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BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE EXPECTED GRADUATION: SPRING 2013 MASTERS OF INTERIOR DESIGN

CYCLORAMA PERFORMANCE ART CENTER

THESIS DOCUMENT START FALL 2012 COMPLETION: SPRING 2013

THESIS STUDENT

THESIS REPRESENTATIVE

________________________________ ISABEL YOUNG LOPEZ

________________________________ WM. PAUL JOYCE

THESIS ADVISOR

HEAD OF INTERIOR DESIGN SCHOOL

________________________________ ANN MARIE PROCOPIO

________________________________ CRANDON GUSTAFSON


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THESIS PANEL MEMBERS THESIS ADVISOR ANN MARIE PROCOPIO DESIGNER THESIS REPRESENTATIVE WM. PAUL JOYCE DESIGNER CLIENT: MICHAEL MCGARTY SET DESIGNER EXPERT CONSULTANTS LUKAS STURM LIGHTING DESIGNER A. VERNON WOODWORTH-AIA, LEED AP BUILDING CODES DESIGN CRITICS YUGON KIM - ARCHITECT PHOEBE LOVEJOY -INTERIOR DESIGNER MOREL ORTA-ARCHITECT SMITA SAHOO-INTERIOR DESIGNER STEPHANIE LOPEZ- ARCHITECT

Figure 2. Print #3. Photograph by DancePrints.com

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Table of Contents THESIS PROPOSAL ........................................................................................................................................... 6 PRELIMINARY REVIEW .....................................................................................................................................34 SCHEMATIC REVIEW .......................................................................................................................................58 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ..................................................................................................................................76 INTERIM REVIEW ..............................................................................................................................................88 FINAL REVIEW ................................................................................................................................................100 SPECIFICATIONS.............................................................................................................................................124 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS .....................................................................................................................182 CODE REVIEW ...............................................................................................................................................210 BIBLIOGRAPHY...............................................................................................................................................214 RESUME ..........................................................................................................................................................216

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Reviewers Present: Crandon Gustafson, Head of Interior Design WM. Paul Joyce, Thesis Representative Michael Mcgarty, Client Representative

Thesis Statement: Understanding the notion of human movement and circulation can therefore lead to a successful interior design. Consequently, this comprehension can be used to improve a space’s intended purpose and benefit the experience it provides.

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Preface Walking through a space one can’t help but to see rhythm and motion in design. Ballet and its choreography portray a sense of beauty, motion, and coordination. Consequently, one ponders on the effect and influence that it has when applied to design and the built environment. It’s as if dance where to become an integral part of a successful design. When creating a composition, designers should take movement and its effects into complete consideration. Designers should not only look at how actual bodies interact and move through a space but should encompass how an actual design creates perspective & movement in the eyes of its beholder.

Thesis Abstract Dance posses a meticulous language which is expressed through human movement. This language conveys human emotion, and its elements are what make a composition resonate. Every movement creates a visual interpretation which leads to a grand scheme. As a result, design can employ this language to create and heighten the experience in a space. The following thesis will explore the how dance and motion can heighten the design of a performance space. We will look at how dance’s influence can increase the potential for innovation of the built form, its experience, and ultimately the overall success of a space. As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance uses colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it. This language goes beyond visual interpretations. Dance choreographers also encompass a body’s movement and its use of spatial dimensions. Interior designers should understand those notions in order to understand how bodies are concerned with space. A dance stage is a livable space is not a static three dimensional portrait. Time and motion become a dynamic influence on how people observe and interact it. The visual motion which people achieve through a space comes to define its purpose. This interaction between motion and purpose creates more than a physical link between dance and interior design. Eva Perez de Vega in her book “Choreographed Environments” says that: “Architecture no longer consists of making buildings and dance no longer consists of making dances. The hope is that as dancers can continue to explore new territories as managers of space, interior designers too can conceive of space as managers of movement. “ 1

1. Pérez De Vega, Eva. “Choreographed Environments. A Performative Approach To Architecture”. New York, December 2007 8


Goal Statement Compose and present a place where people can admire, explore, discover, and interact with dance, music, theater, and arts. This space will be built with the intention of providing performance lovers with a place where they can admire and interact with these arts in a novel fashion and experience. The space will provide an enlightening, enriching and entertaining experience to its audiences. This exploration can be applied to the designs of spaces such as theater, performance, or exhibition venues.

WHY IS IT CRITICAL? HOW WILL IT BE EXPERIENCED WITHIN A PERFORMING ARTS FACILITY. Movement becomes the primary factor defining the purpose of a space and how it is perceived visually and emotionally. Understanding the notion of human movement and circulation can therefore lead to a successful interior design. Consequently, this comprehension can be used to improve a space’s intended purpose and benefit the experience it provides.

Figure 3. Strobe Motion. Photo taken from: http://simonsloan.wordpress.com/

When observing a performing arts facility one can see that movement is an integral part of the whole experience of the space. However, movement must be studied in two ways. One is the perceived movement created by a surrounding environment. This is the visual stimuli, the arrangement of objects, paths, etc. which will create a sense of virtual movement through design. The other type the actual flow of a body as is passes or interacts with a space. This type of movement is created by how a design leads people to progress through a space. People’s emotional response to a space will therefore be affected as motion takes a hold on their psyche. The true success of the space will be directly correlated to the feeling it evokes. Defining the type of motion and interpreting it through design is critical to achieving success.

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ANTECEDENT Classical Ballet With an interior design there is generally no underlying music which establishes rhythm. The rhythm of a space must be created to adhere to the spaces intended purpose.

One way this can be established is with repetition. Repeating shapes ideas, or visuals throughout a space creates a theme. A good example of this is the Nutcracker (classical ballet by Peter Tchaikovsky) in the part of the Waltz of the Flowers. The audience is lead through motions of repetition. For example the dancers repeat the same movements as they dance en Pointe (which means on tip), stretching one leg up in the air followed turning by a series of turns, constantly moving their arms, while they dance in circular motion.

This repetition establishes a frame of mind while the leading movements proved passage to the next step in the dance. The structure found in it contains significant representation through repetition. The piece is delicately choreographed leading an audience through each theme as they repeat themselves as they proceed to the next one. Notably the composition uses thematic repetition to establish a progression. These choreographed steps, twists, and moves build up leading the audience until the stage is ultimately a balanced progression. his use of repetition can be applied in interior design. This is not to say that all interior design elements should be the same but they should work together and complement eacho strengthen the whole composition and define the purpose of the space. “Using these mechanisms will impart a sense of movement to a space, leading the eye from one design element to another.� 2 In the Waltz of the Flowers these design elements are the dancers in their pink dress and how their bodies flow. As they move through the stage their repetition leads to an isolated focus moving the audience towards a desired visual cue. 10

Figure 4. Photograph by Mascia Melocchi.Photo taken from: http://500px.com/


In the Nutcracker ballet simple visual cues such as the arm and leg movements of the dancers are used to distract the eyes form the main movement of the composition as a whole. These then catch the eye and call attention to what becomes an underlying focal point of the work. Dance choreography can presents more than one focal point. This can be a single dancer paving the way with his/her steps to a whole ensemble working together as a single unit. Whichever one it may be the focal point evokes an emotional response form an audience. Similarly, a well-designed space always has, depending on the size of it, one or more focal points which induce a response from the intended audience. A focal point must be dominant to draw attention and interesting enough to encourage the viewer to look further. “A focal point thus must have a lasting impression but must also be an integral part of the decoration linked through scale, style, color or theme.” 3

Figure 5 The Nutcracker Ballet. Photo taken from: http://www.blogforgood.net/

In a space there can be more than one established focal point. The focal points must establish a certain reaction form a person. The spectrum of these reactions can be of several different emotions. For example the focal point’s intention can be to make people want to, relax, be informed, or portray a reaction. In dance a series of actions and established facets lead to a focal point. In design the elements surrounding and leading towards the focal point must be established. By using repetition of the same elements more than once throughout a space, one can use pattern, color, texture, lines, or any other element, people can be lead to a finale source. For example, these can be pieces of furniture, art, or clues which move bodies towards an intended place. 2 & 3. .Interior Design Blog. “7 Most Important Interior Design Principles”. http://freshome.com

Figure 6.Austin’s Ballet ‘The Nutcracker.’ Photo by Jay Janner. Photo taken from: http://www.austin360.com/ 11


Balance is another key factor that must be observed. Like dance interior design must take into account the effects of balance. For example in a large venue a dance choreographer must make use of the space proportionately. Balance must be achieved in order to give the audience a sense of serenity no matter where they look. Balance therefore becomes an important factor when pertaining to a successful design. “Symmetrical balance is characterized by the same objects repeated in the same positions on either side of a vertical axis. This symmetry also reflects the human form, so one innately becomes comfortable in a balanced setting.“ 5

Figure 7. Print #10. Photograph by Dance Prints.com

4.Bitgoo, Stephen. “Not Another Step! Economy Of Movement And Pedestrian Choice Point Behavior In Shopping Mall” 5.Interior Design Blog. “7 Most Important Interior Design Principles”. http://freshome.com 12


PRECEDENT STUDIES A selection of significant precedents have been identified to further inform the design proposal. An analysis has been conducted based on three categories: flexibility as a black box theater, sculpting spaces and layers of movement. One of the precedent studies can be categorized as flexibility. This has been chosen to support the idea of moving limits, as well as experimentation. This precedent will grant the direction on how to present a flexible space that provide users with independence permitting them to simply maneuver the space to meet practical and aesthetic needs. The other two studies that have been chosen are sculpting spaces and layers of movement, these represents a structure for how to begin and sustain innovative movement that can materialize through set design and exhibit content. The result of the subsequent study is to further comprehend how ideas can be transform into physical space.

Figure 8. “Why am I not where you are�, 2010. Photo taken from: Dance Structures. http://lizaniacruz.blogspot.com 13


1. King Abdullah II House of Culture & Art by Zaha Hadid Sculpting Spaces Located the greater Amman Municipality in Jordan, the King Abdullah II House of Culture & Art by Zaha Hadid Architects is a performing arts and cultural centre that contains an educational center, rehearsal rooms, galleries, 1600-seat concert theatre and 400-seat theatre. The architectural appearance for the innovative performing arts centre has been inspired by the wonderful ancient city of Petra explains Zaha Hadid. “Petra is an astonishing example of the wonderful interplay between architecture and nature, as well as the intricate complexity and elegance of natural forms – the rose-colored mountain walls have been eroded, carved and polished to reveal the astonishing strata of sedimentation. We have applied these principles to articulate the public spaces within the centre, with eroded interior surfaces that extend into the public plaza in front of the building.”6 This project has been selected as a precedent because it represents an inspiration of how natural movements can sculped spaces and create visual experiences.

Figure 9 & 10. House Of Culture & Art. Amman Jordan. Photos taken from: Dezeen Online Magazine.

6. Dezeen Online Magazine. http://www.dezeen.com/ 14


Figure 10. House Of Culture & Art. Amman Jordan. Photos taken from: Dezeen Online Magazine.

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2. Black Box Theater. Emerson College. Boston, MA Flexibility Mainly used for student productions and classes, the Black Box theatre at the Paramount Center is a four-walled performance space, of 2,300 square ft. and has no parallel walls. The existing exposed brick walls located on the North and East of the building are the main aspect that creates the personality of this exceptional performance space.� The facade has two levels of large arched windows. The windows have black out shades for rehearsals and performances, but whether deployed or retracted, the warm brick and arches make the Black Box Theatre a warm and intimate venue for such a large footprint.�7 This precedent represents the flexibility of the space. By designing a black box theater we will be able to create a space for diverse functions and users.

Figure 11 & 12. Black Box Theater. Emerson College. Photos taken from: http://livedesignonline.com

7. Black Box Theater. Emerson College. Photos taken from: http://livedesignonline.com 16


3. Music Center by Mirko Daneluzzo. Toronto, Canada Layers of Movement Designed by Mirko Daneluzzo, the music center is located on the waterfront in Toronto. The building composes a clear part of the city’s skyline. Using the pre existing Canada Malting Silos this building now displays an animated and growing music scene. It has been convert it into the “contemporary form of a cultural contamination beacon.” 8 This project is clearly identified by a series of layers. These layers present diverse performing qualities that change the character and personality of the building as people move through it and experience the buildings environment. This particular building allows for a unique and novel design. Taking advantage of its construction the fissures in the skin of the building allows natural ventilation in summer. While in the winter the ice that forms between the fissures allows for natural insulation keeping the building warm. “The layer system generates a collection of musical experiences, from the strong typology of the theaters characterized by a clean geometry, to the eroded geometry that conforms the spaces in between, research and education institutions, and knits the project to the surrounding context. The place gives you something to build the script to design something unique: Toronto is characterized by severe winters and hot summers, then the Figure 13. Music Center By Mirko Daneluzzo. external layer works as a protective skin in winter thanks the slow Photo taken from: http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/ formation of an artificial ice barrier in between the fissures, and wind catchers to allows a natural ventilation in summer.”8

8. Music Center by Mirko Daneluzzo. http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/ 17


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CULTURAL CONTEXT Since its inception the Cyclorama building has been dedicated to bringing innovative and novel art to its audience. Its historical value must be celebrated and it purpose can be increased by creating an interior design which in itself resembles a work of art. By using elements of motion to reate a new interior design people will be attracted to the premise and will enjoy cultural awareness and bringing a fresh intellectual aspect of art and performance to society.

Figure 14. Cyclorama Building, Tremont St. view. 19


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SITE CONTEXT

CYCLORAMA BUILDING 539 Tremont Street. South End. Boston, MA 02116 21


Location

Location: South End, Boston, MA.

539 Tremont Street. South End. Boston, MA 02116 22


Proposed Site

My Map

This section presents an analysis of the proposed site for The Performance Art Center. An examination of the surrounding district and the proposed building support the intention of presenting an artistic institution that expands the accessibility of culture.

Cyclorama Building Location: South End Boston, MA

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THE BOSTON CYCLORAMA BUILDING

Figure 15. Cyclorama Building, Tremont sT. view.

Based on the identified requirements, Boston Cyclorama Building has been selected as a proposed site for the Performance Art Centre. The following analysis will discuss in detail how the region and the building meet the stated requirements. Spanning over 500 acres in Boston’s South End, the BCA is committed to developing, exploring, and showcasing the arts of our time. Visual and performance arts are avidly displayed throughout this exquisite landmark district. This area covers a four acre parcel of land whose perimeter is composed by Tremont Street, Clarendon Street, Warren Avenue and Berkeley Street. 24


Street Views

Figure 16.Top Front View: Tremont St.

Figure 17. View: Tremont St.

Figure 18. Night View: Tremont St. 25


BUILDING ANALYSIS History Boston’s Cyclorama Building was designed by Charles A. Cummings and Willard T. Sears. Its construction displays a “Victorian Classical Revival style.” The building was originally commissioned by Charles F. Willoughby’s Boston Cyclorama Company to house the Cyclorama of the Battle of Gettysburg which is a 400 to 500 foot painting depicting the battle of Gettysburg. Cyclorama exhibitions quickly became a tourist fad and attraction spurring several Cyclorama experiences across the USA. Soon these artistic experiences began using combinations music, lecture, and a diorama to complement and exhibit a large painting. These paintings often depicted famous battles and had several financing companies who helped bring the experience to life. The first Cycloramam of Gettysburg created by Philippoteaux was originally displayed in Chicago. This attraction quickly drew massive crowds and became a tremendous success. Charles Willoughby would then commission Philippoteaux to create a second version for the city of Boston. Philippoteaux second creation was constructed between 1883 and 1884. The with 377 feet wide and 42 feet tall painting was put together and completed with the help of a 20 man crew. The exhibition was opened to the public on December 22, 1884. Figure 19. Cyclorama Building. Circa 1884. Photo taken from: http://www.mysouthend.com/

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The building housed other Cyclorama exhibitions such as Custer’s Last Fight which was opened to the public in 1889. However, by 1890 the Cyclorama fad faded. The building was then bought by Gardner (father-in-law of Isabella Stewart Gardner). He converted the building to a venue for popular entertainment. Many activities were set up to amuse visitors “including a carousel, roller skating, boxing tournaments 9 (including an 1894 fight of John L. Sullivan), horseback riding, bicycling, and so on.” By 1899 the building would once again change its purpose. By this time the space was being used as an industrial venue. Companies like the “New England Electric Vehicle Company, the Tremont Garage, the Buick Automobile Agency” 9 would work within its walls. It is also said that Albert Champion invented the spark plug there before he moved to Flint, Michigan.

In 1922 the building underwent further changes when it was acquired by the Boston Flower Exchange. They would not only change its business purpose but also made architectural changes to the building. They removed the battlements and ramparts which surrounded the rotunda and also removed original copper dome which adorned the roof line. This dome was replaces with a skylight that is still in place today. In 1923 The Boston Flower Exchange also added a new entrance. This company would operate in this building until they moved out in 1970.

Figure 20. Cyclorama Painting. Photo taken from: http://battleofgettysburgbuff. com

Now a day the Cyclorama building has become a “vibrant, multi-use venue available year round for private and public events.10” The BCA is leased to a variety of different companies and individuals for private gatherings, launch parties, fundraisers, and more. This space raises millions of dollars every year with charitable events. The space also houses several art installations and performances which guests come to enjoy. By providing such a wide array of uses the BCA continues to make history and stay true to its original goals. The Improper Bostonian wrote that this venue is considered to be the “best alternative” space for events with “infinite potential.”

9. Cyclorama Building. http://www.wikipedia.com 10. History. www.bcaonline.org 27


Existing Building Description The BCA is a round building originally designed to display its Cyclorama art in a 360 degree field of view. People visiting this venue would stand on a platform which would provide a continuous circumferential view of the painting around them. By using elements such as real cannons, fences, and stone walls in the space between the viewer and the painting, the building’s interior was able to create a seemingly realistic virtual experience. To this day, the round design of the building provides a wonderful context to view art, appreciate exhibitions, and realize experiences offered within the building. Today, as one walks into the Cyclorama Building its street level holds the BCA’s Mills Gallery. This gallery is one of Boston’s first contemporary art gallery. Below this street level there is an area which once served as the service basement. Now, this space is used by the Community Music Center of Boston, the Boston Ballet Costume Shop, and two well-equipped theaters. These theaters in the BCA is are called the Plaza Theatres. These are composed of a 90 seat Black Box and the 142-seat Plaza Theatre.

STRUCTURE • Exterior walls are constructed of brick • Arched large windows and casement windows that go around the circular shape of the building • High ceilings • Steel column structure

Figure 21. Tremont St. Entrance

INTERIOR DEVELOPMENT • The central space is a 127'-diameter steel-trussed dome which, when it was built, was the largest dome in the country after the United States Capitol building. • Steel frame structures on the ceiling • The building’s lighting system consists of strip lighting • Restrooms are available in the building • Original brick floors DAYLIGHT • Exterior walls have custom shape large windows that allow a great amount of daylight to enter the building. Figure 22. Ceiling and Glass Dome 28


EXISTING ENTRANCES • The site currently has more than one point of access into the building. Front Door and Emergency doors are available: • Main entrance located on Tremont St. • Back entrance on Warren Avenue

SURROUNDINGS The surrounding buildings house the best of Boston’s artist communities. Filmmakers, dancers, painters, potters, and theater producers all find subsidized studio space in the TEB Building. At street level is the BCA’s Mills Gallery, Boston’s premiere contemporary gallery. Below the Cyclorama, in the area once just the service basement, the BCA provides space for the Community Music Center of Boston, the Boston Ballet Costume Shop, and two well-equipped theaters. The BCA Plaza Theatres (the 90 seat Black Box, and the 142-seat Plaza Theatre), recently awarded “Best Small Theatre” by the Weekly Dig, are home to the critically lauded Resident Theatre Companies.

Figure 23. Interior of Cyclorama

This is a mix use development area where you will find residential buildings, as well as commercial and institutional. In this area you can also find parks, playgrounds, a variety of restaurants, bars, coffee houses, retail shops and home decor stores.

Figure 24. View of Tremont St. and Union Park

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Space Programming

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Existing Site Plan

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Figure 25. Invitation a la danse. Photo taken from: aestheticassembly.com 32


METHODS OF INQUIRY To better comprehend my proposed thesis topic I intend to research case studies of responsive environment interfaces as well as researching related books about choreography and architecture. Will investigate new forms of interaction and circulation using different types of media within interior spaces and explore innovative spaces that help create new user experiences through interior design. Since the space is dedicated to dance and performance, I plan to interview choreographers and dancers, to understand how they see and use space and research all the different types of theaters and performance spaces.

TERMS OF CRITICISM · Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. · Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guests/users within a space. · Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. · Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. · Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. · Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. · Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. · Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. · Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events.

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Reviewers Present: Crandon Gustafson, Head of Interior Design WM. Paul Joyce, Thesis Representative Smita Sahoo, Thesis Advisor Michael Mcgarty, Client Representative Terms of Criticism: •Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. •Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guest/ user’s experience and perception of a space. •Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. •Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. •Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. •Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. •Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. •Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. •Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events. Thesis Statement: As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance users colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it.

Review Goals: •Introduce my panel to the process of the BAC Thesis program. This helps to determine what they should expect from my thesis project including quality, progress, and presentation of work. •Describe the progression from my initial writing class to the full development of my thesis concept. This will show the research and exploration that I performed. This would in turn provide a clear goal to achieve with my project and design. •Clearly present my design, proposed site, and concept. Suggested nex steps: •Observe natural light during the day. Would it be necessary to cover the dome light? •Create stage lighting in a different way. •Arrange people to come into the space. •Challenge putting diagrams into square footage. •Explore Volumetrically. •Need critique on zoning. •Function of the theater. •Facilities near performance space. •Public areas versus private areas. •Research ADA and Building Codes Recommendations: •Examine the space as it related to the public and how it could connect with the community •The entrance and stairs need to be celebrated. •Look at stage at Tuffts in Medford. Decide on theater type. Space needs to be flexible. This is key.

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THESIS STATEMENT My thesis will explore how dance influence can increase the potential for innovation of a built form and its experience. My chosen site “The Cyclorama Building” will offer the community the opportunity to learn and interact through dance. As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance users colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it.

Terms of Criticism Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guest/user’s experience and perception of a space. Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events.

Client/User The client is a nonprofit organization who wants to promote health and happiness to the South End community through dance, fitness, and music. One of the client proposals is to alter this architectural treasure into a world-class performance space. This feat will be achieved by rebuilding its interior into a modern facility that links traditional dance groups, contemporary performers, and artist. Situated in an atmosphere with buildings typically occupied traditional interiors, this novel approach will bring contemporary culture through a vision of modern architecture and design. Why dance is important for a healthy life: Fun – smile, laugh, relieve stress Fitness – a great way to exercise Friends – meet new people and develop friendships that last a lifetime Culture – teaches you about different countries, lifestyles, and traditions

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THE CONCEPT Throughout history, performance & exhibition spaces have always been in the leading edge of interior design and of ground breaking architectural innovation. By experimenting on new aesthetics, concepts, and ideas architects and interior designers have realized spaces which would break inspire the imagination of its users and change the current state of architectural design.

These images represent materials, textures, and shapes which served as inspiration for the design concept of my project. They also show ideas of motion that can be applied to a physical space.

Concept Diagrams

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SITE CONTEXT Site History The Neighborhood now know as the South End began as a narrow strip of land called the “Boston Neck� connecting Boston to Roxbury and was surrounded by a tidal marsh.

















For the next fifteen the South End became the fashionable place for well-to-do young families to build their homes.













The city added land to the “Neck� by filling in the marshy areas with earth imported from Needham, Massachusetts.

By the turn of the century, financial crisis and other factor caused most of the original residents to move out of the area.

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When rent control ended in Boston in the 1990s, rising rents and Increasing property taxes forced less affluent residents to leave the area. As a result, the neighborhood is increasingly evolving into an upper-middle-class community where people of differing financial circumstances, race, ethnicity, religion, and sexual preference live as neighbors.



By the 1960s, however, crime and poverty had overtaken the area, and its buildings and gardens were neglected and in physical decline.


Location According to census data recently released by the city, the South End’s population grew 12-percent in the last decade Between 2000 and 2010, the South End grew by 2,784 residents, or 12 percent, to 25,889 residents, according to figures the Boston Redevelopment Authority compiled from U.S Census Bureau data. The growth was led by a 2,219 increase, or 18.2 percent, in white residents and a 1,035 increase, or 31.3 percent rise, in the Asian population. The Black/African American segment dropped 17 percent, or 642 residents in the South End. It was the highest proportional drop in Black/African American residents citywide. Meanwhile, the Hispanic/Latino demographic grew by 115 residents, or 3.6 percent.

Demographics

South End Area

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ENVIRONMENT The Cyclorama Building 539 Tremont Street between Clarendon St. and E Berkley St. in Boston’s South End

Public Transportation Parking locations: • Atelier/505 Parking Garage • Warren Ave. at the rear of the facility • John Hancock Parking Garage • 200 Clarendon St. • Parking Garage • 100 Clarendon St. • Open lots • Berkley St. Public Transportation • Green Line -Copley Square • Green Line-Bus 45 • Purple + Orange Line-Back Bay Station

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Cultural Context


Exterior Views 4

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1. Boston Ballet 2. Hamersley’s Bistro 3. Artist Studios Building 4. Mills Gallery 5. The Beehive

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6. BCA Plaza Theatres 7. Cyclorama 8. Community Music Center of Boston 9. Calderood Pavilion at the BCA 41


CYCLORAMA EXISTING CONDITIONS FLOOR PLAN -Current Conditions of the Space Area = 4,048,259.36 square in. (28,112.9123 square ft.), Perimeter = 691’-10 3/16”Dome 60’ Dia 8

Offices 6

9

Restroom

5

Loading Dock

1

Entry & Lift 7

Offices

2

Hallway

3

Kitchen

4

Main Space & Dome CYCLORAMA BUILDING 1st. Floor Plan Scale 1/16”=1’ 42

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Cyclorama Interior Views

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PRECEDENT STUDIES Springstep. Medford, MA Center for traditional and contemporary art Location: Medford, MA Project Size: 23,000 SQ.F. Andrew Cohen Architects Space Information: Large Studio Approx. 2,400 SQ.F Medium Studio: Approx. 1,200 SQ.F. Small Studio: Approx. 375 SQ.F. Atrium: Approx. 900 SQ.F. Meeting Room: Approx. 250 SQ.F.

Exterior View

View from 2nd. flloor 44

Atrium

Meeting Room

Large Studio

Medium Studio


Jose Mateo Ballet Theater. Cambrige, MA DANCE UP CLOSE - Jose Mateo’s Ballet Theatre 400 Harvard Street. Cambridge, MA 02138 Theater Architect: Clarence Blackall Space Information: Studio 1- The Sanctuary Theatre - 90’x50’ Studio 2 - 40’x40’ Studio 4 - 25’x25’ The little sister studio -20’x25’

Bronze Ballerina Sculpture

Site Plan

Studio 1

Studio 2

Exterior view of Old Cambridge Baptist Church The Sanctuary Theatre

Studio 4

The Little Sister Studio 45


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THE PROGRAM Program Summary

The Cyclorama building, will include classrooms, a stage, support spaces for performers, support spaces for the audience, storage, support spaces for technicians, crew, artistic and administrative staff, mechanical rooms, administrative offices for staff; a large performance space used for community events such as dance, music, and theatrical performances, rehearsals and art installations a box office, office and support space, a small kitchen, snack bar with seating area.

Graphic Analysis


Space Programming

47


PROGRAM SCHEME 1 Sketch Diagrams

48

1st. floor plan

Adjecency

Mezzanine

Public & Private

Walking Paths


Diagrams Scheme 1 In this scheme I explore public and private areas. I use the first floor for public areas such as the theater, lobby, and common spaces. The back of the building is for performance support and is used as a private space. In the mezzanine classrooms and offices are also added.

49


PROGRAM SCHEME 2 Sketch Diagrams

Entry level

1st. floor plan 50

Adjecency

Mezzanine


Diagrams

Scheme 2 Scheme two consists of floor plans for the first floor, second floor, and part of the street level plan of the building. The offices are located on the street level. The lobby and theater are on the first floor plan as well as a cafe/lounge. Performance space will be located in the center of the first floor. Performance support spaces will be in the back. Classrooms will be located on the 2nd floor plan. With this scheme the offices will be in a private setting with separate entry for access. Public areas and performance space will be on first floor and will be accessible to the public. The classrooms will have more privacy since they are located on the 3rd floor and will have a view to the theater. 51


PROGRAM SCHEME 3 Sketch Diagrams

1st. floor plan

Mezzanine

52

Adjecency

Light Diagrams


Diagrams Scheme 3 This scheme is created according to the natural light that the building receives. Spaces that require more natural light are located in the front of the building such as offices, common areas and classrooms. Performance support spaces are located in the back of the building.

53


TECHNICAL INFORMATION Performance Space Design Standards

54


Personnel Rooms

55


Auditorium Seating Standards

ADA code called the Code of Federal Regulations. Wheelchair requirements for assembly areas: Number of Chairs Number of Wheelchairs required 4 to 25 1 26 to 50 2 51 to 150 4 151 to 300 5 301 to 500 6 501 to 5000 6 + 1 additional space for each extra 150 chairs 5001 and over 36 + 1 additional space for each extra 200 chairs

56


Dance Teaching Facilities

Lighting TYPES OF LIGHT Floods Soft Spots Profile Spots Beam

57


58 
























Reviewers Present: Crandon Gustafson, Head of Interior Design WM. Paul Joyce, Thesis Representative Smita Sahoo, Thesis Advisor Michael Mcgarty, Client Representative Terms of Criticism: •Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. •Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guest/ user’s experience and perception of a space. •Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. •Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. •Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. •Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. •Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. •Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events.

Review Goals: •To organize spaces so they are connected and adjacent. This will show the importance of each individual space and how they are connected. •To concretely establish links between each space exploring and solving any issues that arise from space planning. •To determine key design elements that will bring the spaces together while at the same time keeping the underling concept of motion. Suggested nex steps: •Focus further on schematics.

Recommendations: •Open the ceiling back up in the restaurant area. •Create a more open area for the rear rehearsal space. •Explore more ideas of movement on the walls.

Thesis Statement: As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance users colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it.

59


60


CONCEPT INSPIRATION Dance Motion

Staircase Designs

Walls and Theater

Lighting and Furniture

61


Concept Model

With this model, I explored motion and its representation in the space. The ribbon is present in the main spaces where people will be able to interact and experience movement

62


Concept Diagrams To explore more the relation of the movements of a baillarina to a build form . I sketched trace the motion of a bailarina and the result was a form with curves, that shows fluidity. With this sketch I was able to develop more my concept of movement and mtion in the building.

Detail Concept

Elevations

Sections

63


Program Diagrams & Walking Paths

COMMON AREAS

RESTAURANT/ LOUNGE

PERFORMER SUPPORT

64

MAIN THEATRE

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

CLASSROOMS

WALKING PATHS


Program Diagrams - Sections COMMON AREAS

RESTAURANT/ LOUNGE

PERFORMER SUPPORT

MAIN THEATRE

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

CLASSROOMS

65


FLOOR PLANS Street Level Floor Plan

66


First Floor Plan

67


Mezzanine Floor Plan

68


BUILDING SECTIONS

69


REFLECTIVE CEILING PLANS Street Floor Plans

70


First Floor Plan

71


Mezzanine Floor Plan

72


PRECEDENT STUDIES- THEATER IN THE ROUND Tufts Theater. Medford, MA Stage & Lighting

Performers Support Spaces

Lighting Rack

Lights & Sound

73


CONCEPT SKETCHES First Floor-Lobby

First Floor -View of Theater

With these sketches I explore the representation of movement on the walls of the lobby/lounge and the opening to the restaurant which will be located below. I also sketched walls with curves in theater.

74


75


76 



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#

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!












Reviewers Present: Paul, Joyce Thesis Representative Ann Marie Procopio, Thesis Advisor Michael Mcgarty, Client Representative

Suggested nex steps: •Start working on construction drawings •More perspectives

Terms of Criticism: •Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. •Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guest/ user’s experience and perception of a space. •Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. •Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. •Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. •Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. •Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. •Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. •Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events.

Recommendations: •Add waterfalls in elevator lobby for focal view •Research Round glass eevator •Remove existing skylights •Add Nana Wall in Classrooms •Add Elevator Machine Room

Thesis Statement: As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance users colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it.

89


FLOOR PLANS Street Level Floor Plan

90


First Floor Plan- Option 1 Proscenium Theater

91


First Floor Plan-Option 2 Theater in the Round

92


Mezzanine Floor Plan

93


DIMENSIONED FLOOR PLANS

94


SECTIONS Long Section

CYCLORAMA. LONGITUDINAL SECTION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’

95


FURNITURE AND LIGHTING Restaurant

Dining Table

Dining Chair

Round Cooper Pendant Lighting

Example of cove lighting for walls

Bench

96

Bar Stools

Small Pendant Lighting

Lighting for Underneat Bar


SKETCHES AND PERSPECTIVES Restaurant

Sketch Drawing of Restaurant Bar with Ribbon

Perspective Drawings of Restaurant/Bar

97


FLEXIBLE FURNITURE Theater

Portable Seating Risers

Portable Acustical Enclousure System

Portable Seating Risers Side View

Portable Ramp

Portable Stage 98


FURNITURE AND PERSPECTIVES Theater

Round Portable Stage

Portable Stage Dolly

Accustical Fabric Fixture

Stackable Chairs 99


100 6

5

4

3

2

1

0

/

.


Reviewers Present: Crandon Gustafson, Head of Interior Design WM. Paul Joyce, Thesis Representative Ann Marie Procopio, Thesis Advisor Michael Mcgarty, Client Representative Terms of Criticism: •Encompass fluidity and motion in order to positively increase a user’s experience and perception of a space. •Take advantage of movement to better accommodate guest/ user’s experience and perception of a space. •Use design to create visual and physical movement within a space for its audience. •Utilize layers of movement to encourage users to interact with the space visually and/or physically. •Use lighting and technology to increase visual and physical movement through the space allowing alterations to adapt to different experiences and events. •Create and portray a three dimensional flowing design. •Encourage users to explore the space and interact with their surroundings by using key design elements. •Create repetition and motion through the use of an underlying theme or design. •Use design fluidity to dynamically allow the environment to be altered to meet the specific needs of altering events. Thesis Statement: As in dance, visual interaction becomes a primary factor in design. This visual and emotional aspect of dance should be expanded beyond a performance to the physical design of a space. Interpreting how the language of dance users colors, lines, textures and their movement will influence the impact of a space. This language, which is expressed through dance, becomes an imperative factor which defines the purpose of a space and a person’s emotional response to it.

101


Floor Plans Street Level Floor Plans

102


First Floor Plan - Option 1 Proscenium Theater

103


First Floor Plan-Option 2 Theater in the Round

104


First Floor Plan- Option 3 Cabaret Theater

105


Mezzanine Floor Plan

106


BUILDING SECTIONS

Section A

Section B 107


BUILDING ELEVATIONS Building Exterior Elevations

A

A New Doors

108

A

A


Building Interior Elevation

109


PERSPECTIVE DRAWINGS Restaurant Perspective Views

Restaurant Lobby

Restaurant Hostess Station & Booth Station 110


Restaurant Perspective Views

Restaurant Bar & Dining Areas

Restaurant Bar & Ribbon Fixture 111


First Floor Lounge Perspective Views

First Floor Lounge Seating

First Floor Bar 112


First Floor Lounge and Private Dining Perspective Views

Private Dining with view of Bridge

Private Dining 113


First Floor Perspective Views

Cyclorama Lobby

Cyclorama Vestibule

View from Top of Double Staricase

First Floor Theater Seating

114


Mezzanine Floor

Mezzanine Seating

115


SCALE MODEL Restaurant & Lounge Model

With this model I explored the aesthetics and proportions that the ribbon would present to the space. The model helped to understand the connection that the ribbon would establish between the restaurant/bar and the lounge. It not only connects the spaces but also creates a unifying grand piece for the concept of motion.

116


FURNITURE & FINISH BOARDS Restaurant Furniture and Finishes

117


Lounge Furniture and Finishes

118 11 8


Lobby & Theater Furniture and Finishes

119


Street Level Floor Plan

120


First Floor Plan & Mezzanine

121


Dance with Ribbons #2. Photo taken from: http://www. http:// madgrass.deviantart.com/ 122


CONCLUSION This project presents an exploration into how a new design for a stagnant commercial building can create an active and purposeful space. I wanted to prove that with key design elements, materials, and a strong concept, an outdated building could become a central part of the community providing, social interaction, entertainment, and a medium for culture. By choosing the Cyclorama building in the South End of Boston I had a huge blank canvas to bring my design and concept to life. This building is a grand historic building that throughout the years has lost its general purpose. Through the conservation of its beautiful façade my project donned this building with a completely new interior, which redefined the space and its function. This project took a large, ambiguous, and desolated space and gave it a defined purpose. The new interior design for this commercial building would transform the space into a hub for interaction. It would provide a lavish and inviting escapade a place to relax, dine, be social, and enjoy visual performance arts. To accomplish this, the entire building was redesigned. Motion was chosen as the key concept to provide a solution to meet the purpose of the space. The design incorporates intertwining spaces which create communication. These spaces have diverse purposes but adhere to the key concept of the building. They flow together allowing users to circulate and interact with the space and the people inhabiting it. In this project I learned how a design can take advantage of movement to enhance a userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience and perception of a space. By using my design concept I was able to create motion and encourage interaction between each space creating a social center for a community. Also, by using movable concepts in key spaces, those are now able to adjust to different events and venues. Space planning was another component that this project taught me. With so many different spaces, such as a restaurant, lounges, classrooms, a theater, and offices, carefully planning each space became imperative. Using several of the skills that I had learnt at the BAC I was not only able to successfully design these spaces but was able to bring them to new life in floor plans, elevations, perspectives, material selection, and the project you have just seen. This project has taught me key elements in commercial design and the role that human interaction plays. It has showed me how create a design that would not only be stunning but would redefine the whole purpose of a space. Providing it with intrinsic values and creating a place that the surrounding community could be proud of as a whole. Given the research, planning, and self involvement nature of this project I can attest that because of it I have completely furthered my skills, knowledge, and capabilities as a designer.

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CODE REVIEW Cyclorama Building. 539 Tremont St Boston, MA 02116. Is a two story 53,530 SF building located in the South End, Boston. Building Area (per story) =26,765. square ft. In addition to the main entry points, there are 4 secondary exits on the first floor and three on the second. Theatre occupant load: 3,200SF /7 net = 457 people max. Restaurant occupant load: 820SF /15 net = 54 people max. Exterior exits: 4 required actual: 8 Construction type: ICC-International Building Code (2009) Type I-B exterior masonry wall, protected - NFPA 220 Use Group: Assembly A-1, A-2 Type II Construction over two stories Use group: 303.1- Assembly Group A. Buildings or part of buildings where people gather for activities such social, theaters, consumption of food or drink. •A-1-A assembly theaters •A-2: (A-2r) For the consumption of food and/or drink includes: restaurants and bars Height & Area Mezzanines do not contribute to single floor building area but do contribute to aggregate building area (505.1) 2 story, 30’0” above grade Fire Walls Section 705.0 •Structural Stability (705.2) •Allow collapse on either side of wall without collapse of the wall Use Group A -Min fire-resistance rating (hrs) 3a (a= Walls shall not be less than two-hour fire resistant rated where separating buildings of type II or V construction) Fire separations: Fire resistance ratings of structural elements are shown in hours for 3-B constructions •2 exterior wall protection, bearing and non-bearing •2 fire walls and party walls •2 fire enclosure or exitway (hallways) and stairs •2 shaft, elevator hoistways •1 exitway access corridors •1 dwelling unit separations •1 interior bearing walls, bearing partitions, columns •1 structural members supporting walls 210


Fire Protection Systems: Section 1202.2 - 1211.4.2 •Fire suppression systems shall be installed and maintained in all portions of the building for A-I use group including over the stage, under fly galleries, under the stage, in basements, workrooms, dressing rooms, store rooms, property rooms, toilet, lounge, trash rooms and chutes. •The minimum standpipe size is 2 1/2” in diameter in buildings 2 or more stories in height with an occupancy load of more than 300. Sprinkler Systems Code section: Use group Aggregate Area (SF) Story height 903.2.1 A-1 All 903.2.1.2.2 A-2r >5000 903.2.1.3 A-3 >5000

Occupant load All >1 >1

Fire Detection and Alarm Systems Code section: Use group Aggregate Area (SF) Story height 907.2.1 A

Occupant load 50

All >299 >299

Detection Divices MPS

Chapter 10 Table 1004.1.2 Occupant Load Table has additional uses and some factors have changed Occupancy 7th Assembly Standing 5 net Exercise Rooms 50 gross Kitchens 200 gross Stages and Platforms 15 net Assembly use groups: A-1, A-2, A-3, A-4, A-5 Special requirements for existing A-2nc with an occupant load of 50 or more people and a single main door exit – Must comply to 780 CMR 10.0 or Section 3400.5.1. RESTAURANT •Assembly without fixed seats •Standing space 5 net(floor are in sq.ft. per occupant •Unconcentrated (tables and chairs) 15 net (floor are in sq. ft. per occupant

211


THEATRE SEATING: •Fixed Seats: Average width should not be less than 20 inches and arranged in rows a minimum of 32 inches apart, back to back. •Assembly without fixed seats •Concentrated (chairs only-not fixed) 7net (floor are in sq. ft per occupant) Number of Seats: •There should not be more than 7 seats ‘between any seat and aisle. However, the number of seats is not limited when self-raising seats are provided which allows an unobstructed passage of at least 18 inches. THEATRE AISLES: •Longitudinal Aisles and Cross Aisles: Aisles should be a minimum of 42 inches, increasing 1/4 inch for every foot of length of aisle. A block of seats cannot have more than 22 rows. Aisles cannot exceed a gradient of 1 3/4 inches per foot. THEATRE FOYERS: Capacity and Construction: •Lobby needs to have a net floor area exclusive of stairs or not less than 1 1/2 sqft. per occupant. •The partitions separating the lobby from other spaces shall be constructed of 2 hour fire resistance rating. THEATRE STAGE CONSTRUCTION: •Stage enclosure walls and Floor: •Walls shall be 4 hour fire resistance rating and permissible window openings require 3/4 hour fire windows. The stage floor requires 3 hour rating. Occupancy - Stages and Platforms: 15 net (floor are in sq.ft. per occupant) Exterior Doors: •Egress openings located on the stage which may be open during occupancy require vestibules to prevent air draughts into the theatre. MEANS OF EGRESS FOR THEATRE: All stairs are required to meet specific code and accessibility requirements. The most important are the tread and riser dimensions. The most common dimensions with a minimum tread depth of 11 inches and a range of 4 to 7 inches for riser height. Number of Stairways: Each tier above the main floor of a theatre requires two interior enclosed stairs located on opposite sides of the structure. Enclosures are not required for stairs serving the first balcony or mezzanine.

212


ADA Access for the physically challenged Places of Assembly: Section 14 Chair width and leg room An examination of recommended chair widths and row spacing (that is, leg room) from published sources and Theatre Projects’ American practice confirms that the increase in chair widths is accelerating. The charts on the next page illustrate the “standard” chair width and the minimum row spacing in design guides dating from 1896 forward. It took 100 years for the standard seat width to change from 19 inches to 21 inches. Yet in the last 20 years, it’s changed from 21 inches to 22 inches. Row spacing has also increased dramatically, but at a steadier pace.

Flexible theater Proscenium theatre Theatre

Seat count 140 203 242

Chair widths Row spacing square feet/seat 21 36 20 to 21 36 20 to 21 36

11 .4 10.4 11 .5

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Archicentral.” UNStudio”. http://www.archicentral.com ArchDaily. “XXI Century Theater in the former Sant Anna’s Church”. http://www.archdaily.com Armstrong, Lesly. Roger morgan. “Space for a dance an architectural design guide”. Pub Center Cultural Resources .1984 Bathurst, Jessica , Tobie S. Stein .Performing Arts Management: A Handbook Of Professional Practices. Random House Digital, Inc. 2010. Beiswanger, George. ”Chance and Design in Choreography”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism , Vol. 21, No. 1 (Autumn, 1962), pp. 13-17. Published by: Blackwell Publishing on behalf of The American Society for Aesthetics. http://www.jstor.org/stable/427633 Binggeli, Corky. Patricia Greichen. Interior Graphic Standards. Wiley. 2nd Edition. John Wiley & Sons. 2010 Blacking, John. Joann W. Kealiinohomoku. “The Performing Arts: Music and Dance”. Walter de Gruyter. Great Britain. 1979 Boston Center for the Arts. “The Cyclorama History”. http://www.bcaonline.org/ Boston Boston Redevelopment Authority. “Census 2010”. http://www.bostonredevelopmentauthority.org Carlson, Marvin. “Places of Performance. The Semiotics of Theatre Architecture” . Cornell University Press, Feb 1, 1993 Ching, Francis D. K. , Steven R. Winkel Building Codes Illustrated: A Guide To Understanding The 2006 International Building Code. 2nd Edition. John Wiley & Sons. 2007 Copeland, Roger .”Merce Cunningham: The Modernizing of Modern Dance”. Routledge. New York, New York. 2004. Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of the Association of American Geographers. http://www.jstor.org Hadid, Zaha. http://www.zaha-hadid.com/ Hammond, Michael. Performing architecture opera houses, theatres and concert halls for the twenty-first century. Merrell - London-New York.2006 Halprin, Lawrence.” The RSVP Cycles. Creative Process in the Human Environment”. Geore Braziller, Inc. New York.1973 Haqu, Usman. “The choreography of sensations: Three case studies of responsive environment interfaces”. Haque Design and Research, London, Uk. http://www.haque.co.uk/

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Interior Design Blog. “7 Most Important Interior Design Principles”. http://freshome.com Jones, Lynn M. Phyllis S. Allen. “Beginnings of Interior Environments”. Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.2009 Laban, Rudolf von. Lisa Ullmann. “The mastery of movement”. Northcote House, 1988 Littlefield, David. Metric Handbook: Planning And Design Data. Third Edition. Elsevier. 2008 Live Design Online. “Black Box Theater”. Http://livedesignonline.com Monthland Preston-Dunlop, Valerie. “Dance Words”. Harwood Academic Publishers Gmbh. Switzerland.1995 Neufert, Ernst, Peter Neufert. Architects Data. Fourth Edition. John Wiley & Sons. United Kindom. 2007. NFPA. “Theater:. http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/research/theatre.pdf Oddey, Alison. Christine A. “White.The Potentials of Spaces: The Theory and Practice of Scenography & Performance”. Intellect Books. Great Britain.2006 Panero, Julius, Joseph Dechiara, Time-Saver Standards For Interior Design And Space Planning. Mcgraw-Hill Education. Jun 13, 2001 Pérez de Vega, EVA. “Choreographed Environments. A Performative Approach to Architecture”. New York. December 2007 Pile, John. F. “Interior Design”. Pearson Practice Hall. Fourth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ.2007 Read, Alan. “Architecturally Speaking. Practices Of Art, Architecture And The Everyday”. Routledge. New York.2000 Spier, Steven. “Dancing and drawing, choreography and architecture”. The Journal of Architecture. Volume 10, Issue 4, 2005. Published on 17 Feb 2007. The online platform for Taylor & Francis group content. http://www.tandfonline.com State University of New York. Geneseo. “Theater Spaces”. 2011. ttp://www.geneseo.edu/ Stein, Tobie S. Jessica Bathurst. “Performing Arts Management. A Handbook of Professional Practices.” Skyhorse Publishing Inc. Canada. Sep 30, 2008 The South End. “History”. http://www.south-end-boston.com/History Suckerpunch Daily. “Music Center by Marko Daneluzzo”. 11.23.2010. http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com

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RESUME EDUCATION BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE Masters of Interior Design Candidate

Boston, MA. August 2008-May 2013

UNIVERSIDAD KINO Hermosillo, MĂŠxico. August 1998-June 2001 Bachelor of Arts (International Studies) / Bachelor of International Commerce with a major in Marketing, Publicity and Communications SKILLS SUMMARY DESIGN SKILLS: Conceptual design, Space Planning, Graphic Design, Presentation Boards, Floor Plans, Elevations and Section drawings, Hand and Computer Rendering, Model Building, Able to sketch and draw Orthogonal and Perspective Drawing, Wood working, COMPUTER SKILLS: Proficient in Software installation and application of Microsoft Office: Word, Power Point, Excel, Adobe Design CS5: InDesign, Fireworks, Photoshop & Illustrator, Acrobat Professional, AutoCAD 2012, Revit Architecture 2012, Rhinoceros 4.0, Google SketchUp Pro, Design Manager, Quick Books, Internet, Social Media, Efl mail and Operating Systems: Microsoft Windows and MacOs. DESIGN EXPERIENCE LOVEJOY DESIGNS LLC Boston, Massachusetts. September 2010 - Present Interior Design Assistant Responsible for the planning and creation of residential projects consisting of floor plans, sections, and elevations in Auto CAD from field measurements Construction of project worksheets, room finish schedules, interior colour boards, researching new vendors, exploring and procuring surface materials, furniture and fixtures Generating client presentations Producing renderings and perspective drawings in SketchUp Retrieving quotes from vendors, installing furnishings, and staging homes for clients Social Media manager: Twitter, Facebook, Wordpress, design and maintenance of monthly blog TANGERINE CREATIONS LLC Flower Design Assistant Assist with event installations Receive and process floral products Gather, count, and divide product according to floral recipes 216

Boston, Massachusetts. July 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Present


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75 Peterborough St. Apt 112. Boston, MA 02215 Phone: (617) 834 6763 E-mail: Isabel.younglopez@the bac.edu. Http://www.izayoung.com

GATEWAY PROJECT Boston, Massachusetts. September 2011- December 2011 Boys & Girls Club of South Boston Creation of floor plans in AutoCAD, Space planning, presentation to clients GREENE & SANDEL LLC Boston, Massachusetts. November 2010 – June 2011 Marketing & Media Manager Responsible for e-marketing , public relations, social media, website presence and branding for book author Bette Greene Researched market for books Created weekly reports of online sales worldwide Managed customer feedback and surveys Developed and implemented site traffic plans designed to encourage new and repeat visits NANCY STRACKA INTERIORS LLC Project Interior Design –Intern Worked in collaboration with real estate agents Took detailed floor plan measurements Created floor plans in Auto Cad from field measurements

Boston, Massachusetts. May 2010

PEABODY PROPERTIES INC Boston, Massachusetts. Oct 2008-April 2010 Marketing/Design Assistant Created sales reports for weekly meetings Contributed to weekly newspaper developing designs and marketing concepts related to property tours, as well as updating & designing themes for the company’s website Filed weekly inventory reports of models and empty units for sale Assisted sales agents, with weekly administrative duties and open houses LANGUAGES:Proficient in English & Spanish TRAVEL: Buenos Aires, Argentina; London, England; Paris, France; Shanghai & Beijin, China, Madrid & Marbella, Spain, Reykjavik, Iceland, Mexico & USA. INTEREST: Painting, cooking, travel & design.

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Profile for Iza Young

Interior Design Thesis by Isabel Young  

Cyclorama. Performance Art Center. “Architecture no longer consists of making buildings and dance no longer consists of making dances. The...

Interior Design Thesis by Isabel Young  

Cyclorama. Performance Art Center. “Architecture no longer consists of making buildings and dance no longer consists of making dances. The...

Profile for izayoung
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