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Installation of Chancellor Terry L. Allison

foundations A publication for alumni & friends of indiana university south Bend | Fall/winter 2013


chancellor

I am happy to welcome you to my first issue of Foundations as chancellor of Indiana University South Bend. Even though I am on the cover, I know this magazine focuses on the accomplishments of the students, faculty, staff, and alumni at IU South Bend and the generosity of our donors. I always intended that my installation as chancellor would be a celebration of the campus and, as you will read, it was that and more. There was an entire week of activities that showcased IU South Bend, its students and faculty. The photos you see in the installation story capture some of the wonderful moments we shared together. I was also able to use my installation speech to continue the momentum that is building to focus on student success. As chancellor you will hear me talk a lot about the many definitions of student success and how the university and community can work together to achieve our goals.

a message from the

This edition of Foundations is full of stories of success and achievement. You will read about how students used their summers to learn and grow in their fields, ranging from sophisticated scientific research to online reporting at USA Today to studying in Mexico. You will read about alumni who make us proud in their journeys in music and nursing. You will read about the enthusiasm of the new men’s basketball coach and his focus on teaching, mentoring, and building character in his players. Not only is there a new chancellor on campus but there are two new deans featured who have already made an impact and are creating excitement for the future. In this issue of Foundations, we also honor two women who have retired after remarkable careers. You will also read about how alumni and friends are giving back to IU South Bend by establishing scholarships so students can follow in their footsteps. Foundations is full of inspiring and interesting stories that reflect only a small part of the good work being done at IU South Bend. I am proud to be chancellor of this special place. I hope you enjoy this issue of Foundations. Sincerely, Terry L. Allison | Chancellor COVER: Installation of Chancellor Terry L. Allison, photograph by Peter Ringenberg


A publication for alumni & friends of indiana university south Bend Fall/winter 2013 Administration and Staff Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs and University Advancement Ilene Sheffer Director of Alumni Affairs Jeanie Metzger, BS’74 Assistant Director of Alumni Affairs Kelly Eberhart, MSW’13 Director of Communications and Marketing Ken Baierl, MLS’09 Writer and Editor Kathy Borlik, BA’79 Art Direction, Production and Design Tiffany Goehring, BFA’04 Photography Peter Ringenberg, Matt Cashore, Kathy Borlik IU South Bend Alumni Association Board Members President Margaret J. Ridenour, AS’99, BS’01, MPA’05 Vice President Kris Fishburn, BGS’03 Secretary Christine Pochert Ringle, MSBA’86, MBA’88 Treasurer Shawn Todd, MBA’10 Past President Phil Mark, BA’84 At Large Members Scott Hancock, BGS’12 Amy Hill, MPA’06 Lory Timmer, BGS’02, MPA’05 Vince Sgambelluri, BS’07 Division and School Representatives Kelli Hayes-Collins, BA’05, Arts Rudy Yakym III, AS’09, BS’11, Business Perla Hernandez, ASDH’04, Dental Hygiene Alma Powell, BS’70, MS’72, Education Kasi Bolden, BGS’94, MS’01, General Studies Robyn Black, BA’13, Aleah Lacopo, BSN’11, Nursing Ex Officio Members *Durleen Braasch, AGS’83, BGS’83 *Todd Beall, BS’99 *Chris Craft, BS’89 *Larry Lentych, BS’69 *Linda McDougal, MPA’84 *Doreen Pienkowski, ASDH’99 *Lucky Reznik, MSBA’75 *Mary Beth Ryan, BGS’99 Hillary Sirhan, Student Alumni Representative *Ex Officio members representing non-academic constituencies. FOUNDATIONS is published twice a year by the Office of Communications & Marketing at Indiana University South Bend. It is distributed to alumni and friends of the university. Please send comments, class notes, and story ideas to Kathy Borlik at kborlik@iusb.edu.

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Summer Excitement

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From South Bend to California

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The Right Choice: To Become a Nurse

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Mystery Photo

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New Coach, New Energy

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Destined to Be a Teacher

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Retirements

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Love of People, Love of Teaching

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Installation of Chancellor Terry L. Allison

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Scholarships

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The Remarkable Eileen and Harvey Bender

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Campus Briefs

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Class Notes


Summer Excitement kathy borlik // Photography Peter Ringenberg, Kathy Borlik, & Michele Morgan DuFour College students during the summer may continue their studies, work, or have some fun. Occasionally, there is a chance to combine all three. IU South Bend students are no different. Here are five students who combined their educational activities, such as research and performing, with some challenges and a touch of fun. Ashley Compton spent 10 weeks in a laboratory at Penn State.

She received a National Science Foundation grant to research aldehydedeformylating oxygenase, which could be used as a biofuel replacement. She worked with 11 other students from across the country. “There were students from Utah, Texas, Georgia, the East Coast, and me.” Compton is a senior biochemistry major from Elkhart. Her dreams are to continue her education and

research, and eventually to be a biochemistry professor at a research institution. The experience at Penn State helped her determine what graduate school would be like and where to narrow her choices. “Penn State helped me make up my mind about going into the field of inorganic chemistry. The campus was a great fit.” In addition to the research and the collaboration, “it was a blast,” she said. She got to

know other college students who shared her interests. “It was the best decision I could have made” to spend the summer at Penn State. “With my background at IU South Bend, the work I did here made me successful. I made some great friendships, and I made a great impression on those from big schools.” Sarah Duis didn’t stray far from her Mishawaka home. She was an online correspondent for “USA


Students

important part of building nanoscale electronics (such as tiny robots doctors may use in the future to conduct noninvasive surgeries). The problem that these researchers face in using graphene nanoribbons is the fact that they are very difficult to obtain. My research involved finding a way to synthesize large quantities of very precise graphene nanoribbons,” she said. She said she really enjoyed the time in the lab and with research interns from across the country. “I am more excited about organic chemistry now.” It wasn’t just lab work, she added. The group took hiking trips, went to Kings Island, and got together to eat and talk. “The work gave me assurance that I’ve made the right decision. It made me a very happy chemistry major,” Warrell said. Lowell Ritter spent four weeks in Oaxaca, Mexico, studying the language and the culture. He received a Rotary Scholarship to study abroad. The Elkhart business senior said the best part was the host family and getting to know them. “The language immersion was crazy good. It was like three semesters of Spanish.” The students also took trips to historic sites, archaeological digs, and an orphanage. “The trip gave me a whole new understanding of the world and globalization.” Ritter would like to go to law school, perhaps to specialize in international law. “It was a different experience, very exciting. I will remember the town festivals with so many vibrant colors and fireworks. I will tell anyone who will listen to me that they should study abroad. I have new friends that I will have for a lifetime,” Ritter said.

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Today College,” a website geared to traditional college-age students. Duis wrote about a dozen stories for the online edition, all relevant to a younger crowd. Duis also was digital content summer intern at the Elkhart Truth. She had to balance her time between the Truth and USA Today. The senior is the editor of the student paper on campus, “The Preface.” There were about 20 other students from across the country who wrote for the college online edition. They emailed and texted about story ideas. The students worked with an online editor who guided them with conference calls and webinars through the wonderful world of journalism. She wrote about the five ways to make the most of the senior year, dorm room broadcasting, workout supplements, 3-D printing, and eating locally. The ideas sprang from other news stories, what was making the rounds on the Internet and what interested Duis. Twitter became a source for interviews. “It was stressful to find someone to talk to for a story.” However, she came through and got the job done and found her sources. At the end of the day, “It was pretty crazy to see stories online or in print,” she said.

She hopes the experience will give her a leg up on the competition as she applies for jobs this spring and summer after graduation. Lawrence MitchellMatthews had a busy July. He went from upstate New York, where he sang five spirituals with Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, to singing some selections from the Gershwin songbook with the Singapore Chinese Symphony Orchestra. The New York appearance was in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Last February, he sang Porgy and Bess with the South Bend Symphony. Also performing in that concert was Tamra Garrett. Mitchell-Matthews is a junior from Detroit and is studying voice in the Ernestine M. Raclin School of the Arts. Last summer he attended the Ezio Pinza Council for American Singers of Opera in Italy. The workshops mold the American artists into accomplished opera singers. This year was an opportunity to be a professional artist. “Italy was school; this summer was different. It let me spread my wings as a singer,” he said. The audiences thrilled to his rich baritone voice singing selections from Porgy and Bess. “The audience was right there with me (as I sang). It was like having a conversation with them.” Outside the theater, he said, “Singapore was breathtaking. It was so green and the people were so friendly. I had a hard time coming back.” Rachel Warrell is a senior from South Bend and a chemistry major. She spent the summer at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, synthesizing graphene nanoribbons. “Graphene nanoribbons are of huge interest in nanoresearch. They are very useful as nanowires, which means they would be a very

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From South Bend to California Jeanie Metzger Photography Freshlookphotography Hollywood

Music had always been in Jeff Urband’s life starting even before his rock band days in the 1960s. After graduating from Adams High School, he went to IU Bloomington as a piano major. After one semester, he decided it wasn’t the right place for him. He came to IU South Bend. “It was the right fit and the right time.” He said he learned so much from faculty members such as Barton McLean, Robert Demaree, and Robert Hamilton. “They were very, very tough. It was competitive, but the real competition was with yourself.” Urband graduated in 1974 with a Bachelor of Music from IU South Bend, and has lived in California since the 1980s. He is a sought-after studio musician in Los Angeles. He came home in late summer to South Bend for an Adams High class reunion where he entertained and wrote a song for his classmates. While at IU South Bend in those college years, he continued to do his rock band gigs and play backup for big name acts that came to the area. He remembered that during finals week, he was hired to play piano for the Righteous Brothers in Fort Wayne. Professor McLean told him not to go and if he did he would get an F.


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He played in Fort Wayne and got the F. He made up for the grade the next semester. Later, after graduation, Professor McLean made up for that grade by helping Urband get a graduate assistant job and a scholarship to Wichita State to pursue a master’s degree in piano performance. After earning his master’s degree, he headed to California to make more music. With a federal grant in hand, he took music to unlikely places such as prisons, hospitals, and nursing homes. Urband later performed on the Princess Cruise Line, and in summers at Aspen School of Music. He arranged music, worked as a studio musician, ran his own studio, coached, mentored, wrote music for the movies, and was an accompanist for John Raitt, Bonnie Raitt, and other performers. He is a master of many genres from opera to rock, gospel to jazz. He says his best reward is seeing young performers he has mentored up on the stage. “Music makes me happy, I have been lucky in a tough,

competitive career. I have an avocation, not a vocation, and I followed my heart.” In the music business, he said, “No one ever asks for your transcripts or résumé. They just want to hear your music and appreciate it.” His best advice for young musicians is never lose sight of your dream. Focus on your craft and learn as much as you can from your teachers. Keep a journal and “be real.” Jeff also performs at the famed Miceli’s Italian Restaurant in Universal City, Calif., and is a musical director/pianist for the Paul Gleason Theater in Los Angeles. Check out the Miceli’s YouTube post to learn more about the entertainment. Urband, who has been a marathon runner for a long time, compares running to his profession. “You need to train and work up to your goal. There will be mistakes but you correct them and move forward.” Successful in his field, he still values his South Bend ties and his education at IU South Bend where it all began.

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The Right Choice To Become a Nurse story & Photography kathy borlik

Sue Anderson saw nurses in action when her sister was admitted to the hospital following an auto accident. “I saw the beauty of the science of nursing and the art of caring.” She decided that it was time for a career change from newspaper editor to nurse. When Sue and her husband, Tracey, moved to South Bend so he could begin teaching in the School of Business and Economics at IU South Bend, she began to work on her BSN. “It felt like I had been welcomed home. The staff members are all good role models. It was such a great experience” to get that degree. “The most important thing I’ve done in my educational life was to come to IU South Bend.” Anderson graduated with her degree and worked in the emergency room. A year or two later, she got a call to teach at IU South Bend. Her career path changed slightly again, and she was an adjunct professor. “I fell in love with teaching. I never thought I wanted to teach, but it happened,” she said. “I grew up in a farming community and was told I would never amount to anything.” Time continued on its way, and she became a visiting lecturer and then a lecturer.

Way in the back corner of her mind she thought she would look into getting her doctorate in nursing. “I talked to (then dean of nursing) Mary Jo (Regan-Kubinski) and I told her I wasn’t sure. She jumped up and down and said ‘yes, yes, yes.’ ” Regan-Kubinski was a mentor and a sounding board for Anderson. She read her research, and helped Anderson every step along the way. Anderson defended her dissertation just 10 days after Regan-Kubinski died in 2011 after a short illness. The death shook the nursing school students, faculty and staff. But Anderson continued and dedicated the dissertation to her. Outside her office door in the nursing hallway of Northside Hall hangs a picture of Regan-Kubinski. Anderson said her mentor and dean is still looking out for her. “IU South Bend has been an amazing place to grow. The nursing staff believed in me,” she said. And she, in turn, believes in her students. “They are enthusiastic. They love to learn and to give back. They keep me on my toes. I love them.”


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The Dental Education office is looking for an answer –

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who is this woman?

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Before the Dental Education program moved from Riverside Hall to the new Education and Arts Building, director Kristyn Quimby and department secretary Sue Szczypka were packing the offices and dismantling some hall photos. The hall was lined with photos of each class beginning in the 1970s. Szczypka was taking the photos out of the frames so they could be scanned and preserved. She pulled the backing off one of the frames and was surprised to find a wedding picture. Szczypka looked to see if the bride was also a hygienist. However there was no match. Quimby said they posted the photo on their Facebook page and there was no response. So they are at a loss but they would like to return the picture to the rightful owner. There are several theories on the photo, according to Quimby. “Someone needed some cardboard to back the photos and didn’t need this particular picture any longer. Someone guesses there was a divorce and it was a way to get rid of a picture.” The bride photo sat in the hallway before the move. “She is like Mona Lisa – her eyes follow you,” Quimby added. If you know who the bride is, please contact Quimby at krirhawk@iusb.edu/.

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New Coach New Energy Ken Baierl // Photography Matt Cashore

Scott Cooper knew what he wanted in his first head coaching job and he found it at IU South Bend. “I wanted to lead a program that had good people from top to bottom,” he said. “That includes the administration, staff, coaches, and players.” Cooper was named the new men’s basketball coach at IU South Bend in June. He has 11 years of experience as an assistant coach and had a successful career as a high school player in Ohio and at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania. After graduating with a degree in mathematics, he turned to learning the coaching trade. He spent six seasons as an assistant coach at Alfred University in New York, was an assistant for two years at his alma mater, served as an assistant at Alderson-Broaddus College in West Virginia, and spent two years at Ohio Wesleyan University before becoming the head coach at IU South Bend. He has helped all of his teams win. “I’m very much a teacher,” he said when asked about his coaching style. “I’m also uber-competitive. During a game, all the players need to do is look at my face to see the intensity.” However, he is not just looking to win. Before he sat down for this interview he was going through the grade reports for his players. Cooper, who has a master’s degree in education, wants his players to be good people and good students. “There is a ton of potential here for the university and athletics,” he said. “This is a campus you can sell to recruits. It’s a really good place.” He is excited about his first season as a head coach. He wants fans to turn out for the games to cheer on the Titans. “The team will put on a good show. We’re going to play a fast-paced game.” He said he let the players set the team goals for the coming year. The Titans won 20 games for the first time last season. Cooper told the team that there would be no steps back this year. The keys are for the players to buy into his system and to stay healthy. “I wouldn’t be here if we couldn’t be successful.” The season schedule can be found at iusbtitans.com/.


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Destined

to be a Teacher

susan miller // Photography Peter Ringenberg From the time he was 8 years old, Marvin Lynn knew he wanted to be a teacher. He recalls one of his favorite family pictures where he’s standing with his grandmother and cousins. In it, he’s holding a notebook and pen and remembers he’d just been playing teacher to his cousins. Now, as dean of the School of Education at IU South Bend, he has an opportunity to use his experience in a new way. He is expecting new challenges and opportunities because this is his first time as a dean. “It’s nice to be in the position where I can set the tone,” he said. “It’s an awesome responsibility.” Lynn was most recently an associate dean of teacher education at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Prior to Wisconsin, he was at the University of Illinois – Chicago, and the University of Maryland College Park as an associate and assistant professor. He also worked as an elementary school teacher in Chicago and New York City public schools. He has a Ph.D. in social sciences and education, a master’s in curriculum and instruction, and a bachelor’s in elementary education. Prior to his appointment, he was also quite engaged and involved in research and enjoyed that tremendously. Being a dean wasn’t always his goal, although he recalls that when he was a teacher he’d often end up in some sort of leadership position, coordinating programs and the like. In this role, Lynn sees a chance to bring people together and focus on common goals. Coincidentally, the School of Education moved to a new building on Aug. 5, about one month after he started his job. Prior to the move, faculty was spread out among three buildings and rarely saw one

anwother. Now, the new organization has invited a lot of collaboration among faculty to work on projects. “Being together has contributed to cohesiveness in the school,” he said. This fresh start is something Lynn hopes will inspire everyone to work together on the goals he’s outlined, one of the most important being increasing enrollment. The School of Education has experienced fairly significant decline in enrollment due to changes in state policy, he said. Teachers no longer receive pay raises for obtaining a master’s degree. Without state incentives, many people are dropping out. There are even fewer high school graduates enrolling. His focus is on stabilizing and strengthening enrollment. He intends to be fairly aggressive in developing and implementing recruiting and marketing campaigns. So far, he feels the school has done a good job getting the word out. One recent change was a redesign of the school’s website, which now includes photos of faculty, event listings, and more information for new students. He sees a strong Web presence as being important to their success. “Students have options. We have to compete for their attention and dollars,” he said. “The faculty is poised to make sure programs are attractive.” Additionally, he’d like to see more diversity in the student body and the faculty. He also plans to address the transfer process and make it easier for students to move to IU South Bend. As Lynn gets settled in, he looks forward to working with faculty, staff, and students. “I think they’re great. Talented faculty help move the school forward.”


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Retirements stories & Photography kathy borlik Elizabeth (Betty) Mooney always has a twinkle in her eye. No matter what the award-winning faculty member is talking about—teaching, her children, her life, challenging students or what it takes to move after so many years in South Bend—you want to listen, learn, and laugh. Mooney, who retired in the spring, was an associate faculty member in sociology for 30 years. Her popular S-164 Marital Relations and Sexuality was offered every spring and always had a long wait list. Through all those years of teaching, she said, she has made an impact on countless students. Many times she was stopped by former students who mentioned a lecture or a phrase that made an impression. Mooney said she knew people had listened. Now back to retirement. After those years of teaching, can she go cold turkey? Not really. It isn’t retirement. It is another phase in life. Now in her 80s, she has moved to West Virginia to live with one of her daughters and to continue writing. She is writing a book on The Five Tasks of Adolescence. To keep up her other skills, she has agreed to give a few lectures at the

Osteopathic Medical School. No doubt she will continue to challenge students, even a few up-and-coming doctors. Originally from Wisconsin, she received a bachelor’s degree from Beloit College and a master’s from University of Wisconsin in education. She began working on her Ph.D. but put that on hold for a fellowship program in Venezuela to establish schools. The varied roads took her to Paris to study how Europeans teach American history, then high school teaching back in Wisconsin, and then marriage to a psychiatrist. The couple started a counseling practice and later moved to Bloomington. He worked at the IU Student Health Center. In Bloomington, Mooney began her work with the Kinsey Institute. She trained interviewers for the San Francisco homosexual study, and she decoded the interviewers’ shorthand for the institute. From 2006 to 2009, she decoded 4,800 interviews with incarcerated felons done by the Kinsey staff. She worked for Planned Parenthood in Monroe County, Ind. Another move took her to Kalamazoo to work for Planned Parenthood and teaching at Western Michigan University and Kalamazoo College. In 1979 it was Planned Parenthood in Chicago and teaching at Roosevelt University. The next stop was South Bend in 1983 as the executive director of Planned Parenthood and teaching at IU South Bend. She retired from Planned Parenthood in 1994. Along the way, she and her husband, who died in 1986, raised six children through adoption or foster care. Several found her welcoming household and decided to stay. While at IU South Bend, she said she enjoyed teaching and challenging the students. “And I can’t say enough about the tremendous staff in sociology and anthropology. They are the most welcoming group, marvelous, dynamic. You could not ask for better colleagues.”


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affairs. And she knows what busy means: In addition to work and family, Pfeifer served on the South Bend City Council from 1996 to 2007. There are causes and social issues, along with a garden to dig into. One thing she wanted known is her appreciation for IU South Bend. “First of all, I love IU South Bend. I would not have traded this experience for anything.” Pfeifer first came as a student in the 1970s as a history major. “I came alive here. The professors appreciated what you were doing. I didn’t feel like a widget. Thank God for IU South Bend.” She praised faculty members Glenn Chesnut, Walt Risler, Judge John Montgomery, Les Lamon, and Donald

Class Notes

Charlotte Pfeifer (BA’76, MPA’81) cleaned out her office in July after 18 years of serving in various capacities—campus diversity, judicial affairs and teaching. She taught for 10 years before she became a full-time employee. There were souvenirs, posters, notes, and paperwork from a long career. She seemed to enjoy the chance to clean the drawers and the shelves. So what is retirement to Pfeifer? “I don’t know. I’ve never done it before,” she laughed. “I’m not a morning person so it will be nice to take it slower in the morning, teaching one course in social work.” She was sure she would keep busy after leaving as director of judicial

Marti. All guided her, saw things in her, and helped her get employment in the community corrections program, probation program, and later back at IU South Bend. In her role in campus diversity, she was charged with keeping the dialogue going on issues. The office brought in major speakers from different cultures and backgrounds for the Conversations on Race programs. “It has been a fantastic ride. I’m the luckiest person to have been here, and to have helped students. I’m fortunate,” she said.

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Love of People, Love of Teaching susan miller // Photography Peter Ringenberg

“I always wanted to learn more,” said Mario R. Ortiz. “You never know what the world will hold.” This positive attitude toward having a broad educational background is what Ortiz brought with him to IU South Bend on July 1, when he began his duties as dean of the College of Health Sciences. He follows Douglas McMillen, professor of chemistry at IU South Bend, who served as interim dean since the death of Mary Jo Regan-Kubinski in 2011. Ortiz studied and graduated with a degree in art history and theater. Then he went on to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from Valparaiso University and a doctorate in nursing from Loyola University in Chicago. He is a registered nurse, a Ph.D., and a public health clinic nurse – board certified (PHCNS-BC). With degrees in hand, love for people and a love to teach, he headed down the academic path and that was when opportunities opened up, he said. Prior to his most recent role as chair of the nursing department at Purdue University North Central in Westville, Ind., Ortiz also spent time in the nursing schools at the University of Portland in Oregon, Cleveland State University in Ohio, the University of Nevada in Reno, and DePaul University in Chicago. When this position in South Bend opened, he was excited. “What a wonderful opportunity to be on a larger regional campus,” he said. The College of Health Sciences has 1,000 students enrolled and 700 of them are in the “pre” stages, i.e. premed, pre-dental, etc. He wants to create more programs for this group. He’s investigating adding a B.S. of applied health sciences degree and hopes to move it through the curriculum process this school year, but these changes have to be cleared by the state. The nursing program currently offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), graduate, and accelerated second degree BSN for registered nurses. There is also a dental

hygiene program and radiology program, which offers allied health, associate, and BSMIT (bachelor of science in medical imaging technology) degrees. “My past role, chair of nursing, was a singular program,” he said, adding that the experience grounded him in national accreditation requirements and prepared him to understand how nursing fits in the broader workplace situation. One of the strengths here, he said, is that all areas have program directors who are strong in their roles. “I’ll work with them on being progressive, on creating new ways to help students learn.” Ortiz noted that the majority of health sciences students stay on the South Bend campus all four years. He believes that is because of the specific local opportunities for employment upon graduation. He sees these community connections as important. Health sciences are in the unique position, he said, to collaborate with the community and public services. “I want people to think of IU South Bend as a place where people learn and then use their skills outside the campus. I want to fill the gaps,” he said. Some other goals he has are to ensure programs have the necessary resources and to expand the college. He wants to make sure the College of Health Sciences offers high-quality programs and meets the needs of the community. He also hopes to share resources with other campuses through the use of technology. Within the health care community, Ortiz expects new opportunities for health-related jobs, like being a liaison for health insurance or working in geriatric care. He sees health care as an exciting field and often tells his students work will be available for them wherever they go. “You can throw a dart at a map, drive there, get out of the car and get a job.”


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Students Alumni Faculty Feature

Installation of Chancellor Terry L. Allison

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Ken Baierl // Photography Peter Ringenberg

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It was more than an Installation of a chancellor. Terry L. Allison used the occasion of becoming the fifth chancellor at IU South Bend to do many things. He introduced his parents, brothers, friends, and colleagues. He recognized his mentor. He thanked IU administrators, the campus and the community for the opportunity to lead IU South Bend. He listened with the audience as his friend and colleague, soprano Sonya Baker, sang a beautiful song of Māori origin that he requested. He read a haiku that he wrote. Then he challenged the campus to bend, to be nimble, and to do more to help students succeed. Then he made a pledge. Then he got a standing ovation. His speech was titled “Here at River’s Bend” using local geography as a metaphor. He said, “Today, Indiana University South Bend is at river’s bend. The campus has been moving along, and in many ways has grown stronger academically and in its capacity to serve students. … Here, today, we must make a significant turn toward student success. Here, today, I ask this community, gathered to celebrate IU South Bend, to recommit to student success.” Since he arrived on campus July 1, Chancellor Allison has been talking about two themes­—planning and student success. These themes have been mentioned in almost every venue where he speaks—on campus and in the community. In his installation speech he said, “On this campus, we must be more flexible and nimble; in other words, to foster student success, we need to bend!” He has already started looking at practices like a first-year experience program, improved advising, and providing more time for underprepared students in the classroom. “IU South Bend was founded to provide greater access to students in our

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Chinese Lantern launch Tamra Garrett performs

Chancellor Allison meets Mr. and Mrs. Joe Kernan


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Parents Betty and Frank Allison, and brothers, Curtis and Eric, all sat in the front row watching as Terry became the chancellor of IU South Bend. His father and mother had spent two weeks in South Bend while the brothers came in a few days before the ceremony. “We’re so pleased,” Mrs. Allison said. “We love the city, campus, and the neighborhoods close to IU South Bend. This was our first time in South Bend, it is wonderful and very lovely.”

Mr. and Mrs. Allison came from Granbury, Texas; Eric from Palm Springs, Calif.; and Curtis from McKinney, Texas. Both brothers said they enjoyed seeing the city, Notre Dame, the architecture, and Amish country. They both have careers in management. The Allison family grew up moving around the world because Mr. Allison was an aviation senior chief. “Before we retired to Texas, we moved 53 times.” She added they are happy to be in Texas now. They have been married 62 years. Mrs. Allison said her son, Terry, was an early reader and loved books as much as she does. He earned a Ph.D. in literature and a master of arts degree in comparative literature from the University of California, San Diego. He also has a master of library and information science degree and a bachelor degree with honors in economics and political science from the University of California, Berkeley.

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The Allison family was well represented at the installation ceremony

Development

region to a high-quality public university education, but initial access that does not lead to graduation and meaningful professional work is, in reality, worth little,” he said. In his speech he advocated for the benefits of a liberal arts degree that IU South Bend provides. “As I have met with regional leaders to talk about the cities, towns, and rural areas that IU South Bend serves, it has been gratifying to hear from employers that the liberal arts and sciences must remain central to our work. CEOs in agribusiness, banking, education, engineering, government service, health care, hospitality, manufacturing, and other fields have all used similar terms. Please give us graduates strong in soft skills, graduates who can solve problems, read and think critically, write and speak well, and people who work well in teams that cut across cultures and national borders.” He closed with a pledge. “Today, as I am officially installed as chancellor, I would like to publicly state my commitment to the university, its students, faculty and staff, and to the communities we serve. I promise to lead by example, share information widely, consult broadly, and share how I arrive at decisions that only I can make. I commit to be fully present and engaged. I will place all my energies into becoming an increasingly effective chancellor and leader within Indiana University and for the broader region this campus serves.” Indiana University President Michael McRobbie placed the chancellor’s mantle on his shoulders and praised Allison and the campus in his remarks, as did other speakers including State Senator Joe Zakas and South Bend City Councilwoman Valerie Schey. Listening in the audience were former Indiana Governor Joe Kernan and Commissioner of the Indiana Commission for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. The ceremony ended with IU South Bend student Lawrence Mitchell-Matthews leading the singing of “Hail, to Old IU.” The week was full of events that drew the campus together including a Chinese lantern ceremony along the St. Joseph River, a concert with soprano Sonya Baker, and a reception following the ceremony.


+Scholarships dina Harris // Photography Kathy Borlik

Alma and Bill Powell

Alumni Endowed Scholarship Bill and Alma Powell are avid supporters of Indiana University, IU basketball, and IU South Bend. Mr. Powell received his bachelor’s in business from IU South Bend in 1972. Mrs. Powell received her bachelor’s and master’s in education from IU South Bend in 1970 and 1972, respectively. Mrs. Powell also received an honorary doctorate in humane letters from IU South Bend in 2012. Mrs. Powell received the IU Distinguished Alumni Service Award in 2010 and was the IUAA School Alumni Association president. Mrs. Powell retired from Elkhart Schools as director of curriculum and instruction. Mr. Powell retired from Workforce Development Services. They live in South Bend. They wanted to give back to IU South Bend and to help students. Mrs. Powell said in their jobs they saw the need to support students who have the knowledge to continue school but don’t have the financial resources. Their gift will be used to support undergraduate scholarships for students on the IU South Bend campus who are working toward a degree in education or business and economics. In order for the scholarship to grow, the donors wish to provide an opportunity for others to contribute and have authorized IU South Bend to solicit additional donations for the benefit of the Alma and Bill Powell Alumni Endowed Scholarship.


Students Alumni Faculty Feature

Vivian & Arnold Sallie

Vivian and Arnold Sallie have both volunteered in a variety of capacities and been loyal supporters of IU South Bend since relocating to the South Bend community in the early 1990s. Originally from Joliet, Ill., the Sallies came to South Bend from Louisville, Ky., for Mr. Sallie’s job with Xerox. He has since retired from that role. Mrs. Sallie was director of development for a number of years for WNIT Public Television. They now own Sallie and Associates in Granger, a consulting firm. “After so many years in this community, this feels like home,” Mrs. Sallie said. “IU South Bend offers so much to this community.” Both have been active in the area, such as being donors to the IU South Bend Civil Rights Heritage Center. Mrs. Sallie has served on the Business School Advisory Council for more than 10 years and has served as a guest presenter for the school’s marketing classes. Mr. Sallie has assisted with planning and supporting community forums and workshops on the IU South Bend campus. In 2012 the Sallies attended the IU South Bend School of Business and Economics Honors Luncheon (now the Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics) in the spring. They noticed that the scholarship for underrepresented students was not sponsored. They decided to explore the possibility of providing a gift to fund the scholarship, and they offered to serve as mentors for the scholarship’s recipients. The Sallies say they both know personally the importance of mentoring early in life. This year, the Sallies established an endowed scholarship to fill this need.

Campus Briefs

Alma and Bill Powell

Development

Underrepresented Student Scholarship

Class Notes

Vivian and Arnold Sallie

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Students

the Wieschaus lecture. Family, former colleagues, students, and university officials attended and offered tributes to the couple. Harvey Bender specified his wishes for this simple memorial, located just north of the new Education and Arts Building. The Bender Scholars Program was endowed through the Indiana University Foundation by the Bender children to honor their parents’ memory. This unique gift included the Bender family home, a collection of paintings by Harold Zisla, and other family valuables. The endowment will ensure that the Bender legacy continues in perpetuity. Eileen Bender was a professor of English at IU South Bend for 33 years before retiring in 2010. She founded the University Center for Excellence in Teaching (UCET) at Indiana University and received many awards for her work, both as a teacher and campus leader. Harvey Bender was a professor of biology at the University of Notre

Alumni Faculty Feature Development Campus Briefs

Certainly you know of Eileen or Harvey Bender … beloved teachers and colleagues in a town famous for the profession. Both were distinguished scholars, in the humanities and science, at IU South Bend and the University of Notre Dame, respectively. They committed their lives to teaching, mentoring, and encouraging students and colleagues. The Benders championed the multidisciplinary integration of knowledge, from the humanities to the sciences. The Bender Scholars in Residence program was inaugurated in October 2013. Squibb Professor in Microbiology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, Nobel Prize (1995) winner, and former student of Harvey Bender, Professor Martin Wieschaus, was the inaugural Bender Scholar in Residence. Wieschaus spoke to IU South Bend students and faculty, and offered a formal presentation to the general community.

The

Class Notes

Remarkable Eileen and Harvey Bender Anne McGraw Photography Ken Baierl

In addition to the Scholar in Residence, the endowment will fund an annual student scholarship. All Bender Faculty Scholars in Residence and scholarship students will have a demonstrated multidisciplinary perspective in their academic life, work, and pursuit of knowledge. Elizabeth Dunn, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at IU South Bend, said, “I cannot think of a sweeter or more meaningful gift to all IU South Bend students, faculty, and community.” An elm tree and bench were dedicated to the Benders just prior to

Dame for 52 years. He was the founding director of the Regional Genetics Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine where he was also a faculty member. Eileen and Harvey were married in 1956 and are survived by three children, Leslie, Phillip, and Sam. Gifts can be made in memory of Eileen and Harvey Bender and their life work and will be directed to the Bender Scholars in Residence Endowment. Please contact Anne McGraw, major gifts manager, at admcgraw@iusb.edu or 574-520-4801.

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campusBriefs FACET Four Indiana University South Bend faculty members were selected to be part of the 2013 class of the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET), an interdisciplinary organization composed of more than 500 of IU’s best teachers. The four IU South Bend faculty members are: Sue Anderson, nursing; Tracey Trottier, political science; Joshua Wells, sociology and anthropology; and Christina Gerken, women and gender studies.

Freitas Appointed to State Board of Education

Craft Receives Award

David Freitas, professor of educational leadership, was appointed in June to the State Board of Education from the 2nd Congressional District by Indiana Gov. Mike Pence. Freitas has extensive educational leadership experience from school board member to consultant for the U.S. Department of Education. Freitas earned his doctoral and master’s degrees in educational leadership from Boston University. He earned a bachelor’s degree in music education at the Boston Conservatory of Music. He joined IU South Bend in July 2003 as dean of the School of Education. He served in that position until early 2005, then took a leave of absence and later returned to the classroom.

Christopher Craft received the IU South Bend Distinguished Alumni Award during commencement ceremonies in May. Craft earned a bachelor’s of science degree in business in 1989. He joined the Alumni Association and eventually served as president of the IU South Bend Alumni Board and chairman of the IU Alumni Association Board of Managers. Craft is also a past member of IU Alumni Association’s Executive Council, Hoosiers for Higher Education, and the Chancellor’s Advisory Board. Craft earned his M.B.A. at the University of Notre Dame.

Undergraduate Research Eric Hankin, a student in Lee Kahan’s English literature from 1600 to 1800 course, received the Library Prize for Undergraduate Research for his paper, “An Act of Concealment: The Portrayal of Physical Aesthetics in Jonathan Swift’s The Lady’s Dressing Room.”

Lundquist Fellow Named Jerry Hinnefeld, professor of physics and astronomy, was named the 2013–14 Lundquist Fellow. During the spring semester 2014, Hinnefeld will make his Lundquist Fellowship presentation.


Students Alumni Faculty Feature

Prize of Distinction Awarded at Exhibition Development

Alan Larkin, associate professor of fine arts, won the Jury Prize of Distinction at the Hoosier Salon 89 Annual Exhibition. He won the prize for his etching “Titinia.” Nearly 140 pieces from 114 artists were accepted for the exhibition out of 498 pieces submitted.

Bike the Bend

The women’s basketball and women’s volleyball teams were honored for their classroom work in 2012-13. Both teams were named 2012-13 Scholar Teams by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). The women’s basketball team led the way with a 3.546 cumulative GPA this school year. The women’s volleyball program had a 3.29 GPA in its third year of the program’s existence. This is the

Carol Rippey Massat was named Social Worker of the Year by the Indiana Chapter Region 2 of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Massat is director of the School of Social Work at IU South Bend, where she led the creation of a bachelor’s degree in social work. The new degree began this fall. Prior to her arrival at IU South Bend in 2011, she worked in adoption and foster care in Decatur, Ill., serving as a special needs adoption worker for Family Services of Decatur.

highest cumulative GPA for each team in the history of Titan athletics at IU South Bend. For a team to be considered for the NAIA Scholar-Team award, it must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) as defined by the institution. The team grade-point average includes all eligible varsity student-athletes. In addition, four student athletes, Chloe McCotter, Elyse Lefebvre, Leah Meyer, and Courtney Simpson, were named Daktronics-NAIA

Class Notes

More than 1,800 bicycle riders took part in the Bike the Bend in May. The 30-mile noncompetitive tour took riders from St. Patrick’s County Park on the north, through South Bend and on to Mishawaka. The event was presented by the Louise Addicott and Georgina Joshi Foundation. IU South Bend was a host site for the event and provided a pancake breakfast and festivities on campus after the race.

Women’s Athletics

Campus Briefs

Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work

Scholar-Athletes. The women’s basketball team was named to the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) Academic Top 25 Team Honor Rolls for the 2012-13 season. The WBCA Academic Top 25 annually recognizes women’s basketball teams across the nation in NCAA Divisions I, II, and III, the NAIA, and junior/community colleges that carry the highest combined grade-point averages (GPAs) inclusive of all student-athletes on their rosters for the entire season.

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Business Students Receive Honors Two teams from the Leighton School M.B.A. program received honors for marketing projects submitted to Marketing EDGE, a national nonprofit for marketing professors and college students. The Collegiate ECHO Challenge lets college students compete and work on a multifaceted marketing assignment for a major corporation. There were 150 entries. One IU South Bend team, Whirlwind, placed second in the nation at the graduate level. Whirlwind members were: Victor Gaj, Elkhart; Robyn Hayden, Berkeley, Calif.; Ming Zhen Liang, South Bend; and Gregory Monberg, Michigan City.

The other team, Prodigy Marketing, was a semifinalist at the graduate level. The team members were: Muhammad Al Houssain Sr., Saudi Arabia; Adam Batton, South Bend; Yuan-Ting Chung, Taiwan; and Anthony Shepherd, Warsaw. The semifinalist round was narrowed to the top 25 teams. The members of both teams were students in Professor Monle Lee’s Management of Promotion class in the master’s program. The teams were challenged with creating an integrated plan using a print catalog, website, retail stores, web-based marketing, and social and mobile platforms for dELiA*s, a retailer of clothing for young women and teenagers.

Two Receive Distinguished Awards Schurz Library Turns 25 It is hard to believe, but the Schurz Library will turn 25 in 2014. To celebrate, the library will have an open house in March 2014 looking back on student and faculty engagement at the library. In the planning for the event, the library staff would love your feedback, memories, and even old photographs of your experiences at the library. If you have a quote or anecdote to share, please contact Julie Elliott at 574-520-4410 or jmfelli@iusb.edu. If you are interested in participating in a more in-depth oral history of the library and IU South Bend, please contact Alison Stankrauff at 574-520-4392 or astankra@iusb.edu. More details about the open house will be coming soon, on the library blog (www.iusb. edu/library/blog) and Facebook page. The entire staff hopes students, faculty, staff, and alumni will join in the celebration.

Two local businesspeople were honored for their achievements by the Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics. Greg Downes, chairman of the board of Gibson, was presented with the E. M. Morris Award. The Distinguished Alumni Award was given to Jeffrey Costello, chief financial officer of Beacon Health System. The Morris award is given for distinguished achievement, leadership, and contributions to the advancement of business and the quality of life in South Bend. Downes serves on several boards such as the United Way of St. Joseph County, Century Center Board of Managers, and the Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics Business Advisory Board. Costello, who earned an M.B.A. from IU South Bend, was named one of the top five CFOs in Northwest Indiana in 2010.

Euclid Quartet Releases CD The Euclid Quartet released its second CD of the Bartok quartets 1, 3 and 5. It was released on the Artek label. The first set, Nos. 2, 4 and 6, was released in 2010 and was highly praised. The quartet members for the second recording are Jameson Cooper, Si-Yan Darren Li, Jacob Murphy, and Luis Vargas.


Students

A Radio Show Hits the Airwaves

Alumni

Emeritus professor of history Roy Schreiber has written a radio play, In the Real World. It can found at https://soundcloud.com, www.gigstarz.com, www.podiobooks.com or from Schreiber’s Facebook page. Joining Schreiber in the radio production are John Lewis, emeritus professor of political science; Betsy Lucal, professor of sociology; Elaine Roth, associate professor of film studies; and Bill Frascella, emeritus professor of mathematics. The story involves two professors who each have an identity crisis and have trouble adapting to the real world. Schreiber said it began as a short story and is a satire on the life and times of academics. “It was great fun to do. It was a story that worked well for radio.”

Faculty Feature

2013 Trustees Teaching Award Recipients Seventeen IU South Bend faculty members received Trustees Teaching Awards for 2013 recognizing their exemplary teaching. Those receiving the recognition and a cash award were: Gretchen Anderson, Sue Anderson, Sushma Argawal, David Blouin, Jane Cera, Hope Davis, Julie Elliott, Hayley Froysland, Christina Gerken, Kevin Gillen, Kwadwo Okrah, Elaine Roth, Andrea Rusnock, Anna Savvopoulu, Rolf Schimmrigk, James Smith, and James VanderVeen.

Campus Briefs

Kelsey Parker, associate professor of English and director of creative writing, has a new novella, Liliane’s Balcony published by Rose Metal Press. It is set at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater in Pennsylvania. The house was built for E. J. and Liliane Kaufmann. In the novella, Mrs. Kaufmann overdoses on pain pills when she becomes tired of her husband’s philandering. The story alternates between Liliane’s story and four tourists to the house who are experiencing their own issues. Parker is also the author of For Sale By Owner.

Development

Published Again

Class Notes

Canadian Journal of Statistics Award The Canadian Journal of Statistics Award is presented each year by the Statistical Society of Canada to the author(s) of an article published in the journal, in recognition of the outstanding quality of the paper’s methodological innovation and presentation. The 2013 winner is the article entitled “Information Borrowing Methods for Covariate-Adjusted ROC Curve” (Vol. 40) by Zhong Guan, Jing Qin, and Biao Zhang. Guan is an associate professor of statistics in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at IU South Bend. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toledo in 2001. Before joining the faculty at IU South Bend in 2004, he was a postdoctoral research associate at Yale University School of Medicine. His research focuses on empirical likelihood method, semiparametric and nonparametric models and bioinformatics.

IU South Bend Elkhart Center The IU South Bend Elkhart Center was named Best College/ University in Elkhart County in a poll taken by the Elkhart Truth newspaper. The Elkhart Center received the most votes in the category in a readers poll. The contest is conducted each year by the Elkhart Truth to showcase the exceptional businesses in Elkhart County in 33 categories.

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fall2013 ’70s

’80s

Fred Stielow, BA’71, History; MA’72, History; Ph.D.’76, History and American Studies Bloomington, is a part of American Public University System as the vice president/dean of libraries, e-Educational Materials & APUS ePress. He now lives in Annapolis, Md. George E. Marlow, BS’72, Business, has been promoted to senior vice president of the Goshen region for First State Bank. James Baranowski, BS’74, Accounting, resides in Connecticut, and is the finance manager for Clinical Laboratory Partners, LLC, which is part of the Hartford Healthcare system and the largest clinical laboratory in Connecticut. He was re-elected for a second term to the Board of Directors for the Connecticut Chapter of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. In addition, he has been the treasurer for the past 13 years of the Indiana University Alumni Association for the Connecticut Chapter. Karen Dowd, MS’78, Counseling & Guidance, is the executive director of Suitts Graduate & Alumni Career Center at the University of Denver, Daniels College of Business. David Daniels, BS’78, Business Administration, is the general manager of Service Corporation International in Houston, Texas, doing business as Chapel Lawn Memorial Cemetery and Funeral Homes, Schererville and Highland, Ind. He is married to another IU South Bend graduate, Heidi Warniers Daniels, BA’79, English.

Gayle Landsmen, AS’85, Dental Hygiene, is office manager for Atlas Ergonomics, a company that she and her husband own. She now lives in Grand Haven, Mich. Thomas Labuzienski, MSBA’87, MBA’90, is at WVPE Public Radio in underwriting development. Jay Howard, BA’88, Sociology, is the dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Butler University. He has received two major career awards in the last year: American Sociological A s s o c i a t i o n ’s D i s t i n g u i s h e d Contributions to Teaching Award and the North Central Sociological Association’s Aida Tomeh Distinguished Service Award. Sheryl Stewart, MS’88, Education, Counseling & Guidance, has retired and is living in Florida.

’90s Fidencio “Felix” Bueno Jr., BS’94, Business, has been named vice president and office manager of the Mishawaka Lake City Bank. Doug Bryant, AS’96, BS’98, both in Business, has been promoted to assistant vice president at 1st Source Bank. Mindie Colanese, AS’97, BS’00, both in Business, has been promoted to assistant vice president at 1st Source Bank, South Bend. Larry Rice, AS’97, Computer Science, is the director of technological solutions with United Federal Credit Union. Sue Ann Von Blon, BS’97, Business, was promoted to vice president in

Middlebury of the First State Bank. Chad Crabtree, BA’98, was recently named to the 2013 Indiana Democrat Party Emerging Leaders Project. This is a group of 40 up-and-coming leaders in the party who are all under 40 years old. D e b o r a h We z e n s k y, B S ’ 9 8 , Education, is the communications coordinator/executive assistant for Chris Jensen, executive director at the Indiana Bicentennial Commission in the state of Indiana. Regina Emberton, BA’98, MPA’00, is president and CEO of Michiana Partnership Inc., a regional business -recruiting initiative in South Bend. The partnership includes St. Joseph, Elkhart, Marshall, and Kosciusko counties in Indiana and Berrien, Cass, and St. Joseph counties in Michigan as well as Indiana Michigan Power and the South Bend Regional Airport, where the organization is housed. She was president and CEO for 14 years with CBRE Bradley. Chad Gentry, BS’99, Business, is an accounting manager at 1st Source Bank, South Bend. Jaime Murphy, BA’99, was recently honored as a recipient of the “40 under 40,” in South Bend’s community. She is employed by Beacon Health Systems as a regional account executive in Occupational Health & Wellness.

’00s Gina Barton, MLS ’01, Liberal Studies, received the George Polk Award for Local Reporting for her reporting on the death of a Milwaukee man who died in police custody after telling Milwaukee Police officers repeatedly for 15 minutes after his arrest that


Feature Development Campus Briefs Class Notes

Sara Lowe, BA’10, History, was recently named a 2013–14 Sustainability Fellow by IU South Bend’s Center for a Sustainable Future. Lowe, who is founder of Michiana Yardeners, a virtual gardening club on Facebook, whose participants grow fruits and vegetables in the city in their own front and back “yardens.” Lowe will work to increase the number of yardeners in Michiana and organize a yardener cooking contest next summer. She works as an assistant in Public Affairs and University Advancement at IU South Bend, and will be completing her work in the Master of Liberal Studies program in 2014. Nick Mitchell, BS’12, Business, is a staff accountant at Kruggel, Lawton & Co., South Bend. Joshua Miller, BFA’11, Arts, is director of the Raclin School of the Arts Gallery, Education and Arts Building. Aleah Wilburn, BSN’11, is a nurse for Hospice of St. Joseph County in South Bend. Scotty Myers, BA’11, is the manager of the Gateway Information Call Center at IU South Bend. Chris Klein, BA’11, German, is pursuing a Master of Arts in College Student Personnel from Bowling Green State University. He is also working as the graduate coordinator for diversity education and LGBT programs in the Office of Multicultural Affairs at

Faculty

Planning?

’10s

Bowling Green State University. Lavon Dean-Null, MS’12, was recently named as one of South Bend’s “40 under 40” for her business success and community contributions. She is employed by Discovery Middle School in Granger. Tina Slabach, MPA’13, was named Outstanding Student in Public Service by the Indiana Chapter of the American Society of Public Administration (IASPA). She was active in developing the IU South Bend’s MPA Student Association. As a practitioner-student, she was the curbside recycling coordinator for the Solid Waste Management District of St. Joseph County, Ind. Casey Couch, BS’13, Accounting, is employed at AmSafe Commercial Products in Elkhart, as a financial analyst. She now lives in Niles, Mich. Kelly Eberhart, MSW’13, is the assistant alumni director at IU South Bend. She is also teaching at Ivy Tech Community College in Elkhart as an adjunct professor in the human services department. Chris Seminario, BA’13, Psychology, is working as a case manager for the Department of Child Services.

Alumni

Gift

Kim Moore, BGS’08, is working at IU South Bend in the Career Services Office as an internship and employer counselor.

Students

he could not breathe. The man died and it was ruled a natural death by the medical examiner. The officers were cleared of any wrongdoing. Barton’s reporting was based on written police records and the video from the squad car. Barton submitted this new evidence to the attention of an assistant medical examiner. Soon after, the medical examiner’s office revised its ruling from natural death to homicide, and the medical examiner resigned. Barton formerly worked at the South Bend Tribune and has been at the Milwaukee paper for 11 years. Mark Berta, MBA’03, has been named assistant vice president and office manager of the South Bend northwest office of Lake City Bank. Ted Church, BS’04, Education, was named Teacher of the Year for Region V by the Magnet Schools of America. He is a teacher at Marquette Primary Montessori Academy, South Bend. Jerri Dunn, MSW’04, is living in the South Bend area, and doing contract work as a mental health therapist. Amy Hill, MPA’06, Public Affairs, is the marketing & communications manager for Transpo. She is also the current president of the South Bend Rotary. She is a member of the IU South Bend Alumni Association Board. Don Metzler-Smith, MS’06, E d u c a t i o n , i s n o w a t Iv y Te c h Community College, Elkhart County campus, as well as sole proprietor at Empowering Educational Services. Angelica Healy, BA’07, was recently named as one of South Bend’s “40 under 40” for her career success. She is employed at St. Margaret’s House in South Bend.

Contact Dina Harris, Director of Development Call (574) 520-4131 or email diharris@iusb.edu

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Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit 540 South Bend, IN

Indiana University South Bend // 1700 Mishawaka Avenue // P.O. Box 7111 // South Bend, IN 46634-7111

alumni travel

reflections of Italy October 22 - 31, 2014

Explore the ruins of the Colosseum, see the beauty of Rome, Florence and Venice, take a boat trip to Mavro Island and spend time on Lake Como. Price is $3,899 per person. Deposit of $250 per person due by April 16, 2014. Final payment due by Aug. 23, 2014. Price includes round-trip air from Chicago O’Hare Airport, 10 days, and includes 14 meals.

Call 574.520.4383 for more info.

Foundations - fall/winter 2013  

A publication for alumni & friends of Indiana University South Bend | FALL/WINTER 2013 | Instillation of Chancellor Terry L. Allison

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