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Bright Future NEW N AM E

Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences

foundations A PUBLICATION FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY SOUTH BEND | FALL/WINTER 2014


CHANCELLOR

I am always inspired when I witness an act of generosity. I have seen many in my career in higher education but the one we are celebrating in this issue of Foundations is very special. Not only is it the largest single philanthropic gift in the history of IU South Bend but its purpose is well-defined and important. Even though I never met her, I like to think that Vera Z. Dwyer is smiling at the way her legacy will be honored through scholarships, teaching, learning and compassionate care for others for generations to come. You can read more about this wonderful gift in our cover story. This issue of Foundations also brings you stories of students from different backgrounds who came to IU South Bend to pursue their dreams in different ways. You’ll read about Herbert Scholars who had the academic credentials to go to just about any college or university but chose IU South Bend. They are joined by the largest class of 21st Century Scholars ever who honored a pledge made in middle school that they would do what it takes to go to college. Their stories showcase the breadth of opportunities available for students at IU South Bend, no matter what their background.

A MESSAGE FROM THE

Plus, we introduce you to two players from the women’s volleyball team who represent the past and the future of the program. Senior Melissa Macellari was part of the first team that ever took the court at IU South Bend and freshman Morgan Fleming just completed her first season. And you will read about another act of generosity that demonstrates the best of what philanthropy means. The dedication concert at the Louise E. Addicott and Yatish J. Joshi Performance Hall was a celebration of life, love and vision through music. I hope you enjoy reading this issue of Foundations and I thank you for your support of IU South Bend. Sincerely, Terry L. Allison | Chancellor

COVER: Nursing students in the Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences, photograph by Peter Ringenberg


A PUBLICATION FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY SOUTH BEND FALL/WINTER 2014 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF Vice Chancellor of University Advancement Ilene Sheffer Director, Alumni Affairs Jeanie Metzger, BS’74 Assistant Director, Alumni Affairs Kelly Eberhart, MSW’13 Chief of Staff and Director, Communications and Marketing Ken Baierl, MLS’09 Associate Director, Communications and Marketing Tiffany Goehring, BFA’04 Freelance Writer Ellen Crowe Photography Peter Ringenberg IU SOUTH BEND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD MEMBERS President Christine Pochert Ringle, MSBA’86, MBA’88 Vice President Kris Fishburn, BS’03 Secretary Shawn Todd, MBA’10 Treasurer Rudy Yakym III, AS’09, BS’11 Past President Margaret J. Ridenour, AS’99, BS’01, MPA’05 At Large Members Shelli Alexander, BS’93, Business Amy Hill, MPA’06 Lory Timmer, BGS’02, MPA’05 DIVISION AND SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVES Judi Lykowski, BA’98, Arts Kasi Bolden, BGS’94, MS’01, General Studies Robyn Black, BA’13, Liberal Arts Tammy Davis, ASDH’99, Dental Mickey Hay, BA’84, MS’89, Education Aleah Lacopo, BSN’11, Nursing Ashley Schmitt, AS’09, BS’12, Business EX OFFICIO MEMBERS *Durleen Braasch, AGS’83, BGS’83 *Todd Beall, BS’99 *Chris Craft, BS’89 *Perla Hernandez, ASDH’04 *Larry Lentych, BS’69 * Phil Mark, BA’84 *Linda McDougal, MPA’84 *Doreen Pienkowski, ASDH’99 *Lucky Reznik, MSBA’75 *Shannon Porowski, Student Alumni Representative *Ex officio members representing non-academic constituencies. FOUNDATIONS is published twice a year by the Office of Communications & Marketing at Indiana University South Bend. It is distributed to alumni and friends of the university. Please send comments, class notes, and story ideas to Ken Baierl at kbaierl@iusb.edu.

foundations IN THIS ISSUE 2

21st Century Scholars Pursue Dreams

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SVO President Ann Wells

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Easing the Transition

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Herbert Scholars Make an Impact

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Setting the Ball High

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New Degree in Sustainability Studies

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Physics Program Wins Big

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New Name, Bright Future

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Special Concert in a Special Place

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Class Notes

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Student Philanthropy Council

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Honor Roll of Donors


21st Century Scholars

Pursue Dreams When this year’s class of 21st Century Scholars at IU South Bend were in middle school in 2008, they each signed a pledge that guaranteed a grant to cover the cost of four years of college tuition at any public college in Indiana if they fulfilled the pledge’s requirements.

What’s remarkable is the difference the opportunity to attend college made to these students. The unique combination of an “early promise” that requires students to study hard and stay out of trouble, and the encouragement for scholars to earn a Core 40 diploma was key. “After I signed the pledge in 7th grade,” said Demetrius Kennedy, “I said to myself, ‘I need to go to college now, it’s free. I made sure I stayed on track in high school.’” Indiana’s 21st Century Scholars Program was created to help raise the education aspirations and attainment of low and moderate income Hoosiers, ensuring all Indiana families can afford a college education for their children. This fall, IU South Bend was the university of choice for 226 of them–a 33 percent increase over 2013 and a new record for the campus. “It was the perfect storm,” explained Karen White, associate vice chancellor for student services. In 2008, many families were experiencing extremely diminished resources, so more students enrolled in the program during middle school. This, combined with the strong reputation IU South Bend has built in the area, led to a big jump in 21st Century Scholars enrollment at the university. “It’s good for the campus,” said White. “The added diversity and value that these students bring to the university is significant.”


Students Alumni Faculty Feature Development Class Notes

Photography Peter Ringenberg

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From Left: 21st Century Scholars Mercedes Jones, Demetrius Kennedy, Teresita Mendez, Luis Osorio, Jacqueline Hundt.

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DEMETRIUS KENNEDY

2014 21st Century Scholar // Sociology The Leadership Academy at IU South Bend had a profound effect on Demetrius Kennedy. The Adams High School graduate didn’t know what to expect but he figured out college pretty fast. In his Freshman Success class, he learned a lot about time management and successful study strategies. “In a week’s time, I changed,” he said. “I became more

LUIS OSORIO

2014 21st Century Scholar // Nursing For Osorio, the greatest advantage of being a 21st Century Scholar was the opportunity to attend the Leadership Academy. “There were 30 of us and we all bonded,” he said. “We took two classes, participated in fun activities like scavenger hunts, shared meals, and spent six weeks together.” The youngest of four children, Osorio has one sibling who is still attending IU South Bend and two others who have graduated. He’s also familiar with the campus from taking some college credit courses while attending Mishawaka High School. Nevertheless, going from high school to college was a big step. “The Leadership Academy this summer eased the transition for me,” he said. “We had peer mentors, someone to walk you to class, and activities to help you get acquainted with the campus.” As a 21st Century Scholar, Osorio could choose any Indiana public college. He feels IU South Bend is the best environment for him. “It’s such a nice homey place,” he said. “It’s a very welcoming place for 21st Century Scholars, especially after attending the Leadership Academy.”

JACQUELINE HUNDT

2014 21st Century Scholar // Radiography Hunt hails from a long line of IU South Bend alumni—her father, mother, and sister all graduated from the campus. When Hundt began her freshman year, she’d already spent a lot of time on campus as a senior in high school taking classes for college credit. “I knew from taking classes here while I was in high school that IU South Bend

mature and responsible. I realized this is college.” In his early years, Kennedy’s grandmother impressed upon him the importance of college. When he signed the 21st Century Scholar pledge in middle school, he knew he needed to stay on track. “I need to go to college now,” he remembers thinking. “It’s free.” As a 21st Century Scholar at IU South Bend, Kennedy is grateful he doesn’t have the pressure of worrying about how to pay for his education. “It gives me a real peace of mind to know that the money is there.” So far Kennedy’s classes are going well, and he attributes his smooth transition to the Leadership Academy, and Assistant Professor Bruce Watson, one of his Academy professors. “He said he knew I was smart enough to do college work, and he cautioned me not to get lazy or satisfied, but to always go above and beyond,” said Kennedy. “I know that Dr. Watson believes in me, and I want to prove him right.”

was my first choice,” she said. Hundt was in the Top Ten of her Bremen High School graduating class and a 21st Century Scholar. She was inspired to study radiography because both her grandmothers died from cancer. “However I can help others who are sick, I want to help,” she said. She’s grateful for the 21st Century Scholars program because without the financial assistance Jones would need to work and go to school. “Since I don’t have to work a lot of hours, I have time to study and enjoy extracurricular activities.” She’s joined the Biology and Chemistry Clubs and is also part of the Honor’s Program. “When I feel connected to a group of people, I feel more connected to the school.”


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TERESITA MENDEZ

Jones loves taking advantage of all that IU South Bend has to offer. She’s president of the Black Student Union and she’s also active in Run the Relay, a peer-to-peer mentoring program for first-year 21st Century Scholars and minority students. “I like helping people,” Jones said. As a sophomore at John Adams High School, Jones lost her mother to pancreatic cancer. It was a difficult time because her siblings were split up between family members. Her mother’s wish was for her children to get an education. “The 21st Century Scholar program removed the financial pressure,” Jones explained. “I stayed on the honor roll in high school, so I would be eligible for the program and could honor my mother’s wish for me to get an education.” She attended the Leadership Academy the summer before her freshman year at IU South Bend. “I got a head start,” she said. “I made a lot of friends; in fact, I won the socialite award.”

“It feels good to be a 21st Century Scholar because I’m part of a group that’s like me,” Mendez explained. “We share the same goals and aspirations.” The transition from Washington High School in South Bend to college was challenging, however, attending the Leadership Academy the summer before her freshman year helped her make the adjustment. When she was invited to join MAC’s Run the Relay program as a peer mentor, she knew it was something she wanted to do. As a peer mentor, she meets with first-year 21st Century Scholars to touch base and troubleshoot issues they may be facing as new college students. “In our meetings, we talk about problems or questions they may have,” she said. “It gives me a good feeling to help new students.” In addition to the financial assistance the 21st Century Scholar program has provided Mendez, she says it also makes her proud. “It feels good to be part of a group that’s worked hard and done well.”

Faculty Feature Development

students develop a relationship with faculty, staff, and other students, they are more likely to feel connected to the campus and seek assistance when they need it.” Creating connections is what MAC does well. One of its flagship programs, the Leadership Academy, invites 21st Century Scholars and minorities to attend an academically focused summer program before classes start in the fall. Students take two courses taught by IU South Bend faculty for college credit, and they get to participate in social events, leadership building group experiences, and spend time with peer mentors and counselors. The Leadership Academy gives students a head start before they begin their freshman year. “I didn’t know what to expect,” said Mercedes Jones. “In the Leadership Academy, I took college-level courses, learned my way around the campus and participated in fun activities. I got a good academic start before classes even began in the fall.” 21st Century Scholars confirm the sense of financial peace the scholarship provides them, but they also note a shared connection that they feel for the campus and their experiences. “IU South Bend is such a welcoming campus,” said Luis Osorio. “After my experience in the Leadership Academy, meeting other students, professors and staff, and then Welcome Week, I feel very comfortable here.”

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Donors

Admission to college does not guarantee student success, especially when many scholars are the first in their families to pursue a college degree. IU South Bend, with the help of a grant from the Lumina Foundation, stepped up to support its 21st Century Scholars through the Making the Academic Connection (MAC) program designed to facilitate the transition from high school to college all the way through to graduation. The 21st Century Scholars program pays for eight semesters tuition only, so it’s critical scholars remain on-track and graduate on-time. “Degree completion and student success for 21st Century Scholars is good for the longterm health of our community,” explained White. “More than seventy percent of IU South Bend’s graduates stay in the area to work, raise their families, and improve the quality of life in our community.” To encourage student success, MAC counselors and staff contact 21st Century Scholars early and often throughout their college experience. “Research shows that creating initiatives centered on student engagement is the key to success,” explained Cynthia Murphy, recruitment retention counselor. “When

2013 21st Century Scholar // Nursing

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2013 21st Century Scholar // Dental Hygiene

Class Notes

MERCEDES JONES


SVO President Ann Wells

Photography Peter Ringenberg

ANN WELLS IS ON HER SECOND TOUR OF DUTY AT IU SOUTH BEND. After graduating from high school, she studied criminal justice at IU South Bend with hopes of becoming a police officer on the vice squad of the South Bend Police Department. When she barely missed the cut, she decided to enlist in the Military Police Corps, the uniformed law enforcement branch of the U.S. Army. In February 2006, Wells was stationed at Camp Yong San in Seoul, Korea. The following year, she was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where she trained for deployment. When her unit deployed, however, she remained at Fort Polk because of an injury she sustained during training. In June 2009, Wells was placed on medical retirement, and in 2014, she was released medically with an honorable discharge. Today, Wells is a senior general studies major and president of the Student Veterans Organization (SVO). She discovered SVO when she was having some problems in a few of her classes, and it offered the support she needed to get over the hurdles. As the SVO president, her goal is to help recruit more studentveterans and to support their academic success as they pursue their degrees at IU South Bend. Wells has refocused her career aspirations to helping veterans. After she graduates next spring, she hopes to provide outreach for disabled veterans. “My experience in the military and now as an SVO officer has completely changed my career goals,” she remarked. “I want a career that focuses on helping disabled veterans.”


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Photography Peter Ringenberg

E Runners start Sweat for Vets 5K.

TRANSITIONING FROM MILITARY LIFE - where recruits learn to do exactly what they are told - to student life can be difficult. “It’s hard to come back into civilian life where there is a very loose structure and less support,” said IU South Bend Student Veterans Organization (SVO) President Ann Wells. Veterans who become college students face many challenges in a university setting. “Most veterans rose in rank in the military,” Wells added. “As students, they are starting over again as freshman. If they don’t succeed academically, they face further alienation.” The SVO at IU South Bend was created to ease the adjustment for student-veterans, so they can make a successful transition from the battlefield to the college campus. Established in 2007, SVO’s current leadership is passionate about building a strong, proactive student organization that advocates for

asing the Transition


Students

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg celebrates end of race.

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Leaders of Student Veterans Organization.

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Navy veteran finishes race.

more active on campus and in the community.” Wells attributes this development to the club’s healthy military mindset. “In the military the motto is: Don’t come to us with a problem if you don’t have a solution,” she explained. “As a club when we identify problems, we try to identify solutions too.” When SVO leaders met recently with IU South Bend Chancellor Terry Allison, they came with a list of ideas to make the campus more veteran friendly. “The SVO is a wonderful example of students making a difference,” said Chancellor Allison. “It is a priority to make this campus a place where student-veterans can be successful.” Allison has a personal commitment to veterans because of his father’s career in the Navy and the

military service of five of his uncles. An example of the SVO’s engagement is the Sweat for Vets 5K that was held over Veteran’s Day weekend for the second consecutive year. This year the money raised was donated to Habitat for Humanity for the construction of the first home built for a veteran and his or her family in South Bend. Additionally, SVO’s first flag exchange on Flag Day was wildly successful. “We expected 40 people,” said Wells. “We collected 200 tattered flags and gave out 150!” For more information about the Student Veterans Organization at IU South Bend, email svoiusb@iusb.edu and to contact the Veterans Student Services Office call (574) 520-4115 or email veterans@iusb.edu.

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IU South Bend student-veterans. They recruit new members with a personal touch. “We work hard to make contact with student-veterans,” said Wells. “We went to all the orientations and Welcome Week activities in the fall, and invited student-veterans to join the SVO and to let them know we are here to help no matter what the problem.” IU South Bend has 285 students who receive veteran benefits and 80 additional student-veterans who do not receive military service benefits. Tamika Johnson runs the Veterans Student Services Office at IU South Bend and has been the SVO’s advisor since 2007. She has watched the club grow in membership and involvement. “Over the last seven years it has blossomed into a positive organization that has become

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EACH FALL, IU SOUTH BEND WELCOMES TWO ADAM W. HERBERT PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARS TO ITS FRESHMAN CLASS—students who were the best-of-the-best of Indiana’s graduating high school seniors; students who were talented enough to be admitted to any college campus in the country, but chose IU South Bend after being awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious scholarships for IU students. “After I received the scholarship, I decided to attend IU South Bend, and it’s been a great experience. My professors are excellent, and I love my classes,” said sophomore Alexandra Hochstetler, one of six valedictorians in her graduating class at NorthWood High School and a 2013 Herbert Scholar. The Herbert Presidential Scholarship, named in honor of Indiana University President Emeritus Adam W. Herbert, is funded by the Lilly Endowment to attract and retain Indiana’s brightest students to Indiana, and is awarded to a total of 70 incoming freshman on IU’s eight campuses. This year marks the 10th class of Herbert Presidential Scholars. They have an average GPA exceeding 4.0 (supplemented by advanced placement and honors classes). Almost all ranked in the top five percent of their class. “I feel very blessed,” said 2014 Herbert Scholar Xander Laughlin from Westview High School. “It was a huge honor and boost to my confidence to be awarded the Herbert Presidential Scholarship.” In addition to outstanding academic records, the criteria for choosing Herbert Scholars includes evidence of strong leadership skills through school and community service. The intent is that these students will continue to excel and seek leadership opportunities on their IU campus. Senior Jessica Williams, a 2011 Herbert Scholar from Washington High School in South Bend, is a shining example of campus and community involvement. “I am the president and founding member of Beta Beta Beta, a national biology honors society, and the statewide regional vice president of the Residence Hall Association,” she explained. As representatives of Indiana’s best and brightest, Herbert Scholars are a diverse group with a wide range of interests. Along with a four-year renewable scholarship, they receive a stipend to expand their educational opportunities abroad. Elaine Jackson, a 2012 Herbert Scholar from Westville High School and biological sciences/pre-med major and East Asian studies minor, plans to

Herbert Scholars Make an Impact use her stipend to travel to Japan and Hong Kong as part of an IU South Bend Asian study abroad experience next year. These students represent the real meaning of the Herbert Presidential Scholarship. It is not so much its place in the financial equation, but its role in the life of a student. “I was meant to be here,” commented Jackson. “The Herbert Presidential Scholarship made a lot of things happen in my life that would not have been.”


Students Alumni

ELAINE JACKSON, a 2012 Herbert Presidential Scholar, is already working at a job she loves. “If my professor had not taken the step to tell students about an opportunity to work at the St. Joseph Medical Center emergency room as a scribe for attending physicians,” said Jackson, “I never would have known about it. It’s been an invaluable experience.” It’s given her firsthand experience in the world of the emergency medicine, and fostered her desire to become an emergency medicine physician. “I like that you get to help people at the peak of their need,” she commented. When she learned she had been awarded the Adam W. Herbert Presidential Scholarship, she was excited to attend IU South Bend. As a student at Westville High School, she visited the campus and liked that it was not far from home, and the class sizes were small. A biological sciences/pre-med major and Asian studies minor, Jackson enjoys the contrast between the two areas of study. “Asian studies is very different from my science classes,” she commented. “It really hones my critical thinking skills, and I enjoy the challenge.”

Faculty Feature Development Class Notes

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Donors

Agriculture is 2014 Adam W. Herbert Scholar EMILY SHEET’S first love. She was an active member of the Future Farmer’s Association (FFA) throughout her career at NorthWood High School. In addition to service projects, leadership demonstrations and public speaking, Sheets restored three tractors for FFA. As a top 20 graduate from her high school class, she’s decided to pursue biochemistry as her major at IU South Bend. “When I was offered the Herbert Presidential Scholarship,” she explained, “it sealed my decision to go to IU South Bend.” It offers her peace of mind. “I can pursue my future goals post-college without worrying about a lot of debt.” When she’s not attending class or working at her parttime job at Martin’s Supermarket, she’s restoring a 1953 Allis Chalmers tractor with her dad. “We refurbished the entire engine, disassembled the tractor from top to bottom, sanded it down, and we’re repainting it,” she said. “We plan to show it at tractor shows around the area when we’re done.” For Sheets, the Herbert Presidential Scholarship affirms the path she chose in high school. “The scholarship feels like recognition for all my hard work.”


ALEXANDRA HOCHSTETLER was one of six valedictorians in her NorthWood High School class when she was named a Herbert Presidential Scholar. “I’m really glad I chose IU South Bend,” she said. “I like that the IU South Bend faculty is very involved with their students. They are passionate about what they teach, and they want kids to succeed. I’m not sure I would have found that at a larger school.” A strong math and science student, Hochstetler has chosen nursing as her major and Spanish as her minor. A lifelong resident of Nappanee, Hochstetler hopes to someday work with kids. “I love kids, so I’d like to have a job in pediatrics.” She hopes that the combination of nursing and Spanish will prepare her well for a future in medicine. Down the road, Hochstetler hopes to travel to Costa Rica to study abroad to broaden her experience with other cultures and hone her Spanish skills - something she would not have been able to consider without the stipend to study abroad through her Herbert Presidential Scholarship. Like other Herbert Presidential Scholars, the scholarship validated her hard work in high school and offered new opportunities for her in college. “It made me feel proud of myself,” she commented. “And it motivates me to excel in college and take advantage of as many opportunities as I can while I’m here.”


Students Alumni

A self-proclaimed Harry Potter fan and a 2011 Herbert Scholar, senior biology major JESSICA WILLIAMS isn’t afraid to jump in and take action. She’s a founding member of the IU South Bend’s chapter of Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society, and she has been recognized as a National Residence Hall Honorary, a select group of the top one percent of student leaders in campus housing. “Attending IU South Bend was the best decision I could have made,” Williams said. “It’s a school that has a real sense of community.” A graduate of Washington High School in South Bend, Williams hopes to attend medical school next fall. She’s no stranger to the field of medicine. She works part-time in patient registration in the St. Joseph Medical Center emergency room when she’s not tutoring students in biology and chemistry or organizing housing dances, events and parties. For Williams, being able to live on campus, embrace community and leadership opportunities, and build lifelong friendships with her peers on the campus is the value of the Herbert Presidential Scholarship. “As the middle of five children the scholarship certainly made a difference financially,” she commented. “But it also enabled me to live on campus, which made my college experience at IU South Bend that much better.”

Faculty Feature Development Class Notes Donors

“Inspiring,” was the word XANDER LAUGHLIN used to describe how he felt about being named a 2014 Adam W. Herbert Scholar. “It really made me believe in myself.” Like all Herbert Scholars, Laughlin graduated in the top of his Westview High School class and participated in a variety of student leadership opportunities. Currently he’s enrolled at IU South Bend as an exploratory student. “It’s fascinating to learn about new things,” he explained. “I’m interested in quantum physics, but I also love to study the monetary system and the Federal Reserve.” He plans to pursue some of his high school interests—peer tutoring, theatre, German—in college. “I like quantitative subjects like math because the rules never change,” said Laughlin. “I’m good at math, so I’d like to tutor students in this area.” As a National Honor Society member and active student leader in high school, Laughlin was admitted to several colleges. “The Herbert Presidential Scholarship was the deciding factor,” said Laughlin. “It was a big honor to know only two people on this campus were awarded this scholarship.” One of five children, Laughlin is excited to be in college. “I feel very blessed to have this opportunity, and I want to make the most of it.”

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Photography Peter Ringenberg

Volleyball players Morgan Fleming and Melissa Macellari.


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SETTING THE BALL

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the Titan volleyball team as a middle hitter. “Once I visited the campus, I loved it. It felt like home,” she said. This is her first year on campus, but she’s living her dream, she said. “I love walking across the bridge to practice.” And once she’s on the court with the team, she feels like she’s where she belongs. “I like the coach, and I feel comfortable here.” Fleming plans to major in women’s and gender studies and minor in fine arts. “I want to work in women’s ministry and eventually counsel women,” she explained. Both players are grateful for the opportunity to play women’s volleyball for IU South Bend. “I’m just so proud to be a player on this team,” said Macelleri. “And to be able to say I was one of IU South Bend’s first volleyball players.” She and her senior teammates have built a strong foundation for the younger players like Fleming. “Morgan’s challenges will be different than Melissa’s,” said Coach Ashmore-Pott. “The trials and tribulations of starting-up a new team have been worked out.” Fleming shares Macellari’s enthusiasm about playing on the team, and she’s eager to begin a new chapter in her life. “My mom has always been my teacher and my home was my classroom,” she explained. “I’m excited about living and going to IU South Bend, and competing on the volleyball court.” The team finished the 2014 season with a 17-12 record.

Feature

a sense of team spirit, encouraging and boosting their teammates, working hard for the good of the team, and who show a lot of energy on the floor,” said Ashmore-Pott. Macellari is a leader on and off court. The elementary education major earned a 4.0 her first semester at IU South Bend. As she completes her final Titan volleyball season, she praises her teammates, especially the seniors, and aims to set a high bar for those who follow. “I want to be a role model,” Macellari remarked, “and set the standard for this team in future years.” The senior Titan volleyball setter and her teammates have made a strong impression on freshman recruit Morgan Fleming. “I look up to the seniors,” she said. “They have been so supportive and helpful.” Most college student-athletes begin playing their sport early in their lives. Home schooled her entire life, Fleming never played on a high school team, but began playing at the club level. Her first year in club ball was a learning year, and she wasn’t given much encouragement to pursue the sport in college. “My second year, I decided I’m going to go for it and prove to people I can do it,” she said. “The experience taught me to follow my dream and be persistent.” After taking a year off she contacted volleyball coaches in the area, including Coach Ashmore-Pott, to invite them to watch her play. And the rest is history. This year she joined

Faculty

SENIOR SETTER MELISSA MACELLARI AND FRESHMAN MIDDLE HITTER MORGAN FLEMING haven’t been teammates for long, but both agree that playing on the Titan volleyball team while earning a degree at IU South Bend has been an experience like no other. The IU South Bend women’s volleyball team began competing in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference (CCAC) in 2012, the year Macellari joined the team as a sophomore. Since then, she’s been a major contributor to the team’s outstanding success both on the court and in the classroom. “I transferred here from a different school. I wasn’t happy, and my confidence was low,” she commented. “Since I began playing for IU South Bend, I’ve fallen in love with volleyball again.” The setter’s passion for Titan volleyball is evident. Last season, in addition to being named to the CCAC all-conference second team as well as the all-academic team, she was recognized as a Daktronics/NAIA Scholar Athlete. She also delivered a single record of 909 assists per set, moving her to first place on the all-time list at the university. “I want to be able to look back and be proud of where this team is going and my contribution to its success,” Macellari remarked. Macellari represents the characteristics Titan volleyball coach Jamie Ashmore-Pott seeks in the players. “I look for players who display

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Sustainability Studies IU SOUTH BEND HAS TAKEN ANOTHER STEP AS A LEADER IN SUSTAINABILITY IN THE AREA. A bachelor’s degree in Sustainability Studies is now being offered for students interested in jobs in the growing “green” economy. “We’re on the cutting edge of a new area of study for higher education with this degree,” said Mike Keen, professor of sociology and director of the Center for a Sustainable Future at IU South Bend. “It’s an area of study that is responding to some of the most challenging problems facing our nation and world.” It’s not surprising that Keen was the driving force behind the first undergraduate degree in sustainability at IU South Bend. He was the first faculty member to be named the IU South Bend Chancellor’s Professor, recognizing his leadership in creating new connections between campus and community, and he has been director of the Center for a Sustainable Future since its inception in 2008. “The degree is designed to inspire and educate a generation that will hopefully put us back on the right track,” Keen explained. Unlike most of the early sustainability programs, which add sustainability coursework to another core discipline, IU South Bend’s bachelor’s degree starts with sustainability as the platform. “We are the first in the state to integrate the triple bottom

line approach, bringing together environment, economy and society.” Additionally, students are encouraged and supported in forming community relationships for the application of sustainability principles to real world situations. “Educate. Engage. Empower,” said Keen, “That’s what we try to do with our students.” Through class projects, practicums, internships and networking in the community, students build connections, and from these community connections come jobs. Myles Robertson, a 2012 graduate with a Sustainability minor, landed a job immediately after graduation as the local produce scout for the Purple Porch Co-op, a local organic food grocery. “With the work Mike Keen has done at the university level and in the community, it certainly affected my job prospects, and I just had a minor,” said Robertson. As students and faculty interact with the community, change begins to happen. IU South Bend senior Samantha England experienced this firsthand in her practicum class, when T. J. Kanczuzewski, the president of Inovateus Solar, spoke to her class. “He asked us to describe our dream job,” said England. “I said I wanted to be a vice president or president of the sustainability department for a large corporation.” England doesn’t have her dream job yet, but

Photography Peter Ringenberg

New Degree in


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MYLES ROBERTSON Purple Porch Co-op

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SAMANTHA ENGLAND

Photography Peter Ringenberg

Inovateus Solar


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hopeful in looking at Indiana’s future as these students graduate and go into the community.” First Federal Savings Branch Manager Andy Haeck agrees, “First Federal supports the Center and Mike’s efforts because we believe sustainable practices are way of the future. That’s why we built a green building. IU South Bend’s new bachelor’s degree in Sustainability Studies is innovation with education. It’s inspiring students who will someday be our future leaders.” Likewise, Keen finds the transformation of students’ perspectives the most rewarding aspect of creating the minor and now the major in sustainability, as well as the graduate certificate in strategic sustainability leadership. “The Einsteins and the Edisons of

this generation aren’t going to create a new world,” Keen commented, “but they’ll reinvent this one in accordance with the lessons of nature and principles of sustainability.” The bachelor’s degree in Sustainability Studies is designed to break down the boundaries between campus and community, creating new futures for students and the communities they touch. “We are new, but we’ve had a pretty big impact already with our students,” said Keen, “and we’ve been instrumental in changing the culture of sustainability in the region.” For additional information about the Bachelor’s of Arts in Sustainability Studies at IU South Bend contact Mike Keen at mkeen@iusb.edu.

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she’s getting closer with her dream internship in sales development at Inovateus Solar. “The Center for a Sustainable Future is the vehicle through which we have developed the curriculum. Networking is one of the biggest services the Center provides our students and the community,” said Keen. “It allows people in this region to come together, connecting faculty and students with government, nonprofits and industry.” IU South Bend alumna and the former assistant director at the Center, Krista Bailey, was recently recruited by the City of South Bend to head its new Office of Sustainability. Before her departure from the Center, she also worked on developing curricula for the Bachelor of Arts in Sustainability. “The new bachelor’s degree makes me very

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Photography Peter Ringenberg

BIG PHYSICS PROGRAM WINS


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IT WAS AN AMAZING ACCOMPLISHMENT. THREE PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF) FELLOWSHIPS WERE AWARDED TO IU SOUTH BEND GRADUATING SENIORS IN 2014, and two of the awards went to physics students. “We have an incredibly dedicated faculty,” explained Professor Henry Scott who is chair of the Physics Department. “There’s not much incentive in academia to spend a lot of time with undergraduate research. Yet, as a department we all thrive on this type of student interaction.” Undergraduate research is not uncommon. What is uncommon is the intensity of the research experience for

IU South Bend physics majors. In most instances, undergraduate research projects are small in nature and short in duration. However, because of the small size of the department, students work on one project over a twoyear period, developing a very close connection with their faculty mentors, especially over the summer months when there’s plenty of time to talk and work in the lab. IU South Bend had the largest number of graduating seniors winning NSF grants than any other college or university in Indiana. The NSF recipients from the Physics Department were Mark Klehfoth of Elkhart, who is now studying theoretical physics at the University of

Chicago, and Luis Morales of Elkhart, who is doing his graduate work at the University of Notre Dame. The third winner was Ashley Compton of South Bend, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry and is studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “They learn what scientific research is really about,” said Scott. Faculty mentors share their own trials and tribulations with the process. Students learn there are a lot more failures than successes. They learn it’s difficult to get funding. They learn to ask questions and how to discover the answers on their own. “It’s important to be patient with the process, and praise the successes,” said Scott. “It’s


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the close relationship with a faculty mentor that helps students persist and be successful in their research endeavors.” Students are not the only ones who gain from this close-knit research environment. “Undergraduate research projects take time, and they make me get into the lab with my students,” Scott explained. “I’ve done projects that I wouldn’t have started if I wasn’t trying to come up with a good student research project. And sure enough, it turns out to be publishable. And for students, the transition from consuming information to creating new knowledge triggers an excitement to learn more.” “Research is our biggest strength,” said Scott. And the Physics Department at IU South Bend has the results to prove it.

Professor Lynker earned her Ph.D. in Physics at the University of Texas at Austin. Lynker’s main area of research is string theory, but she is also published in high-energy particle physics and nuclear physics. She received the IU South Bend Distinguished Research Award and was twice selected as Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics Scholar. Lynker has been a member of the IU Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching since 2005. Lynker is also associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and director of the CLAS Academic Advising Center.

Professor Hinnefeld began his academic career as a high school physics and math teacher before he pursued his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics at the University of Notre Dame. He’s an experimental nuclear physicist with interests in reactions with radioactive beams and reactions with astrophysical implications. Hinnefeld has received several National Science Foundation (NSF) grants and the IU South Bend Distinguished Research Award. He was also named to IU’s Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching.

Professor Levine earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Yale University and his Ph.D. in Physics from Purdue University. A recipient of multiple National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, Levine’s research focuses on the search for dark matter and exploring the applications of experimental techniques. He has been aided in his work by 35 undergraduate research assistants since 2002, as well as several local high school students and teachers and a postdoctoral research associate. He was awarded the 2008 IU South Bend Distinguished Research Award.

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Associate Professor Schimmrigk earned his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Texas at Austin. He’s the recipient of the IU South Bend Research Award, the Student Government Association Educator of the Year Award, as well as IU South Bend Trustees’ Teaching Award. Particle physics is Schimmrigk’s main area of research interest. He was selected as a Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics Scholar, and as a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute in Munich, Germany and CERN in Switzerland.

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Professor of Physics and Department Chair Scott earned his Ph.D. in Earth Science/Geophysics from the University of California Santa Cruz. Scott won IU South Bend Trustees’ Teaching award in 2008 and 2012 and is a member of the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching, an IU-wide teaching organization. Scott’s research has been funded by grants from the American Chemical Society. His areas of research include high-pressure mineral physics, planetary mineralogy, and the whole-earth carbon cycle.

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Gift Creates Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences

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Photography Peter Ringenberg

From left: Mario Ortiz, dean, Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences; David Kibbe, vice president and trust officer, Indiana Trust; Terry L. Allison, chancellor, IU South Bend.


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her husband, James G. Dwyer, who founded Dwyer INDIANA UNIVERSITY SOUTH BEND HAS RECEIVED Instruments in 1931 in Chicago with his brother F.W. THE LARGEST SINGLE PHILANTHROPIC DONATION Dwyer. Its first product was a fluid-filled inclined IN ITS HISTORY AND THE LARGEST GIFT TO ANY IU manometer that was used as a draft gauge in furnaces and REGIONAL CAMPUS. A $5.85 million gift from the Vera boilers. The company moved to Michigan City in 1955 Z. Dwyer Charitable Trust has been given in support of the College of Health Sciences at IU South Bend. In recognition and its headquarters remain there today. In recognition of the Dwyer family ties to Michigan City, 20 percent of the of the gift, the College of Health Sciences at IU South Bend total scholarship funds of the Vera Z. Dwyer Scholarship in has been named the Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Healthcare is reserved for students from La Porte County. Sciences. The purpose of this philanthropic investment Dwyer Instruments continues to be a leading manufacturer in IU South Bend by the Dwyer Trust is to permanently in the controls and instrumentation industry. strengthen the quality of healthcare education in the region “Vera Dwyer believed in higher education and wanted and help fill the demand for more qualified healthcare to provide more opportunities for students to go to college. professionals at area hospitals and medical facilities. The gift includes $2.5 million to be used to increase She also wanted to make sure there was quality healthcare in the area,” said David Kibbe, t h e e n d o w m e n t o f t h e Ve r a Z . vice president and trust officer at Dwyer Scholarship in Healthcare; Indiana Trust. “Our confidence in the $1.5 million to create and endow leadership of Chancellor Allison and the Dwyer Distinguished Chair in Dean Ortiz at IU South Bend made Advanced Nursing Practice; $1 million this gift a perfect match.” in a guaranteed matching pledge for The naming was approved by the the Health and Wellness Center at Indiana University Board of Trustees IU South Bend to expand low-cost on December 5. Charitable gifts to healthcare services to the community; Indiana University are held and and $850,000 to be used to begin managed by the IU Foundation in implementation of these initiatives. Bloomington, Indiana. When combined with the earlier gift The endowed Vera Z. Dwyer of $1 million that established the – Terry L. Allison, Scholarship in Healthcare will Dwyer Scholarship in Healthcare, the Chancellor generate funding to provide combined gift reaches a total of $6.85 scholarships that will attract and million. If the matching pledge is support highly qualified students interested in the health realized, the total results of the gift would be $7.85 million. sciences, especially low-income, under-represented and “IU South Bend is thrilled to receive this gift. We will first-generation students. The gift is expected to support honor the vision of Vera Dwyer by providing excellence in approximately 60 students with financial need annually. healthcare education for years to come,” said Chancellor The endowed Vera Z. Dwyer Distinguished Chair in Terry L. Allison. “Our students need financial support. Scholarships like this make the difference in whether or not Advanced Nursing Practice will bring an expert in the field to the School of Nursing program at IU South Bend a student is able to stay in school and earn a college degree. as a faculty member. This position will elevate teaching, The lives of many of our students will be changed because learning and community service in healthcare at IU South of this.” Bend and will position graduates to be at the forefront of “This act of generosity will allow IU South Bend to innovation in the nursing profession. attract and support outstanding students and faculty in The Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences at healthcare to our campus,” said Mario Ortiz, dean of the IU South Bend includes the School of Nursing, the Vera Z. Dwyer College of Health Sciences. “Graduates will Dental Education/Dental Hygiene program, the be in high demand and residents will benefit from better Radiography program, and operation of the Health and healthcare.” Wellness Center on campus. Several healthcare degree The Vera Z. Dwyer Charitable Trust is managed by programs are planned as part of the Academic Master Plan Indiana Trust and Investment Management Company at IU South Bend. of Mishawaka and represents the legacy of Vera and

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“We will honor the vision of Vera Dwyer by providing excellence in healthcare education for years to come.”

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A Special Concert in a Special Place “LOUISE WELCOMES YOU.” With those words, Yatish Joshi set the stage for the dedication concert for the Louise E. Addicott and Yatish J. Joshi Performance Hall at IU South Bend. “This evening you will meet our extended family,” he continued, referring to the special guest artists who would grace the hall with memorable performances, all to honor the vision of Louise E. Addicott.


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engagements have included leading roles around the world. Violinist George Zacharias maintains a busy international performance career and currently is an academic lecturer and postgraduate tutor at the Royal Academy of Music in London. The opening piece was a personal request by Yatish. Kodanashvili played “Moonlight Serenade” which Louise used to play for Yatish. The crowd listened in awe and responded with a standing ovation. The evening ended with performances by faculty and students from the Ernestine M. Raclin School of the Arts. For information on upcoming performances at the Louise E. Addicott and Yatish J. Joshi Performance Hall visit arts.iusb.edu.

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our students and faculty will sparkle. I cannot express how much that means to all of us.” The Addicott-Joshi family attended recitals in the old hall when children Georgina, Tenzing and Avatar were growing up. Those memories made the renovation of the hall the perfect way to fulfill the vision of Louise and the concert captured that perfection. Three internationally-known artists traveled to South Bend at the invitation of Yatish to headline the concert. Vakhtang Kodanashvili is a past winner of the World Piano Competition and is a former member of the Toradze Piano Studio at IU South Bend.  Soprano Simona Mihai made her Royal Opera House debut in 2009. Her operatic

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THE RENOVATED HALL IS A SHOWCASE VENUE FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF CHAMBER MUSIC AND SMALL ENSEMBLES WHICH WERE ON DISPLAY DURING THE CONCERT. Funded by a lead gift from the Georgina Joshi Foundation, the 224-seat hall provides students and faculty with a place to hone their craft and record their music. From the first note played the audience knew they were listening to world-class acoustics provided by one of the most sophisticated sound systems in the country. “The vision of Louise Addicott will shine here,” said IU South Bend Chancellor Terry L. Allison. “And here

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fall2014ClassNotes 1960s Larry Lentych, BS’69, Business, has been appointed to the IU Alumni Association Board of Managers. He is a Manager at Large for the term 2014-2016.

1970s Alma Powell, BS’70, Education; MS’72, Education; Hon. Degree ’12, has just retired from the IU South Bend Alumni Board of Directors after serving two terms. She and her husband, Bill, have also established a scholarship in their names for an IU South Bend student in Business or Education.

1980s Mickey Hay, BA’84, MS’89, Education, is the new Education Representative on the IU South Bend Alumni Board, and has her own consulting firm, Mickey Hay Associates. Lisa Shaffer, MS’88, Education, is now the Vice Chancellor of Enrollment Management and Marketing and Communications for the North Central and Northwest regions for Ivy Tech Community College.

1990s James Boger, BS’90, Education, has been named as Director of Career Services and Human Resources at IU South Bend. Jeff Johnston, BS’91, MPA’09, has accepted a new position as the University Registrar in Bloomington, IN. Shelli Alexander, BS’93, Business, is a new Member at Large on the IU South Bend Alumni Board. She is also a Vice President at 1st Source Bank.

Sue Anderson, BSN’93, has has been selected as an American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) Future Leaders Program participant. Sue is also a member of the faculty in the School of Nursing. Chad Crabtree, BA’98, Political Science, has accepted a new position at Ivy Tech Community College of Elkhart County as the Associate Director of Admissions. Tammy Davis, ASDH’99, is the new Dental Education Representative on the IU South Bend Alumni Board. Thaddeus Cutler, BA’99, Fine Arts, is the downtown coordinator for the Greater LaPorte Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau, LaPorte Urban Enterprise Association, Greater LaPorte Economic Development Corp., and the city of LaPorte. He and his wife Laura opened the Thaddeus C. Gallery in 2004. Debra Martin, BS’95, Education; MS’02, Education, was honored by the South Bend City Council and Mayor Pete Buttigieg with the Daniels School Health Award. She is principal at Madison Elementary School in South Bend.

2000s Alex Lozano, BS’02, Business, is a Sales Executive at Interlogic Outsourcing, Inc. Kris Langel Fishburn, BS’03, Criminal Justice, and her husband, John, welcomed their daughter Braelynn Hope, on July 13, 2014. E r i n B l a s k o , B A’ 0 3 , M a s s Communications, is a reporter at the South Bend Tribune. K e l l i C o l l i n s , B A’ 0 5 , M a s s Communications, is the corporate sales manager for the Inn at Saint Mary’s and the Hilton Garden Inn.

Jason Cytacki, BFA’07, is an Assistant Professor of Painting at the University of Oklahoma. He also has an exhibit at the South Bend Museum of Art September 27, 2014-January 4, 2015. Brandon Briggs, BFA’07, was accepted into the Works on Paper competition at Manifest Gallery in Cincinnati, Ohio. Vince Sgambelluri, BS’07, Business, is now working as a Continuous Improvement Director and Branch S a f e t y O f f i c e r f o r Va l l e y C r e s t Development/Landscaping in Las Vegas, Nevada. Jason Overholt, BA’09, Mass Communications, is the lead digital producer at WSBT-TV. Ashley Schmitt, AS’09, BS’12, Business, is the new Judd Leighton School of Business & Economic Representative on the IU South Bend Alumni board, and has received a promotion at ABRO Industries as Controller.

2010s Je n n i f e r Z e l l e r s , B A’ 1 0 , M a s s Communications, is a production assistant at ABC-57. Roy Saenz, AS’10, Business; BA’10, Sociology; is a regional leader and independent representative of Primerica Life Insurance Company. Ashley Henderson, BA’11, Mass Communications, is a newscast producer at WSBT-TV. Chris Klein, BA’11, German, is the new Assistant Director in the Career Development Center at IU Bloomington. Scott Hancock, BGS’12, is now a graduate student in the Master of Social Work program. He has been named


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Dina Harris, Director of Development (574) 520-4131 // diharris@iusb.edu

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CONTACT

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THE STUDENT PHILANTHROPY COUNCIL WAS FORMED IN APRIL. It was started as a new initiative for students to learn about philanthropy and what it means to give back to the university. The council is made up of core students from Student Government and Student Alumni Association. Its members are Shannon Porowski, Aaron Wilson, Michele Redding, Julia Robinson, Justin Chupp, Mandi Bowser, Shawn Wagner, Michael Staszewski, Kate McDonald and Hannah Van. Kelly Eberhart, Assistant Alumni Director, is their staff advisor. The council meets on a regular basis and has been challenged to raise money for a project of their choosing, They have selected a campaign called “Titans Supporting Titans.” They hope to raise $2,000 per semester to help students and their families receive dental care at the Roger S. Pecina Dental Education Clinic on campus. It is not only a campaign but also a contest. There will be prizes for the three students that raise the most money. They also have placed coin/cash containers at the University Grill, SAC, Starbucks and the dental clinic for extra change for the cause. The council has hosted several events, the latest being a luncheon, open to all students, with guest speaker, Kristyn Quimby, Director of Dental Education. Hannah Van also spoke on what philanthropy means to her. Chancellor Allison provided the luncheon and also attended. They have collected over $1,000 thus far and hope to reach their $4,000 goal at the end of the academic year. These students are committed to their cause philanthropy and how it can benefit their lives, and in this case, the lives of their fellow students. If anyone would like to contribute to this very important cause please contact the Alumni Office at (574) 520-4381.

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GIFTPLANNING?

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National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Student of the Year in Indiana. Krystal Vivian, BA’12, Mass Communications, is a digital producer at the Elkhart Truth. Joel Bazzell, BA’12, Mass Communications, is working on a graduate certificate in non-profit management at IUPUI, and a Master of Public Affairs while also employed with Fifth Third Bank. Courtney Seanor, BA’12, Mass Communications, is a page designer at the South Bend Tribune. Miranda Hankins, BS’13, Business, is the Human Resources Division Assistant at Arvest Bank in Fayetteville, Ark. Joseph Graf, BA’13, Mass Communications, is a multi-media journalist at Techie.com. Sidney Shafer, BA’13, Speech Communications, is working as a member of the Main Street Daily Operations team at Disney World, Orlando, Fla. Taylor Neff, BA’14, Mass Communications, is a director at ABC-57. Sarah Duis, BA’14, Mass Communications, is a county reporter at the Elkhart Truth. Alisenne Turner, BA’14, Mass Communications, is a sports desk clerk at the Elkhart Truth. Danielle Miller, BA’14, Mass Communications, is a freelance writer at the South Bend Tribune. Lauren Desrosiers, Master of Music’14, was selected to study in Greece with Grammy Award-winning soprano Cheryl Studer at the North Aegean Music Festival. Desrosiers was able to take master classes and opera workshops with Studer. Tamra Garrett, Master of Music’14, won third place in the Indiana Chapter of National Association of Teachers of Singing in her division. Garrett has attended the Druid City Opera Workshop Young Artist Program in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Over 100 singers auditioned with only 21 being selected.


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS DECEMBER 1, 2013 – NOVEMBER 30, 2014 GUARDIAN $50,000-74,999 Van and Jean Gates PHILANTHROPIST $25,000-49,999 Scott and Kay Schurz ANGEL $10,000-24,999 Chancellor Terry L. Allison Dale J.* and Maralyn Bruce Christopher Costello Arthur J. Decio Frank and Marsha Martin Chuck and Lois Niemier Jack and Sherron Schuster Isaac Torres and Maria Villa Dorothy J. Wiekamp BENEFACTOR $5,000-9,999 Yatish J. Joshi Michael R. Leep, Sr. Arnold and Vivian Sallie Amish Shah and Amy Young PATRON $2,500-4,999 Patrick J. Furlong William and Leslie Gitlin Vince and Barbara Hall Daniel and Delia Helpingstine Bob and Pat Kill Ryan T. Marcott Frederick and Carol Naffziger Robert Rowland and Linda Fritschner Harvey and Carin Weingarten DONOR $1,000-2,499 Robert and Pamela Beam David K. Barton Louis and Linda Bixler Vernon Block and Deborah McGraw-Block Marilyn J. Bolinger Christopher and Kristen Bradford F. Peter and Durleen Braasch Rita E. Brockie Steven Bruce Allen and Cathy Buckman Barbara J. Byrum Thomas and Dorthy Corson Peter and Lisa Deputy David and Laura Douglas Lawrence and Carolyn Garber Lucille E. Gering Edith Goodman Glenn Hassan Linda T. Irwin Larry and Judith Lentych Kenneth and Cheryl Little Joan Mansfield Donald and Gail Marti

John and Charleen McIntosh Christopher and Carmen Murphy John Murphy and Elizabeth Dunn John G. Pfeil John Powers Emil and Shirley Reznik Randolph and May Rompola Mark C. Royer Asghar and Khadijeh Sabbaghi Richard and Ilene Sheffer David and Kathleen Sparks Dean and Janet Strycker Raymond A. Vander Heyden David Vollrath and Gwendolyn Mettetal John Voorde Erik and Linda Waelchli Jeffrey A. Wimble Lester M. Wolfson Nanci G. Yokom W. Bruce Zimmerman Harold and Doreen Zisla SPONSOR $500-999 Dean Alvis and Anne Brown Donald and Keri Anderson Dudley and Stephanie Andrew Rick Ashmore Peter and Nancy Baranay Thomas and Janice Brunner Bruce D. Carter Lorena J. Celis Debora L. Chudzicki Donald P. Costello Christopher and Kelly Craft Marvin V. Curtis John and Monique Deguara Gregory and Mary Downes Robert and Sandra Ducoffe Robert L. Frank William and Cynthia Frascella Steven and Margaret Goldberg Fred and Jennifer Helmen Hale S. Henderson William and Patricia Henry Lawrence and Sharon Hussey Paula J. Jenkins Kimberly K. Keene Harold and Janice Langland James McLister and Deborah Marr Jorge Marin and Natalia Jimenez Frank Julian Frances L. Lanciotti Bruce McDonald Edgar B. Midgett* Michael and Jeanette Miranda William Murray and Dina Harris Andrew and Marilyn Naylor Donald and Nancy Olson

Paul and Nancy Piller John and Michele Russo Arman Sabbaghi Roy Schreiber and Linda Chen Craig and Marlene Schroeder Scott and Stephanie Schurz Charles and Margo Stahl Jon and Patricia Stahl Jeffrey Sutter and Rebecca Torstrick David L. Vance Dennis M. Wolf Katharine L. Wolford FRIEND $250-499 Steven and Karen Austin Seymour and Cheryl Barker James D. Bentz David and Brenda Bickel Patrick and Mara Boettcher Robert C. Bonzo Ryan and Rachel Bradley Thomas and Billie Catanzarite Joseph R. Chaney Christopher Claeys Margaret Cline Jennifer A. Colanese C. Michael and Teri Crabill Chad M. Crabtree Rick and Dorene Dennie Deloris A. Dutoi Timothy and Moira Dyczko Philip and Ann Eskew Richard and Kathy Fair Judy Ferrara Brenda J. Fleming G. R. Fletcher Michael and Debra Flowers David and Deborah Fox Lyndal and Joan Fox Kevin and Diana Garvey Ricky and Susan Goe Michael M. Grayson Ann M. Grens Anna Guillaume Hossein Hakimzadeh Robert and Kathy Hammond John and Martha Harper Gerald and Eileen Harriman Clark and Avon Hartford Roger and Rebecca Hartman Warren Haas and Karen Behnke Gary R. Hawkins Randy and Yolanda Hedington Donna L. Heffner Richard and Audrey Herzberg Peter J. Holland James R. Hurst Leonard and Deana James


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ALTRUIST $75,000-499,999 Judd Leighton Foundation, Inc. The Kresge Foundation

PHILANTHROPIST $25,000-49,999 Afdent Dental Services Schurz Family Foundation

BENEFACTOR $5,000-9,999 A. Harold & Lucile Weber Charitable Trust Days Corporation Florence V. Carroll Charitable Trust Georgina Joshi Foundation, Inc. Gurley Leep Automotive Family J J White, Inc. John, Anna & Martha Jane Fields Foundation KeyBank Foundation Muessel-Ellison Memorial Foundation Stanley A. and Flora P. Clark Memorial Foundation

SPONSOR $500-999 a5 Group, Inc. Beta Gamma Sigma, Inc. Bruce Carter Associates, LLC Caterpillar Foundation Chevron Products Company Dunes Volleyball Club First Federal Savings Bank IUSB Office of Alumni Relations Lehman and Lehman, Inc. St Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office South Bend Medical Foundation, Inc. South Bend Tribune Steel Warehouse Company, LLC Sweeney Julian PC Transformations By Wieland, Inc. YWCA North Central Indiana

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ANGEL $10,000-24,999 Darwin & Dorothy Wiekamp Foundation Frank & Marilyn Martin Family Foundation Intercambio Express, Inc. Jewish Community Foundation of St. Joseph Valley Kem Krest Corporation Lake City Bank St. Joseph Regional Medical Center Schurz Communications Foundation Teachers Credit Union Foundation Trinity Health

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GUARDIAN $50,000-74,999 Community Foundation of St. Joseph County Rex and Alice A. Martin Foundation The Martin Foundation, Inc.

DONOR $1,000-2,499 American Endowment Foundation Barnes & Thornburg, LLP Crowe Horwath, LLP DJ Construction Company Incorporated Dorothy Fromm Trust General Sheet Metal Works 1st Source Corporation Kruggel, Lawton & Company, LLC Melvin & Edith T Goodman Charitable Foundation

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TRANSFORMER $500,000-1,000,000 Vera Z. Dwyer Charitable Trust

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PATRON $2,500-4,999 Corson Family Foundation, Inc. 1st Source Foundation, Inc. Gibson Lewis, LLC Hull Lift Truck, Inc. Indiana Center for Nursing Kabri Products Lyons Industries, Inc. Northern Indiana Public Service Co. Pathfinders Advertising & Marketing Group, Inc. Teachers Credit Union Waste-Away Group Ltd.

Faculty

Ronald and Loraine Troyer Dominic Vachon and Mary Murray Vachon John and Patricia Van Dyke Michael and Elizabeth Van Gordon Alberto and Nancy Vitale Michael and Dena Wargo Paul J. Wendzonka Karen L. White Barbara Williams Edward B. Williams Jeffrey M. Wright Qiang Xu

Alumni

Gail Parent Jaskowiak Robin L. Johnson William and Ruth Johnson Jeff and Tammy Johnston Jann Joseph Daniel and Kathryn Kaminski Thomas E. Kauffman James and Christine Kelly Michael J. Kempiak Keith Knauss and Paula Auburn Jeffrey S. Knight Vakhtang M. Kodanashvili Glenda G. Lamont Jerry O. Lentz Mark and Judith Liszewski Joan A. Lyman Michael and MaryFrances McCourt Cris McFarland and Nancy Mariotti Anne D. McGraw Douglas W. McMillen Elyce J. Meilstrup Pamela Mendenhall Susan L. Moore Terence and Bridget Morgan Jorge Mũniz Mark and Kathleen Neal James and Joyce Nelson Vicki L. Nesting Thomas Niemier and Glynis Benbow-Niemier H. Theodore and Annette Noell William J. O’Donnell Scott A. Opasik Robert and Deborah Pardue Mark Parent Marian V. Pelking Dirk L. Pletcher Victor and Marjorie Riemenschneider Claude and Lynn Robertson Michael G. and Kathleen M. Rudolph Weir A. Rummel Rev. Daryl M. Rybicki Robert and Brenda Schosker Robert A. Schulz Ann L. Schwarz Steven and Cynthia Searfoss Richard and Barbara Sherwood Dan and Marjorie Snider Pamela Shrader Richard and Chantelle Snyder Thomas and Roberta Spencer Shane and Jessica Stopczynski Judith L. Swisher Biniam K. Tesfamariam Roger and Amy Thomas Townsend and Margaret Thomas Lory L. Timmer Alexander D. Toradze

FRIEND $250-499 Euclid Quartet Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County Flowers Building Account Jorgeson Family Revocable Living Trust South Bend Police Department The Chamber of Commerce of St. Joseph County Villing and Company Wells Fargo & Co. Foundation

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Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit 540 South Bend, IN

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SOUTH BEND // 1700 MISHAWAKA AVENUE // P.O. BOX 7111 // SOUTH BEND, IN 46634-7111

LIFT EVERY VOICE

Celebrating the African American Spirit Hear the works of Langston Hughes in music, performed by guest tenor Albert Lee, along with other guests and the university choirs.

7 pm Saturday, February 28 Campus Auditorium, Northside Hall

Tickets $3, FREE to students/children // 574.520.4203 // arts.iusb.edu

Foundations - fall/winter 2014  

A publication for alumni & friends of Indiana University South Bend | FALL/WINTER 2014 | New Name: Bright Future. Vera Z. Dwyer College of H...

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