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Page 1

THE LATEST NEWS FROM YOUR BUILDING SUPPLIES SPECIALIST

Keeping your records straight 07

Dealing with employment disputes 12

Highlights

A view from the Board Highlights and trends of the LBP scheme from the BPB Annual Report 2019 03

ISSUE 89

Coming soon: Your new plug-in truck 17

F 20 EB 20

The apprentice diary: final entry 28


ISSUE 89: FEB 2020

In this issue LBP CODEWORDS

PROMOTION

A view from the Board

Duratuf Lifestyle sheds

03-04

19

LBP CODEWORDS

LEGAL

Tax evader’s LBP licence cancelled

What building laws (if any) apply to boatbuilders?

05

20-21

LBP CODEWORDS Keeping your records straight and quiz

07-08

APPRENTICE The apprentice diary: final entry

23

PROMOTION

INDUSTRY NEWS

Makita outdoor power equipment

09

NZCB Rusty Hammers initiative

24

FISHING

PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

How much do we catch?

10

Get the most out of your Paslode nail guns

26

INSURANCE

PROMOTION

Employment disputes

12-14

Dulux and Cabot's paint

28

VEHICLES Coming soon: Your new plug-in truck

17-18

ITM NEWS Burnt down Sunday. Up and running again the next day

29-30

Keeping your records straight

P07

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HIGHLIGHTS Coming soon: Your new plug-in truck

New Makita 18Vx2 chainsaw

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Get the most out of your Paslode nail guns

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Building Business contributes towards your LBP skills maintenance requirement. Ensure you log this into your ITM diary or the ITM App today.

Building Business is a bi-monthly magazine produced by ITM Support Office. For feedback or address updates contact: ITM Support Office, PO Box 101556, North Shore, Auckland. Email: buildingbusiness@itm.co.nz Ph: 09 415 2787.


ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The 2019 Annual Report of the Building Practitioners Board shows that the number of complaints against LBPs is low but there are trends we can learn from.

CONTINUE >>

LBP CODEWORDS

A view from the Board

03


04

LBP CODEWORDS

The Licensed Building Practitioner (LBP) scheme is overseen by the Building Practitioners Board (the Board).

building consent and any amendments. Note that building work includes demolition and preliminary work on the foundations.

The Board’s functions are to hear appeals against licensing decisions of the Registrar of LBPs, investigate and hear complaints about LBPs, and approve rules for LBPs.

Ignorance is not bliss

Report now available to view Every year we review our operations and report to the Minister for Building and Construction. Our 2019 Annual Report is now available on the Licensed Building Practitioners website, www.lbp.govt.nz. The report highlights trends we are seeing within the LBP scheme, and I encourage you to have a read. The commentary on complaints may seem a bit grim, but given that there are over 25,000 LBPs, the number of complaints is very low, with around one percent of LBPs coming to the attention of the Board. This suggests a lot of good work is being undertaken, and consumers rarely feel the need to report LBPs to the Board.

A busy year for complaints This year was a busy one with the Board receiving over 250 complaints and holding 143 hearings. Many of the complaints did not proceed to a hearing. This is often because the Board believed the threshold for discipline had not been met or there was not enough evidence. As a result of the hearings, 119 complaints (or 84%) were upheld, which means the LBP was found to have committed an offence and held to account. Of those LBPs who were disciplined, nine had their licence cancelled, five were suspended, four were ordered to undertake training, and the majority were fined and required to pay costs. The fines ranged from approximately $5,000 to $7,000 at the higher end and $500 to $1,500 at the lower end.

Names published Of the LBPs sanctioned, 10 also had their name published in Codewords to alert the industry of the severity of their offending. This represents a minority DESIGN of cases (8%), as the Board only orders publication (over and above the inclusion in the register and in the decision documentation) when there is a perceived need for the public and/or profession to SITE know the findings of the hearing.

D S

Many LBPs still think that if they ignore a complaint issued by the Board, nothing will happen. In fact, the opposite is the case. No response from an LBP generally leaves the Board with no option but to proceed. LBPs who engage early with the process have a much better chance of providing credible evidence that may persuade the Board not to proceed to a hearing. If the complaint does proceed to a hearing, evidence provided much earlier in the process is seen as more genuine. Some LBPs come to a hearing and try to excuse poor work by saying they had been ordered from the site and that the errors would have been picked up at the end of the job. While in some cases this may be correct, the Board is made up of practitioners with many years of experience who understand the job. They can tell the difference between unfinished work and snag-list items, and cases where the LBP clearly did not do the job correctly in the first place, or in sequence, and the cost to remediate would have been high.

Right first time The LBP scheme was founded on having skilled people doing the job correctly the first time. LBPs, especially those supervising unlicensed workers, need to take responsibility for the quality control of their work. It is not acceptable to do poor building work and hope mistakes will be picked up later, maybe by the council, or go undetected. The complaints process is a valuable tool to ensure consumers have confidence in the system and LBPs are held to account in a fair and timely manner. If you do the job correctly the first time, fix issues, communicate well, and take pride in your LBP status, there will be very little chance you will come before the Board.

by Chris Preston

EP

EXTERNAL PLASTERING

Chairman, Building Practitioners Board

BB BRICK & BLOCK LAYING

Don’t jump the gun

C

One of the key themes from the complaints was LBPs starting work before the building consent had CARPENTRY been issued. The Board understands there is often pressure to get started, but the law is clear. As an LBP, you need to be strong and refuse to start work before you have sighted the stamped copy of the

Complete the quiz on page 8 and add the F

activity to your LBP skills maintenance log.

FOUNDATIONS

A

R

ROOFING

ALL

This article is relevant to these classes:


05

LBP CODEWORDS

Tax evader’s LBP licence cancelled Rajesh Sami’s LBP Carpentry licence was cancelled after the Board learned he had been convicted and imprisoned for tax evasion. Mr Sami (licence number BP 118692) was sentenced in the Papakura District Court in September 2017 on 17 charges of tax evasion, amounting to $550,000 of unpaid tax. He had not filed income tax or goods and services tax returns over a seven-year period. Inland Revenue noted that when its investigation began in 2015, Mr Sami was uncooperative and disingenuous about his true earnings. When income tax returns were eventually filed, Mr Sami had grossly underreported his income by more than half. For the tax years 2011–2015, it was assessed that Mr Sami’s gross income was just under $1.8 million and the income tax evaded was $433,571. During the same period, he was assessed as having not paid $115,676 in GST and had also aided his partner to evade $120,615 of income tax. Mr Sami was sentenced to two years and 10 months’ imprisonment as a result of his offending.

Building Practitioners Board investigation The Board became aware of Mr Sami’s offending when a complaint was made that he had failed to provide a Record of Work (ROW) to a client. Mr Sami provided a written response to the complaint, noting that he was in prison and not aware that the Complainant was seeking a ROW but had no intention to withhold it. The Building Act states there may be grounds for discipline by the Board if an LBP is convicted of an offence punishable by six months or more of imprisonment, and the offence reflects poorly on their fitness to work as an LBP. The Board requested an investigation into why Mr Sami was imprisoned, so it could decide if the offending met the threshold for discipline under the Building Act.

Board decision As the tax evasion conviction carried a sentence of more than six months in prison, the Board had to decide if Mr Sami’s offending affected his ability to work as an LBP. The Board took into account the nature and seriousness of the charges, acceptance

of responsibility, previous history and the effect on public confidence. Carrying out or supervising building work often involves handling client funds or entering into credit arrangements. Tax evasion is a dishonesty offence, which calls into question Mr Sami’s trustworthiness as an LBP. Mr Sami did not cooperate with the Inland Revenue investigation and attempted to mislead them as to the true nature of his income. His serious offending could have an effect on public confidence in the LBP licensing regime. The Board found there were grounds for discipline and Mr Sami’s licence was cancelled. He cannot reapply for a licence for three years. In addition, the Board believes it is important that the building industry and wider public is aware of this offending, so it ordered that this decision be made public.

What we can learn from this decision Convictions with a prison sentence of over six months can be grounds for discipline if the offence reflects negatively on the person’s fitness to carry out or supervise building work or inspection work. In this case, the dishonest behaviour that led to Mr Sami’s conviction indicates that Mr Sami is not fit to work as an LBP. Additionally, the seriousness of his offending risks damaging public confidence in the LBP scheme. This decision and other past decisions can be read in full on the LBP website, www.lbp.govt.nz


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Keeping your records straight It's important to provide your Record of Work on completion of Restricted Building Work. They must be filled in on time, every time, to avoid complaints being made against you and potential disciplinary action. The Building Practitioners Board received a disappointingly high number of complaints this year about ROWs.

Don’t withhold Records of Work Some Licensed Building Practitioners (LBPs) hold back the ROW in a dispute or because the client is behind in their payment. This is done under the belief that they can use the ROW as leverage. This is bad practice, as the disgruntled client can complain to the Board that the LBP did not complete the ROW. The Board will then have to discipline the LBP for failing to provide their ROW, regardless of any commercial dispute, as this is not a valid reason to withhold a ROW according to the Building Act. The Board has no jurisdiction over contractual disputes – it only addresses the conduct of LBPs. Therefore, the LBP can be fined, even if the client hasn’t paid for the work.

Knowing when work is over Usually it is easy to know when to complete the ROW. The job is finished, so you complete the ROW before moving on. However, sometimes a job ends unexpectedly. Perhaps there is a dispute between contractors, or the client stops paying the bills. If the job isn’t finished, but you won’t be returning to finish it, you should submit a ROW. On it you can detail what work you did complete, even though the overall job was unfinished. Sometimes it is uncertain if you will return or not. When in doubt, you can still submit a ROW on what you have done thus far.

In the unlikely event you do return, you can add to your records.

Submit your own ROW, don’t pass to others There is still the myth that if you’re a labour-only contractor to another LBP, the head contractor will do the ROW. This is not the case. Each LBP who does RBW must do a ROW. Another mistake is to provide the ROW to the head contractor who does not pass it on to the homeowner or council. The Building Act puts the responsibility on the LBP to ensure the ROW is sent to the homeowner and council. You can still be disciplined even if you did provide the ROW to the head contractor.

Typical penalties When a complaint against an LBP for failing to provide a ROW is upheld, the Board usually issues a fine and requires a payment towards the cost of the DESIGN EXTERNAL PLASTERING hearing. If this was the only offence committed by the LBP, the fine is typically $1,000–$3,000 and costs are around $500.

D S

SITE

EP

BB

BRICK & BLOCK LAYING

Complete the quiz on page 8 and add the activity to your LBP skills maintenance log.

C CARPENTRY

F FOUNDATIONS

This article is relevant to these classes:

A

R ROOFING

ALL


08

LBP CODEWORDS

Codewords Quiz 1

Codewords Quiz 2

A view from the Board (from pages 3-4)

Keeping your records straight (from page 7)

1. If you are notified that there is a complaint against you, you should: a. Ignore it, hopefully it will blow over. b. Engage with the investigation, so you can provide evidence that may exonerate you. c. Get legal advice, if you feel you need to. d. Both b. and c.

1. When should you provide a ROW? a. When the client has paid for the work. b. When the job is complete. c. When your part of the job is complete, or you do not anticipate returning to do more work.

3. Some complaints do not lead to hearings. This is because: a. The LBP has not responded to the complaint. b. The Board believes the threshold for discipline has not been met or there is not enough evidence.

3. If the Board finds that you failed to provide a ROW, the likely disciplinary action will be: a. Cancelling your licence. b. A fine and payment of costs towards the enquiry. c. Nothing, as long as you agree to fill in the ROW.

Answers: 1.D, 2.C, 3.B

ADD TO LBP ACTIVITY LOG This article is from Codewords Issue 93. Use the ITM App to log your activity today.

Answers: 1.C, 2.B, 3.B

2. The Board is NOT responsible for the following: a. Hearing complaints about LBP conduct. b. Hearing appeals against licensing decisions made by the Registrar. c. Hearing contractual disputes.

2. The Building Act requires LBPs to send ROWs to: a. The main contractor who engaged them. b. The homeowner and the territorial authority. c. The homeowner and/or the territorial authority, if they ask for one.


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10

How much do we catch?

FISHING

Snapper, kahawai and blue cod are the most popular saltwater finfish caught and kept by recreational fishers in New Zealand. As you would expect, snapper is the most common fish taken, representing nearly half of the national finfish landings. The results are in

Regions of most concern

We now have two reliable surveys of recreational harvest using the same methods, so the results can be compared nationwide. The first of these comprehensive year-long surveys was completed in 2012, the most recent in 2018. Interestingly, between 2012 and 2018 the number of snapper caught by recreational fishers is down by 23% overall.

There are some fisheries at really low levels and this makes it hard for recreational fishers to access those species. The ones causing most concern right now are crayfish in the Hauraki Gulf and Bay of Plenty, tarakihi and hapuku on the east coast of New Zealand, kahawai and blue cod at the top of the South Island.

Fish availability varies from year to year and this naturally affects overall catch. The increased minimum size limit for snapper caught off the northeast coast means more fish were released.

LegaSea is working to convince the Minister of Fisheries that we need more fish in the water.

The methods used by NRB in the National Panel Survey has attracted international attention, especially from countries struggling to gather reliable estimates of recreational catch in their jurisdictions. Back home, the numbers of people fishing dropped between 2012 and 2018. Around 14% or 680,000 people went fishing in the sea at least once in 2018. For tradies, that percentage would be much higher if the number of work vehicles parked at boat ramps is used as an indicator.

Recreational vs commercial catch When we do go fishing, our total combined, national catch is estimated to be around 10,000 tonnes of finfish and non-finfish, i.e. shellfish, crayfish, per annum. This compares to around 405,000 tonnes landed by the commercial sector. So when anyone suggests that recreational fishers take too many fish, you can rightly chip in that collectively we take around 3% of all fish harvested from New Zealand waters. There is also some kai moana taken under permit for Maori customary use but the remainder is commercial take.

Catch only what you can eat As you enjoy an extended summer of fishing, please think about how many fish you need and what you can do to conserve stocks. You can maximise your catch by using the whole fish. Smoking the fish or using the offcuts to make stock is good practice and shows respect for each fish taken. If you are not going to use the fish heads and frames, please use the Free Fish Heads app or website to find someone who would love to take them off your hands. For tips and tricks on how to stay safe, the best ways to look after your catch, and how to reduce your impact on the marine environment, please visit the FishCare website. Happy fishing from the LegaSea team. Free Fish Heads website www.freefishheads.co.nz. FishCare website www.fishcare.org.nz


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12

INSURANCE

Employment disputes can be very expensive – how to do it right Earlier this year a builder who resigned following a heated argument with his boss was awarded more than $17,000 by the Employment Relations Authority. The Authority found despite the employee resigning, his employer breached employment law, including

failure to keep holiday pay and leave records, pay annual holiday pay and failing to provide an employment agreement. They were ordered to pay $12,000 in penalties for breaching employment law and $5,000 plus 5 per cent interest in unpaid and underpaid holiday pay.


13

Some of your responsibilities include:

merit of the dispute, if you don’t follow the right procedures, you could be in trouble. If you do experience an issue or dispute with an employee, there are three things you must do as an employer:

☐☐ Pay employees what their employment contract states, and at least the legal minimum wage.

1. Always act in good faith.

☐☐ Give the employee at least four weeks’ annual holidays.

3. Follow a fair process.

☐☐ Give the employee the day off on 11 public holidays or give them an alternative holiday if they work, if it is a normal working day for them. ☐☐ Pay at least time and a half if an employee works on a public holiday. ☐☐ Give employees at least five days’ sick leave per year. ☐☐ Act in good faith and with honesty. ☐☐ Provide a safe workplace. ☐☐ Do not deduct money from wages unlawfully.

2. Have a genuine or valid reason for taking action.

Always act in good faith When an employer is making a decision which might cause an employee to lose their job (such as a disciplinary process), the employer must: ☐☐ Provide the employee with access to relevant information about the decision. ☐☐ Give them an opportunity to comment on this information. MBIE has a very helpful website with information and guidance on the disciplinary process: www.employment.govt.nz/resolving-problems.

An example of unjustified dismissal A Christchurch man was awarded nearly $30,000 for unjustified dismissal after he was sacked for sharing details of his salary with a co-worker. James was hired in June 2017 as a salesman for a Christchurch building firm, along with two other sales staff. After his base salary was reduced he discussed this with another staff member, who confronted the employer and subsequently resigned. The employer claimed he had not dismissed James but had told him to go so that there was some space for them both to cool off. However, the ERA found James was unjustifiably dismissed and suffered an unjustifiable disadvantage in his employment by having had his pay reduced unilaterally and was entitled to a payout. James was awarded $28,630, after a 30 per cent reduction was applied due to breaching good faith by revealing his salary.

Good reason An employer’s reasons for the action must be what a fair and reasonable employer could have done at the time of the dismissal or action. To ensure fairness in the circumstances, before making a decision, the employer needs to ensure that they have: ☐☐ All of the facts that they can reasonably gather. ☐☐ Heard the employee’s response to those facts. ☐☐ Considered how they have acted in similar circumstances. ☐☐ Taken any other relevant considerations (such as length of service, any mitigating circumstances etc). Every situation must be considered on its own facts and in context of your workplace.

The case above is just one of far too many examples of trade firms being penalised for not following the right processes when dealing with an employment issue. The key message is that, regardless of the

CONTINUE >>

INSURANCE

As an employer you have legal obligations towards your employees. As the example on page 12 shows, failure to meet your obligations can be very expensive.


14

INSURANCE

Fair process

Employee Disputes Insurance

When taking action against the employee, the employer must follow the requirements of the Employment Relations Act 2000 and natural justice. This means that the employer must:

Even with the best processes in place you may at some point have to deal with a disgruntled employee and have to face the Employment Relations Authority. At the very least you will need to engage professional legal services to help you through a dispute.

☐☐ Fully investigate the concerns, taking into account the resources that they have to do this. ☐☐ Properly raise their concerns with the employee. This involves telling the employee exactly what the problem is, providing all relevant supporting information and telling them that disciplinary action is a possibility. ☐☐ Give the employee a reasonable opportunity to tell their side of the story. ☐☐ Genuinely consider the employee’s explanations (if provided).

Employee disputes insurance provides protection from allegations of wrongful acts committed by you against an employee. The policy covers the cost of defending these actions and any damages awarded against the directors, management or company. The average cost of a claim from one specialist insurer is $14,000. Common areas of exposure include: ☐☐ personal grievance actions, ☐☐ claims for unjustified dismissal or demotion, ☐☐ discrimination or harassment (with sexual harassment claims in particular on the rise), ☐☐ unlawful constructive or actual termination, ☐☐ emotional distress, ☐☐ failure or refusal to hire potential employees, ☐☐ invasion or breach of privacy rights under the Privacy Act, or ☐☐ other alleged disadvantage under the Employment Relations Act.

The employer should also: ☐☐ Make sure the decision maker is as impartial as possible. ☐☐ Tell the employee that they may have a representative or support person present at any disciplinary meetings. ☐☐ Give the employee an opportunity to seek independent advice throughout the process. ☐☐ Give the employee an opportunity to give their explanation or response to the person who will make the final decision. ☐☐ Not make the decision on what action to take until after hearing and considering the employee’s response to the proposed course of action. ☐☐ Treat employees without bias and in a way that takes into account any similar situations that have occurred.

Typically, employee disputes insurance comes as part of a 'management liability' package, which includes a whole bunch of good stuff to protect businesses from the cost of liability. Employee disputes claims can represent up to 40% of all management liability claims. With Builtin you can simply add it when you take out a public liability policy.

In a nutshell Employment law is a minefield and can easily trip you up if you get it wrong. Following the right processes is critical if there is a dispute, and good professional advice could save your bacon. Employee disputes cover will help pay the bills if it does turn to custard.

by Ben Rickard Builtin Insurance Advisor

☐☐ Consider all options before making a final decision. It is important to note that both parties must also comply with the duty of good faith during this process. In particular, the parties must be responsive and communicative.

Builtin Insurance are New Zealand’s trade insurance experts. For more information and an instant quote visit builtininsurance.co.nz or contact Ben Rickard at ben@builtin.co.nz or 0800 BUILTIN


WHEELBARROWS

Prices valid Feb 3rd - Mar 15th or while stocks last.

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70 litre bolt-free galvanised steel tray 160kg load capacity Extra heavy-duty construction Hot-dip galvanised protection Built for trade / professional use Supplied assembled 24kg in weight, when empty Puncture-proof wheel

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ITM WIDE BRIM HAT

! EE R H F WITHASE

Purchase either of these wheelbarrows and get a free Wide Brim Hat*

RC PU

*Strictly while stocks last. Limit of one hat per customer.

EXPOL delivers the ultimate no scoria drainage solution for retaining walls.

This project shows EXPOL StyroDrain and EXPOL QuickDrain used in conjunction as a drainage solution behind a retaining wall. Retaining Wall

EXPOL StyroDrain

EXPOL StyroDrain – Made from 100% recycled lightweight polystyrene, EXPOL StyroDrain provides protection and drainage when used in retaining wall cavities. Its permeable nature allows water to easily drain through it whilst also providing excellent protection of the waterproofing membrane.

uickDrain – A unique drainage solution that incorporates recycled EXPOL polystyrene securely contained in a sleeve around an HDPE pipe. It eliminates scoria, is lightweight and easy to handle. Ideal for difficult sites, it bends around corners with ease and cuts drainage insulation time in half.

Soil

EXPOL QuickDrain Concrete

EXPOL StyroDrain and EXPOL QuickDrain are designed to be used in conjunction with each other or independently. 100% Recycled Lightweight Polystyrene

Contact EXPOL P: +64 9 634 3449 F: +64 9 634 0756

T: 0800 86 33 73 E: sales@expol.co.nz

Technical Advice/Quotes E: tech@expol.co.nz

EXPOL: Auckland – Tauranga – Wellington – Blenheim – Christchurch (Belfast, Rolleston) – Cromwell

Guaranteed Performance

Website www.expol.co.nz Details www.miproducts.co.nz

ITM12020

Learn more about EXPOL StyroDrain or QuickDrain simply go to www.expol.co.nz If you would like to talk to somebody about EXPOL StyroDrain or QuickDrain then please call our Technical Manager Wayne Watson on 0800 86 33 73 or email tech@expol.co.nz


The Ford 150 (a larger version of the Ford Ranger) has been the top-selling passenger vehicle in the US for over 30 years.

It was hard to miss Elon Musk’s latest and greatest grand reveal of the legendary Cybertruck. The shape and construction are breakthrough (in many ways) and the performance is astounding. But the reality is your new electric truck will most likely come from the same stable as your current diesel-powered rig. And it will be sooner rather than later. Tesla has upped the game in terms of disruptive technology, but the established players have been steadily working under the radar to protect their lucrative market share.

While it is difficult to distinguish the facts from the hype, here’s a summary of what’s on the cards.

VW-Ranger hybrid A hybrid Ford F 150 will be launched by the end of the year or shortly thereafter, followed by an all-electric version in 2021. The other sign of Ford’s commitment is their investment last year in Rivian, an EV start-up that is regarded as a serious rival to Tesla. Rivian plans to begin producing a pick-up truck by the end of the year.

Furthermore, Ford has partnered with Volkswagen to collaborate on producing mid-sized pick-up trucks and vans to global customers. According to sources, Ford’s pick-ups will be based on Ford’s “global Ranger”.

17

VEHICLES

Coming soon: Your new plug-in truck

The pick-up truck is one of the biggest selling vehicle variants in the world. In NZ, pick-up trucks have been the number one seller of all vehicles for many years.


18 EV Colorado

VEHICLES

GM has invested $3 billion in an electric truck development programme, which will use a new platform called B1T. They officially announced last year that their electric pick-up will begin production early in 2021, but details were sketchy.

Toyota has been showcasing an ever-evolving concept hybrid pick-up since 2008. Known as the A-Bat, an acronym for Advanced Breakthrough Aero Truck, the truck has been tipped by some industry commentators to go into production later this year or in 2021.

GM has also invested in an innovative EV start-up, Lordstown Motor Group. Just a few hours before Tesla revealed the latest Cybertruck in November last year, Lordstown announced it was accepting deposits for its electric pick-up truck, badged Lordstown Endurance.

Nissan Dongfeng

Part of the Lordstown group is another prominent EV innovator, Workhorse. The Workhorse W15 has been in the pipeline for a while and will benefit from GM experience in bringing production capacity up to speed.

Electric Hilux Toyota has a big stake in the pick-up market worldwide, and they have a lot of experience in hybrid vehicles.

Nissan is launching an electric pick-up truck through a joint venture in China with state owned Dongfeng. With its zero-emission mandate, China manufacturers have become world leaders in EV technology.

The Dongfeng Rich truck is based on Nissan’s pick-up truck platform but with an electric powertrain. Not so much a breakthrough but a practical make do. However, with the highly advanced state of Chinese electric vehicle technology, it is likely that we’ll see some Chinese EV pick-ups here very soon.

Mazda and Mitsubishi There is very little information available about Mazda and Mitsubishi plans for EV pick-ups, but the companies both have a strong presence in the small truck market and will undoubtedly be developing EV offerings. Ditto for Mercedes.

While there are plenty of rumours, very little detail has been released about the final form of a hybrid or fully electric Toyota Hilux pick-up.

Who gets to claim bragging rights for the first mainstream mass production EV pick-up is anyone’s guess. But the race is definitely on. And if you’re thinking of replacing your truck in the next couple of years, you really can start thinking electric.


LIFESTYLE SHEDS

#LRMC

No permit required

Added depth provides plenty of space for your ride on mower with ample room for additional storage. Base Dimensions Width

Depth

3.150m

3.150m

2.600m

Under 10m2

2.400m

RURAL – Marlborough Colour Steel

Prices valid Feb 3rd - Mar 15th or while stocks last.

Lean-to

3.150m

3.150m

Door 2.400m opening 2.400m

#LRKC

No permit required

Makes for a good sized workshop with extra room on each side to set up workbenches and shelving. Base Dimensions Width

Depth

3.900m

2.550m

Lean-to

2.600m

Under 10m2

2.400m

RURAL – Kaipara Colour Steel

3.900m

METRO – Ponsonby Colour Steel

2.550m

Door 2.400m opening

2.400m

Width

Depth

2.400m

1.000m

2.440m

2.400m

Door

1.800m

1.800m opening

METRO – Fendalton Colour Steel

Door can be placed either side

1.000m

Base Dimensions

2.400m

The ideal size to store your sports gear, lawnmower and tools while adding a touch of class to your unused space.

#LMPC

Width

Depth

3.150m

1.000m

Door can be placed either side

2.440m

Base Dimensions

2.400m

With extra width and a wider roller door the Fendalton provides secure storage for larger items.

#LMFC

2.400m opening

2.400m

1.000m

3.150m

Door

Colour Options You can choose any combination of shed and door colour. For colour options visit www.duratuf.co.nz Flooring Options You can pour your own concrete slab, or for an additional cost a plywood or timber floor can be purchased. Assembly Options Lifestyle Range sheds are delivered as a ready to build kitset and come with comprehensive assembly instructions. Hi-tensile steel Duratuf Lifestyle Range sheds are built using 0.4mm thick hi-tensile anti-rust steel.

See in store for a hot price!

ITM WIDE BRIM HAT

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20

What building laws (if any) apply to boatbuilders?

LEGAL

Boat building is a specialised form of carpentry and joinery, but you don’t think of it as building or construction in the traditional sense. Nevertheless, there are just as many risks associated with boat building as there are with designing and constructing buildings that might leak, or collapse on you, or catch fire. Logic would suggest that boat building ought to be regulated just as stringently as the construction of homes, apartment buildings, office towers, bridges, tunnels and dams. But is that true? Are boat builders as strictly policed as builders are, or do they in fact get a free rein? The starting point is to look at the various laws governing builders. Those are found in the common law (the law made up by Judges rather than Parliament), and in the statutes passed by Parliament. Under the common law, builders can be sued for breach of contract (for failing to honour the promises they made to their client) and they can be sued for negligence (for failing to take reasonable care to avoid causing loss to other people). Then

there are the statutes. The two main statutes that regulate the building trade are the Building Act 2004 and the Construction Contracts Act 2002. And in the residential context, builders are also governed by the Consumer Guarantees Act 1993.

The Building Act The Building Act is the one that makes sure our buildings are safe and functional. It does that by requiring all building work to comply with the Building Code, by requiring all but the most basic building work to have a building consent at the start, and by requiring a code compliance certificate to be obtained at the end. Because building work is so inherently dangerous, we can’t just rely on


21

Since the leaky building era, the Building Act has required builders who do important residential work to be licensed, it has established the Building Practitioners Board (the “BPB”) to discipline them, and it has given to homeowners a lot of special rights and remedies against all residential builders (not just licensed ones). In a residential building project costing $30,000 or more, there are four mandatory documents that builders have to give to their customers, including a written building contract. And those customers can enforce a lot of implied warranties against them, as well as insist that any defects emerging within 12 months are rectified immediately.

Are boatbuilders covered? Do any of those rules apply to boat builders? Do they have to comply with the building code, ensure that building consents are obtained, and become licensed? Are they required to hand over the four mandatory documents, and are they subject to the powerful consumer rights and remedies? Perhaps surprisingly, the answer to all those questions is “no”. And that is because the Act specifically says that a “building” does not include any description of vessel, boat, ferry, or craft used in navigation, whether or not it has a means of propulsion, and regardless of what that means of propulsion is. There are some grey areas of course. There have been a few reported cases where people have built what is effectively a house, but in the style of a boat, and have argued that they should be exempt from the Building Act requirements. Whether they succeed depends upon whether the boat is (or will be once completed) capable of being launched without substantial modification. However in general, the building code, the building consent regime, the licensing requirements, and the consumer rights and remedies don’t apply to boat building. You don’t have to meet any prescribed standards, you are not scrutinised by an independent regulator, you don’t have to have any special qualifications, and your customers don’t have any special rights and remedies against you.

themselves, and by creating a quick and dirty method for resolving building disputes promptly and economically. Recently, rules have been introduced requiring payment retentions to be held in trust or otherwise secured for the benefit of the intended recipients. Does the CCA apply to boat builders? That depends on whether you are doing “construction work” as defined by the CCA. “Construction work” is much more comprehensively defined in the CCA than “building work” is under the Building Act, but the crucial point is that the structure being built must form, or be intended to form, part of land. And that would appear to exclude boat building, even though there is no explicit exclusion for boats as there is in the Building Act. That means you don’t have to ensure your contracts are CCA-compliant, you are not subject to the payment claim/payment schedule system, you can’t use CCA adjudication to resolve disputes, and your payment retentions don’t have to be held in trust.

The Consumer Guarantees Act So what does that leave? Only the law of contract, the law of negligence, and the Consumer Guarantees Act 1993 (the “CGA”). What the CGA does is insert some basic rights and remedies into every contract for the supply of consumer goods or services, and those override anything that the written contract might say to the contrary. The CGA only applies if you are supplying goods or services to “consumers”, and consumers are individuals, companies, Councils, clubs or other legal entities who acquire goods or services “of a kind that are ordinarily acquired for personal, domestic, or household use or consumption”. So unless the boat you are building is a commercial fishing vessel, a tugboat, a destroyer or an oil tanker, then the CGA is the one statute that you can be held accountable under

by Geoff Hardy Auckland Commercial Lawyer

The Construction Contracts Act What about the other statute, the Construction Contracts Act 2002 (the “CCA”)? This is the one that is designed to free up cash flow within the industry. It does that by prohibiting certain unfair clauses in building contracts, by establishing a payment claim/ payment schedule system that forces parties at the top of the pecking order to either pay up or explain

lawyers

Geoff Hardy has 45 years’ experience as a commercial lawyer and is a partner in the Auckland firm Martelli McKegg. He guarantees personal attention to new clients at competitive rates His phone number is (09) 379 0700, fax (09) 309 4112, and e-mail geoff@martellimckegg.co.nz This article is not intended to be relied upon as legal advice.

LEGAL

the threat of being sued to ensure the industry meets acceptable standards. There needs to be an independent body to oversee their activities, and in New Zealand that job falls upon the local Councils.


NEW PRODUCT

Prices valid Feb 3rd - Mar 15th or while stocks last.

18Vx2 (36V) Brushless Top Handle Chainsaw 350mm (14”) #DUC356PT2 • Up to 500 cuts on 50 x 50 pine using 2 x 5.0Ah batteries • Torque boost mode - increases torque for better cutting efficiency • Additional safety & control with a kickback brake and metal bumper • 18Vx2 brushless motor provides chain speed of 1,200m/min • Captive bar nut allows for efficient chainsaw maintenance • XPT for increased dust and moisture resistance • Supplied with 2x 5.0Ah batteries (BL1850B) & Dual charger (DC18RD)

BONUS #DUB184Z 18V BL BLOWER SKIN VIA REDEMPTION

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RC PU

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EXPOL-X

This project shows EXPOL–X used in the construction of a concrete floor for its insulation value, high compressive strength and water resistance.

EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE Specify EXPOL-X when exceptional construction performance is required.

Concrete slab Polythene

EXPOL-X extruded polystyrene sheets have a high compressive strength, are remarkably water resistant and provide an exceedingly high insulation value where the R Value is retained for the life of the building.

EXPOL-X

Specifiers looking for a product that offers excellent performance in a diverse range of climate conditions turn to EXPOL-X.

Levelling sand EXPOL PodStick Steel mesh

Often used in applications that are subject to high loads, pressure and moisture, EXPOL-X is a high performing extruded polystyrene solution for: Retaining Walls

Masonry Walls

Concrete Floors

Cladding

Learn more about EXPOL-X simply go to www.expol.co.nz If you would like to talk to somebody about EXPOL-X then please call our Technical Manager Wayne Watson on 0800 86 33 73 or email tech@expol.co.nz Contact EXPOL P: +64 9 634 3449 F: +64 9 634 0756

T: 0800 86 33 73 E: sales@expol.co.nz

Technical Advice/Quotes E: tech@expol.co.nz

EXPOL: Auckland – Tauranga – Wellington – Blenheim – Christchurch (Belfast, Rolleston) – Cromwell

Guaranteed Performance

Website www.expol.co.nz Details www.miproducts.co.nz

ITMX12020

ITM WIDE BRIM HAT


23

THE APPRENTICE

The apprentice diary: final entry That’s it, I’m done. I’ve finished my apprenticeship. After three years of hard work, I’ve had the final handshake and congratulations from my training advisor. I’m a qualified builder It feels funny saying you’re a qualified builder, as people instantly think you know everything about building. But I’ve had to explain to some friends, it’s more like just dropping your L-plates. You know the basics, but there is a whole heap more to learn. Lots more. In saying that, it’s also pretty cool to say you’re a qualified builder. It has a sort of nice ring to it. The workload over the last two months has helped me get across the line. I’ve been foreman on a fourcar garage build with a parapet roof, an adjoining deck and covered walkway. It’s been great. From advising the client, to organizing all the subbies, and booking and taking inspections.

Project managing is a tough gig After having full control of the site, I can see how a good foreman/project manager is worth their weight in gold. It’s quite hard to keep juggling all the balls at the same time. I used to wonder before becoming a builder, how could there be so many mistakes and delays? Surely everything goes together like a giant Lego kit and in a set order. To a certain degree, it does, but there are so many aspects that impact this ideal world, as you well know.

What’s next?

So long, farewell

Hopefully I will continue to run small jobs or help assist running bigger sites. There’s nothing like being thrown in the deep end. I’ve been asked if I will go out on my own and start a company. I won’t rule it out, but it’s not on my radar now. I quite like the idea of a few years as foreman first.

With that, I say farewell and wish you success in your apprenticeships and careers. I’ve enjoyed the journey and I hope you have too. Remember, good builders will always be in high demand, and we’re worth our weight in gold.

What have been my biggest learnings?

Stay safe, you never know, one day I may open my diary again and start writing.

Well, I think a positive attitude is a must. I also believe the earlier you can start looking and understanding plans is a great asset. And finally, take your time to learn from good builders, ask lots of questions and try different methods to achieve the same result. That way you will come up with a good idea of what’s easiest for you. And lastly, be adaptable. You may come across tasks you haven’t done before, but if you go through all the options you’ve used before, you’ll find a way to achieve success.

by Stu Foster Apprentice Qualified Builder

Stu’s last word of advice Learn from your mistakes, but make sure to celebrate your successes too.


24

INDUSTRY NEWS

NZCB builds on mentoring success with cross-generational Rusty Hammers initiative Inspired by the success of its current mentoring programme and in response to building market trends, New Zealand Certified Builders (NZCB) has introduced a new membership category, Rusty Hammers. Rusty Hammers is designed for older builders wanting to retain their trade association while spending less time on the tools. In exchange for membership at a reduced rate, Rusty Hammers will provide mentoring to other builders who are at an earlier stage of their careers. NZCB Chief Executive Grant Florence says with the ongoing high demand for builders and an increasingly complex regulatory and business landscape, it makes sense to find new ways to support highly skilled older builders while harnessing their experience to nurture the next generation. “Builders who’ve been on the job for decades have built up a depth of practical experience that extends well beyond what younger builders have had a chance to learn in their first few years on the job. Having access to someone who’s ‘been there, done that’ is incredibly valuable for our younger members,” says Mr Florence.

Eligibility To be eligible for NZCB’s Rusty Hammers membership category, builders need to be working for only around 20 hours per week and been a full NZCB member for over 10 years. They must also commit to mentoring a younger builder for 12 months, meeting at regular intervals.

Technical and business skills The mentoring focuses not only on technical trade skills but also on business skills, leveraging the mentors’ decades of experience owning small-tomedium sized building businesses. “Owning a small to medium sized business, as many of our members do, is challenging for anyone in any sector of the economy. Our sector has ongoing

John 'Swampy' Marsh and Luke Monahan, mentor and mentee.

regulatory change to navigate plus new demands and opportunities from developments in building materials and technologies." “Enabling early-career builders to learn from those who’ve run successful building businesses for a long time, and allowing those older builders to retain their membership of NZCB is a win-win for everyone, including consumers who ultimately benefit from this sharing of best practice,” says Mr Florence.

Same services for a reduced fee While the builders who are eligible for a Rusty Hammers membership pay a reduced membership fee, they continue to have access to all of NZCB’s services. “Our longstanding member builders want to retain their memberships because they see the value we provide, and Rusty Hammers is a direct response to this. But we’re also seeing new membership numbers steadily increase year on year, particularly from builders in their first few years on the job who are seeking ongoing professional support and guidance, as well as a voice on industry issues,” says Mr Florence.


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26 PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

Get the most out of your Paslode nail guns Follow these tips to ensure that your Paslode FrameMaster and TrimMaster are performing at their peak, year after year.

☐☐ Ensure you are using the correct fuel cell connector to suit your tool. – The squarer connector suits our older tools. – The round connector suits our current models. ☐☐ Follow the instructions on the fuel cell to ensure that you twist and lock your connector correctly.

5. Use Paslode collated nails We recommend that you use Paslode Nails. ☐☐ BRANZ Appraised - Paslode are the only nails independently tested by BRANZ to ensure they meet the NZ building code. ☐☐ The red dye that coats our nails performs two functions: a) When fired, it heats up and acts as a lubricant. b) When it sets, it sets as an adhesive. ☐☐ The superior collation keeps the nails aligned and firing at speed.

1. Safety first Before carrying out any maintenance on your tools, make sure to remove all fasteners, fuel cell and battery, and wear the proper eye protection. Restrict maintenance to the cylinder and nose of the tool. For other issues, consult an authorised service agent.

When the weather's hot, safe storage of your Paslode fuel cells is essential Summertime is hot – probably not news to most of us right! When it’s hot outside it’s important our Paslode Fuel Cells are stored correctly. Paslode Fuel Cells must not be stored at temperatures exceeding 49o Celsius.

3. Clean the cylinder

When you are on site, be sure to take your fuel cells out of your car. On a warm day, the temperature of your car can be twice the outside temperature. Make sure you are storing your fuel cells in a cool, well ventilated place out of the sun.

To keep your tool performing at optimum levels for many years, it is recommended that you clean the cylinder every 10,000 nails.

For other safe practice advice, check out the Safety Essentials video on the Paslode website: www.paslode.co.nz/support

2. Monthly maintenance Tighten all screws and bolts in your nailer each month.

For a hands-on demonstration, visit paslode.co.nz where you will find a series of step by step cleaning and maintenance videos.

4. Check the fuel cell One of the most common causes of a tool misfire is using empty or out of date fuel cells. ☐☐ Ensure you check the expiry date on the bottom of the fuel cell and that your fuel is in date - they typically last 18 months.


BBQ'S

Prices valid Feb 3rd - Mar 15th or while stocks last.

Corona Kettle BBQ

Stack Drum Smoker

#CM155-028

#CM155-045

• • • •

FREE

Grill, roast, smoke or bake 22” (56cm) cooking area Lid mounted temperature gauge Large capacity removable ash catcher

HEAT BEADS BRIQUETTES 4KG AND COVER

• Drum smoker for low and slow cooking • Various options – hanging smoker/ BBQ/fire pit • Two large cooking racks and a hanging rack with hooks • Water bowl included

$250

$240

EXCL GST

EXCL GST

Matrix 7610 4-Burner BBQ

90L Chillzone Ice Box

#GM172-124

#GMCZ90W

• • • •

• • • •

Large glass viewing window Double skinned stainless-steel hood Side burner BBQ cover included

$800 EXCL GST

ITM WIDE BRIM HAT

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FREE

HEAT BEADS BRIQUETTES 4KG AND CHIMNEY STARTER

Keeps contents cold for up to 18 days Rotomolded for greater density and rigidity 40-50mm thick walls Wheels for portability

FREE

WATER/ICE BOTTLE AND TRAY

$330 EXCL GST

Spend over $350 on any product on this page and get a free Wide Brim Hat* *Strictly while stocks last. Limit of one hat per customer.


PAINT

Extra charge for tinting applies to all paints

Dulux Timbacryl • • • • •

Dulux Aquanamel – Semi-Gloss, Gloss

Water based 100% acrylic paint Self-priming on most surfaces Apply direct onto most bare surfaces 10 year guarantee*

4L – various colours

$65 EXCL GST

• • • • •

10L – various colours

$65 EXCL GST

ITM WIDE BRIM HAT

$95

EXCL GST

• Use on decks, garden furniture, pergolas, fences & gates • A highly durable, low odour decking oil • Protects the natural look of exterior timber • Lasts twice as long as traditional oil-based decking oils

10L - Kwila, Amber, Burnt Walnut

$125 EXCL GST

! EE R H F WITHASE RC PU

Water based Hard wearing Fast drying, 2-hour dry time Chip resistant Non yellowing

4L – Vivid White

$127

Cabot’s Aquadeck

5L - Kwila, Amber, Burnt Walnut

Prices valid Feb 3rd - Mar 15th or while stocks last.

EXCL GST

Cabot's Natural Decking Oil • • • •

Use on decks, garden furniture, pergolas, fences & gates A fast-drying penetrating oil Nourishes and protects the timber Provides a semi-transparent matt finish

5L - Kwila, Natural, Pine

$60 EXCL GST

10L - Kwila, Natural, Pine

$120 EXCL GST

Spend over $350 on any product on this page and get a free Wide Brim Hat* *Strictly while stocks last. Limit of one hat per customer.


29

While the huge scale of the devastating fire at the Dayle ITM Kopu store in November last year made headlines, the recovery was far more spectacular. 25 fire trucks attended the fire; it was a big one and destroyed nearly 75% of the facility including the shop, drive-through and pre-nail and truss shed. Yet within 24 hours, the Kopu team had their IT system up and running again and it was business as usual (sort of) pretty much straight away.

While huge amounts of hardware were consumed by the flames, including the computers, all major data was backed up in the cloud, which Dayle ITM Director Deborah Dayle says was absolutely crucial to their quick recovery. “We were able to divert the phones by Monday morning, and reprint all the dockets from our cloud back up. Our customers expecting delivery Monday morning had everything they needed ex Auckland by Monday afternoon.”

Because Dayle ITM also runs stores in Avondale and Tamaki, they were able to manage a lot of the Kopu business through their Auckland outlets. “The orders that could no longer be served out of Kopu were handled in Avondale,” says Deborah. “We were packing and delivering from Avondale and also had the Kopu pre-nail guys driving up to our East Tamaki branch for a week to keep things working." “From a team point, I can’t say enough. They’ve been fantastic, amazing.”

What now? In the aftermath of the fire, there was concern in the community that the store might close down. Deborah explains: “A large well-known hardware outlet in Paeroa recently suffered some water damage to their building and they just closed it down and left town. People thought we might do that as well." “We have 17 staff here and we didn’t want to put them out of work, especially at that time of the year. The idea of putting anyone out of work was not an option.” While Deborah expects it will take 12 months or so to get everything fully functional again, a good workable plan B has fallen into place. “We discovered the building next to us was vacant and managed to secure a lease on that for the next 18 months. We were able to move the drivethrough over to that building and so things are working out ok."

ITM NEWS

Burnt down Sunday. Up and running again the next day


30

ITM NEWS

Blaze a wake-up call for all ITM customers You can replace tools. You can buy new materials. But if you lose your data in a fire or other disaster, you’re really screwed.

“We had a small business subletting some of the space at Kopu, and they were devastated by the fire as much as we were,” says Deborah Day. “We were already in the process of building a new shop and showroom, and fortunately the fire didn’t affect that. It should be completed by March.” The cause of the fire was subsequently traced to a faulty fluorescent light that appears to have exploded following a power surge.

“But an even greater tragedy for them was they lost all their data. They backed their data up on to hard drives, which were left in the office, but of course the fire destroyed them. They were digging through the ashes trying to find the motherboards out of their computers to try and organise data recovery. “I think the lesson applies to a lot of our customers too, small builders and large building companies. Your data might be on your computer at home or at the office, but if you don’t have a back-up in the cloud, you could lose everything.

Deborah says everyone in the community is incredibly grateful for the fast response by fire brigades in the area. “Of the 25 trucks that attended, 24 of them were manned by volunteers. They were brilliant. If it wasn’t for their quick response, the whole place would have been wiped out.”

“Back-up doesn’t have to be complicated. Something as simple as Dropbox (www. dropbox.com) will do perfectly well. I urge our customers to have a look at how you’re doing all that. She’ll be right doesn’t cut it anymore.”

A 20 UG 19

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We live to support those who live to build NORTHLAND ☐ Bay of Islands ITM Haruru, Paihia 09 402 7703 ☐ Dargaville ITM 09 439 8730 ☐ Far North ITM Kaitaia 09 408 3927 ☐ Far North ITM Mangonui 09 406 0048 ☐ Mangawhai ITM 09 431 4963 ☐ Waipu ITM 09 432 0203 ☐ Whangarei ITM 09 437 9420

AUCKLAND ☐ Albany ITM 09 415 6889 ☐ Dayle ITM Avondale 09 828 9791 ☐ Dayle ITM East Tamaki 09 274 4942 ☐ Dysart ITM Glen Innes 09 521 3609 ☐ Hillside ITM Glenfield 09 443 8101 ☐ MacClures ITM Henderson 09 836 0088 ☐ Mahia ITM Takanini 09 267 0234 ☐ Matakana ITM 09 422 7525 ☐ Pukekohe ITM 09 238 3678 ☐ Thomsons ITM Papakura 09 294 9410 ☐ Tuakau ITM 09 236 8226 ☐ Waiuku ITM 09 235 7289 ☐ Warkworth ITM 09 425 1021 ☐ Weck’s ITM Patumahoe 09 236 3684 ☐ Western ITM Kumeu 09 412 8148 ☐ Western ITM Swanson 09 832 0209 ☐ Western ITM Whenuapai 09 416 8164

WAIKATO/BAY OF PLENTY ☐ Acorn ITM Hamilton 07 856 6789 ☐ Cambridge ITM 07 827 0953 ☐ KKBS ITM Katikati 07 549 0689 ☐ Matamata Post and Rails ITM 07 888 8189 ☐ Mount ITM Mt Maunganui 07 575 3126 ☐ Opotiki ITM 07 315 5984 ☐ Otorohanga ITM 07 873 8079 ☐ Tauranga ITM 07 541 1232 ☐ Omokoroa ITM 07 552 5770 ☐ Thomsons ITM Hamilton 07 849 3674

☐ Thomsons ITM Whatawhata 07 829 8518 ☐ Timmo’s ITM Te Awamutu 07 871 7545 ☐ Triangle ITM Tokoroa 07 886 6611 ☐ Whakatane Timber & Hardware ITM 07 307 0031

☐ Tawa ITM 04 232 5999 ☐ Tumu ITM Masterton 06 370 6060

NELSON/MARLBOROUGH

☐ Barrier ITM Tryphena 09 429 0466 ☐ Coromandel ITM 07 866 8848 ☐ Dayle ITM Kopu 07 868 9829 ☐ Pauanui ITM 07 864 8579

☐ Blenheim ITM 03 578 3049 ☐ Havelock ITM 03 574 1018 ☐ Kaikoura ITM 03 319 5447 ☐ Motueka ITM 03 528 7254 ☐ Nelson ITM 03 548 5487 ☐ Picton ITM 03 573 6888 ☐ Takaka ITM 03 525 0005

CENTRAL NORTH ISLAND

CANTERBURY/WEST COAST

☐ Braithwaite ITM Taumarunui 07 895 6881 ☐ Central ITM Feilding 06 323 3400 ☐ Central ITM Marton 06 327 5458 ☐ Hometown ITM Foxton 06 363 8049 ☐ Manawatu ITM 06 356 9490 ☐ New Plymouth ITM 06 758 8939 ☐ Stratford ITM 06 765 7800 ☐ Taupo ITM 07 378 9899 ☐ Tumu ITM Dannevirke 06 374 4260 ☐ Turangi ITM 07 386 5736 ☐ Waitara ITM 06 754 8822

☐ Ashburton ITM 03 307 0412 ☐ Basher’s ITM Amberley 03 314 8311 ☐ Darfield ITM 03 318 7474 ☐ Dyers Road ITM Bromley 03 373 6049 ☐ Geraldine ITM 03 693 9397 ☐ Greymouth ITM 03 768 0441 ☐ Hamptons ITM Waltham 03 374 3333 ☐ Hillside ITM Hornby 03 349 9739 ☐ Kaiapoi ITM 03 327 8829 ☐ McMullan Timber ITM Hokitika 03 755 8519 ☐ McVicar ITM Harewood 0800 191 674 ☐ ProBuild ITM Rolleston 03 324 3300 ☐ Rangiora ITM 03 313 4862 ☐ Timaru ITM 03 688 8074 ☐ Waimate ITM 03 689 7427

COROMANDEL

HAWKE’S BAY ☐ Tumu ITM Gisborne 06 868 9599 ☐ Tumu ITM Hastings 06 873 0999 ☐ Tumu ITM Havelock North 06 872 9600 ☐ Tumu ITM Napier 06 872 6222 ☐ Wairoa ITM 06 838 7332

WELLINGTON/WAIRARAPA ☐ Crighton ITM Greytown 06 304 7193 ☐ Crighton ITM Levin 06 368 4057 ☐ Crighton ITM Seaview 04 568 3896 ☐ Parapine ITM Upper Hutt 04 527 6800

DUNEDIN/OTAGO/SOUTHLAND ☐ E H Ball ITM Invercargill 03 218 3787 ☐ Fraser Hardware ITM Balclutha 03 418 0170 ☐ Gore ITM 03 208 0649 ☐ Mosgiel ITM 03 489 8885 ☐ Southbuild ITM Winton 03 236 6055 ☐ Southern Lakes ITM Alexandra 03 445 0081 ☐ Southern Lakes ITM Cromwell 03 445 0081 ☐ Southern Lakes ITM Queenstown 03 451 1567

FOR YOUR NEAREST ITM STORE PHONE 0800 FOR ITM OR VISIT ITM.CO.NZ PRODUCTS ON PROMOTION: All prices exclude GST. Prices are valid February 3rd - March 15th, 2020 unless specified otherwise. Some products may not be available in all ITM stores, but can be ordered in. FREE ITM Wide Brim Hat: Applies to purchases made between February 3rd and March 15th 2020, and only while stocks last. Please note, unless stated, the $350 (excl GST) qualifier for the FREE ITM Wide Brim Hat applies to the products on the specified page only and cannot be made up of products purchased from other pages. Purchases must be made on one invoice/account. Offer is limited to one per customer.


WE’LL SEE YOU RIGHT, IN - STORE AND ON SITE At over 90 owner-operated ITM stores you’ll find people who put your needs first, because that’s how it should be. If we can help you get the job done faster at a better price, we will. If we can go the extra mile to get a delivery to you on time, we will. So, while you’ll often hear us say we’ll always see you right, now you know we mean it.

Find your local ITM store at www.itm.co.nz

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Building Business February 2020  

The latest news and promotions from your building supplies specialist.

Building Business February 2020  

The latest news and promotions from your building supplies specialist.