conted.

20 - The Black Codes to Brown v. Board of Education, 6-7:30 p.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Historians Jere Nash and Dr. Michael Williams discuss topics related to black history, specifically the time period between the end of the Civil War and the modern civil rights movement. Free; call 601.576.6920; email info@ oldcapitolmuseum.com; oldcapitolmuseum.com.

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

23 - JJ Grey and Mofro, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The band from Jacksonville, Florida plays several genres of music such as southern rock and R&B. Doors open at 7 p.m. $25 in advance, $30 at the door; call 601.292.7121; ardenland. net.

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

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Events // sweet


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CELEBRATING Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

61


MY LOCAL LIST

10

Picture-Perfect Places 4 3

2 5

1

6

7

1) The Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St., 601.359.3114) is a nice place to take engagement pictures. It has those cascading steps and large columns, statues, and flower garden in the front. 2) The King Edward/Hilton Garden Inn (235 W. Capitol St., 601.353.5464). The King Ed historic hotel is definitely a great place for wedding and receptions, with the stairs, fireplace and the reception area’s arching ceiling—it’s just really nice and classy. 3) Mynelle Gardens (4736 Clinton Blvd., 601.960.1894). The gardens have great options with locations, flowers and scenes. 4) Jackson City Hall (219 S. President St., 601.960.1111) I’ve taken some really great engagement and bridal pictures at Jackson’s City Hall, especially in the fall months, when the trees and flowers are really bright and vibrant. 5) The Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive, 601.432.4500). The culture and history of the Ag Museum makes for very scenic weddings and receptions. 62

8 9 10

6) The Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601.960.1515). I especially like the way the flowers in the Art Garden are cut like a maze. Then, the McRae Children’s Fountains adds an extra touch. Inside, you have all types of art that’s makes for great pictures. 7) The Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St., 601.359.9000). The décor and atmosphere of the Old Capitol Inn are great, but it’s the cobblestone patio and fountain that make for magical wedding pictures. 8) The Capital Club (125 S. Congress St., 601.969.7101). This 19th-floor club in Capital Towers with panoramic windows

January - February 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

offers a great view of the city—the perfect backdrop. 9) Red Phone Booth Congress Street Near the end of Congress Street, where it intersects with Capital Street, there’s this old vintage red phone booth. The red of that phone booth really pops, and it gives a lot of character to engagement pictures. It’s one of my favorites places of all the locations I shoot engagement pictures. 20) The South Warehouse (627 E. Silas Brown St., 601.939.4518). The South is a perfect blend between vintage and modern. You have to bring in more lighting, but that’s a tiny detail compared to the quality of the scenery offered. boomjackson.com

PHOTO OF WILL STERLING COURTESY WILL STERLING; PHOTO OF DAISIES COURTESY FLICKR/BIGTALLGUY; PHOTO OF THE SOUTH COURTESY THE SOUTH; REST OF PHOTOS BY TRIP BURNS

Will Sterling, celebrity photographer and owner of Sterling Photography, shares his top 10 places in Jackson for engagement and wedding photographs.


The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine now 6 times a year! Advertise: 601.362.6121 ext. 11

March 2014 Editorial:

- Innovators & Visionaries

- Coolest Offices

- Spring Office Fashion - Parades! - Spring Menu Guide

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September 2014 Editorial:

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- Fall Food and Fashion

January 2015 Editorial:

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BOOM Jackson, The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine, is distributed in more than 200 locations in the Jackson metro, including area grocery stories, high-traffic businesses and curbside “BOOM boxes.” BOOM is placed in business-class hotels in the region, and is distributed by local chambers and visitor’s bureaus. Copies are available for meetings, trainings and recruiting by local companies and organizations. Subscriptions are available for $18/year for shipping and handling costs. Call 601.362.6121 x11 for ad information. Boom Jackson is a publication of Jackson Free Press, Inc.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

63


BOOM Jackson v6n5 - 2014 Hitched & Power Couples Issue  
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