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F R E E M ay 2 6 , 2 0 2 1 / Vo lume X L I , N umb e r 4 0 / O u r 47 t h Ye a r 

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

BUDDING BUSINESS PAGE 8

GARAGE DELAY

Green St garage projects may to begin by July PAGE 3

JUSTICE

SCHOOL

CENTER

ELECTION

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Legislature officially Final results from approves CJC board of Ed. election

NCAA

BOUND

Nine IC students Headed to the championship PAGE 12

WILLY’S

WONDERLAND

BVC reviews a Nic Cage thriller PAGE 15


Vital for Life

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TRY RESISTANCE FOR BETTER RESILIENCE When it comes to exercise many seniors consider their daily walk enough to keep them healthy. While walking can be an excellent cardio workout on a daily basis, adding resistance training a few times a week can build resilience, overcome the natural loss of muscle mass, and increase agility and stability in a way cardio alone cannot. However, it is not a good idea to simply run out, purchase resistance equipment, and start working out. It is important that your program be designed specifically for your condition and abilities by a professional. You may find the right personal trainer at your local gym, or try working with a certified physical therapist. aa.com

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(607) 266-5300 Toll Free: (800) 253-6325

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VOL.XLI / NO. 40 / May 26, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S

ELECTIONS

A Budding Business������������������������ 8

Evans lands seat on Board of Ed., voters approve budget

Officials start looking in to what retail cannabis could look like in downtown Ithaca

‘Mushroom Memoirs’������������������� 13 Trumansburg native to publish book about fungi, where to find it, and how to use it

ART S &E N T E RTAINME N T Dining���������������������������������������������������������11 Sports�������������������������������������������������������� 12 Stage�����������������������������������������������������������14 Movies��������������������������������������������������������15 Times Table�����������������������������������������������16 Classifieds������������������������������������������������18

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he Ithaca City School District Board of Education certified and approved the results of the May 18 election on May 19. There were four people vying for three seats on the Board of Education, incumbents Nicole LaFave, Moira Lang and Ann Reichlin, and challenger Kelly Evans. Evans won a seat on the board, ousting Reichlin by just three votes. LaFave received the most votes with 1,375, Lang received 1,266, Evans received 1,115 and Reichlin 1,112. Their threeyear terms will begin July 1 and end June 30, 2024. Evans has said she decided to run in an effort to bring “new blood” to the school board, which has faced heavy criticism over the past year for what many parents called a lack of transparency stemming from allegations of misuse of power and district funds by Superintendent Luvelle Brown, as well as Brown’s announcement to leave the district and then reverse that decision weeks later. Voters also approved the proposed 2021-22 district budget of $145 million 1,369589, and the appropriation and expenditure of capital reserve funds 1,614-340. The $145 million budget is a 6.09% increase from the year prior, or a jump of $8.3 million. The district also spent right to the top of the tax levy increase of 2.96%, though the tax rate per thousand decreased. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

ON T HE C OV E R Photo by Jakub Matyas via Unsplash Design: Marshall Hopkins

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m

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Green Street garage projects construction expected to begin in July

he Planning and Economic Development Committee received an update on the two Green Street garage projects, neither of which has yet commenced construction. The Vecino Group is building a 12-story building called the Asteri where the western portion of the garage

is. It will contain 181 low- and moderate-income apartments on the upper floors, while the first three floors will house a 49,000 sq. ft. conference center, 350 public parking spots and a small retail space. The eastern portion will be built by Ithaca Properties, LLC. The building, called the Ithacan, will be a 14-story building that houses

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▶  Dam rescue - The Ithaca Fire Department’s rope rescue team rescued an injured woman at the 30-Foot Dam near Giles Street. The woman had been swimming and was injured while jumping to a rock platform. The rescue crew was dispatched around 7 p.m. on May 24. Bangs

Sharon Davis, Distribution F r o n t

a parking garage, market rate apartments and the Ithaca College physician’s assistant school. The center portion that houses Cinemapolis will remain untouched. The garage closed to parking at the end of March, with belief that construction would be imminent. However, resi-

F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE COPYRIGHT © 2021, BY NEWSKI INC.

continued on page 4

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Ambulance paramedics and IFD firefighters made their way down the trail from the Giles Street entrance using four-wheel drive vehicles, a ladder and rescue gear to reach the injured woman and three others down from the rock platform. Once removed, crews splinted the victim’s injured ankle and brought her out on the 4x4.

J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m

She was treated by paramedics and transported to an area hospital. The fire department wants to remind everyone to only hike on approved paths and never swim in any restricted locations. “Heed all warning signs, use common sense and please be safe this summer!”

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All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

POLICE R EFOR M

PHOTOGRAPHER County gives next steps, timeline for Reimagining Police work By C a se y Mar tin

WHAT’S YOUR ADVICE FOR CLASS OF 2021 GRADS?

“Take your time before you get married.” -Dan P.

“ “Never let a win get to your head, or a loss to your heart.”- Chuck D.” -Sarah & Tom T.

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ounty Administrator Jason Molino presented a proposal for next steps in the Reimagining Public Safety process at the May 20 Public Safety Committee meeting. Two days prior, the County Legislature had approved spending $144,380 for the Community Justice Center, which will go toward the salaries and benefits for a project director and a data analyst, as well as operating expenses and project management software. The city of Ithaca is expecting to contribute $124,430 pending Common Council approval. “Since the plan was adopted we’ve been working on next steps for materializing it,” Molino said. The most immediate need is developing a contract with the city for the Community Justice Center’s employees. Molino said a main focus

moving forward will be communication. “The Community Justice Center will give ongoing progress reports to the County Legislature and Common Council, and probably other community groups and committees…,” he said. “Constant communication about where things are is going to be important. We don’t want to have a silent moment as you go through this. We want to seek community input, keep folks engaged and have ownership over what’s going on.” Molino also spoke about coming up with a framework for an advisory board that is going to work closely with the Legislature and Council. “It needs to be a board with large community representation on it,” he said. “We envisioned an advisory committee

created by a resolution, but the role is to monitor implementation of the plan, provide recommendations for changes in management […], and organize around the shared working agreement.” He said he envisions advisory board members would serve a one- or two-year term, and would be appointed by the Legislature and Common Council. The board would also ensure community involvement in the process. “The Community Justice Center’s major function is community engagement,” Molino said. “Facilitating town halls, finding ways to work with other community organizations, manage the community dashboard, communicate public information routinely…” Molino also had draft versions of the job descriptions for the Community Justice Center’s project director and data analyst positions. Once approved by all parties, Molino said he anticipates advertisement and recruitment for the positions will begin by July 15

GREEN ST GARAGE Contin u ed From Page 3

“Do the thing until it doesn’t happen, then find the other thing. Dad says make sure to make dinner reservations before your kid’s graduation weekend.” -Mike & Scotty N.

“Don’t get a job.” -Willow S. & Clark P.

‘Enjoy Ithaca as much as you can! Also, invest in your ROTH IRA and live in the present!” -Alexa R. & Ciara C.

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dents have likely noticed there hasn’t been any movement on the project. Nels Bohn, director of Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency, said things are beginning to move forward after some hiccups in the process. “There were myriad contingencies that had to be satisfied before the city could convey ownership to the developers,” he said. “That’s what we’ve been working on since January and February.” The Asteri building’s main issues were getting construction costs in the range of their original projections, a feat Bohn said has now been accomplished. Additionally, they had to get their approval from the Industrial Development Agency (IDA) regarding abatements for building below-market housing and wait for the enactment of the hotel room tax. With all these things accomplished, they are working on the bond closing. All financing is expected to be in place by the end of June, and work on the project can begin immediately after. The Ithacan project also had 26–June

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to secure financing through a bank and work with the IDA for incentives. Bohn said one of the longest hold ups has been negotiating the lease agreement between the city and the developer. “That has been going on for at least six weeks,” he said. “We’ve reached a conceptual agreement.”

The City Administration Committee is expected to vote on the agreement at its May 26 meeting, and then Bohn said it would be in front of the full council at the beginning of June. “Everything is moving,” he said. “Not as fast as we thought, but we’re moving toward closing.”

with the new hires beginning by Oct. 31. “It could likely be quicker, but that’s a conservative estimate,” he said. “We want to make sure everyone is engaged and all folks can participate.” A timeline was also presented, stretching from this month to Feb.2024, mapping out different steps of the process. For instance, “develop and finalize contract between Tompkins County and the City of Ithaca to establish the CJC” is marked from June 2021 to Aug. 2021. The recommendations that stretch to Feb. 2024 and beyond are developing and executing a comprehensive community healing plan, state advocacy work and the ongoing collaboration with the state troopers. Some of the more immediate implementations, expected to be completed by the end of the year, are the review of the SWAT callouts and the public disclosure of the District Attorney and Assigned Counsel Office statistics. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Tom Knipe, the city’s deputy director of economic development, added that the conference center team is close to finalizing a contract with third-party operator ASM Global, which operates more than 300 venues around the world, including the Albany Capital Center in Albany and the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester. “They’re top notch, they’re the best,” Knipe said. “They’re helping us in reviewing the designs for the conference center and making recommendations for changes. It’s really good to have them at the table.” While it was certainly good news that the financing was being finalized, it does seem to mean the initial estimates for construction timelines will now be off by at least three months or so. The original hope was that the garage portion would be completed by the holidays to support shoppers coming into downtown, however, given the late start that seems impossible now. Following the completion of the garage, there will still be about two years of work left to finish the towers. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

COUNTY LEG

County Legislature approves Community Justice Center, supports NY Health Act

Leslyn McBean-Clairborne was given a certificate from the county celebrating her 20 years in service to the Legislature.

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he Community Justice Center was officially approved on May 18, after the funding being previously approved by the Budget and Public Safety committees. Legislator Rich John introduced the resolution and said it is the first big step following the Reimagining Public Safety plan’s approval in March. Funds totaling $144,380 were committed from the county’s contingent fund. Legislator Leslie Schill shared that city residents find this important, and many constituents have been interested in and successfully advocated for the furthering of Reimagining plans. The resolution passed 12-2 with Legislators Mike Sigler and David McKenna voting against. John added that the work ahead is substantial and thanked County staff for their work on this to-date. Legislators specifically acknowledged the work of County Chief Equity and Diversity Officer, Deanna Carrithers to further this proposal and for her leadership in the Reimagining Public Safety Collaborative. Separately, resolutions calling for civil service reforms to

address misconduct by police officers and to better provide for the hiring of police officers that better represent the communities that they serve were passed unanimously. Advocating for civil service reforms in these areas were included in the Reimagining Public Safety plan passed earlier this year. Resolution Passes Supporting a Single- Payer Approach to Health Care at the State Level The Legislature also passed a resolution (12-2, with legislators Sigler and McKenna voting no) urging the New York State Senate and Assembly to enact the New York Health Act. This would federalize how health-care providers are paid and would leave many more New Yorkers insured by the state while working to address rising healthcare costs. Legislature Shawna Black shared that concerned citizens had approached her regarding this act and thanked those citizens for helping to craft the resolution. John shared some concerns, “I support this with some reservations, I’m concerned for small businesses and particu-

larly not-for-profit providers. I’d prefer if our national congress would make amendments to the Affordable Care Act.” The resolution clarifies that the Legislature has been urging the Senate and Assembly to enact the act for nearly 15 years. Sigler moved a substitute resolution suggesting that the state begin by covering cancer treatments in the 2022 budget. Legislators Black and Lane shared sentiments that there are many serious illnesses that should also be addressed by the system, not just cancer. Legislator Deborah Dawson shared, “The health insurance business model is the real problem here, leaving people paying for administrative overhead and advertising. This substitute resolution will not address the things that make health insurance unaffordable.” Sigler further clarified his stance that trying something more practical might lead to better outcomes and more political buy-in, having seen the Health Act not pass even with a supermajority of Democrats at the state level. The substitute resolution failed 11-2 with Sigler and Glenn Morrey voting in favor. Legislature Hears Presentation from Emergency Operations Center on COVID-19 Response and Vaccine Administration The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) gave their biweekly update on the pandemic response and vaccine rollout. County Administrator Jason Molino and Public Health Director Frank Kruppa outlined how school-aged children are being vaccinated at clinics in partnership with local school districts and Cayuga Health System. Details were also shared on the reopening guidance recently issued by New York State and clarified by the Tompkins County Health Department. Molino shared that activities seeking reimbursement for COVID-19-related expenses from FEMA and through the American Rescue Plan are ongoing and have been promising. This was Molino’s last presentation to the Legislature as he plans to depart in the next few weeks. He shared that he hopes that as the pandemic subsides, this is one of the last presentations on the local response. Kruppa added that the

Emergency Operations Center plans to wind down on-site operations and shift to a more virtual work program from staff ’s dedicated offices as they further resume the normal functions of their roles. He added that this shift is related to the low disease prevalence and high vaccination rate in the county and across New York state. Deputy County Administrator Amie Hendrix shared information on how the county organization plans to return to offices, including that departments will be using existing telework and flexible work policies to plan for 2021 operations. Legislator Anne Koreman thanked the EOC and commended the ongoing presentation format for keeping legislators informed on how the response has been going and what is being planned by the EOC. Legislature Chair Leslyn McBean-Clairborne inquired about variants and Kruppa shared that most of the new cases in Tompkins County are related to the variants, though cases continue to steadily decline overall. Among Other Business A resolution honoring Dooley Kiefer and appreciating her contributions to the county as a Legislator from 1994 through 2017 was moved by Amanda Champion and unanimously seconded and passed. Kiefer was honored for not only her time as a Legislator, but for her championing of environmental causes, ethics, and social justice among other achievements. McBean-Clairborne was given a certificate from the county celebrating her 20 years in service to the Legislature. Legislators shared reflections on her leadership and successes. Legislators unanimously approved the addition of Budget Director and Budget Analyst positions to County Administration, the proposal followed discussion on the appropriate county staff needed to develop each year’s budget more efficiently. The county will start recruiting for the positions in the coming days, job descriptions can be found on the Human Resources Department’s website. -Staff R eport May

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Ups On May 25 the Tompkins County Health Department announced there were zero new positive cases. Plus, nearly 60% of the county is fully vaccinated. Two exciting feats! Heard Ithaca College celebrated its commencement with two celebrations last weekend with Emmy-nominated television creator and producer (and IC alum) Liz Tigelaar as the featured speaker. Seen A vigil for George Floyd was held in DeWitt Park on May 25 on the one year anniversary of the murder of Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Find your COVID Personality Type 1. (M)asked, (U)masked or White Fragility (H)azmat 2. (D)istant, (H)ugs or Distant with (B)enefits 3. (V)axed, (A)nti-vax or In (W)aiting 4. Following Science: (A)lways, (S)ometimes or Marjorie Taylor (G)reene *Use the above questionaire to Creaty your own COVID personality nametag.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

SURROUNDED BY REALITY

Nick Romo: Protecting against the odds Agree to Disagree By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s

By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

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rowing up in the Southeast side of Chicago, Nick Romo always loved baseball, the Cubs in particular. “I lived in the City, a bike ride to the Indiana border…During college I was volunteering for a distant relative, who was running against Barack Obama for the Illinois Senate. During the candidates’ debate, Barack Obama came over to us and shook our hands. I was impressed by his courtesy and bearing. And the rest is history.” Not long ago Nick opened his State Farm Insurance office on Tioga Street, right across the street from the Court House. “I did an intensive four-month training program in the State Farm headquarters in the midwest first. Since then, my first three years in Ithaca have been great. I am pleased to offer the protection of a well-known, well-established company to Ithaca, with lots of local customer service, which I am convinced is a good match.” “I visited Ithaca in 2010 and I liked this town so much.” In the intervening years before Nick opened up shop in Ithaca, he worked in business development and sales. “Working for a large, international company I travelled all over New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey. I got to go to

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lots of baseball games, but I never found another town more appealing than Ithaca…I do miss seeing the Cubs play, but while professional sports are curtailed, I’m getting to know and enjoy my new home base.” Nick told of Southern Tier clients who came to him to purchase life insurance. One man purchased a modest life insurance policy on his life, for the protection of his long-time fiancée, soon to be his wife. Tragically, the policy owner died suddenly before the wedding. But for his grieving fiancée the proceeds of that policy meant she didn’t lose their home. “I was so glad to deposit the proceeds of her loved one’s policy into her bank account… When tragedy hits, in the midst of the grief the survivors are living through, insurance can protect their ability to stay in college, continue the payments on their home, on their car. That safety net can make all the difference to maintain stability in times of crisis and loss.” Nick’s office also sells car insurance, disability insurance, pet insurance, computer coverage and identity theft insurance. Policies can be bundled to continued on page 7

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ews item: Three weeks ago, the Ap- irredeemable cheugies and that therefore pellate Division of our own Third the possibility of cognitive dissonance is Department of the New York Su- moot. A hearing is set for July. Two petitions citing the “tortured lens preme Court, in a unanimous decision (50), ordered a Tompkins County woman to of cognitive dissonance” standard were remove a Confederate flag-painted rock filed the following Monday. In the first, near her driveway or risk a “change in cir- Matter of Jedediah CC. v Joanne HH., cumstances” in the child custody case of the father, who currently has alternate her young daughter. Though the matter was weekend visitation, seeks to have himself not addressed at the Family Court level, nor declared the custodial parent based on was it raised by the child’s attorney, Justice a change in circumstances in that the Stanley Pritzker wrote that while the mother mother has a tee shirt with the image of was protected under the First Amendment Charles Darwin on it. Furthermore, she to display the Confederate flag, the rock’s brushes the children’s teeth with storepresence, if it remained after June 1, would bought toothpaste rather than a paste of wheat chaff and force the court clay as suggested to reconsider the by scripture. The joint custody she second petition, has with the girl’s also filed by a father. “Given non-custodial that the child is father, (Matter of mixed race, it of Blackstone), would seem apraised the issue parent that the of college loyalty presence of the as the Tortured flag is not in the Lens, citing the child’s best intermother’s bachests, as the mother elor’s degree in must encourage Communication and teach the Arts at SUNY child to embrace Cortland and her mixed-race his own degree identity, rather from Ithaca Colthan thrust her lege. Given the into a world that mother’s proclivonly makes sense ity for wearing a through the torhoodie adorned tured lens of cogwith a small red nitive dissonance.” dragon during Well, it certhe week precedtainly has been a Rudyard Kipling ing the Cortaca busy three weeks in game every Tompkins County year, he alleges Family Court. that it would be in the children’s (ages 7 Since the new standard enumerated by and 9) best interests given the change in the appellate court in Matter of Christie circumstances to have his condo desigBB. v Isaiah CC., newly-filed petitions nated as the primary custodial residence. have been more frequent than news A request was also made to have a law stories about people willing to testify guardian from a neutral college backagainst Matt Gaetz. The first application ground assigned to represent the children. for a change in a custodial arrangement Six other similar petitions have been came the very next day in the divorce that filed in recent days. One that raises the has roiled Cornell’s College of Arts and spectre of cognitive dissonance by virtue Sciences faculty for years – Cornstarch v Cornstarch. The mother, a Department of of the fact that the custodial parent runs a Coke household while the non-custodial Literatures in English (formerly known parent adheres to the gospel of Pepsi may as the English Department) professor, seem to tread perilously close to the realm cited the father’s insistence on displaying of frivolity, but bear in mind that the law a framed lithograph of Rudyard Kipling in his home’s foyer as a change of circum- holds tight to the doctrine of stare decisis. In the words of Disraeli, “a precedent stances that would warrant termination embalms a principle.” The wheels of jusof his parental rights. The father has tice grind on. already responded in court filings that the 15-year-old child in question has already decided that both her parents are


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS Contin u ed From Page 6

take advantage of discounts. During the pandemic, people can ask for a phone consult with Nick. He can help them evaluate their current situation and he can recommend a range of policies for their consideration. And the services Nick can provide are fortified by the national services his company offers wherever the insured travel.

As Nick gets to know homeowners and workers, he mentions his interest in also meeting with young adult groups in their school classes and clubs. He wants to reach young people who may not currently feel drawn to college or to a trade. Working in insurance does not require a college degree for entry positions, and it is a field that one can work in anywhere in the country. New staff receive intensive training to become licensed in this field.

COMMENCEMENT

Ithaca College grads encouraged to find gifts in the losses

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mmy-nominated television creator and producer Liz Tigelaar told some 1,300 Ithaca College graduates that the beauty in life comes in the questions and the unknowns, and to relish being in a moment where there is so much to discover. A 1998 IC graduate herself, Tigelaar was the main speaker at the college’s 126th Commencement ceremonies held on Sunday, May 23. In alignment with current New York State public health guidelines for physical distancing at large indoor gatherings that include unvaccinated individuals, two identical ceremonies were held for the graduates, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. They included a hybrid of creative in-person and virtual components so that every student who wished to participate could do so. While no guests were allowed to attend in person, families were able to watch — and even participate themselves — virtually. “You’ve lived through a global pandemic, classes on Zoom, and now a graduation your parents can’t attend,” said Tigelaar. “In many ways, you were robbed. That is true. But in what was stolen, something was left. A gift… And that’s what life is going to bring you. Losses that are gifts. You have to be resilient. Yes, grieve the loss, but find the gift.” She urged graduates not to rush through life to get to the answers, because it is the moments between all the answers that will shape and reshape who they are. “You now know that what you take for granted, you can lose. You now know that what you hold most dear can be taken from you without warning. You now know how good it feels to not be behind a screen. So don’t just take a picture on your phone today. Take it in your mind. Enjoy today.” Most recently the creator, showrunner, and executive producer of the acclaimed Hulu series “Little Fires Everywhere,” Tigelaar noted how lucky she was to leave Ithaca College with the education she had, the opportunities it afforded her, and the drive to go out and do every wild and precious thing she longed to do. “There’s nothing that made me special. But it was this place that made me believe I could. And if I can, so can you. So go out

and go after your own wild and precious life. And enjoy it.” Ithaca College President Shirley M. Collado awarded honorary Doctor of Letters degrees to noted economist Raj Chetty and groundbreaking theologian the Very Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas. She presented the Presidential Medal to Eileen Filler-Corn, a 1986 IC graduate who broke ground by becoming the first woman in the 402-year history of Virginia’s legislature to be elected as speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates. “The values of service, selflessness, and a desire to impact the world around me for good have been the touchstones for my public and private life,” said Filler-Corn in her address to the graduates. “Today is a day of change for all of you seated here. As you leave this campus and enter a world shedding the dark cloud of the past year, I hope you will let those values guide you as well.” Representing her classmates, Senior Class President Ali Kelley recounted their shared experiences during the first two years on campus together, and how suddenly, in the middle of their junior year, “the world changed faster than anyone ever thought possible.” “While it seemed like the world was spinning out of control, we managed to remain eager and hopeful that we would find ourselves reunited again,” said Kelley. “Togetherness shifted from sharing physical space to instilling a sense of solidarity for each other while finishing our college journeys. As we navigated a new world of distance learning and involvement, we strove to create justice and equality in our own communities.” Kelley noted that, while forging their individual paths forward, the graduates should remember how fortunate they are that their journeys collided at Ithaca College. “Our time at Ithaca College has shown us to expect the unexpected, support each other in our hardest moments, and to work hard in the face of adversity. As we move into the next chapter of our lives, it is clear that we will carry Ithaca with us forever. Here’s to us and our unconventional finale.” - D av e M a l e y

YOUR LETTERS Re: Three developers vying for Inlet Island project

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ike most folks around here I take great interest in the health of Cayuga Lake. Right now the two major threats are Hydrilla (invasive species) and harmful algal blooms (HABS). The organization Cayuga Lake Watershed Network is the lead agency working on this. The chosen developer should include a yearly donation to this nonprofit group. You can get information at www.cayugalake.org. If you are going to get the "jewel in the crown" you should be willing to help keep the lake healthy. I would also like to see a requirement for charging stations. Ithaca will need more stations very soon. Even Wegman's does not have them! -David Nowicki, Interlaken, NY

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ould the Ithaca Times actually consider the downside of a Development rather than take as gospel whatever the developers have to say. For example, the obvious traffic congestion that will result on rt 89. coming over the bridge into Ithaca. It's crazy now on a summer weekend, but a housing development on Inlet Island with no way out for vehicles except entering a long chain of vehicles backed up to the bridge, then you're really looking at a mess. It is beyond me why a city that spends decades to sort out traffic in the West End shoots itself in the foot by encouraging more congestion through large developments. Oh wither our local Green New Deal! Perhaps City officials placate themselves with the state of the art energy efficiencies promised, but what really sustains a community is houses with some breathing room that a family can live in and grow with. Instead we plan for small apartments in large buildings for which occupants bide their time and then move onto somewhere else. If we are going to build in a public space let's try to attract families who may actually stick around and grow a community. Absent building for real neighborhoods, I would suggest turning the public space on Inlet Island into another waterfront park. Rather than carve out a small walkway for the public (as proposed) maybe give some thought to public space really being for the public rather than a commodity sold to developers who have already taken their fare share of Ithaca's property. -Tom Stern, via Ithaca.com

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f you propose low cost housing then the City should implement something NOT mentioned here. A small locally grown produce store on site would be the progressive initiative that would benefit residents vs developers. That would get approved by the zoning Board if they were truly progressive and didn't bend to developer whims. These are considerations that a well thought out proposal by a City and developer would come up with to decrease May

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driving and increase healthy lifestyles. The prices at this store should also not be convenience store prices and the rent for this store should be reasonable to make that happen. You might even have the option to buy that small parcel so the rent issue would be moot. My thoughts. -Dr. Scott Noren, via Ithaca.com

In support of Samantha Lushtak for Legislator

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amantha Lushtak is running for Tompkins County Legislator, which is good news for our community when it comes to housing. Sam is an energetic, down to earth candidate with a focused agenda that includes a commitment to affordable housing. Tompkins County needs her at the table in order to continue the progress we’ve made to prioritize quality housing, both rental and owned, and ensure that everyone in our community has a decent place to live. In Tompkins County, housing is expensive, supply is limited, and vacancy rates are extremely low. Affordable housing is the foundation for success, for families and for our entire community. A decent, stable place to live is the gateway to better health, wealth building, success in school, community engagement, and job stability. Sam is prepared to continue the good work that Martha Robertson accomplished during her tenure as a Legislator. Martha has always been a steadfast champion for affordable housing, helping direct thousands of dollars towards affordable housing opportunities for the families who need them most. I know that Sam is prepared to carry that torch, as a mom, small businesswoman, homeowner, and advocate. We need a successor who will be committed to expanding accessible, affordable, decent housing for everyone in our community. Sam already devotes some of her spare time to supporting Habitat for Humanity of Tompkins and Cortland Counties in fundraising endeavors and events. She does not just talk the talk. She has taken the time to ask questions, understand Habitat’s mission, and engage herself in a meaningful way. We need legislators who care enough to delve deeply into the affordable housing issues facing our community, understand them, and tackle them head on. Affordable housing should not be an afterthought, but a priority. Sam is sincere, intelligent and thoughtful. I know that she will bring these qualities to her decision making as a Legislator, coupled with her savvy business sense, love for her community, and equity-focused approach. I’m thrilled to see Sam in the running, and I’d encourage anyone to learn more about her at www.SamanthaLushtak.com and contact LushtakForTC@gmail.com with questions. -Shannon MacCarrick, Executive Director, Habitat for Humanity of Tompkins and Cortland Counties

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A BUDDING BUSINESS

Officials start looking in to what retail cannabis could look like in downtown Ithaca

BY Ta n n e r H a r di ng

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t the end of March, New York state became the 15th state in the country to legalize recreational marijuana, and at the May 19 Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting, we got our first idea of what that will look like for Ithaca. 8  T

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed bill S.854A/A.1248-A on March 31, which allows for “adult use” marijuana, fulfilling what the state calls a “key component of his 2021 State of the State agenda.”

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SO WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

You can now legally possess up to three ounces of marijuana, or have up to five pounds of marijuana stored securely in your home, but no home cultivation is allowed as of yet. Eventually, when you are allowed to grow at home, you will be able

to grow up to six plants for personal use (three mature plants and three immature plants) and a maximum of 12 plants per household (six mature and six immature), even if there are three or more adults aged 21 or over in the residence. This marijuana cannot be sold and must be used for personal use only.


You can smoke marijuana anywhere cigarette smoking is allowed. You can’t yet purchase marijuana without a prescription or sell it without a license until state regulators finish writing up rules. The bill established the Office of Cannabis Management, whose role it is to design and implement framework for regulating medical and adult-use marijuana and licensing for marijuana producers, distributors and retailers. The state is currently projecting $350 million annually in tax revenue from the sale of marijuana, as well as the addition of 30,000-60,000 new jobs in the industry. The state’s cannabis taxes will cover the costs to administer and implement the new program, and any remaining revenue will be split with 40% going to education, 40% to the community grants reinvestment fund and 20% to drug treatment and public education funding. Municipalities can opt out of retail dispensaries or on-site consumption licenses by passing a local law by Dec. 31. However, the indication for Ithaca is quite the opposite. IN ITHACA

Things are still in very preliminary stages right now as the city awaits guidance from the state, but Tom Knipe, deputy director of economic development for the city, did present some research and ideas to the Planning and Economic Development Committee to make sure he was on the right track. His goal is to get ahead in the planning so things go smoothly down the line. Knipe said that his office has already heard from some locals who are interested in opening dispensaries when it’s possible, adding that he had personally spoken to four folks already. He said the process from the state level will include reaching out to the municipalities where the applicant wants to locate the shop, in this case the city of Ithaca, for comment. Part of the licensing requirement for the applicant will be to demonstrate that their proposed location allows for cannabis retail. “I’d imagine once the state adopts [rules and regulations] and puts out a call for licenses, people who want to establish businesses in the city are going to be asking what are rules are,” Knipe said. “That’s the main reason we’re trying to get ahead of this to avoid confusion in the future.” For right now, Knipe said he doesn’t have a concrete timeline but that guessing from the language in the bill and some of the statements from legislators and the governor, he thinks operating licenses for

retail shops won’t be issued until April 2022 at the earliest. “The state law establishes a budget line starting in the fiscal year 2022-23, which starts April 2022,” he said. “So my interpretation of that is the state is unlikely to issue licenses for operations to begin prior to that. My sense is that’s the earliest date.” He said there’s still much to be done, including establishing the Cannabis Control Board which will help create the rules and the license application. “Our goal at the city is to be prepared so that when the state publishes the rules and application, we can quickly turn around and adopt local legislation that fits within the rules the state is establishing,” Knipe said. He anticipates that the rules and regulations will be published sometime this year. The Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act establishes a new office for the regulation of cannabis to create a regulated and taxes cannabis industry in New York. Based on this act, cannabis will be taxed at 9% and the local tax will be 4%, meaning a total of 13% tax on cannabis. “It’s not clear in reading the law how this would be distributed,” Knipe said. “We assumed for fiscal benefit analysis it’s split the same way as the regular sales tax.” Assuming the tax is split 2% to the county and 2% to the city, Knipe shared the below estimates for tax revenue: Low High

Year 1

$126,609

$211,015

Year 2

$188,226

$313,708

Year 3

$215,538

$359,232

Year 4

$250,768

$417,946

Year 5

$287,855

$479,758

Knipe’s office also spoke to some individuals in the community to learn of any concerns that they might want to address. Some of the main takeaways were: clarity around the city’s role in regulation, desire to avoid a repeat of a cluster of head shops, signage regulation, permits, making sure it doesn’t define the Commons, equity and inclusion for shop ownership, avoidance of cannabis retail becoming an open market for those most well capitalized and desire to avoid the onsite use of cannabis at bars or nightlife establishments. After looking at some of comparable cities in other states with legalized recreational marijuana, Knipe said they began looking at buffers between shops on the Commons,

in Collegetown and elsewhere, with no more than 12 total shops allowed initially. He also suggested dispensaries should only be allowed in commercial zones, with no drive thru shops allowed. Additionally, Knipe said there would only be two shops maximum on the Commons if they use the 500-foot buffer between shops. “We have quite a lot of local authority through zoning to establish things like buffers,” Knipe said. There’s also a requirement for 500-foot buffers from school grounds, and 200-foot buffers from places of worship. Alderperson Donna Fleming said she thinks cannabis regulations should be as consistent as possible with current liquor store regulations. “I am asking the rationale about keeping shops away from churches, I don’t get that,” she said. “And also not selling cannabis at

of a buffer between dispensaries to create a saturation limit. However, she pointed out that because of the New Roots school on N Cayuga Street, the 500-foot buffer would make the west end of the Commons ineligible for a dispensary. In the same vein, alderperson Steve Smith pointed out that he wasn’t sure what the definition of a house of worship is but that there are myriad religious groups that meet downtown, and he wasn’t sure if that would have an effect on buffers. As far as New Roots, Knipe said because that’s a mixed-use building, it might not fit the definition of school grounds and that he would defer to legal counsel. However, Brock said she wasn’t sure if she was comfortable with that technicality. “I’m hesitant to seek an exemption for New Roots just because it’s a multi-use building,” she said. “To say your 10-year-

A lder person, Cy nthi a Brock

Deputy Dir ector of economic D e v e l o p m e n t sTo m K n i p e

bars. Why not?” Knipe clarified that state regulations won’t allow establishments that sell alcohol to also sell cannabis. “I don’t entirely know why,” he admitted. “I do know there are some rules and regulations in cannabis laws that are similar to liquor regulations that don’t allow for vertical integration of the supply chain […] But my guess is it has more to do with concerns about intoxication and mixing alcohol and cannabis. But I don’t know for sure.” Knipe added that there will be licenses for on-premises consumption, but that in the communities his office studied most dispensaries were just retail shops. Alderperson Cynthia Brock said she supported keeping retail cannabis shops in the commercial zones and likes the idea May

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old at New Roots won’t have the same protections as a single use building is something I think I’d like to avoid.” She offered the adult-use zone as an alternative, which Director of Planning and Development JoAnn Cornish confirmed was on Cherry Street. Ultimately, these are some of the kinks that the city will have to work out going forward. Overall, the Planning and Economic Development Committee was happy with the starting point Knipe and his office had reached. He said they’ll continue to do outreach and research, and will work on drafting legislation to bring forward to Common Council for consideration “when the timing is right.”

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TR AVEL

United Airlines to resume flights from Ithaca to D.C. beginning June 3

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thaca Tompkins International Airport (ITH) has announced its United Airlines service to Washington Dulles (IAD) will resume on June 3 with two daily flights Monday through Friday and one daily flight on Saturdays and Sundays. Resumption comes after United Airlines paused the service following the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spring 2020. “We are thrilled that United Airlines is

resuming flights to and from ITH,” shared Airport Director Mike Hall. “We want to thank United for rejoining American Airlines and Delta Air Lines as a service provider at ITH, filling our schedule with a critical connection to Washington, D.C.” With the resumption of

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United service, the number of available daily seats could reach 250 by early June, and the airport may continue to see added flights from airline partners as demand increases and restrictions ease. “We are excited to resume service to Ithaca, providing our customers with an enhanced travel experience and unmatched service,” said Eddie Gordon, managing director of United’s Washington Dulles hub. “A short flight to Washington Dulles will provide customers traveling from Ithaca direct access to the National Capital region and the opportunity to connect to more than 100 domestic and international destinations.” For more information, visit https://flyithaca.com. -Staff R eport

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Dining

Fusion Mix

Mix offers a wide range of cuisines for breakfast, lunch and dinner — and their drink menu won’t disappoint either. By He nr y Stark In Thailand, it’s customary for Buddhist monks to give a newborn baby a nickname based on the day, date and time of his/her birth. In the early morning hours of a notso-long-ago Friday, December 25, Wanna Sutchai was born in Bangkok and given the nickname “Mix.” She started working in restaurants when she was 13 years-old and her apprenticeship included training as cook, chef, server and dishwasher. She never owned her own restaurant until she opened Mix on Elmira Road in Ithaca on August 5, 2016, on the site where Lucatelli’s had operated for many years. She, and her California-born husband Shane, whom she met in Thailand, immediately went to work remodeling to create the beautiful venue it is now. The carpet was replaced by a porcelain tile flooring, the unpopular hi-tops were replaced by faux marble tables and a new transparent bar display was created. After adding an additional outdoor dining area they now can seat about 200 diners in three indoor and two outdoor dining sites. Mix offers a fusion cuisine with hints of Thai, French, Italian and American specialties on their extensive menu. The most popular menu items are the half dozen authentic Thai Noodle Bowls ($13.95). They include a choice of ramen egg noodles or vegetarian and gluten-free rice noodles. I recently selected Gaeng Phalo, a five spice Daikon broth which, despite its name, is on the mild side. You can choose to add one of five proteins (from $2 Thai-style fried egg to $9 garlic shrimp). I ordered Marinated Crispy Tofu ($3) which was cut in large, meaty-type robust blocks. Another popular lunch item is “Max’s Fine Fried Chicken” ($15.95), which is brined in a solution of buttermilk, chicken stock and seasonings. I selected it at a recent visit and received an attractively arranged platter of four pieces of chicken — breast, thigh, leg and wing — along with a Cheddar Hash Brown Casserole, a dish of Southern Creamy Coleslaw, Buttermilk Biscuit, and a Honey Hot Sauce. The entire combination could have easily passed as a dinner entrée — it was a lot to eat. The chicken was cooked well, not too moist and not too dry. The buttermilk coating was crunchy but came close to overwhelming the chicken underneath. I really enjoyed the textures and flavors of the cheesy hash brown casserole which looked more like a mound that had been put on

the plate with an ice cream scooper than a casserole. The honey hot dipping sauce was, indeed, on the hot side, and could be a bit much for some readers. However, it is served on the side and I was able to use as much, or as little, as I wanted. I asked for butter with the biscuit and my friendly and efficient server quickly brought me a pat.

Four burger combinations ($14.95) are creative and interesting and the three salad offerings should please all palates. At a recent dinner, I selected and enjoyed the Duck Confit ($19.50), a leg quarter with a crushed pecan and rosemary coating. To prepare it, the chef gives it a quick dip “flash fry” in the deep fryer to achieve a crispy outer coating and then finishes in the oven. Another time I ordered a dish that was unfamiliar to me. I like lamb and generally like spare ribs so the unusual combination of lamb and ribs in the Pomegranate Mint Lamb Spareribs entrée ($18.40) intrigued me. It’s hard to explain but the ribs were lean, yet juicy, and the pomegranate molasses glaze complemented the meat quite well. Also at dinner there’s a “Butcher Block” with five basic steak entrées ($36-$48) with a choice of five different sauces. The breakfast menu is extensive. There are 16 omelet choices ($9.95-$14.95) including dishes from Italy, Germany, Thailand, Mexico, Greece and France.

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There’s also a choice of nine buttermilk pancake varieties, a half-dozen waffles, vegan French toast, vegan crab Benedict, and vegan brown sugar oatmeal and many more creations to make an early morning vmore interesting – and fun. Saturday and Sunday breakfasts are very popular so I try to go on weekdays. The wine selection is impressive — not because of its scope but because among the wines offered there’s an excellent selection of countries and appropriate grape varieties. If you prefer beer or cocktails, you’ll be happy too.

Tidbits: -Almost every food item is keyed with vegetarian, vegan, or gluten free identification…and there are many of all of these. - Every breakfast and lunch item on the menu is available at the 8 a.m. opening.

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Sports

Unfinished Business By Ste ve L aw re nc e

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hile most college students have put the 2020-21 collegiate year behind them, nine members of the Ithaca College Track and Field team are heading to North Carolina A&T University this week for the NCAA Championships. Seven women and two men will put forth their best efforts to put more All American and, hopefully, national championship trophies in I.C.’s trophy case, starting on Thursday. One the men’s side, Nathaniel Oczkowski will compete in the 400-meter hurdles, while Dom Mikula will try to do his part to cement the Bombers’ reputation as one of the nation’s preeminent pole vaulting contingents. For the women, Meghan Matheny (featured in a previous column this year) will enter the pole vault competition as the #1 seed. Teammate Juliann Terry is right behind her as the #2 seed, and Sara Altonen (#9 seed) is hoping to step onto the podium as well. Logan Bruce will be pulling double duty for the Bombers, as she will compete

in the 100-meter hurdles as the #4 seed and in the heptathlon as the #5 seed. Katelyn Hutchison is seeded at #10 in the 400-meter dash, while teammate Samantha Healy is the 11th seed in the hammer throw. Finally, senior Parley Hannan will also double up on events, and if past performances are any indication, the rest of the field will be chasing her. Hannan enters the NCAA tournament as the #1 seed in both the 5,000-meter and 10,000-meter races, and she will run the 10K — the tournament’s longest race — at 8:30 p.m. on Thursday. She will then have about 18 hours to rest before hitting the track for the 5K at 3 p.m. on Friday. It has been a lot of fun following Parley’s career at Ithaca College. She came in as an ambitious four-sport high school athlete, and in 2019, she did her part to further stock that aforementioned trophy case. She was the NCAA champion, an All American, the Liberty League Runner of the Year, a member of the Liberty League All Academic team, a CoSIDA Academic

All American and she broke course records and tournament records regularly. I recall a conversation I had with her 18 months ago, after she won Ithaca College’s first individual cross country national championship. I pointed out that her bio did not indicate that she had been a cross country runner in high school, and she said, “I attempted cross country once in high school, but we ran some hills in the second practice, and I was done. I said, ‘I’ll never do cross country again.’” Many of her competitors undoubtedly wish she had not changed her mind. Later, she offered, she started running long distances for “therapeutic reasons,”

and to warm up for a tennis match (she competed for the Bombers) she would run six miles. Head Coach Jennifer Potter is pleased with the number of athletes she is accompanying to the NCAAs, but, she said, “We were hoping for more.” Asked about Hannon — who has a long list of cross country accolades —and her going into two races as the #1 seed, Potter pointed out that while such recognition is much-deserved, it is even more remarkable given “This is Parley’s first-ever outdoor track season.” I asked if there was any difference in training methodology between the two disciplines and she lightheartedly said, “Both the 10K and 5K are on the track, so they’re running in circles, and the surface is consistent. In cross country, there can be varying surfaces.” Indeed, virtually all cross country runners have navigated mud, snow and ice — often on the same weekend. Given Parley’s history of reinventing herself — and her ability to adapt to new challenges — it’s not surprising that she decided to run outdoor track as a senior. Of the team’s ability to compete after missing last year, the coach expressed her gratitude and said, “Our motto this year was, ‘Unfinished Business.’ In 2020, we were ranked number two going into the NCAAs, and then we were all sent home.” She added, “We stayed focused on the belief that we would — someday — have another meet, another championship.”

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Trumansburg native to publish book about fungi, where to find it, and how to use it By Jaime Cone

V

ictoria Romanoff, of Trumansburg, sometimes wishes she could forgo technology and write with a shaggy mane. “It’s a common mushroom,” Romanoff said. “It’s delicious when it’s young and fresh, and has a delightful white skirt. As it gets older it turns very, very dark, and when it gets very old it produces a blackish blue fluid. It’s been used as writing ink by monks in Europe for centuries.” But does she use it herself? “I don’t know if I would care for that aroma in my office,” she said with a chuckle, adding that the odor has a “distinct flavor.”

Arts&Entertainment

‘MUSHROOM MEMOIRS’

Romanoff, who has a quick mind that flies effortlessly into eloquent, imaginative tangents, can wax poetic on nearly any topic (including writing), but for her new book she homed in on a dear, familiar friend: the mushroom. Titled “The Mushroom Memoirs of a Tattered Tatar,” it is part guide, part cookbook, part autobiography, and it is complete and slated for release by Abbeville Press in the spring of 2022. She chose the unique title for her book because she only recently found out that in addition to being Russian and Czech, she also descends from the Tatars of Turkey. “I’m a tattered Tatar because I’m of too many backgrounds,” she said, adding that she does not fit neatly into one identity or another. Romanoff ’s relationship with the mushroom dates back to before her birth, as a tradition of collecting mushrooms was handed down to her by her mother. In some of her earliest memories, 3-year-old Romanoff was taught to identify and collect them. That was when she was living in Latvia; when her family moved into a German displaced persons (DP) camp, hunting for mushrooms became a way in which Romanoff could help feed her family. The book is an examination of her complicated roots combined with a clear and concise guide to picking mushrooms in Upstate New York. Each of the 12 chapters focuses on one mushroom that can be easily found and identified within the region. It is a complete walkthrough of the mushroom gathering experience, from the first steps of the hunt all the way to the dining room table, as it contains a recipe for preparing each type of mushroom. The book has been a truly Trumansburg based effort, drawing from the skills of local Peggy Haine, who helped refine the recipes, sisters Elvira Brockman and Rose Viggiano, who through their connections opened the doors to Abbeville Press for the aspiring author, and photographer Sarah Adams, who took many of the book’s photos. For Romanoff, who is “the most private mushroom picking person there is,” the book lets the reader into an intensely personal world where she always wanders alone and everything else falls away. “When you first sit down in a forest, you think it’s quiet,” she said, “and as you sit in it for a few minutes you realize everyone is climbing up someplace, including my knees. Once you sit there for a while, your ears open up and you hear so much, and the engagement is so fulfilling.” She invites others to take up the hobby, connect with the natural world, and maybe even strike up a conversation with a mushroom or two — something she frequently does. “I just say, ‘thank you. How wonderful for you to have arrived.’ Then I talk to them and say, ‘now really, you want to sit here and be eaten by slugs, maggots and crows, or come with me, and I’ll clean you up nicely — you’ll take a bath, and then you’re going to do the backstroke in cream, butter and white wine.’ And guess which they always choose?”

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The disjointed path to freedom The Cherry’s latest walking play explores local freedom struggles through music, poetry and words from activists By Barbara Ad am s

A

t a rare in-person business meeting recently, several conversations were happening at once. Finally one of the leaders shouted, “Can we have just one conversation instead of five? I’m having enough trouble dissociating lately.” This sense of being pulled in myriad directions, asked to follow multiple dialogues, is the challenge at the heart of The Cherry Arts’ latest play, “Trap Door,” which opened last weekend. It’s an hour-long headphone walking play on local freedom struggles –– from the Underground Railroad to the present –– that starts at the History Center and leads listeners through eight downtown sites. The material was written by a team led by Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon and directed by Cynthia Henderson. The corresponding eight audio tracks offer up a miscellany: songs, both solo and choral performances; snatches of poetry and “poetic” speech; quotations from notable activists like Frederick Douglass and Dorothy Cotton; portions of classroom lessons scenes; hints of biography of a man who survived slavery; questions; injunctions to write and reflect; and more. Certainly not all dramatic art needs to be narrative –– one can find coherence in a mashup, even a crazy quilt, but here one hungers for a single thread of connection from one moment to the next. When we reach the segment that begins to offer bits of the story of former slave Peter Wheeler, we’re both fascinated and grateful, our thirst for coherence momentarily slaked. Likewise with the quotes from memorable activists; these stand on their own. But much else is a jumble, nothing fleshed out, no clear direction (and even the directions, such as the insistence on our stopping to look at a particular street address that’s not there, can be confusing). Both of the Cherry’s previous headphone plays exploring local history –– “Storm Country” and “The Missing Chapter” –– were narratives featuring a central character. And their stories took the peripatetic audience alongside the canal and through fairly serene natural environments. “Trap Door,” in contrast, led us mostly through busy downtown streets screaming with nonstop traffic (not to mention past a street preacher urging repentance whose sound system drowned out our audio for at least a block). And in 89-degree weather, the conflicting experience began to feel rather like descending into Dante’s Inferno. It was satisfying to view up close the bold Douglass mural under the overpass (though the disabled receive no warning

about a steep stairway to arrive there); pleasant to chat with young playgoers resting on the walkway overlooking Six Mile Creek; lovely to peacefully peruse the gardens along Sears Street (despite not understanding why we were at that locale). We studied the George Floyd memorial at the corner of DeWitt Park. A wiry old fellow wearing a Veterans for Peace t-shirt joined us, pausing at the memorial to reverse the “end racist policing” sign to its blank backside. He then informed us “racism – war – wash your mouth,” tapped his baseball cap and moved on. (As you can see, I’m following the advice of the program: “Trap Door” challenges audiences to provide their own creativity.”) The cast of eight actors delivers sections of dialogue (sometimes persuasively, sometimes melodramatically), but we often can’t discern what character (or context) is being represented. Equally frustrating, “Trap Door” asks us to contemplate the sites of struggles for freedom but enjoins us to bypass visiting actual sites and avoid expecting painful past narratives. We are urged to reflect, but with only disjointed fragments, what are we reflecting on? At the outset, walkers are given a handy spiralbound guide, with maps and some fine literary excerpts, but there are also empty spaces for workbook-like exercises in which we are to jot down our thoughts and feelings. For anyone not overly fond of participatory theatre, much less dictated self-examination, these instructions may feel cloying. Not quite theatre nor entertainment nor education, “Trap Door” may still stimulate your interest in any of the many topics or individuals it touches on. Next stop, sites nine and 10: the public library and the History Center itself.

The Cherry Arts “Trap/Door,” by Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, directed by Cynthia Henderson. A headphone walking play produced by The Cherry Arts; available Friday, May 28, 4-7 p.m. and Saturday May 29, 2-6 p.m. $15-$45 Reserve tickets in advance at https://ci.ovationtix.com/35407/ production/1031752. Walks will begin at The History Center located at 110 N. Tioga St. Bring headphones and a fully charged cell phone. A limited supply of MP3 players and headphones will be available for use if needed. Barbara Adams, a regional arts journalist, teaches writing at Ithaca College


Movies

Nicolas Cage cleans up “Willy’s Wonderland”

A C-grade horror thriller featuring rowdy local kids, evil robots and a silent Nic Cage By Br yan VanC ampe n

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irst things first: To paraphrase a Monty Python sketch, I’d like to apologize to everyone in the world for the last line in last week’s review: “The Mitchells vs. the Machines” continues that style of all manner of styles crammed together with energy and style. That’s right. I used the word “style” three times in one sentence. Dreadful. I mean, I do have a thesaurus, and I should do better than that. I guess someone needed a nap. Sorry. Second, now that Regal is reopened in Ithaca, and Cinemapolis looks to re-open sometime in June, this column will start looking and reading like it did before COVID. All the stuff I’ve had to come up with to keep the column going is officially retired. The third and likely final leg of “The New To Me Film Festival” will see print in a few weeks. I did 12 editions of the “Celebrity Quarantine Film Festival,” and I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who agreed to talk to me: John Simon, Charley Githler, David Moreland, Gay Huddle, Brett Bossard, Peter Bakija, Brian Trenchard-Smith, David Del Valle,

Danny Peary, Greg Proops, Annie Burns and Paula Poundstone. Back to business. “Willy’s Wonderland” (Screen Media Films-Landmark Studio Group-Baffin Media LTD-Saturn Films-JD EntertainmentLandafar Entertainment, 2021, 88 min.) took me back to my favorite high school job, working a summer at the San Jose Chuck E. Cheese in 1980. There were two great gigs there: the first was game room attendant, which was basically getting paid to supervise the kids playing video games and making sure they weren’t trying to tilt “Space Invaders” and “Pong.” The second chore was even better. Back then, Chuck E. Cheese still had its animatronic animal shows, which were run by a huge computer in a cooled back room. Now, you could run the whole thing from a laptop or your phone. Hanging on a hook next to the computer was a Chuck E. outfit complete with tail and a separate head. I’d get to work and the manager would point at me and say, “You’re Chuck E. today.” Some kids hated doing that, but I loved it. So whether I was making pizzas or busing tables, every 20 minutes, I’d run

Nicolas Cage and Emily Tosta in Willy’s Wonderland

SIGN UP TODAY!

to that back room and put on the mouse suit. There was a whole programmed intro, à la Johnny Carson: “He-e-ere’s Chucky!” I’d go out and walk around the restaurant and interact with the customers. The older wise-ass kids would always try to knock my hat off. Nicolas Cage has it a lot worse in “Willy’s Wonderland.” Driving through a small town, his tires get shredded, and since no one in town takes plastic, the only way he can pay for his auto repairs is by agreeing to spend the night cleaning a third-rate theme restaurant called “Willy’s Wonderland.” We know there’s something off about “Willy’s” because a band of local kids decide to break in and burn the place down, but for dumb story reasons, they get distracted and start acting like a generic teen cast from a bad slasher movie. Aside from Cage and the great character actor Beth Grant (“Rain Man,” “Speed”), the acting is pretty dicey. None of that matters, though. I never knew I wanted a movie where Nicolas Cage beats the ball bearings out of a bunch of evil robots until “Willy’s Wonderland” served it up. “Willy’s” has eight animatronic animal characters, including a crocodile and a gorilla. Despite an amateurish cast and some really poor cinematography, Cage doesn’t phone it in, even in a C-grade horror thriller. He may be working a lot these days, but he’s still swinging for the fences and making choices no other actor would make. A big fan of silent films, Cage opts to play his character — known only as The Janitor — without speaking. So if you want to see a movie where Nicolas Cage fights a mechanical ostrich, “Willy’s Wonderland” is here for you. May

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110 North Cayuga St., Ithaca repstudio.com • 607-272-4292

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Music Bars/Bands/Clubs

5/27 Thursday Aaron Lipp | 5:30 p.m. | South Hill Cider, 550 Sandbank Rd, Concerts/Recitals

unforgettable theatrical experience on foot in Ithaca. Tickets at thecherry. org. Premieres 5/20 and will run Fridays thru Sundays, 5/21-5/30. Walks begin every fifteen minutes at the Southside Community Center in Downtown Ithaca. Steven Albert: Psychic Medium Gallery Event at CBC | 6 p.m., 6/2 Wednesday | Cortland Beer Company, 16 Court Street | | $40.00

Art Museum Book Club: Axel Madsen’s “Silk Roads” | 4 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Our spring reading series about travel continues! Join Nancy Green and Maryterese Pasquale-Bowen once again to imagine far-off places through art.

“Bridges and Boats” Art Exhibition at North Star Art Gallery | 12 p.m., 5/28 Friday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road | This exhibition opens May 1st and runs through June. It includes paintings of man made creations of boats and bridges in natural settings. | Free Paintings by Andrew Paine | 5 p.m., 5/28 Friday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gal-

lery at South Hill will be having a one person exhibition of recent painting by Andrew Paine. The Gallery at South Hill entrance is located in the back of the building. | Free Free Community Science | 10 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | Conley Park, 601 1st St | Join Sciencenter educators and local experts every Saturday at 10am in Conley Park (behind the Sciencenter), for hands-on science exploration and fun! | Free Seeing the Forest for the Trees | 5 p.m., 5/30 Sunday | State of the Art Gallery, 120 West State Street | Everyone knows what a tree looks like. But ask an artist, and you may be surprised by the result.

Film Virtual Cinemapolis: Hermitage: The Power of Art | 1 p.m.,

5/26 Wednesday The Wailers | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | $15.00 - $30.00

5/27 Thursday NYS Baroque Rising Artists: The New Consort: O Stars, Conspiring Against Me | 7:30 p.m. | Online, Online | Free

5/28 Friday Eldridge Park Opens for the Season |

6/3 Thursday Farm to Concert Dinner at Center for the Arts | 5 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | $40.00 - $280.00 Rosie Newton & Paul Martin at South Hill Cider at South Hill Cider | 5:30 p.m. | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center Rosie Newton & Paul Martin at South Hill Cider at South Hill Cider | 5:30 p.m.

Special Events

Stage

WE WENT TO WAR: VOICES OF TRUMANSBURG’S PAST AT GROVE CEMETERY SATURDAY, MAY 29 & 30 AT 7PM Grove Cemetery, 8825 Falls Rd., Trumansburg | Dramatic historical monologues of Trumansburg’s military personnel buried in Grove Cemetery, presented by Encore Players Community Theatre. This event will feature stories of some of our past residents who served in the Revolutionary, Civil, and both World Wars. Historian John Wertis has researched the lives of a dozen servicemen and women whose stories are brought to life by local actors as audience members tour Grove Cemetery. (photo: provided)

THISWEEK

Trap Door at South Side Community Center | 4 p.m., 5/28 Friday | Southside Community Center, S. Plain St. | Combines text, dialogue, music, and sound design to create an

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HERMITAGE: THE POWER OF ART

RUNS MAY 26 - JUNE 1, APPOINTMENT SCREENINGS DAILY AT 1PM, 4PM, 7PM, AND 10PM.

Cinemapolis, 120 E Green St, Ithaca | Celebrate the gradual re-opening of movie theaters with a visit to our favorite local independent art house theater. Hermitage: The Power of Art is a spectacular documentary event tour through St. Petersburg’s State Hermitage Museum, a wonderful complex of buildings with the largest collection of paintings in the world,

Ithac a T imes

5/26 Wednesday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | A spectacular documentary event tour through St. Petersburg’s State Hermitage Museum, a wonderful complex of buildings with the largest collection of paintings in the world, to retrace two and a half centuries. The appointment screenings will be daily at 1pm, 4pm, 7pm, and 10pm. Thru 6/1. Virtual Cinemapolis: Dementia Part II | 5/29 Saturday | Virtual | Suzanne wasn’t always this confused. She wasn’t always dead either – When an ex-con takes a job as a handyman for an unstable elderly woman to avoid a parole violation, it becomes a choice he may regret. Virtual Cinemapolis: Drunk Bus | 5/29 Saturday | Virtual | A recent graduate whose post-college plan is derailed when his girlfriend leaves him for a job in NYC. Michael comes face to tattooed face with a 300-lb punk rock Samoan who challenges him with a kick in the ass to break from the loop and start living. Virtual Cinemapolis: Rockfield | 5/29 Saturday | Virtual | The story of two Welsh brothers who built a studio in the attic of their farmhouse and started recording with their friends. Kingsley’s new wife, Ann, left her job in the local bank to do the books, and they continued farming all the while. Virtual Cinemapolis: Two Gods | 5/29 Saturday | Virtual | A Muslim casket maker and ritual body washer in Newark NJ mentors two kids – Furguan, a confident 12-year-old who comes from a rough home, and Naz, a 17-year-old who has been fighting through his own struggles as a young black man growing up in Newark. Virtual Cinemapolis: RK/RKAY | 5/29 Saturday | Virtual | A charming “meta-movie” about filmmaking itself in his newest, RK/RKAY tells the story of a film director whose main character usurps control of the plotline, and eventually, real life.

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Stop Asian Hate Discussion | 5/27 Thursday | Virtual | Members of the Ithaca Asian American Association will lead a discussion of current events surrounding racist hate and violence against the AAPI community. Learn more and register at https://www.

AARON LIPP

THURSDAY, MAY 27 AT 5:30 PM

South Hill Cider, 550 Sandbank Road, Ithaca | Whether it be fiddling for an old time square dance, rocking a telecaster for the rockabilly dance party, playing the Hammond B3 organ with the sacred steel gospel bands, etc, Aaron Lipp is constantly performing and developing new musical ventures. | (photo: provided)


“Tompkins provided extremely valuable advice, oversight, and support, so that we could create a healing space for our community,” says Dr. McAllister.

Service Stability Strength

Books Cooking Class at 15 STEPS | 11 a.m., 5/26 Wednesday, 15 STEPS, 171 E. State Street | Soft and pillowy, in recent years, gnocchi has been appearing on an increasing number of restaurant menus. If you have sampled them you may wish you could make them at home. Composting Webinar | 12 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Cortland Free Library, 32

DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES of ITHACA Dr. Josie McAllister, Founder

When Dermatology Associates of Ithaca had outgrown their office space, Dr. Josie McAllister turned to a team who has been there for the practice every step of the way: Tompkins Trust Company and Tompkins Insurance Agencies. With guidance and financing help from Tompkins, Dr. McAllister was able to purchase and renovate a beautiful 8,000 square foot facility in Ithaca.

Visit TompkinsTrust.com or TompkinsIns.com Insurance and investment products are not FDIC insured, have no bank guarantee and may lose value.

4/21

tcpl.org/events/aapi-month-stopasian-hate-discussion. | Free Friday Night Roller Skates | 5:30 p.m., 5/28 Friday | Cass Park, 701 Taughannock Blvd | Sessions will be limited to 60 public skaters. Skaters are encouraged to use online registration to pre-purchase your session admission and your skate rental, if desired. There will ONLY be walk up spots available if pre-registration has not reached capacity prior to the start of each session. Public Sunset Cruises at Allen Treman State Park | 7:30 p.m., 5/28 Friday | Nothing beats a sunset on the lake! Settle in for a relaxing cruise that features a light narration and a chance to chat informally with our crew. Cayuga Trails 50 Mile | 6 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | Cayuga Trails 50 Mile, 105 Enfield Falls Rd | Description: Welcome to the Cayuga Trails 50 and Marathon, presented by Atayne.

Notices

Church St | Join local Master Composter Jared Popoli to learn more about composting! Contact the library at 753-1042 or reference@cortlandfreelibrary.org to register. STEAM Book Club Reads Prairie Lotus (ages 9-12) | 3:45 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Virtual | The May 26 club will read Prairie Lotus by Linda Sue Park, about a young Asian-American girl living in the mid-west in 1880. Learn more and register at https:// www.tcpl.org/events/steam-bookclub-prairie-lotus. | Free Museum Book Club: Axel Madsen’s “Silk Roads” | 4 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Our spring reading series about travel continues! Join Nancy Green and Maryterese Pasquale-Bowen once again to imagine far-off places through art. YA Book Club Reads Patron Saints of Nothing (Teens) | 4:30 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Virtual | The May 26 club will read Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay, about a Filipino-American teen who travels to the Philippines to uncover the truth about his cousin’s death. Learn more and register at https://www.tcpl.org/ events/ya-book-club-reads-patronsaints-nothing | Free We Read Diverse Books: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian | 6:30 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main

Street | The library will be offering a monthly virtual book discussion to discuss novels centered on characters with diverse cultures, ethnicities, and life experiences. Tween Book Club | 3 p.m., 5/27 Thursday | Watkins Glen Library, 610 S. Decatur Street | ZOOM CLASS: Garden Insect and Diseases--Organic Control and Management | 6 p.m., 6/1 Tuesday | Virtual | What’s eating your vegetable plants? Learning to identify the beneficial and detrimental insects and pests in your garden will help reduce insect damage to your vegetables, fruits, and flowers. | $0.00 - $30.00 Zine on Zoom | 6/2 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Youth writers in 4 th through 12 th grades are invited to help create and produce Tomfoolery, a quarterly publication of poems, stories, and art. Drum-Making Workshop with Zelda Holating at Firelight Camps | 9 a.m., 6/3 Thursday | Please join us on June 3rd for a full day of drummaking with expert Zelda Hotaling.

Kids The Wailers | 8 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | The legendary Wailers continue their quest to bring reggae to the forefront of the world’s stage. | $15.00 - $30.00

Tween Book Club | 3 p.m., 5/27 Thursday | Watkins Glen Library, 610 S. Decatur Street | Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 5/28 Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm. Free Community Science | 10 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | Conley Park, 601 1st St | Join Sciencenter educators and local experts every Saturday at 10am in Conley Park (behind the Sciencenter), for hands-on science exploration and fun! | Free Tanglewood Nature Center at Havana Glen Park | 10 a.m., 6/1 Tuesday | Havana Glen Park, 135 Havana Glen Road | We’re kicking off our summer Storytime, Blankets & Books with special guests Sophie the Owl and friends from Tanglewood! Toddler Story Time - Snow | 10:30 a.m., 6/2 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Join Miss Ashley on zoom for an interactive time of stories, songs and more. This program is geared toward toddlers is open to children birth through preschool with their caregivers. Toddler Story Time - Socks & Shoes | 10:30 a.m., 6/2 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Join Miss Ashley on zoom for an interactive time of stories, songs and more. This program is geared toward toddlers is open to children birth through preschool with their caregivers.

Composting Webinar | 12 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St | Join local Master Composter Jared Popoli to learn more about composting! Contact the library at 753-1042 or reference@cortlandfreelibrary.org to register. Trumansburg Farmers Market | 4 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Enjoy live music, supper and shopping at the community-built pavilions and lawn tents for fresh locally grown produce, naturally raised meats, eggs, flowers, plants, crafts and products. Healthy Cooking: It’s a SNAP! | 6 p.m., 5/27 Thursday | Virtual | Join us for a free class about how you can eat healthy without breaking the bank! And try out a new recipe, Baked Kale Frittata! Join us for this virtual workshop on Zoom. | Free Ithaca Farmers Market | 9 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | Visit the farmers market every Saturday, rain or shine, at the pavilion. Seed Giveaway | 10 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | CCE-Tompkins Education Center, 615 Willow Avenue | For 2021, our Horticulture Program is planning to hold a series of seed and plant giveaways of curated collections of seeds and donated seedlings. | Free Orchard Tours and Tastings at Black Diamond Farm at BLACK DIAMOND FARM | 11 a.m., 5/29 Saturday | Taste our ciders, tour an orchard with more than 100

We’re Back!

historical and modern apple varieties, and enjoy the Finger Lakes view! We Went to War: Voices of Trumansburg’s Past at Grove Cemetery | 7 p.m., 5/29 Saturday | Dramatic historical monologues of Trumansburg’s military personnel buriedin Grove Cemetery, presented

The Finger Lakes most complete activity, entertainment and events calendar. List your event with us online IT’S FREE! ithaca.com/calendar

FRIDAY NIGHT ROLLER SKATES

FRIDAY, MAY 28 AT 6:30 PM

FRIDAY, MAY 28 AT 6:30 PM

Finger Lakes Cider House, 4017 Hickok Road, Interlaken | Beginning this Friday, live music is happening at the Finger Lakes Cider House up Route 89 in Interlaken. Grab some delicious cider and local, farm to table food and settle in to enjoy the music as the sun sets and the crickets chirp. Music from 6:30-8:30 every Friday night, May 28 - Oct 15, 2021.| (photo: provided)

Cass Park Skating Rink, 701 Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca | Throughout late spring, all summer, and early fall, Cass Park Rink will offer Friday Night Roller Skates open to the Ithaca Area Community. Roller Skate Sessions will be limited to 60 public skaters. Pre-registration is encouraged. (photo: provided)

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THISWEEK

NIGHT FARM JAMS: TRAVIS KNAPP

by Encore Players Community Theatre on May 29 and 30 from 7-9pm. Annual Memorial Day Chicken BBQ | 12 p.m., 5/31 Monday | Halsey Valley Fire Department, 506 Hamilton Road | Dewitt Park Ithaca Farmers Market at Dewitt Park | 9 a.m., 6/1 Tuesday | This market is perfect for grabbing prepared food or groceries. Vendors set up around the perimeter of the park (across from Greenstar Oasis) with tents and tables. ZOOM CLASS: Garden Insect and Diseases--Organic Control and Management | 6 p.m., 6/1 Tuesday | Virtual | What’s eating your vegetable plants? Learning to identify the beneficial and detrimental insects and pests in your garden will help reduce insect damage to your vegetables, fruits, and flowers. | $0.00 - $30.00 Virtual Chair Yoga | 10 a.m., 6/2 Wednesday | Virtual | Led by certified yoga instructor Caryn Sheckler, this weekly class will focus on gentle stretching to help adult participants develop better balance and flexibility. Each class will include mantra, breath, meditation, and exercise in a relaxed and joyful virtual setting. Drum-Making Workshop with Zelda Holating at Firelight Camps | 9 a.m., 6/3 Thursday | Please join us on June 3rd for a full day of drummaking with expert Zelda Hotaling. Candor Farmers Market | 3:30 p.m., 6/3 Thursday | Candor Town Hall Pavilion, 101 Owego Road | 25 local vendors with a great assortment fresh

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Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

AUTOMOTIVE

CASH FOR CARS!

DONATE YOUR

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We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

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June 3, 12-4. June 4-6, 9-2 3054 Garett Rd, Ithaca, off Rt 89.

320/Bulletin Board Frontier provides flat rate residential service for $14.97 - $24.75, flat rate business service for $21.24 - $38.76 (where available) and measured business service for $13.12 - $20.24 (where available). Other taxes, fees, and surcharges may apply. Frontier offers single party service, touch tone, toll blocking, access to long distance, emergency services, operator assistance, and directory assistance. Use of these services may result in additional charges. Budget or economy services may also be available. Frontier offers Lifeline service which is a nontransferable government assistance program that provides a $9.25 discount on the cost of monthly telephone service or eligible broadband products (where available) and is limited to one discount per household. If you have any questions regarding Frontier’s rates or services, please call us at 1-800-FRONTIER for further information or visit us at www.Frontier.com. 5/26/21

HALSEY VALLEY FIRE DEPT.

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Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at I t h a c a 866-585-6050 Tori m e sFree / M Toll ata y 866-585-6050

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607-274-2128. Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place.

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EMPLOYMENT Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

DRIVER NEEDED

Ehrhart Energy has immediate openings for Class B EDL Drivers with Tanker & Hazmat Endorsements. No Endorsements, we will work with you so you can get GREAT PAY, Bonus Plans, Medical including Dental and Eye Care, 401k contributions. Join the team today in Trumansburg. Call 607 387-8881 or email us at: bcummings@edplp.net

English Language Arts Teacher

OCM BOCES REACH program has a full-time opening for an English Language Arts Teacher for 7th-8th grade students at the Crown Road Campus, 4500 Crown Road, in Liverpool, NY. This successful candidate will provide ELA instruction for middle school innovative education students. The program focuses on interdisciplinary project-based learning, 21st century skills, and the infusion of technology throughout the curriculum. NYS English Language Arts 7-12 certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply by 06/08/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

Looking for work? We are hiring!

The William George Agency has openings: YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A FullTime position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 3 ½ days on, 3 ½ days off. This position focuses on relationship-building, mentoring, and helping youth develop coping skills and build self-reliance. AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting. CARPENTER: A Full-Time position, working in a residential treatment facility. 5-day work week, 8am-4:30pm. Requires general carpentry skills, roofing, building repairs, as well as providing vocational supervision and training to youth. REGISTERED NURSE: A Full Time position in a residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills & ability to multi-task, includes preventative health maintenance, evaluate, and triage care and record keeping. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN APPLICATION, visit us online at: www.wgaforchildren. org/career-opportunities/ or call 607-844-6460 The William George Agency Salary: $31,200.00 F/T Minimum, Overtime available. Full time/Part time, Flexible Hours Benefits: Health/Dental/Vision/ Life/401k/ Personal/Sick time/ Meals provided on duty/Vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED The William George Agency

MATHEMATICS TEACHER

OCM BOCES has the need for a fulltime Mathematics teacher located at the STARS Alternative High School in Syracuse, NY. Provide mathematics instruction for 9th - 12th graders in a program designed for alternative education students. NYS Secondary Mathematics certification required. Register and apply by 06/08/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

EMPLOYMENT Mechanic Wanted

Keep us Trucking! Mechanic Wanted. Heavy Trucks, brakes, tramways, oil changes, and regular monthly PMs. General upkeep of propane systems, trained by Ehrhart Energy. ASE certifications a plus. Join the team today, send resume, cover letter to Ehrhart Energy, Attn: Bill Cummings, PO Box 388, Trumansburg, NY 14886. Or call (607) 387-8881.

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Special Education Teachers (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) – Looking for teachers with experience in a 12:1:1/12:1:4 setting. Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online by at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from 7/6/21 to 8/13/21: Teaching Assistants Located at various sites within Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Interested in joining a collaborative and innovative instructional team with a student centered focus? Consider applying to the OCM BOCES STARS program providing Special Education instruction/services to alternative high school students. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to receive first rate professional development in the principles of instructional best practices, restorative practices and technology integration. Come join the team at OCM BOCES! NYS certification in Special Education 7-12 required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR

Transportation Supervisor Southern Cayuga Central School District, Aurora NY. Candidates MUST satisfy the requirements for School Bus Driver as set forth in the Rules and Regulations of the New York State Commissioner of Education; competitive salary & benefit package. See more details including job description & apply online with the Support Staff Application; southerncayuga. org/644, click on the application in the right column; Civil Service test may be required. SCCS EOE

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

DRIVE WITH US! ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers & Aide Positions. Interviews by appointment

Call for info: 607-274-2128 Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place.

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


SERVICES 610/Apartments APARTMENT FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

SERVICES TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

800/Services COMPLETE CARE

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

HOME WARRANTY

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-877673-0511 | Hours Mon-Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

Mathematics teacher located at the STARS

NY.

School

in

Syracuse,

Provide mathematics instruction for

9th - 12th graders in a program designed for alternative education students. Secondary

Mathematics

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warrant COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 off 2 FREE Months! 866-4406501 (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE

MEDICATION

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

OCEAN CITY

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

at: www.olasjobs.org/central.

information, visit our website at:

www.

MARYLAND Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToThe-

1010/Commercial

Beach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

820/Computer

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc.

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER Interested in joining a collaborative and innovative instructional team with a student centered focus? Consider applying to the OCM BOCES STARS program providing Special Education instruction/ services to alternative high school students. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to receive first rate professional development in the principles of instructional best practices, restorative practices and technology integration. Come join the team at OCM BOCES! NYS certification in Special Education 7-12 required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

English Language Arts Teacher OCM BOCES REACH program has a full-time opening for an English Language Arts Teacher for 7th-8th grade students at the Crown Road Campus, 4500 Crown Road, in Liverpool, NY. This successful candidate will provide ELA instruction for middle school innovative education students. The program focuses on interdisciplinary project-based learning, 21st century skills, and the infusion of technology throughout the curriculum. NYS English Language Arts 7-12 certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply by 06/08/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

NOTICE TO NEW YORK RESIDENTS

Homeowner Funding is now offering homeowners a chance to make necessary energy efficient home repairs and will be offering its services to families who: 1. 2. 3.

certification

For more

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

NYS

required. Register and apply by 06/08/21

ocmboces.org EOE

HOME REPAIRS

REAL ESTATE

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

OCM BOCES has the need for a full-time

High

GUTTER CLEANING

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

MATHEMATICS TEACHER

Alternative

SERVICES

ARE UNABLE TO PAY CASH FOR NECESSARY HOME REPAIRS. CANNOT AFFORD HIGH OR ADDITIONAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS. HAVE BEEN TURNED DOWN FOR FREE STATE OR GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS.

REPAIR TO INCLUDE: ROOFING • SIDING • WINDOWS • DOORS & MORE...

PRINCIPAL COBBLES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (K-5) Penfield Central School District is seeking a dynamic and collaborative instructional leader with a focus on supporting the social and emotional needs of all learners. Ideal candidates will possess teaching and leadership experience, strong background in teaching & learning, strong knowledge of student developmental levels and a passionate commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion for all learners. Interested candidates please visit www.penfield.edu, click on the Job Opportunities and follow directions to apply.

EOE

May

Money Is Now Available Through Approved Lenders to Qualified Applicants* for Home Repairs No Money Down

up to

$25,000

No Equity Required

CALL TODAY: (800) 736-9629 or visit NYImprovementFund.com

*Approved applications will have the work completed by a quality repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING

2 6 –Ju ne

1 ,

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I t h a c a T i m e s   19


BackPage A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

Lifelong

119 West Court St., Ithaca 607-273-1511 tclifelong.org

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

DiBella’s Subs “The Best Sub You’ve ever had!” $5.00 off any purchase at

Engaging, Inclusive Officiating... ... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved ones and friends.

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

*Acupuncture Works*

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES

607-272-0114

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149

Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c) www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

ANIMALS LAND & SEA

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org CLEANING SERVICES

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP 607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

FREE BRAKE CHECK Brakes feeling spongy? Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd 607-882-6816

OAR: 272-7885 910 W. State St., Ithaca EVERY Saturday May 1 to June 19th, 10am - 2pm. ITHACA NEWS

with Community Cash Coupon 222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

Macintosh Consulting

COVID vaccine! OAR is now offering information and sign up sessions for you to get Comfortable getting your vaccine. Transportation an Issue? No Problem - let us assist you!

Delivered to your inbox every day Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

DiBella’s Subs

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS

#GETVACCINATED

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext: 1214

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

John’s Tailor Shop John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org

Oil Change $19.99 Includes oil & filter 4 tire rotation & brake check with Community Cash Coupon Ithaca Auto Service 607-220-9183

PIANOS

Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services No job too big or too small

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26 South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS.

Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation Custom made & Manufactured by

SOUTH SENECA VINYL Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Your Go-To Oil Change Stop

Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816

List your event for FREE! Announcing the Times Table Online The Finger Lakes most complete activity, entertainment and event calendar has a new platform to connect our community. FOR THEATERS, ENTERTAINMENT VENUES, WINERIES, GALLERIES and ORGANIZATIONS STAGING EVENTS AND FUNDRAISERS: A 24/7 self-self service way to list your event online FREE including times, dates, directions, ticket prices and descriptions. Additional paid options are available for video, ticket sales and premium position. FOR STUDENTS, VISITORS, TOURISTS : A quick look at your phone or computer can show you the most complete menu of events by subject, location, and date, along with click-through ticket purchasing, directions and information.

ithaca.com/calendar 20  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/ May

26–Ju ne

1 ,

20 2 1


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE 100/Automotive CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

110/Automotive Services Freon Wanted:

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

COMMUNITY

EMPLOYMENT

320/Bulletin Board

OCM BOCES REACH program has a full-time opening for an English Language Arts Teacher for 7th-8th grade students at the Crown Road Campus, 4500 Crown Road, in Liverpool, NY. This successful candidate will provide ELA instruction for middle school innovative education students. The program focuses on interdisciplinary project-based learning, 21st century skills, and the infusion of technology throughout the curriculum. NYS English Language Arts 7-12 certification required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply by 06/08/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

Frontier provides flat rate residential service for $14.97 - $24.75, flat rate business service for $21.24 - $38.76 (where available) and measured business service for $13.12 - $20.24 (where available). Other taxes, fees, and surcharges may apply. Frontier offers single party service, touch tone, toll blocking, access to long distance, emergency services, operator assistance, and directory assistance. Use of these services may result in additional charges. Budget or economy services may also be available. Frontier offers Lifeline service which is a nontransferable government assistance program that provides a $9.25 discount on the cost of monthly telephone service or eligible broadband products (where available) and is limited to one discount per household. If you have any questions regarding Frontier’s rates or services, please call us at 1-800-FRONTIER for further information or visit us at www.Frontier.com. 5/26/21

HALSEY VALLEY FIRE DEPT. ANNUAL CHICKEN BBQ

MEMORIAL DAY, MAY 31, 2021 12 NOON - Gone!!! 1/2 Chicken, Baked Beans, Pasta $alad, Coleslaw & Roll - $10.00* ***Raffle Tickets available. 1st Place, Whole Butchered Pig. 2nd Place $200. 3d Place $50. Maximum 500 tickets being sold. Tickets are $10 & go on sale day of BBQ. Drawing 9.1.21. **CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK***

We pay CA$H for cylinders and cans. R12 R500 R11 R113 R114. Convenient. Certified Professionals. Call 312-2919169 or visit RefrigerantFinders.com (NYSCAN)

400/Employment BACK TO SCHOOL!

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

FREE PIANO

Lauter (1920) Upright in excellent condition. Recently tuned (609) 319-4140.

215/Auctions ESTATE SALE

June 3, 12-4. June 4-6, 9-2 3054 Garett Rd, Ithaca, off Rt 89. Hundreds of vintage and primitive items, tools, jewelry, appliances, books. clothes. See them on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/MottvilleEstate-Sales-1930729970271665/. Mottville Estate Sales

| 59,200 Readers

BUS DRIVERS NEEDED

ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers: by appointment. Call for info: 607-274-2128. Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place.

Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

DRIVER NEEDED

Ehrhart Energy has immediate openings for Class B EDL Drivers with Tanker & Hazmat Endorsements. No Endorsements, we will work with you so you can get GREAT PAY, Bonus Plans, Medical including Dental and Eye Care, 401k contributions. Join the team today in Trumansburg. Call 607 387-8881 or email us at: bcummings@edplp.net

English Language Arts Teacher

Looking for work? We are hiring!

The William George Agency has openings: YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A FullTime position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 3 ½ days on, 3 ½ days off. This position focuses on relationship-building, mentoring, and helping youth develop coping skills and build self-reliance. AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting. CARPENTER: A Full-Time position, working in a residential treatment facility. 5-day work week, 8am-4:30pm. Requires general carpentry skills, roofing, building repairs, as well as providing vocational supervision and training to youth. REGISTERED NURSE: A Full Time position in a residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills & ability to multi-task, includes preventative health maintenance, evaluate, and triage care and record keeping. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN APPLICATION, visit us online at: www.wgaforchildren. org/career-opportunities/ or call 607-844-6460 The William George Agency Salary: $31,200.00 F/T Minimum, Overtime available. Full time/Part time, Flexible Hours Benefits: Health/Dental/Vision/ Life/401k/ Personal/Sick time/ Meals provided on duty/Vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED The William George Agency

MATHEMATICS TEACHER

OCM BOCES has the need for a fulltime Mathematics teacher located at the STARS Alternative High School in Syracuse, NY. Provide mathematics instruction for 9th - 12th graders in a program designed for alternative education students. NYS Secondary Mathematics certification required. Register and apply by 06/08/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

Mechanic Wanted

Keep us Trucking! Mechanic Wanted. Heavy Trucks, brakes, tramways, oil changes, and regular monthly PMs. General upkeep of propane systems, trained by Ehrhart Energy. ASE certifications a plus. Join the team today, send resume, cover letter to Ehrhart Energy, Attn: Bill Cummings, PO Box 388, Trumansburg, NY 14886. Or call (607) 387-8881.

EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES

COMPLETE CARE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Special Education Teachers (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) – Looking for teachers with experience in a 12:1:1/12:1:4 setting. Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online by at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from 7/6/21 to 8/13/21: Teaching Assistants Located at various sites within Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Interested in joining a collaborative and innovative instructional team with a student centered focus? Consider applying to the OCM BOCES STARS program providing Special Education instruction/services to alternative high school students. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to receive first rate professional development in the principles of instructional best practices, restorative practices and technology integration. Come join the team at OCM BOCES! NYS certification in Special Education 7-12 required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR

Transportation Supervisor Southern Cayuga Central School District, Aurora NY. Candidates MUST satisfy the requirements for School Bus Driver as set forth in the Rules and Regulations of the New York State Commissioner of Education; competitive salary & benefit package. See more details including job description & apply online with the Support Staff Application; southerncayuga. org/644, click on the application in the right column; Civil Service test may be required. SCCS EOE

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

HOME WARRANTY

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-877673-0511 | Hours Mon-Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

APARTMENT FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

1010/Commercial

MARYLAND

RENOVATIONS

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

BEST SATELLITE TV

DRIVE WITH US! ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers & Aide Positions. Interviews by appointment

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

GUTTER CLEANING

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warrant COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 off 2 FREE Months! 866-4406501 (NYSCAN)

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Profile for Ithaca Times

May 26, 2021  

May 26, 2021  

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