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F R E E A u g u s t 5 , 2 0 15 / V o l u m e X X X V I I , N u m b e r 4 9 / O u r 4 3 r d Ye a r 

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

Get the Lead out

contamination at Ithaca Falls to go PAGE 3

Big

Block

re-tooled Trebloc building still tall PAGE 4

Totally Upstate

landscapes and cows from Bill Benson PAGE 13

Flute

Sojourn

local wind players head for D.C. PAGE 15


140 The Commons 272-1810

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A big salute for a new beginning!

GREE W E

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Caring, convenient and close to home health care

on both sides of the lake. Convenient Extended Hours: Monday - Thursday, 7:30 am - 5:30 pm Friday, 7:30 am - 5:00 pm

Cayuga Medical Associates

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Internal Medicine of CMA

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East Office

16 Brentwood Drive, Ithaca, NY 14850 phone: (607) 266-7500 | (607) 277-2170

West Office

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cayugamedicalassociates.org 2

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VOL.X X XVII / NO. 49 / August, 2015

A New Chapter . ........................... 8

Tompkins County

City of Ithaca

Schuyler Assigned Re-tooled Trebloc Counsel Needs Help Bldg. Presented

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lthough Tompkins County already turned in its shared services plan to the state earlier this summer, there’s now another shared service possibility on the horizon. Schuyler County is looking to improve its assigned counsel program, so they’ve come to Tompkins County for help. Over the past few months, representatives from both counties have been meeting to discuss the possibility of having Tompkins oversee Schuyler’s assigned counsel program. Although the discussion about joining forces is recent, the event that triggered this is eight years old. Back in 2007 the New York Civil Liberties Union filed a class action suit, Hurrell-Harring et.al. v. State of New York et. al. The suit, filed on behalf of 20 criminal defendants, alleged that New York State was falling short of its constitutional responsibilities by failing to provide sufficient funding, resources, and oversight for indigent defense services. In addition to naming the state as a defendant, the suit also specifically called out five counties: Ontario, Onondaga, Suffolk, Washington, and Schuyler. The parties finally reached a settlement in 2014, just before the case was scheduled to go to trial. As a result, the state will improve oversight through its Office of Indigent Legal Services and spend $4 million over two years to increase attorney-client communications, promote the use of experts and investigators, and improve training for lawyers representing indigent clients. The counties, including Schuyler, have to provide counsel at first arraignment. Schuyler County Attorney Geoffrey Rossi said, “That’s probably the largest feature of the settlement. Included along with what we think can be addressed would be improvement of quality [of defense], improvement of training, and improvement of supervision of attorneys. Also more access to investigative services, expert witness services—things of that nature are also features of the lawsuit settlement.” Also, the county has to maintain caseload standards and improve its assigned counsel program. That’s where Tompkins County comes in. If Tompkins and Schuyler agree to work together, Tompkins County would oversee Schuyler’s program. While continued on page 4

The owners plan on rebuilding a storied Collegetown pub after an April fire

Lead architect John Kelly, of Kelly Grossman, Austin, Texas, said that the building will have activity rooms and lots of residential amenities “that create the sort of lifestyle people are looking for these days.” Even the studio apartments will have full-size refrigerators, full-size washers and dryers, and full-sized ranges: “No one likes those tiny things,” Kelly said, “no one likes to live like that … These one or twobedroom units can appeal to a whole group of people, whoever they might be.” “Campus Advantage’s bread and butter is student housing around the country,” Whitham said. “One very strong concern was this would be a monocultural building of just students, and they responded immediately to that.”

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Local artist/musician paints the world around him

NE W S & OPINION

thaca planner Scott Whitham was careful to make the point that the East State Street location where a Texas developer wants to build an 11-story housing tower is historically the densest part of downtown. Whitham showed a full City Hall meeting room a picture of Ithaca’s downtown from 1873, when the largest buildings were around the intersection of State and Aurora streets. “This was really the heart of downtown, which we lost as part of urban renewal,” Whitham said. The occasion was a “Community Investment Incentive Tax Abatement Program” (CIITAP) hearing on July 28 for a 620-resident building proposed at 301 E. State St. by Proposed 11-story Trebloc building at east end of the Commons. (Image: provided) Campus Advantage, of Austin, Texas. The three-sided Whitham also preemptively addressed block is across from the east entrance to concerns that are often raised at abatement the Commons. Projects must increase the hearings by saying that the building may be potential tax payment for a property by LEED-certified and will pay a living wage $500,000 or more per annum to be eligible to the seven full-time employees expected for the abatement. to staff it after completion. Dick Schneider Initial reports of the project noting that Campus Advantage focuses on student of LeChase Construction was also on hand to give some local labor numbers from housing led to some pushback against previous projects his company has built the idea of a large undergrad dorm-like in Ithaca: the Gateway Commons was 44building downtown, so project planners emphasized this building is aiming at a continued on page 7 diverse clientèle.

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▶ Police officer exam, Currently, there are four (4) vacancies in the City of Ithaca Police Department. The eligible list established as a result of this examination may be used to fill these vacancies and any future vacancies that may occur during the life of the eligible list. Candidates must be legal residents of either Tompkins County or one of its six (6) contiguous counties (Cayuga, Chemung, Cortland, Schuyler, Seneca or Tioga) at least one month prior to the date of the examination. Preference in certification may be given to candidates who are residents of the municipality in which

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appointment is to be made, provided that the candidate is a resident of such municipality at the time of examination and remains a resident of such municipality continuously thereafter, up to and including the dates of certification and appointment. Application Deadline: October 1, 2015. Examination Date: November 14, 2015. Affidavits of Residence with supporting documentation must be filed with the application by the application deadline of October 1, 2015. For more information contact the City of Ithaca Human Resources/Civil Service Department at (607) 274-6539.

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Newsline . ........................................... 3-7 Personal Health .............................. 11 Sports ................................................... 12

ART S & E NTE RTAINME NT

Stage ..................................................... 14 Music . ................................................... 15 Art . ....................................................... 16 Film ....................................................... 17 TimesTable ..................................... 21-24 HeadsUp . ............................................. 24 Classifieds...................................... 25-26 Real Estate........................................... 27 Cover Photo: Walls in the Old Chapter House (Photo: Marshall Hopkins) Cover Design: Marshall Hopkins

ON THE W E B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. B i l l C h a i s s o n , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , 6 07-277-70 0 0 x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m K e r i B l a k i n g e r, W e b E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J o s h B r o k a w, S t a f f R e p o r t e r , x 225 R e p o r t e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C h r i s H a r r i n g t o n , E d i t o r i a l a s s i s t a n t , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Brian Ar nold, Photographer P h o t o g r a p h e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Steve Lawrence, Sports Editor, Ste vespo rt sd u d e@gmai l .co m M i c h a e l N o c e l l a , F i n g e r L a k e s S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 236 Sp o rt s@Flcn .o rg M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r e c t o r / D e s i g n e r , x 226 P r o d u c t i o n @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m P e t e M i o, A d v e r t i s i n g D i r e c t o r , x 214 P e t e @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m G e o r g i a C o l i c c h i o, A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 220 G e o r g i a @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J i m K i e r n a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 219 J k i e r n a n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Cy n d i B r o n g , x 211; J u n e S e a n e y A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Rick Blaisdell, Chris Eaton, Les Jink s Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C o n t r i b u t o r s : Barbara Adams,Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Cassandra Palmyra, Arthur Whitman, and Bryan VanCampen.

T he ent i re c o ntents o f the Ithaca T i mes are c o p y r i ght © 2 0 1 5 , b y newsk i i nc . All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $69 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 607-277-7000, FAX 607277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i me s G a z e t t e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHER By Br i an Ar nol d

What Has Been the highlight of your summer so far?

“ Grassroots.” —Cameron Sheldrake

“Sitting in my backyard this morning; the breeze was perfect.” —Cary Joseph

“Being unemployed for the first time.” —Jenn Caiello

“Just enjoying this nice weather.” —Joaquim Jones

“Grassroots! It was so sunny and the music was so good.” ­—Molly Willisallen

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Pollution

200 Tons of Lead Laden Soil to Go

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his summer, visitors to the Ithaca Falls have come across rather intimidating yellow signs from the Environmental Protection Agency warning them of lead contamination in the Fall Creek gorge. In September, people trekking to the falls are likely to find crews removing the dirty soil so that the signs can stop scaring tourists and work may proceed on improvements in the area. According to Don Graham, an on-site coordinator with the EPA, about 200 tons of soil will be removed from the Ithaca Falls natural area to complete the cleanup; his estimate right now is that “the work will be done in plus or minus a month.” The contamination is concentrated at the base of the cliffs on the southern side of the gorge, mostly in piles of scree. “It’s not a huge amount of material,” Graham said, “but with only one way in and one way out there are some logistics involved in getting it out of the gorge and shipping it off site to disposal.” Graham hopes the EPA-coordinated cleanup, which he says will be paid for by Superfund monies, won’t require closing off the area. One or two “mini-excavators,” of a skid-steer/Bobcat style, will likely be the machinery used to remove soil within the gorge, which will be bagged a ton at a time or put in roll-off dumpsters until it’s shipped off. A release was sent out by the city on June 16 saying that lead contamination above acceptable levels had been found in the Fall Creek gorge. That was based on testing in May, which the state Department of Environmental Conservation requested from the EPA. The request originated with Common Council, which asked that a contamination study be performed during talks about upgrading the Lake Street Park at the Falls entrance. According to Nels Bohn of the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency, 19 different grids of 250 square feet each were tested in May. According to a “community update” released by the EPA in July, half the soil samples tested were above the “Residential Screening” level of 400 parts per million (or over 400 milligrams of lead per kilogram of soil, for those who are metrically inclined). Findings of contamination above that 400-ppm level is the federal standard for taking action. A more comprehensive second round of testing in July was performed “to corral in exactly where the contamination was,” Graham said. A $4.8 million, two-year cleanup of the Falls area was completed in 2004 by the EPA, which removed over 6,000 tons of soil. Contamination at the site stems from the Ithaca Gun factory operating 5

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Yellow saw horses in the vicinity of the Ithaca Falls warn visitors of lead contamination. (Photo: Josh Brokaw)

there until 1986, and sometimes testing their wares by firing into the falls. According to a report by Kirk Johnson in the Oct. 15, 2000, New York Times, concentrations of lead on the site were greater than 215,000 parts per million before that initial remediation. “Our goal is to reach 400 ppm,” Graham said, “and that was attained back in 2004. What we think might have happened is that work done up top might have resulted in materials redepositing in the area.” A cleanup performed by Paragon Environmental Construction on top of the gorge cliffs in an area that will become a new “Falls Overlook” park site was completed in early June. About 2,000 tons of soil was removed at the top of the cliff, according to Bohn. Other clean-up work Assignedcounsel contin u ed from page 3

Tompkins County uses its assigned counsel program as the first stop for indigent defense, indigent defendants in Schuyler County are typically represented by the public defender. If there’s a conflict, the case is instead assigned to the conflict defender. If there is yet again a conflict, then the case goes to assigned counsel. Rossi said that only comes out to around 80 to 100 assigned counsel cases per year. (In contrast, Tompkins County’s Assigned Counsel Office processes around 3,000 cases per year.) Rossi said that currently Schuyler’s assigned counsel list is down to about 10 attorneys and, although that’s enough to cover the current caseload, “We’re looking for more depth, more experience.” He added, “We’d definitely be looking to draw

was finished early in 2015 on a private portion of the Gun Hill site owned by Travis Hyde Properties, which plans a 45townhouse development there. When the contamination was first reported in June, some stated that people should not go down into the natural area around the falls. A yellow public works sawhorse with a No Trespassing sign was placed at the entrance for a day or two. Those worries might be a tad overblown; according to Graham, most of the contamination can be avoided if one stays on the path and away from less trod area underneath the southern cliff face. His message was wash your hands and don’t eat the dirt, and you should be fine. • —Josh

B r o k aw

on … a deeper pool of legal talent.” Tompkins County, of course, would not be providing assistance for free, but County Administrator Joe Mareane said he didn’t anticipate any notable profits from any potential agreement: “I don’t think we’re looking at it as a money bonanza or anything like that.” Although the case would not specifically benefit Tompkins County, Mareane said that it could benefit Tompkins County assigned counsel attorneys who may get assigned additional cases. It would also, of course, benefit any Tompkins County residents who may get arrested in Schuyler County and find themselves in need of indigent defense services. At this point, all talks are still in the early stages. Mareane said, “There aren’t any deals in place. It’s just an exploratory conversation we’re having.” • —Keri

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ichard Bennett began his duties as Ithaca’s Rescue Mission director on June 1. Ithaca became the fourth Rescue Mission shelter for the homeless in upstate New York when the Syracuse-based organization took over the administration of services at 618 W. State St. from the Red Cross in February 2014. Ithaca Times: So what’s your story? What brought you to the Rescue Mission? Richard Bennett: I’ve been in addiction and treatment services for 20 years, and when this opportunity came up it seemed like a wonderful way of taking on a new challenge and serving people who really are struggling. I worked at Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services for a little over 10 years. My wife Tammy and I moved to Ithaca in 2004. We were living in California and really enjoying the sunshine and warmth. Then we had a baby. While the baby was planned, what was unplanned was the pullback toward family we felt. I found an ad for CARS on the New York state website, came out for a visit, and fell in love with the area. We’re equidistant between the grandparents here. Part of what drew me to the Rescue Mission was they really believe we can end hunger and homelessness, and they’re passionate about it. Our job is to love people and care for people by taking care of basic needs related to a roof over people’s heads and food in their bellies and then we can go from there. IT: For those who don’t know what the Rescue Mission does, what services does it provide here in Ithaca? RB: We have a 20-person capacity shelter here [on State Street] and 25 low-cost, singleroom occupancy beds that include a house on Court Street. Those are designed to help people make their first permanent step into housing. They’re people who are working and need time to put the pieces back together. We’ve got three case managers in Ithaca, and 12 staff total here. The Rescue Mission is nearly 90-percent funded from sales at the 16 Thrifty Shopper locations, and through donations, with some local grants, too. When we have someone comes in who needs clothes, we can give them a voucher for the Thrifty Shopper and they can get a suit for a job interview or whatever they need. We also have a food bank that’s now open seven days a week, from 9 to 11 in the Richard Bennett (Photo: Josh Brokaw)

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morning and 2 to 4 in the afternoon. And there’s the Friendship Center, which is sort of like a living room for the homeless. It’s a safe place for our clients to get off the street, get a warm cup of coffee, a cold drink of water, to rest a little bit. Our clients can get mail delivered here, and we provide what we call linkage services, helping people connect with different services. Our last fiscal year, which ended September 30, we provided 2,282 overnight stays in our emergency and low-cost housing, to 439 people, and we helped 100 people find permanent housing and had 48 find employment. IT: What challenges does Ithaca provide to your mission of ending homelessness? RB: The combination of the Jungle closing, and the huge increase in heroin and opiate use has come together to create a much more significant number of homeless people than we’ve seen before in this community. With our 20-

person capacity, we sometimes end up turning people away. I’ve seen us have anywhere from one to two people waiting to up to 10 people since I’ve been here. You see Ithaca on these lists, the top 10 places to live, and all our resources here, and it’s created an incredible demand for housing. A lot of our clients just don’t get to compete on an even playing field. They have gaps in their résumés, gaps in rental histories, and other struggles that don’t allow them to compete for places. IT: What programs or points of emphasis are you focusing on right now? RB: Focusing on “housing first” is our biggest push, getting people into safe, supportive housing as quickly as possible. We want to be able to provide treatment on demand. When someone comes in, they’re ready for change. In three days, maybe not—it’s like New Year’s resolutions, when you say you’re going to do something more or something less. Something like 80 percent of people who join a gym aren’t going in 60 or 90 days. We want to be able to anchor that feeling for change to something real and tangible, and meet them in the moment. We’re working on doing more formal outreach to take care of basic needs, and having our staff go out and meet our clients where they are. There used to be a saying something like ‘I don’t care what you say until I know that you care.’ Many of our clients have been burned, and don’t really have a lot of trust in the world around them and are pretty sure life is always going to be this way. Sometimes our job is to help them hold out hope for a better future. IT: And what can people do to help? RB: Certainly we have restrictions over housing here, but we really are rich as far as resources go in this community. We had a church just donate a new freezer for us. Sometimes we’re able to give people bus tickets. We take donations of funding and put them to good use, and we love people who can volunteer their time and resources. You can help man the food bank, or sit in the Friendship Center and provide support, just by being there. Or teach a class, on anything from how to balance a bankbook to how to play a kazoo. • —Josh T

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Ups&Downs ▶ Iron women on horseback, Pam Karner (large animal veterinarian who co-owns Starland Vet practice in Ithaca) and Rachel Lodder (Newfield), just competed in and finished the Tevis Cup endurance (horse) race in California on Aug. 1. This is a 100 mile race through extremely difficult terrain and with (this year at least) high heat. The race is highly regarded as the most difficult 100-mile endurance race in the world. To finish this race is quite a feat- like Hawaii Ironman triathlon kind of feat. Riders from all over the world compete in this race. If you care to respond to something in this column, or publish your own grievances or plaudits, e-mail editor@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “Ups & Downs.”

Heard&Seen ▶ Fireman’s tales, Tompkins County Public Library and the City of Ithaca Fire Department will partner for “Firefighter Storytime,” a familyfriendly program filled with firefighter stories, books and fun, August 19 at 11 a.m. in the Library’s Thaler/ Howell Programming Room. This special themed storytime will be facilitated by guest reader Thomas Basher, Jr., of the Ithaca Fire Department. Basher will share some of his favorite books about firefighters and fire trucks. At the conclusion of storytime, families are invited to stay for crafts and snacks. ▶ Top Stories on the Ithaca Times website for the week of July 29-August 4 include: 1) South Seneca, Tburg Merger a Success 2) New Directions for Groton Olde Home Days 3) Selling Ithaca-made Food to the Rest of the World 4) 11-Story State Street Project Presented, Questioned 5) A Special Camp for Special Teenagers For these stories and more, visit our website at www.ithaca.com.

question OF THE WEEK

Do you ever drink alcoholic beverages? Please respond at ithaca.com. L ast Week ’s Q uestion: D o you make an effort to

purchase locally grown food and locally made products?

55 percent of respondents answered “yes” and 45 percent answered “no”

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Editorial

surroundedbyreality

It Is Finished ... Mostly O n Friday, July 31 the new Ithaca Commons was declared “substantially complete” and it was therefore Tammy Baker’s last day of work. Baker was the project outreach coordinator, which basically means that she has been at the eye of the storm since April 2013 with the fury of the storm perhaps slackening during the winter. Many Ithacans took an oddly fatalistic attitude toward the Commons project as it dragged on through the years. More than a few began to take the jokes about it never being finished rather seriously. During the period when all the underground work was going on and NYSEG kept everyone else waiting for weeks because they were short-staffed, Ithacans watched as men (and some women, although not many) in hard hats dug holes, installed pipes and then filled in the holes again. Pause. Press repeat. We saw the same few computergenerated renderings of a finished Commons over and over again until they seemed a bit like an illustration from the 1964 World’s Fair that showed everyone owning their own helicopter and flying to work. The unreality of the situation was maintained until Bank Alley was more or less completed in the spring. Yes, they left a big pile of sand next to the new pavilion. Yes, they used the future site of the water feature ... or is that the reading room? ... as a place to store equipment and materials. But the essential elements of the Sa-

Parking Roulette

saki design were suddenly apparent. The potholed concrete of old was replaced with smooth, textured expanses of brick. In the place of the rough Brutalistic planters and walls of yore people saw clean, substantial blocks of granite and arched fences of black iron. The old Commons always seemed to have nice plantings in the beds, but the new vegetation has a pedagogic bent with a heavy emphasis on native species including, of all things, ferns. Most of the structures of the old Commons were built in the middle of old East State Street, right over the trunk lines of all the utilities. That is why the new Commons design has a wide promenade down the middle and has put the features (many more of them mobile) in a double row between the storefronts and the central promenade. The honey-locust trees that had grown diseased and root-bound have been replaced by a wider variety of tree species, although there are still some honey-locusts. Many of the building owners have spent a great deal of money to restore the façades of their properties. Where once the large trees hid them, now Ithacans can admire the mixture of 19th and 20th century architecture styles that line the pedestrian mall. The less said about the gateways— which look like a nightmare that H.G. Wells might have had—the better. If you have been staying away from the Commons, your exile is over. •

By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

News item: Earlier this month, 21 new parking stations went into use, replacing 326 coin-fed “lollipop” meters on city curbs. The new stations will charge for parking based on a vehicle’s license plate number, digitally tracking a car’s time parked with no need for a display ticket. If more time is needed, a text message can be sent to a driver’s cell phone, letting them pay on their smartphone for more time. Frank Nagy, director of parking for the City of Ithaca, said he expects parking not only to be easier, but the new stations will increase parking revenues as well. “There are so many easy ways to pay,” Nagy said. “Instead of having no quarters and taking a chance when you take a space, now you can extend your time from anywhere.” By month’s end, users will be able to pay through an app on their phone, allowing them to pay for their parking space without leaving their car. (Ithaca Journal, July 10) Sometimes fortune smiles on the righteous. Philomena Cornstarch, 84 years old, gingerly backed her Buick Skylark into a prime parking spot on West Buffalo Street between Cayuga and Geneva streets. Traffic, heavy for a Thursday afternoon, made it clear that such spaces were a rare commodity this day. Though spry for her years, she was unhurried as she extricated herself from the vehicle. She draped her cane, used more for a sense of security than actual support, over her left arm and pulled her change purse from her handbag in order to buy some time from the meter. She glanced up to check the meter, but in its place was a forlorn-looking steel post with a paper bag on its top. There was a similar post at the space behind where her car was parked. In fact, stretching as far as she could see in either direction there were empty posts where the parking meters used to be. It takes a lot to nonplus a Cornstarch, but Mrs. C was nonplussed. As luck would

have it, though, a helpful Millennial was passing by and paused to render assistance. She explained to Mrs. Cornstarch that a handy parking station was located on the other side of the street, and that parking could be purchased there. The young woman also suggested that the transaction could be done remotely with the use of a smartphone app. Mrs. Cornstarch thanked her benefactor and set out to find the parking station. Not to belabor the point, but there was a certain ponderousness in the elderly woman’s movements, and what with waiting for the light to change and crossing the street, it was a full two minutes before the parking station was reached. Squinting in the sunlight, Mrs. Cornstarch proceeded to read the instructions on the screen. She pressed a button to start. She selected English as the language. The screen asked for her license plate number. “Consarn it,” she muttered. She didn’t know it. Still, Cornstarches had been shopping in downtown Ithaca since Simeon DeWitt was in knee britches, by cracky, and she wasn’t going to be stymied by some newfangled parking station. A parking drone with automated plate recognition technology floated overhead as she set out for the corner of Cayuga and Buffalo to re-cross the street. Some five minutes later, armed with her plate number and now leaning heavily on her cane, Mrs. Cornstarch returned to the parking station. As she was set to begin the process again, she looked up to see, across the street, a brown-shirted parking violations officer with her foot on the Cornstarch Skylark, issuing a ticket. You might have seen the news story: “Senior Citizen Charged with Damaging Public Property”. Hard to know what the world is coming to when old folks are the vandals. •

YourOPINIONS

Thanks for All the Help

Golfers from all over upstate New York attended Trumansburg Rotary’s recent 17th Annual Golf Classic at the Trumansburg Golf Course, and the weather gods smiled down on us. Proceeds from the event benefit local programs, Rotary Exchange (sending two high school students abroad this year, while welcoming one from overseas), and supporting the fight for polio eradication worldwide. Our 23-member club is working with Educate the Children International, local Rotary clubs, and a Rotary club in Nepal to aid in recovery from recent earthquakes and to provide sanitary facilities 6 T

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that will allow girls in Nepal to attend school. Trumansburg Rotary is grateful for the generous support of the Classic’s sponsors: Audrey Edelman RealtyUSA, Char and Mike McGuire, Chemung Canal Trust, CINTAS, CSP Management, Dock Curtis MD Memorial, Ehrhart Propane, Life’s So Sweet Chocolates, Maines Paper & Food Service, Premier Catering, Ciaschi, Dietershagen, Little, Mickelson and Company, Wegmans, and Rogan’s Corners. The following businesses provided prizes for our players: Dick’s Sporting Goods, Wide Awake Bakery, Finger Lakes Distilling, Gimme! Coffee, Americana Vineyards, Little Venice, Ron Don’s Village


Treblocbuilding

CommunityConnections

He Brings Turkish Culture U By M a rjor i e O l d s

nsal Ayar was 17 years old when he made his way from Turkey to New York City. Leaving behind his parents, his sister and brother he worked very long hours as a waiter, dishwasher, bartender, cook. Sometimes he was very lonely and homesick, but he had big dreams for the future he would create, so he held steady. And good things happened: He met his future wife, Carina, from Tompkins County, and he learned a lot about the restaurant scene in the city. “It was great living in New York City, but after we fell in love and married, Carina and I began thinking about putting down roots and raising a family.” Carina had an MBA from Ithaca College and a good job in the city, but after their first child was born, she too was willing to pull up stakes. Luckily, they chose Ithaca. “Tompkins County has been very welcoming to me. It is a community that places great value on education, and upon diversity. Here we have grandparents nearby who spend time with our children. Our local school is wonderful; it’s like a private school with so many resources, such wonderful teachers ...We are happy here.” While Unsal has been working day and night to open and now operate the Istanbul Turkish Kitchen on Third Street in Ithaca, Carina has helped with the business and design aspects of this endeavor. Unsal’s in-laws have graciously helped out with the children and provided support as needed. “I believe in and practice respect for all individuals ... customers and workers. We are a small staff team here. Everyone knows everyone else’s job. If the cooking is caught up, and we are short a dishwasher, I wash dishes ...We all get along and help each other. I model what I hope the staff will do. And they do.” Unsal’s staff relates how comfortable they are working at the Istanbul. Many have been there since its opening in May 2014. “As I am cooking I enjoy the Turkish music. I joke with the staff. As I prepare authentic dishes from cities and villages in my home country, I call out the place of origin. The staff laughs while they get to know a little bit of my country. We do everything together, and this brings out good spirit.” What is it like juggling family life with restaurant life? “I love providing hospitality. I couldn’t be any happier. We are open sevens days a week and people can come at lunchtime or dinner hour or any time in between. If I have time, I run home with a beautiful drive along the lake, and there is never any traffic, compared to traffic in Turkey. I play soccer with my

children, or I work on menus or ads on my laptop. Then I head back to work.” I’m always happy, since I have plenty of energy and try to be as good as I can be as a restaurant owner, a father, a husband, a son. My children have an incredible future ahead for them here.” Every summer Unsal’s parents spend a month with their Ithaca family. Unsal’s father, who has operated his much loved family-owned bakery in Istanbul for 30 years and Unsal’s mother, are on tap for advice, recipes, and intricate Turkish

Unsal Ayar (Photo: provided)

furnishings for the Istanbul. They too have fallen in love with this area. When Unsal’s boys are a little older they may enjoy a summer vacation in Turkey with grandparents, aunts and uncles. Unsal will always love and miss his homeland, his family and his friends there, but the move to Ithaca has only strengthened that love. “I am proud,” he said, “to be part of this beautiful community; to create a cultural spot to share with this community.” “Running a busy restaurant is so much more than preparing food,” he said. “I order and receive the ingredients and the supplies. I prepare the food with attention to Turkish spices and traditional marinades. I work with the staff, and am here to assist whenever we are open. I realize with so much going on at any time, there are so many tiny details that can go wrong ... But luckily mostly it goes right. People seem to appreciate the hard work, judging from the generous comments posted on our website about their time at the Istanbul.” •

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percent union labor, and 49-percent local, with none of that crossing over; 19-percent of labor was local and 23-percent union at Planned Parenthood; and 37-percent union and 14-percent local on a six-story building in Collegetown. Noah Demarest and Robert Morache of STREAM Collaborative were recently added to the project to assist in “facade design and three-dimensional visualization assistance to better illustrate how a building of this scale relates to the existing urban fabric,” as it says on their website. They showed some buildings from Utica and Providence built no later than World War II, which inspired their reworking of this project’s design. “We wanted to look at precedents from 80 to 100 years ago,” Morache said. “There’s always a gesture made at the third or fourth story … and this classical notion of a base, middle, and top.” So far as the numbers are concerned, Campus Advantage vice president Ronnie Macejewski presented a chart showing what the building will pay with an abatement versus the status quo. The current assessed value of the property is $1.8 million, which comes out to $70,200 in taxes this year. Without improvement, Campus Advantage projects the property to be worth just over $2.5 million in 2027, and to have a tax burden of $112,782. In contrast, the company projects that completing the project would cause an increase in assessment value to $25.9 million in 2018, and just over $44 million in 2027. By that last year of the abatement, when Campus Advantage would only be getting 10-percent off, they project a payment of $1,751,967 in taxes. The abatement starts at 100-percent in 2018 and steps down 10-percent every year for a decade; Macejewski told the room that the “cumulative increase” in taxes paid over that time by the building would be nearly $7.4 million. It was also stated that a studio apartment in the building would likely rent in the mid-900s. Peter Wissoker asked Campus Advantage CEO Michael Peter why his company, with $210 million in projects started last year, needed tax abatements to build in Ithaca. “We know we’re a great place for you to be,” Wissoker said. “My only question is why private enterprise can’t take the risk yourself rather than asking us to subsidize your risk a little bit ... I’m sure you have a lower cost of capital than the city of Ithaca.” “We’re operating within rules that you designed yourself,” Peter responded. “We’re not asking for anything you haven’t offered out.” Wissoker asked if Campus Advantage would still build without the tax abatements. Peter responded with a flat no. Other criticisms from citizens included the height—116 feet, in a 120-foot zone— shadows that may be cast, and how parking will be affected by the building having no accompanying parking. The most eloquent word of caution against the project and T

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problems that denser urban development brings was issued by John Bleakley, later that evening before the planning board. “How lucky we are to have such romantic scenes and scenery here … For years, driving up 96B people have had a view of distant views, so please consider making this line of view inclusive to all and not exclusive for only a few,” Bleakley said. He then continued to quote a portion of H.P. Lovecraft’s poem, “Azathoth.” “When age fell upon the world, and wonder went out of the minds of men; when grey cities reared to smoky skies tall towers grim and ugly, in whose shadow none might dream of the sun or of spring’s flowering meads ...” Another abatement hearing on the 301 E. State St. project is currently scheduled for Aug. 25. • Youropinions contin u ed from page 6

Pub, Lucas Vineyards, Creekside Café, Chateau LaFayette Reneau, Atlas Bowl, Exercise Enterprise, State Theater, Smok’n Bones, American Legion Post 770, Mr. Chicken, Trumansburg Liquor, Lakewood Winery, Two Goats Brewing, Ginny Lee Café, Stonecat Café, Seneca Harbor Station, New York Pizzeria, Rooster Fish Café, Myer Farm Distillers, Good to Go, NAPA Auto Parts, Skyland Art Barn, Hosmer Winery, Jerlando’s, Elmira Savings Bank, Wright’s Beverage, Curly’s Family Restaurant, Hazelnut Kitchen, Red Newt Winery & Bistro, Wagner Brewing, and Dano’s on Seneca. – Scott Anderson, President, and Ben Curtis, Event Organizer, Trumansburg Rotary

It’s a Natural Area

Plaudits to Ronda Roaring for her comments noted in the July 29 Ithaca Times article covering the Ithaca Falls. Ithaca has been noted, at least the last 30 to 40 yrs, for not going to people or groups knowledgeable about a subject, but instead going to a survey by a group who will come up with an opinion that is what the powers that be want. Really? $240,000? For a park? Cut the sacred trees so the falls will be visible? – R.L. Sheffield, Ithaca

Well Done, Elizabeth

On Saturday, Elizabeth Ann Clune will don her wetsuit and swim across Cayuga Lake (with her nephew Canon Shaw at her side in his kayak) and she will hand over a very generous donation check to Hospicare. Elizabeth set out to raise $5,000, and once she got her fundraising wheels turning, and mobilized her vast network of friends and family, she is now somewhere north of $17,000! That said, the Women Swimmin’ event is still in need of sponsors to support the amazing work of Hospicare, and readers can still go to www.hospicare.org and make a donation. Once again, I congratulate Elizabeth on her ambitious efforts across the board, and I wish her luck in her swim on Saturday. – Steve Lawrence, Spencer u g u s t

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A New Chapter Owners of the storied pub to rebuild in 2016 B y J o s h B r o k aw

A

ny old building can earn itself a plaque declaring it “historic” in this young country, purely by continuing to exist while its neighbors disappear. What makes a location feel “iconic,” as the Chapter House Pub was so often called, after it burned this past April, is harder to identify. The old pictures hanging everywhere and the initials and messages scratched into the tables and walls certainly gave Chapter House patrons the sense that others had come before. Perhaps it is a sense of history destined to repeat itself, of being in a line of others who have shown up to this place before for reasons easily understood: to talk, drink, eat, take the edge off, laugh or cry. Perhaps that is why so many mourn the loss of a longtime barroom while saving an old train station or factory is purely the pursuit of enthusiasts. However these attachments form, it was announced a few weeks ago the Chapter House will return next year in a new building modeled after the old, according to pub owner John Hoey and property owner Sebastian Mascaro. After a public promise to rebuild the Chapter House, it seems a good time to round up some reminisces from those 8

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Th e C h a p t e r H o u s e b u i l d i n g i n 1 9 0 5 , Wh e n i t H o u s e d a n A p o t h e c a ry. ( P h o t o : P r ov i d e d) involved in running this one old, beloved place. Though it’s a safe bet to say that there have been far more stories forgotten about an establishment around in one form or another since the 1920s than we could ever collect. Jim’s Place to Chapter House In 1924 James Floros opened “Jim’s Place” on Stewart Avenue. Floros, with his brother Peter, had founded a candy company in 1909. The first media mention of the location as a drinking establishment is during the first year after the repeal of Prohibition. In an Oct. 3, 1934 story in the Cornell Daily Sun that recaps a hearing before a state liquor commissioner. Stewart Avenue residents presented petitions “stating that the establishment is an evil influence to student morals and also a public nuisance.” In a “Variety” gossip column the next day, one of those petitioners was said to have “confessed the main drawback to the beer dispensary was, of all things, the clatter of dishes in the kitchen.” Jim’s survived with its newly-acquired liquor license intact and continued to sell drinks through the ‘30s and ‘40s; Kevin Willis, the son of a former owner of Jim’s, has those state licenses framed in the basement of his suburban Philadelphia

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home. “To keep them in order, Dad would tack (the licenses) one on top of the other,” Willis said. “I can remember deliveries going down a slide into the basement, which was filled with cases of Blue Boy soda and beer. I used those as building blocks, playing down there. And I remember my younger brother sneaking into the kitchen and coming out with his arm bright red … he got it stuck in a jar of maraschino cherries.” Willis’ father Frank bought Jim’s Place from Floros in 1953 in a partnership with John Leonardo; his mother Mary (née O’Connell) and aunt bought the building from Floros’ estate in 1963. In 1965, Frank changed the name to “The Chapter House” to reflect the close relationship the place had with fraternity life, and also, as his daughter Karen Ocello said, he had an answer for people asking a reason for the name change: “My name isn’t Jim.” Before his return to Ithaca, Frank ran country clubs in Olean and Williamsport, Pennsylvania after graduating from the Cornell hotel school in 1950. Ocello remembers that her father had good times at the pub, and so did she while growing up there. “I remember two of us when we were toddlers,” she said, “opening up the beer

taps and watching it flow. Wasn’t that fun!” As she grew older, Ocello said she had a box to stand on so she could run the dishwasher, make salads after school, and paint bread with garlic and oil. Under the Willis family’s ownership, the Chapter House was very much a restaurant as well as a drinking establishment. Ocello remembers her father advertising in the papers with lines like “We’re down to our last 100,000 miles of spaghetti. Get it while you can!” Wednesday nights were $1 all-you-can-eat pasta. Pizzas were made with provolone rather than mozzarella, and during most of his 15 years at the Chapter House Willis employed one cook: Jimmy Federico. “Jimmy was an Italian immigrant, and he’d come in and clean behind the bar, mop the floors in the morning,” Ocello said. “He’d bring these dishes to my father— chicken cacciatore, a beef stew with red sauce—and they were good. My father said ‘Why the hell do I have him doing what he’s doing when he should be in the kitchen cooking?’” Ocello only got a “guest appearance” from her father on her birthday; March 17 was the busiest day of the year at the Chapter House, she said. “I never saw it, but they did serve green beer on St. Patrick’s Day, and had


a huge crowd. It was a zoo, and it didn’t had a short, matter what day of the week it was.” stubby cigar Times at the Chapter House could get hanging out of wild. One account from the Daily Sun in his mouth. My December 1966 recounts a march across father went up campus by “approximately 75 Cornell men, to this kid and most of them freshmen,” who left Jim’s said ‘If you want Chapter House full of holiday spirits to the bartender’s carol at the girls’ dorms. attention, rap “The management of Jim’s appeared a quarter on relieved,” the article continued, “when the bar and say someone led the singing group out. As “Chauncey! their gala mood developed, they had begun Chauncey!”’ to break glasses and snatch slices of pizza Moose lifted from passing waiters.” up this kid A remembrance of 18th-birthday by the shirt, festivities by Dan Weinberg in the Cornell looked over his alumni magazine in 1986 describes round shoulder and after round of “sloe gin fizzes, rum and saw my father Coke, and Singapore slings,” despite the laughing, and new drinker having only a very foggy clue knew he’d been of what these concoctions contained. had.” Another tradition in the wintertime Eventually, was making a special hot toddy recipe that Ocello thinks included “brown sugar and butter and her father whatnot,” Ocello said. “They’d make a big wanted production of how secret it was and take something a cardboard pizza boxes and tape up the little slowerwindows to the kitchen.” paced than the From the ceilings hung personal mugs Chapter that old regulars returning for a visit would House. The ask to be taken down to fill once again, family sold and the musical entertainment Ocello out in 1968 remembered was an a cappella group called and moved the “Cayuga Waiters,” who sang in the to West middle room. Virginia, Ocello said her father was one of the where first barkeeps in New York to apply for Frank took a license to serve alcohol without a full a position menu. During the slow summers, Willis directing preferred to put out pickled eggs and a perfunctory hot dog machine and close the kitchen. Ocello remembered her father as fun loving, given to practical jokes and barroom antics, with her mother “a little more on the serious side” and taking care of the bookwork. Frank was a big Cornell hockey supporter, often hiring the players and hanging backlit posters of them in the center room. Ocello remembers that her father had a “little crew” that were often up for a joke. “He was catering sandwiches for a while, selling them to the houses,” Ocello said, “and one of his drivers ran into a little competition. He had his fraternity brothers come out and park the other driver in at the sorority house. They did a lot of things like that. Sometimes when things got too quiet at the Chapter House, my dad would look around and see who was missing. He’d say to the bartender, ‘Maybe we should hold a little money out for bail? What do you think?’” On another occasion, Frank To p t o B o t t o m : C h a p t e r H o u s e had some fun with a young, timid m e n u , J o h n a n d J e n n i f e r C l e m e n t, freshman, trying to make his way to the J o h n Hoey outside the Pub, K aren bar for a drink. O c e l l o , a n d J o h n H o e y (A l l “We had a very intimidating P r ov i d e d , e xc e p t O c e l l o b y J o s h bartender, Moose O’Neal. I don’t think I B r o k aw) . ever knew his real first name. He always

Amygdala and Yeast John Van Boven bought the Chapter House in 1968, some months after his first restaurant, the Alt Heidelberg, burned down. The German immigrant had cooked quality German fare at his restaurant and before that at the Rathskeller, in the hotel school, but still was advertising $1 spaghetti nights in the early ‘70s. When John died unexpectedly in 1975, his son Harold was working on his dissertation in economics at SUNY-Binghamton. He came back to Ithaca to run the Chapter House along with some other rental properties the family owned. “I put the business theory (à la Peter Drucker) and economic theory that I had learned in the classroom to practical use,” Van Boven said via email. “Revenues soared way beyond anything my father ever took in. As an ‘intellectual type’ I was shocked. I was thinking, do the students ever study? My written business plan and operations focused on stimulating the students’ amygdala (primeval brain) to give them what they wanted . . . and it was not food, nor drink. “We served “finger food,” enough beer to fill Cayuga Lake (keg and bottle), hard liquor, and wine,” Van Boven continued. “According to my distributors, some years I was the biggest beer account in Tompkins County.” The Phi Psi 500 foot race began in 1975 and included the Chapter House as one of its chug-a-beer pit stops. Other antics included Van Boven getting kidnapped for a Delta Upsilon scavenger hunt during rush week, a Guinness and Playboy “dart night” promotion, and one lucky bartender dating Dallas star Audrey Landers for a time. The conversation was edifying, too, Van Boven said. “After they had a drink or two (or three) I learned so much about non-Euclidean geometry, linguistics, entomology, entropy, etc. Some students would join us. Our discussions were out of this world.” Van Boven closed the Chapter House in fall 1983 after the drinking age was increased, and sold the building to Kimball Realty in April 1985. Charles Torrance and two fellow hotel school students tried to make a go of it as a non-alcoholic juice bar for a year, but the location was empty when James Clement started looking for somewhere to brew beer in 1987. Clement, an attorney in New York City, had taken a strong interest in the science of aging—he now runs a stem cell laboratory in California—and his reading led him to molecular biology, which led to playing with yeast, and then to wine and home-brewing. It took nine months to rehabilitate the Chapter House and turn it into a brewpub,

food services for Marshall University. “After a long time of having your own place there are headaches that add up,” Ocello said. “The laws were changing … at one time when Rockefeller was governor they were talking about coding bar glasses with how many ounces they hold.”

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chapterhouse contin u ed from page 9

Clement said, with all of his 11-barrel capacity brewery equipment on display. He found a basement closet that “had stacks of photographs, going back to the 1930s,” and in some cases found the exact (less faded) place where a photograph had previously hung on the wall. Patrons started bringing their own photographs, and sometimes “new photos would just appear.” “We were cool with people scratching their name into the tables and the walls, so long as there was nothing hateful in it,” Clement said. The reputation the Chapter House had in its later years for a good place to

converse was part of the original concept he had, Clement said. “We were incredibly strict with our ID’ing, which kept us in good graces of the police and also gave us a reputation so we got a tremendous business from the 6,000plus grad students at Cornell. Most of them just didn’t want to be around crazy drunk adolescent undergrads.” Clement started by serving four of his own beers, but demand dictated that he put in more taps. “We started taking on microbrews and import beers and built a huge cooler downstairs with 40 taps. It really made us one of the most unique places in New York. We started getting visitors from literally around the country coming all the way there to go to a place that had just

microbrews.” The older crowd and craft beers did not eliminate all the barroom high jinks. One of Clement’s first hires was a guy named McGee, he said, a rugby player, a “very shy stand-up comedian,” and “also the Ivy League chugging champion.” “He drank an entire yard of beer in five and a half seconds,” Clement said, “and we put that up on one of our chalkboards. Everybody wanted to see how fast they could drink that yard of beer … we had rules in place so people wouldn’t do it when they were already drunk. Because nobody could beat McGee’s record, we eventually had to bring it out to three or four places.” On Sunday nights in the ‘90s, the Chapter House was “packed with 60

The VoTes are being counted Use the ballot on page 20. Fill it out and send it in today or go to ithaca.com to cast your ballot.

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to 100 people standing and watching The Simpsons.” What Clement mostly remembers is the conversations. “Having that clientele of grad students, post docs and professors coming in on a daily basis sitting around the bar and most of them wanting to talk was one of the most enjoyable experiences of my life. In academia everything is siloed. It’s hard for professors in one field to talk to one another. At least for our tenure the Chapter House was the kind of place you could hold a conversation without going hoarse.” Clement sold off the brewing equipment in the late ‘90s and transitioned the Chapter House to a “sort of normal college bar” before moving to Florida in 1999. It was then that Hoey wholly took over management of the Chapter House, though he knew Clement from renting him an apartment in New York in the ‘80s and had been part of the investment team in the Vernon Valley brewery in New Jersey, which supplied the Chapter House with beers until it closed in 1992. “I paid for a study from the Cornell hospitality school,” Hoey said, “to see what people wanted there, some of the answers which I knew already. People weren’t interested in touring the brewpub anymore or touring the brewmaking area. They wanted more games, they wanted to see women working there, and weren’t interested in the food. The most important conclusion was they wanted to expand from beer and wine to a full liquor license. A lot of people would complain they didn’t come there with certain friends because they couldn’t get a hard drink.” Hoey says that the mystique of the place does factor into the decision to rebuild. “There are lots of stories of marriages coming from the Chapter House … there is a tradition to it, which is the driving force of why I’m going to rebuild it,” Hoey said. “No one in his right mind would start a new bar. The fact we’re rebuilding the Chapter House at the same location is an added plus, it takes some of the risk out. I do have the choice of taking all the insurance money and driving out into the sunset like General MacArthur in the Korean War.” •


health

Wired and Tired All the Time

Treat Adrenal Fatigue with Exercise and Massage By Bil l Ch ai s son

O

ne possible consequence of living a go-go lifestyle is to frequently have no idea where you put your keys. But a more serious consequence can be adrenal fatigue. The adrenal glands, located on top of your kidneys, secrete a number of different hormones that control the release of various chemicals in your blood stream, like glycogen and electrolytes. The adrenal glands are hooked into your sympathetic nervous system, the primary function of which is oversee your body’s “fight or flight” responses. The go-go lifestyle is essentially a non-stop string of stimuli to your sympathetic nervous system. According to Jaclyn Borza Maher, an Ithaca chiropractor who has a focus on adrenal fatigue, the chief symptom is feeling “tired and wired” at the same time. “I see a lot of this in my practice,” she said. “When I get a rush of them I find myself saying the same things over and over, although everyone is a little different.” Her clients are anxious and drinking caffeine 24/7, but they are exhausted. Different regions of the adrenal gland

secrete different hormones. The cortex produces corticosteroids, including cortisol and androgens, which are precursors to sex hormones. The medulla produces hormones that respond to stress, like epinephrine and norepinephrine. The adrenal glands are part of the endocrine system, which includes the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus, much of it connected via feedback loops. “I start with how much sleep someone is getting,” said Borza Maher. “Most people are drinking too much coffee. I try to get people down to one cup a day if they can. Some quit altogether, and other go to tea.” She said that it is best to have coffee with a nutrition-dense breakfast. Borza Maher likens the system that deals with stress to a set of gears, with each gland or organ like a single gear. “One doesn’t work without the other,” she said, “or the system is dysfunctional.” Ithaca Timesthe immune system, the She described digestive 2.4 x 5.5system and the adrenal glands as a “triad.” There are other components, but she focuses on those three.

Jaclyn Borza Maher (Provided)

“The adrenal gland is like a savings account,” she said. “It produces stress hormones, but if we keep withdrawing, then we overdraw the account, leading to a deficit of stress hormones.” The chiropractor said that people become too reliant on the boost they get from cortisol, which she called “adrenalism.” Chiropractors work on the nervous system, said Borza Maher. They try to calm it and break the fight-or-flight pattern. One approach is “cranial release” therapy. The idea is to restore the original rhythm of the electrical impulses in the nerves along the spinal column between the cranium and

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the sacrum (tailbone). “It should be a pulse that is timed with the breath,” said the chiropractor. “Stress changes the breath.” Borza Maher recommends behavioral changes like the practice of yoga, which is all about coordinating movement and breath, and light exercise, like taking a walk. Strenuous exercise, she said, taxes the adrenal glands. Adrenal fatigue is a “sub-clinical condition,” said Borza Maher. Blood work would not tend to reveal its presence. The adrenal glands are working; they are just overworked. In any case blood work is done in order to rule out the presence of pathology. Once behavioral cues have overdrawn the reservoir of adrenal hormones, the body is vulnerable to other stressors, like allergies. Food sensitivities and seasonal allergies lead to inflammations and adrenal fatigue can decrease the immune response to them. Borza Maher wrote an essay that summed up her views on adrenal fatigue and submitted it to Greenstar Cooperative Market to see if they were interested in holding a class on the subject. The class was held in May and was one of the best attended in the history of the wellness series. The chiropractor said that people were coming up to her after the session, telling her that they wished she had been able to go into more detail on certain aspects of the syndrome. The size of the response to her first class makes it likely that she will offer another. •

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Soaring is Awesome

Reaching 8,000 feet, covering 200 miles, at 60 mph By Ste ve L aw re nc e

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ike most of us Baby Boomer guys, Burke Carson used to be awesome. The difference is, he’s on the road to be awesome again. Back in the mid-‘70s, Carson, who lives in Ithaca, was flying sailplanes or gliders as a member of a club on West Hill. That club folded, and Burke said, “I did the raising a family thing, and didn’t take it up again until 2004.” Now Carson takes to the skies as often as possible at Harris Hill, and over the past week, he has been on terra firma as an official (in a communications capacity) for the National Championships at the soaring facility in Big Flats. While he hopes to someday compete in regional competitions, Burke is honest enough to say that he is “not quite at the level of these guys,” and he said, “There are flyers from Los Angeles, Georgia, Alabama, New York, Connecticut and

several from Canada.” He added, “Fortytwo pilots signed up, and at least half of them are highly competitive flyers.” The planes represent two classes: The

Coming in for a landing. (Photo: provided)

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feet before being released, and before it is finished with its flight it may reach altitudes of 8,000 feet and cover distances of 150-200 miles. “The contest director looks at the weather,” Carson said, “and figures out what is doable. A typical route might take competitors to Dansville, then they make the turn and go to Swain, maybe over parts of Pennsylvania and they average 50-60 miles-per-hour.” He added, “They look for thermal lift, they carry ballast water for extra weight and extra speed, and they might make a 5-15 mile circle as they reach one of the destinations and turn and head for the next one.” The event is spread out over a several day period from July 26 through Aug. 4, and Carson said everyone was very pleased that they had been able to fly on

every day save one (at this writing). He explained, “All the planes are equipped with GPS devices, and when the flyers return, they plug in the stick and the results are determined. They determine who went how far, for how long.” I asked Burke how long the typical course takes to complete, and he said, “They usually launch around 1 p.m., and land about 4 pm.” For the uninitiated (like me), it really is difficult to imagine that you can climb into a plane with no motor, get towed up to 2,000 feet, disengage from the tow plane and stay up for 4 hours and 200 miles. Burke and I have been friends for many years, and he has offered to take me up for a first-person account, and I’d love to do that. Please stay tuned … •


Local Artist/Musician Paints The World Around Him B y Wa r r e n G r e e n w o o d

On The Hill by William Benson (Photo Provided)

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erhaps the best thing I’ve discovered this summer is the art of William Benson. What is it with this crazy town? Why are there so many world-class artists packed into such a microscopic city? Is it the water? Ithaca’s position in the Cosmos? Someone should do a study. I discovered William Benson’s work accidentally, on display at Collegetown Bagels on Aurora Street. It is brilliant. Extraordinary stuff. And it has a populist touch. Ordinary people seem attracted to it. (I overheard a young person looking at one of Benson’s paintings saying, “I feel privileged just to be able to look at that!”) The works are impressionist landscapes— almost Academic Realism—of upstate New York. (But there is an added touch of Abstract Expressionism—geometric shapes and abstract textures. Later I was to discover this was actually the under-painting rather than added on. Benson uses traditional Renaissance geometric underpinnings under his works.) And the subject matter is local. Most of the works are of locations in or around Ithaca. And it is worth mentioning that Benson is an important cultural fixture here in Ithaca. He makes his living as a portrait painter (most recently he painted the CEO of the Cayuga Medical Center), was the chair of the board of the Saltonstall Foundation, has murals around town (including that excellent jazz themed mural at the upscale restaurant Madeline’s), and is the bass player for Pete Panek and the Blue Cats—an Ithaca musical treasure that just performed its 35th anniversary Blue Monday jam at the Nines in Collegetown this July.

Steep Grade by William Benson (Photo Provided)

As for the work … They are all stunning … but here are a few that I found to be knockouts: Bostwick Hill (oil on canvas—2015); This is a big, tall, vertical painting with a view—seen from a hilltop—of a country road rising up a hill through upstate New York fields and forest. Down toward the bottom of the picture frame, the dark green summer foliage is so dense it makes a kind of bridge right over the road. And there are cool abstract expressionist touches around the edge of the picture frame. I must confess that this painting probably struck me so deeply because it evokes an event from my childhood … riding in a car in the early 1960s with some of my childhood friends … driven by a friend’s mom … on a trip through northern New York State. The landscape seemed an endless succession of impossibly tall hills before us. And it wouldn’t be upstate New York without the dairy cows … And there are three startling works containing our bovine friends in Benson’s show: Serious Guernsey (charcoal on paper—2014), The Hill (charcoal—2015) and The Herd (oil on canvas—2013). These are all large works. Serious Guernsey features a cow reclining on the grass, gazing at the viewer. This is a black-and-white work, with a realistic cow (an amazingly compelling cow), and the grass she is lying upon and the background rendered in a tasteful Abstract Expressionism. On the Hill is a tall vertical work … a perfectly realistic charcoal drawing of a cow in an upstate field with distant upstate hills and summer clouds in the background. It has a strong design sense, the field taking up most of the picture frame (the foreground

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foliage going into abstraction). The cow is so realistic and solid and three-dimensional it seems to pop out of the picture plane like a sculpture, or perhaps a real animal. And I find the far off, rolling upstate hills compelling and beautiful. The Herd is the showstopper of the cow paintings—a sublime oil painting. This is a big horizontal painting shaped like a film frame. A wide shot of a herd of cows fills the bottom three-quarters of the picture frame … and the top quarter shows a pastural backdrop of farmland and forest. The angle is close enough on the herd that we see parts of the cows … their backsides and tails … and close-ups of their faces, both in profile and looking right at the viewer. Behind this are a glimpse of a field and a copse of trees and magnificent hills on the far horizon. This is a realistic painting—but almost surrealistic with those marvelous animals thrust right in your face. The Reader will have to drop by CTB to see this one him-or-herself to grasp how compelling (even a bit overwhelming) this painting is. Steep Grade (oil on board—2015); This is a long horizontal painting of a country highway in upstate New York … undulating through hills and forest…and then down a steep grade. (We see one of those “Steep Grade” signs with a truck symbol on a triangle indicating a steep slope … reading “Next 2 Miles.”) In the distance is greenery. And the thing about this one is that all sorts of geometric underpinnings from the under-painting show through on the image … triangles and rectangles and half-circle arches and so on.

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stage

Sherlock and The Crew

Detective Stars with Victorian England’s Finest By Br yan VanC ampe n Sherlock Holmes & The West End Horror, by Anthony Dodge & Marcia Milgrom Dodge, adapted from the novel “The West End Horror” by Nicholas Meyer. Directed by Shaun Peknic. Scenic design by Andrea Nice. Costume design by Wendi R. Zea. Lighting design by Eric Behnke. Performances at CRT through Aug. 8.

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ortland Repertory Theatre has been on a roll this summer, producing economical and stylish productions of some fine comedies and musicals, but the overall wit that has gone into the sets, costumes and casting of Sherlock Holmes & The West End Horror make it feel like CRT’s finest, bravest hour. CRT loves their murder mysteries, but this vision of Holmes and Watson is pretty far from the traditions of Agatha Christie and the like. Here is one of those thrifty productions, written by Anthony Dodge & Marcia Milgrom Dodge, adapted from the novel The West End Horror by Nicholas

Meyer, in which a smallish group of actors quick change into a plethora of guises and disguises in the Greater Tuna mode, allowing for the portrayal of dozens of characters. The plot revolves around Holmes and Watson, well played here by James Taylor Odom and Joel Stagliano, and the play begins with Odom’s Holmes in depression, wandering his flat at 221B Baker Street, musing about his validity in the world as Watson huffs and puffs around him. Then a prominent theatre critic by the name of George Bernard Shaw (Dan Wisniewski) drops by to inform Holmes that another critic has been murdered. This information sends Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous duo down the rabbit hole into the theatre district of London’s West End, where they meet everyone from Gilbert and Sullivan to Oscar Wilde, not to mention an overabundance of producers, housekeepers, backstage players and policemen. Odom and Stagliano are supported

by six actors able to switch characters on a dime: Wisniewski, who also plays Henry Irving; Connor Cook, who acts the role of Gilbert and Sullivan chorine Jessie Rutland (particularly odd and frightening at the climax of the first act); Jared Goldsmith as Mrs. Hudson and Richard D’oyly Carte, and if the Pythons were doing this, you could say that Goldsmith was playing all the Terry Jones bits; Daniel Wisniewski, James Taylor Odom, and Joel Stigliano (Photo Provided) Lukas Miller, whose best role would be a spoiler; Logan to provide a new angle on the scene as it Mortier as Wilde and Gilbert; and Brian progresses. There is also a neat waving line Rieff as Sullivan and Bram Stoker. of doors, a sweet little dance number in It felt like it took the audience about the middle of the action. 15 minutes to get into the groove, but Scenic designer Andrea Nice has once the quick changes and intrigue provided us with a late 19th-century began to mount, everyone really took to English proscenium stage, ringed by the fun of the production. The props and photos and playbills from the era, and set dressings are almost all on wheels, various object clues mounted on walls. At and a desk, chair and several doors are opportune moments, the back curtain is easily moved into many interesting lit as a scrim, revealing a row of theatrical configurations; Holmes and Watson may lighting ropes, a very evocative portrait of knock on a door, step through and then an earlier era of stagecraft. • have the door moved to another position

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music

Gathering of the Flutes

Fingerlakes Group to Perform at D.C. Convention By Bil l C h ai s son

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he theme for this year’s National Flute Association Convention, the 43rd, is “Out of Many, One” or E. pluribus unum. Flutists from many countries and backgrounds assemble to play music for each other and attend lectures and seminars. The Fingerlakes Flutes ensemble will be headed down to Washington, D.C. for the August 1316 event. Like the convention itself, the Fingerlakes Flutes are made “out of many, one.” It is made up of many individuals and several smaller groups. The NFA was founded in 1972 (this is the 43rd Annual NFA Convention,) and is an association with 5,000 members worldwide. Annual conventions are hosted in major U.S. cities each year and include lectures, concerts, competitions, masterclasses, demonstrations, and the industry display of flutes, books, music, recordings, equipment, and trivia. Applications for convention performance and presentation are highly competitive and adjudicated by the program chair; this year they received over 500 proposals. Fingerlakes Flutes is a sextet of

professional flutists who perform transcriptions of classical repertoire by member Susan Stolov. These engaging works come from a wide range of musical genres (piano, vocal, string) and compositional styles (Debussy, Tchaikovsky, Elgar). Seamlessly weaving the melodies and accompaniment into each part, Stolov’s work demands both artistry and musical skill from each member of the chamber ensemble, which is currently comprised of four C flutes (one doubling on piccolo), one alto flute, and one bass flute. In Washington the Ithacans will be presenting “Suite Mignonne,” by Jean Sibelius (1921). In the early 1920s Sibelius wrote a set of three suites for string orchestra that explore the miniature, as well as his great love of the Viennese waltz. Each of these compositions exists in two versions: one for string orchestra and one for piano (arranged by the composer himself). Originally written for two flutes and string orchestra in 1921, “Suite Mignonne,” Op. 98a, was arranged by the composer for the piano that same year.

Choosing to preserve the colorful and lyric flute voices from the orchestral version of “Suite Mignonne,” Liisa Ambegaokar Grigorov presents a new arrangement of Op. 98a for two flutes and piano, which was a part of her Eastman School of Music D.M.A. Lecture-Recital. These brief, yet charming, movements “Petite scene,” “Polka,” and “Epilogue,” provide opportunity to program an example of Sibelius’ salon music in a chamber music setting for two flutes and piano. Wendy Herbener Mehne, a member of Fingerlake Flutes, is also on the board of directors of the NFA. She will be performing several pieces throughout the convention. These include “Synchronisms No. 1” by Mario Davidovsky, written in 1963 and the first electroacoustic piece for flute. Herbener Mehne will also be performing “Suite Modale” by Ernest Bloch (1957) and Trio for flute, viola, piano by Leo Sowerby (1919). Both works will be performed with her Ithaca College colleague, Diane Birr, on piano. “In Her Own Voice,” with text and music by Sora Jederan-Shpack, was commissioned by the Ithaca Flute Duo, Elizabeth Shuhan and Juliana MayPepinski, flutists, with guests, Andrea Merrill, pianist; Sera Smolen, cellist; and Stephanie Dumais, speaker. The work will be performed at the convention on Aug. 15 at the “Engaging Premiers Concert.” As the first half of the work explores women’s accomplishments, the music explores time periods and places around the world. All these settings are connected

Now Taking Reservations!

Back Row - Joyce Catalfano, Julianna Pepinski, Liz Shuman - Middle Row - Susan Stolov, Wendy Mehne, Beth Kelly - Front Row - Liisa Ambegaokar Grigov, Sora Jederan-Shpack, Laura Campbell (Photo Bill Chaisson)

through and slowly begin to present a complete melodic theme. The second half of the composition expands on the thematic material as the text describes how women deal with their trials using powerful character traits that have and continue to empower women everywhere to accomplish their work. Former Cornell president and flutist David Skorton, who recently departed for Washington to become Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, was Liisa Ambegaokar Grigorov’s student. This August the nation’s capital will be full of Ithaca flutists.•

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art

Corning. Her three works on paper are them, even when they use bright colors standouts here, vibrant confabulations and doodle-like drawing—as does Surf of rapid gestures and scribbles, pulsing and Turf, probably her highlight here. blobs of color, vertical drips, and nearly Steve Carver and Minna Resnick are microscopic linear doodles. As usual, talented artists but I have trouble getting Zarem combines painting and drawing behind the work they usually show. media—acrylic, crayon, gouache, and Carver, whose roots include Social New Exhibit Sizzles and Pops at Corner Gallery ink. Realism and Pop, comes out of a career There is something confectionary as a magazine illustrator. His Vanitas By Ar thur W hit m an about the smaller square Candy Moth, I-95, acrylic and alkyd painted on wood, Zarem’s signature white best approached as a sampling from some on’t read too much into “Crave,” of the frame shop/gallery’s regular artists. gouache melding frostinglike with spots of dark redCorners Gallery’s current “food Like all of the Corners shows, purple. The moth is there themed invitational.” The late “Crave” was curated by gallery-owner as well, dark brown and summer show gathers seven artists, all Ariel Bullion Ecklund. black wings and graphite of them presenting work “about” the Melissa Zarem is in concurrent scribbles suggesting lines pleasures of food. The work—mostly group shows at Cornell’s Johnson of flight. Two larger, paintings—is diverse, and the exhibit is Museum and the Exhibit A gallery in landscape-format pieces, Nascent Fruit and Shy of Plenty, have been framed without glass. Plenty is particularly memorable with its watery suns of Welcoming new patients! hot yellow-orange and it’s procession of tiny tally-like • Same day sick appointments purple ink marks. • All Physicians board certified Elizabeth McMahon in Pediatrics has recently returned to Steve Carver’s Indigestion (Photo Provided) painting after a long career • Full spectrum newborn and as a children’s entertainer. inpatient care at Cayuga Medical Center She is new to Corners. Her three acrylics are more-or-less abstract. is a sign painting in more than one • Lactation consultants/counselors on staff Acrylic and crayon on paper, Jester’s sense. Flatly painted, it incorporates Cake is a highlight with its energetically text—FRUIT FLOWERS EXIT, DARE • Separate adolescent office, including scrawled lines and areas of vivid color. TO BARE, TURN AROUND ITS NOT adolescent GYN care Candlelight Cake is on canvas while the TOO LATE—, blocks of color, an arrow, Homage to Home Dairy Bakery, on paper, a cigarette, a naked woman kneeling, and incorporates collage. a distorted skull. Similarly the acrylic on Ruth Sproul is showing four acrylic wood Indigestion parodies advertising paintings, each incorporating two or mascots by playfully altering their race. 257-2188 Pediatrics Wellness Begins Here! three adjacent panels. I’ve always been Resnick’s work, mostly 257-5067 Adolescents ambivalent about her work. One senses printmaking, echoes the ‘80s-style high 2 convenient locations! 319-5211 Trumansburg Rd. Office that her prints and paintings are not postmodernism of artists like Sigmar 10 Graham Road West meant to have the easygoing charm that Polke and David Salle, known for their Mon-Fri 8-4:30, Sat 8-11:30 1290 Trumansburg Road even Zarem’s most sophisticated pieces seemingly incongruous juxtapositions exude. There is something prickly about of imagery taken from or influenced by www.Northeastpeds.com 76749 Kendal Dog Ad for Ithaca Times T: 10 x 5.5 mass-media culture. She is showing three mixed-media prints here, interrogations of female body image. Garden Fresh and Calvin Always Likes to Lick the Spoon Exploring Ithaca’s spectacular landscape with her bury her skillful figure drawing in trusty pal, Tasha, gives Loretta great scenery and overwrought found image pastiche. Tim Merrick was the subject of even better company. Whether she’s hiking to the Corners’ last exhibit and his paintings heart of the gorge or just taking in the falls, she here continue in a similar vein. In his always enjoys the natural beauty of the area. recently shown work, Merrick builds up thick layers of oil paint and wax, using Living on the 105-acre campus of Kendal at palette knives and scraping through Ithaca not only keeps Loretta connected to the the layers to make lines. The textures places and companions she loves, but the care she recall the abstract work of contemporary may need someday. And, from here, the story just German painter Gerhard Richter, and they feel exhausted. While the earlier keeps getting better. show featured geometric architectural Come for a visit and tell us your story. designs, his canvases here incorporate Call 877-891-7709 or go to kai.kendal.org/IT2 “fruit” in the form of bright circles of color—and flat shapes indicating leaves to learn more. and a bowl. Pieces such as Caravaggio’s Basket of Fruit and Veronese’s Lost Lady with Cherries in her Hand are improvements as they give us something to grab onto besides the paint texture. 2230 N. Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850 Still, one wishes Merrick would show his printmaking instead—his etchings have a élan missing from any of his paintings A not-for-profit continuing care retirement community serving older adults in the that I have seen. • Quaker tradition. ©2014 KENDAL

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film

On Cruise Control

Actor Lights up The Screen in new M.I. Thriller By Br yan VanC ampe n Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation, written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie, playing at Ithaca Stadium 14.

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hat is it about this Tom Cruise guy? Talk about an impossible mission: since watching the HBO Scientology documentary, I thought

it would be very difficult to watch Cruise in a new movie and not think about what a wing nut he probably is. Then again, I’ve always thought he was a good, sometimes great, actor. Look at Rain Man and you’ll see that it’s Cruise, not Dustin Hoffman that drives the drama of that film. Aside from all that Scientology stuff, the only

negative thing I could say about Cruise is that I wouldn’t want to have to make some of the films he’s had to make to get to something interesting or challenging or offbeat, like Magnolia, Vanilla Sky and Tropic Thunder. (Yes, I’m looking at you, Cocktail, Far and Away and The Last Samurai—for starters.) Apart from their penchant for disposing of their leading ladies over the years, Cruise’s Mission: Impossible film series have largely been of good quality and actually have held up a lot better than a few other Purchase tickets at our website:

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Tom Cruise as Ethan Hunt (Photo Provided)

franchises I could name. It’s because they avoid complicated soap opera plots, meaning that each film can stand on its own as worthy entertainment. You don’t have to see them in any order to have a good time, and all you really need to know is that Cruise plays a spy named Ethan Hunt who is very good at his job. And as Hitchcock said, you’ll love a character, if the character is good at their job. After a terrific Bond-style curtain raiser that sees Hunt hanging on for dear life to the side of a plane as it lifts off, the main plot kicks in when Hunt checks in for his next assignment (in a hip touch, it’s a listening booth in a record store) and learns that everything he knows is wrong, and that a Hydra-like (hello, Avengers fans) organization called the Syndicate has infiltrated the Impossible Missions Force department, and it knows Hunt’s every move. So he goes very effectively under cover to find a mysterious figure with glasses that he saw in the record shop. Meanwhile, the IMF bureau chief (Jeremy Renner) is trying to keep from being made redundant by the head of the CIA, played with snarling gusto by Alec Baldwin. Hunt gets his tech support guy Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg) away from his desk to fly to Vienna and help track down the new bad guy; other characters from the franchise also show up to lend a hand. Hunt wakes up in a dungeon-like cell, and meets a female agent named Ilsa Faust, and played by a riveting newcomer named Rebecca Ferguson. Ferguson is so good she may be the most interesting and charismatic female character in the series to date. Let’s just say that there are large basic questions as to Faust’s true allegiance and leave it at that. The Mission: Impossible series has always been handled by different directors; the latest was written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie, who wrote the overrated The Usual Suspects, but he’s written a much better twisty thriller this time around. If I had to rate or compare the latest film to the series, it feels most like the first film, directed by Brian DePalma. It has more of a sense of humor and a sense of classical elegance as the story globe-trots from one glamorous location to the next. There’s a very cool suspense fight scene staged high in the rafters of an opera house in Vienna, and the whole thing has a sense of champagne whimsy that’s pretty much been missing from all the Daniel Craig Bond films. And if we’ve learned anything from Kingsman: The Secret Service and Spy this year, it’s that spy movies can be fun. •


‘Benson’ contin u ed from page 13

And, even though it is essentially a realistic painting, there are all kinds of abstract-expressionist flourishes. And Benson does this thing in the sky where it looks pre-aged—the paint conveys an effect like a Renaissance painting ravaged by time. There are more paintings, but that’s enough for now. One more thing I want to mention—I even love Benson’s signature logo—where he’s taken the letters of his name and formed a logo that has a feel like Japanese or Chinese characters. • • • I met with William Benson at Collegetown Bagels on the afternoon of July 17 for a bit of conversation about his life and work. I learned that Benson grew up on the North Shore of Long Island, attended prep school in New Hampshire like Holden Caulfield, and studied fine art and graphics at Cornell from 1968 to 1972. Benson is a very appealing guy. The thing that struck me the most forcibly is his vigor. He is a remarkably energetic and vigorous man. I always ask people about childhood, and Benson told me: “I’ve drawn since I was two. My parents saw me drawing on the walls. “I came home from kindergarten, and my kindergarten teacher—who was my mother’s best friend—said, ‘Hey, look what Billy did!’ And my mother goes, ‘Uh, huh. So what?’ And my teacher said, ‘No, no, these are different …’ “And, growing up, painting and drawing, I was always intrigued by how the great painters started. ‘What’s underneath that beautiful finished piece?’ “I loved pieces that showed me hints of how they actually began the work…” Which leads us to the geometric underpinnings in Benson’s paintings. This is an idea that was invented in the Renaissance. Leonardo da Vinci was a master of this. Benson elaborated at length on the geometry hidden underneath his work: “I loved geometry when I was working my way through math … and I think most of the great Renaissance painters were intrigued by geometry as well … “I try not to be too crazy and obvious about it … I don’t know if the design is going to mean anything to the viewer … but it holds something special for me in the way it pulls aspects of the design together … regardless of the image. And that’s why I like to pull out from the under-painting the parts that are going to reflect the sections of the landscape that I find important … “And these are things I see when I’m actually out there traveling, so it’s not like I do a representational painting and then throw all this abstraction on top of it—it’s the opposite.” “My mother once said to me, ‘Why do you ruin your beautiful landscapes?’ with that abstraction. “I said, ‘I think I’m enhancing them.’” Since Benson is also a musician,

playing in the venerable Blue Cats, I asked him if he was also attracted to music in childhood, and he told me: “My brother was a drummer … and in school he and some friends got a band together. And someone—an adult—came up to the band and said, ‘You guys are alright, but you need a bass’, and I said, ‘O.K. I’ll pick it up’. “So I started playing bass at 13 or 14 … and just kept at it … like Paul McCartney … he’s a great painter …” And we talked about … cows. Benson said: “People ask, ‘Why are you doing cows?’ “They’re all black-and-white cows … Holsteins. They embody this beautiful abstraction from the get-go. And I love charcoal …

“They hold for me this bovine-human connection … for thousands of years … the domestication is long before almost any other animal … because we need them … and we protect them from the wild … “And I’ve been seeing them outside my house for ten years … and I’m thinking, ‘I can do something cool with these guys…’” And Benson said of his work, he attempted to: “Make it really upstate. Make people look at it and go, ‘That is upstate New York.’ “This show is part of a show I just had in Manhattan. And I have a good friend who’s doing very well as a writer, and he came to the show. He used to live here, and we were very good friends at Cornell. And he saw Bostwick Hill and said, “It’s totally

upstate.” Summing up the essence of his work, Benson said: “The critic Clement Greenberg’s big theory was that you must respect the picture plane—so no threedimensional stuff. ‘Don’t give me any of this illusion.’ That’s why he loved Pollock so much … it’s all abstract minimalism … it’s just the picture plane. “Well … I am the antithesis of Clement Greenberg. I want that illusion to be as severe as I can make it. I want people to get as deep into the picture as possible.” • William Benson’s exhibit will be on display at Collegetown Bagels, 203 N. Aurora St., Ithaca. through the month of August. Visit: www.williambenson.com

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VOTE ONLINE AT ITHACA.COM Win an Ithaca Times travel coffee mug or dinner for two at Coltivare. 20 winners in all.

2015

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THE RULES

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Fill out at least 2/3 of this form and: 1. Bring it to the Ithaca Times office at 109 North Cayuga Street by noon on Friday, September 5th. 2. You can also mail the form to: Reader’s Poll, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14850 3. Or fill out the ballot on our Web site at www.ithaca.com. Be sure to include your name and address, and if you’re one of the lucky 20 people chosen at random, you will win a 14 oz. Ithaca Times Travel Coffee Mug or a $50.00 gift certificate to Coltivare. We’re only taking one entry per person, and any attempts at ballot stuffing will be disqualified. We’ll print the results in our BEST OF ITHACA issue on September 30, 2015.

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Hank Williams, Bill Withers. Liz Enwright, Forte, Symphony Of The End | 6:30 PM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Folk, Americana, Indie, Heavy Metal, Alternative Metal, Melodic Hardcore. 

8/09 Sunday

Music bars/clubs/cafés

8/05 Wednesday

Reggae Night | 9:00 PM-1:00 AM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | I-Town Allstars are the House Band featuring members of: Mosaic Foundation, Big Mean Sound Machine, Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, John Brown’s Body and More! Open Jam with Featured Songwriters | 7:30 PM-10:30 PM | Varna Community Center, 943 Dryden Rd (Rt. 366), Dryden | Join hosts David Graybeard and Mitch Wiedemann. We are looking for local songwriters, poets and authors to showcase their work. Each week we will spotlight an artist for an hour, from about 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM, to perform (mostly) original compositions Jam Session | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Canaan Institute, 223 Canaan Rd, Brooktondale | The focus is instrumental contra dance tunes. www. cinst.org. Triple Play with Alice Detrick | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Hickories Park, Hickories Park Road, Owego | Concerts In The Park presents. Classic Country, Rock.  Bike Night with Iron Horse | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM | The Parkview Restaurant, 145 Front St., Owego | Southern Rock, Blues. Covers of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Allman Brothers Band, Marshall Tucker, ZZ Top, and the occasional Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead. Come check out motorcycles, eat food, and listen to music.  Djug Django | 6:00 PM-9:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Live hot club jazz.

MANY MORE SHOWS NOT LISTED HERE! STAY UP-TO-DATE AT DANSMALLSPRESENTS.COM

i3º | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Live Jazz: A Jazz Trio Featuring Nicholas Walker, Greg Evans, and Nick Weiser Home On The Grange | 4:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Richie Stearns & Friends, Bluegrass, Jazz, Folk, Old-Time, Americana. Grassanova | 7:00 AM | StoneCat Cafe, 5315 Rt 414, Hector | Bluegrass, Country, Old-Time, Covers.

8/06 Thursday

Head Band | 9:00 PM | Casita del Polaris, 1201 N. Tioga St. #2, Ithaca | Post-Rock, Instrumental, Prog-Rock, Jam, Psychedelic. With special guest Dan Brauer of Leche de Tigre. Sugar Lumps Speakeasy Show | 7:00 PM | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | 1920’s, 30’s and 40’s speakeasy culture. Rural country blues, ragtime, gypsy jazz and swing. Monk Rowe Trio | 7:00 PM | Hamilton Village Green, , Hamilton | Pre-rock sounds of swing, R&B, country, gospel, chart-toppers.  Jesse Collins Group | 7:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Jazz, Funk, Rock. Jazz Thursdays | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM | Collegetown Bagels, East Hill Plaza, Ithaca | Enjoy jazz and bagels at CTB. Hoodoo Crossing: Blues, Brews and BBQ | 6:00 PM | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Blues. Rock. Ribs. 

8/07 Friday

The Purple Valley | 10:00 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Dancing Blues, Swing, Rock & Roll. Underground Reggae Dance Party | 9:30 PM | Sacred Root Kava Lounge & Tea Bar, 139 W State St, Ithaca | DJ Solid

Gould, veteran selector on 92 WICB’s FRESH ROOTS RADIO will be laying down some Reggae and Rub-a-Dub vibes all night long. Roots reggae, rocksteady, rub-a-dub sounds! Dr. K Paul Kempkes | 9:30 PM-12:00 AM | Coltivare, 235 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Solo guitar with attitude. Songs by Steely Dan, Springsteen, Supertramp, and more.  Spirit Posse | 9:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Electronic, House, Jungle, Druid Stuff, Seances, Eternal Stew, Heavy Bass, Animal Pelts, Wizarding, Deep Chatham, Sick Beats, Apothecary, Leafy Greens, Wobble. Contra and Square Dances | 8:00 PM | Great Room at Slow Lane, Comfort & Lieb Rds, Danby | Everyone welcome; you don’t need a partner. Dances are taught; dances early in the evening introduce the basic figures. Bring a tasty treat and get in free. For directions/information, call 607-2738678; on Fridays, 607-342-4110. Mostly Beatles | 8:00 PM | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | British Invasion tunes, Zombies, Stones, Beatles, Herman’s Hermits, Manfred Mann, and more. Rock, Rock & Roll, Blues, 1960’s.  Kitestring | 8:00 PM | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | Alternative, Americana, Soul, Roots.  DixieKats | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Newark Valley Depot, Depot Street, Newark Valley | Depot Friday Nights presents. Dixieland, Bayou Gumbo, Jazz, Blues.  Go Gone | 6:00 PM-9:00 PM | Corks & More Wine Bar, 708 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Roots, Rock, Blues, Americana.  Virgil Cain | 6:00 PM-11:00 PM | The Boat Yard Grill, 525 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Pop, Americana, Rock, Multi-Instrumental. 

9/23 WILCO 9/26 HOME FREE 10/3 PAULA POUNDSTONE 10/9 PATTY GRIFFIN 10/10 THE MACHINE 11/8 POSTMODERN JUKEBOX 11/11 ARLO GUTHRIE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF ALICE’S RESTAURANT

Cat’s Elbow | 6:00 PM | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Alternative Rock, Roots Rock, Old-Time, Americana. Under Construction | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | Rock and Roll, Blues, Country, Soul, 50’s, Funk.  Hee Haw Nightmare | 5:30 PM-8:30 PM | Felicia’s Atomic Lounge, 508 W State St, Ithaca | Crazy Old-Time, Rockabilly, Bluegrass. Reunion Show.  Wil Shishmanian, Samuel B. Lupowitz & The Ego Band | 9:00 AM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Folk, Prog-Rock, Jazz, R&B, Blues, Americana.  Space Train, 5 Mile Train, DJ Cappel | 10:00 PM | Lot 10, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | ICSL Fundraiser. Funk, Blues, Jam, Dub, Progressive Rock, Classic Rock, Electronic, House. 

8/08 Saturday

Casey Max Duet | 10:00 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | American Standards. Johnny Dowd & Anna Coogan | 9:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Blues, Soul, Punk, Experimental, Roots, Country. PHILM, Owl, Killation | 9:00 PM | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Heavy Metal, Thrash, Progressive Rock, Experimental, Hard Rock. Dave Lambardo of Slayer on drums for PHILM. Chris Wyses of The Cult, fronts Owl.  Under Construction | 8:30 PM-12:00 AM | JD’s Town Tavern, Rte 223, Erin | Rock and Roll, Blues, Country, Soul, 50’s, Funk.  The Grey Wolf Band | 7:00 PM | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | Early R&B, Rock, Country, Covers of Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Otis Redding,

Acoustic Open Mic Night | 9:00 PM-1:00 AM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Hosted by Technicolor Trailer Park. International Folk Dancing | 7:30 PM-9:30 PM | Kendal At Ithaca, 2230 N Triphammer Rd, Ithaca | Teaching and request dancing. No partners needed. Monkey Wrench Revolt | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Felicia’s Atomic Lounge, 508 W State St, Ithaca | Alt-Bluegrass, Alt-Country, Alt-Folk. East Coast Bigfoot | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM | Maxie’s Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca | Roots Rock, Rock, Indie, Soul.  Ben Miller | 12:00 PM-3:00 PM | Moosewood Restaurant, 215 N Cayuga St Ste 70, Ithaca | Jazz piano.  Greg Neff | 12:00 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Acoustic Music of the 60’s & 70’s  Fun Zone | 11:00 AM | StoneCat Cafe, 5315 Rt 414, Hector | Joe Otatti and Friends, Groovy Jazz, Classic Throwbacks. 

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Open Mic | 9:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | I-Town Community Jazz Jam | 8:30 PM-11:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Hosted by Professor Greg Evans Irish Session | 8:00 PM-11:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 South Cayuga Street, Ithaca | Hosted by Traonach Professor Tuesday’s Jazz Quartet | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Corks & More Wine Bar, 708 W Buffalo St, Ithaca |

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New Riders of the Purple Sage, Tumbleweed Highway | 8:00 PM | Westcott Theatre, 524 Westcott St, Syracuse | Country Rock, Bluegrass, Psychedelic, Country. Dryden Music Series | 6:30 PM | Dryden VFW, Rt. 13, Dryden | Wednesday Wing Nights at the VFM with live music.

8/06 Thursday

The Gunpoets & Ave Mack (CFCU Summer Concert Series) | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | State Theatre Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | Hip Hop, Rap, Underground.

Locked featuring Rump$tep | 8:00 PM | Westcott Theatre, 524 Westcott St, Syracuse | With special guests DG, Sudden Death, Quazarr, Koala, & Etcetera. Dance, Electronic, Hard Bass, Dub Step, House, Chillout.

8/11 Tuesday

STATE THEATRE OF ITHACA • TICKETS: 607.277.8283 • STATEOFITHACA.COM

concerts

8/07 Friday

Blue Mondays | 9:00 PM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | with Pete Panek and the Blue Cats. Open Mic Night | 8:30 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Signups start at 7:30pm.

11/13 BO BURNHAM 11/14 GORDON LIGHTFOOT 11/20 GUSTER 12/3 CITY AND COLOUR 12/4 MATISYAHU 1/29 GET THE LED OUT 2/20 THE MOTH MAINSTAGE

Intergenerational Traditional Irish Session | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM | Sacred Root Kava Lounge & Tea Bar, 139 W State St, Ithaca | Calling all fiddlers, whistlers, pipers, mandos, bodhran’s, and flute players. All Ages & Stages. Intergenerational Traditional Irish Session | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM | Sacred Root Kava Lounge & Tea Bar, 139 W State St, Ithaca | Callin’ all fiddlerswhistlers-pipers-mandos-bodhran’sflute players- you know who you are! All Ages & Stage, Intermediate level the goal, Traditional Session style. Bring a tune to share, learn a tune or two! EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT!

8/08 Saturday

Driftwood | 8:00 PM | Spool Mfg. Gallery, Johnson City | Americana, Folk, Rock, Roots-Rock, Art Rock, Old-Time. Warren Haynes | 7:30 PM | Paper Mill Island, 136 Spensieri Avenue, Baldwinsville | Southern Rock, Hard Rock, Blues, Blues-Rock, Jam.  Taughannock Falls Summer Concert Series: Kevin Kinsella | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Taughannock Falls State

8/21 GRAHAM NASH 11/13 INDIGO GIRLS SMITH OPERA HOUSE 8/20 THE JAUNTEE (PHISH PRE PARTY) 9/15 OF MONTREAL

THE HAUNT

9/11 SLAMBOVIAN CIRCUS OF DREAMS 9/26 CHRIS SMITHER

THE DOCK

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Celebrating an uncommon place.

The Commons Celebration Weekend. August 28 & 29. Tompkins Trust Company is a proud sponsor of The Commons Celebration Weekend.

Locally focused. A world of possibilities. Insurance and Investment products are not FDIC insured, not Bank guaranteed and may lose value.

Park, Bath house stage, Trumansburg | Leila Nassar-Fredell, Graeme Bailey | 1:30 PM | Barnes Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | Violin and Piano duo. Classical, Bach, Leclair, Wieniawski, Weill/Frenkel. 

8/09 Sunday

The Fingerlakes Flutes | 2:00 PM | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | A preview of their DC performance with IC Faculty members Wendy Mehne and Diane Birr. Classical.

8/10 Monday

Three Chord Monty | 11:00 AM-1:30 PM | Sunny Days of Ithaca, 123 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Folk.

8/11 Tuesday

Go Gone | 6:30 PM | Ellis Hollow Community Center, 111 Genung Road, Ithaca | Roots, Rock, Blues, Americana.

Film

little sympathy from his family and begins to wonder if bad things only happen to him, his mom, dad, brother and sister - who all find themselves living through their own terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. ParaNorman, Night of the Living Dead | 7:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday | Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell, Ithaca | A misunderstood boy takes on ghosts, zombies and grown-ups to save his town from a centuries-old curse. Night of the Living Dead - A group of people hide from bloodthirsty zombies in a farmhouse. Whiplash | 2:00 PM-4:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday | BorgWarner Room, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Follow drummer Andrew Neyman in his ambitious attempt to become part of an elite Jazz ensemble, under the tutelage of one of the most vicious teachers known to film. Miles Teller does his own drumming in this study of obsession and inspiration, and J. K. Simmons is terrifying in his Oscar winning role. cinemapolis

Outdoor Movie Nights: Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day | 8:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Trumansburg Farmers Market, Corner of Rtes 96 and 227, Trumansburg | Alexander’s day begins with gum stuck in his hair, followed by more calamities. However, he finds

Friday, 8/07 to Thursday, 8/13. Contact Cinemapolis for Showtimes Amy | A documentary on the late Singer-Songwriter Amy Winehouse, who died of alcohol poisoning in 2011. | 128 mins R | Infinitely Polar Bear | A manic-

depressive mess of a father tries to win back his wife by attempting to take full responsibility of their two young, spirited daughters, who don’t make the overwhelming task any easier. | 90 mins R | Irrational Man | A tormented philosophy professor finds a will to live when he commits an existential act. | 96 mins R | Dark Places | Libby Day was only seven years old when her family was brutally murdered in their rural Kansas farmhouse. Twenty-five years later, she agrees to revisit the crime and uncovers the wrenching truths that led up to that tragic night. | 113 mins R | Mr. Holmes | An aged, retired Sherlock Holmes looks back on his life, and grapples with an unsolved case involving a beautiful woman. Ian McKellen stars. | 104 mins PG | The Stanford Prison Experiment | Twenty-four male students out of seventy-five were selected to take on randomly assigned roles of prisoners and guards in a mock prison situated in the basement of the Stanford psychology building. | 122 mins R | regal theater

Wednesday 8/05 to Tuesday 8/11 Contact Regal Theater Ithaca for Showtimes

Watkins Glen International, Thursday, 8/06 through Sunday, 8/09 The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series will travel to Watkins Glen this week, and with it, over 100,000 people from all over the world. The big dogs will be there as well, including Jeff Gordon, Jimmie Johnson, Kyle Bush, and Danica Patrick. This 90 lap, 220.5 mile race is sure to please fanatics and casual fans alike.

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Stage Late Night Catechism | Auburn Public Theater, 108 Genesee St, Auburn | Runs through Saturday 08/08 | Catechism is an uproariously funny play that takes the audience back to their Catholic school youth. Call it Loretta Young meets Carol Burnett. For tickets and showtimes visit www.auburnpublictheater.org Sherlock Holmes and the West End Horror | Cortland Repertory Theatre, Dwyer Memorial Park Pavilion, Preble | Runs through Saturday 08/08 | Young

Online Calendar See it at ithaca.com.

aspiring Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw entices his good friends Holmes and Watson to take on the case of a murdered theatre critic. As they cross swords with the most famous literary luminaries of the day including Bram Stoker, Gilbert & Sullivan, Henry Irving and a young H. G. Wells, Holmes comes face-to-face with his own celebrity. For tickets and showtimes visit www.cortlandrep.org Saturday Night Fever | Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 E Lake Rd, Auburn | Runs through Wednesday 08/12 | The story centers on Tony Manero, a Brooklyn youth whose weekend is spent at the local dance hangout. There he escapes into the admiration of the crowd, a growing relationship and the pulse of the beat that enables him to forget the realities of his life, his dead-end job and his gang of deadbeat friends. For tickets and showtimes visit fingerlakesmtf. com/theatres/merry-go-roundplayhouse Talley’s Folly | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Runs through Saturday 08/08 | Closing their Mainstage Season, the Hangar Theatre presents Lanford Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning romantic comedy, Talley’s Folly. Directed by the Hangar’s artistic director Jen Waldman, Talley’s Folly will run from July 30 until August 8, 2014. Join the cast, crew, and Hangar staff on opening night, Friday, July 31 at 8pm at the Hangar Theatre, located at 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca, NY 14850 in Cass Park. Tickets and times at www.hangartheatre.org.  Owen’s Story | 11:00 AM, 8/10 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Original play performed by acclaimed youth theatre and improvisational troupe, Tin Can Fantasy Factory, in the Library’s Thaler/Howell Programming Room. This performance is interactive and will include engaging conversations between the actors and audience members. The audience will have the opportunity to think critically, offer advice and share what they know and believe. For info contact Kate DeVoe at kdevoe@tclp.org

Notices Rehearsals for the Dryden Area Intergenerational Band | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Dryden United Methodist Church, 2 North St, Dryden | Rehearsals for Band. Concert will be Sunday, August 9, 3 p.m

Sarah Gotowka,

Silky Jones, Friday, August 7, 5:00 p.m. This artist’s exhibit showcases an interesting materialist-collage makertake on conceptions and visual language. Her full size mixed media work incorporates many natural flowers, echoing an entomologist’s detail, and combined with lyrics to pop songs, the effect is both natural and industrial. The range of size and combination of the work is impressive, and surely worth taking a look at while drinking a beer and hanging with friends.

ThisWeek

Cheeze-It 355 At The Glen,

Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation | Ethan and team take on their most impossible mission yet, eradicating the Syndicate - an International rogue organization as highly skilled as they are, committed to destroying the IMF.| 131 mins PG-13 | Ant Man (3D) | Armed with a super-suit with the astonishing ability to shrink in scale but increase in strength, con-man Scott Lang must embrace his inner hero and help his mentor, Dr. Hank Pym, plan and pull off a heist that will save the world. | 117 mins PG-13 | Dragonball Z: Resurrection ‘F’ | One peaceful day on Earth, two remnants of Frieza’s army named Sorbet and Tagoma arrive searching for the Dragon Balls with the aim of reviving Frieza. They succeed, and Frieza subsequently seeks revenge on the Saiyans. | 93 mins NR | South Paw | Boxer Billy Hope turns to trainer Tick Willis to help him get his life back on track after losing his wife in a tragic accident and his daughter to child protection services. | 123 mins R | Pixels (3D) | When aliens misinterpret video feeds of classic arcade games as a declaration of war, they attack the Earth in the form of the video games. | 105 mins PG-13 | Trainwreck | Having thought that

monogamy was never possible, a commitment-phobic career woman may have to face her fears when she meets a good guy. | 125 mins R | Shaun The Sheep Movie | When Shaun decides to take the day off and have some fun, he gets a little more action than he bargained for. A mix up with the Farmer, a caravan and a very steep hill lead them all to the Big City and it’s up to Shaun and the flock to return everyone safely to the green grass of home. | 85 mins PG | Spy | CIA Analyst Susan Cooper is forced into her first real field work and trys to save and revenge her fellow agents. | 115 mins R | Jurassic World (3D) | Visitors at the famed theme park run wild when the genetically engineered Indominus Rex and other dinosaurs go on a rampage. | 124 mins PG-13 | Vacation | Rusty Griswold takes his own family on a road trip to “Walley World” in order to spice things up with his wife and reconnect with his sons. | 99 mins R | Paper Towns | A young man and his friends embark upon the road trip of their lives to find the missing girl next door. | 109 mins PG-13 | Inside Out | Disney Pixar’s new film about a Midwestern girl whose life is turned upside down when she and her parents move to San Francisco. | 102 mins PG | Minions (3D) | Minions Stuart, Kevin and Bob are recruited by Scarlet Overkill, a super-villain who, alongside her inventor husband Herb, hatches a plot to take over the world.| 91 mins PG |


Mentors Needed for 4-H Youth Development Program | CCE Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Mentors commit to 3 hours per week for this school year, with the option to continue next year. The Mentor and Student meet twice a week at Boynton Middle School from 3:25 PM until 4:35 PM.The Mentor-Student Program is an opportunity to make a positive impact in a young person’s life. An adult Mentor meeting regularly, one-on-one with a middle school student and read, do homework, play board games, and more. Behind-thescenes help with programming very much needed. For more info, call (607) 277-1236 or email student.mentor@ yahoo.com. Tompkins Workforce: Meet the Employer Session-Cornell | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | Tompkins Workforce New York Career Center, 171 E State St, Ithaca | A Cornell human resources representative will discuss job search tips, the application process, and overall information about working at Cornell University. Friday Market Day | 8:00 AM-2:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | Triphammer Marketplace, 2255 N. Triphammer Rd., Ithaca | Farmer’s & Artisan’s Market at Triphammer Marketplace. Outside 8 a.m. to noon, Inside 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Fridays through December. Locally grown & produced foods and handcrafted items. Local seasonal produce, honey, flowers, baked goods, meats, pottery, woodwork, jewelry, glass, fiber arts and the Owl’s Head Fish Truck! Lots of variety, plenty of parking. Varna Pancake Breakfast | 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, 8/09 Sunday | Varna Community Center, 943 Dryden Road (Rt. 366), Dryden | Includes Pancakes, French Toast, Ham, Bacon, Sausage. Scrambled Eggs, Hash Brown Potatoes, Fresh Fruit, Breakfast Breads & Beverages. Rehearsals for the Dryden Area Intergenerational Chorus | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/10 Monday | Dryden United Methodist Church, 2 North St, Dryden | Rehearsals for Chorus group. CRC Walking Club | 5:00 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Ithaca High School, 1401 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca | Walking, large muscle group strengthening, and gentle yoga.

Learning

ThisWeek

American Sign Language II (ASL II) | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday

| Finger Lakes Independence Center, 215 Fifth St, Ithaca | American Sign Language (ASL) is a useful and fun means of communication, and many signs can be easy to learn. ASL is used by people who are Deaf, hard of hearing, have difficulty speaking, or are non-verbal, as well as interpreters, family and friends, human service professionals, and people who want to be able to communicate with someone who uses ASL. Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Market | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | The Space at GreenStar, 700 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | This documentary addresses the effects of animal agriculture on the environment. There will be vegan snacks during the movie and discussion after with Harold Brown. Free and open to the public and held at the Classrooms@GreenStar, 700 W. Buffalo St. Registration required sign up at GreenStar’s Customer Service Desk or call 273-9392. Ithaca Community Gardens Food Truck RoundUp | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Ithaca’s Children’s Garden, Cass Park, Rt 89, Ithaca | Learn, Grow, and Grub every first Wednesday of the month from July - September at Ithaca Children’s Garden! Part of ICG Volunteer Academy’s Learn & Grow Series - monthly, hour-long workshops that teach a new skill followed by the opportunity to put that new skill to use in the Garden. Our monthly Food Truck RoundUp means you came come to ICG for dinner, and stay to volunteer, or simply throw out a blanket and enjoy the Garden and it’s magical surroundings!Featuring Alexander’s Food Truck and The Smash Truck, join us for an amazing meal in ICG’s Parking Lot! Art Classes for Adults | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | Adult classes and private instruction in dance, music, visual arts, language arts, and performance downtown at the Community School of Music and Arts. For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@ csma-ithaca.org. www.csma-ithaca. org. Professional Opportunity Developers: Resume Overview & Critique | 9:00 AM-11:00 AM, 8/06 Thursday | Tompkins Workforce, Center Ithaca, 2nd fl, Ithaca | Facilitated by Jackie Mouillesseaux-Grube. If you just shook your head and decided you don’t need to attend this session, we dare you to join us! Haven’t had resume feedback in a while (or at all),

then consider the benefits and ask yourself: “what do I have to lose?!” Maybe you’ll learn a tip or two, or maybe you’ll decide to reshape your resume altogether! If it leads to an interview, then it’s worth it! We’ll cover strategies, “Do’s and Don’ts”, and, for those of you who are comfortable, you can have your resume reviewed by your peers and me. Emphasis will be on what works and what can be altered to improve your chances for an interview.

Special Events Chemung County Fair | Runs through Sunday 8/09 | Chemung County Fairgrounds, 170 Fairview Road, Horseheads | See listings at www. chemungcountyfair.com Cheez-It 355 at the Glen | 12:00 AM-11:59 PM, 8/06 Thursday, 8/07 Friday | Watkins Glen International, 2790 County Road 16, Watkins Glen | Fans enjoy NASCAR K&N Pro Series East, NASCAR Xfinity and NASCAR Sprint Cup Series all in one action-packed weekend. Do not miss a minute of the action with Zippo 200 on Saturday and Cheez-It 355 at The Glen on Sunday.  Movie Night in the Vineyard: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix | 7:30 PM, 8/07 Friday | Cayuga Ridge Estate Winery, 6800 State Route 89, Ovid | The entire Harry Potter series every Friday night this summer! 2nd Annual Northside Community Celebration | 3:00 PM-6:00 PM 8/08 Saturday | Quaker Meetinghouse (Third & Madison), Ithaca, NY | Featuring free food, live music,and childrens’ activities. Garage Sale (Records, CD’s, Comic Books, and More) | 9:00 AM-3:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | Garage Sale, 2457 State Rte 89, Seneca Falls | Friday & Saturday, August 7 & 8, near the Chiropractic College. Thousands of records, CD’s, books, magazines, and comic books @ $1 each, plus some other items and a few higher-priced collectibles. Ithaca BlueStocking vs. Connecticut Yankee Brutals | 7:00 PM-9:00 AM, 8/08 Saturday | Cass Park Rink & Pool, 701 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Roller Derby match.  Spiedie Eating Championship | 7:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday | Tioga Downs, 2384 W River Rd, Nichols | This 10-minute contest, sanctioned by Major League Eating, will boast Major League eaters from around the country. Joey “Jaws” Chestnut, world champion eater, will

The documentary Cowspiracy plays at The Space at Green Star, Wednesday, 8/05 at 7:00 pm (Photo Provided) join the competition again. He set the world chicken spiedie-eating record last year by eating 13.75 Lupo’s spiedies in 10 minutes. Newark Valley Day | 10:00 AM-5:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday | Downtown Newark Valley, Newark Valley | Vendors, food, spinning demo in the Shuttles & Spindles Guild’s booth. Parade at 11 am. Finger Lakes Riesling and Craft Brew Festival | 10:00 AM-5:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday, 8/09 Sunday | New York Wine and Culinary Center, 800 S Main St, Canandaigua | Also at the Canandaigua City Pier. rieslingfestival. com/ Tioga Downs Antique Center And General Marketplace | 9:00 AM, 8/08 Saturday | Tioga Downs, 2384 W River Rd, Nichols | Indoor marketplace and outdoor flea and farmers market. Antiques, collectibles, furniture and more! Open every Friday 12 noon-5 pm, Saturday and Sunday 9 am-5 pm thru November 1, 2015.  Sterling Renaissance Festival | 8/08 Saturday, 8/09 Sunday | Sterling Renaissance Festival, Fraden Rd, Sterling | Fantasy, Fairies, and the Future Weekend. For info visit www. sterlingfestival.com Cancer Resource Center Benefit in Honor of Eric Ott | 1:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/09 Sunday | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | A Benefit For Cancer Resource CenteriIn honor of our great mentor Eric Ott. Featuring Musical Performances By: Richie & Rosie, Tenzin Chopak with Rockwood Ferry and The Yardvarks. Music from 1PM until 5PM. Kitchen will be open from 1PM to 6PM.  Tioga County Fair | 12:00 AM-11:59

PM, 8/10 Monday, 8/11 Tuesday | Tioga County Fair Grounds, Rt. 17C, Owego | See tiogacountyfair.com for event listings. World War Z Zombie Club | 6:30 PM-7:30 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | BorgWarner Room, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Escape the Ordinary at Your Library with this fun-filled book club being held in celebration of our Adult Summer Reading Program. Participants will discuss World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, by Max Brooks. Dan The Snake Man | 6:30 PM-7:30 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Muldoon Park, Waverly | Dan will educate people of all ages about the nature and importance of reptiles. Come share in this unique experience and interact with the reptiles up-close and personal. Fun for the whole family. Empire Farm Days | 8/11 Tuesday | Rodman Lott & Sons Farm, 2973 Route 414, Seneca Falls | For more information call 877-697-7837 or visit www.empirefarmdays.com.

Meetings City of Ithaca Common Council | 6:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | Public is heard during privilege of the floor. City of Ithaca Commons Advisory Board | 8:30 AM, 8/07 Friday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | City of Ithaca Board of Public Works | 4:45 PM, 8/10 Monday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca

Mostly Beatles,

Nature & Science Adventure Play Days in the Hands-on-Nature Anarchy Zone | 5:30 PM-7:30 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Ithaca’s Children’s Garden, Ithaca | Come dig for worms, play with water, sand and clay, build forts out of straw bales and stumps, climb trees — and in the process get muddy, wet, and dirty while exploring your connection to nature. No registration is required and this is a free event, though donations are always welcome! Stargazing at Fuertes Observatory | 8:00 PM-12:00 AM, 8/07 Friday | Fuertes Observatory, Cornell, 219 Cradit Farm Dr, Ithaca | The Cornell Astronomical Society hosts stargazing at the historic Fuertes Observatory on

Whiplash,

CSMA, Friday, August 7, 8:00 p.m.

BorgWarner Room, Saturday, August 8, 2:00 p.m.

Specializing in British Invasion tunes, this band’s repertoire includes classics by The Zombies, The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark Five, The Hollies, Herman’s Hermits, and Manfred Man, but the bulk of the catalog is mostly Beatles, hence the name, and includes hits from all eras of the band’s extensive and diverse catalog. If your looking to step back in time, or simply looking for an arty rock and roll night, this is a sure hit. Don’t miss out!

City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | Town of Ithaca Planning Board | 7:00 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Town Of Ithaca, 215 N Tioga St, Ithaca | Ithaca City Board of Education | 7:00 PM-, 8/11 Tuesday | Ithaca City School District - Administration Building, Lake Street, Ithaca | City of Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission | 5:30 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission (ILPC) | 5:30 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Common Council Chambers Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | The ILPC is charged with administering and interpreting the Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Ordinance.

This 2014 American Drama film is based on the real life experiences of director Damien Chazelle’s time with his Princeton High School Studio Band. The film centers around the chaotic relationship between an intensive jazz student and his abusive instructor. In the oft-times insane world of academic music, this film receives many accolades for its portrayal of the participants of said world. Not to be missed.

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Cornell’s North Campus every clear Friday evening starting at dusk. Free and open to the public; parking across the street. Call 607-255-3557 after 6 p.m. to see if we are open that night. Fossil ID Day | 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, 8/08 Saturday | Museum Of The Earth, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca | Bring your mystery fossils in to the Museum of the Earth and get them identified. Guided Beginner Bird Walks, Sapsucker Woods | 7:30 AM, 8/08 Saturday, 8/09 Sunday | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca | Sponsored by the Cayuga Bird Club. Targeted toward beginners, but appropriate for all. Binoculars available for loan. Meet at the front of the building. For more information, please visit http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/ calendar.

Books A Novel Idea - Book Club | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Come spice things up, catch up with friends, and get your intellectual side out over delightful cocktails and books that you will not want to put down. Hosted by Buffalo Street Books’ Asha Sanakar. Kate Schatz | 5:00 PM, 8/05 Wednesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Author discusses her book Rad American Women from A-Z. Gabriel Urza | 5:00 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Author reads from his debut novel, All That Follows. The novel is about a politically-charged act of violence that echoes through a small Spanish town. It’s a dazzling debut in the tradition of Daniel Alarcón and Mohsin Hamid, and has received much praise.

Art First Friday Gallery Night | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | Ithaca | On the first Friday of each month, art galleries in downtown hold their opening receptions for exhibitions. Visit www.downtownithaca.com for details Oil Meets Water | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | CAP ArtSpace, Center Ithaca, The Commons, Ithaca | Who says water and oil don’t mix? Sue Hertz’s oil paintings feature water in its many forms, inspired by local surroundings as well as her travels to Ireland, Iceland,

HeadsUp Benefit for Local Friend by Bill Chaisson

F

ive bands are going to carry on an old Rongovian tradition by playing a benefit this Sunday, Aug. 9, complete with a silent auction and more food than you want to think about. The benefit is for the Cancer Resource Center in honor of Trumansburg’s Eric Ott, who has had reason to avail himself of their services lately. “It’s fairly common for people to hold fundraisers for the Cancer Resource Center,” said Bob Riter, the director of the center. “When people have been touched by cancer, they want to give back. They vary in size from small to pretty large.” The Rongo has a capacity of about 250 and it is not unusual at these things for the event to spill out onto the sidewalk. The CRC is a local organization (not part of a national non-profit) that guides people through treatment for cancer, administers support groups for men and women, old and young, people who have cancer and caregivers. “We create community,” said Riter. “People come for information, but they find a community. We help them stay connected. When they get sick, people tend to feel isolated.” In addition to information, the CRC offers members of the community practical things, like wigs. “We’re a communications hub,” Riter said, “for people touched by cancer; a third of our clients are family members.

Switzerland, California, and Maine. Jessie Beardslee of Thermis and Thread | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | The Art and Found, 112 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | The Art and Found hosts a different pop up vendor each gallery night in downtown Ithaca. For August we are featuring local designer Jesse Beardslee of Themis and Thread, showcasing a collection of beautifully simple clothing that makes you feel comfortable, sexy, and on the edge all at once. Themis and Thread’s fashions are locally made with a passion for integration and whim. 100% customizable statement staples from a national award winning brand! For the next two weeks The Art and Found will be giving out 25% off coupons to our customers so don’t forget to grab one at check out! Sarah Gotowka | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM,

We help businesses when one of their employees gets sick. They want to know what they can do.” The most important information that the CRC tries to get out there is to let people know that they are in charge. “There is no single right path,” said the CRC director. “We tell friends and family to not give advice. In most cases it’s not helpful. You should listen more than you talk.” Eric Ott was told by his doctor to put on some weight, get some exercise, and play as much music as he can. The last one, said John Simon, Ott’s bandmate in the Yaardvarks, has become his mission and his mantra. On Sunday Ott will be taking the stage with the Lost Sailors Trio and with the Yaardvarks. Ott played bass for the Lost Sailors for many years. He, drummer Roy Flacco and guitarist Larry Honigbaum recently reunited as a trio at an Alternatives Federal Credit Union member appreciation day and will play their second gig at the Rongo on Sunday. If people don’t know Ott from the Lost Sailors, they certainly know him as one of the owners of the Rongovian Embassy (with his wife Mary) during some very successful years for the venue in the 1980s and ‘90s.

8/07 Friday | Silky Jones, 214 The Commons, Ithaca | Pop-cultural text, Mixed Media, Language, Crafts. Show runs August 6-30. Vrana and Spitznagel | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | State Of The Art, 120 W State St Ste 2, Ithaca | The prints and paintings in this show create personal moments that give visibility to emotions and the psyche. Through abstraction, both artists develop forms that do not follow logical criteria, but are based on imagination and subjective thought. This artwork invites the viewer into a conversation between the conscious and the subconscious. Show runs until August 30. Marian VanSoest | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | Decorum - too, 215 N. Cayuga St. Dewitt Mall, Ithaca | Artist will present a variety of color-filled abstract paintings. Came join us to

The Haunt, Saturday, August 8, 9:00 p.m.

Two Los Angeles bands with two rather well known musicians visit The Haunt on this night. Dave Lombardo, the original and highly regarded drummer of Slayer, brings his band, Philm, an awesome art houseprogressive rock band, that incorporates punk, metal, avant-garde, and experimental sounds. Chris Wyse, the long time bassist for gothic rock/metal masters The Cult, showcases his band, Owl, who play a hard-rocking alternative form of music. Killation open up.

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Simon plays in Radio London with guitarist Ken Zeserson. It was Zeserson who introduced Simon to Ott in 2007. “He said, ‘You gotta play music with him. He’s the nicest guy you’ll ever meet.’ We kind of flipped for each other. Playing music together is a way to build close relationships.” Rosie Newton has been the prime mover of the event. She knows Ott through Tenzin Chopak with whom she played in Rockwood Ferry. Chopak and Ott are good friends. Newton has never undertaken a benefit before, but has

learn about the artist and ask questions about her work. Ian McCoy | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 8/07 Friday | The Ink Shop, 330 E. State / MILK Street, Ithaca | 2015 Kahn Family Fellow, Bookmaker, Printmaker, Vdeo-Artist. Exhibited work is from Fellowship. Iniervenio Orwcromico by Grazia Terrible | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 8/11 Tuesday | BorgWarner Room, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Documentary About Art in Nature in Southern Italy in 1983. ongoing State of the Art Gallery |120 West State Street, Ithaca | Wednesday-Friday, 12:00 PM-6:00 PM, Weekends, 12:00 PM-5:00 PM | Vrana and Spitznagel, Abstract Prints and Paintings | Runs

found that the widespread fondness for Ott has made it come together. The silent auction, for example, will be vast. “Jess [co-owner Jessica Giles] has been using Sundays to do community events,” said Newton, “so she was all about it.” The other bands that will take the stage this Sunday are Richie & Rosie (with a special guest), Mary Lorson with a full band, and Tenzin Chopak and Rockwood Ferry. The event begins at 1 p.m. and continues until 4 p.m. •

August 5 through August 31 | For information: 607-277-1626 or gallery@ soag.org Stella’s | 403 College Avenue, Ithaca | Lea Freni, Mixed Media, Fashion Design. July 1-August 31 | 607.277.1490 CAP ArtSpace | Center Ithaca, The Commons, Ithaca | Mon-Thu 9:00 AM7:00 PM, Fri-Sat 11:00 PM-7:30 PM; Sun 12:00-5:00 PM | Oil Meets Water, Sue Hertz presents oil paintings inspired by her travels throughout the world | www.artspartner.org Gallery at FOUND | 227 Cherry Street, Ithaca | 10:00 AM-6:00 PM, closed Tuesdays | Dee Sprague: The Spirit of Ithaca. Oil Paintings, Folk Art. On Display August 7 through August 30 | www.foundinithaca.com Community School of Music and Arts | 330 E.State / MLK Street, Ithaca,

NY 14850 | Group exhibition of works by CSMA’s visual arts faculty. Featuring paintings and drawings by artists Rob Licht, Kevin Mayer, Terry Plater, Miriam Rice, and Melissa Zarem. Runs throughout August and September.| www.csma-ithaca.org The Ink Shop | 330 E.State / MLK Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 | Tuesday to Friday 12 -6 PM, Sat 12-4 PM | Ian McCoy, Multi-Media Artist displays work from recent Family Fellowship. Through August 31 | www.ink-shop.org

Got Submissions? Send your events items – band gigs, benefits, meet-ups, whatever – to arts@ithacatimes.com.

Johnny DowD & Anna Coogan, Rongovian Embassy, Saturday, August 8, 9:00 p.m.

ThisWeek

Philm, Owl, Killation

Illustration by Q. Cassetti

Dowd, one of Ithaca’s most impressive and original musicians, brings his alternative-country-crooner style, complete with his signature noisy, jazzy, avant-garde, experimental soloing and dark humor, and mixes it with Coogan’s honest, bold, country-influenced-easiness, to forge something very unique and engaging. The two have traveled the world together playing music, and show it, with their unmistakable confidence and grit. This is sure to be a great one!


Town&Country

Classifieds

employment 430/General AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

In Print | On Line | 10 Newspapers | 67,389 Readers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

Internet: www.ithacatimes.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

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Male and Female Maltese FREE for Adoption if interested contact me at jw056232@gmail.com

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PIANOS

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August 7 Virgil Cain, August 14 Little Joe, August 21 Ron Riddle & the Riders, August 28 Under Construction, September 4 Virgil Cain. Classic Rock on the deck at BoatYard Grill, 525 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca, NY 6:00pm-9:00pm

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Shelburne, MA needs 5 temporary workers 9/1/2015 to 10/31/2015, work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period. $11.26 per hr. Applicants apply at Franklin/ Hampshire Career Center, One Arch Place, Greenfield, MA 01301, 413-7744361 or apply for the job at the nearest office of the SWA. Job order #591182. May perform any combination of tasks related to the planting, cultivating, and processing of fruit including, but not limited to driving, operating, adjusting and maintaining farm machines, preparing soil, planting, pruning, weeding, thinning, spraying, irrigating, mowing, harvesting, grading and packing. May use hand tools such as shovel, pruning saw, and hoe. One months experience in duties listed required.

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Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Career! We offer Training and Certification Running Bulldozers, Backhoes and Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866362-6497 (NYSCAN)

employment

employment

Apple Acres

MAKE $1000 Weekly!! Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately. www.theworkingcorner.com (AAN CAN)

Windham, NH needs 2 temporary workers 8/15/2015 to 11/5/2015, work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period. $11.26 per hr. applicants to apply contact Scott Koblich, NH Employment Security at 603-229-4407. Or apply for the job at the nearest local office of the SWA. Job order #103119. May perform any combination of tasks related to the planting, cultivating, pruning, thinning clearing brush and weeds, repairing crates, cutting wood, move pallets of fruit with hand trucks. May harvest, package, process and prepare fruits and products for sale but not limited to, driving, operating, adjusts and maintaining farm buildings and machines, preparing soil, planting, pruning, weeding, thinning, spraying, irrigating, mowing, harvesting, grading, packing. May use hand tools such as shovel, pruning saw, hoe and cutlass. Climbing ladders with picking bucket on shoulder with up to 40 pounds of weight. 1 months experience in duties listed required.

Individualized Care Coordinator (ICC)

Pathwyas, Inc., Home & CommunityBased Waiver Program is seeking a FullTime Individualized Care Coordinator (ICC) for Tompkins County. This program assists families and youth with SED. The position assists with strength based service planning, provides linkage, coordination, and monitoring of services. Qualifications: MS Degree in Social Work, Psychology or related discipline, and a>minimum of Two years’ experience working w/children with one or more of the following diagnosis: mental illness, mental retardation, alcoholism, chemical dependency or substance abuse, BS degree in Social Work, Psychology or related discipline & four years’ experience as described above. To Apply: Visit our website www.pathwaysforyou. org to download an application. Send cover letter, resume and application to hr@pathwaysforyou.org or Pathways, Inc. Attn: HR, 33 Denison Parkway West, Corning, NY 14830; Call: (607)937-3200; Fax: (607)937-3205.

272-2602

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Rogers Orchards

Southington, CT needs 8 temporary workers 8/15/2015 to 11/1/2015, work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period $11.26 per hr. Applicants to apply contact CT Department of Labor at 860-263-6020. Or apply for the job at the nearest local office of the SWA. Job order #4559281. Any combination of tasks related to the production and harvesting of apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, plums, and apricots including pruning, thinning, hoeing, bating, irrigating,mowing, fertilizing, and harvesting. Workers will be using straight and stepladders and will be required to lift approximately 50lbs while descending and ascending ladders on a sustained basis. At least two months experience in duties listed above.

Waiters Servers Dishwasher Needed 607-256-3425

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Music Director/Organist

Musical training or experience with choral or bell directing and Keyboard/Organ is required. Send resume with qualifications to Trumansburg United Methodist Church, PO Box 628, Trumansburg, NY 14886 ATTN: Peter Cooke or e-mail tumc@fltg.net. Call (607)387-9024 for info.

Your one Stop Shop

950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY

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employment

adoptions

employment

The City of Ithaca

is accepting applications for the following exam: Police Officer Exam No. 68-102: Minimum Quals & Spec Req: Visit website for full requirements. Salary:

520/Adoptions Wanted

$44,891. Exam: November 14, 2015. Residency: Applicants must be residents of Tompkins County or one of the sic (6)

ADOPT

contiguous counties. Application deadline: October 1, 2015. City of Ithaca HR

Creative, musical, nurturing teacher wishes to adopt a baby into here loving & secure home. Expenses Paid. Call Lillian 1-888-861-8427 or www.liliadopts.com

Dept., 108 East Green St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (608)274-6539 www.cityofithaca. org. The City of Ithaca is an equal op-

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. (AAN CAN)

portunity employer that is committed to diversifying its workforce.

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2 Bedroom

19, 2015. City of Ithaca HR Dept., 108 East Green Street, Ithaca, NY 14850, (607)274-6539, www.cityofithaca.org.

CLOSE TO CORNELL

The City of Ithaca is an equal opportunity

Spacious, Furnished 2 Bedrooms one with Balcony, Carpet and Hardwood Floors. Heat, Hot Water, w/s included. Tenant pays electric. 4 Blocks to Central Campus. Carol CSP Management 2776961 cspmanagement.com

employer that is committed to diversifying its workforce.

435/Health Care

Lower Collegetown

School Nurse

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Southern Cayuga School has an opening for a Registered Professional Nurse effective September 1, 2015. Please send letter of interest, district application, copy of license/certification, transcripts, fingerprint clearance and at least three

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real estate

A Ranch in the Country

Split-Level Home with a Spread Around It

At A Glance Contact: Peggy Haine, Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker, RealtyUSA; peggy@peggyhaine. com Phone: (607) 220-5463 Website: www.aedelman.com

Price: $262,500 Location: 4264 Cold Springs Road, Town of Ulysses School District: Trumansburg Central Schools MLS#: 303048

By C a s san dra Palmy ra

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to v p a ge 2 0 or go to Ithaca.com

! ote

more than 100 years 4264 Cold Springs Road, Ulysses (Photo: Cassandra Palmyra)

N

o one seems to know who invented the split-level home. The original idea is ascribed to Frank Lloyd Wright, who certainly did divide and offset the floors of some of his houses to separate public and private areas. Who adapted it into a vernacular home that anyone could afford is not known, but there have been many variations on the idea since the 1950s. The house at 4264 Cold Springs Road in Ulysses is one of these variations. In many split levels you enter between the first and second levels, but here you enter into a foyer adjacent to a family room to the right on the same level, while there is a short set of stairs to the left that lead to the living room. In addition to the family room, which is graced with a pellet stove, there is also a single-bay garage and a laundry room at ground level. The rear door exits from the laundry room. You step up a short flight into the kitchen where you find custom-made modern oak cabinets; all the doors to the cabinets have rounded corners. There is a gas stove (this house is at the end of the natural gas line), a steel double sink and Formica counters. There are 12-inch ceramic tiles on the floor. The dining room is adjacent to the kitchen and there is a wide entrance from there to the living room at the front of the house. While the floor of the dining room is oak, the living room is carpeted wall to wall and has a large picture window. You ascend another short set of stairs to attain the third level of the split, which is all private space: bedrooms and bathrooms.

Immediately at the top of the stairs is a small room with a hardwood parquet floor that could be either a study or a bedroom (there is a closet). At the end of the hall there are two more bedrooms. The front room is slightly smaller and the rear room is the master, which has an adjacent full bathroom with a shower stall and a double closet with louvered doors. There is another full bathroom off the hall that includes a tub and shower. The trim throughout this house is unpainted, nicely finished oak. The only surfaces that have been painted are the walls. In addition to the main house, there are two outbuildings. The workshop has nearly as large a footprint as the house. It has a gambrel roof, which gives the loft on the second story a lot of head room. The ground level is a poured concrete slab and is one big open space. That is, there is plenty of room for installation of machinery. It already has natural gas and electricity installed. If water is run to it, it could be developed into a second inhabitable structure. The second outbuilding is smaller. There is only one window on the wall opposite the door (which also has a window). It has the makings of a small yoga or pottery studio or a writer’s retreat, but the walls are not finished inside. The entire parcel is 13 acres, which appears to be agricultural land that was let go about 25 years before. Much of it is shrub (e.g. gray dogwood, honeysuckle) and saplings (e.g. ash, cherry). The two acres around the house are landscaped with lawn and large specimen trees. •

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