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BALLOT

QUESTIONS

CRIME WAVE

A look at the Myrick responds to proposals up for vote spate of violence PAGE 5

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RIGHT TO RENEW

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LOCAL

SCARES

Law undergoes scrutiny

Three Ithacans share scary movie recs

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BEYOND POP-UP

A pop-up art gallery on the Commons PAGE 13


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Vital for Life

by Betsy Schermerhorn Director, Marketing and Admissions

ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES One of the most critical decisions an older person will make when preparing for retirement is where to live. Many people immediately think of assisted living facilities or a continuing care community, and there are good reasons for this. Such senior housing options offer peace of mind for families and improved quality of life for their occupants. Residents receive the support they need. There are immense benefits, including round-the-clock medical care. Other services and amenities may include social activities and outings, housekeeping and laundry services, mobility assistance, nutritious meals, beauty salons, and barbershops. One of the most important benefits, however, is the strong bonds formed

with staff members and neighbors, which can combat loneliness and depression. The typical resident lives in assisted living for two to three years, and many then move to nursing homes. Individuals who require a wheelchair for locomotion, have a severe cognitive impairment, or show behavioral symptoms such as wandering are discouraged from becoming residents of an assisted living facility. Call the marketing team at (607) 266-5300 to schedule a tour to see our facilities and learn more about lifecare at Kendal at Ithaca. Find us on the web at http://kai. kendal.org/ P.S. Assisted living residents are generally active and remain relatively independent, but may need support with activities of daily living (ADLs). 2230 N. Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 14850-6513

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VOL.XLII / NO. 10 / October 27, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S In the running Part II �������������������������������8 Get to know the candidates for the contested Common Council seats.

Meet Sparky the Unicorn ��������� 13 BEYOND Pop-Up gallery brings art to the Commons, anchored by a 12foot tall, rideable unicorn

Newsline ��������������������������������������������������3-5 Opinion �������������������������������������������������������� 6 Letters �������������������������������������������������������� 7

ART S &E N T E RTAINME N T Film ������������������������������������������������������������� 15 Stage ���������������������������������������������������������� 16 Books ��������������������������������������������������������� 19 Times Table ���������������������������������������������� 20 Classifieds ����������������������������������������������� 22

R AIL TR AIL

New portion of Dryden Rail Trail runs through Reynolds Game Farm

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he newest section of the Dryden Rail Trail is officially open. The section, just short of a half-mile long, includes the railbed running through the Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Reynolds Game Farm. Because the trail is on state land, deputy supervisor Dan Lamb worked for years to work out a deal with the DEC to negotiate an agreement to open up the corridor for the trail. “After years of trying to meet with the right staff at DEC, I was able to negotiate with the deputy commissioner and his staff, who helped expedite a 20-year agreement for the trail,” Lamb said. “We were able to convince supporters of the state’s last pheasant raise and release program at the Game Farm that the trail would support rather than threaten that operation. The trail will attract hundreds of weekly users and we will erect signage at the trailhead to ensure that trail users are

educated about DEC’s important work.” The path had been completely overgrown and hadn’t been touched since the railway closed in the early ‘70s, and work began to clear the path this past spring. “Our guys cleared their way to the two old railroad bridges,” Dryden Highway Superintendent Rick Young said. “They removed rotted sections, built new members, reinforced portions and gave the trestles a new life.”

Rail Trail Task Force chair said the DEC previously thought the town would need to demolish the old trestles and build new bridges. However, a town engineering report found that the bridges were in a good enough condition to be safely repaired for use by pedestrians, cyclists and equestrians. The restored timber-trestle bridges stretch over Cascadilla Creek, and the entire trail is covered with a stone dust surface, making it ADA accessible. As with many rail trails, the path is mostly a flat grade. This portion does have some gentle bends though, making it unique from the often straight paths of former railways. This portion of the trail was funded from a grant from the New York State Office of

T a k e

▶  Safety Tips - The Ithaca Fire Department put out some safety tips for kids ahead of Halloween on Sunday. They suggest planning costumes that are bright and reflective and making sure that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping. Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trickor-treat bags for greater visibility.

Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000

Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation through the Environmental Protection Fund. The grant was awarded in 2017 and requires an equal match by the town. It’s focus is on rehabilitating 5.5 miles of the town’s abandoned rail corridor through trail clearing, developing parking lots and trailheads and repairing infrastructure. The Triad Foundation in Ithaca also provided $15,000 to purchase materials for the trestles. When completed, the Dryden Rail Trail will connect the village of Dryden to Freeville, Etna, Cornell and the city of Ithaca. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

N o t e

Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup as a safer alternative. When shopping for costumes and accessories, purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant. Have a flashlight with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts. Teach children how to call 9-1-1 if they have an emergency or become lost.

ON T HE WE B

Town Supervisor Jason Leifer, Council Members Dan Lamb and Leonardo Vargas Mendez and Highway Supervisor Rick Young

Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers, then parents can do the cutting. Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and should never be left unattended.

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T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m Sharon Davis, Distribution F r o n t J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE COPYRIGHT © 2021, BY NEWSKI INC.

All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

CR IME

PHOTOGRAPHER Myrick responds to recent wave of crime with ‘all-of-the-above’ approach By C a se y Mar tin

WHAT WAS YOUR ALL-TIME FAVORITE HALLOWEEN COSTUME GROWING UP?

“Luke Skywalker.” -Nick Z.

Ithaca, Mayor Svante Myrick via Fackbook live

“I grew up in Brazil, so we didn’t celebrate Halloween…but I did love my Ballerina Costume for Carnival!” -Caroline M.

“Classic white-sheet-ghost, and a vampire!” - Chris. M. & Kyra S.

A

fter a cluster of shooting incidents throughout the month of October in the city of Ithaca, Mayor Svante Myrick said the city and Ithaca Police Department are taking a comprehensive approach to quell the violence. Myrick described the violence as “a couple of extremely irresponsible people engaged in a personal dispute” who are “intent on shooting each other.” Most recently, two parties exchanged gunfire at the Kwik Fill on S Meadow Street, though fortunately nobody was injured. Police have been investigating but as of now it’s unclear whether they have any suspects. Ithaca Times has reached out to Acting Chief

John Joly for more information. According to Myrick, the ease of access to guns, the fraying of social bonds and the stress of an unequal economy has led to a rise in gun violence across the country. To stifle that in Ithaca, the city will be taking a four-pronged approach. The first part is “prevention through social investment.” Myrick said crimes are often the result of people being left without their basic economic and social needs being met. To combat this the city will be maintaining and increasing investments in GIAC (including My Brother’s Keeper), the Ithaca Youth Bureau, Southside

County Legislature

“Bo Diddley..Ok JAMES BROWN!” -Mr. Lovett

“Homemade Robot! JAKE FROM STATE FARM!” - Lilly T & Cole P.

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Legislature passes tentative county budget, COVID hospitalizations stay low

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he Tompkins County Legislature’s budget season is coming to the end as the tentative 2022 budget is passed in anticipation of next month’s public hearing. Legislature Chair Leslyn McBean-Clairborne offered an amendment to the recommended 2022 county budget that would appropriate just over $605,000 from unassigned fund balance to achieve a 0%

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tax levy increase resulting in a tax rate decrease of 1.81% and a $1,250 County tax bill on a median priced home. This amendment had been previously discussed at Expanded Budget Committee meetings and followed a presentation on the unexpected significant increase in 2021 sales tax revenues. The amendment passed 10-4 with legislators Mike Lane, Leslie Schill, Deborah 20 2 1

Community Center, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, Black Hands Universal, Unbroken Promise Initiative and REACH. The second is “smart targeted enforcement.” Joly is directing available resources, as well as recruiting assistance from the state police, to assist in a “special gun violence suppression detail” in areas of the city. Ithaca Police Department put out a statement earlier in the week stating they would be increasing patrols in the West End, where much of the recent violence has been concentrated. Longer term, the city is also working on launching the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program to expand law enforcement options. The program originated in 2017 but didn’t have funds to get past the concept stage until they received $900,000 in grant money last fall. And of course, the city’s working group continues to design the new Public Safety Department that is part of the Reimagining Public Safety initiative. The third facet is “building a safer city through safer infrastructure.” This includes things like better lighting and more camera technology. Myrick said the city had recently purchased the city’s streetlights from NYSEG and are working on repairing broken lights and identifying dark spots that could benefit from improvement. The city is also reportedly working with private property owners to improve their lights, cameras and property management, specifically focusing on larger

developments. The last part is “combating misinformation.” The Ithaca Police Benevolent Association (PBA) has been putting out its own press releases about the shootings, in addition to the department’s official releases. The PBA has taken an aggressive approach in their public relations campaign, often targeting Myrick specifically. In their most recent press release on Oct. 20, the PBA accused the “anti-police rhetoric of activist” Myrick of making the city less safe. They’ve also accused Myrick of ignoring the PBA’s ideas for police reform, however it’s worth noting that three IPD officers, including PBA President Sgt. Tom Condzella, are working members of the Reimagining Public Safety task force. Myrick hit back at the PBA’s campaign in the “combating misinformation” portion of the city’s plan. “I’m sure you’ve noticed by now that nearly every day the police union’s PR firm issues a press release framed in the scariest possible language,” Myrick said. “And that is of course their intent — if they can use scare tactics to draw a correlation between police reform and crime, they can sway public opinion and convince the community to drop our planned reforms.” (To view Myrick’s Facebook Live, visit https:// www.facebook.com/419907/ videos/252394183519648/. To view the PBA’s page, visit https://www.facebook.com/ IthacaPBA/. ) -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Dawson and Henry Granison opposed. The tentative 2022 Tompkins County Budget as amended passed 13-1 with Granison opposed. The budget as approved in this meeting will go to a public hearing on Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. The budget may continue to be amended in the lead-up to the public hearing.

ect. The presentation detailed greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, facilities, vehicles and equipment as well as measures to be taken in the future to improve facilities and reduce emissions. Presenters outlined the history of green facilities improvements, stating that facilities improvements have guaranteed financial savings to the county and looked forward to the work to come as part of the Green Facilities Initiative adopted in 2020 set to reduce net carbon emissions for facilities to zero by 2027 Later in the meeting bonding toward the first phase of

Green Facilities

Director of Facilities Arel LeMaro, Chief Sustainability Officer Terry Carroll, and representatives from Johnson Controls gave a presentation on the county’s green facilities net zero carbon emission proj-

continued on page 7


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

Ups The new Ulta between Old Navy and Trader Joe’s opens this week after taking over the space

this summer. Downs Say your goodbyes to the sunshine. November and the end of daylight savings is creeping up on us and the weather has been steadily getting more and more dreary.

HEARD&SEEN

Heard Starting last Sunday, residents must dial 607 in front of local phone numbers, in case there are any people left who don’t already do that. Seen The framing is up for the new KFC going in on Elmira Road, so fried chicken lovers get your wet wipes ready.

ELECTION

Ballot questions aim to remove voting barriers, amend redistricting

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n addition to electing officials like County Legislatures and Common Council members, voters in the Nov. 2 election will also have important ballot questions to decide. There are five statewide ballot proposals for consideration.

Proposal 1: Amending the apportionment and redistricting process

This proposed constitutional amendment would freeze the number of state senators at 63, amend the process for the counting of the state’s population, delete certain provisions that violate the U.S. Constitution, repeal and amend certain requirements for the appointment of the co-executive directors of the redistricting commission and amend the manner of drawing district lines for congressional and state legislative offices. This is a meaty proposal that would do a handful of things. Firstly, it would amend and repeal portions of the state constitutional amendment adopted by voters in 2014 that created a redistricting commission. It would allow

the redistricting commission to appoint two co-executive directors by simple majority vote, without consideration of party affiliation. It would also eliminate the alternative process currently in place that allows for the appointment of co-executive directors and codeputy executive directors by the legislature in the case that the redistricting commission fails to appoint co-executive directors. It would also remove the requirement that the two co-executive directors be members of different political parties. The amendment would also require that state assembly and senate district lines be based on the total population of the state, and require the state to count all residents, including non-citizens and Native Americans if the federal census fails to include them. This comes on the heels of the state losing a representative after coming up 89 people short to retain its 27 seats. In further changes to redistricting, it would count incarcerated people at their place of last residence, rather than at their place of incarceration. This practice is already

established by state statute for Senate and Assembly districts. As the state is currently in the midst of redistricting efforts, the next change of procedure would go into effect in 2022. The approval of a plan by the redistricting commission would require at least seven “yes” votes out of the 10 commissioners. A plan approved by at least seven commissioners must be approved by a majority of each house of the legislature to be approved. In the case that seven-vote threshold is not reached, the commission would have to send the legislature the redistricting plan that garnered the most votes. The legislature could then adopt the plan with 60% majority. Importantly, this amendment would also require the redistricting commission to submit its redistricting plan and implementing legislation to the legislature two months earlier than currently called for in an effort to speed the process up. For the redistricting due to proceed in 2022, the time frame would be condensed to meet election-related deadlines. This is by far the most complex amendment. For the full text, visit elections. ny.gov/2021BallotProposals. html.

Proposal 2: Right to clean air, clean water and a healthful environment

This proposal would simply

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own grievances or praise, write news@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “U&D.”

add an amendment to article I of the constitution in relation to the right to clean air and water, and a healthful environment.

Proposal 3: Eliminating 10-day advance voter registration requirement The proposed amendment would delete the current requirement by the state that a citizen be registered to vote at least 10 days before an election. It would also allow the legislature to enact laws permitting a citizen to register to vote less than 10 days before the election.

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What Halloween candy should we cancel? 3.7% Vegan Candy Corn

Proposal 4: Authorizing noexcuse absentee ballot voting

57.9% Anything with Raisins

Currently, there’s a provision on absentee ballots that requires the voter to be unable to appear at the polls by reason of absence from the county, illness, or physical disability. This proposal would delete that provision, allowing people to choose to vote via absentee ballot for any reason.

7.9% Apples 10.5% Chocolate NECCO wafers

Proposal 5: Increasing the jurisdiction of the New York City Civil Court

Perhaps of less personal interest to voters in Tompkins County, this proposal would allow the New York City Civil Court to hear and decide claims for $50,000 or less, rather than the current limit of $25,000 or less. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

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N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

Are you registered to vote in Ithaca yet? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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SPORTS

SURROUNDED BY REALITY

An Amplification of Desire

Not Making This Up

By St ev e L aw r e nc e

By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

Tim Hector

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wimmers don’t wear hats, but if they did, Tim Hector of the Ithaca College swim team would wear several. The 2017 Ithaca High graduate is primarily a backstroker, but he jumps in to help out (good metaphor) if the team needs him for sprints, freestyle or butterfly.

Hector is a tri-captain for the Bombers, and he earned that designation not because he is a senior, but because he has made big contributions over the years. During the 2019-20 season —the Bombers’ last real season before the pandemic — Tim was part of the winning 200 medley relay team at the Liberty League Championship which won in 1:31.89, setting a new meet record. He was also on the winning 200 freestyle relay team and the winning 400 medley relay team which won in 3:21.55, setting a new meet, conference and school record. His list of accomplishments is a long one, but you get the point — he earned that title of tri-captain. Any college athlete will tell you that there are some adjustments to be made when going from the high school to the collegiate level, and in Hector’s words, “I think the biggest difference is that in high school, you have some kids come out for teams to have fun, to spend time with their friends. In college, you still want to have fun, but there’s a bigger focus on becoming the best athlete you can possibly be.” continued on page 7

AN ACT relating to the social studies curriculum in public schools. BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF TEXAS: SECTION A 1. Subchapter J, Chapter 21, Education Code, is amended by adding Section 21.4555 to read as follows: A. Henceforth, educators shall present each topic from diverse and contending perspectives without giving deference to any one perspective. B. In adopting the essential knowledge and skills for the social studies curriculum for pre-kindergarten, the Texas State Board of Education shall adopt essential knowledge and skills that develop each student ’s civic knowledge, including: (1) an understanding of: (a) the fundamental moral, political, and intellectual implications of baking four and twenty blackbirds in a pie, provided, however that there be equal exposure to alternative theories regarding the number of blackbirds, the conditions in which the pie may or may not have been baked, and the race or ethnicity of the person(s) engaging in the baking, if any, of the pie. (b) the history and complexity of Georgie Porgie, who may or may not have kissed girls and made them cry, presenting the contending perspectives that Porgie later ran away when the girls came out to play, it was a long time ago, and Porgie didn’t recall kissing anyone, just like Justice Kavanaugh. (c) the moral and political implications of the story of the Old Woman Who Lived In a Shoe, including an exploration of why she keeps having offspring while inhabiting a shoe, as well as the diverse interpretations of the narrative, such as invoking the spirit of the pioneers of the Olde West and making her fend for herself. Like the pioneers. Also, reminding the students that corporal punishment is legal in Texas. (d) the previous existence of Native Americans and dinosaurs in Texas, provided, however, that no deference is given to any one theory about when they lived or what happened to them. Just before naptime, suggest that hypothesizing the existence of people or creatures that existed before us has all the earmarks of a hoax. (e) the essential importance of the concept that Caring is Sharing, bearing in mind that self-interested buyers and sellers are the very cornerstone of Capitalism. Under no circumstances punish, criticize or otherwise sanction a student for not sharing at snacktime, as that sends the message that you are giving deference to the perspective that sharing is mandatory, which is indistinguishable from Socialism. (f) the history and traditions associated with the story of the Itsy Bitsy Spider, while being careful to avoid giving deference to the perspective that increasingly-frequent episodes of torrential rainfall alternating with scorching drought are in any way a symptom of climate change caused by human activity. NEXT COLUMN: Do you think Mexico will take Texas back if we ask them nicely?

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SPORTS Contin u ed From Page 6

He continued, “There is what I would call an amplification of the desire to do well in the classroom and in the pool. I feel obligated to learn the skills of time management, I know how important it is to carry those skills forward and I think being a college athlete is a good way to do that.” Hector was a part of a swimming dynasty of sorts while at Ithaca High, and the Little Red never lost a dual meet during his time there. He developed a strong relationship with his head coach, Mike Blakely-Armitage, and he was happy to hear that his high school coach would be following him to South Hill (as an assistant coach). In Tim’s words, “It was an interesting turn of events to have him coach me again, starting in my sophomore year. Having that established connection makes it easier to work together.” Blakely-Armitage was well aware of what he was getting into when he joined the Bomber coaching staff, as he is an insider by any measure. As an undergrad at Ithaca College (class of 2000) Mike was on the swim team and immediately moved into an assistant coaching position, maintaining that position until 2004. During his time as an assistant, the men’s swimming and diving team won its first conference championship in 2001 and went on to win two more while he

was on the staff. I asked Mike about the changes he has seen over two decades, and he said, “The training elements are so much more advanced, and the kids are a lot faster.” Asked how his own times would stack up now, Mike laughed and said, “I was a decent D-III swimmer, and I was one of the top 10 point scorers for the team, but I wouldn’t even make the travel squad now.” From a coaching standpoint, BlakelyArmitage said, “The ways we communicate now are so much different. We use texting, we use apps, we have always said that we are available to our athletes at all times, and I’ll tell you, with phones at everyone’s fingertips, that’s the real deal.” He added, “It’s mostly a good thing, but I am conscious of the fact that we still need to teach them to figure things out on their own. “When I was first coaching, we made phone calls, hoping we could reach the recruits, but more often than not we left messages on answering machines. We used snail mail, we sent letters... To be honest, I don’t know how we did it.” The Bombers’ 2021-22 season is just getting underway, and Blakely-Armitage told me, “We definitely have targets on our backs in the Liberty League, and we are heading to RPI, where the men are hoping to snap a losing streak. I think the women will edge them, but it should be close.”

COUNTY LEGISLATURE Contin u ed From Page 4

facilities improvements under this plan passed unanimously, 14-0.

Among Other Business

Tompkins County Public Health Director Frank Kruppa and Deputy County Administrator Amie Hendrix shared an update on the county’s ongoing COVID-19 response. The presentation highlighted information on COVID-19 hospitalizations in Tompkins County, describing that individuals who are unvaccinated are at significantly more risk of being hospitalized due to COVID-19, though hospitalizations remain very low in Tompkins County. Kruppa shared in charts that the average age of unvaccinated individuals who have been hospitalized since August 1 is 55.7, whereas the average age of hospitalized fully vaccinated individuals is 77.1. Data was also shared showing that since Aug. 1, there have only been five vaccinated individuals below the age of 70 in the hospital, whereas there have been 32 unvaccinated. Kruppa also shared that the Health Department continues to plan around vaccine booster doses, clarifying that the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson boosters had not been fully approved yet and that the Health Department’s efforts and focus will be directed toward vaccinating 5–11-year-old children with Pfizer.

Bill Troy was unanimously appointed as Tompkins County’s attorney effective Nov. 1. Troy is an internal promotion, having worked as deputy county attorney for several years. Current attorney Jonathan Wood is retiring at the end of 2021. A municipal bond for three phases of the creation of a backup 9-1-1 emergency dispatch center was approved unanimously, 14-0. Director of the Department of Emergency Response Michael Stitley joined the meeting to discuss the project, a partnership with Cornell University. The project addresses issues with redundancies and the procurement of additional hardware to ensure continuity of operations and necessary renovations of the current space at 92 Brown Rd. The debt would be paid via a New York state grant to support the project. A resolution urging New York state to adopt a conservation easement exemption for Tompkins County passed 14-0. Legislator Dan Klein shared that this would benefit the “land-rich but money-poor,” and Schill stated that this would “reduce development pressure” for some properties in the county. The proposed perpetual easement would result in a 50% reduction in taxable value for lands under the program.

THE TALK AT

2nd Ward residents can get to know Rick better by emailing him at: rmichaelmurray5@gmail.com. -Jeff Barken, Ithaca, NY

Re: The cost of healthcare

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YOUR LETTERS Rick Murray, The Non-Partisan Candidate For 2nd Ward Ever since the “Don’t Slip on the Slate” signs appeared this fall, I’m sure many have wondered, who is Rick Murray? Having spent some time with Rick this summer and fall, I write to say he’s not only worthy of your vote, but an inspiring candidate for Second Ward Alderperson. In March, he battled cancer. Triumphant, he hustled and got himself on the ballot. Retired Army, and a career Logistics Specialist, Rick’s experience serving as the Diversity and Inclusion officer for a major corporation will be an asset to Common Council and the City of Ithaca. Running as an independent is an uphill climb. Rick has taken a personal approach to earn every vote in the Second Ward. Perhaps Rick left his card or he stood with you at your door and listened. Rick and I read a novel together this summer; Jubilee, by Margaret Walker. Set in the Antebellum South and continuing through the Civil War and Reconstruction, the book was foundational for fruitful discussions concerning Ithaca’s present discourse on systemic racism. With lifelong ties to the 2nd Ward, Rick has unique perspectives and a wealth of knowledge. His bi-racial heritage informs his sense of community and his commitment to the City as a whole. Rick wishes to defuse the paralysis of political polarization. He recognizes the need for increased opportunities within the City and will be a vocal ally and advocate for those enduring hardships. Rick is also budget conscious and will help the City meet its financial commitments. He knows what services the city can realistically and legally provide, and the importance of growing the tax base to meet these goals. Rick’s pragmatism makes him uniquely qualified to help implement Ithaca’s reform initiatives. He’ll navigate the complexities of change with an eye for what is in Council’s purview. As for Rick’s reference to slipping on the Slate, he prefers dialogue to doctrine. Candidates for Council are not interchangeable. He believes each ward rep should be individually elected and personally accountable. Rick campaigns entirely in-person and wants every 2nd Ward voter to know they have options in this year’s race. Voters wary of non-party candidates will be pleasantly surprised. Rick is cordial, well-attuned to the issues, and ready to dedicate these next years to public service. He is the non-partisan alternative to this year’s party line. O c to b e r

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ecently, Cayuga Medical Center had a fundraising campaign. There are some very good peoplewho work in the Healthcare system but there are also a few very greedy people who take advantage of the system.I believe anyone who has an interest in Cayuga Medical Center or perhaps who recently donated, should be aware of the amount of money the CEOs and other administrators have been making over the years. One particularly egregious salary is of the former CEO in 2018, $4,961,584 (https://projects.propublica. org/nonprofits/organizations/222325405). This was the year after the union campaign was defeated, likely the CEO was rewarded for keeping the Union out of the healthcare system. Ithaca has historically been a town of progressives with left leaning people who have advocated for people of lesser means, including healthcare access. I am not sure how the overinflated salaries of the administrators at the local hospital has escaped the attention of advocates for improved healthcare access. Cayuga Medical was a community hospital in the past, with a mission to serve the Tompkins County community.We are fortunate to have a decent hospital but how much better could it be or how many more people could afford to access care there, if the hierarchy in the system had reasonable salaries? Dale Porter, Ithaca, NY

Write to us! Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

Correction In last week’s Ithaca Times we covered the contested races for County Legislature. We did not cover District 13, because the race is uncontested. However, we wanted to make readers aware that Samantha Lushtak’s name was never removed from the ballot after she lost the Democratic primary to Greg Mezey, and she has since moved out of state, making Mezey the only campaigning candidate.

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IN THE RUNNING PART II Get to know the candidates for the contested Common Council seats. By A n dr e s R e n d on a n d Ta n n e r H a r di ng The next election is slated for Nov. 2, so Ithaca Times spoke to Common Council candidates for the contested races. Polls will be open from 6 a.m. – 9 p.m. on election day. For more information on polls, candidates in non-contested races or to see sample ballots, visit www.tompkinscountyny.gov/boe.

FIRST WARD (WEST HILL) CYNTHIA BROCK

Cynthia Brock is the current alderperson for the first ward running for re-election: Some of the biggest issues in Ithaca that Brock believes are important to address are development and housing. “We have a growing demand for housing,” Brock said. “We need housing for all income levels and all types of housing.” Brock also mentioned that Reimagining Public Safety is another concern for Ithaca that she would like to work on. “This will be a multi-year process that involves a lot of community stakeholders … Police officers, social service providers,” Brock said, “are involved in how we envi-

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sion delivering public safety services to our residents.” Being the alderperson for the first ward, Brock noted that her experience and ability to create relationships with stakeholders and community members allows her the chance to create effective policy and fulfill the role of the council member efficiently. “It really requires working together and finding common purpose and goals to make this happen,” said Brock. When it comes to implementing her policy ideas, Brock explained how she would love to see a program where the community is able to work with the county to be able to convert food waste into energy and electricity. “I think that would be incredibly beneficial to the community because it would be clean energy,” said Brock. Brock also stated that she will take the concerns about zoning and try her best to make her constituents’ concerns be heard and addressed in council.

MADDIE HALPERT

Maddie Halpert is running against incumbent Cynthia Brock under the Solidarity Slate Party. Halpert cited housing as a big issue in Ithaca. She noted that there needs to be available housing for low-income individuals. She also said that the Reimagining Public Safety process is also important for the


community. Climate change is also a concern for Halpert. “This comes out of all the grassroots movements we’re seeing that kind of gave birth to the Solidarity Slate… and from all the door knocking, hearing people’s stories at their doors,” she said. “Underlying all of these issues are needed to design a system around principles of care and around addressing the histories of injustices that tend to divide people.” Having grown up in Ithaca, along with many volunteering experiences, Halpert feels closely connected to the area and the community and has a good grasp on what needs to be addressed. Halpert has been the consensus facilitator of a co-op and has served in leader-

ship roles in the United States Peace Corps, where she learned how systems operate and some information on budgeting. Halpert cited her experience and organizing role with the Solidarity Slate party as experience in being able to serve the community as well. She stated that she would like to see policies like free TCAT rides for riders, noting that her discussions with stakeholders make this idea feasible. Halpert mentioned that free TCAT rides would help lower income and homeless individuals in the city get to where they need to go more easily, plus it would reduce traffic and emissions into the atmosphere. “I think it would be a win-win all around,” Halpert said.

SECOND WARD (THE COMMONS, FALL CREEK, SOUTHSIDE) PHOEBE BROWN

Phoebe Brown is running for the second ward alderperson position. Brown is running as a Solidarity Slate candidate. She states that the issues facing Ithaca today are the same issues facing the whole country — systemic racism, Reimagining Police and housing are some that Brown mentioned. “We have pretty much the same problems as other cities have,” said Brown. “Many times, people can get caught up in the beauty and not the grassroots issues.” Brown came from Harlem in New York City and noticed how gentrification was an issue there. She wants to work and ensure that people who live here are not displaced as she noticed before. Brown mentioned how she has endured several challenges throughout her life, and how those experiences shaped her view and focus regarding community needs. “Someone who first-hand has been affected by the decisions the Common

Council has had to make. I think it would be a voice that is usually not at the table.,” Brown said. Brown stated that her experience volunteering and working with community groups and organizations has allowed her to gain insight and the ability to work with different people on different issues. “I think my experience would be lived experience,” Brown said. Looking towards the future, Brown would like to have more conversations and actions regarding Reimagining Policing and public safety. She states that whoever comes into the position of protecting people should also understand and acknowledge the history of police. Brown also mentioned how she would like to see more public benches and access to childcare.

Murray stated that some of the biggest issues facing Ithaca are infrastructure, housing, and Reimagining Police. Development and zoning were another issue that Murray felt strongly about. “Re-zoning and making sure the tax base is not overly inflated with a false sense of inflation is important,” Murray sense. “We’ve got prices on houses rising, but if we don’t control the crime here, those prices are going to start plummeting.” Murray has lived in Ithaca and has family living in the area. Growing up in Ithaca and living here today, Murray feels connected to the residents and what is important to the community. Murray spent 21 years in the Army, and then 19 years managing distribution centers across the country. He feels at home in Ithaca. His grandmother lived on 2nd Street, and he recalls spending many days there. “I have close ties to the second ward,” Murray said. Murray placed a heavy emphasis on local infrastructure and development, stating

FOURTH WARD (COLLEGETOWN) GEORGE ‘JORGE’ DEFENDINI

RICK MURRAY

Rick Murray is running for the second ward alderperson. He is running as an independent.

that it’s these areas that need to be worked on when it comes to local government. “’I understand Black Lives Matter,” Murray said. “Local politics is about infrastructure issues and budgeting and making sure the city is fiscally responsible for everything that is going on.” With a degree in economics, and with experience in logistic divisions in Fortune 500 companies, Murray understands how budgets work and how money can affect people’s lives. He said his experience in the Army and serving as a director of diversity also help him work with people of different cultures and ethnicities. Murray stated that while he understands the importance of issues like abortion rights and police violence, he believes that the local government needs to focus on development. Issues like traffic rights and what buildings are being constructed need to be analyzed and reformed for the community’s benefit.

George “Jorge” Defendini is running for the fourth ward seat that will be vacated by current council member Graham Kerslick, who is not running for re-election. Part of the Solidarity Slate, Defendini is a Democratic and Working Families candidate. He believes that housing is “by far” the biggest issue currently facing Ithaca. “Whether you’re a local who has lived here your whole life or a student venturing into Collegetown for the first time, the housing market has become a lottery,” he said. “You need to get lucky to find expensive housing. Rent is increasing, availability is declining and the quality is diminishing.” Defendini noted that he’s of the belief that housing is a human right, and the city O c to b e r

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needs to ensure housing people is priotizied over profit. “All our housing policies should be about that,” he said. He also supports the Good Cause Eviction legislation currently working its way through the legislative process in the city, and inclusionary zoning. He said it’s also important to opt into the Emergency Tenant Protection Act, which he said would provide many tenant predictions. “That’s the first issue, housing for me,” he said. “After that, I want to look into public safety and criminal justice.” Defendini said that the existing police structure is reactive in nature, and the city needs to find a way to be more proactive. “We respond to crime by sending militarized police,” he said. “That’s money that can be going into a proactive approach as opposed to waiting for crime to happen and responding. We need to stop it before it happens.” He suggests doing this by funding services to ensure people have access to basic necessities such as food, money and mental health care. Defendini worked on Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s successful primary campaign in 2018, and then worked on Rep. Jamaal Bowman’s campaign, and was a cam-

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pus organizer for Bernie Sanders. Last fall he worked on Leslie Danks Burke’s Senate campaign, and has held leadership positions in different student organizations on Cornell’s campus. He said his individual qualifications combined with his work with organizers in Ithaca on the Solidarity Slate give him the energy and resources to bring about real change. ALEJANDRO SANTANA

Alejandro Santana is running as an Independent for Kerslick’s seat. He believes infrastructure, public safety and

affordable housing are the city’s biggest issues at this point. “The roads are a mess, and they’re difficult to navigate for both cars and pedestrians,” he said. “We have to invest in infrastructure. Roads, sidewalks and possibly signage.” He added that in the fourth ward specifically it would be nice to have a community parking lot to give options aside from street parking as the area continues to slowly grow in population. He said as far as public safety goes, it’s important for communities to feel safe and that addressing public safety needs to be thought about in a realistic way for longterm success. He noted that fourth ward residents are often college students, and that population is more vulnerable because they tend to spend more time walking around in the evenings. “Crime has picked up and something needs to be done about it,” Santana said. “Whether it’s revamping the police force, more members, more patrols. We have to reshape it to fit what our reality is.” He said during his term he thinks Reimagining Public Safety needs to be a priority.

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“Of course it’s a very tricky one, but it should be scaled to focus on achievable measurements,” he said. Santana said the city needs to better train and equip the police force, particularly increasing training related to mental health crises and de-escalation techniques. “The next thing would be more police engagement with the public,” he said. “Police should feel like members of the community are part of their daily lives.” He noted that right now the public and police only ever interact when something bad is happening, and he thinks building trust and respect between residents and officers would increased the feeling of safety for both sides. He also suggested diversifying the police department by splitting up the larger department into smaller ones who each have different roles within the community. Santana also believes he would bring a new perspective to Common Council. An immigrant from the Dominican Republic, he was involved in many youth groups and activities in his hometown. He also has four kids in the Ithaca City School District, so he knows what improvements are needed for children. Currently, Santana owns a construction businesses and said that al-

lows him to speak with many different people around town and said it’s given him a good idea of what issues are affecting the city as a whole.

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TENANTS

Public scrutinizes ‘Good Cause Eviction’ legislation at committee level

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he Planning and Economic Development Committee faced a lively public comment section at its Oct. 20 meeting after changes were made to the Good Cause Eviction or Right to Renew legislation ahead of the meeting. The exact language changes depending on who’s speaking, though the spirit of the bill remains the same. The committee has been discussing this legislation, which would introduce additional tenant protections, for the past couple of months. Originally introduced by the Ithaca Tenants Union, the legislation has since been tweaked to closer resemble the legislation recently passed in Albany. It would protect tenants from losing their homes by guaranteeing them the option to renew their lease except under specific circumstances, such as non-payment of rent. It also aims to protect tenants from retaliation by landlords due to things like demanding repairs or organizing with other tenants. However, prior to the meeting council member Cynthia Brock made changes to the bill that drew the ire of many in the public comment. “Unfortunately, some of the changes really destroyed the intent of the legislation,”

resident Theresa Alt said. Resident Randall Frank echoed that, and said in the bill’s current form, all protections are gone. “It seems to me the substantive improvements in the September [version] were eviscerated,” he said. “It undermines all the meaningful protections of the most vulnerable people. Whose interests are being represented here?” Genevieve Rand, a leader with the Ithaca Tenants Union and a driving force behind this legislation, said she took issue with changes to the lease renewal timeline and other new good causes for eviction in the bill. “This version of the bill is quite dramatically different from the version that was circulated last month,” she said. “Literally the whole point of this law is so a non-renewal notice can’t exist without a tenant’s consent unless the landlord takes them to court to prove they broke a rule. […] If you sign a year contract, how can you evaluate that contract two months in? The building sale thing, the inspection refusal thing, all of this was thrown in with one sweeping move without a [public] session like this. This version of the bill doesn’t do any of the intentions of the Good Cause legislation. It needs to be thrown out and reverted to the September bill.” Rand was referencing a few substantive changes made by Brock in the latest version of the bill. Currently, the city’s code requires landlords to wait 60 days before offering a lease renewal to a tenant, however they can include a waiver to those 60 days in the lease agreement. Many rent-

ers unknowingly waive this 60-day waiting period and end up signing lease renewals shortly into their current lease before getting the chance to evaluate their living situation. Brock suggested eliminating this waiver allowance, meaning landlords will be required to wait the 60 days before offering a renewal lease, and then a tenant would have 45 days to negotiate and accept the renewal lease or indicate they will not be renewing. Totaling 105 days, Rand, and others during public comment, argued this was not enough time to evaluate if the living situation was a good one. Rand also referenced “the building sale thing,” which refers to the section Brock added that allows a landlord to terminate a lease for the purpose of sale or renovation. The Tenants Union had previously argued against the sale of a building as a “good cause” for eviction. Brock did include a relocation assistance requirement for building sale lease termination that would require landlords to provide one month’s rent for a tenant household paying rent greater than fair market rent plus the full repayment of the security deposit. If a tenant is paying rent equal to or less than fair market rent, they would receive two months rent and full repayment of the security deposit. Lastly, Rand mentioned the inspection refusal portion of the new bill. This refers to the inclusion of a tenant refusing the landlord access to the housing accommodation for the purpose of making necessary and/or routine repairs, maintenance inspections or improvement required by law or for the purpose of showing the housing accommodation to a prospective purchaser, mortgagee, tenant or another person having a legitimate interest as grounds for the removal of tenants. There’s concern from some that this could be abused by some landlords. Brock, for her part, said that the chang-

es she made were on behalf of much public feedback and meetings with members of the Board of Realtors, area landlords, affordable housing providers, tenants who have been subject to landlord demands to commit to lease renewal within weeks of moving in, tenants who have been subject to automatic non-renewal, and tenants experiencing dramatic rent increases. “I did this for the benefit of the committee knowing in committee meetings we’d have the opportunity to go through it with the group to evaluate the changes independently. This is not something that is mine alone,” Brock said. “I feel it is a deep break in understanding in thinking that something that comes forward is my singular vision.” Brock’s colleagues also came to her defense, crediting her for being the one to move the discussion along in the first place and explaining that there’s a process for working through new legislation. “It’s often the case that when we are proposing something there are multiple iterations and with each iteration there are new comments from people on council and the public,” committee member Laura Lewis said. “We work to improve as best we can and reflect and incorporate those comments.” This newest version was voted to be circulated by the committee, which means it is out for comment from the public and council members. Committee chair Seph Murtagh said he wants to hold a public hearing in November to further discuss the legislation. The next meeting is scheduled for Nov. 17 at 6 p.m. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

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COVID

Health Dept. gives booster shot run-down

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he Tompkins County Health Department shared the recent announcement from the CDC recommending COVID-19 booster shots for all eligible individuals. All three available COVID-19 vaccines, including the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are now approved for a booster dose — Pfizer has been approved for booster doses since September. New York State has adopted this recommendation and encourages all New Yorkers to get vaccinated when eligible. Eligible individuals should contact their

primary care physician or a local pharmacy to obtain their booster dose. Individuals without internet or transportation can call 211 (877-211-8667) during regular business hours 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. for options. You will need to present your vaccination card demonstrating which vaccine you were given and the date your vaccine was received to obtain a booster dose. TCHD is not holding additional booster clinics at this time. Frank Kruppa, Tompkins County Public Health Director states, “The recent

approval of COVID-19 booster doses for Moderna and J&J will allow all eligible individuals in our population to get this additional layer of protection when they are able. Booster shots are available and recommended to help increase your immune response prior to a decrease in protection from the primary vaccine. All available vaccines continue to be safe and effective at protecting against severe illness, hospitalization, and death.”

Based on CDC guidance:

For individuals who received a PfizerBioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, the following groups are eligible for a booster shot at 6 months or more after their initial series:

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People 65 years and older should receive a booster shot. • Residents of long-term care settings age 18 years or older should receive a booster shot. • People aged 18 years and older with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot. For a full list of medical conditions, please refer to the Health Department website. • People aged 18 years and older who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission due to workplace or institutional setting may receive a booster shot. This may include but is not limited to the following: • Healthcare workers and first responders • Individuals who work in long-term care facilities and nursing homes • School and daycare staff working with students who are not currently eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine due to age • Food and agricultural workers • Grocery store workers • Public transit workers For those who received the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are recommended for those who are 18 and older and who were vaccinated two or more months ago. For more information from CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/ p1021-covid-booster.html For more information from NYS: https://covid19vaccine.health.ny.gov/ booster-doses -Staff R eport

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BEYOND Pop-Up gallery brings art to the Commons, anchored by a 12-foot tall, rideable unicorn

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By Sydney Keller

he BEYOND Pop-Up Art Gallery is a donation entry immersive and hands-on art exhibition on the Ithaca Commons. The popular art collective is nearing its final days as its final day is on Oct. 31. The gallery features work from 30 lo-

cal artists with exhibits ranging from a 12-foot tall rideable unicorn to unique and interactive video games. Doug Shire and Laurence Clarkberg are the co-lead artists of the BEYOND art group which began in late 2019 when both artists were inspired by the successful Meow Wolf Collective in the midwest. Shire and Clarkberg are also the creators of Sparky the Giant Rideable Unicorn which is the 12-foot tall, can’t-miss attraction that sits in the art gallery’s front window. “I knew that Ithaca has the talent and the open mindedness and the tourism to support a similar space here in upstate New York,” Shire said. “My vision became having a destination attraction that would support the local

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Arts&Entertainment

MEET SPARKY THE UNICORN

Sparky the Giant Rideable Unicorn created by Doug Shire and Laurence Clarkberg

I t h a c a T i m e s   13


POPUP GALLERY Contin u ed From Page 13

artistic community that would be a new thing to do in town and that would have a broad appeal beyond the traditional appeal of art galleries and museums.” The collective’s installation space on the Commons is a combination of an interactive science museum, art exhibit and pure entertainment. “I saw a chance to have a meaningful and good livelihood for artists in the community and a super fun place for people to go and enjoy themselves at the same time,” Shire said. “You know, kind of a win, win.”

BEYOND has seen success since being open in July and the collective’s long-term goal is to find a permanent space on the Commons. “We are hoping to find a landlord to move into a larger space,” Clarkberg said. “If you just walk around the Commons you can see how many empty spaces there are and a couple of them would be large enough for Sparky.” Clarkberg said that many people come in and ask if the collective is scary. “It’s not scary, it’s magical,” Clarkberg said. “And everyone who comes in here ends up leaving happy.” Most artists are local to Ithaca or live throughout central New York. Shire and Clarkberg said most of the artists are not Sand Topography Table.

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trained artists, but their friends that span from students to older adults. Shire has lived in Ithaca since 1994 and Clarkberg has been a resident of Ithaca since 1997. Shire had a dinner party at his house in February of 2020 with around 4050 people where he shared their idea of the BEYOND collective. “But then during COVID, it dwindled to about six people, but now it’s blossomed to about 20 to 30 people,” Clarkberg said. The donation-only pop-up has seen over 8,000 people come in since July and the collective has received about $9,000 in donations. “You know when you give a gift to someone and they really receive it well?” Shire asks. “They’re touched, they’re moved, they’re inspired by receiving something from you. That’s how I feel now with having worked so hard with all of our friends to give this gift to the community and the reception has made it all worth it.” Clarkberg encourages anyone who is interested to join the BEYOND collective experience. “People don’t have to consider themselves successful artists,” Clarkberg said. “We’ll all make each other successful together.” Sparky the Unicorn has made appearances in Ithaca before and will be joining the community again on the Commons for Halloween and during the Ithaca Winter Light Festival.

BEYOND Pop-Up gallery The exhibit opened on the Ithaca Commons on July 26th and it’s last day will be on Halloween day. Their closing event is Saturday, Oct. 30 from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. where costumes are encouraged for Halloween. Operating hours are from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. until Oct. 31, 171 East State Street (Center Ithaca on the Commons)


Film

Scare local

C OM E WO R K W I T H U S!

By Br yan VanC ampe n

H O S P I CA RE IS H IRI N G AL L P O SI T I ON S!

Three Ithaca celebs pick their favorite spooky movies

T

o cap off a month of Halloween cinema, I reached out to three groovy ghoulies and asked them to recommend a favored fright flick. Can your heart stand the shocking facts listed below? Read on, if you dare, kiddies…

of this loss, he takes on a job restoring a church in Venice. The rest of the story takes place in this very Gothic city. As I recall, there was a pair of psychic sisters that predicted very bad things for Donald Sutherland, and he starts seeing flashes of red in the streets of Venice. IT: Wow. CG: It’s so well done, it’s so artistic. It stayed with me to this day, to the point where my oldest daughter — she just turned 27 — when she was little, I wouldn’t let her wear red. IT: [laughs] CG: My mother-in-law was kind of a seamstress and made this cape with a hood that was red and gave it to her as a Christmas present. And of course, I couldn’t reveal myself as being terrified of this garment, but for the next two or three years, whenever she would wear this thing, I would watch her like a hawk.

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LOOKING FOR WORK?

CHARLEY GITHLER — “DON’T LOOK NOW”

WE ARE HIRING!

Charley Githler writes the Ithaca Times column “Surrounded by Reality.” “Don’t Look Now” (1973) was adapted from a 1971 short story by Daphne duMaurier and directed by Nicolas Roeg. Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie play a married couple who travel to Venice following the recent accidental death of their daughter after Sutherland accepts a commission to restore a church. CG: I’m a movie fan, and a lot of that stuff creeps into my column pretty regularly. IT: I have noticed that you like scenes and screenplays. CG: Yeah, and a lot of references to old movies and old movie plots and stuff. IT: You’re pitching a movie or a movie scene. So, why did you pick “Don’t Look Now?” CG: Well, I didn’t see it in a theater when it came out, but maybe a year or so later in college. It just blew me away. Have you seen it? IT: No. CG: The early part of the story is, there’s this couple — Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie — and they have a daughter who drowns in the pond. And she’s wearing a red cape with a hood. To get over the grief

Work a t o u r residence or in

MARY FESSENDEN — “THE VANISHING”

Mary Fessenden is the director of Cornell Cinema. In “The Vanishing” a man’s wife disappears at a highway stop and he becomes obsessed with finding out what happened to her. Be careful what you wish for… IT: We’re here to talk about “The Vanishing.” MF: Yes. I was reminded of this film just recently because Bob Proehl actually posted on Facebook asking for recom-

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Stage

Life imitates art

Syracuse Stage makes its live return with a show featuring a familiar topic — a school board grappling with vaccination mandates. By Barbara Ad am s

“D

iversity, Integrity, Citizenship, Kindness” –– these are core values, proudly posted, of a private day school in ever-so-politically aware Berkeley, California. But over the course of Jonathan Spector’s satirical comedy, “Eureka Day,” every admirable social LeeAnne Hutchison, Jason O’Connell and Tanisha Jackson in Eureka Day by Jonathan Spector Directed by Robert Hupp

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decided to hold a community connection over Zoom to weigh the issues: to require vaccination or not. The outnumbered board members, perching on tiny student chairs, struggle to be heard –– they’re effectively drowned out by the on-screen chat scrolling above them. The chat scroll undeniably steals the show. Beginning with the usual operational posts (“Is my sound on?”), the dialogue progresses to typical random, off-topic comments, and then to adamant declarations of viewpoints, and thence escalates to outrageous (and very funny) attacks and name-calling. As effective as a cluster bomb, this contentious cacophony leaves the board members devastated. The scene is the play’s comic high point, in part because the humor is so on target yet over the top. Many earlier scenes in the first act, of board members straining to be politically sensitive, feel not satiric but merely realistic –– we expect a parody but just experience the behavior itself, as in many meetings we’ve all been a part of. In this aspect, the playwright perhaps doesn’t go far enough to create the comedy. Another drawback, at least on one evening last week, was the sound levels. The men could be easily heard, but the women murmured their lines, with almost a third of them being lost. I queried people sitting close to the stage and they agreed. As actors return to the stage, I’ve noticed, it’s as if, so long silenced, they’ve forgotten the demands of projection. Hopefully later performances improved on this. The actual debate the play poses –– between individual need and community good –– is layered and complicated, a veritable rats nest of reasonable positions. At play’s end, when a now-smug Carina takes charge, we sense that the school has survived –– but we still mourn the personal cost.

Artist Residency

Open House

work by Max Geller, ‘21

quality gets trounced and trampled in a community free-for-all. Celebrating Syracuse Stage’s return to the live stage, “Eureka Day,” with its strong ensemble, is ably directed by artistic director Robert Hupp. It’s also remarkably prescient. Written in 2016, the play addresses the conflict among school board members and parents when a child having contracted the mumps raises the prickly question of whether the school should require its students to be vaccinated. Their debate-turned-debacle unrolls in the school library, where the board gathers to decide how to proceed. A bright banner overhead welcomes students back for the 2017-18 school year, and posters declare the idealistic philosophy, “Every child is an activist.” The set –– by Junghyun Georgia Lee, lit by Dawn Chiang –– radiates cheerful optimism, as does the headmaster, Don, a splendid Jason O’Connell. Conciliatory and absurdly positive, he negotiates contrary personalities and increasingly unravelling events with charming haplessness. Scrambling to stay atop the crisis, he hilariously clings to his flipboard lecture like a drowning man to a life raft. Don’s audience, the board members, includes the overly sensitive Meiko (Laura Yumi Snell) and the grandstanding Eli (Drew Hirshfield), whose affair (he’s married) complicates the group dynamic. But the true polar forces meet in longtime board member Suzanne (LeeAnne Hutchison) and the tentative newcomer (and only board member of color), Carina, who’s politely careful not to overstep. In group deliberations, where all board members labor to be hyper-respectful of the views of others, Suzanne still steamrolls over Meiko and the deferential Carina. As the self-appointed monitor of political correctness, she constantly reminds the newcomer of “how we do things here” (as in, referring to all the children by gender-neutral pronouns). Hutchinson is deliciously insufferable in this role, and so our irritation with her is aptly upended when she later reveals her own poignant story, the origin of her antivax position. But that’s a second-act revelation, when everyone has to go deeper, after the first act has ended in uproar and disarray. In the school spirit of equity, Don had

Friday, Oct. 29 5:30 - 7:30pm

Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts saltonstall.org

readings at 6:00pm 435 Ellis Hollow Creek Rd., Ithaca

Sponsored by:

Syracuse Stage “Eureka Day,” by Jonathan Spector, directed by Robert Hupp. At Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Through Oct. 31. Tickets at syracusestage.org and 315443-3275. Barbara Adams, a regional arts journalist, teaches writing at Ithaca College.A r t s O c to b e r

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1

$ 99 mendations for horror films. And my friend Cathy Crane, who is a filmmaker and teaches films, actually commented on “The Vanishing,” and I was like, “Oh, yeah, ‘The Vanishing.’” That is certainly one of the creepiest films I have ever seen. Have you seen it? IT: I did, and I also saw the 1993 “Love Conquers All” American remake, which was also directed by George Sluzier. MF: Oh, that American remake, I never saw [it]. Who was even in it? IT: Jeff Bridges, Kiefer Sutherland, Nancy Travis and Sandra Bullock. MF: Oh, wow! That cast sounds surprising to me. Sandra Bullock. Wow. IT: Jeff Bridges played the bad guy. MF: And Kiefer Sutherland was the husband. IT: You must have shown it at Cornell. That might have been how I saw it. MF: Yeah, yeah. It came out in 1988, and we probably would have shown it shortly after that. Late ‘80s. I’ve just seen it once because it was just too creepy to see ever again. I don’t necessarily like the experience of being completely freaked out [laughs] by a movie, so I don’t necessarily seek out a lot of films like that, but this one I did see, and was truly horrified at the end of it, when you find out what had happened. IT: And the villain is so anonymous. He’s just this schlub. He’s not Kevin Spacey in “Se7en,” it’s a different thing. MF: Yeah, that’s HOME OFsurprising, the cat and mouse between him and the partner who

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about us, they just wanna eat brains and walk forward and stumble over things. Inevitably it goes terribly because the human survivors all inevitably turn on each other. It’s also a perfect example of a “Spam in a Can” movie, where everyone’s trappedRed or California in one location, one place, and they’re all trying to survive. What counts as that kind of “Assault on Precinct 13” (1976) movie? A buddy of mine once suggested that the first one of those might have been “Stagecoach” (1939). IT: There’s also “Lifeboat” (1944). PB: It’s a common theme in films: people stuck in one place, and things out- lb. side coming to get them. IT: I just wrote about “Chopping Mall” (1986). PB: Oh, yeah! [laughs] There you go! [laughs] “NOTLD” invents a genre, and is a really good example of an entire other genre. And then it’s got this sort of 1968 race relation situation where our lead hero is an African-American man, and spoiler, he survives the zombie assault, and at the end, he’s killed by cops. IT: White cops. PB: White cops, exactly. He’s killed by white cops, having survived the night battling zombies and the people inside the house, and he’s the only one who makes it out alive, and then he’s killed by the white cops who are willy-nilly shooting at anything that’s moving at that point. At the time it was very pointy, and now it’s very pointy. It’s a very pointy film.A r t s

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has been left behind. He just becomes so obsessed, it just takes over everything. It doesn’t even necessarily matter that he would find his partner. It became so much more about his obsession about just what happened. That was very interesting to me. Just talking to you, it’s bringing it all back, and it’s just like, oh, boy. Movies like that can tap into something that on a personal level that you are personally frightened by or freaked out by. Any movie that involves rats would just make my skin absolutely crawl. For somebody else, it would be snakes. This one really got to me, and I’m sure I had a hard time sleeping that night.

“Night of the Living Dead” (1968), cowritten, photographed, edited and directed by George A. Romero, Duane Jones and Judith O’Dea lead a cast of seven people trapped in a farmhouse surrounded by a growing crowd of cannibalistic ghouls. Warning: SPOILERS.

IT: You picked “Night of the Living Dead.” Why? PB: “Night of the Living Dead” is one of my favorite movies of all time. It’s a perfectly structured film. It is a perfectly envisioned film. It invents a whole genre, and everything that they established in the 1968 “NOTLD” still holds today for PETER BAKIJA — “NIGHT all zombie cinema. The basic premise of OF THE LIVING DEAD” all zombie cinema is that the zombies are never the enemy. They’re like a natural diPeter Bakija teaches high school and saster, a force of nature. It’s always us that hosts “Burning Airlines” on WRFI. In is the real enemy. The zombies don’t care California Red or Green

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Art Is. . . (1983) a joyful performance by Lorraine O’Grady where dancers dressed in white framed viewers with empty gold picture frames to shouts of “Frame me, make me art!” and “That’s right, that’s what art is, WE’re the art!”

Books

A True Voice

Dr. Stephanie Sparling Williams reflect on the meaning of Lorraine O’Grady’s artwork By G.M . Bur n s

Dr. Stephanie Sparling Williams

I

t is a hard truth that in the last decade funding for the arts has been cut and the art world seems to have changed into the art market. And, according to iconic artist Lorraine O’ Grady, “that women artists who are not attended to lose opportunities to grow. People think the critic has no function, but I beg to differ.” In the newly released book by Dr. Stephanie Sparling Williams reflecting O’ Grady’s conceptual art of visual images and poetry, O’ Grady’s work is highlighted and informed on with the artist’s insight. The interview with the Ithaca Times covers the vast material of a 40-year oeuvre by a feminist conceptual artist as Williams charts the long career of O’ Grady in her recent book, “Speaking Out Of Turn: Lorraine O’ Grady and the Art of Language.”

Ithaca Times: You were drawn to the artwork, but what do you feel drives Lorraine O’Grady as a visual and poetic artist? And how does she reflect the soul of a people that has been overlooked? Dr. Stephanie Sparing Williams: My book, “Speaking Out of Turn,” sought to produce a critical dialogue around O’Grady’s work and practice in ways that examined and celebrated the artist’s innovative use of language. In the introduction and conclusion, I discuss the ways O’Grady’s art “spoke” to me on the levels of ideology and subjectivity. I found it interesting to approach a monographic study of an artist through the methods of auto-ethnography, critical theory, and phenomenology. We will hear in the reviews whether that was successful. In the meantime, I will just add that my directive emerged from what I understand as the “soul,” to use your term, of O’Grady’s work, which is its proclivity towards risk-taking. A demand, really, for all of us to take great risks in our work. Failing is productive and interesting. IT: O’ Grady has gone back into some of her past artwork and recuperated it, in other words rewritten the poetry. How does she organize her work and the time it takes in order to do this? And why does she do this?

SSW: Returning to past work is a central artistic strategy seen throughout O’Grady’s practice and the reasons vary across each of her projects. Ranging from a dissatisfaction with the work that was originally produced, as was the case with Cutting Out the New York Times (1977), or a desire to produce something for “the gallery wall” in Miscegenated Family Album (1980/94), I discuss several of the driving impulses in O’Grady’s process of recuperation throughout the book. IT: Can you speak, Dr. Williams, of the beginning and ending of this artwork, and the changes O’ Grady has undertaken with her poetic work. And what makes her art stand out? SSW: O’Grady’s work stands out for many reasons, namely, her use of language. Examining O’Grady’s use of language, both written and spoken, I chart the artist’s strategic use of direct address—the dialectic posture her art takes in relationship to its viewers—to trouble the field of vision and claim a voice in the late 1970s through the 1990s, when her voice was seen as “out of turn” in the art world. I love that through O’Grady’s avant-garde practice an idiom historically used to silence women is gaining new theoretical significance. IT: Many were glad to know of Lorraine O” Grady’s artwork which had a recent major retrospective exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. But what are your thoughts as to why more museums and art galleries seem to ignore women artists or limit viewing of the vast amount of artwork that has been created by so many diverse women artists? O c to b e r

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SSW: This is an important question; one that Black feminist, womanist, and feminist artists and scholars have illuminated for decades. The short of it: intersecting systems of oppression that undergird societal exclusion at every level, including fine art institutions. Indeed, the artistic impulse fueling institutional critique, along with dozens of artists’ collectives and organizations that emerged in the 1960s, 70s, 80s, and beyond, came together to expose the compounded effects of capitalism, racism, and sexism in the art world. While Lorraine O’Grady benefitted from class privilege, an elite education, and cultural mobility, racism and sexism within the art world affected the ability for her work to be taken seriously by the powers that drive artistic success (critics, curators, gallerists, museums), and thus, be seen and appreciated by wider audiences at the time much of her work was being produced. As you note, though, this was endemic for all women and artists of color. Importantly, O’Grady continued to make work, continued to exhibit and hone her conceptual practice, despite what the art world was doing. Her resume is quite impressive in that way. She never stopped; still to this day, she is making new work. IT: Lorraine O’Grady seems to be working hard to reflect and change the culture in a different direction. But change brings new thoughts and ways of thinking. What insights do you feel lie ahead with O’ Grady’s art? SSW: O’Grady will always be a risktaker; the conceptual heft of her work only outdone by her prolific writing. I believe O’Grady offers a rigorous model for artists, curators, and scholars alike of how to sit with oneself-- with one’s work-- over time. So much of our creative cultures are yielding to the frenzied pace of an increasingly digital world, but O’Grady’s work dares to look back, to return, to slow down and repeat. In 2021, this is a risky move indeed. We should take notes.

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Junior Recital: Landon Locke, oboe at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 4 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Senior Recital: Angelique Scully, piano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center SHOVELS & ROPE | 8 p.m. | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd.

11/8 Monday Music Bars/Bands/Clubs

10/31 Sunday Sunday Music feat. Bryan Syrell | 1 p.m. | Treleaven Wines, 658 Lake Road Concerts/Recitals

Marty Stuart & his Fabulous Superlatives | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Clarinet Potpourri Recital with IC Clarinet Faculty and Special Guest Wojtek Komsta at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Elective Recital: Amber Ward, soprano at Nabenhauer Recital Room | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

10/27 Wednesday

10/30 Saturday

Graduate Recital: Xiangyu Wang, piano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Eilen Jewell & Jerry Miller | 8 p.m. | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd. | $25.00 Graduate Lecture/Recital: Abby Strayer, trumpet | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

Senior Recital: Caroline Ryan, violin | 1 p.m. | Ithaca College, Ford Hall Clarinet Studios Recital | 4 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center CU Treble Choir: Twilight Concert | 6 p.m. | Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Ave | $7.00 - $17.00 Junior Recital: Nicolas Peloso, double bass | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, Hockett Family Recital Hall

10/28 Thursday Midday Music in Lincoln | 12:30 p.m. | Lincoln Hall B20, 256 Feeney Way | Free Music In The Square | 5 p.m. | Fingerlakes Mall, 1579 Clark St. Rd. PO Box 7128 African Drumming and Dance | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, Ford Hall Elective Recital: Anna Damigella and Jacob Boseley, trumpet | 8:30 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

10/31 Sunday Junior Recital: Jack Pesch, double bass at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 1 p.m. | Ithaca College, Hockett Family Recital Hall Faculty Recital: Sidney Outlaw, baritone at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 4 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Elective Recital: Jacob Boseley, trumpet | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/1 Monday

Brahms Chamber Music: CU Music | 8 p.m. | Barnes Hall, 129 Ho Plaza | Free

Composition Premieres | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, at Hockett Family Recital Hall

THISWEEK

10/29 Friday

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11/6 Saturday

Christone “Kingfish” Ingram | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Junior Recital: Jingwen Ou, violin | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, at Hockett Family Recital Hall

Junior Recital: Anna Damigella, trumpet at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 1 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Senior Recital: Maria Vincelette, clarinet at Ford Hall | 2 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Graduate Recital: Comfort Smith, violin at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 3 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Elective Recital: Tiffany Hotte, violin and Mahum Qureshi, viola at Nabenhauer Recital Room | 4:30 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Binghamton Community Orchestra Fall Concert | 7 p.m. | MaineEndwell Middle School Auditorium, 1119 Farm-to-Market Road Wynton Marsalis and the Cornell Wind Symphony | 7 p.m. | Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Ave | Free A Band Called Honalee | 7:30 p.m. | CRT Downtown, 24 Port Watson Street Amy Helm | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Maddy Walsh Album Release | 8 p.m. | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd. Family Weekend Ensemble Showcase at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/3 Wednesday Elective Recital: Andrea Morokutti, piano | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, at Nabenhauer Recital Room Samantha Fish | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St

11/4 Thursday An Evening with Keller Williams | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Senior Recital: Ratewenniio George, percussion at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, Ford Hall Saxophone Studio Recital at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/5 Friday Junior Recital: Julian Sanita, piano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Andrew Zhou, piano: CU Music | 8 p.m. | Barnes Hall, 129 Ho Plaza | Free Senior Recital: Allison Quade, violin at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, Ford Hall Junior Recital: Alice DeRagon, jazz tenor saxophone at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 9 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/7 Sunday Stephanie Monteiro, soprano at Nabenhauer Recital Room | 2 p.m. Senior Recital: Emma Dwyer, clarinet at Ford Hall | 3 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Thomas Feng and Richard Valitutto, piano: CU Music | 3 p.m. | Barnes Hall, 129 Ho Plaza | Free

FINGER LAKES BEER FESTIVAL

FRIDAY, OCT. 29 AND SATURDAY, OCT 30

Watkins Glen International | In the spirit of Halloween weekend, the newly popular Boos and Brews kicks off a weekend featuring over 40 New York State breweries, distilleries and cideries. Attendees are also treated to a 32-team cornhole tournament and stein holding competition. (Photo: Provided)

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String-Piano Chamber Music at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Percussion Ensemble at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/9 Tuesday PaceSetter’s Luncheon | 12 p.m. | Community Wesleyan Church, 2095 Grand Central Ave Junior Recital: Kam’ren Spence, tenor at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center

11/10 Wednesday NYS Baroque: The Panther & the Rose | 7:30 p.m. | First Unitarian Universalist Society of Ithaca, 306 N Aurora St | Free

Stage Whose Live Anyway | 8 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | State Theatre of Ithaca, 107 West State St | 90 minutes of hilarious improvised comedy and song all based on audience suggestions. w/ cast members Ryan Stiles, Jeff B. Davis, Greg Proops, and Joel Murray Brave Space | 7 p.m., 11/3 Wednesday | Ithaca Community School of Music and Arts, 330 East State Street | A puddle of fabric grows to envelope the audience in a world of wondrous circus performed under a blanket fort as we build the world we want to live in, even for only a few shared moments. | $25.00

Art Professional Development for Teachers: Fall Session 1 | 4 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Teachers

of all disciplines and grade levels can draw on art to illuminate the past and challenge and enrich our understandings of the present. Museum Book Club: “Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad” | 4 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | In conjunction with the Johnson’s fall exhibition Women Making Their Mark , we will read a book exploring one of the many arts that women have historically used for self-expression in the United States. Museum Book Club: “Ninth Street Women” by Mary Gabriel | 4 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Artists Lee Krasner , Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan , Joan Mitchell , and Helen Frankenthaler shared a history that makes a fascinating tale of determination, drive, talent, and guts. Recent Paintings by William Deats | 5:30 p.m., 10/28 Thursday | Damiani Wine Cellars, 4707 NY-414 | Opening Reception. The Gallery at South Hill exhibit by Sidney Piburn | 5 p.m., 10/29 Friday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | he Gallery at South Hill exhibit of paintings and drawings by Sidney Piburn. Open Fridays from 5-8pm, an Saturdays and Sundays from 12-4pm. Please use back entrance. | Free The Gallery at South Hill Exhibit of Sidney Piburn drawings and paintings | 2 p.m., 10/30 Saturday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gallery at South Hill Artist talk by Sidney Piburn. Sidney will discuss his exhibited work and over fifty year career as an artist.

Film There’s Your Ready Girl - Screening & Discussion | 5:30 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | The History Center in Tompkins County, 401 East State Street | Please join us for an encore screening of READY GIRL and an update on the feature film from which it is excerpted MOVE WHEN THE SPIRIT SAYS MOVE. Mandabi | 7:15 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Cornell Cinema, 136 Ho Plaza | An elderly family patriarch, a likably self-centered man of the old world with fragile pretensions to social dis-

THE FRENCH DISPATCH

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29 AT 7:00PM. ADDITIONAL SHOWINGS ALL WEEKEND. Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green St., Ithaca | Writer/ director Wes Anderson’s latest film is finally here! The film follows an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional twentieth century French city that brings to life a collection of stories published in ‘The French Dispatch Magazine’. (Photo: IMDb)


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tinction, receives a money order from Europe, only to find himself faced with a maze of bureaucratic red tape to cash it. Sharply satirical; a comedy that slowly turns into a tragedy. Center Stage | 6:45 p.m., 10/28 Thursday | Cornell Cinema, 136 Ho Plaza | Maggie Cheung embodies tragic screen siren Ruan Lingyu, known as the “Greta Garbo of China,” in this unconventional biopic by Hong Kong New Wave master Stanley Kwan ( Rouge ). Cryptozoo | 9:45 p.m., 10/28 Thursday | Cornell Cinema, 136 Ho Plaza | Cryptozookeepers try to capture a Baku, a dream-eating hybrid creature of legend, and start wondering if they should display these beasts or keep them hidden and unknown. Titane | 10/28 Thursday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Following a series of unexplained crimes, a father is reunited with the son who has been missing for 10 years. Titane : A metal highly resistant to heat and corrosion, with high tensile strength alloys. Lamb | 10/28 Thursday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | A childless couple in rural Iceland make an alarming discovery one day in their sheep barn. They soon face the consequences of defying the will of nature, in this dark and atmospheric folktale, the striking

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debut feature from director Valdimar Jóhannsson. Icelandic with English Subtitles. Becoming Cousteau | 10/28 Thursday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Takes an inside look at Cousteau and his life, his iconic films and inventions, and the experiences that made him the 20th century’s most unique and renowned environmental voice — and the man who inspired generations to protect the Earth. Mass | 10/29 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Years after an unspeakable tragedy tore their lives apart, two sets of parents (Jason Isaacs and Martha Plimpton, Reed Birney and Ann Dowd) agree to talk privately in an attempt to move forward. The French Dispatch | 10/29 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | The latest film from Wes Anderson. The Spine of Night | 10/29 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | This epic fantasy tale, about the history of a land that never was, begins when an ambitious young man steals forbidden knowledge from a sacred plant. He falls to its darker temptations and in so doing, unleashes ages of suffering onto mankind. Shaun of the Dead | 8:30 p.m., 10/30 Saturday | Cornell Cinema, 136 Ho

Lost Card? Turn it Off.

Plaza | Part Dawn of the Dead parody, part charming romantic comedy.

Books

Bicycle Thieves | 7:15 p.m., 11/3 Wednesday | Cornell Cinema, 136 Ho Plaza | This classic of Italian post-war neo-realism is a devastating story of a poor married man, his son, and the bicycle which provides their livelihood. The film follows the desperate search of the father and son through the war-ravaged streets of Rome to find the treasured bicycle.

The Annual Hu Shih Distinguished Lecture | 4:45 p.m., 10/28 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | The Annual Hu Shih Distinguished Lecture will be given this year by Tim Brook, University of British Columbia October 28, 2021, at 4:45 p.m. ET | Free Writing Workshop - Re-inventing Fairytales | 10:30 a.m., 10/30 Saturday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | A writing workshop with Katharyn Howd-Machan. More details to come soon. Virtual Teen Writing Workshop | 4:30 p.m., 11/2 Tuesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street |

Special Events Night Sky Cruise at Allen Treman State Park | 8:30 p.m., 10/29 Friday | Allan H. Treman Marina, 1000 Marina Drive | Hop on board the MV Teal to see the stars over the lake! Night Sky Cruises are every Friday through September 9-10:30pm. Reserve at discovercayugalake.org | $35.00 $40.00 SUNY Brockport Athletics: Women’s Volleyball vs New York University | 1:30 p.m., 10/30 Saturday | Women’s Volleyball vs New York University https://www.gobrockport. com/calendar.aspx?id=8992

Kids Toddler Story Time - Moovin’ & Groovin’ | 11:30 a.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Toddler story time is for birth to preschool age children and their parent/guardian. This weekly program includes stories, songs, fingerplays and more all around the theme for that week. Preschool Story Time | 10:30 a.m., 10/28 Thursday | Cortland Free

Library, 32 Church St | Stories, songs, and activities with a different theme each week. All ages are welcome but this program is designed for children ages 3 to 5. Registration is limited and is required each week. Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 10/29 Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm. Ballet and Books | 10 a.m., 10/30 Saturday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Ballet & Books is a national, non-profit organization that provides 3-9-yearold children with an opportunity to improve their literacy skills through a combination of dance instruction and literacy-focused mentorship with high school and college-aged students. Chinese-English Storytime | 3 p.m., 10/30 Saturday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Children of all ages and their caregivers are invited join Librarian Kai for songs, rhymes, stories, and books! Masks for those aged 2 and up are required for this drop-in program. Animal Ambassador Encounters | 12 p.m., 10/31 Sunday | Cayuga Nature Center, 1420 Taughannock Blvd | Come enjoy a wild meet and greet with some of the Animal Ambassadors of the Cayuga Nature Center every Sunday this October. | Free Junior Recital: Jack Pesch, double bass at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 1 p.m., 10/31 Sunday | Ithaca College, Hockett Family Recital Hall | Sunday, 10/31/2021 1:00pm | Hockett Family Recital Hall Junior Recital: Jack Pesch, double bass Current Ithaca College policy requires everyone indoors on campus to wear a face covering, Faculty Recital: Sidney Outlaw, baritone at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 4 p.m., 10/31 Sunday | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center | Sunday, 10/31/2021 4:00pm | Hockett Family Recital Hall Faculty Recital: Sidney Outlaw, baritone Charis Dimaras, piano Kyle Armbrust, viola Current Ithaca College policy requires everyone indoors

Notices Ales for Tails | TC SPCA Fundraiser | 5 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | The Westy, 516 W State St #100 | Join Tompkins Connect for its signature autumn networking event and help raise money

Haunted History - Downtown Ithaca Walking Tour | 6 p.m., 10/27 Wednesday | Downtown Ithaca, 110 North Tioga St | Haunted History walking tours in Downtown Ithaca | $15.00 Trumansburg Farmers Market | 10/27 Wednesday | Trumansburg Farmers market, Corner of Route 227 & 96 | 10.27-Comfort Hill | Free Ithaca Farmers Market | 9 a.m., 10/30 Saturday | Saturdays are the star, but Sundays are no slouch. Our pavilion gets full during peak season and there are some vendors that you won’t find on Saturdays. Orchard Tour & Guided Cider Tasting | 11:30 a.m., 10/31 Sunday | Blackduck Cidery, 3046 County Road 138 | Learn about FLX fruit cultivation and wild fermentation with Blackduck Cidery Orchardist and Cider Maker, John Reynolds. | $25.00 Farmer’s Market Cruises on weekends! at Ithaca Farmers Market | 12:30 p.m., 10/31 Sunday | Enjoy a ONE Hour cruise from the dock at Ithaca’s iconic Farmer’s Market! Reservations are NOT necessary. Pay on board with cash or credit card. Building Bridges and Making Peace | 1 p.m., 10/31 Sunday | Zoom Presentation, Zoom Presentation | Learn about Givat Haviva International School in Israel’s successful efforts to promote peace. | Free Ithaca Restorative Justice Meetings | 6:30 p.m., 11/3 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | The discussions will be led by Ithaca Restorative Justice, and anyone who is interested in restorative justice is welcome to attend. The meetings will take place in-person in the Schwarz Jacobson room, but will also be available via Zoom. Questions? Contact Sophia McKissick at smickissick@tcpl.org.

ORCHARD TOUR & GUIDED CIDER TASTING

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 3:00-8:00PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31 AT 11:30AM

Downtown Ithaca including Press Bay Alley | Enjoy trick or treating and Halloween activities at participating stores and live entertainment from Nate The Great! If scary movies are more your bag, check out the State Theatre’s double feature of Phantom Of The Opera & Nosferatu, featuring live music from The Frankentet. (Photo: Facebook)

Blackduck Cidery, 3046 County Road 138, Ovid | Learn about FLX fruit growing and cultivation; wild fermentation; what makes Blackduck cider and perry so unique. Orchard tours include a guided tasting of Blackduck beverages and local baked snacks and local cheese. (Photo: Provided)

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THISWEEK

DOWNTOWN ITHACA’S HALLOWEEN FESTIVITIES

for local shelter animals at the SPCA of Tompkins County on October 27.

I t h a c a T i m e s   21


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

| 59,200 Readers

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

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Heavy duty high capacity lawn vacuum Trac Vac 880. Purchased 2016 for $3250. Used lightly for 3 years. $2000 OBO. mes12@cornell.edu, 607-2551665

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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has received a Brownfield Cleanup Program (BCP) application and Draft Remedial Investigation Work Plan from 110 Cherry Street LLC for a site known as Neighborhood of the Arts, site ID #C755020. This site is located in the City of Ithaca, within the County of Tompkins, and is located at 110 Cherry Street. Comments regarding this application must be submitted no later than November 26, 2021. Access the application and other relevant documents online through the DECinfo Locator: https://www.dec.ny.gov/data/ DecDocs/C755020/. The documents will also be available at the document repository, located at the Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street, Ithaca, NY, 14850. Information regarding the site and how to submit comments can be found at http://www.dec.ny.gov/ chemical/60058.html or send comments to Christopher Mannes, Project Manager, 615 Erie Boulevard West, Syracuse, NY, 13204; christopher.mannes@dec.ny.gov; or call (315) 426-7515. To have information such as this notice sent right to your email, sign up with county email listservs available at www. dec.ny.gov/chemical/61092.html.

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400/Employment Building Manager First Presbyterian Church Building Manager- First Presbyterian Church, Ithaca. Coordinate and oversee building maintenance. 2-3 years experience in building maintenance preferred. 25 hours per week, Sunday through Thursday with flexibility to provide supervision for emergency repairs. $20.00 per hour. Send cover letter, resume and list of references to First Presbyterian Church, ATTN Building Manager Search, 315 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850

CARE GIVER FOR SENIOR

Unique opportunity to work as a Caregiver for an active Senior who enjoys life enrichment activities and stimulating convos. I am looking for a caring & compassionate person to Care for my Mother. The right person will be outgoing, energetic, flexible, Driver and adaptable. Work Schedule is 5 days a week and 5 hours per day. Salary is $25/hr. Forward your email to Mark (chillingtong@gmail. com) for more details.

Coordinator of Substance Abuse/ Intervention

F/T 11-month Coordinator of Substance Abuse/Intervention, provisional position available 11/1/21. This incumbent is responsible for the coordination of the Youth Development Program as it supports the social-emotional learning and prevention needs of component districts in the T-S-T BOCES region. Excellent benefits available. Detailed job posting: www.tstboces.org Apply online by 10/31/21 at www.tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, Email: hr@tstboces.org

Custodial Worker I

(Substitute: 20 – 37.5 hrs per week) OCM BOCES has the need for substitute Custodial Worker I’s, available at multiple locations within Cortland County. Responsible for routine building cleaning tasks, cleaning ceiling vents, changing lights, washing windows, toilets, fixtures, collecting trash, minor maintenance and repair on equipment, and maintaining inventory of supplies and equipment. Send letter of interest and resume to: OCM BOCES, Personnel Department/ Recruitment Office, PO Box 4754, Syracuse, NY 13221. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

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EMPLOYMENT

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES CLINICIAN: A full time clinical position in a residential treatment center providing intensive individual, group and family therapy and treatment planning services for male at risk youth of 16 & 17 years of age. This position will be responsible for identifying potential mental health and substance abuse needs for each youth and make referrals as needed. A Master’s Degree in Social Work (preferably licensed) is required and direct experience working with youth in a counseling position preferred. REGISTERED NURSE – FLEX - DAYS/ EVENINGS: Our Agency is looking for a Registered Nurse to provide coverage at our residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills and the ability to multi-task. Responsibilities include preventative health maintenance, evaluation, triage care, and record keeping. This position will require the ability to work a flexible schedule to provide day or evening coverage as needed. COTTAGE DIRECTOR/MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELOR: The William George Agency is currently seeking MSW-level candidates to provide mental health counseling services for adolescent boys and girls at our Residential Treatment Facility located in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York. This full-time position is responsible for the development of individual treatment plans for each resident and family, implementation of the treatment plan, to include subsequent transfer and discharge planning, along with appropriate continuing care recommendations. A Master’s Degree in Social Work or a Bachelor’s Degree and 3-5 years of direct experience working with youth in a counseling position required. Candidates will also need to have a valid driver’s license. We offer a very competitive salary and excellent benefits package in a team oriented, supportive work environment on our beautiful 650acre campus. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION, VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.WGAFORCHILDREN.ORG/ CAREEROPPORTUNITIES/ OR CALL 607-844-6460 The William George Agency SALARY: $33,280 F/T Minimum Overtime available Full time/Part time Flexible Hours BENEFITS: Health/Dental/Vision Life 401k Personal/Sick time Meals provided on duty VACATION: Generous vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED THE WILLIAM GEORGE AGENCY

EMPLOYMENT DRIVE WITH US!

ICSD Transportation Services is conducting INTERVIEWS FOR BUS DRIVERS Walk in Monday - Friday 150 Bostwick Rd By Appointment: Call 607 274-2128 Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children Diversity Enriches Our Workplace

School Counselor

OCM BOCES Instructional Support Services has the need for a Guidance Counselor to be located at the Main Campus, Liverpool, NY. Successful candidate will serve as Home Instruction Program liaison, support Alcohol Drug Addiction Prevention Education Program (ADAPEP), provide professional learning and support for the Dignity Act and Mental Health Service, facilitate School Counselor Roundtables, and other duties as assigned. New York State School Counselor certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SHIFT MANAGERS

NOW HIRING IN ITHACA!! Starting Salary up to $17.00/hour. As a Taco Bell Shift Manager, your duties will include: Supporting the General Manager (RGM) by running great work shifts and meeting Taco Bell standards, taking ownership and responsibility to solve problems, seek help when needed and are willing to help and guide others, making sure Team Members complete all assigned duties and serve safe, quality food in a friendly manner, and also ensuring that the restaurant is a safe place for Team Members to work and customers to visit. Send resume to: LizS@hrgweb. com. EOE

Substitute Teachers

OCM BOCES has an immediate need for per diem Substitute Teachers for Innovative Education programs located at the Cortland Alternative School and Seven Valleys New Tech Academy in Cortland, NY. Duties include but not limited to providing individual programming and support to alternative education students in grades 9-12. $115/per day. Bachelor Degree required. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

PIANOS

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Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

TEAM MEMBERS

HOME WARRANTY

NOW HIRING IN ITHACA! Starting salary up to $16.00/hour. We’re looking for Service and Food Champions who love serving customers and who want to be part of the largest restaurant company in the world! If you want to build a great career while providing fast, fun and friendly service to our customers, Taco Bell is the perfect place to learn, grow and succeed! Send resume to: LizS@hrgweb.com. EOE

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BANKRUPTCY

Single Ch 7 Bankruptcy $750.00 Legal Fee. Call Mark “The Hammer” Gugino at 144 Bald Hill Road Spencer, NY at 607319-0766. We also do Chapter 13 12 11 Bankruptcy, Auto Accident Injury, Divorce and Real Estate Closings. Attorney Advertising Debt Relief.

BATH & SHOWER UPDATES

Updates in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices - No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior and Military Discounts available. Call: 1877-649-5043 (AAN CAN)

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IT & COMPUTER TRAINING PROGRAM

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details: 1-855-5544616. The Mission, Program Information and Tuition is located at CareerTechnical. edu/consumer-information. (AAN CAN)

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EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

School Counselor

OCM BOCES Instructional Support Services has the need for a Guidance Counselor to be located at the Main Campus, Liverpool, NY. Successful candidate will serve as Home Instruction Program liaison, support Alcohol Drug Addiction Prevention Education Program (ADAPEP), provide professional learning and support for the Dignity Act and Mental Health Service, facilitate School Counselor Roundtables, and other duties as assigned. New York State School Counselor certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs. org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

820/Computer

Substitute Teachers OCM BOCES has an immediate

need for per diem Substitute Teachers for Innovative Education programs located

at the Cortland Alternative School and Seven Valleys New Tech Academy in Cortland, NY. Duties include but

not limited to providing individual

programming and support to alternative

education students in grades 9-12.

$115/per day. Bachelor Degree required. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/

central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

DENTAL Insurance

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

from Physicians Mutual Insurance Company

Call to get your FREE Information Kit

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Product not available in all states. Includes the Participating (in GA: Designated) Providers and Preventive Benefits Rider. Acceptance guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. Contact us for complete details about this insurance solicitation. This specific offer is not available in CO, NY; call 1-800-969-4781 or respond for similar offer. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN). Rider kinds: B438, B439 (GA: B439B).

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800/Services

EMPLOYMENT

Place Your Ad Go to ithaca.com/classifieds

6208-0721

NOTICE TO NEW YORK RESIDENTS

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator

Homeowner Funding enables families to make necessary energy efficient home repairs who: • • •

REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

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Approved applications will have the work completed by a quality repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING

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BackPage

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

CLEANING SERVICES

We reach more Ithacans in more ways

Available in Appstore & Google Play

than anyone! Buy Local Issue - November 23, 21

Delivered to your inbox every day

Last-Minute Gifts - December 22, 2021

INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

Ithaca Times Daily

Call Larry at

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

Times Mobile App

Holiday Gift Guide - December 8, 2021

AAM Macintosh Consulting

READY FOR THE HOLIDAY’S?

ITHACA NEWS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

ALL ABOUT MACS

Get The New Ithaca

Diane’s Downtown Automotive

Men’s and Women’s Alterations

*Acupuncture Works*

435 W. State Street

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

(607) 272-AUTO (2886)

Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c)

FREE Trip Check

Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair.

www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

$20 Off Mounting/Balancing 4 Tires

Same Day Service Available

607-272-0114

10% Off Any Repairs over $100

for over 20 years

SEE COUPONS IN 10/20/21 Issue

AGWAY TRUE VALUE

VOTED BEST OF ITHACA 2021

213 S. Fulton Street 2309 N. Triphammer Rd

FAMOUS BRANDS

(607) 272-1848

FAMOUSBRANDSOUTLET.COM

(607) 882-9590

John’s Tailor Shop

607-277-7000 ext: 1214 TO RESERVE YOUR ADS Ithaca Times @ ITHACA.COM

ACUPUNCTURE & CUPPING THERAPY

John Serferlis - Tailor

Lotus Theory Acupuncture

102 The Commons

821 Cliff St. Ithaca

273-3192

BOOK NOW ONLINE: www.lotustheory.com

OOY’s Cafe & Deli

$1.00 off $10.00 412 N. Franklin Street

$2.00 off $20.00

10% OFF Order

SHORTSTOP DELI

$5.00 off $50.00

Watkins Glen, NY 14891

STOP IN or CALL

888-535-4952

Corner of Aurora and Seneca Street

200 W. Seneca Street

coupon in 10/20/2021 issue

Family Owned & Operated

(607) 319-4022

Ithaca, NY 14850

Breakfast Any Time, Hot and Cold Subs, Paninis,

$1.00 Off any Fresh Made Deli Sub or any size Hot

Soups and Salads

Truck Pizza Sub

Coupon in 10/20/2021 issue

Coupon in 10/20/2021 issue

Since 1983

ANIMALS LAND & SEA

FLYITHACA.COM

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

Convenient-Clean-Connected

DRIVE WITH US! Open Interviews Monday-Friday 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.Call for Appointment: 607-274-2128

150 Bostwick Road

Negotiated Wage and Health Benefits | NYS Retirement Pension Program | CDL/Paid Training | Equal Opportunity Employer | ICSD is committed to equity,inclusion, and building a diverse staff. We strongly encourage applications from candidates of color. I C S D Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e r v i c e s 24  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

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Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

BUY SELL TRADE

EMPLOYMENT

GET DIRECT TV

CARE GIVER

ONLY $69.99/Month! 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies on Demand (w/ SELECT ALL Included Package). PLUS Stream on Up to FIVE Screens Simultaneously at No Additional Cost. Call DIRECTV: 1-888-534-6918 (NYSCAN)

100/Automotive CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

SAVE MONEY ON EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS!

Our vehicle service program can save you up to 60% off dealer prices and provides you excellent coverage! Call for a free quote: 866-915-2263 (Mon-Fri: 9am-4pm PST) (AAN CAN)

TRAC VAC 880

Heavy duty high capacity lawn vacuum Trac Vac 880. Purchased 2016 for $3250. Used lightly for 3 years. $2000 OBO. mes12@cornell.edu, 607-2551665

320/Bulletin Board The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has received a Brownfield Cleanup Program (BCP) application and Draft Remedial Investigation Work Plan from 110 Cherry Street LLC for a site known as Neighborhood of the Arts, site ID #C755020. This site is located in the City of Ithaca, within the County of Tompkins, and is located at 110 Cherry Street. Comments regarding this application must be submitted no later than November 26, 2021. Access the application and other relevant documents online through the DECinfo Locator: https://www.dec.ny.gov/data/ DecDocs/C755020/. The documents will also be available at the document repository, located at the Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street, Ithaca, NY, 14850. Information regarding the site and how to submit comments can be found at http://www.dec.ny.gov/ chemical/60058.html or send comments to Christopher Mannes, Project Manager, 615 Erie Boulevard West, Syracuse, NY, 13204; christopher.mannes@dec.ny.gov; or call (315) 426-7515.

110/Automotive Services Freon Wanted:

We pay CA$H for cylinders and cans. R12 R500 R11 R113 R114. Convenient. Certified Professionals. Call 312-2919169 or visit RefrigerantFinders.com (NYSCAN)

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

| 59,200 Readers

400/Employment Building Manager First Presbyterian Church Building Manager- First Presbyterian Church, Ithaca. Coordinate and oversee building maintenance. 2-3 years experience in building maintenance preferred. 25 hours per week, Sunday through Thursday with flexibility to provide supervision for emergency repairs. $20.00 per hour. Send cover letter, resume and list of references to First Presbyterian Church, ATTN Building Manager Search, 315 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850

FOR SENIOR

Unique opportunity to work as a Caregiver for an active Senior who enjoys life enrichment activities and stimulating convos. I am looking for a caring & compassionate person to Care for my Mother. The right person will be outgoing, energetic, flexible, Driver and adaptable. Work Schedule is 5 days a week and 5 hours per day. Salary is $25/hr. Forward your email to Mark (chillingtong@gmail. com) for more details.

Coordinator of Substance Abuse/ Intervention

F/T 11-month Coordinator of Substance Abuse/Intervention, provisional position available 11/1/21. This incumbent is responsible for the coordination of the Youth Development Program as it supports the social-emotional learning and prevention needs of component districts in the T-S-T BOCES region. Excellent benefits available. Detailed job posting: www.tstboces.org Apply online by 10/31/21 at www.tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, Email: hr@tstboces.org

Custodial Worker I

(Substitute: 20 – 37.5 hrs per week) OCM BOCES has the need for substitute Custodial Worker I’s, available at multiple locations within Cortland County. Responsible for routine building cleaning tasks, cleaning ceiling vents, changing lights, washing windows, toilets, fixtures, collecting trash, minor maintenance and repair on equipment, and maintaining inventory of supplies and equipment. Send letter of interest and resume to: OCM BOCES, Personnel Department/ Recruitment Office, PO Box 4754, Syracuse, NY 13221. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

DRIVE WITH US!

ICSD Transportation Services is conducting INTERVIEWS FOR BUS DRIVERS Walk in Monday - Friday 150 Bostwick Rd By Appointment: Call 607 274-2128 Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children Diversity Enriches Our Workplace

EMPLOYMENT LOOKING FOR WORK? WE ARE HIRING!

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES CLINICIAN: A full time clinical position in a residential treatment center providing intensive individual, group and family therapy and treatment planning services for male at risk youth of 16 & 17 years of age. This position will be responsible for identifying potential mental health and substance abuse needs for each youth and make referrals as needed. A Master’s Degree in Social Work (preferably licensed) is required and direct experience working with youth in a counseling position preferred. REGISTERED NURSE – FLEX - DAYS/ EVENINGS: Our Agency is looking for a Registered Nurse to provide coverage at our residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills and the ability to multi-task. Responsibilities include preventative health maintenance, evaluation, triage care, and record keeping. This position will require the ability to work a flexible schedule to provide day or evening coverage as needed. COTTAGE DIRECTOR/MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELOR: The William George Agency is currently seeking MSW-level candidates to provide mental health counseling services for adolescent boys and girls at our Residential Treatment Facility located in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York. This full-time position is responsible for the development of individual treatment plans for each resident and family, implementation of the treatment plan, to include subsequent transfer and discharge planning, along with appropriate continuing care recommendations. A Master’s Degree in Social Work or a Bachelor’s Degree and 3-5 years of direct experience working with youth in a counseling position required. Candidates will also need to have a valid driver’s license. We offer a very competitive salary and excellent benefits package in a team oriented, supportive work environment on our beautiful 650acre campus. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION, VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.WGAFORCHILDREN.ORG/ CAREEROPPORTUNITIES/ OR CALL 607-844-6460 The William George Agency SALARY: $33,280 F/T Minimum Overtime available Full time/Part time Flexible Hours BENEFITS: Health/Dental/Vision Life 401k Personal/Sick time Meals provided on duty VACATION: Generous vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED THE WILLIAM GEORGE AGENCY

School Counselor

OCM BOCES Instructional Support Services has the need for a Guidance Counselor to be located at the Main Campus, Liverpool, NY. Successful candidate will serve as Home Instruction Program liaison, support Alcohol Drug Addiction Prevention Education Program (ADAPEP), provide professional learning and support for the Dignity Act and Mental Health Service, facilitate School Counselor Roundtables, and other duties as assigned. New York State School Counselor certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

SHIFT MANAGERS

BATH & SHOWER UPDATES

NOW HIRING IN ITHACA!! Starting Salary up to $17.00/hour. As a Taco Bell Shift Manager, your duties will include: Supporting the General Manager (RGM) by running great work shifts and meeting Taco Bell standards, taking ownership and responsibility to solve problems, seek help when needed and are willing to help and guide others, making sure Team Members complete all assigned duties and serve safe, quality food in a friendly manner, and also ensuring that the restaurant is a safe place for Team Members to work and customers to visit. Send resume to: LizS@hrgweb. com. EOE

Substitute Teachers

OCM BOCES has an immediate need for per diem Substitute Teachers for Innovative Education programs located at the Cortland Alternative School and Seven Valleys New Tech Academy in Cortland, NY. Duties include but not limited to providing individual programming and support to alternative education students in grades 9-12. $115/per day. Bachelor Degree required. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

TEAM MEMBERS

NOW HIRING IN ITHACA! Starting salary up to $16.00/hour. We’re looking for Service and Food Champions who love serving customers and who want to be part of the largest restaurant company in the world! If you want to build a great career while providing fast, fun and friendly service to our customers, Taco Bell is the perfect place to learn, grow and succeed! Send resume to: LizS@hrgweb.com. EOE

BEST SATELLITE TV

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DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo EXPIRES: 1/21/22, 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

GUTTER CLEANING

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

HOME WARRANTY COMPLETE CARE

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-866440-6501 (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

800/Services DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

HOME REPAIRS

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty Covers all Major Systems and Appliance. 30 Day Risk Free. $200 off and 2 months Free. 1-877-673-0511. (AAN CAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

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Single Ch 7 Bankruptcy $750.00 Legal Fee. Call Mark “The Hammer” Gugino at 144 Bald Hill Road Spencer, NY at 607319-0766. We also do Chapter 13 12 11 Bankruptcy, Auto Accident Injury, Divorce and Real Estate Closings. Attorney Advertising Debt Relief.

IT & COMPUTER TRAINING PROGRAM

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details: 1-855-5544616. The Mission, Program Information and Tuition is located at CareerTechnical. edu/consumer-information. (AAN CAN)

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

ithaca.com/classifieds O c to b e r

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