{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

F R E E J a n u a r y 2 2 , 2 0 2 0 / Vo lume X L , N umb e r 2 2 / O u r 47 t h Ye a r 

IPD ATTACK Man killed by cops was struggling in final weeks | Page 4

HALF PINT Reggae legend prepares for show at the Haunt | Page 29

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

2020 W t e r Tiin mes

ANGELHEARTS DINER

A review of Ithaca’s newest vegan spot | Page 31

CAROLYN SERLING

Twilight Zone legacy bearer dies at 91 | Page 3

BACK on TOP


Phillip Hockley, CS

A new view of God and its effect on well-being

In this free talk, learn how the loving God found in the Bible heals Sunday, January 26 At 2:00 The Hotel Ithaca North Ballroom 222 S. Cayuga St, Ithaca This lecture is sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ithaca and is free and open to the public. Information: 607-272-1650 Park for free in the lot behind The Hotel Ithaca or in the garage across the street from the hotel.

advertising sales Looking to run your own show?

Weight loss surgery saved my life.

Paul Rossi Corning, NY

Cayuga Center for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery 2  T

h e

Ithac a Times

Right here. With Cayuga’s highly skilled Board-certified bariatric surgeons, a team of specialists to support and guide me, I didn’t need to go anywhere else.

cayugawellness.org

/January

22– 28 ,

We are looking for someone to help us grow more. Are you outgoing, selfmotivated, bright, and imaginative? Are you enthusiastic about developing business relationships? We are seeking candidates that have excellent verbal and writing skills. Sales experience a plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits. Send your cover letter and resume to: jbilinski@ithacatimes.com

10 newspapers in print and online

2 0 2 0


Newsline

VOL.XL / NO. 22 / January 22, 2020 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

Sitting Pretty�������������������������������� 8 Cornell men’s hockey heads into crucial stretch

City Affair

Half Pint�������������������������������������29x

City employees want more connection to leaders

A conversation with a reggae figure

NE W S & OPINION Newsline��������������������������������������������������3-9 Sports�������������������������������������������������������� 10 Winter Times��������������������������������������13-28

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T

C

ommon Council held a special meeting on Jan. 15 to discuss the results of a citywide employee engagement survey conducted last year. The survey asked a series of questions about employees’ thoughts across eight categories ranging from customer service to the overall work environment. Some of the key themes throughout the study were that employees saw customer service and diversity/inclusion in the workplace as points of pride. However, respondents did perceive there is a disconnect between city staff and city leadership, with plenty of opportunities to improve trust in the Common Council. The Council will be looking to make sure some of the suggestions made to keep that disconnect from continuing. Other focus areas were accountability, compensation, and increased opportunities for professional development. City employees were asked about some of the things the city does well. Most employees responded by saying the staff was responsive and resourceful and had high standards. Negative perceptions were found in budgeting practices and interactions between staff. The three most acclaimed departments were the Department of Public Works, the Ithaca Police and Ithaca Fire Departments. When asked what were some of the most significant challenges facing the city, a majority of employees said aging infrastructure such as roads and city-owned facilities. Others said the role of politics in City operations and budget constraints such as having limited resources and tax base. E dw i n J. Vi er a

Dining���������������������������������������������������������31 Movies������������������������������������������������������� 32 Art�������������������������������������������������������������� 34 TimesTable������������������������������������������35-38 Classifieds����������������������������������������� 38-40 Cover: Photo: Jared Silber, Design: Marshall Hopkins

ON T HE WE B In Memoriam

Writer Caroyln Serling, widow of Rod, passes away at 91

O

n Jan. 16, actress and editor Carolyn Serling passed away at the age of 91 at her home in California. Recently, she was best known for the work she did to keep her husband, acclaimed screenwriter Rod Serling’s legacy alive. Rod, a central New York native and professor at Ithaca College, passed away in 1975 after creating “The Twilight Zone.” Carolyn was a consultant on 1983’s “Twilight Zone: The Movie.” At the time of her death, she was receiving an executive producer credit on the CBS All Access revival of The Twilight Zone hosted by Jordan Peele. Her daughter, Anne Serling-Sutton,

said her mother passed of natural causes. In an interview, Serling-Sutton reminisced on the family’s trips to Cayuga Lake. “One of my best memories is how we all used to come to the lake in the summer,” Serling-Sutton said. “It was an annual pilgrimage and a chance for my dad to get away from Los Angeles and the constant stress of writing all the time. Our cottage is a place built by my great-grandfather and my mother had been there all her life. It was quite special and just really lovely memories of family time.” Even later into her life, Carolyn Serling was recognized for

T a k e

▶  The Dorothy Cotton Jubilee Singers - will present a Community Celebration Concert to honor Martin Luther King, Jr., at 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 23 at the State Theatre of Ithaca. The concert also will feature The Dorothy Cotton Youth Singers, Ithaca High School Chorale, Trumansburg High School Choir, Vitamin L, GIAC Jumpers, IC

her work on The Twilight Zone Magazine from 1981 through 1989. She was an associate publisher and consulting editor throughout the magazine’s lifespan. She also served as the editor of the book “Twilight Zone: 19 Original Stories on the 50th Anniversary,” a collection of assorted short stories from various authors. Carolyn also organized an exhibit dedicated to her late husband at Ithaca College. This was something her mother enjoyed. In addition to remembering her intelligence, Serling Sutton recalled her mother as someone who gave of herself. Carolyn Serling was an active volunteer at the Santa Monica hospital and she loved buying toys for kids in the hospital. She also worked in the suicide prevention field. Serling-Sutton said her mother requested there be no services.

M a t t B u t l e r , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 232 SouthReporter@flcn.org E d w i n J . V i e r a , S ta f f R e p o r t e r R e p o r t e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A u s t i n L a mb , C o p y E d i t o r E me r i t u s AL a m b @ i t h a c a t i m e s . c o m E r i n S t e w a r t , A cc o u n t R e p r ese n ta t i v e , x 220 E r i n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R e p r ese n ta t i v e , x 218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , x 211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Chris Eaton, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o c h b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

E dw i n J. Vi er a

N o t e

Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Owego Middle School Choir. The concert is free of charge, with donations accepted. ▶  Food, Brews & Kangaroos - Join for some chews and brews for the ‘roos on Australia Day, Jan. 26 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Liquid State Brewery, to raise funds Aussie style for fire recovery in the Snowy Mountains

Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000

of Australia. Bring your mates for the Australian Games, featuring a trivia competition of Australian slang, unusual facts about the island/country/continent, and questions relating to Aussie music and artists. Compete for the Golden Thong trophy in our toss the thong competition.

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE COPY RIGHT © 2019, BY NE WSK I INC.

All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $7ll9 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

It h ac a T im e s  3


INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

Idle IPD

PHOTOGRAPHER IPD officer’s attorney responds to city’s allegations By C a se y Mar tin

WHAT ASPECT OF ITHACA SHOULD BE HIGHLIGHTED IN OUR SUPERBOWL COMMERCIAL?

“Diamonds Lunch Buffet!” -

Joseph A. Parker M

“It should be a commercial targeted at Vampires since we have no sunny days.” -Mary M. - Carol-Rose L. -Eszter O. - Rina W.

-Piper

“The Rhine House!” Jess G. & Holland T.

“Definitely highlight Treman State Park – It has the best views!”

4  T

h e

Ithac a Times

Association, who is challenging the notice of discipline to Barksdale, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a federal body that is dedicated to preventing discrimination by enforcing federal laws against workplace conduct driven by race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetic information, according to the EEOC website. Filing with the EEOC, Kopko said, would eventually allow them to take the case to the federal court in Syracuse, which is what he and Barksdale intend to do. Kopko is not Barksdale’s union representation. “This is a retaliatory firing,” Kopko said. “Our charge is that the notice of discipline was based on the complaint of discriminaton that she filed.” Additionally, Kopko said they’d likely be challenging the total number of cases reported by Lt. John Joly to be inadequately investigated over the last decade by Barksdale. Kopko said he’d be arguing that the list compiled by Joly contained inaccuracies that would significantly change the

Decastro History

More details emerge about man killed during attack at IPD headquarters

P

“The Dog Park!”

-Felicia P. Mitchell K

I

thaca Police Officer Christine Barksdale has retained local attorney Ed Kopko to represent her as she navigates the process and decides how to proceed as the City of Ithaca moves to terminate her from the force. The City of Ithaca announced last week that they would be seeking the termination of an Ithaca Police Department investigator, later confirmed to be Barksdale, after an internal audit discovered a decade of “deeply troubling failure” to adequately investigate cases in the department’s investigation division. In the release, the city stated that they believed the number of impacted cases was close to 200, and included 80 sex crime cases, and that they had handed the investigation materials over to Tompkins County District Attorney Matt van Houten, who said Monday he couldn’t comment on the situation, and New York State Attorney General Letitia James’ office. Kopko said that he had presented the case both to the Ithaca Police Benevolent

olice revideo from IPD’s ports and lobby the morninterviews ing of Decastro’s show that Michael death, and also a Decastro, the 57 request for previous year old man killed police reports from by an Ithaca Police incidents involving Department officer Decastro, saying on Dec. 21 when he that the release of entered IPD headthe reports would quarters wielding interfere with an a knife, according ongoing police to police, had been investigation. An struggling with appeal of those two possible mental rejections has been health issues and submitted. potential drug “There is ababuse during the solutely no doubt latter years of his in my mind - our life. Police have not Sergeant saved his confirmed a motive own life, and was for the attack, and entirely justified in say the investigahis actions,” Myrick tion is still open. wrote on Facebook One officer when the incident Michael Decastro sustained an injury was announced in during the incident. December, adding Ithaca Police Chief that he had viewed Dennis Nayor said the investigation is enthe video of the shooting and that the oftering its final stages, but that a motive has ficer injured in Decastro’s attack had been not yet been uncovered. The City of Ithaca released from the hospital. “I also believe rejected FOIL requests for the surveillance that he saved the lives of other officers. His

/January

22– 28 ,

2 0 2 0

number of actually impacted cases. He also wondered why the City of Ithaca chose to make this particular incident so public, considering normal government policy of keeping personnel matters private and in-house. Though, it should be noted, Barksdale is not the first police officer in recent memory for which a personnel matter was publicly announced, as IPD officer Kyle Paolangelli had his termination publicly announced in May after he pled guilty to perjury in relation to a January 2018 search warrant. It wouldn’t be the first time Barksdale lodged allegations of discrimination against the city, though her attempt in mid-2019 was decided against her. In that case, Barksdale, a black woman, filed a complaint against the City of Ithaca, the Ithaca Police Department and Joly with the state’s Division of Human Rights, stating that she’d been discriminated against due to her race and gender and generally subjected to a hostile work environment as a result too. DHR issued a ruling in December on the matter, stating that Barksdale had not proven the allegations true and thus exonerating the three accused parties. M att Butler actions were nothing short of heroic.” Meanwhile, Tompkins County Sheriff ’s Office reports show that Decastro had an extensive history with law enforcement around the county. Most of the interactions are not violent, though they do point to a person in the throes of a chronic mental health struggle. There’s plenty of welfare checks, most of which center on county officers responding either at Decastro’s own behest or due to someone else’s call. In many of them, Decastro is complaining about hearing voices or people planning against him. Overall, the Sheriffs have at least 20 police reports filed involving Decastro over the last five years. Interestingly, there’s a large gap in the records: almost all of them take place either in the summer of 2016, then a gap of over three years, then a wave of arrests starting in September 2019. The latter portion of offenses are certainly more worrisome than Decastro’s previous record, and include a forcible touching incident, a dispute call and a few disorderly conduct reports. Records show that he was taken to CMC for evaluation occasionally, but it doesn’t appear that anything that warranted a long-term stay was uncovered, or at least it’s not noted in the police reports. Mike Foster, former program director at the Rescue Mission homeless shelter (now under the direction of St. John’s Community Services, who did not respond to requests for comment), knew Decastro since Foster started working with the local impoverished population in 2012 and 2013. Due to one troublingly inapprocontinued on page 7


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

County Chair

A

County legislature trying again to choose a leader

t Tuesday’s Tompkins County are trying to make big decisions about big year or so, at least compared to the normal Legislature meeting, the county’s things and people have different opinions, function of the Tompkins County Legislaleading governing body will try you’re going to get a lot of tension,” Kelles ture. With a Democratic voting advantage once again to pick a chair to lead them for said. “The job is inherently tense [...] But of 11-3, there usually aren’t many very the next legislative year after deadlocking honestly, I don’t think it’s a bad thing that contentious debates, and the legislature is on the decision two weeks ago. everyone has the courage to be honest and generally in agreement on most issues. But Legislators Mike Lane and Anna Kelles bring it up. It’s not something we’re washin August, tempers did moderately flare are both running for the position. At the ing over, there’s a willingness to have this during the extended discussion centered first meeting of the year, the two tied with conversation out publicly.” on whether to pursue a second study on seven votes, and even after several re-votes Sinking into whatever tension has been co-locating the Tompkins County Sheriff ’s a decision couldn’t be reached. Due to created by the chair vote, or that which Office and the Ithaca Police Department. an interpretation of municipal law by just naturally exists, Kelles said, could be Robertson called any tension on the Tompkins County legislature a prodAttorney Jonathan uct of the “vigorWood, a vice chair ous debate.” After was not selected serving as chair either and will need for 6 of the last 10 to be chosen via years, Robertson another vote. announced late Most of the peolast year she would ple spoken to for be stepping away this story insist that from the posithe chair stalemate, tion, so Sigler has and the position of been named chair chair itself, is more temporarily until about personality Lane or Kelles is than about politics. chosen. It’s the first That’s exemplified time that a tempoby a glance at who rary chair has been voted for who, as needed for a second the votes didn’t fall meeting since 2013. anywhere close to If 30 days passes party lines: Lane, after the first meetgenerally considing, the Tompkins ered a moderate, County Clerk, counted progresMaureen Reynolds, sives like Deb Dawwould choose a son and Shawna temporary chair Anna Kelles Mike Lane Black among his who would serve supporters, along indefinitely until a a net positive for the group. And, as Sigler with others. On the other hand, Kelles, permanent chair is successfully approved echoed in his post-meeting press release certainly considered a progressive legislaby vote by the legislature. recap, democracy can at times be messy; tor, had support from the body’s RepubliRobertson said she was stepping back that can, in turn, be good in the long run. can members Glenn Morey, David McKfrom the post because she simply felt like Meanwhile, Klein said he felt like the enna and Mike Sigler, as well as former she’d had enough. She named the county’s episode was emblematic of larger issues chair Martha Robertson, among others. new judge seat, the massive airport renoamong the legislature that aren’t exactly After four separate votes at the meeting vation and the state’s relocation of its Depolitical, but have divided the group reearlier this month, nobody had budged. partment of Transportation facility from gardless. Over the last year, Klein said, There are two ways to look at the curthe Ithaca waterfront to Warren Road he’s felt that morale on the legislature was rent situation in the legislature. At least (which is pending) as some of her proud“very low.” He said he feels the legislature one legislator, Dan Klein, views it as an est accomplishments, but also indicative of is the most divided it has been since he example of the rumored in-fighting and the traits needed in a chair. She expressed was first elected in 2014. personality clashes that have evolved over confidence that things would “work them“Absolutely,” Klein said. “I truly think the last several months among the legisselves out” regarding the vote. it’s 90 percent personality and power lature’s 14 members. Meanwhile, fellow “It’s not about being passive and letting struggles. In the end we all have one vote. legislator Anna Kelles portrayed the curthings happen, or letting the staff do all [...] I really don’t think it has anything to rent chair selection process as necessary the work,” Robertson said, noting that and beneficial discomfort that will eventu- do with progressive or conservative or she’s supporting Kelles’ candidacy for the anything like that.” ally lead to a more thoroughly-discussed chair position. “The chair of the legislature He’s seen resentment and personal outcome, whatever that outcome may be. really needs to be out front and carrying squabbles take over a larger portion of the When legislating, Kelles said, too much the message of Tompkins County, of what debate culture, he said, something that he camaraderie can lead to an undue amount we’ve accomplished and what we need again blamed on personalities and leaderof complacency, which in turn inhibits from New York State.” ship in the legislature. There have been progress. M att Butler some publicly tense moments over the past “When you have a lot of people who Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

Thumbs Up - As mentioned in our cover story this week, see if you can make it out to Lynah Rink this weekend for either of Cornell’s men’s hockey team’s big games, as they both promise to be exciting contests. On Friday at 7 p.m., the team faces Dartmouth, their lone loss on the season, and on Saturday at 7 p.m., the team hosts Harvard in the storied rivalry game. Pack your dead fish for Saturday. Thumbs Up - Cornell announced this week that four fraternities would be banned from recruiting on-campus this semester, part of a campaign of increased scrutiny on Greek life that university president Martha Pollack has committed to. It’s apparently not related to Antonio Tsialas’ death or the subsequent heightened regulations, but it’s good to see some follow-through during a crucial time. Seen - The Collegetown location of Collegetown Bagels will be moving across the street while its current spot is demolished and redeveloped. It will be moving to the Cornell-owned Sheldon Court. According to the Cornell Daily Sun, the lease was signed on Christmas Eve.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own grievances or praise, write news@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Would you like Meghan Markle and Prince Harry to spend time in Ithaca now that they’re moving to North America?

2 0 2 0

17 Yes. 27 No.

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

What would you throw on the ice at Harvard-Cornell ice hockey games? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

/ T h e

It h ac a T im e s  5


COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

ITHACA NOTES

Jim Holahan: Turning Down the Dial A

Chronic Frivolity

By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s

ny day we, as earth’s residents, figure out ways to turn back the dial on our energy use is a good day, according to Jim Holahan. We learn how to ride buses, bikes, scooters instead of cars, how to dry our clothes on the line outside or the line near our furnace. We start saving up to replace our water heater with one that will suck in heat from surrounding air and somehow transfer that into the hot water tank. We buy into community solar to power our homes. When Jim is in town for work, he heads to his compact office at Taitem Engineering. A great place to work—with supportive colleagues who share common goals: These days, folks at Taitem Engineering are busy with local and regional projects at Upstate Medical University, Binghamton Zoo, Lansing Central School District, Ithaca Community Childcare, and the new GreenStar building. Jim’s last Taitem gig took him winding along Fall Creek to Gutchess Lumber in Cortland. GL’s goal is to produce hardwood lumber for their customers. However, they suspected there were ways to save energy and they hoped to save 7.5 percent on their energy use for the year. Jim’s background includes commercial

and industrial energy audits, solar energy, with familiarity re combined heat and power technology, which was well suited for Gutchess Lumber. GL uses all parts of harvested trees: They burn their sawdust to produce steam, which fuels the kiln, which dries the lumber. Scraps are turned into pallets, and ground into mulch. Jim said “Gutchess uses every bit of every tree.” But were there more ways to save energy and thereby save money? What about the steam going up and out the chimney of the boiler? What if they added a turbine to recapture that steam? That would be a Combined Heat and Power contraption and Jim is fond of those. Through NYSERDA (a state agency working to conserve energy) Jim served at GL as “On Site Energy Manager,” working along with the in-house team. NYSERDA paid 75 percent of Jim’s salary and Gutchess paid the rest. As Energy Manager, Jim spent 12 months onsite at Gutchess, so he knows the plant and he knows the team. He then spent three additional months completing his Gutchess Lumber Case Study and Roadcontinued on page 7

“All this year’s nominations were based entirely on the nominee’s ability to defeat Trump in a General Election.” 6  T

h e

Ithac a Times

/January

22– 28 ,

2 0 2 0

By St e ph e n P. Bu r k e

T

he upcoming month of February brings two of the more playful days on society’s social calendar: Super Bowl Sunday and Valentine’s Day. Despite their engaging frivolity, these secular semi-holidays are not as big in atypical Ithaca as elsewhere. Lighthearted or not, they are days of ordained activities and spending money, not favored lifestyle features here. Ithaca is partial to events that are homegrown and (in multiple senses) free: Ithaca Festival, the Apple Harvest Festival, Wizarding Weekend. Ithaca values free -wheeling creativity. Super Bowl Sunday and Valentine’s Day are rather limited in scope. One involves watching a football game on television. The other customarily focuses on going out to dinner. Each primarily features, rather than creativity, consumption: of four hours of television accompanied by snacks and alcohol; of restaurant meals, augmented by flowers, candy, and cards. Ithaca sometimes proves itself eccentric in the root meaning of the word: that is, an orbit not having the Earth precisely at its center; and these upcoming activities seem not particularly central here. In the interests of journalistic research I was at a sports bar over the weekend and asked three random patrons if they knew the date of the Super Bowl. None did; and these were guys in a sports bar, who happened to look as if they knew their way around a remote, chicken wings, and beer. Among the general Ithaca population, interest in football might suffer for political and cultural reasons. It’s a violent, war-like game, and Ithaca is generally peaceful and bookish rather than brawling and balling. There’s a story (not strictly relevant, but illustrative) about a Talmudic scholar who comes from the old country to America and doesn’t understand the obsession here with sports over study, so his hosts take him to a football game to see what the fuss is all about. Upon observation, the learned elder asks, “Why not give each side a ball? Then there’s no reason to fight.” In further research for this column, I

asked an acquaintance who operates one of Ithaca’s most popular restaurants if there’s a surge of business on Valentine’s Day. He shrugged. “Maybe at the high-end places,” he said, but not at places that offer comfortable, affordable quality over fuss and extravagance. Ithacans don’t much like to dress up anyway, and February here is not a great time to be out in fancy clothes and flimsy shoes. Politics and culture also come into play for Valentine’s Day in Ithaca. For the most part, flowers for the holiday are grown in monoculture in vast tracts in South America and shipped in thousands of heavily refrigerated cargo jets. On February 15 all the unsold ones are trashed, and of course within a week all the sold ones are, too. From start to finish, it is a fairly eco-savage enterprise. Ithaca is an education center in more ways than one. Before coming here I blithely bought, each Valentine’s Day, the lushest roses I could find (when I had reason to), and minded only the cost to my budget. Callow, callous youth. Along with buying my first Volvo, I perhaps became a real Ithacan when I discovered a commercial cache of dried and fresh locally-grown botanicals at a market where you could mix and match individual components to create your own ecologically sound bouquet. Conversely, though, and on the whole, maybe a little expenditure and frivolity is not so bad in the cold and gloom of February, if one can find ways to temper the waste and whatever dissolution. I find I can personally profit in a small and harmless way on Super Bowl Sunday with a brainy, winning wager on the game, or brighten the day of an adversary with an ill-conceived losing one. On Valentine’s Day I might generate some curiosity and conversation by dressing in black in recognition of Singles Awareness Day, as February 14 is known in some circles. The appellation shares an acronym with its concurrent condition, Seasonal Affective Disorder, and has some of the same traits, which depending how you deal with them are either less severe and chronic, or more.


“I believe progressive companies will employ energy managers as a key compoContin u ed From Page 6 nent to controlling costs.” Where else do Taitem Energy Manmap. The Roadmap showed how Jim and GL got from Point A to Point B, useful for agers share their expertise? Recently GAP-Old Navy applied to NYSERDA other industrial sites dialing back their for incentives. A technical review was energy use. required for their 1.5 million sq. ft. What did Jim and GL decide to do warehouse in Fishkill, NY. Even though to achieve that goal? While at Gutchess, Jim didn’t come home with a new GapJim often problem solved with the Plant Old Navy wardrobe, he did feel great Engineer: settling on the best options that all of the lighting in the entire huge throughout their partnership. warehouse was swapped out for energy“Why are the lights on when it’s dayefficient fixtures following his Audit there. light?” Jim and Gap calculated that they will save “How can we retroabout $300,000 fit that conveyor, so it annually, by this doesn’t run when not change alone. needed?” Growing A facility energy up in Bergen audit determined County, New opportunities for Jersey, Jim felt energy savings. Howcomfortable ever, getting staff and using the tools employees onboard his father, a is a crucial part of carpenter, used the solution. Having at work and at an outsider become, home. Later, over time, an insider Jim Holahan on the roof of City Centre. (photo provided) when Jim was helped. working as a By the time Jim’s “super” for eight contract was up he and the Plant Engineer NYC apartment buildings on the lower had also converted all the standard lighting to LEDs, while utilizing National Grid East Side, Jim had no idea he would one day live in Danby, NY and work with incentives to make the cost of new bulbs industrial clients to save energy and save affordable. Not bad for a one-year hitch. money. Not every recommendation has been But now that Jim is an old-timer here completed so far. Eventually, according in Tompkins County, he sees a lot of to the Audit and Plan, up to 22 percent overlap in these chapters in his life. Jim’s energy use can be reduced, or approxiTaitem job has taken him all over the state mately 2.4 million kWh of energy, equatand Jim feels great satisfaction that he ing to about $210,000 a year. When Jim’s assignment was completed can help people protect the environment and save resources and money. Chalk up GL reaped a 10 percent overall energy another good day. savings! The GL Plant Engineer said: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

DECASTRO HISTORY Contin u ed From Page 4

priate episode, Decastro had been banned from the Rescue Mission for, as Foster puts it, a “long time,” but they would often see each other when Foster was working off-site. Unfortunately, Foster said, most of his interactions with Decastro came when Decastro appeared to be struggling, either due to his mental health or from an addiction. About two years ago, Foster said he’d seen Decastro after an extended absence and that he was looking like “a completely different person,” and that Decastro said he had turned his life around. For whatever it’s worth, that corresponds with the large time gap in police reports from the Tompkins County Sheriff ’s Office; whether Decastro moved out of the area for that time, or simply stayed out of trouble is unclear. Foster said he had a conversation with Decastro,who he didn’t think had a family, about two weeks before his death, in which Decastro expressed frustration at his ongoing mental health struggles.

“He said ‘It’s f***ed, Mike, it’s just so f***ed. There’s just no point,’” Foster said, noting that Decastro was lamenting his inability to receive help with his issues. “He came across to me as a man who had just completely given up, because even when he wanted to get help he couldn’t get it.” Foster said he wasn’t sure how lucid Decastro was during the conversation, which veered off into some nonsensical directions, but that a central theme was that Decastro felt that even when he had access to help, which he felt was rare, it wasn’t curing his problems. Over their years of interactions, Foster said that Decastro could certainly be aggressive and at times borderline violent, which would precipitate Foster calling the police, though at other times he’d help carry groceries or assist Foster with a task. But throughout their relationship, Foster said he never sensed that Decastro had a pointed problem with authority or law enforcement, definitely nothing that would indicate his alleged actions that led to his death. “I had never seen a focus on authorities, I had seen the opposite,” Foster said. “He was more reasonable and more likely

THE TALK AT

Justice/Bail Reform Laws

I

would like to comment on the article Bail Reform Snap Judgment in the January 15 Ithaca Times. The article begins by inferring that the tragic case of Kalief Browder was a genesis of sorts for NY’s legislators’ passage of the Criminal Justice/Bail Reform laws that took effect on Jan. 1, 2020. And that somehow the inequities of justice unfairly foisted upon the racially/culturally/socially/economically vulnerable members of society would be equalized or even eliminated with the new laws’ passage. This, of course, at the expense of mandatorily requiring that a person picked up on an arrest or bench warrant for failing to appear in court as required, or a person who violates an order of protection, for example, be released on their own recognizance (there are other barely more onerous conditions of release but these have to be analytically justified “on the record’). Tompkins County is “extremely’ fortunate to have a wise and thoughtful District Attorney in Matt Van Houten, who recognizes that “[it] becomes a problem when you take away a judge’s discretion...” Automating the legal and judicial operations of our society is not the right answer, and algorithms are not yet capable of using judgment, which is required when dealing with human beings. The general public presumptively doesn’t realize that the ‘only consideration in imposing bail on someone

to be talked off the ledge [when authorities were involved.] I was blown away when that happened.” Over the years, Foster said he called Cayuga Medical Center over 20 times and IPD around six times, trying to get Decastro committed or institutionalized in some capacity. Usually, he said, this was when Decastro seemed particularly paranoid or aggressive, or appeared generally close to spiraling out of control. CMC spokesperson John Turner was unable to confirm any information about Decastro specifically, citing patient confidentiality laws, though he did offer the following statement: “We are saddened to hear about the passing of one of our former patients,” Turner wrote. “Because of health privacy law, we cannot discuss specifics of his care. We can tell you that caring for behavioral health patients involves a lot of complexity that is coordinated by our highly skilled team in behavioral services and various community partners. Every behavioral patient entrusted in our care receives a medical screening exam, and if appropriate, a referral is made for a comprehensive mental health evaluation.” Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

charged with a crime is to insure their appearance at their next scheduled court date. The fact that someone who was charged with burglary or harassment, for example, might, if released, pose a threat to others or the community at large is not a justifiable factor in making a bail determination. As such, it is difficult for me to understand how the required least restrictive form of release guarantees in any way that that person will show up for their court date. The allegation that the racially/culturally/socially/economically vulnerable members of society are disadvantaged with respect to their more racially/culturally/socially/economically advantaged counterparts under a “cash bail’ system is not due necessarily to faulty laws, but rather to law enforcement and judicial personnel who don’t believe in or respect the principle of racial, social, cultural, economic equality of all people. That Lady Liberty is blind does not mean that legislators, enforcers, and administrators of the law should or can be. If we are so concerned about being compassionate and fair in our control over others, then the mandated behavior of those in control needs to be tempered by thoughtful judgment. Finally, the administrative requirements and burdens on prosecutors, defense attorneys, and courts resulting from the new Criminal Justice Reform will make it more difficult to prosecute those charged with a crime, more likely that those charged who would have been convicted will be at large, and will cost taxpayers more for the ersatz benefits delivered by this legislation. What normally transpired in 45 minutes took three hours at the most recent Newfield Town Court session. Hon. William Greener Newfield Town Justice Tompkins County Sheriff Derek Osborne added his own statement, noting the limitations that are put on officers attempting to arrest someone under the Mental Hygiene Law. “I can only reiterate that our ability to secure someone based on mental health concerns is extremely narrow and limited...we have to be able to articulate that, at that moment of contact, their life is in danger due to their own actions, or they are a danger to others,” Osborne said in an email comment. “The mere presence of mental health symptoms is not enough. If we consider them a danger, we can remove them to the hospital.” IPD Chief Dennis Nayor previously stated that his department has had previous contacts with Decastro, but declined to provide more specifics, again citing the ongoing investigation.

2 0 2 0

M att Butler

/ T h e

It h ac a T im e s  7


F o rwa r d C a m D o n a l d s o n , a j u n i o r , f i r e s a s h o t pa s t P r i n c e t o n ’s g o a l i e . ( P h o t o : Dav e B u r b a n k /C o r n e l l At h l e t i c s)

Back on Top Cornell Men’s Hockey hopes to tighten grasp on top spot

B y A n d r e w S u l l i va n 8  T

h e

Ithac a Times

/January

22– 28 ,

2 0 2 0


N

early a full year had gone by since the Cornell University men’s ice hockey team last stood atop the mountain known as Division I men’s hockey. The Big Red began this season ranked as the fifth best team in the nation, and after rattling of 10 consecutive wins at the get go, the squad appeared poised to retake the throne. On Jan. 13, with its record standing at 12–1–2, Cornell at last completed its ascension up the polls, earning the top spot in the country in both the USA Today/USA Hockey Magazine poll. (Cornell was originally tied with University of North Dakota for number one in the US College Hockey Online poll, but has since broken out of that tie.) “Last year we were ranked number one, but last year it lasted six days,” head coach Mike Schafer said. “I think our guys learned a lesson on that the previous year. It’s really nice – it’s nice for media, it’s nice for alumni – it’s nice for everything, but I don’t think inside the locker room the meaning and the purpose of it hasn’t really registered with our guys.” This past Friday, the team was greeted jubilantly by the Big Red diehards when it returned to Lynah Rink to play its first match while holding the number one ranking. Though they settled for a 2–2 draw in the first of two games against then-17th ranked Northern Michigan University that night, the Big Red declawed the Wildcats in a 3–1 victory the following night, improving their record to 13–1–3 and broadening their unbeaten streak to six straight matches. The team is now gearing up for two hefty home games on back to back nights: Friday, Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. at Lynah Rink against Dartmouth University, who owns the lone triumph over Cornell this year, and at the same time and place on Saturday against Harvard University, one of the most storied rivalries in college hockey lore. Cornell’s already beaten Harvard once this season. Cornell’s defensive unit has been stout thus far this season, as the team is ranked second in the country in scoring defense, averaging 1.47 goals allowed per contest. Junior Goaltender Matthew Galajda gives up on average the second-fewest amount of goals in Division I men’s ice hockey at 1.46. Galajda’s .940 save percentage ranks third-best nationwide as well. “I think the biggest thing for me is just being more calm, playing more composed,” Galajda said. “I think in year’s past I’d try to chase a play, and I think one

S ta r g o a l i e M at t h e w G a l a j d a e xc h a n g e s p l e a s a n t r i e s w i t h f e l l ow b ac k s t o p N at e M c D o n a l d . thing that I focused on this year is just letting the play come to me and I think that’s been a big benefit to me this year.” Senior defenseman Yanni Kaldis said the rest of the squad has provided the necessary padding to not put all of the pressure on Galajda as well. “I think everyone is just playing their own game,” Kaldis said. “They’re not trying to be someone they’re not. Obviously, we have good defensemen. But it’s also our forwards that are helping out a lot. We have good defensive forwards that aren’t getting the credit that they deserve on the scoresheet.” “We have players in particular that are matched up against the other team’s top line, and I think so far throughout this year we’ve really limited the other team’s top line, their best players, [from scoring] goals against us. I think that’s what they do best – they shut them out.” Schafer said one aspect of the team this season that has gone unnoticed on both sides of the puck is its discipline in terms of committing penalties. Cornell has only been able to kill 76.36 percent of its penalties so far, but the squad has only committed 55 penalties in 17 matches. “We haven’t had to kill a lot of penalties this year, and I think it’s, with the exception of one game against Providence, I think we’ve had more power play opportunities than we’ve had to kill,” he said. Senior forward Morgan Barron has been the Big Red’s top threat offensively in the 2019–2020 season. Barron leads the team in points with 20 and is tied for 20th in the country in points per game with 1.18. He has also scored a team-high nine goals on the season and is one assist be-

hind junior forward Cam Donaldson for the team lead in assists with 11. “I just think he’s got a little bit more of a step offensively,” Schafer said. “Just little things on the power play that he continues to get better at. Changing speeds he’s gotten a little better at. Using guys around him he’s getting a little better at. He’s just someone that continues to progress as a player.” Cornell has the seventh-highest scoring offense in the country at the moment, average 3.53 goals per game. While he is enjoying a successful season so far, Barron said the team as a whole has taken leaps offensively. “Up and down our roster, I think the numbers have been good for everybody,” Barron said. “That makes it a lot easier

when the puck is going in the net. When the team is winning that helps a lot, too.” Junior forward Brenden Locke has been one of the most reliable players for the Big Red, according to Schafer. Locke has the second-most points on the team (17), third-most goals (seven) and fourth-most assists (10). “I think he’s been more consistent from back-to-back nights, and that’s something that we harped on our team after the big Harvard win, that some of our games on the Saturday haven’t been as complete as we’d like to see,” Schafer said. If the Big Red want to retain their position as top dogs of Division I men’s ice hockey, Schafer said the team is going to need to refine certain aspects of the game moving forward. “Definitely, we need to improve our penalty kill,” Schafer said. “But all aspects of our game, we’re trying to get better … playing faster, playing with more poise and, something that we work practice all the time, getting more detailed in our faceoffs … who do we have offensively, where are we going offensively, those are just the little things we keep tweaking that we want to get better at.” He also said some improvements can be made at the individual level as well. “We have eight freshmen, and we think a lot of those guys can get better from here until the end of the year,” he said. “We think there’s some guys that can play better. There’s some team things that we could do better. We definitely haven’t reached our potential yet.”

Th e j oy o f v i c t o ry. ( P h o t o : E l d o n L i n d s ay/C o r n e l l At h l e t i c s)

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

It h ac a T im e s  9


sports

Ithaca Women’s Recreational Basketball still thriving By Ste ve L aw re nc e

O

nce upon a time – around the turn of the century – I was contacted by a woman named Jessica Ryan, who asked if I would be interested in writing a story about an upstart women’s basketball league in Ithaca. The Ithaca Women’s Recreational Basketball Association was in its second season, I was told, would be self-governed and self-officiated, would welcome players of all ages and abilities and would play once a week. Here we are in 2020, and I connected with Jessica Ryan once again to get an update on the league and her involvement in it. Ever the jokester, Jessica said, “I call myself the President Emeritus, and I have handed over the management to Naama Menda.” I asked Jessica to describe a cross-section of players, and she said, “We can take players 16 and up, but most are in their mid-20s, late 30s to early 40s.” She laughed and added, “And then there’s me! The only over-50 white haired lady out there!” I recall the big bash thrown last year

for Jessica’s 50th. Her husband, Joe, pulled off a big surprise party/basketball game wrapped into one event, and the players were clearly grateful for all Jessica has done over the years. I wrote a fake story about it, our designer-extraordinaire photo shopped a hilarious image, and it was a lot of fun. The IWRBA’s Elder Stateswoman drained a few buckets, ate a few pieces of cake and was the toast of the evening. While many leagues in many sports struggle to keep the numbers up, the IWRBA is thriving. “We play Wednesdays and Sundays at BJM gym,” Ryan said, “and we’re happy that we are pulling in enough players to add that second night.” While the games are self-officiated and friendly, make no mistake that the women come to play. Ryan said, “Many of our players participated in the Gus Macker Tournament at Ithaca High, and that is a huge event. Our league was able to field three or four teams and one of them actually won the tournament! We’re bonafide!”

The range of skill can be wide, and Jessica said, “Everybody has at least some high school experience and some played in college. We had a player from HobartWilliam Smith, and a woman who played a few years ago actually played for the Egyptian National Team! The level of play is good. They know the game.” The structure is simple, and Ryan stated, “We see who shows up (Wednesdays and Sundays at 7 pm at BJM), we mix ‘em up and we play.” She laughed again when describing those “garish yellow pinnies” they use for “uniforms,” and when I asked her about the level of intensity seen at the

games, she said, “Well, last year I cracked my head open when I hit it on the floor,” but she was quick to add that such injuries are rare. Jessica called the IWRBA “a great community-based league,” and she said “We do play some in the summer, but we mostly follow the ICSD’s calendar, from September to June.” For more info, please visit https:// ithacawomensbasketball.wordpress.com/ or https://www.facebook. com/ithacawomensbasketball/.

Need your investment to be a bit more…

Grow your deposits in a CFCU Money Market Savings Account. All of the flexibility you need at a great rate! Federally insured by NCUA.

Learn more and check our rates at mycfcu.com/moneymarket 10  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0


Dog Daze

Call today to connect with a

City developing report on how to handle dogs on The Commons

T

he Public Safety and Information (PSI) Commission will be drafting a report for the Common Council regarding the issue of dogs on the Commons. A consistent hot topic for residents, the issue of dogs on the Commons has been found to go largely unenforced by Ithaca Police, who prefer warnings over doling out tickets. The most well-known scofflaw of this regulation is Riley, the unofficial mascot of the Commons who can be found outside of The Outdoor Store. During the January meeting of the City Administration Committee, Robert Canta-

lmo outlined some of the work that has already gone into developing this report. “We took into consideration existing Ithaca municipal laws which prohibit the companion dogs on the Commons as well as make special accommodations for those who carry out some service for individuals,” Cantalmo said. “We have reached out to a number of similar municipalities with pedestrian walking malls and determined whether or not they allowed dogs, who is responsible for the enforcement of any dog regulations, whether or not they permitted licenses, whether they required anything like leashes or rabies vaccination. In instances where we were able to collect information on, for example, the maximum number of dogs on leashes, we were able to collect that, though we didn’t get that for all the municipalities.” He went on to say the commission has spoken with several city agencies like Ithaca Fire Department, the Ithaca Police Department, the Downtown Ithaca Alli-

ance, and Public Works. The commission also reached out to the Tompkins County government for feedback and solicited public opinion as much as possible. Cantalmo is hoping people will attend the PSI’s meetings to express their concerns regarding the dogs on the Commons law. The report will be the subject of future discussions at PSI’s February and March meetings. Some of the communities the commission spoke with are Alexandria, VA; Asheville, NC; Boulder, CO; Burlington, VT; Charlottesville, VA; Kalamazoo, MI; Knoxville, TN; San Antonio, TX, and Savannah, GA. Of those nine communities they reached out to, only Boulder, Colorado also didn’t allow dogs on their pedestrian malls. “Right now, it’s a question of consistency,” Cantalmo said. “Whether it’s consistency on enforcement of the existing ordinance which would prohibit dogs, or if it’s the enforcement of city policy. In the rest of the city, dogs are allowed. It’s The Commons that is the exception. Enforcement of the prohibition, at the moment, is inconsistent. We’ve heard commentary from some folks at IPD that it’s quite hard. A lot of people have some ignorance of the law.” From 2015 to 2019, close to 200 incidents of someone having a dog on the Commons have been reported to IPD. However, only been six tickets given out, with three of them belonging to Riley. Some have found the inadequate signage of the rules on the Commons being a primary factor of this. Others believe the cause is the Ithaca Police’s shortage of officers. Cantalmo has said one important thing to examine is the economics of this, whether it is the cost associated with having more enforcement on the Commons or those officially permitting dogs on the Commons. As of now, the commission has yet to examine the economics of the change, though this is something that will be reviewed for the draft report. Other concerns raised by the members of the City Administration Committee were how the Commons has no grassy areas and how dog waste would be handled. Cantalmo is looking to garner more resident feedback about this issue to ensure there is enough information for his commission to review. The report is expected to have a more thorough draft sometime in the spring.

SENIOR LIVING ADVISOR INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS — Learn the different types of senior care available LOCAL KNOWLEDGE — Our Advisors have the local knowledge to help you hand pick communities in your area SIMPLIFY — Your dedicated Advisor will simplify your search and help schedule tours EXPERIENCE — Our Advisors help thousands of families understand their options every day

There’s no cost to you!

(855) 524-7885 ! We’re paid by our partner communities

A Place for Mom has helped over a million families find senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options.

Joan Lunden, journalist, best-selling author, former host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.

E dw i n J. Vi er a

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   11


Celebrate Spring with

Weddings

Thanks for choosing New Delhi Diamo Celebrate Winter Celebrate Spring with with us! Us!

Serving theThanks best food inFood Ithaca for Indian Best Indian &since Best1993. Buffet for choosing New Delhi Diamond’s

NewforDelhi Best Indian Food & Best Buffet for 2010!! Lunch Hours:

Diamond’s Diamond’s New Delhi

Call

Very Competitive

on all kinds of Insurance:

LOW RATES

Auto • Home • Renters • Boat • Life • Health

LEE NEWHART AGENCY

273-6391

for a quote

1011 W. State St., Ithaca, N.Y.

Contact your sales rep or call (607) 277-7000

12  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

days 5-1

• 106 W. Green 272-4508 open 7 • days 272-4508 BeerBeer&& Wine Wine• Catering • Catering • St.106• W. Green• St.

ability d n e p For De Service and

COMING FEB. 12

lunch Lunch Buffet only Buffet only Dinner menu $7.99 7 $10.14

Mon-Sun: 11:30-3:00 p.m. Dinner p.m. DinnerHours menu4:30-10:00 7 days 5-10pm

for 201


Winter Times 2020


Regional Ski Area Map

7

8 10

9

13

1

11

5 3 14

4

15 12

2

1. Four Seasons (315) 637-9023 — Fayetteville, 8

5. Toggenburg Mountain Winter Sports miles east of Syracuse. Downhill, snowboarding and snow Center (315) 683-5842 — Fabius. 5 lifts, 21 trails. tubing. Rates: Adult day lift ticket $24, $18 for juniors 12 Skiing and snowboarding. Open daily with night skiing and under. Instructional programs available. Mon-Sat. Rates: $57 day $50 4 hrs $30 1hrs. College Rate (with ID) $30. 2. Greek Peak (607) 218-8714 — 2000 NYS Route 392, Cortland, NY. 33 trails, train park, half pipe, tubing center. 6. Gore Mountain Ski Area (518) 251-5026 — Rates: $79 adult full day lift ticket, $66 14 & under. Night North Creek. 15 lifts, 107 trails. Downhill and cross-counpass $43. try skiing, snowboarding. Open daily. Rates: Mid-week: adults $86; teens (13-19) and seniors (65-69) $64; seniors 3. Labrador Mountain (607) 842-6204 — Truxton, (70+) $44; juniors (7-12) $46. Weekends and holidays: NY. 250 skiable acres, 6 lifts, 4 base lodges. Provides adults $88; teens (13-19) and seniors (65-69) $66, seniors skiing and snowboarding. 3000 foot terrain park, 300 foot (70+) $42; juniors (7-12) $50. half-pipe. Rates: $61 8hr, $56 4hr, $51 for juniors. (12 & under). Instructional programs available. 7. McCauley Mountain (315) 369-3225 — Old Forge. Six lifts, 21 trails. Downhill and cross-country 4. Song Mountain (315) 696-5711 — Tully. Five skiing, snowboarding. Open daily, but closed Tuesday. lifts, 24 trails, Skiing and boarding. Open daily with night Weekday rates, adults $35 full-day, $30; seniors (60-69), skiing. Rates: $61 8hrs, $56 4hrs.; Juniors: $51 8hrs, Under students & military, $30 full-day. Weekend rates, adults 6 $15 8 hrs. $35, night lift pass. $35 full-day, $30 half-day; seniors (60-69), students & military, $30 full-day, $20 half-day. 8. Snow Ridge (315) 348-8456 — Turin. Seven lifts, 21 trails, halfpipe. Open Wed.-Mon. Lift tickets $15-$35. Call for all other lift prices.

14

6

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

9. Woods Valley (315) 827-4721 — Westernville, NY, 13. Beaver Lake Nature Center (315) 451-7275

10 miles north of Rome. Skiing, snowboarding, children’s — Baldwinsville, 650 acres of woods, 4 trails 1-3 miles programs, ski team, beginners specials programs. long open for skiers. $5 per car, $25 per bus. Trails for All-day rates: adults, $43 (weekends and holidays), $35 walkers also available — snowshoe rentals available. On (weekdays); Juniors – 12 and under, $37. Instructional the Web: www.onondagacountyparks.com/beaver-lakeprograms available. nature-center 10. Whiteface Mountain (518) 946-2223 — 14. Highland Forest County Park (315) 683-5550 Wilmington, NY, 7 miles from Lake Placid. Skiing, — 11 miles east of Tully, exit 14 off Rt. 81. Various hiking snowboarding. Biggest vertical drop in the east. Daycare and cross-country trails. More than 30 skiable acres. 4 Center. Instructional programs available. Day Passes (Peak major cross-country runs. Skiing day pass $10 adults and season): $104, adults; $79, teens and seniors; juniors $5 for children. Lodge, with food, open to general public (7-12), $68; 6 and under, free, 70+ must be acquired at on weekends. Horse-drawn sleigh rides through February. Whiteface Mountain. www.whiteface.com. Rentals available. Web: onondagacountyparks.com/ highland-forest 11. Bristol Mountain (585) 374-6000 — Canandaigua. Six Lifts, 34 slopes, 138 skiable acres. Skiing and 15. Podunk X/C Ski (607) 387-6716 — 9147 St. Rt. snowboarding available. Open daily with night skiing. 96., Interlaken. Ski shop, sales, trades, rentals, trails, Rates (8hr): $68, adults; $56, juniors and seniors (70+). beginner instruction. Closed Mondays. Open 10-4 all other days. 12. Hunter Mountain (800) 486-8376 — Hunter, NY. Skiing, snowtubing. 240 skiable acres. 35 miles of trails. On the Web, www.huntermtn.com. Rates: From $61–$81

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0


Winter Times 2020

VOL.XL / NO. 22 / January 22, 2020 Serving 47,125 readers week ly Matt ON THE WEB

Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 M a t t B u t l e r, M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 232 SouthReporter@flcn.org E d w i n J . V i e r a , S ta f f R e p o r t e r R e p o r t e r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L aw r e nce, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t s D u d e @ g m a i l . co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r e c t o r / D e s i g n e r , x 216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m A u s t i n L a m b, C o p y E d i t o r E me r i t u s AL a m b @ i t h a c a t i me s . c o m

A

s we continue our wintery trudge, often without the help of the sun for weeks at a time, the Ithaca Times wants to let you all know that despite how it may seem, your days don’t have to be a continuous loop of sleep-work-eat-sleep. As dour as the season may seem, there are plenty of ways to get out of the cold, or at least distract yourself from it. Ithacans and residents of Tompkins County have been dealing with the frigid temperatures and snow for a long time, so they’ve been able to carve out plenty of niches to fit whoever is looking for an outlet. That’s why we’ve compiled this little guide. We can’t cover everybody, but this is a good start to figure out the activities that are going on regardless of the weather. Make sure you check out these ways to stay active and engaged. By the time you’re finished with all the options, who knows? It might just be warm again.

E r i n S t e w a r t , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n ta t i v e , x 220 E r i n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n ta t i v e , x 218 l i s a @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , x 211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Chris Eaton, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m L a r r y H o c h b e r g e r, A s s o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 214 l a r r y @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE COPY RIGHT © 2019, BY NE WSK I INC.

All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $7ll9 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

hi ber ca tion hi ber ca tion

[hī-bər-ˈcā-shən] A state of relaxation and coziness characterized by the body’s increased exposure to charming lake towns, delightful culinary experiences, local craft breweries, and friendly, down-to-earth people. It most commonly occurs in the Finger Lakes during winter months.

Book your cozy getaway at

hibercation.com The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

15


Snow removal on State Street in the 1960s. (Photos courtest of the History Center)

W I N T E R

T I M E S

Let It Snow

T

hese days, when it snows in Ithaca, the city mobilizes its fleet of plows and salt trucks and, considering that there are some 72 miles of streets within city limits, the roads are cleared pretty quickly. While property owners are responsible for the sidewalks, the roads are the domain of the Department of Public Works. It wasn’t always so simple. In the 19th century, winter activities often revolved around survival. Farms and even the villages in the hills could be snowed in for weeks. People relied on the food put aside, and ways had to be cleared for horse-drawn cutters to bring in supplies. In outlying towns such as Newfield or Dryden there were “path masters,” whose job it

16

By C h a rle y G ith le r was to secure men for snow management and direct road-clearing operations. Workers were often compensated with reduced property taxes. It’s not at all unusual in 19th-century diaries to read of the roads being ‘broken out’ and made passable after a snowfall, not by the town, but by neighbors. This didn’t necessarily mean snow removal, either, but managing drifts and deep snow by rendering it flat or packing it down. Back then, people didn’t use snow plows, they used snow rollers. Travel through snow was by sleigh, sometimes by removing the wheels and attaching skis to horse-drawn carts and carriages. Snow rollers were huge, horse-drawn wheels that would flatten out the snow, making The

It hac a

Ti m es

it easier for sleighs to move through the winter roads. This was as true in an urban setting like Ithaca as out in the country. Sometimes, snow was even added to roads to ensure smooth travel. In Ithaca, though, where people relied on more frequent deliveries of food and supplies, blizzards could pose a problem. With two railroad lines serving the village (Ithaca became a city in 1888), it was rare for the community to be cut off completely for more than a couple of days. Still, even into the 1920s, attempts at snow control included citizens going into the streets to level the drifts for sleigh traffic. Snow removal was not yet practiced on a citywide basis in the absence of exceptional snowfall. In order /

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

for residents to travel, or for stores to receive goods (and customers), they were responsible for clearing their own streets. Snow shovelers were frequently hired to do this for them, which provided dozens of temporary jobs throughout the winter season. One of the biggest blizzards ever to hit the northeastern United States was in mid-March, 1888. Somewhere around twenty inches fell over three days, with howling winds. Drifted snow paralyzed the region. The March 14, 1888 Ithaca Journal makes reference to a streetcar with an attached “snow scraper,” pulled by horses to clear State Street, so clearly by then some thought had been given to the city being responsible for


dealing with extraordinary winter weather, at least on major streets. In the early 20th century, the automobile entered the picture, bringing a demand for snowfree streets. The popularity of the automobile ushered in the modern era of snow removal. It was a rapid changeover. In 1899, the first automobile came to Tompkins County. By 1911, New York state would issue 300 auto licenses to people in Ithaca, and by 1916, there were eight auto dealers in the county. There were advertisements in the 1919 Ithaca newspapers for tires, auto repair shops and car dealerships. Yet, 1920s Ithaca was still a place where half of the roads in the city had yet to be paved, and automobiles still competed with horse-drawn vehicles, streetcars. The first traffic lights weren’t installed until the late 1920s, and the busier intersections downtown were manned by a live patrolman using hand-operated traffic signs. After a record-breaking snowfall on January 29, 1925 (26 inches in one day), A. K. Fletcher remembered, “snow piled up very high from State down Tioga to Seneca, becoming a problem for sleighs, automobiles and street cars. A large old Lehigh coal car was brought [on the trolley tracks] to State and Tioga, some of us young guys were hired, and we shoveled all night into the coal car. The car was towed by streetcar to Renwick [now Stewart] Park where the snow was dumped, then it returned again for more snow.” The shovelers were allowed to take a food break at the Sideboard Restaurant (about where the Tompkins Trust Company now is on Tioga) at 2 a.m. By the 1930s, salt was experimented with, but was objected to because it ruined the streets for sleighing and damaged the shoes and clothing of pedestrians. For the time being, streets and icy bridges were coated with cinders and sand instead. Car owners would put chains on their tires in snowy conditions.

All Shows @ 2 P.M.

1551 Slaterville Rd, Ithaca, NY

Snow removal methods from the 1890s (above) at the corner of Cayuga Street and State Street and early 20th century (below). In the above picture, sleigh traffic is visible to deal with the snowfall.

The practice of hiring casual laborers to help out persisted through the Depression. In late January, 1939, 18 inches of snow fell in 36 hours. The Ithaca City School District took the extraordinary step of cancelling afternoon classes. On January 31, the Ithaca Journal reported “Employment for scores of Ithacans resulted from the current snow. Early Monday [January 30] morning 40 laborers were hired by the City of Ithaca to assist 20 regular municipal workmen in removing the steep snow from city streets. The extra men were paid at the rate of 50 cents an hour. Five trucks were also hired to meet the emergency. During the day some 100 applicants appeared at the City Pumping Station asking for employment.” Longtime Ithaca resident John Perko remembers snow being loaded onto flatbed train cars in the 1930s and towed to the trolley sheds at the Dean Co. building at the bottom of East State Street hill (now Gateway plaza), where the snow would be dumped into Six Mile Creek As the age of automobiles became complete, the frequency of accidents increased in foul weather. And so, after World War II, city Public Works officials began to use salt by the ton to improve road conditions. Motorized salt spreaders became a tool in fighting snowy roads, and it became an expectation that municipal government would take care of making all streets clear for automobile travel. These days, according to Cliff Murphy, Supervisor of Streets at the Department of Public Works, the city might use 25-30 tons of salt per hour during a steady snowfall, with 13 municipal plows working continuously until the city’s streets are cleared. Weather forecasts and conditions are monitored closely, and it’s a rare event that overwhelms, even temporarily, the city’s ability to keep up. Not all that long ago, though, we were kind of on our own.

t a c i s u M r e t Win

SU JAN 26 DIANA LEIGH TRIO

SUN FEB 16 THE INNER CRAZY

SU FEB 2

IMMORTAL JELLYFISH

SUN MAR 1 THE PELOTONES

SU FEB 9

BLUE SKIES

SUN MAR 8 DOOLIN O’DEY

FRI FEB 14

VALENTINES DAY PARTY/DINNER W/ DJ EVO 6-9 P.M.

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

17


A scene from the Winter Market, now held at Triphammer Marketplace. (Photo Provided

Cinemapolis is once again hosting its celebration of cinema on Feb. 9.

W I N T E R

E V E N T S

Ithaca is a winter events wonderland

A

s the months go on and 2020 gets into full swing, numerous groups around Ithaca will be holding numerous events to make people forget about the freezing cold. JANUARY Jan. - Mar.: Winter Market at Triphammer Marketplace - This year, the Winter Market is being held at Triphammer Marketplace on Triphammer Road, different from its usual spot at the Space @ GreenStar. From January to March, the market will feature farm, food and artisan vendors. Additional information about the Winter Market can be found on the Ithaca Farmers Market website. Jan. 25: The Saturday Morning All-YouCan-Eat-Cereal Cartoon Party and The Peanut Butter Solution - Cinemapolis will be holding a special event to memorialize the tradition of Saturday morning cartoons. Curator Kier-La Janisse will be guiding event goers on a 2-hour trip down memory lane with a tribute to the eye-popping, brain-addling Saturday morning cartoons of yesteryear. This event wouldn’t be complete with a melange of delicious sugary cereals. Favorites from the 40s to the 90s will be playing on the screen with a special presentation of the 1985 fantasy comedy film The Peanut Butter Solution bookending this event. The event begins at 10 a.m. and is $15 for adults and $12 for kids ages 12 and under. Jan. 26: Transuary at Cinemapolis Ithaca College’s Center for LGBT Education, Outreach & Services and Planned Parenthood of Greater New York’s Out For Health: LGBT Health & Wellness Program are teaming up to present two award winning films that talk about being transgender in the 21st century. Both screenings will be accompanied by discussions, information, and local resources for transgender services and support in the community. Admission for these special screenings is $5 at Cinemapolis.

18

By Ed w i n J. Vie ra will run until Feb. 22. Tickets can be purchased at the Kitchen Theatre or on their website. Feb. 4: WVBR Rockin’ Remnants (Standing in the Shadows of Motown) - As a part of their Rockin’ Remnants series, WVBR will be showing the documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown. The documentary centers on the lives of the Funk Brothers who played on numerous hit records. The film

FEBRUARY Feb. 2: Cry It Out - The Kitchen Theatre will begin its production of Cry It Out by Molly Smith Metzler on Feb. 2. The play centers on an unlikely friendship that develops between neighbors as they take on the challenges of parenthood. The play is 1 hour and 35 minutes, performed without an intermission. Cry It Out

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

features interviews and live concert footage of the surviving Funk Brothers and Motown’s crack musicians performing some of Motown’s most legendary songs. Following the film there will be a discussion with the Rockin’ Remnants hosts. The event starts at 7 p.m. with tickets being $9.35. Feb. 9: “And the Winner Is…” Awards Night Party - For their 11th year in a row, Cinemapolis will be celebrating another year of great cinema with a showing of the Academy Awards ceremony. Food and drinks will be supplied by Serendipity Catering. The event starts at 7 p.m. Advance tickets are $60 for people and $110 for couples. Feb. 8: Murder Mystery Party - The Cayuga Chamber Orchestra (CCO) will be holding their 3rd Annual Murder Mystery Dinner Party at Coltivare. People can relax and enjoy the fun or unleash their inner Sherlock Holms/Miss Marple/Jessica Fletcher to solve the case. There will also be prizes and raffle baskets as well. The Murder Mystery Dinner Party begins at 6:30 p.m. People do need to RSVP by February 1 with prices being $60/person or $105/couple. For groups of 8 or more, please call the CCO office for a special rate. All proceeds go to supporting the Cayuga Chamber Orchestra. Feb. 8: Ithaca is Winter Comedy Series Presents Max May - Max May, known for his laid back demeanor will be delivering a punch when he comes to Ithaca. He will be performing at the Hilton Garden Inn from 7 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $15 to $35. VIP Tickets include access to an open bar and a meet and greet with Max May. Feb. 20 & 28: Unseen Ithaca (DeWitt Mall) - Take a walk in the present while examining the past. Historic Ithaca will be offering tours of DeWitt Mall, which was originally built to be the former Ithaca High School. In Shik Lee, the property manager of DeWitt Mall, will guide the tour through this pinnacle of Ithaca’s history.


working class New England. However, after Tim Phelan’s arrival back home sets off a spiraling crisis that strains their hold on each other. The play will begin at 4 p.m. with tickets available from The Kitchen Theatre box office or their website. Mar. 28: Streets Alive! Film Festival - Bike Walk Tompkins will be holding their sixth annual Streets Alive! Film Festival which featured unique short films about bikes and urban transformations. All members of the community are welcome to come and engage in lively discussion. The program will be a bevy of local short-films followed by an intermission. The second-half of the festival will conclude with Portland’s Filmed By Bike Festival. Doors open at Cinemapolis at 6 p.m. with the films starting at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available through Bike Walk Tompkins’ website. Rosanne Cash (Photo provided)

The Right Combination

n

ctio e t o r P

Pric

e

For Your Home, Auto, Business

CAYUGA HEALTH NEWS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

Tompkins County Heritage Ambassador Martha Preston will share the history of the building and Historic Ithaca’s and Preservation Services Coordinator Christine O’Malley will join the group to explain the value in using buildings for adaptive reuse. Each tour will last one hour and is $5 per person. Registration can be done through Historic Ithaca’s registration is required. MARCH Mar. 1: Rosanne Cash at The State Theatre - Singer/songwriter Rosanne Cash comes to the State Theatre with her latest collection of poetic songs, “She Remembers Everything.” Tickets are between $35 - $55 for all ages. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 8 p.m. Mar. 5: Family Concert #2 - The Cayuga Chamber Orchestra is teaming up with Tompkins County Public Library will be bringing live music to captivating stories in a performance for kids of all ages. Kids will be given the opportunity to try instruments following the storytime and performance. This

Keep informed with Cayuga Health’s latest news by downloading the Cayuga Health Magazine App.

Available now through the App Store! Search for

Cayuga Health Magazine and download it for FREE today!

Max May, comedian, will be featured at Winter Comedy Series. concert will be held at 4 p.m. at the Tompkins County Public Library. Mar. 15: Catch As Catch Can - The Kitchen Theatre will be putting on a production of Mia Wright’s Catch as Catch Can, directed by Zoë Golub-Sass The play centers on the Pheland and the Lavecchias, who grew up together in

cayugahealthsystem.org

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

19


Caption (Photo: Eldon Lindsay/Cornell Athletics)

W I N T E R

T I M E S

CU Women’s Hockey cruising to best start in years

W

ith much of the hype surrounding the men’s team’s number-one ranking in the nation (see page 8), the Cornell University women’s ice hockey team is quietly off to its best start to a season in nearly a decade, and are ranked as high as fourth in the country according to the US Collegiate Hockey Online and USA Today/USA Hockey Magazine polls. Currently rolling with a record of 14–1–2 (.882 winning percentage), the Big Red are off to their best 18-game start since the 2011–2012 campaign when they began that season with a record of 15–2–0 (.882). Not to mention, Cornell is sporting the top record in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) at 8–0–2 (.900). Looking deeper into the numbers, it comes as no surprise as to why Cornell is ranked as

20

By An d re w S u ll iv a n one of the top five squads across the nation. For starters, the Big Red’s defense is stuffing its opponents more than Joey Chestnut would with his gullet at a family barbecue. Cornell ranks number one in the country in goals allowed per game, holding its foes to less than a goal per contest (0.88). Through the first 17 matches of last season, the team was relinquishing up two goals a game on average. Though it is a difficult rate to sustain, head coach Doug Derraugh believes the team has what it takes to continue to stifle the opposition. “We’ve found with this group that they are truly upset as a unit and as a team when we do get scored against,” Derraugh said. “It bothers them. Sometimes, I’ve been on teams where it’s been more about scoring goals that they’re interested in. This team genuinely The

It hac a

Ti m es

seems committed to and is very upset when the other team scores against them. … They take it personal when the other team scores.” Junior goaltender Lindsay Browning anchors the defensive side of the puck for the Big Red. Prior to this season, Browning only played in a total of 12 games. In her first full season guarding the net, Browning is establishing herself as one of, if not the, top goalie in the country. She currently rocks the best average of goals allowed per game of 0.83 goals. She and Northeastern University junior Aerin Frankel are knotted for first in save percentage at .958. Browning also has the third most shutouts recorded by a goaltender with five. “I think she’s become a more aggressive goaltender, and I think that comes with confidence in that as her confidence builds, you /

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

see her challenging the shooters more than she used to,” Derraugh said. Offensively, Cornell ranks sixth in terms of goals scored per game with an average of 3.71 on the season. Seniors Jaime Bourbonnais, Maddie Mill and Kristin O’Neill are featured in the top three of most of the squad’s offensive categories. Bourbannais leads the Big Red in points with 23 and also ranks 15th in the nation in points per game (1.37). Mills is second on the team with 21 and O’Neill is third with 19. Both rank 27th and 21st in the country in points per game, respectively. O’Neill is Cornell’s top goal scorer with 11, and Mills is tied with senior Amy Curlew for second with nine. Bourbonnais also leads the team in assists with 20. Mills has the secondmost assists with 12. Derraugh said having


Maddie Mills, a junior forward who’s looking for more awards. (Photo: Dave Burbank/Cornell Athletics)

those three seniors being the top players on the rink for the team is one thing. However, having them also be the squad’s hardest working players is just as beneficial. “When they’re also your hardest working players, I think that really rubs off on the team as a whole in that when the younger players come here, many of them have been the top players wherever they’ve been,” he said. “But then they get here and everybody is the top player of the teams that they’ve been on, and you see the national team players and the upperclassmen, who are some of the best players in the NCAA,

Senior Kristin O’Neill gets position against a Brown player. (Photo: Eldon Lindsay/Cornell Athletics)

and you see that they’re also our hardest working players you quickly understand that if you want to be a part of Cornell women’s hockey you’ll have to have that work ethic, regardless of who you are.” One player who has stepped up offensively for Cornell is senior forward Paige Lewis. Lewis has the third-most assists (10) and fourth-most points (16) for the Big Red. While racking up those numbers, Lewis simultaneously is learning how to play a new position. Derraugh switched Lewis from the wing to the center position at the beginning of this

season. Up until this season, Lewis had never played center. Derraugh said the transition from a wing position to the center position can be difficult in that one must understand the defensive coverage while playing at a down low position. Yet the move has been a successful one so far, he said. Despite the glistening record and lofty statistics, Derraugh said there are still some aspects of the game that the team will need to polish up, like improving its scoring efficiency, as the season progresses.

“I think we generated close to 40 shots in the last three games, but we didn’t get more than two goals,” he said, recalling the squad’s recent performances against Mercyhurst University, Union College and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “We’ve got to better the goal-to-shot ratio, and we’ve got to be a little bit better finishing around the net and finding ways to score at a higher clip. That has been a focus here this week, and it will be a focus for us in the second half.”

76749 Kendal Skiing Ad for Ithaca Times T: 10 x 5.5

A fresh blanket of powder and sunny skies mean getting out and enjoying the great outdoors. Because for Kendal residents like Joan and Don, spending more time experiencing the changing seasons is important — especially now that they have the time to do it. Living on the 105-acre campus at Kendal not only keeps them involved in the lifestyle they love, but connected to any future care they may need. And, from here, the story just keeps getting better. Come for a visit and tell us your story. Call 800-253-6325 877-891-7709 or go to kai.kendal.org kai.kendal.org/IT to learn more.

2230 N Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850

A not-for-profit continuing care retirement community serving older adults in the Quaker tradition. ©2014 KENDAL

76749_SkiingAd_IthacaTimes.indd 1

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

21

3/3/14 10:01 AM


W I N T E R

T I M E S

The Snow Can’t Stop You SNOWSHOEING IS HIKING’S ANSWER TO WINTER

H

By Mat t B utle r

iking is one of upstate New York’s most popular outdoor activities, a (mostly) free way to make your own tourist adventure around hundreds of miles of scenic landscapes. Tompkins County is no different, as there aren’t many days when weather permits that hikers don’t populate the area’s trails around its hills and gorges. Of course, that can change a bit during the winter months, when the skies are gray with clouds and the ground is gray with snow packed over dirt. But it doesn’t have to. Richard Andrews, a floor supervisor at Eastern Mountain Sports, has been snowshoeing for over 30 years, enjoying the ability to hike on the less crowded, post-snow trails and spend a few quiet hours by himself. He said winter or sturdy hiking boots are best for snow-shoeing, although winter boots are his preference in terms of warmth and versatility. Other things that can be helpful for a snowy trek include walking poles, gloves, a heavy coat (obviously) and even a headlamp, although Andrews said hiking on a full moon night, guided just by moonlight is one of his favorite ways to snowshoe. Snowshoes can range pretty widely in price, depending on the quality and size of the shoes. Those available at Eastern Mountain Sports, for example, range in price from $95 to around $250 per a pair of shoes. Andrews clarified that nobody is walking on top of the snow, necessarily, but the snowshoes are valuable in that they prevent hikers from sinking too deep into the snow. This makes hiking far easier instead of sinking to one’s waist with each step. Of course, when the snow gets to that level is when Andrews finds the most stimulation from snowshoeing.

“I don’t think snowshoeing is much more fun until there’s more than a foot of snow on the ground,” Andrews said. “The more snow on the ground, the better it is. If there’s only like eight inches, you’re walking on grass and dirt.” Andrews lives in Slaterville, so he said that Hammond Hill, the Roy Parks Preserves, Yellow Barn State Forest, Finger Lakes National Forest, Bear Swamp are popular snowshoe spots that are also some of his favorites. One thing to watch out for, Andrews noted, is keeping a keen eye on your surroundings. That’s because snowshoes leave behind significant prints, and if someone using them traipses across a trail laid down for crosscountry skiers, it can have a fairly damaging impact on the trail. This same aspect, though, is beneficial for hikers who want to be able to backtrack their path if they find themselves disoriented. “Anywhere where there’s state land, you can snowshoe,” Andrews said. “You can’t get lost, I had a customer concerned about getting lost once. I told him to take 30 steps and turn around, because you really disrupt the snow with snowshoes, you can’t get lost.” The only exception, Andrews said, is if the snow is intense enough or the wind is fierce enough, in which case hikers should probably stay inside anyway. Of course, some part of the experience is each person finding out on their own what their preferred trails are, especially ones that might take a bit of a drive to get to. Andrews isn’t giving his up. Richard Andrews of Eastern Mountain Sports shows off one of their snowshoe selections. (Photo by Casey Martin)

FIND OUT WHAT’S. . .

IC3 Main Campus IC3 at Kendal IC3 School Age Program

Ages 8 Weeks – 5th Grade NAEYC Accredited Child-Centered Curriculum Experienced, Professional Staff Large Indoor & Outdoor Play Spaces Low Teacher Turnover Nutriti tio ous Lunch & Snacks Included Scholarships Available Quality Care Since 1975!

Call For a Tour Today

isered o p wby: 22

Ithaca Community Childcare Center

579 Warren Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 Phone - (607) 257-0200 www.icthree.org

and The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0


W I N T E R

T I M E S

Ithaca Farmers Market

Ice Fishing

Winter

Market

MAKING A TIMELESS TRADITION YEAR-ROUND

Saturdays 10:30 to 2pm

Jan 4th-March 28th

New Location! Triphammer Marketplace 2255 N. Triphammer Rd

N

An icefisherman’s set-up on the east end of Cayuga Lake. (Photo by Casey Martin)

By Mat t B utle r

early everyone has enjoyed a casual day of fishing. The sun is out, the boat is gently rolling back and forth with the waves and every once in a while, the line tugs a bit, generating a rush of excitement before identifying the culprit to be a bundle of seaweed. That same scenario can play out even in the winter months. Of course, the temperature is about 60 degrees colder, there’s no boat and required materials include something called an augur and a heap of warm clothes, but local fishermen claim that can be just as good of a time. Generally speaking, Cayuga Lake isn’t known for its ice fishing yield, but that is beginning to change. Mark Sacco, the Secretary of Tompkins County Fish and Game Club and an ice-fisher for over two decades, said finding ice fishing opportunities in Ithaca isn’t quite easy, though his club is heavily involved. Location is the main issue, as the best conditions tend to present themselves toward the top of Cayuga Lake when the weather turns. Other places around the Finger Lakes have garnered more of a reputation, with northern destinations like Oneida or the Adirondacks proving popular, but Sacco said that perception could shift south given a few more years. The state’s Department of Environmental Conservation issued some guidelines for ice fishing safety just after Christmas, stating that people should wait until the ice is at least four inches thick before attempting ice fishing to avoid undue danger. Along with a cautionary warning, the DEC said ice fishing is growing in popularity across the state partially because it can be combined with a list of other activities for families on a day out, like snowshoeing, cross country skiing, etc. There’s an ongoing effort to market New York, particularly upstate, as a more popular fishing destination. Whether that movement is causing the rise in popularity, or thriving because of it, isn’t totally clear, but the effort is highlighted in part by the founding of

tournaments like the New York State Winter Classic Fishing Tournament, now in its sixth year. Tim Thomas, a professional angler yearround, organized the event to shine a light on New York fishing, which he felt was underappreciated particularly during the winter, along with engaging more young people in the sport of fishing. “First and foremost, it was to highlight the fisheries that we have here in New York State,” he said. “They’re world-class and up until now there hadn’t been anything that really highlighted it for the rest of the country to show that we have 15 pound Walleye and 30 pound Pike, not just in one waterway but in multiple waterways.” He’s made significant progress on that mission so far. The competition’s grown from 150 contestants in the first year to 675 during the last few years. Any kind of legal fishing is allowed, which means no nets or explosions or the like, and any body of water where fishing is permitted is fair game. Whether the scales tip more toward ice fishing rather than open water fishing has changed from year to year; last year, Thomas said the warmer temperatures led to more people opting to fish normally, whereas so far this year there have been spells of brutal cold that has created stable, thick ice that can easily support a day’s worth of sitting over the hole. Thomas said there’s a sizable legion of contestants from the Finger Lakes region, and while he’s never fished in Cayuga Lake specifically, he’s also heard the north end can be a fruitful venture. The south end, where Ithaca sits, sees less ice fishing due to its relative lack of depth, though among ice fishers the stretch of lake near Stewart Park is fairly popular. The sport may seem intimidating, and also dangerous, but with the right precautions it can be done safely and ejoyably. Thomas said much of the experience depends on the participant’s planning, what they have access to and how much of a fishing background they have. The

It hac a

Ti m es

“Sometimes they’re out there before sun-up until sun-down, others are out there just in the morning, it really depends on your persistence and when you want to finish,” Thomas said. “This year’s been very good fishing in most waterways, so a lot of guys are getting their limit in the morning, and then they spend the afternoon cleaning their fish up.” Thomas notes that the only outside factor limiting someone is the allowable number of kept fish on a given waterway; other than that, a fisher could catch and release fish all day if they wanted to, maybe just for the practice. Sacco speaks fondly of his years in Colorado before he moved to the area, where the ice would regularly grow to three feet thick and they could drive out to the perfect spot in a pickup truck, hook a motorized drill to the car batteries and be ready to fish in seconds. Before that they’d use the effort to fend off the chills. “We used to walk out there, get on the ice and get a fire going and chop a couple of holes,” Sacco said. “And if you were cold getting out there, by the time you chopped or drilled through the ice with a hand augur, you were warmed up and ready to go.” By 10 a.m. on Saturdays, the group would normally be bare-chested and have cold beers in their hands, as long-burning kindling fires would keep the ice-shelters quite warm against the elements. Sacco isn’t convinced the sport has much potential to expand its popularity, mostly because he doesn’t think it has the crossover appeal of some other outside activities; while he knows plenty of women who hunt or fish, he’s never seen much interest in ice fishing. That alone could cap its growth. Regardless, he swears by it all the same, even if it gets him a strange look occasionally. And for the record, he’s never fallen through the ice. “Ice fishing is a lot of fun,” he said. “People think you’re crazy when you say that you’re doing it, but it’s a lot of fun.” /

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

FOOD . FARM ARTS & CRAF TS

• Over 4,000 bolts of Fabric • Sewing machine sales, service & training • Books, patterns, notions and kits • Classes & Events • Gift Certificates available

23


Wi n t er

Calendar

A select gu ide to this se ason’s Fi nger L a k es ev en ts 2/5 Wednesday Midday Music for Organ: David Yearsley and Annette Richards | 12:30 PM, | Sage Chapel, Cornell, Ithaca | Midday Music for Organ: David Yearsley and Annette Richards. “Sounding Mean c. 1600,” music in meantone, including works by Sweelinck and Byrd on the Vicedomini organ. “For the Love of Art” | 12:00 PM, | State of the Art Gallery, 120 W Martin Luther King, Jr./State Street, Ithaca | Through Sun., March 1. Nine member/artists will show digital art, drawing, fiber art, mixed media, multi-media, painting, photography, print-making, sculpture, and prints. Showing will be: Jane Dennis, Frances Fawcett, Saundra Goodman, Patricia Hunsinger, Jan Kather, Susan Larkin, Alicia Sanguiliano, David Watkins, Jr., and Connie Zehr.

2/6 Thursday Bob Marley B-Day Tribute Show to Benefit Cayuga Lake | 7:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | The Notorious String Busters Junkyard Theory Kitestring Vicious Fishes The Cool Club & The Lipker Sisters Mama Rabwa, Inkwell, The 86ers and more to be announced. | $7 s.d. Citizen Cope | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Clarence Greenwood, the trailblazing artist and producer better known as Citizen Cope.

2/7 Friday Brandon “Taz” Niederauer | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | Sixteen-yearold Brandon Niederauer, nicknamed “Taz” for his ferocious guitar playing, is living proof that dreams really do come true. Having performed in some of the most legendary venues in America with many of the most prominent musicians of our time, the young guitarist, singer, and songwriter has already earned himself quite the reputation. Cry It Out | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | Contact theater for additional showtimes. Thru 2/22. With little in common besides new babies and adjacent backyards, Jessie, a corporate lawyer, and Lina, a nurse, form an unlikely friendship over a series of naptime coffee breaks.

24

2/11 Tuesday

But with the addition of their career oriented neighbor Adrienne, another new mom, the duo’s friendship and their individual conceptions of parenthood are put to the test. A candid comedy about parenthood.

Andy Frasco & The U.N. vs. BIG Something | 8:30 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | w/ Kyle Ayers

2/12 Wednesday 2/14 Friday

First Friday Gallery Night | 5:00 PM, | Downtown Ithaca, Center Ithaca, Ithaca | Downtown Ithaca explodes with talent in different shops, restaurants and hotels. Nearly 20 businesses downtown become the home to different local artists and sometimes global ones, as well.

Cry It Out | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | See 2/7. Contact theater for additional showtimes. Thru 2/22.

Justin Greenwald | Clarity through Chaos | 5:00 PM, | Ink Shop Studio Gallery , 330 E.State / MLK Street Ithaca, NY 14850 , ITHACA | Clarity through Chaos is an exhibit of solarplate etchings and monotypes concerned with repetitive mark making. Justin uses numbers and equations and occasionally words in his prints. Through March 2020.

A Valentines Day Party | 6:00 PM, | Six Mile Creek Vineyard, 1551 Slaterville Rd, Ithaca | Join Six Mile Creek Winery, DJ Evo and Singing Notes and Slinging Jokes for a Valentine’s Day party that is unlike any other. | $30 - $65 VIP and Couples tickets Includes Food, and a Bottle of Wine.

2/15 Saturday

Creative Sanctuary Club | 5:45 PM, | The Art Therapy Studio, 408 West State Street, Ithaca | Connect more deeply with your creativity through Art-Therapist-developed art prompts and/or techniques in an inspiring & relaxing atmosphere.  All supplies & Tea provided. | 15

Durand Jones & The Indications w/ Y La Bamba | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca Symphoria Masterworks V: Ellis Island: The Dream Of America | 7:30 PM, | Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery Street, Syracuse | $90-$20, College $5, 18 & under $0

2/8 Saturday

2/16 Sunday

Diana Leigh & the Shorty Georges | 8:00 PM, | St. Pauls United Methodist Church, Ithaca | Swing dance with Diana Leigh & the Shorty Georges! Music for WCS, Lindy, Jitterbug. Introductory swing dance class at 7 pm, band starts at 8. | $12/$9 Ithaca Is Winter Comedy Series: Max May | 7:00 PM, | Hilton Garden Inn Ithaca, 130 E Seneca St, Ithaca | Comedy on The Commons is proud to present the Ithaca Is Winter Comedy Series, a monthly comedy series at the Hilton Garden Inn featuring nationally touring comedians out of New York City. | $15 - $35 VIP tckets include Open Bar and meet and greet with Max May IC Women in Math Day | 10:30 AM, | Ithaca College, 953 Danby Rd, Ithaca College, Ithaca | This program is designed for female high school students and their families and is open to any high school student interested in mathematics.   22nd Annual Downtown Ithaca Chili Cook-off | 11:30 AM, | The Commons, East State Street, Ithaca The

HOWARD JONES 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Howard Jones Acoustic Trio is an intimate stripped-down trip through Howard’s 30-year music career. | $39.50

| Features a variety of meat, vegan, and vegetarian chili prepared by 40+ restaurants competing for the titles of Best Meat/Overall Chili, Best Vegetarian/Vegan Chili, and People’s Choice Chili.

new ways to play through the coldest season. Cayuga Chamber Orchestra: Murder Mystery Dinner Party! | 6:00 PM, | Coltivare, 235 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Relax and enjoy the fun of watching others solve the crime, or don your sleuthing hat and take a stab at solving the mystery. Let out your inner Sherlock Holmes or Miss Marple!  We’ll provide the suspects but solving the case is up to you! | $60 per person / $105 per couple

Circus Culture Showcase | 2:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Second show at 6pm.  Join Circus Culture artists of all ages for a family friendly circus show full of variety! Festival of Fire and Ice | 3:00 PM, | Ithaca Children’s Garden, 121 Turtle Lane, Ithaca | An annual celebration of winter outdoor play, ICG’s annual Festival of Fire & Ice provides time and space for us to remember the winter games we love and to discover It hac a

Ti m es

2/9 Sunday Bound for Glory | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | LESLIE LEE AND STEVE GRETZ. /

Wi n t er

Ti m es

Yamato – The Drummers of Japan | 4:00 PM, | Bailey Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | Yamato is described as the “epitome of the Japanese spirit,” bringing new life to the traditional Japanese taikoand wadaikodrums by paying respect to its rich history, and exploring contemporary drumming styles. | $19-39 John Sebastian | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Over four decades the contributions of John Sebastian have become a permanent part of our American musical fabric. His group The Lovin’ Spoonful played a major role in the mid-’60s rock revolution.

2 02 0

Bound for Glory | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | CAROLANN SOLEBELLO AND JOE IADANZA.  Carolann is a really fine singer and songwriter, and Joe is a very hot guitarist.  Mike Doughty | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | Mike Doughty, the force behind seminal 90s band Soul Coughing, accomplished solo artist and author, will tell your future on tour this February. Cayuga Chamber Orchestra presents: Uncommon Ensembles | 3:00 PM, | First Unitarian Church Ithaca, 306 N Aurora St, Ithaca | BEETHOVEN: String Quintet, Op 29; CASELLA: Serenata, Op 46. | $27 Adults / $10 Students

2/20 Thursday Artist Alley Open Studios | 5:00 PM, | South Hill Business Park, 950 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Artist Alley Entrance is off the lower lot at the red doors. Up to 40+ studios!


2/21 Friday Cry It Out | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | See 2/7. Contact theater for additional showtimes. Thru 2/22.

2/22 Saturday Quinn Sullivan | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca

2/26 Wednesday Mardi Gras Celebration with CJ Chenier & The Red Hot Louisiana Band w/ Rose & The Bros | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | CJ Chenier is Creole music royalty. His father, the legendary Clifton Chenier, invented the style of music we know today as Zydeco and was the first Creole musician to be recognized with a Grammy Award.

2/27 Thursday Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center | 8:00 PM, | Bailey Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | This program, featuring the institute’s piano and wind quintet, combines six distinctive instruments with composers from five countries to create an evening that is as surprising as it is captivating. | $19-30

The Travelin’ McCourys | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Winners of the BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM AT THE 2019 GRAMMY AWARDS Creative Cortland - A Winter Visual Arts Gallery | 5:00 PM, | Cortland Repertory Theatre, 24 Port Watson St., Cortland | CRT Downtown becomes a hip and trendy gallery showcasing the work of Cortland’s very best artists, including professionals, amateurs and students! Ongoing through March 8.

The Machine Performs Pink Floyd: 40th Anniversary of The Wall | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | A special 40th Anniversary performance of The Wall in its entirety as only The Machine can, plus an encore featuring fan favorites from other Floyd albums. Featuring the Interstellar Lights. | $25.00 - $35.00

Urban Arts Crawl | 5:00 PM, | Downtown Corning, Corning

3/1 Sunday

2/29 Saturday

Bound for Glory | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | THE VOLLMERS.  Old Timey music from a duo who really know how to play it. 

The Sorceror’s Apprentice: a free concert for the community | 2:00 PM, | St. Pauls United Methodist Church, 402 N Aurora St, Ithaca | This kid-friendly performance of Paul Dukas’ The Sorceror’s Apprentice tells the story of Jhann Wolfgang von Goethe’s famous ballad. Our concert will also include music from favorites such as Harry Potter and Peer Gynt. Binghamton Community Orchestra Winter Concert | 7:00 PM, | Binghamton East Middle School, 167 E. Frederick St., Binghamton | Evan Meccarello, Guest Conduc-

3/3 Tuesday

tor. Featuring Guest Artist Jessica Best, Mezzo-Soprano. Co-hosted by the Binghamton Philharmonic – Beethoven Project | $10-12

The High Kings | 8:00 PM, | Smith Center for the Arts, 82 Seneca St, Geneva | Irish ballad group.

Ithaca | The politics of expression in the dancer’s body, from the exquisite to the damned and offering both pleasure and provocation, is this year’s LGD. | 7

3/4 Wednesday

3/6 Friday

Geoff Tate (Official) Empire 30th Anniversary Tour | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | : Empire and Rage For Order w/ Till Death Do Us Part

Eric Gales | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Through the years, it would not be unusual to look out in the audience and see artists like Carlos Santana, Eric Johnson, B. B. King, and Eric Clapton, looking on with interest as Eric took his guitar and worked crowd after crowd into a frenzy.

3/5 Thursday Cayuga Chamber Orchestra: Family Concert and Storytime | 4:00 PM, | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | A different “note-worthy” children’s book is selected for each date, and we feature a variety of instruments to help bring the tale to life with the help of musicians from the CCO. Children will have an opportunity to try out the instruments following the storytime and performance.

Symphoria Casual III: Mozart And Beethoven | 3:00 PM, | St. Paul’s Syracuse, 220 E. Fayette Street, Syracuse | $45-$35, College $5, 18 & Under $0 Rosanne Cash | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Rosanne Cash is on tour with She Remembers Everything, a poetic, lush and soulful collection of songs.

The Jayhawks | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer Locally Grown Dance (LGD) | 7:30 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University,

2/28 Friday Fourth Friday Concert Series: Strange Heavy | 6:00 PM, | Montour Falls Library, Montour Falls | Original sultry rock. Based in Ithaca, NY. Comprised of groovy cello, guitar, banjo, and drums backing bluesy vocals. | $10 suggested donation

First Friday Gallery Night | 5:00 PM, | Downtown Ithaca, Center Ithaca, Ithaca | Downtown Ithaca explodes with talent in different shops, restaurants and hotels. Nearly 20 businesses downtown become the home to different local artists and sometimes global ones, as well.

3/8 Sunday

Creative Sanctuary Club | 5:45 PM, | The Art Therapy Studio, 408 West State Street, Ithaca | Connect more deeply with your creativity through Art-Therapist-developed art prompts and/or techniques in an inspiring & relaxing atmosphere.  All supplies & Tea provided. | 15

Symphoria Masterworks VI: All Italian | 7:30 PM, | Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

Macy Gray | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | That unmistakable rasp, unshakable grasp on soul, and funky spirit ensured Macy Gray her status as a 21st century icon since her arrival with the tripleplatinum How Life Is in 1999. Locally Grown Dance (LGD) | 7:30 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | See 3/5. | 7

Cayuga Chamber Orchestra Presents: Pivotal Pieces | 7:30 PM, | Ford Hall, Ithaca College, Danby Rd, Ithaca | Pre-concert Chat 6:45pm MENDELSSOHN: The Fair Melusine Overture; R. STRAUSS: Horn Concerto No. 1 in E-flat Major, Op 11; Scott Leger, horn; BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7 i n A Major, Op 92. | $30 Adults / $10 Students

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIET Y OF LINCON CENTER

An Intimate Evening of Songs and Stories with Graham Nash | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Legendary artist Graham Nash is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee - with Crosby, Stills, and Nash and with the Hollies.

Locally Grown Dance (LGD) | 7:30 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | See 3/5. | 7

3/7 Saturday

Kamasi Washington | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Young saxophonist and bandleader, who exceeds any notions of what “jazz” music is.

Street, Syracuse | $90-$20, College $5, 18 & under $0

2 02 0

Bound for Glory | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | BILL DESTLER AND REBECCA JOHNSON.  Bill Destler is one of the original Bound for Glory performers, way back when. 

3/10 Tuesday Jim Messina | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | From Buffalo Springfield to Loggins & Messina, Jim Messina is an undisputed expert in the fine art of making hit music.

3/12 Thursday O.A.R.: Spring Fling Tour | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | A band whose twenty yearcareer spans sold-out stands at both Madison Square Garden and Red Rocks Amphitheater. | $28.50 - $48.50 The Red Hot Chilli Pipers | 8:00 PM, | Smith Center for the Arts, 82 Seneca St, Geneva | Bagpipes with attitude. Drums with a Scottish accent. A blazing rock band and show so hot, it carries its own health warning! | $29-$39

25


CJ CHENIER The Nether by Jennifer Haley | 7:30 AM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | Part crime drama and part sci-fi thriller, Jennifer Haley’s haunting play The Nether investigates the boundaries of ethics and human desire in a world of ever-changing technology. | 7 Kyle Kinane: The Spring Break Tour | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Internationally touring comedian.

3/13 Friday Howard Jones | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Howard Jones Acoustic Trio is an intimate stripped-down trip through Howard’s 30-year music career. | $39.50 Lúnasa | 8:00 PM, | Bailey Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | Lúnasa, one of the most influential bands in the history of Irish traditional music, gets Ithaca into the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day, 2020. Lúnasa has remained at the forefront of Irish music for over 20 years, a leading voice of the living tradition of Irish music, and the standard against which others are compared. | $19-$36 The Nether by Jennifer Haley | 5:00 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | Part crime drama and part sci-fi thriller, Jennifer Haley’s haunting play The Nether investigates the boundaries of ethics and human desire in a world of ever-changing technology. | 7 Jack Hanna’s Into The Wild LIVE! | 7:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Fans can expect to see animals such as a baby cheetah, a joey (baby kangaroo), a baby tiger, and much more. | $24.50 - $47.00

3/14 Saturday NYS Baroque: The Panther and the Rose | 7:30 PM, | First Unitarian

26

DAVID SEDARIS

Church Ithaca, 306 N Aurora St, Ithaca | Italian medieval music by Landini, Ciconia, and others. The Nether by Jennifer Haley | 2:00 PM & 7:30 PM | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | Part crime drama and part sci-fi thriller, Jennifer Haley’s haunting play The Nether investigates the boundaries of ethics and human desire in a world of ever-changing technology. | 7 Dead Silent, or Florence of Moravia - Mystery Dinner Theatre | 6:30 PM, | Cortland Repertory Theatre, 24 Port Watson St., Cortland | Starring the Acme Mystery Company - Catering by Linani’s Catering.It’s 1927 and local radio personality Nevelle Haspin invites you to the broadcast of a gala reception! Be careful. These celebrities autograph with poisoned pens! | $50 Tig Notaro | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Groundbreaking stand-up comedian, actor, writer, producer, and director originally from Mississippi. | $30.00 - $40.00

3/15 Sunday Bound for Glory | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | DANA AND SUSAN ROBINSON.   They’re really adept at the old songs, and really good at writing new songs that feel like they’ve been around for quite a while. 

3/17 Tuesday R.A.P. Ferreira w/ special guest Kaila Chare | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | Ithaca Underground Presents: R.A.P. Ferreira ‘Purple Moonlight Pages Tour’ w/ special guest Kaila Chare Riverdance - 25th Anniversary Show | 7:30 PM, | Clemens Center, 207 Clemens Center Parkway, Elmira | A powerful and stirring reinvention of this beloved family favorite, The

celebrated the world over for its Grammy Award-winning music and the thrilling energy and passion of its Irish and international dance.

children come home for the holidays, it feels like the good old days are back. But it’s only a matter of time before old behaviors resurface and long-held secrets are confessed. Recommended for ages 14+

3/18 Wednesday

Heermans-McCalmon Dramatic Writing Student Award Presentation | 4:30 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | This event offers a presentation of recent, distinctive student work for stage and screen, selected for its promise. The Drama Book Award will also be presented during this event.   

Tom Paxton and The DonJuans | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award winner and folk icon, Tom Paxton, teams up with the Grammy winning singer/ songwriter duo The Don Juans - Don Henry & Jon Vezner. Riverdance - 25th Anniversary Show | 7:30 PM, | Clemens Center, 207 Clemens Center Parkway, Elmira | See 3/17.

3/21 Saturday Symphoria Pops IV: Movies And The Masters | 7:30 PM, | Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery Street, Syracuse | $90-$20, College $5, 18 & under $0

3/19 Thursday Artist Alley Open Studios | 5:00 PM, | South Hill Business Park, 950 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Artist Alley Entrance is off the lower lot at the red doors. Up to 40+ studios!

New Play Festival (schedule TBA) | All Day | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | Directed by Aoise Stratford. Readings by Elaigwu Ameh, Anna Evtushenko & Edy Kennedy ‘20. A daylong series of readings and events.

3/20 Friday The Town Pants | 8:00 PM, | Smith Center for the Arts, 82 Seneca St, Geneva | The Vancouver BC based band combines aspects of Irish traditional, folk, rock and roots Americana, fusing their signature dual lead vocals from brothers Duane and Dave Keogh to create a unique form of high energy West Coast Celtic.

Dead Silent, or Florence of Moravia - Mystery Dinner Theatre | 6:30 PM, | Cortland Repertory Theatre, 24 Port Watson St., Cortland | See 3/14. | $50 One Funny Ithaca | 7:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | A benefit for the Cancer Resource Center, featuring local First Responders sharing the lighter side of work and life in Ithaca. | $30

Dead Silent, or Florence of Moravia - Mystery Dinner Theatre | 6:30 PM, | Cortland Repertory Theatre, 24 Port Watson St., Cortland | See 3/14. | $50

3/22 Sunday

Catch As Catch Can | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | Thru 4/4. Contact theatre for additional showtimes. Two working class New England families have grown up in each other’s homes, weathering the good and the bad. When the adult

It hac a

Ti m es

MELISSA ETHRIDGE

The Acoustic Living Room: Songs and Stories w/ Kathy Mattea Ft. Bill Cooley | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Kathy Mattea has enjoyed the kind of success many artists only dream of: /

Wi n t er

Ti m es

two GRAMMY wins, four CMA Awards, four #1 country singles, and five gold albums.

3/25 Wednesday Béla Fleck & The Flecktones | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Groundbreaking, Grammy-winning quartet will be celebrating its 30th anniversary with a North American tour. | $28.50 - $48.50

3/26 Thursday Prince Daddy & The Hyena w/ Just Friends + Macseal | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca Judy Collins | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Judy Collins has inspired audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, personal life triumphs, and a firm commitment to social activism. In the 1960s, she evoked both the idealism and steely determination of a generation united against social and environmental injustices.

3/27 Friday Fourth Friday Concert Series: Se Leigheas | 6:00 PM, | Montour Falls Library, Montour Falls | Lively Irish folk music. | $10 suggested donation Cayuga Chamber Orchestra presents: Orchestral Finale | 7:30 PM, | Ford Hall, Ithaca College, Danby Rd, Ithaca | Pre-concert Chat 6:45pm. ARRIAGA: Los esclavos felices; PIAZZOLLA: Obilvion; RODRIGO: Concerto de Aranjuez; Jordan Dodson, guitar; SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major, D. 485. | $30 Adults / $10 Students Catch As Catch Can | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | See 3/20. Recommended for ages 14+ Urban Arts Crawl | 5:00 PM, | Downtown Corning, Corning

2 02 0

3/28 Saturday Symphoria Masterworks VII: War And Peace | 7:30 PM, | Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery Street, Syracuse | $90-$20, College $5, 18 & under $0 Al DiMeola | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | A celebrated career that has spanned four decades and earned him critical accolades, three gold albums and more than six million in record sales worldwide. | $22-$45

3/29 Sunday Tab Benoit | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Grammy nominated singer, songwriter and guitarist who has built a remarkable 30+ year career on the foundation of his gritty and soulful Delta swamp blues. Menopause The Musical® | 2:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Four women at a lingerie sale have nothing in common but a black lace bra, memory loss, hot flashes, night sweats. | $37.00 - $59.00

4/3 Friday Catch As Catch Can | 8:00 PM, | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | See 3/20. hru 4/4. Contact theatre for additional showtimes. Recommended for ages 14+ First Friday Gallery Night | 5:00 PM, | Downtown Ithaca, Center Ithaca, Ithaca | Downtown Ithaca explodes with talent in different shops, restaurants and hotels. Nearly 20 businesses downtown become the home to different local artists and sometimes global ones, as well. Creative Sanctuary Club | 5:45 PM, | The Art Therapy Studio, 408 West State Street, Ithaca | Connect more deeply with your creativity through Art-Therapist-developed art prompts


and/or techniques in an inspiring & relaxing atmosphere. All supplies & Tea provided. | 15

songwriter and musician Vanessa Carlton is best known for her charttopping single A Thousand Miles.

4/5 Sunday

4/14 Tuesday

An Afternoon with David Sedaris | 3:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Join best-selling author and NPR contributor, David Sedaris for an evening featuring allnew stories, an audience Q&A, and a book signing. | $36.00 - $60.00

Whose Live Anyway? | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | 90 minutes of hilarious improvised comedy and song all based on audience suggestions. Cast members Ryan Stiles, Jeff B. Davis, Greg Proops, and Joel Murray will leave you gasping with the very witty scenes they invent before your eyes. | $35.00 - $75.00

4/7 Tuesday Jukebox the Ghost w/ The Elwins | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca

4/9 Thursday The Beach Boys | 7:30 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | The band is led by Mike Love, who, along with longtime member Bruce Johnston, musical director Scott Totten, Brian Eichenberger, Christian Love, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill, Keith Hubacher and Randy Leago, continue the legacy of the iconic group. | $55.00 - $85.00

4/10 Friday Vanessa Carlton | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | he melodic pop/rock singer-

4/15 Wednesday Asleep at the Wheel | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Ray Benson founded Asleep at the Wheel in Paw Paw, West Virginia 49 years ago. Now based in Austin, the band holds 10 Grammy awards, 20 studio albums and 20 singles on the Billboard country charts.

4/16 Thursday eTRASH | 7:30 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | A GRMPA (Graduate Researchers in Media and Performing Arts) Lab production. It’s the age of the Anthropocene, the age of the

Apocalypse, and as artists we ask: Where does nature remain? | 7

precision that is the ultimate Queen experience. | $25.00 - $45.00

4/19 Sunday

4/23 Thursday

Artist Alley Open Studios | 5:00 PM, | South Hill Business Park, 950 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Artist Alley Entrance is off the lower lot at the red doors. Up to 40+ studios!

Amanda Shires | 8:00 PM, | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | It’s all rock & roll – no golf! is how singer/songwriter/violinist Amanda Shires describes her electrifying fifth album, To The Sunset.

Cayuga Chamber Orchestra presents: Dvorak & Harbison | 3:00 PM, | First Unitarian Church Ithaca, 306 N Aurora St, Ithaca | DVORAK: Piano Trio No. 2, Op 26; HARBISON: Quintet for Winds. Dvorak’s second piano trio is a wonderful study of character and contrast with hints of his popular Slavonic Dances that would soon follow. | $27 Adults / $10 Students

Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas | 8:00 PM, | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Cuttingedge fiddle and cello explorations of Scottish and global music. | $25

4/17 Friday

Melissa Etheridge - The Medicine Show | 8:00 PM, | Smith Center for the Arts, 82 Seneca St, Geneva | Calling the album The Medicine Show puts straight up, front and center, that this is about health, wellness, cannabis, this new thought, new paradigm, however you want to talk about it, however you want to understand it. It influences every song on the album. We’re not afraid of this any more. We’ve come a long way. | $45 and up

eTRASH | 5:00 PM, | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | A GRMPA (Graduate Researchers in Media and Performing Arts) Lab production. It’s the age of the Anthropocene, the age of the Apocalypse, and as artists we ask: Where does nature remain? Through a series of open workshops, “eTRASH Lab: an Exploratory Experiment in Theatre/Transforming Research/ Representing And System/Shifting Humanity/Healing” invites the Cornell and Ithaca community to challenge how we imagine, manifest, perform, and transform “nature.” The laboratory will culminate by sharing our research findings through a devised public performance     | 7

eTRASH | 2:00 PM & 7:30 PM | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | See 4/16. | 7

4/21 Tuesday

Fiddler On The Roof | 7:00 PM, | Clemens Center, 207 Clemens Center Parkway, Elmira | Elmira Savings Bank Broadway Series

4/24 Friday

Fiddler On The Roof | 7:00 PM, | Clemens Center, 207 Clemens Center Parkway, Elmira | Elmira Savings Bank Broadway Series

Fourth Friday Concert Series: Lisa Fenwick | 6:00 PM, | Montour Falls Library, Montour Falls | Harpist. Celtic, classical and popular music. | $10 suggested donation

4/22 Wednesday

Penny and Sparrow | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca

Fiddler On The Roof | 7:00 PM, | Clemens Center, 207 Clemens Center Parkway, Elmira | Elmira Savings Bank Broadway Series

Stefon Harris and Blackout | 8:00 PM, | Bailey Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | In addition to serving as Associate Dean

Celebrate Spring with

Thanks for choosing New Delhi Diamo Celebrate Winter Celebrate Spring with with us! Us!

4/18 Saturday

Serving theThanks best food inFood Ithaca for Indian Best Indian &since Best1993. Buffet for choosing New Delhi Diamond’s

NewforDelhi Best Indian Food & Best Buffet for 2010!! Lunch Hours:

Almost Queen | 8:00 PM, | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Donning genuine costumes, Almost Queen recaptures the live energy and

Diamond’s Diamond’s New Delhi

lunch Lunch Buffet only Buffet only Dinner menu $7.99 7 $10.14

Mon-Sun: 11:30-3:00 p.m. Dinner p.m. DinnerHours menu4:30-10:00 7 days 5-10pm

for 201

days 5-1

• 106 W. Green 272-4508 open 7 • days 272-4508 BeerBeer&& Wine Wine• Catering • Catering • St.106• W. Green• St.

TCAT Goes Where YOU Go! Diane’s Tireside Chat • All season or snow... Which are better for your vehicle and typical driving?

Groceries

• Do I need two or four snow tires? • Can I really use a penny to check my treads?

Downtown

See Diane for Answers, & the Right Tires for the Right Price!

Carshare

Museums

Airport

Campus my

®

Find your stop, sign up to get alerts, and track your bus in real-time at:

realtimetcatbus.availtec.com

service@dianesautorepair.com

Accessible: TTY: 277-9766

607-272-AUTO (2886) Ti m es

Doctor

(607) 277-RIDE (7433) | www.tcatbus.com

435 W. State St./Martin Luther King Jr. St.

It hac a

Nightlife

Mobile Apps: Get real-time bus locations with myStop and Ithaca Transit - Live Tracker, or plan your trip with Moovit, transit, or google by choosing the bus icon!

Ithaca’s Only Women-Owned and Operated Repair Shop

The

Work

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0

Connect with us online: TCATrides Everything TCAT

27


What if YOUR BANK

was changing the community for the better?

We know. It sounds unlikely. But here’s the truth: Tompkins Trust Company has been giving back to the community for decades. Social responsibility has always been at the core of who we are. The money you deposit with us works hard for you, and does good in your community. Your support enables us to support local nonprofits and to make loans to local businesses. Not to mention, our employees volunteer thousands of hours of their time each year.

We hope that makes you proud to work with us. But most of all, we hope it makes our community a little better.

TompkinsTrust.com

08/19

28

The

It hac a

Ti m es

/

Wi n t er

Ti m es

2 02 0


The Haunt welcomes long-time reggae act

A

By G.M. Burns

s a musician Half Pint began his musical career while singing in the school choir and later after his schooling was completed he continued on by seeking work as a vocalist in the Jamaican music scene. For more than four decades Half Pint performed and wrote music as a Reggae artist, and has released more than 20 albums and has plenty of hit songs on his resume as well. The hit tune “Winsome” was covered by the Rolling Stone band, and was retitled as “Too Rude” on their “Dirty Work” record. Happy to be living life and playing music, Half Pint is touring in North America and in this interview he talks with the Ithaca Times about his fans and his life in music. Ithaca Times: Reggie music seems popular to many people the world over. What was it that drove you to write and perform it for more than four decades? Half Pint: For me it’s very much like a folk type of music, but it’s really soul to the mind of people from Jamaica. So they can be more social, more economical and more spiritual. Some of them are entertained and they like to dance. For the music to me like life in general

– it’s very like life. IT: The song “Sally” is unique for you – can you talk about why it was a big hit for you in Jamaica? And how you came to write it? HP: Okay. Well the song “Sally” I recorded in 1983—it was the first release from my album and it’s like coming from the fans. The people at the time would prefer to dance in the dance aisle, and the people would know it actually before I recorded it. The song was actually released in 1983, yes. I think and that song was my first debut single. And the writing ability about it came from some of the social way of life. Because I grew up with my grandfather and grandmother living together—those words came to me like that. IT: Of the many hit songs that you have written, which one would you say was the hardest to compose? HP: Oh, actually all my hit songs came from when they were written and performed live in the dance aisle like in 1978, ’79. And I’ve written new songs and put together -some of them were written on paper and some in my mind and art. The political picture was written from what was taking place in Jamacia, 1980, ‘81, ’82. Political bribery was high—so those songs were written around the experience of social art and business back at that time. So “Money Man Skank” was a song that which was written and portrayed eventual poor people don’t have money in the bank—more rich people have money in the bank. And “Mr. Landlord”

was written about the tenement. So these are just some of my experiences I had and also I have out of my lived experiences and through some of those [experiences] in my life. IT: What are your hopes for Reggae music in the next decade? HP: I am hoping for Reggae music to be more taken into consideration by the younger generation. Reggae music is about life, and about values, and social order, and must be kept with honor and respect. And lending that quality of being sociable with equal rights and justice. And I look for Reggae music defending the poor, unifying, and more economically strong. IT: In your spare time how do you relax? HP: I do relax really, and I do meditation about world events and the world situation. IT: Would you like to say anything more about the upcoming concert in Ithaca or to your fans? HP: Well to my fans I want them to know that I love them and appreciate them very dearly. And also I want to be confirming I am very grateful—my fans I do believe in them and love like they do me and love my songs. I am trying to let them know, please bare with me until you see me and I will be sing songs for you all. And giving you all thanks, and blessings and love—more blessings and love for the fans. And they will love me also. Thank you. Half Pint will perform on January 23rd, at 8 p.m. at the Haunt. Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

Arts&Entertainment

Half Pint

Half Pint has been performing reggae music for decades, becoming one of the most well known acts in the genre. (Photo provided)

I t h a c a T i m e s   29


Movies

th

It is with much gratitude that we'd like to thank everyone who helped make our 5 annual Ithaca Chill It is withChallenge much gratitude that we'd like to thank everyone who helped make our 5th annual Ithaca Chill such a success. It was a great way to celebrate New Year's Day. We are delighted to have Challenge such a success. It was a great totocelebrate Year's our Day. Weatare raised over $48,000! —money which will go way directly maintaining New and improving building 518delighted to have West$48,000! Seneca Street as a place where dealing with addiction of any type can come for supportour building at 518 raised over —money whichanyone will go directly to maintaining and improving and fellowship. Thank you to all our participants and all our donors; you can still find them on our West Seneca Street as a place where anyone dealing with addiction of any type can come for support website at ithacachillchallenge.org. Thank you to the fabulous Ithaca Yacht Club for providing the and fellowship. Thank to all ourteam). participants andwant all to our donors; can still find them on our perfect venue (and ayou top fund-raising We especially thank our top you two corporate Automotive and CSP Management—for theIthaca funds forYacht us to institute website sponsors—Maguire at ithacachillchallenge.org. Thank you to theproviding fabulous Club for providing the "Match Day," which was wildly successful! Thanks to all these key corporate sponsors as well: Beck perfect venue (and top fund-raising team). WeThe especially want to thank top two corporate Equipment, CivilaAdvocacy Project, Feirman Builders, Alcohol & Drug Council, TMannour Painting, Foster Custom Kitchens, Tompkins Trust Company, and The Ithaca Times. sponsors—Maguire Automotive and CSP Management—for providing the funds for us to institute "Match Day," which waswonderful wildly successful! keyofcorporate sponsors as well: Beck In addition, so many local businessesThanks supportedto us all withthese donations prizes and services: Equipment, Civil Advocacy Feirman Builders, The Alcohol & Drug Council, TMann Painting, Rulloff's La Tourelle/August Moon Project, Spa Cat's Pajamas Heights Restaurant Foster Custom Kitchens, Tompkins Trust Company, and The Ithaca Times.

A Life on Film

“Up” Series continues at Cornell Cinema By Br yan VanC ampe n

Viva Taqueria Buffalo Street Books

15 Steps Rasa Spa

In addition, many wonderful local businesses supported Press Café us with donations of prizes and services: Pastaso Vitto Green Star Cinemapolis Moon Spa Rulloff's La Tourelle/August BrooktonCat's MarketPajamas Heights ZaZa's Restaurant GrassRoots Festival Mercato Viva Taqueria 15 StepsMoosewood Wegmans Ithaca Bakery Buffalo Street Books Rasa SpaAgava Shortstop Deli Le Café Cent Dix Press Café Pasta Vitto Bangs Ambulance Gimme! Cinemapolis The DrainGreen Brain Star The Antlers Bruce Vanek Snowplowing Brookton Market ZaZa's Monks on the Commons New York State Police Dive Team GrassRoots Festival MercatoThe and remarc solutions, who created and oversees our awesome website. Wegmans Moosewood is an astonishing list! We live in an astonishing community! Ithaca Bakery Agava This Time and again, businesses come through when we ask for their support. Let's support them back! Shop Shortstop Deli Le Cafélocal! CentGoDix out to eat! Bangs Ambulance Gimme!Happy New Year to all, The Drain Brain The Antlers Judy Epstein & Carol Miller, the Ithaca Chill Challenge Bruce Vanek Snowplowing Monks Co-Chairs on theforCommons Ithaca Community Recovery 518 York West Seneca Street The New State Police Dive Team Ithaca, NY 14850 and remarc who created and oversees our awesome website. January solutions, 2020 This is an astonishing list! We live in an astonishing community! Time and again, businesses come through when we ask for their support. Let's support them back! Shop local! Go out to eat!

DENTAL Insurance

Happy New Year to all, Judy Epstein & Carol Miller,

Co-Chairs for the Ithaca Chill Challenge Ithaca Community Recovery 518 West Seneca Street Ithaca, NY 14850 January 2020

Physicians Mutual Insurance Company

CALL NOW!

A less expensive way to help get the dental care you deserve

1-888-611-0499

Get help paying dental bills and keep more money in your pocket

Bruce at 13 and 63 The “Up” Series follows people throughout their growth to adulthood. (Photo provided)

This is real dental insurance — NOT just a discount plan You can get coverage before your next checkup

Don’t wait! Call now and we’ll rush you a FREE Information Kit with all the details.

FREE Information Kit

1-888-611-0499 Visit us online at

www.dental50plus.com/ithaca Product not available in all states. Acceptance is guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. This specific offer is not available in CO: call 1-800-969-4781 for a similar offer. For complete details about this solicitation of insurance, please contact us. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN) 6129-1118

30  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

I

n 1963, filmmaker Michael Apted (“Coal Miner’s Daughter”) interviewed several seven-year-old British students for a film called “7 Up”; he and his cameras returned every seven years to track their progress personally and professionally. It’s not a compulsory thing, and the participants can drop in and out as they wish. The cumulative programs are great documentaries and fascinating anthropological projects. I saw “35 Up” when I signed on at the Ithaca Times in 1991, and “42 Up” seven years later. Seeing “63 Up” (Britbox, 2019, 144 min.) really feels like catching up with old friends. One person’s lifespan may seem mun-

dane and ordinary in real time, but seen this way, it’s epic stuff. Think about your own family and friends, and how much can change in the span of seven years. There’s Tony, who wanted to be a jockey when he grew up, and grew up to be a cab driver, actor and entrepreneur. At age 63, he’s been married, divorced and remarried with three kids. Sue got married, divorced, and she’s been engaged to the same nice guy now for over 20 years. Apted has a knack for cutting together each subjects’ life stories in a series of cuts from childhood black and white to colorful adulthood, and he has been doing this continued on page 32


Dining

Angelhearts Diner

An adventure into vegan territory By He nr y Stark

Angelhearts Diner features a throwback environment aesthetically while catering to a more modern-thinking diet. (Photo by Casey Martin)

B

ased on impressions formed when I was growing up, my idea of a diner is a long and narrow railroad-car-shaped-space featuring a dominant counter and booths, each with its own jukebox and napkin dispenser. In my memory, diners served breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week with lots of comfort food offerings for omnivores, e.g. eggs with sausage and bacon for breakfast and meatloaf or mac and cheese later in the day. However, you can forget about the sausage, bacon, meatloaf and cheese here as Angelhearts serves exclusively vegan fare—although management does hope that it’s all comfort food. Angelhearts opened on Sept. 28 and the interior, which is not long and narrow, is the same rectangular shape as the previous occupant of the space, Napoli Pizzeria. Each booth along the wall is lit by a pendant light and the floor is an eye-catching black and white checkerboard pattern. The words that occur to me each time I enter Angelhearts Diner are “clean and pretty” and the bright, light-hearted feeling is enhanced by the servers, and even the cook in the open kitchen, who wear aqua accented shirts to match the aqua theme found on the upholstery located throughout the restaurant. There is background music playing which is rarely my taste, and sometimes a bit loud. Speaking of loud, the restaurant has a low ceiling, and bare walls and flooring, which can lead to a noisy ambience when there are lots of customers. And often there do seem to be lots of customers because it’s a delight for us Ithacans to

IAC Wrestling Championships 1/18/20

have an establishment totally devoted to vegan food. So often, vegans and vegetarians have to pick and choose between items on traditional restaurant menus to come up with a total meal to fit their needs. At Angelhearts, vegans can relax and choose anything they find appealing on the menu which features many appetizing choices. It should be noted that it can also be a good choice for carnivores and omnivores who care to try it. Breakfast is served all day and thus accounts for a significant percentage of their total business. The two most popular breakfast items are Good Morning Ithaca and The Full Plate. The former comes in the form of a filled burrito. The Full Plate features “scrambled eggs,” “sausage patty,” home fried potatoes and a biscuit. But since Angelhearts only serves vegan food, the eggs are actually scrambled tofu mixed with seasonal vegetables like onions and peppers, and the sausage patty is a combination of oat flour, wheat flour, soy protein and spices. I liked the spice combination… just enough to keep the patty from being bland and not enough to be overpowering. I was disappointed, however, in the texture of the patty.. Recently, at lunch, I chose the soup of the day special which was curried butternut squash, a delicious puree with a perfect hint of heat that should have made everyone happy. I’ve ordered one of their most popular dishes, Susie’s Seitan Burger. (Seitan is a chewy protein-rich meat substitute made from wheat gluten). It arrived looking like

an open-faced hamburger with two large tomato slices on a Kaiser bun. The topping included a mix of spinach and mushrooms and some smoked, shredded coconut. Besides being attractively presented, as is everything here, it was delicious. I was happy that I chose to add a side salad with a homemade lemon tahini dressing to make the whole dish only $12. The Philly which is chick wheat shreds with mushrooms, onions, and peppers, and The Beets Me Burger are two other popular choices. I ordered a homemade “plain” glazed donut to end the meal. Delicious, however it set me back a whole $2 but, what the heck! So after enjoying several meals at Angelhearts Diner, I could sum up the experience this way: Omnivore restaurant reviewer tries vegan restaurant and not only, survives, thrives.

Tidbits Two individual all-gender restrooms are located a short distance down a corridor outside the restaurant. These rest rooms are shared with other retail establishments and accessed by a key from the wait staff. When the restaurant is busy, customers are asked to obtain a table, check the menu, and proceed to a counter to order, and later pay. There is no liquor license and there are no plans to apply for one. It is not permissible to bring your own (BYOB). The restaurant is open Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on weekends, so evening

See the entire gallery at: photos.espnithaca.com

110 North Cayuga St., Ithaca repstudio.com • 607-272-4292

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   31


MOVIES Contin u ed From Page 30

for decades before Richard Linklater came up with “Boyhood,” the popular 2014 film that followed a similar conceit. You get the spread of a person’s life in a series of cuts that feels like a magic trick at times. At this point, there’s real suspense as to whether Apted and company will make it to “70 Up.” “63 Up” screens at Cornell Cinema on January 26 at 3:30pm and on January 28 at 6:45pm. ● ● ●

MERCE CUNNINGHAM SuiteForTwo (Photo-Martin_Miseré)

Documentaries can also be a great crash course in an unfamiliar area or person. For years, I associated the name Merce Cunningham with arts listings in the front of The New Yorker. I had no idea what a talented and revolutionary choreographer and dancer Cunningham was. Russian filmmaker Alla Kovgan’s “Cunningham” (Magnolia, 2019, 92 min.), now playing at Cinemapolis, doesn’t just talk about Cunningham’s work; how can you talk about dancing without showing it? The doc is about one-third archival film—home movies, news reports and other recordings—that go into detail about Cunningham’s process: he never set dance pieces to music, and the first time anyone would hear the composer’s work was in performance. He loved to collaborate, and worked on his pieces with artists like John Cage, Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg. Cunningham never seemed to go for an emotional effect. He was just making things and throwing them out there without preamble or comment. It was your job as the auditor to decide what it meant to you. As to the rest of the film, working with choreographers steeped in the Cunningham style, Kovgan and cinematographer Mko Malkasyan actually restage excerpts from the ‘50s and ‘60s pieces that vaulted him from NYC obscurity to international acclaim. I would say about one-quarter of the excerpts are filmed in abstract theatrical space in studios, but the majority of them are staged in ballrooms, on city rooftops, in front of buildings and in the woods. These pieces are stunning, in and of themselves for Cunningham’s abstract, kinetic approach and for taking dance out of the dance studio and into the real world. I’d be lying not admitting that a few moments struck me as pretentious and affected, and reminded me of old “Bad Playhouse” SNL sketches. But getting to know Merce Cunningham—he died in 2009—I’m sure he wouldn’t have cared. He was happiest making things.

32  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0


Arts

Crossing Over

Singer Caitlin Mathes tries an interactive exhibit By Ar thur W hit m an

T

hough impossible to prove, it is plausible to hold that those art-forms we have come to regard as separate—music and the visual arts among them—emerged together in human prehistory, bound up in ritual and the need for human togetherness. That these have emerged in modern culture as distinct cultural traditions can be seen as a mixed-blessing. Individualism, narrowfocus, and a self-conscious relationship to a specific history of making are undoubtedly responsible for much excellent work. They remain invaluable for many artists. And yet, there are risks inherent in overspecialization. Locally, an excessive silo-ing is evident in the compartmentalized spaces—and distinct audiences—for the various arts. While it’s not uncommon to have a musician at an art opening or to have an illustrator do an album cover, truly inventive or unconventional collaborations between sound and sight are relatively rare. Harkening back to early 20th-century cabaret while (literally) adding a personal spin, “Apple: Tree” is long-gestating “passion project” for local mezzo-soprano Caitlin Mathes, a distinguished opera singer and actress. Working with her longtime pianist-collaborator Avedis Manoogian, and adapting a century-spanning collection of musical material, Mathes has created an interactive performance incorporating the abstract paintings of her father, Al Mathes. For the show, The Cherry Artspace has been filled with a hodgepodge of rolling chairs and a pianoon-wheels. Guided by the lighting and rounding the room, both performers and audiences move from painting to painting—each paired with a song. Loosely narrative, the sequence traces an emotional path from lovesickness and strife to reconciliation and cautious hope.

Although I have yet to see the performance, it’s hard to miss the ambition and creativity (and hard work) that have been poured into this project. The verve emerging from the rehearsals is palpable. And the paintings look striking in this unusual presentation. Done on overscale sheets of Mylar, the senior Mathes’ recent acrylic paintings have been hung around the Cherry’s pleasingly rough-textured space. More so than the heroic “handwriting” associated with classic Abstract Expressionism, they recall the furtive little gestures, accidentallooking textures, and stylized harshness of more contemporary painters as varied as Antoni Tàpies, Cy Twombly, and Gerhard Richter. A J.M.W. Turner-esque atmosphericism evokes landscape. Some pieces have been attached directly to the wall with pins or magnets. Others hang freely in space like screens—calling attention to the translucency and feel of the supports. Sponged and scraped as well as brushed and laden with drips and smears, they offer an artfully contrived feel of being found rather than created. Most of the paintings are predominantly grisaille (gray-ish), with little bursts or tinges of unexpected, sometimes discordant color. Standing out in this regard are the yellow-brown infused “Slow like honey” and “Non, Je Ne Regrette,” with its rich purples and blues. (Each painting here is titled in accordance with its intended musical accompaniment. The former joins a nineties Fiona Apple song, the later one of several tunes here associated with Edith Piaf.) Merging black and gray with a splash of sunset orange “Pirate Jenny” is reminiscent of one of Turner’s stormy seascapes yet largely stripped of his characteristically warm color and light. It serves as a backdrop—if that’s the right word—for Kurt Weil and Bertolt Brecht’s

Weddings

Caitlin Mathes tried something new with an interactive show at Cherry Artspace. (photo provided)

chilling revenge-murder tale from their Weimar-era “Threepenny Opera.” (Fussing with a pirate ship silhouette projection was underway during my visit.) His use of Mylar springs from his previous career in landscaping, where he used the material for drafting. So too, his sensitivity towards the way these paintings occupy physical space evokes his training as a sculptor. Central to the cabaret tradition is its capacity to transgress established boundaries: between popular and high culture; between the arts; between various cultures and languages. Returning to the Weimar

Republic, “Alles Swindle” (sung in English), is a cynical indictment of societal greed set to an infectiously jaunty tune. More up-to-date, Mathes and Manoogian offer inventive reconfigurations of the David Byrne/Talking Heads classic “This Must Be the Place” and—bringing us into the current century— Björk’s hopeful, uplifting “Unison.” It’s a local rarity to see merger of visual art and music—and elements of theatrical storytelling—as ambitious and idiosyncratic as this one. Evoking a condition of synesthesia and unhinged narrative, “Tree” promises to be an exciting event.

THE FAVORITE GIFT

IOUS GIVE DELIC

THEY

4 (6 oz.) Filet Mignons 4 (4 oz.) Boneless Pork Chops 4 (4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers 4 (2.8 oz.) Potatoes au Gratin 4 (4 oz.) Caramel Apple Tartlets Signature Seasoning Packet

WILL

$218.92* separately

$

6999

COMBO PRICE + 4 FREE BURGERS

THAT’S 16 MAIN COURSES!

COMING FEB. 12

*Savings shown over aggregated single item base price. ©2019 Omaha Steaks, Inc. Exp. 2/29/20

ORDER NOW! 1.877.420.5568 ask for 59104JXZ www.OmahaSteaks.com/cheer85

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   33


Music

Bound for Glory: Matt Nakoa | 8:00 PM, | Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca

Bars/Bands/Clubs

1/29 Wednesday

1/23 Thursday Half Pint w/ The Yellow Wall Dub Squad | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca

1/24 Friday Silver Lining| 6:00 PM, | Montour Falls Library, Montour Falls | Eclectic folk music, several instruments and genres. | $10 suggested donation The Notorious String Busters | 6:00 PM, | Hopshire Farm & Brewery, Freeville Pat Kane CD Release Party: “Arcane Memory” | 7:00 PM, | Grill 125-Radisson Hotel Corning, Corning | $5 Dead Night with Terrapin Station | 9:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca

1/25 Saturday Gutterpunk ft. Spazzare, River Diver, Chimes of Bayonets, Jan the Actress | 7:30 PM, | Bowl-ODrome, Ithaca The Small Kings with Roadman | 8:00 PM, | Casita Del Polaris, Ithaca

1/26 Sunday Diana Leigh Trio | 2:00 PM, | Six Mile Creek Vineyard, Ithaca Ithaca Jazz and Blues Jam | 4:00 PM, | Mix Kitchen and Bar, Ithaca

34  T

h e

Canaan Jam Session | 7:00 PM, | Canaan Institute, Brooktondale Jesse Collins Quartet & Diana Leigh Quintet | 7:00 PM, | Argos Warehouse Lounge & Event Space, Ithaca | Expressions in Jaz. | $10/$15 Too Many Zooz w/ Birocratic | 8:00 PM, | The Haunt, Ithaca | $20/$22 Concerts/Recitals Greensky Bluegrass w/ Ghost Light | 8:00 PM, 1/22 Wednesday | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Michigan-born bluegrass mavericks | $27.50 - $32 Dorothy Cotton Jubilee Singers present A Community Celebration Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. | 7:00 PM, 1/23 Thursday | State Theatre, 107 W. State St, Ithaca | The concert also will feature The Dorothy Cotton Youth Singers, Ithaca High School Chorale, Trumansburg High School Choir, Vitamin L, GIAC Jumpers, IC Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Owego Middle School Choir. Cornell Glee Club and Chorus Return from Tour Concert | 3:00 PM, 1/25 Saturday | First Presbyterian Church, 315 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | The Glee Club and Chorus return from their concert tour of the Pacific Northwest, performing a selection of repertoire for the Ithaca community. The Arts at Grace presents Hugh McElyea’s Tenebrae: The Passion of Dietrich Bonhoeffer | 3:00 PM,

Ithac a T imes

/January

JAN THE ACTRESS with Gutterpunk ft. Spazzare, River Diver, Chimes of Bayonets 1/25 Saturday at 7:30 PM | Bowl-O-Drome, Ithaca

1/26 Sunday | Grace and Holy Spirit Church, 13 Court Street, Cortland | A unique performance marking the UN Holocaust Remembrance Day. Using the church’s sanctuary as the set. Featured performers will be Steven

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

Stull as Bonhoeffer, Dawn Pierce as his fiancé Maria, David Neal as narrator, SUNY Cortland Choral Union, a professional chamber ensemble, and Opus Ithaca children’s choir.

An Evening at Notre Dame: Jeffery Snedeker, organist | 4:00 PM, 1/26 Sunday | St Luke Lutheran Church Elca, 109 Oak Ave, Ithaca | Louis Vierne’s Third Organ Symphony in recognition of the 150th anniversary

of his birth in 1870, and Guilmant’s First Organ Sonata Ithaca Sounding 2020 | All Day 1/30 Thursday through Saturday 2/1| A multi-day, multi-venue festival and symposium celebrating, explor-


FAST FINANCING

The faster, easier, online way to get a business loan.

TompkinsTrust.com

NYS Baroque presents Nevertheless, She Persisted | 7:30 PM, 2/1 Saturday | First Unitarian Society of Ithaca, 306 N. Aurora Street, Ithaca, NY | Music by and about strong women, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Susan B. Anthony’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. | Symphoria Pops III: James Bond | 7:30 PM, 2/1 Saturday | 411 Montgomery Street, Syracuse, NY |

Stage Apple:Tree - A mixed media “rolling cabaret” | 8:00 PM, 1/23 Thursday through 1/25 Saturday | Cherry Artspace, 102 Cherry Street,, Ithaca | Featuring song, art, and shifts in perspective. Acclaimed opera singer-turned-cabaret chanteuse

Festival24 | 7:30 PM, 1/25 Saturday | Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Cornell University, Ithaca | A free evening of performances in the Black Box Theatre, Schwartz Center featuring an array of various original artistic works written, cast, directed, rehearsed, and performed by students, in just 24 hours! Whiskey Tango Sideshow’s SleazeO-Rama! Burlesque Extravaganza | 9:00 PM, 1/25 Saturday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | ComedyFLOPs Presents: All You Can Eat Improv To Benefit Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services (CARS) | 7:00 PM, 1/30 Thursday | 702 Willow Ave., Ithaca | The FLOPs are partnering with The Haunt to bring great comedy to Ithaca. | http://www. comedyflops.com

La Cerise Noire | 8:00 PM, 1/31 Friday & 2/1 Saturday | 102 Cherry St., Ithaca, | A scripted neo-vaudeville show peppered with a tantalizing variety of delectable delights including burlesque, drag, comedy, circus arts, bellydancing, grown-up puppetry, music, and much more to tickle your fancy. Running to Places - Winter Showcase | 7:00 PM, 1/31 Friday & 2:00 PM, 2/1 Saturday | 1401 N Cayuga St, Ithaca, NY | Many of the songs are from shows that R2P hasn’t put on because the cast would be too small for the growing number of youth who audition for R2P, now that participation is entirely free.

Art Philipson and Stevens-Gupta: HORIZONS and ABSTRACT REALITIES | All Day 1/24 Friday | Collegetown Bagels, East Hill Plaza, 329 Pine Tree Road,, Ithaca | 20/20 Hindsight | 20 years in Prints and Books plus Portfolios & Ephemera | 5:00 PM, 1/24 Friday | Ink Shop Studio Gallery and CSMA

Parasite | All unemployed, Ki-taek’s family takes a peculiar interest in the wealthy and glamorous Parks for their livelihood until they get entangled in an unexpected incident.|132 mins R Cornell Cinema

09/19 Loans subject to credit approval.

Caitlin Mathes will sing a palette of music from Baudelaire to Brecht, from Piaf to Björk, paired with an immersive environment of her father (Al Mathes)’s visual art. The entire show surrounds an audience seated in rolling chairs, with performers and audience travelling around the space, encountering the art as the evening progresses.

Little Women | Four sisters come of age in America in the aftermath of the Civil War. Directed by Greta Gerwig, starring Saoirse Ronan, Timothee Chalamet, & Emma Watson.| 135 mins PG-13 Jojo Rabbit | A young member of Hitler Youth finds out his mother is hiding a Jewish girl in their home.| 108 mins PG-13

because your time is money.

ing, and questioning the traditions of modernist and experimental concert music by Ithacans past and present. Times and locations vary. Visit http://music.cornell.edu/ithacasounding-2020 for the complete schedule. | https://music.cornell.edu/ ithaca-sounding-2020

a series of high-stakes bets that could lead to the windfall of a lifetime. Howard must perform a precarious high-wire act, balancing business, family, and encroaching adversaries on all sides, in his relentless pursuit of the ultimate win. | 135 mins R

All films are shown at Willard Straight Hall on Cornell campus.

corridor, 330 E.State / MLK Street, ITHACA |

Film Cinemapolis Week of Friday, January 24 through Thursday, January 30, 2020. Contact Cinemapolis for showtimes. New films listed first*. Clemency* | As she prepares to execute another inmate, Bernadine must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates, ultimately connecting her to the man she is sanctioned to kill. | 113 mins R Color Out of Space* | A town is struck by a meteorite and the fallout is catastrophic. | 111 mins NR The Song of Names* | Several years after his childhood friend, a violin prodigy, disappears on the eve of his first solo concert, an Englishman travels throughout Europe to find him. | 113 mins PG-13 Uncut Gems | |A charismatic New York City jeweler always on the lookout for the next big score, makes

Ad Astra | 1/22, 6:45 PM; 1/25, 9:15PM | Astronaut Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) travels to the outer edges of the solar system to find his missing father and unravel a mystery that threatens the survival of the planet. His journey will uncover secrets that challenge the nature of human existence and our place in the cosmos. Mon Oncle | 1/23, 6:45 PM | Slapstick prevails again when Jacques Tati’s eccentric, old-fashioned hero, Monsieur Hulot, is set loose in Villa Arpel, the geometric, oppressively ultramodern home and garden of his brother-inlaw. Subtitled. The Lighthouse | 1/23, 9:15 PM; 1/26, 6:45PM | Both Dafoe and Pattinson are receiving raves for Robert Eggers’ brooding, atmospheric gothic thriller about two lighthouse keepers trapped on a remote island. The Lion King | 1/24, 7:00 PM | Director John Favreau’s live action remake of the classic Disney animated movie. Hustlers | 1/24, 9:30 PM | Inspired by the viral New York Magazine article, Hustlers follows a crew of savvy former strip club employees who band together to turn the tables on their Wall Street clients.

63 Up | 1/26, 3:30 PM; 1/28, 6:45 PM | In 1963, a group of seven-year-old British children from widely ranging socioeconomic backgrounds were interviewed about a range of subjects. Director Michael Apted returned to the same children every seven years for the past five decades to check in and document their current lives. (*See review in this issue.) Some Like It Hot | 1/27, 9:00 PM | Two jazz players on the run from the mob hide out in an all-girl cabaret that happens to be led by a voluptuous blonde who just can’t resist sax players. Ranked the funniest American movie of all time by the American Film Institute. Aquarela | 1/29, 6:45 PM | A cinematic journey through the transformative beauty and raw power of water. From the precarious frozen waters of Russia’s Lake Baikal to Miami in the throes of Hurricane Irma to Venezuela’s mighty Angel Falls, the film captures water’s many personalities in startling cinematic clarity. Knives Out | 1/29, 8:45 PM | When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. Regal Ithaca Wednesday 1/22 through Tuesday, 1/28. Contact Regal Ithaca for showtimes. New films listed first*. The Turning* | A young governess is hired by a man who has become responsible for his young nephew and niece after the deaths of their parents. A modern take on Henry James’ novella “The Turn of the Screw.”| 94 mins PG-13 The Gentlemen* | A British drug lord tries to sell off his highly profitable empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires.| 113 mins R Bad Boys for Life | The Bad Boys Mike Lowrey and Marcus Burnett are back together for one last ride in the highly anticipated Bad Boys for Life.| 123 mins R

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 AT 6:45 PM

HALF PINT W/ THE YELLOW WALL DUB SQUAD

Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza, | Cornell Cinema reopens for the Spring semester this week. On Thursday, they kick off their Garden Cinema series with a screening of Jaques Tati’s Mon Oncle. Tati’s Monsieur Hulot character is set loose in Villa Arpel, the geometric, oppressively ultramodern home and garden of his brother-in-law. (photo: provided)

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 AT 8:00 PM

The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave., Ithaca | Jamaican reggae legend will be joined by special guests Andrew Bees (lead singer of Black Uhuru) & King Hopeton, plus DJ Mike Judah. (photo: Facebook)

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

ThisWeek

MON ONCLE

I t h a c a T i m e s   35


Papachryssanthou, children, along with their families and caregivers, will be treated to playfully reimagined classics, originals, and modern standards. This series aims to provide a positive social experience for young children and families through music and movement. After the music, opportunities for play and social time will be provided.

Heads UP It h ac a S ou n di ng 2 02 0 January 30 – February 2, 2020 Cornell University: Johnson Museum, Barnes Hall, Lincoln Hall Ithaca College: Hockett Hall Buffalo Street Books

I

thaca Sounding 2020 is a multiday, multi-venue festival and symposium celebrating, exploring, and questioning the traditions of modernist and experimental concert music by Ithacans past and present. It features keyboard works by composers Julius Eastman, Sarah Hennies, Robert Palmer, Ann Silsbee, and David Borden. Connecting and mediating the themes of music in the academy, marginalized art, improvisational performance practice, and queer experimentalism, this interdisciplinary series of events probes the creative and personal histories of some of Ithaca’s most renowned musical personae with concerts, workshops, talks, presentations, and readings. Featured presenters include musicologists Sara

Haefeli (Ithaca College), Ellie Hisama (Columbia), and Matthew Mendez (Yale). Featured performers include the acclaimed New York City pianists Joseph Kubera, Adam Tendler, and Cornell alumnus David Friend, the Ithacan composer and percussionist Sarah Hennies, and festival coordinator and pianist Richard Valitutto, a DMA performance practice student in the Cornell Music Department.

Preschool Storytime at Southworth Library | 10:00 AM, 1/24 Friday | Southworth Library, 24 W. Main Street, Dryden | A different theme every week! Early Communication Strategies for Babies and Families | 10:30 AM, 1/24 Friday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | A program exploring ways caregivers can help children up to 18 months improve communication skills.No registration is required for this free program. Chinese New Year Celebration | 6:30 PM, 1/24 Friday | Seneca Falls Library, 47 Cayuga Street, Seneca Falls | Ring in the Year of the Rat with lots of fun crafts and activities. Must preregister.

For more information and the complete scedule, please visit https://music.cornell.edu/ithaca-sounding-2020.

Dolittle | A physician discovers that he can talk to animals. w/ Robert Downey Jr.| 106 mins PG 1917 | Two young British soldiers during the First World War are given an impossible mission: deliver a message deep in enemy territory that will stop 1,600 men, and one of the soldiers’ brothers, from walking straight into a deadly trap.| 119 mins R Like A Boss | Two friends with very different ideals start a beauty company together. One is more practical while the other wants to earn her fortune and live a lavish lifestyle. | 83 mins R

Spies in Disguise | When the world’s best spy is turned into a pigeon, he must rely on his nerdy tech officer to save the world. | 101 mins PG Bombshell | A group of women decides to take on Fox News head Roger Ailes and the toxic atmosphere he presided over at the network.| 108 mins R Star Wars:The Rise of Skywalker | 141 mins PG-13 Jumanji: The Next Level || 123 mins PG-13 Knives Out | 130 mins PG-13 Ford vs Ferrari | 152 mins PG-13

ThisWeek

Just Mercy | World-renowned civil rights defense attorney Bryan Stevenson works to free a wrongly condemned death row prisoner. | 136 mins PG-13

Underwater | A crew of aquatic researchers work to get to safety after an earthquake devastates their subterranean laboratory. But the crew has more than the ocean seabed to fear. | 95 mins PG-13

36  T

h e

Frozen II | 103 mins PG Once Upon A Time In Hollywood | 161 mins R

Special Events Contra Dance and Dessert with The Contradictions | 7:30 PM, 1/25 Saturday | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | A feast of music, dancing, friends, and fabulous desserts are all part of the delectable “Dance and Dessert Potluck” hosted each winter by Hands Four Dancers of Ithaca. Contra dancing (7:30-10:30 pm) will be followed by a dessert potluck and couples dances: swing, schottisch, hambo, waltz, and possibly tango (10:30-11:30 pm).

CORNELL GLEE CLUB AND CHORUS RETURN FROM TOUR CONCERT

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 AT 3:00 PM

First Presbyterian Church, 315 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca | The Glee Club and Chorus return from their concert tour of the Pacific Northwest, performing a selection of repertoire for the Ithaca community. (photo: provided)

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

Hilby:The Skinny German Juggle Boy | 6:00 PM, 2/1 Saturday | 107 W State St, Ithaca, NY | Hilby creates unforgettable moments for his audiences with such death-defying feats as The New Schrubber Schrubb Schrubb of Doom, in which he juggles an electric powered hedge trimmer, a bowling ball and a flaming beanie baby. Working in the tradition of the legendary silent vaudeville-inspired comedians such as Buster Keaton as well as the great mimes Marcel Marceau and Lecoq, Hilby presents a show without boundaries in which artistry and anarchy are blended into utter hilarity.

Books Meet the Author: Isabel Sterling | 6:00 PM, 1/22 Wednesday | Tompkins

County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Isabel Sterling is the author of This Coven Won’t Break and These Witches Don’t Burn, the TCPL YA Book Club selection for January. Drag Queen Story Hour | 12:00 PM, 1/26 Sunday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Join Miss Coraline, Miss Tilia, and friends once a month for Drag Story Hour. Join our colorful and fun group for an hour of story time full of glimmer and more glamour than you have ever seen in the daylight!

Kids Family Music Concert Series | 11:30 AM, 1/23 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Presented by Alejandro Bernard-

Open Heart Kids Yoga | 11:00 AM, 1/25 Saturday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | A weekly yoga program is best suited for children ages 3 to 9, but younger siblings are also welcome. Space is limited for this free program, and registration is required. Family-Friendly Dance Party Event to Benefit Fall Creek PTA | 1:00 PM, 1/26 Sunday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Come bust a move to a live band playing kid-requested pop hits and classic rock favorites! Bake/Snack sale, Silent Auction, Raffle Baskets and more!  All proceeds benefit Fall Creek Elementary PTA.  Credit cards accepted. Online ticket sales and more details at https://fallcreekpta.ptboard.com/ | $10/person or $35/family Sew Amazing | 6:00 PM, 1/27 Monday | Seneca Falls Library, 47 Cayuga Street, Seneca Falls | Here’s a sewing class just for kids and teens in 4th grade and up. Learn basic hand-sewing techniques and create your own stuffed animal. All materials provided. Preregistration is required.

FESTIVAL24

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 AT 7:30 PM

Black Box Theatre, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, 430 College Ave., Ithaca | A free evening of performances in the Black Box Theatre, Schwartz Center. Festival24 features an array of various original artistic works written, cast, directed, rehearsed, and performed by students, in just 24 hours! Get there early, a full house is expected. (photo: provided)


Family Story Time | 10:30 AM, 1/28 Tuesday | Newfield Public Library, 198 Main St. , Newfield | Join us every Tuesday for stories, songs and fun. There is a different theme each week. Preschool Science Series | 11:00 AM, 1/28 Tuesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Designed for preschoolers and their families and caregivers. Each week a new animal classification will be covered: amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and arthropods (bugs). Some weeks will feature live animals. No registration is required. Baby Doll Circle Time | 10:00 AM, 1/29 Wednesday | Jillian’s Drawers, Center Ithaca, Ithaca | Calling all toddlers and their grown ups! Come join us for a sweet session of doll play where we focus on forming caring relationships, encouraging empathy, and expanding our socio-emotional skills through social play. Dolls, songs, books, and good times will be provided. Please RSVP jessica@childdevelopmentcouncil.org  Cuddle-up Infant & Toddler Library Time | 10:00 AM, 1/29 Wednesday | Southworth Library, 24 W. Main Street, Dryden | Family Movie Event: The Addams Family | 5:00 PM, 1/29 Wednesday | Van Etten Library, 83 Main Street, Van Etten | Popcorn and drinks provided.

Notices Ithaca Sociable Singles | 6:00 PM, 1/22 Wednesday | Dinner: Antlers. Host: Allen Q., RSVP: allenq3@ lightlink.com; 1/29, 6:00 PM Dinner: Pasta Vitto. Host: Nadine L., RSVP: nlem1155@gmail.com Teen Writing Workshops | 4:30 PM, 1/23 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Teens may attend a couple of sessions or all of them; each week will offer something different, and attendance every week is not required. These one-hour workshops will be led by volunteers from Ithaca College, and they will involve a variety of prompts, exercises, and opportunities to workshop pieces. (no mtg 3/12)

Technology Class at Newfield Public Library | 6:00 PM, 1/23 Thursday | Newfield Public Library, 198 Main St, Newfield | The first session will cover general computer and internet topics to demystify how it all works. We will also have some fun with voice commands.  Future sessions will help attendees with email, word processing, spreadsheets, security and more!

interview can be a challenge. This workshop will help you to overcome this challenge by teaching you how to: research and prepare prior to an interview, what to expect during an interview, how to follow up after an interview, and how to avoid common

creation based on the story. Please preregister. Civil Service Workshop | 1:00 PM, 1/29 Wednesday | Tompkins Workforce, Center Ithaca, 2nd fl, Ithaca | Learn how to look up exam and vacancy information for various

Beginner Bird Walks | 8:30 AM, 1/25 Saturday | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca | Guided bird walks every Saturday and Sunday morning, sponsored by the Cayuga Bird Club. For more information, go to the club’s website, http://www. cayugabirdclub.org/calendar

renewed. GET READY TO LIGHT UP THE WORLD! | $25 Sacred Sunday Community at Yoga Farm | 9:00 AM, 1/26 Sunday | Yoga Farm, 404 Conlon Rd, Lansing | Open Meditation | 10:30 AM, 1/26 Sunday | Foundation of Light, 391 Turkey Hill Road, Ithaca | Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous | 4:00 PM, 1/26 Sunday | Community Recovery Center, 518 W Seneca St, Ithaca | FA is a free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating, or bulimia. foodaddicts. org. Additional meetings held Mondays @ 7pm and Saturdays at 8am.

Doug’s Fish Fry ToGo! | 11:00 AM, 1/27 Monday | Trumansburg Fair Grounds, Route 96, Trumansburg | To benefit Cayuga Medical Center Auxiliary.

Health

Staying With Exercise: A Free Open House | 7:00 PM, 1/27 Monday

Exercise Class for Seniors | 8:30 AM, Tusdays & Thursdays | Newfield Public Library, 198 Main St. , Newfield |

Landlords Association Monthly Meeting | 4:30 PM, 1/27 Monday | Hotel Ithaca, 222 S. Cayuga St., Ithaca | This month’s speakers will be Russ Maines, Ithaca attorney, discussing the new state Landlord-Tenant laws, and Jack Little, on 1031 exchanges Rental property owners interested in joining are invited to attend. French Conversation Sessions at TCPL | 6:00 PM, 1/27 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | The conversation group is appropriate for anyone who has taken some French in the past and is looking for a place to practice.

Conquering the Interview Workshop | 1:00 PM, 1/28 Tuesday | Tompkins Workforce, Center Ithaca, 2nd fl, Ithaca | Preparing for your job

Open Hearts Dinner | 5:00 PM, 1/29 Wednesday | McKendree UMC, 224 Owego St., Candor | Come and join in the fun. Whether you are looking for fellowship or a free meal this one’s for you. Contact: Denice Peckins denicepeckins@hotmail.com January Science on Tap: “Filling in Missing Data: Politics, ____, Healthcare” presented by Prof. Madeleine Udell. | 7:00 PM, 1/29 Wednesday | Casita Del Polaris , 1201 N Tioga St, Ithaca | In this talk, Prof. Udell will tell us how data scientists use low rank models to analyze big messy data sets in politics, healthcare, and beyond.

Knitters and Crocheters | 3:00 PM, 1/26 Sunday | Varna United Methodist Church, 965 Dryden Rd, Ithaca | Come meet other fiber artists and share skills with one another.

Trumansburg Community Chorus Spring Session | 7:00 PM, 1/27 Monday | Jacksonville Community United Methodist Church, 1869 Trumansburg Rd, Jacksonville | Weekly rehearsals will be held at the Jacksonville Methodist Church. All individuals who are interested in singing are encouraged to join us! | $40 adults/$25 students. Donations are available

meet others who are practicing English, watch and discuss YouTube videos, and talk with Library volunteers about current events, Ithaca, family life, culture, food, and holidays.

FRENCH CONVERSATION SESSIONS at the Tompkins County Public Library | 6:00 PM, 1/27 Monday

problems. Please register. Literary Legos (For Adults!) | 7:00 PM, 1/28 Tuesday | Seneca Falls Library, 47 Cayuga Street, Seneca Falls | Legos aren’t just for kids! Register for a fun evening of listening to a short story and then building a unique Lego

forms of government jobs. We’ll look at the application process and provide an understanding of navigating the process. Please register. ESL Talk Time, | 3:45 PM, 1/29 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | In these classes, interested people will

| Island Health and Fitness, 310 Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca | A free pre-

Take off Pounds Sensibly | 6:00 PM, 1/23 Thursday | Candor Town Hall, 101 Owego Road, Candor | Contact Jean Dewey 659-9969 or jmdewey@ frontiernet.net

sentation and discussion open to all

Inner Wisdom Meditation Series | 7:00 PM, 1/23 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | At these sessions, led by Lisa Margaret, guided meditation and deep relaxation techniques will be used to help participants obtain this deeper super-conscious state in order to access inner wisdom. In accessing this wisdom, participants can gain a higher understanding of life and their purpose in the world.

Radon Action Event | 6:00 PM, 1/29

Reset and Renew, a New Year’s Intention Setting Workshop | 1:00 PM, 1/25 Saturday | Fine Spirit Studio, 201 Dey St #202, Ithaca | Find your path towards transformation through a blend of warming and restorative yoga flows, breathwork, meditation, discussion and creative expression. During this journey inward you’ll reset your intentions, explore yoga as selfcare and leave feeling empowered and

members of our community. Hosted by Cayuga Wellness Center and Island Health and Fitness.

Wednesday | CCE-Tompkins Education Center, 615 Willow Avenue, Ithaca | January is Radon Action Month! Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. Though it is naturally occurring in rocks and soil it can accumulate in your home. Do you know how much Radon you have in your home and what the acceptable level is? Do you want to learn how to test your home? Come to a free half hour presentation and learn how to perform a home radon test. Then receive a FREE home radon test kit while supplies last!

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26 AT 8:00 PM

Anabel Taylor Hall, 548 College Ave., Cornell | Bound for Glory’s 53rd year continues, opening the spring season with Matt Nakoa. According to stalwart host, Phil Shapiro, “[Nokoa is] one of the best of the coming generation of acoustic performers. He’s quite versatile on keyboards and on guitar, and is a highly creative songwriter. He’ll be a great way to start live shows in 2020.” (photo:mattnakoa.com)

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26 FROM 1:00 - 5:00 PM

The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave., Ithaca | Come bust a move to a live band playing kid-requested pop hits and classic rock favorites! Bake/Snack sale, Silent Auction, Raffle Baskets and more! All proceeds benefit Fall Creek Elementary PTA. (photo:WikimediaCommons)

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

ThisWeek

BOUND FOR GLORY: MATT NAKOA

FAMILY-FRIENDLY DANCE PARTY EVENT TO BENEFIT FALL CREEK PTA

I t h a c a T i m e s   37


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

BUY SELL TRADE

COMMUNITY

140/Cars

The Village of Candor has the following surplus items available

and will accept sealed bids for all items

until 5:00 pm, May 7, 2020. Bids can be mailed or dropped at the address listed

100/Automotive

above. Please call the telephone number listed above to make an appointment

CASH FOR CARS!

110/Automotive Services AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH!

Candor Schools

400/Employment Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 214.

Groundskeeper/School Bus Driver

Southern Cayuga School District has an immediate opening for a FT Groundskeeper/School Bus Driver; minimum starting rate per contract; two years experience in parks or grounds maintenance AND eligible for appropriate level NYS driver’s license; apply online using the Support Staff Application; at southerncayuga. org/644, click on the application in the right column; applications will be accepted until position is filled. SCCS EOE

to inspect any items.

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-5691909. (AAN CAN)

300/Community Attention Village of Trumansburg residents!!

Have you ever considered running for office? There are 2 vacant seats on the Village Board of Trustees. The election will be held March 18th for the 4-year terms. If you are interested in running or voting for nominee, plan to attend the Ulysses Democratic Caucus. You have to be nominated and seconded by a registered Democrat living in the Village. Sun. Jan 26 @ 3PM, Tburg Fire Hall All village residents who are registered Democrats may vote at the caucus. You don’t have to be a Democrat to be nominated. For more information, please contact Cynthia Mannino, Chair UDC, cynthiam.udc@ gmail.com Child-care will be provided at the caucus

TODAY’S DATE: 01/09/2020 EXPIRATION DATE: THURSDAY, 05/07/2020, 5:00 PM DESCRIPTION Dell keyboards (6 each) Dell mouse (4 each) Netgear wireless router Linksys wireless router Muratec printer - #267 Muratec printer - #MFX-1430 Dell monitors -#CN-OGC811-72872-63L47KM (17”) * #CN-OKCO26-64180-6441JWC (14”) *#CN-OGC811-72872-63L-3M6M (17”) *#CN-OGC811-72872-64I-2E0M (17”) Seth Thomas Clock Primo water cooler HP desktop computer (Windows Vista) Dell Dimension 5150 desktop computer (Windows XP) Dell Dimension 3100 desktop computer

Ithaca’s only

(Windows XP) Dell Optiplex 3010 (Windows 7)

hometown electrical distributor Your one Stop Shop

Since 1984 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca 607-272-1711 fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com

CONDITION(s): The Village of Candor reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Sealed bids will be opened and read at the regular meeting of the Village Board of Trustees on Thursday, May 7, 2019 at 6:30pm. Thank you for your interest!

MULTI-MEDIA SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Ithaca.com/Ithaca Times/FingerLakes Community newspapers, the area’s most trusted media brand, seeks a highenergy media sales specialist to help local businesses reach our educated, active and motivated audience in this dynamic and growing community. Experience in digital media or print advertising sales is preferred, but all representatives have a thorough training process from experienced professionals. This is a base-plus-commission position with no cap on earnings and excellent benefits. Requirements: A strong work ethic and the desire to help local businesses grow. A self-starter, smart on your feet, outgoing, congenial and responsible. Excellent written and verbal communication skills A car and driver’s license Helpful: Experience in media, outside and cold-calling sales presentations for newspapers or digital and social media A knowledge of the Ithaca and surrounding area and its businesses Proven success creating and delivering sales presentations or growing client business. Job type: Full time Please email cover letter, resume and references to larry@ithacatimes. com.

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINYL Ithaca WebsIte DesIgn Manufacture To InstallREPLACEMENT WINDOWS REPLACEMENT Do you have a business? WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate & WINDOWS

Professional Installation are you starting a business? A FULL LINE OF Custom VINYL made & manufactured AREPLACEMENT FULL LINE OF VINYL WINDOWS by… Let Us help You! REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Call for Free Estimate & Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation 3/54( We have been in business since 1980 specializing in streaming Professional Installation Custom made & manufactured Custom made & manufactured 3%.%#! audio and video. Our team of experts can build you a website by… by… with features such as search engine optimization, tracking 6).9, web site visitors, listing on Facebook. Check us out on Romulus, NY 3/54( 3/54( 315-585-6050 www.ithacawebsitedesign.com 3%.%#! 3%.%#! or Toll Free at Call us at 607-272-9175 we are open Monday to Friday 9am. 6).9, to answer your questions. 6).9, 866-585-6050

38  T

h e

www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at I t h a c a 866-585-6050 Tori m e sFree / Jata n u a r y 2 2 – 2 8 , Toll

866-585-6050

2 0 2 0

EMPLOYMENT Part-Time Teacher Aide

| 59,200 Readers

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call: (585)-507-4822 Today! (NYSCAN)

EMPLOYMENT

Effective February 2020 Application deadline February 3, 2020 www.candorcsd.org (607)659-5010

SCHOOL COUNSELOR

School Counselor – P-Tech F/T, 10-month position available ASAP at T-ST BOCES, working at the TC3 Campus. (NYS School Counselor Certification required + 3 years exp.) Apply online by 1/29/20: www.olasjobs. org/central Detailed job posting: www. tstboces.org TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, Phone (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, Email: hr@tstboces.org,

SERVICE SPECIALIST

F/T, 10-month Service Specialist, provisional position available ASAP at T-S-T BOCES working with area youth in component districts. Must meet county residency and position requirements. Apply online by 1/31/2020 at: www. tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel View job posting: www.tstboces.org TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Email: hr@ tstboces.org

425/Education AIRLINE CAREERS

EMPLOYMENT JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC - $16 P/H LI- $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY. If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)462-2610 (347)565-6200 (NYSCAN)

435/Health Care SCHOOL NURSE – 11-Month

School Nurse, F/T, 11-month position avail. ASAP working in the Exceptional Education Dept. at T-S-T BOCES, Smith School. Must meet county residency and job requirements. Apply online by 2/14/2020 to: www. tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel View job posting: www.tstboces.org TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, Phone (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, hr@tstboces.org

DELIVERY Part-Time Route Driver needed for delivery of newspapers every Wednesday. Must be available 9am-1pm, have reliable transportation, and a good driving record.

Call 277-7000

Start Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 (NYSCAN)

430/General AIRLINE CAREERS

begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094. (AAN CAN)

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


SERVICES

800/Services A PLACE FOR MOM

has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-977-3677 (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

SERVICES

SAVE ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION!

Lung Cancer? And Age 60+?

World Health Link. Price Match Guarantee! Prescriptions Required. CIPA Certified. Over 1500 medications available. CALL Today For A Free Price Quote. 1-866-569-7986 Call Now! (NYSCAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET)

805/Business Services

Cracked and Bowed Foundation Walls?

Sagging and Bouncing Floors? Call the PROS now and save! Free Estimates and Fully Insured. 607-216-1809

Denied Social Security Disability? Appeal!

If you’re 50+, filed SSD and denied, our attorneys can help! Win or Pay Nothing! Strong, recent work history needed. 866-979-0096 [Steppacher Law Offices LLC Principal Office: 224 Adams Ave Scranton PA 18503]

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no-slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 888-657-9488. (NYSCAN)

COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE!

Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7

EMERGENCY $20 OFF ANY SERVICE with coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 866-996-1581 (AAN CAN)

You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. For Information Call 877-225-4813 (NYSCAN)

SERVICES Looking for self storage units?

We have them! Self Storage offers clean and affordable storage to fit any need. Reserve today! 1-855-617-0876 (AAN CAN)

Need Help with Family Law?

Can’t Afford a $5000 Retainer? Low Cost Legal Services- Pay As You Go. As low as $750-$1500- Get Legal Help Now! Call 1-844-821-8249 Mon-Fri 7am to 4pm PCT (AAN CAN)

Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment?

Retire to Sunshine! Sebastian, Florida (East Coast) Beach Cove is paradise; 55+ Community with maintenance-free living, where friends are easily made. Sabastian is

shopping, restaurants. Direct flights

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

One-Stop-Shop For All Your Catheter Needs.

We Accept Medicaid, Medicare, & Insurance. Try Before You Buy. Quick and Easy. Give Us A Call 866-282-2506 (AAN CAN)

from Newark to Vero Beach. Custom manufactured homes from $114,900. 772-581-0080; www.beach-cove.com (NYSCAN)

1040/Land for Sale

Go to ithaca.com/classifieds

GOT LAND? Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ To hunt your land. Call for a FREE info packet & Quote. 1-866-309-1507 www.BaseCampLeasing.com

DONATE YOUR CAR Wheels For Wishes

1000/Real Estate for Sale

benefiting

Fruit Tree Pruning

607-226-1970

Real Estate – Residential

CAROL SCOTT PERFECT PLACE REALTOR (c) 607.247.0808 Honesty ~ Integrity ~ Transparency KW Southern Tier & Finger Lakes

Make-A-Wish ® Central New York

DISH TV

$59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-888-609-9405

THE FAVORITE GIFT

ONLY $35/month! 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies On Demand (w/SELECT All Included Package.) PLUS Stream on Up to FIVE Screens Simultaneously at No Additional Cost. Call DIRECTV 1-888-534-6918 (NYSCAN)

$218.92* separately

$

69

COMBO PRICE + 4 FREE BURGERS

www.OmahaSteaks.com/cook31

*Savings shown over aggregated single item base price. ©2019 Omaha Steaks, Inc. Exp. 2/29/20

DENTAL Insurance CALL NOW!

www.dental50plus.com/nypress MB17-NM003Ec

Discover the world’s best walk-in bathtub from

2

Includes FREE American StandardRight Height Toilet

Limited Time Offer! Call Today!

888-609-0248 Receive a free American Standard Cadet toilet with full installation of a Liberation Walk-In Bath, Liberation Shower, or Deluxe Shower. Offer valid only while supplies last. Limit one per household. Must be first time purchaser. See www.walkintubs.americanstandard-us.com for other restrictions and for licensing, warranty, and company information. CSLB B982796; Suffolk NY:55431H; NYC:HIC#2022748-DCA. Safety Tubs Co. LLC does not sell in Nassau NY, Westchester NY, Putnam NY, Rockland NY.

3 4 5

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

One touch of a button sends help fast, 24/7.

5 Reasons American Standard Walk-In Tubs are Your Best Choice 1

Call:(315)400-0797

Life Alert® is always here for me even when away from home.

Visit us online at

Insurance Policy P150NY 6129

WheelsForWishes.org

alone

1-855-225-1434

Don’t wait! Call now and we’ll rush you a FREE Information Kit with all the details.

* 100% Tax Deductible

I’m never

Get help paying dental bills and keep more money in your pocket You can get coverage before your next checkup

* Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE

Saving a Life EVERY 11 MINUTES

FREE Information Kit

1-855-225-1434

This is real dental insurance — NOT just a discount plan

* We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

99

THAT’S 16 MAIN COURSES!

ORDER NOW! 1.866.749.2741 ask for 59104VSL

Physicians Mutual Insurance Company

* We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not

4 (6 oz.) Filet Mignons 4 (4 oz.) Boneless Pork Chops 4 (4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers 4 (2.8 oz.) Potatoes au Gratin 4 (4 oz.) Caramel Apple Tartlets Signature Seasoning Packet

Get DIRECTV!

A less expensive way to help get the dental care you deserve!

Place Your Ad

atmosphere, excellent medical facilities,

New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

830/Home

SERVICES

an “old Florida” fishing village: quaint

855/Misc.

Need a roommate?

Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE

Help at Home with

GPS !

Backed by American Standard’s 140 years of experience $ Ultra low entry for easy entering and exiting Patented Quick Drain® fast water removal system Lifetime Warranty on the bath AND installation, INCLUDING labor backed by American Standard 44 Hydrotherapy jets for an invigorating massage

®

1,50

SAVING0 S

I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

Batteries Never Need Charging.

FIRST AID

! FREE

Help On-the-Go

KIT

WHEN YOU ORDER!

For a FREE brochure call:

1-800-404-9776

FREE IN-HOME EVALUATION!

Ja n ua ry

2 2 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   39


BackPage 3 Tompkins Artists Needed ($)

For rates and information contact Cyndi Brong at

Up to 75% off

cbrong@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

CLEANING SERVICES

to paint glyphs on wall. Shedstuff.wordpress.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

com

AAM

Medical, Trigger Point Therapy

Winter Seconds Sale

Swedish massage and more!

Jan 24-Feb 9

Oscar Schmidt Massage

102 W. State Street, Downtown Ithaca

Sustainable Local Healthcare

INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

Macintosh Consulting

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

http://www.allaboutmacs.com

BRAMBLE a retail store, tea bar

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

bulk herbs & spices

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

(607) 280-4729

ITHACA NEWS Begin 2020 with a focus on your vision Delivered to your inbox every day

Utilizing breath, meditation

medicine-making supplies

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy

locally handcrafted products. Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 Press Bay Court 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org

the landscapes we are nestled in

(607) 379-0113

Ithaca Times Daily

A reference point for the year ahead

Carol James Yoga

Text ITHACA to 22828 to sign up

Tuesday thru Saturday 11-6

PEACEFUL SPIRIT TAI CHI Traditional Yang Style, Modified

Where POWER Meets BLISS

Looking to Boost your

MONDAYS 4:30-5:30 PM

In each class, we infuse a MIGHTY vibe

Business in 2020?

Beginning on 04 November 2019

encouraging you to move beyond the physical

Centerline Fitness, 335 Elmira Road

to transform and to grow.

Anthony Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M. (c)

Mighty Yoga

(978) 273-0580

Chinese herbal extracts Authentic ingredients sourced directly from over 300 farms

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext 214

BLUE LIGHT, INC. 530 W. State St

Find out about great ad packages at admin@peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-275-9700 Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

info@treasureoftheeast.com

GREEN IDEAS

Handwork

607.273.4489

ALL ABOUT MACS

h e

Deep Tissue, Sports,

Eandoschmidt@yahoo.com

JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET

40  T

Save on Local Artists’ 2nds and Overstocks

Massage for all your needs!

106 West State St

607-272-0114

We pick up & deliver! We reduce building energy use and improve comfort in ways that make sense for our customers and the planet

used home goods furniture & Decor Buy · Sell · Consign

Energy Audits

Basements & New Crawlspaces Construction

Heating & Cooling

Insulation

Air Sealing

Mimi’s Attic

Snug Planet

1730 Mecklenburg Road, Ithaca NY 14850 Phone: 607.277.SNUG (7684) • snugplanet.com

Ithac a T imes

/January

22 – 28 ,

2 0 2 0

Mimi’s Attic 430 W State St Free & Easy Parking! @MimisAtticIthaca (607)882-9038

Check to make sure you

RECYCLE RIGHT!

We accept only plastics marked with a #1, 2, or 5 to prevent recycling contamination. RECYCLING AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT OF TOMPKINS COUNTY

Learn more at: recycletompkins.org 607-273-6632

Profile for Ithaca Times

January 22, 2020  

January 22, 2020  

Advertisement