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County committee Board of Ed. expects Protesters gather Review of a Japanese A look at Cornellians Approves funds End to hybrid learning On Commons Ceramics exhibit Heading to the Games PAGE 4


Woodstock

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Be a GreenStar Member Shop at any GreenStar Store in May You’re Entered! Membership is required to enter this giveaway contest. Already a member? Just shop in May and provide your member number. Not a member yet? Join today and shop!

Prize package courtesy of Paddledockers and Explore Ithaca.

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VOL.XLI / NO. 39 / May 19, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S

R ESEARCH

Cornell, Cancer Resource Center partnership opens students’ eyes to realities of disease

I

n 2012, Bob Riter, then the Executive Director of the local Cancer Resource Center, and Robert Weiss, a Professor of Molecular Genetics at Cornell, met to discuss an interesting dilemma. From his own experiences as a graduate student in cancer biology, Weiss reflected on how odd it was that scientists-in-training never interacted with the people who are affected by what they were studying. Riter saw the same was true from the opposite side. Many cancer patients and survivors also wanted to connect with students to learn more about their disease and speak with the future leaders of the field. As a result, Riter and Weiss formed the Cornell Community Cancer Partnership to bring students, researchers, and community members together for weekly discussions about cancer. But while other organizations had been developing similar programs at that time, “I think what was really unusual is that this was not a one-shot deal,” said Riter.

Now in its ninth year, the program is still going strong. The partnership recently held a two-day workshop where members listened to lectures from a variety of different fields, such as an economist who talked about the price of chemotherapy drugs, a filmmaker who examined what breast cancer treatments actually look like, and a researcher who studies the impact of health equity on care. Brittany Schutrum, a PhD student in Biomedical Engineering, said that the multidisciplinary approach was part of what drew

her to join the program. “I spend my whole day thinking about the biological aspect of the disease,” she said. “I wanted to use this opportunity to learn about the sides of cancer I do not often consider.” Alongside listening to lectures, students interview the community members to learn about the disease from their perspective, which Weiss says is usually the part that students remember most. “When you hear an individual’s story and what challenges they had to deal with, I think that really makes it sink in,” Weiss said. Riter acknowledged that another important part of the interview is to serve as a safe space for students to practice speaking with cancer patients and survivors. For example, “while it is often a reflex, a person recently diagnosed with cancer doesn’t want to hear ‘don’t worry, you’ll be fine,’” Riter said. For her interview, Schutrum was paired with a woman who is a university professor and professional artist. “My biggest takeaway from our conversation was an understanding of how overwhelmed she was upon first getting her breast cancer diagnosis,” said Schutrum. “This experience allowed me to take a glimpse into the real lived experience of someone who has a disease I normally only view through a microscope.” An additional goal of the Cornell Community Partnership is to encourage and help other institutions start similar programs. Research fellows Andrew Sinkoe and Mia Spezia attended the Cornell workshop to get ideas for their researcher-patient partner-

T a k e ▶  Fill the cruiser - COVID-19 impacts have led to an increase in local food insecurity, affecting the most vulnerable populations in our county. The Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office will be conducting a “Fill the Cruiser” food drive in partnership with Tops Market to help out the local community. The event will take place this

ship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Washington D.C. “This was one of the best events I’ve ever gone to in my career,” Sinkoe said. “It confirmed that it’s a good thing we are forming this partnership at the NCI because it can be very helpful for everyone.” Spezia added that meeting patients can not only be very motivating for scientists but can shape what they choose to study. “We can’t minimize the fact that patients have a lot of insight in terms of what research is needed and what’s missing, because they’re living this experience,” she said. Susan Boutros is one of those people, who found a dearth of research when it comes to patients who have been diagnosed with Lyme disease and cancer. As a participant in the Cornell program, she loves getting to speak with the next generation of researchers. As a scientist herself, she also knows the great value in helping science trainees realize the magnitude of their research beyond trying to get grants and funding. “With programs such as this one, it brings humanity into the training,” Boutros said. “Hopefully that will stick with people and they will realize that the purpose of their research is, or should be, to improve the health of people who have lives, who have hopes, and who have dreams.” For more information about the partnership, you can check out their website at https:// blogs.cornell.edu/cancercommunitypartnership/

Saturday, May 22, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at the Tops Market located at 2300 N. Triphammer Rd., Ithaca NY. All proceeds will be donated to the St. John’s Community Center. Most unopened, unexpired, and unprepared foods will be accepted. They are in most need of the following nonperishable low sodium, low fat

and low sugar items: Peanut butter, granola bars, cereal, kid-friendly healthy snacks, nuts, beans, lentils, brown rice, raisins & other dried fruits, whole wheat pasta, crackers, and canned fruit & vegetables (poptop lids). All donations will receive a reusable Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office shopping bag.

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Three developers vie for the opportunity to build on Ithaca’s Inlet Island

‘The Floating Bridge’����������������� 13 Japanese ceramics exhibit in Syracuse bridges generational gap

NE W S & OPINION ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T Sports ������������������������������������������������������� 11 Cornell ���������������������������������������������������� 12 Anime Artistry �������������������������������������� 15 Times Table ��������������������������������������������� 17 Classifieds ���������������������������������������������� 18

ON T HE C OV E R Three proposals for this site on Inlet Island

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m Sharon Davis, Distribution F r o n t J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

-Marin Langlieb

N o t e

Island Real Estate������������������������������������������������8

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All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

Schools

PHOTOGRAPHER Hybrid learning likely gone by fall, ICSD aims for all in-person By C a se y Mar tin

WHERE’S ONE PLACE YOU’VE BEEN, THAT YOU SUGGEST EVERYONE CHECKS OUT, AT LEAST ONCE IN THEIR LIVES?

“This’ll be controversial but…Times Square!” Josh & Ari B.

T

he fall will likely bring the end of the hybrid model that’s been prevalent in Ithaca City School District classrooms throughout the pandemic. While some students are remote and some are in school, teachers have been tasked with teaching both simultaneously. Both teachers and parents have complained about this teaching model in Board of Education meetings throughout the year, as it’s taxing on teachers and students alike. Student representative Grace Lim asked the board at the May 11 meeting if they had plans for next year’s learning

“Rome & Alaska.” Jason & Courtney W.

“Sedona, Arizona. I could really be myself there!”

Police reform

County inches toward Justice Center with Committee approval

-Alison W.

“Hilo Hawaii. It’s a pretty inexpensive place to visit, and its beautiful.” Kevin R.

“Go hiking at Treman State Park!” -Monita C.

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model. Superintendent Luvelle Brown said the administration is operating “under the assumption that all our young people and staff are going to be back in the fall.” He added that while there may still be virtual opportunities for students who are interested, they have no intent on continuing the hybrid model unless the state decides to mandate it. Expanding on that, Deputy Superintendent Lily Talcott said they’re currently looking at potential models for the next school year, and for the elementary school level they’re thinking it will be a predominantly in-person

/ May

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he Community Justice Center took one more step toward reality as it received unanimous approval from the Tompkins County Budget, Capital and Personnel Committee on May 10. The total funding proposed for the Community Justice Center is $268,811, with the city and county splitting it between them, aside from an additional $19,950 paid by the county for project management software that would be used by other county departments as well. The total funding of $268,811 breaks down into the following: Project manager (director of

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the CJC) Salary: $83,866 Benefits: $44,197 Data analyst (program analyst) Salary: $69,285 Benefits: $36,513 Other operating expenses: $15,000 Project management software: $19,950 The Community Justice Center will be based loosely on the county’s Emergency Operations Center model. The project manager will be the director of the center, while the data analyst will focus on data and collection. Together they would work with the Ithaca

model. However, she said they’re still exploring what a virtual option might look like, for instance having a district-wide first grade virtual classroom for students with medical needs who would be safer learning from home. “We’re in very early stages [of planning] for elementary level and very early stages for secondary students but it’s clear from students and staff that continuing the hybrid model really doesn’t meet the needs of all our kids,” she said. “We’re always shortchanging one, and we want to avoid that. It’s not what anyone wants.” Talcott added that the news that children 12+ are now eligible for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been “very welcome and exiciting,” as she said it opens up more in-person opportunities. “We recognize because of science and because of the vaccine roll-out that virtual learning will not be necessary, so that’s what we’re anticipating,” she said. “Unless the state mandates a specific model, we’re looking at in-person teaching and learning.” Student representative Adam Saar asked if the district planned to mandate vaccines or what other type of policy might be in place. Board member Ann Reichlin said that would be a statelevel decision, but because the

vaccines are approved by the FDA under its Emergency Use Authorization it’s a bit different than other mandated vaccines like the measles vaccine. “Any requirement in terms of entry to school would be a statewide conversation, but I don’t think they can require it if it’s not a permanent approval,” she said. Teacher Liz Quadrozzi had also asked earlier in the meeting about getting students back at the middle school and high school sooner. “We have kids at the secondary schools who want to return for four days as they’ve been told that they can, but the barriers are transportation and space in the building in terms of lunch and times in the schedule where they’re all together,” she said. “It seems like something that should have been worked out before the four days a week option was offered.” None of the board members had a specific answer in terms of plans to address those issues, but a handful said that it’s been an ongoing discussion. It remains unclear whether or not additional students will return to the classroom this school year. “Our ultimate goal is to get everyone back into the building as quickly as we can and responsibly and safely,” board member Chris Malcolm said. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Police Department, Tompkins County Sheriff ’s Office, Common Council and County Legislature to establish the framework for implementation of the 17 approved recommendations shared by the city and county, as well as identify and facilitate the next steps for community engagement. The two city-only recommendations will be the focus of a city task force. Legislator Rich John, who heads up the Public Safety Committee (which approved the funds in April), said that at the May 20 public safety meeting there will be more defined information about the roles, including specific job descriptions and “everything else we need to know.” Legislator Mike Lane said he’s “not hearing a lot of great things” about the Community Justice Center in his district (district 14, eastern portion of

town of Dryden), and said he views it more of a help to the city than the county. “How are these funds going to be administered? Are they pooled together in one fund? Who decides how they’re spent?” Lane asked. John said those details would be included in the update on May 20, but that the county will likely be in charge of the Community Justice Center, as the two employees will be county employees in a county office. “I’d push back in that the city is looking at ‘we pay city taxes and county taxes so we pay more than half,’” John said. “I don’t even want to get near that argument. A 50-50 share is reasonable.” Legislator Deborah Dawson added that the funds up for approval are just for salaries and continued on page 7


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

Ups Spring finally feels like spring! After an unseasonably cool start to May, the warm and sunny weather is a nice change. Downs Police are looking for a woman who may have been involved in an assault after a person was set on fire inside of a parked car. See Ithaca.com for a photo and contact IPD with information

HEARD&SEEN

.

Heard Local Non-profit OAR is offering informational and sign up sessions for people hesitant about the COVID-19 vaccine every Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. through June 19 at 910 W State St. in Ithaca. Seen We highly recommend heading to Stewart Park for a walk and looking at all the fuzzy baby geese walking around. They’re pretty cute.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own grievances or praise, write news@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Are you feeling like Ben and Jennifer or more like Bill and Melinda?

R ally

Protesters gather in support of Palestine, against US aid of Israel

“F

ree Palestine! Free free Palestine!” These chants rose loudly from the crowd at Bernie Milton Pavilion in Ithaca on the afternoon of May 16, as residents gathered to show support for Palestinians in Gaza as they exchange hostilities with Israel. “In Gaza it’s a time of shock and mourning of the dead and wounded,” Beth Harris of Ithaca Jewish Voice for Peace

said. “Entire families have been killed, high rise residences have been crumbled. Today we deplore the catastrophic loss of Palestinian life.” The New York Times currently puts the death toll at 145 in Gaza and 12 in Israel as the tensions grow and rockets fly between the sides. Rally-goers in Ithaca called for an end to the “racialized violence” and called on supporters to sign a petition that would end U.S.

Beth Haris hosted speakers at a rally in support of Palestine on May 16 (photo: Casey Martin)

military funding to Israel and support H.R. 2950, a bill that calls for an end to “U.S. funding of Israel’s oppression of Palestinians.” The petition also wants to hold Israel accountable by supporting sanctions on Israel until it complies with international law and ends its apartheid regime, and uplift Palestinian calls for freedom by “centering those most harmed by violence and oppression” and “support their right to resist Israel’s ethnic cleansing.” Harris called the current conflict a “watershed moment of Palestinian resistance.” The protest was sponsored

by Ithaca Committee for Justice in Palestine, Ithaca Jewish Voice for Peace, CODEPINK, Episcopal Peace Fellowship, VFP Ithaca, Interfaith Veterans Fellowship of Reconciliation, Finger Lakes Veterans Peace Coalition, Ithaca DSA, PSL Finger Lakes, Ithaca Catholic Worker, Tompkins County Antiracist Coalition and United Methodist Upper NY Annual Conference Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/ Israel. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

Choose your own mask/social distancing/ adventure. Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

ITHACA NOTES

Cora Yao: A Little Girl from Southeastern Texas C

The Underground Railroad By St e ph e n Bu r k e

By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s

ora Yao was born to a large, close, switchboard…I grew up knowing women loving family in Beaumont, Texas, could do a lot! 15 miles from the Louisiana border. “We lived in Jackson, Mississippi dur“My 3 siblings and I had a blast! Our yard ing my elementary school years, where backed onto our grandmothmy father and his brother er’s yard. Her father, my great worked for an air condigrandfather, a carpenter, was tioning and refrigeration always around fixing things, business. We were surand sometimes ‘Papa’ would rounded by cousins, aunts sneak us treats. We were a and uncles and new friends. close family, and my memoWe would play outside till ries were happy ones. dark and then race in for “My great grandfather dinner. All the parents in was a lay minister, and the neighborhood kept we loved going to Sunday watch over all the kids, and School, studying, and hearwe understood the expectaing ancient stories from the tions they had for all the Cora Yao First Baptist Church. Our kids. Even with four kids family was the center of our and work my mother played universe and this family piano in our home, and it support and love gave us great comfort was quite a feat to bring that baby grand and confidence...I still feel it today. along with us when we moved from Texas “My grandmother was a WWII piowhen I was 5. neer with Southwestern Bell Telephone “Next stop was New Orleans, where Company. She is photographed wearing my father worked for [General Electric]. a dashing hat and high heels with her continued on page 7 gang of women workers ‘manning’ the

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he Finger Lakes region of New York is an important place in the history of struggles against oppression in the United States. In 1848 the region hosted the nation’s first convention for women’s rights, in Seneca Falls, at the northwestern end of Cayuga Lake. Fifteen miles east is Auburn, which was a vital hub of the Underground Railroad, a network of escape routes for enslaved African Americans in the early to mid-19th century. Auburn was the last home, and is the final resting place, of Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery and became known as “the Moses of her people” as a leader of the abolitionist movement generally and the Underground Railroad particularly. The struggle against slavery is poised for new entry into cultural consciousness this month with the debut of “The Underground Railroad,” a streaming television series on Amazon Prime Video. The broadcast is based on the eponymous novel by Colson Whitehead, a bestseller that won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Barry Jenkins directed the much-anticipated adaptation. Jenkins is an acclaimed filmmaker who in 2016 directed “Moonlight,” winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture. The New York Times calls the 10-hour series “a technically, artistically, and morally potent work, a visual tour de force worthy of Whitehead’s imaginative one.” Whitehead’s fiction depicts the Underground Railroad mythologically, as a distinct physical entity running beneath the soil from southern states to the north. The book has thus been described by some reviewers as fabulistic, speculative fiction or alternate history. Whitehead’s central metaphor, or actually his negation of any, gives him license to move subjects through space, time, consciousness and reality incongruously, illustrating the almost unfathomable distance and difference between slave and free states (of the nation and of being), the legal acceptance of the most horrific crimes against humanity, and the torturous oppression and proximity of death always for an enslaved people in a nation that somehow proclaims liberty and equality its founding principles. Whatever its alternate conception, the book is painstakingly exact in its portrayal of broad brutality, repression and persecution cast singularly and collectively among its subjects. In an afterward Whitehead acknowledges, among others, “Frederick Douglass, obviously.” Like Harriet Tubman, his friend and colleague, Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in Maryland. Like her, he

escaped slavery and came to reside in central New York. Tubman’s work was largely furtive. In the decade before the Civil War, soon after her own escape in 1849, Tubman aided or personally made scores of surreptitious trips to the south to bring hundreds of enslaved African Americans north, at penalty of death. During the Civil War, she worked as a spy for Union forces. Douglass’s work was more open. In 1845 he wrote an autobiography, “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave,” which was widely read in the U.S. and abroad. He became a noted political figure, orator and writer. In 1847 he founded a newspaper, the North Star, which he published from the basement of the Memorial AME Zion Church in his adopted home of Rochester, New York. In Ithaca, the AME Zion Church has significant historical roots. St. James AME Zion Church is Ithaca’s oldest church. It stands on Cleveland Avenue, built in 1836 in the heart of Southside, Ithaca’s traditional African American neighborhood. The Ithaca church is among the oldest in the AME Zion system, which was founded by African Americans in 1821 in New York City, and now has over a million congregants nationwide. Ithaca’s St. James Church was a crucial component of the Underground Railroad. Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass both visited. In ways, Ithaca can be a self-contained place. Its “central isolation” is a wellknown cliche. In decades living here, I have been to Rochester twice, for instance. I don’t know anyone there. I know one person in Auburn, but he moved there from here. As it happens, the first social media notice I saw from him of his (recent) move there was a photo he took of Harriet Tubman’s grave. Tubman’s tombstone is stirring in its starkness. It is without ornamentation, bearing only her name. I have been to Auburn once, to see Tubman’s house. I did not visit her at rest, at least not technically. The official tour of Tubman’s home is brief. It is a humble structure. The staircase and doorways are narrow, the ceilings low and its rooms smaller and fewer than modern houses. I entered the house as the last of five visitors. I closed the front door behind me. There came a sound from the latch. continued on page 7


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS Contin u ed From Page 6

He had a special talent for fixing things and had his choice of jobs. In [New Orleans] in middle school, I met a mix of Cajun French, Catholics, Jews, African Americans and glimpsed how much more cosmopolitan life was in cities. “Our mother and we four kids sang in the First Baptist Church Choir, which led to choir trips in nearby states. Benjamin Franklin Senior High was [New Orlean’s] first magnet school, and after that I attended Louisiana State University (LSU). Three years of my Nursing program were taught in New Orleans, where nearby, my future husband was studying engineering at Tulane University. We married and he joined the Air Force. “We lived in Kansas until my daughter Jamie was born and my husband went to Vietnam. Jamie and I lived with my parents until we could be reunited, then we headed on to Florida and Mississippi. Karen was born in Biloxi [Mississippi], shortly after Hurricane Camille subsided, after living in the concrete shelters. Biloxi was our last southern assignment. I was happy to have good neighbors, and for two blocks all the backyards were available to all the kids for a common play area. Everyone helped each other, and the kids and mothers had fun. “Germany, in 1970, was my first move outside the south. For the next four years we got to know the villages of Morbach, Sembach and Wiesbaden, living in private housing for much of our time. The girls could walk to the bakery in the village, and we could all stop at the pub. We got to know our villagers. During our last year in Germany, I returned to my nursing career, working in maternal and child nursing in labor and delivery, savoring the new babies and offering support to new parents. “Our next assignment was the Pentagon, and while living in Virginia I worked in our county’s Health Department as a school nurse each morning, and offered public health clinics each afternoon. This enabled me to reach children and families who otherwise might not have a health safety net for care. “During this time, I obtained a master’s degree in nursing in maternal and child nursing from Catholic University,

which had a terrific nursing program. Over time I was recruited to join other medical professionals who consulted on issues of quality and standards of care, best practices. “Over the years I joined Blue Cross/ Blue Shield’s medical review team and stayed on for 19 years. We audited hospital departments for fraud and abuse, as well as provided education on billing practices. Later I consulted Medicare staff. “In 2009 I retired at 65 to live in Ithaca, near my younger daughter and her marvelous family. Just like when I was a child, my family is nearby, and my grandsons can walk to my house around the corner and we can be together often. “I loved Ithaca as soon as I was unpacked, and I have spent time supporting the Ithaca Kitchen Cupboard to address food insecurity, to feed the hungry. Through Area Congregations Together (ACT) I have been part of solving community issues. By bringing together the talents of individuals of various faiths, solutions evolved that are acceptable to more people in need. Through monthly meetings ACT shares amazing local resources with liaisons from many congregations. I have again been able to work with people of all religions, creeds, beliefs, and backgrounds. “I continue my medical consulting business as well. Not a month goes by that someone does not call me about an abrupt hospital discharge of a patient in need of care and questions about Medicare and insurance coverage. Understanding the intersection of Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance and the vast resources available to assist patients in need has enabled me to assist many people to understand their options and their rights. “Since I was a child in a small southeastern Texas town, I have had a wonderful time in each chapter of life. I’ve met fine people, had lots of fun, and have been able to share what I have and what I know to help people I have met along the way. I always felt loved by God and my family and I have felt so blessed. My Mother encouraged us to share our bounty, to reach out to others, and to be open to all views…I have traveled a long way from my birth to reach Ithaca, but this feels like home now. Neighbors, friends, and St. John’s Church keep me involved and feeling the goodness of community.”

JUSTICE CENTER Contin u ed From Page 4

the expenses of the office, not for funds stemming from implementation. “Any expenditure like that would come before the Legislature and Common Council,” she said. County Administrator Jason Molino also confirmed that there was no definite location chosen for the Community Justice Center yet, but that the Mental Health Building is one location being considered. He also clarified that the $144,380 is one

year’s worth of funding, but that the idea is the Community Justice Center is a two-year initiative, so the Legislature and committees can expect another request the following year. Ultimately, the committee passed the funding unanimously. The full County Legislature will vote on it on May 18, after the Ithaca Times goes to print. Check Ithaca.com for updates. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

THE TALK AT

YOUR LETTERS Re: ICSD Budget

T

he 6% budget increase is about five times the applicable cost of living rate. Way too high. And the NYS cap is supposed to be a maximum not a target. As the Board went to the very last dollar of the cap it is clear the budget is based on going as high as the cap allows, not district needs. Costs due to salary increases and due largely to bargaining union contracts and the Board has agreed to high numbers. They control what they offer. The Board of course focuses on the tax rate. What they don't say is they are absorbing for themselves the large increase in assessments due to assessment increases and new buildings. There is a half million dollar increase in administration. And they are adding three million to the fund balance. Finally, and most importantly, they are using one time federal revenues. If you approve the budget, when these revenues dry up the overall budget spending will not, violating a cardinal rule of fiscal prudence. When you vote, consider these things and vote NO on the budget, proposition 1 on the ballot. -Henry Kramer, via Ithaca.com

Re: Ithaca is Tenants!

T

he chief reason why rents are so high here is because of the government. All the landlord's costs must be passed onto the renters if the landlord stands to make a profit. Even when the landlord receives government subsidies, the costs are still transferred to the renters in the form of either higher taxes or inflation. The costs to local landlords have increased in recent years due to: 1) New regulations including the Residential Rental Permit requirements. 2) Higher maintenance costs. Lumber prices or example are 4x what they were a year ago, and there is scarcity of skilled craftsman since the government is paying people not to work thanks to Covid bailouts, unemployment benefits, and government issued loans that don't need to be paid back. 3) Higher property taxes, due to higher assessments combined with higher rates of government spending. The higher home prices stem from increased demand from wealthy people fleeing large Democrat run dysfunctional cities, where crime and tax rates are soaring. Yet they alienate, disparage, disrespect and defund the very people who would decrease crime. 4) Less competition among landlords as the new regulations disproportionately hurt smaller landlord business compared May

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to big ones who can more easily comply with onerous laws, and who also receive subsidies in the form of "affordable" housing contracts. 5) Decreased purchasing power of the US dollar. The value of money is determined by the quantity in circulation, as well as its velocity (how often and how much of that particular currency is transacted). The US government via the FED has engaged in destructive amounts of money printing, deficit spending, and over a decade of essentially zero percent interest rates (which have also pushed asset prices like homes much higher, due to easier to obtain mortgages for larger sums of money). Furthermore, capital reserve requirements for financial institutions are incredibly low, allowing them to loan out at least 10x more money than they actually have. All this has resulted in huge amounts of money flowing through our economy, creating massive asset bubbles everywhere, including the stock market, housing market, higher education, etc. Bottom line; inflation has is finally lead to higher prices of everything, and it will only get much worse. Despite this, hoardes of misguided uninformed voters will continue to demand more government "solutions" rather than recognizing that those "solutions" are actually the root cause of the very problems we're facing. -Richard Ballantyne, via Ithaca.com

Write to us! Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

ITHACA NOTES Contin u ed From Page 6

I turned as the door creaked open, then stopped. No one was there. I must have looked startled, at least somewhat. The tour guide looked over to address me. “Oh, that’s alright, don’t worry about that. That’s just Harriet,” she said. I looked at the guide. She was smiling, but just slightly, professionally. Beyond that she looked placid and completely sincere.

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WATERFRONT ALCHEMY

VISIUM

FINGER LAKES DEVELOPMENT

ISLAND REAL ESTATE middle-income housing and retail from water

A conceptually rendered view of the Anchor and Stays on Inlet Island, as seen from the west. The layout of the site prioritizes green open space along the Flood Con Channel and existing Cay 8 trol uga Waterfront Trail whi le accommodating the circ needs of a working waterfr ulation ont. Both the Anchor and the Stays will benefit from and access to the water. Pub views lic amenities along the Cay uga Waterfront Trail will enhanced as part of this plan be . The solar panel microgrid on the roofs of the existing Finger Lakes Boating Cen ter and the new proposed buildings are seen here as wel.

Three developers vie for the opportunity to build on Ithaca’s Inlet Island By Ta n n e r H a r di ng

I

nlet Island is up for grabs, and three developers have made their case to the city about why they’re the best company for the job with the best plan for the site. The city of Ithaca through the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency (IURA) put out a request for expressions of interest (RFEI) in March with an early April deadline, and on May 11 the three contenders presented their ideas. The RFEI stated its goal is to redevelop underutilized public lands and seeks projects that improve the physical, social and economic characteristics of the site and surrounding area. 8  T

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The site is the 2.65-acre waterfront site that includes 410-446 Taughannock Blvd. and the auxiliary Coast Guard building. The RFEI specifically called for plans that support Plan Ithaca’s waterfront plan chapter adopted in 2019, including mixed-use, opportunities for housing at all income levels, public access to waterfront, better multi-modal connections and a vibrant waterfront. Currently, the site mainly comprises a 120-space public parking lot and boat storage. The three developers who presented ideas for the site are Strategic Elements &

19–25,

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Waterfront Alchemy, Visium Development Group, and Finger Lakes Development. Moving forward, the IURA’s Economic Development Committee will hold a public comment period regarding the projects on June 8. They will also go over scoring for the projects and make a recommendation for the full IURA. On June 24, the IURA will hold a public hearing and possibly make a recommendation for a preferred developer. On July 20, the Planning and Economic Development Committee of the Common Council will hold its own public hearing, and then the project will go to vote

in front of the entire Common Council on Aug. 4. STRATEGIC ELEMENTS & WATERFRONT ALCHEMY

To anyone who follows development in Ithaca, the names associated with this project will sound familiar. Lincoln Morse leads this project’s team, with support from Guy Gridley from Cambria Hotel’s real estate team and Noah Demarest, founder of STREAM Collaborative Architecture. Morse said that for years he’s referred to the Cayuga waterfront as a necklace upon which to place jewels, and that Inlet Is-


dFEI RFEI Submission Submission

land is the crown jewel, gleaming brightly among the gems that are GreenStar, the Farmers Market, Stewart Park and Cayuga Medical Center. His proposal includes 48 one-bedroom apartments for the “missing middle” income housing, a 122-room Cambria hotel, 10,000 square feet of first-floor retail space, view from Route 89 bridge 3,000 square feet of marina storage and launch site, a new public pier and 33,300 square feet of new public park space. The middle-income housing would target households making 80-100% of area median income, which is a range of about $48,000-$60,000, and Morse said he could envision people working at the places along the waterfront as possible tenants. Gridley said that Cambria had been eyebike/kayak rental and public restrooms ing Ithaca as a market for about three years Inlet Island Revitalization to see if the city would be a good fit. “We’re very specific on where these hotels go,” he said. “They’re not roadside motels, not lower end cookie cutter hotels. They’re boutique hotels with the backing of a strong brand. Ithaca is the right type of market for these hotels […] There are not many places comparable to Ithaca as far as what’s needed for a successful hotel project. STRATEGIC ELEMENTS & WATERFRONT ALCHEMY’S PROPOSAL There’s hiking, a waterfront, the arts scene, To p : v i e w f r o m R o u t e 8 9 b r i d g e . B e l ow: N o a h D e m a r e s t, restaurants, then world class higher educaL i n c o n M o r s e a n d C r a i g M o d i s h e r ( P h o t o : C a s e y M a r t i n) tion. It really has everything a hotel developer would look for.” Demarest said the buildings were carefully thought through and designed for the site in an effort to create a hospitality core. He added that in an effort to maintain already existing parking and reduce costs, they will improve the parking lot already on the site. “We intend to upgrade it, but we’re not reinventing the wheel,” he said. “We’re working off the footprint already there.” The proposal also outlined other community benefits, such as increasing waterfront access for locals and visitors, creating 50-100 construction jobs, creating 60-70 long-term hospitality and retail jobs and creating parking income for the city and property tax income for the city, school district and county. Doug Dylla, a member of the IURA’s Economic Development Committee, asked how the project might integrate with the Cayuga Waterfront Trail for pedestrian and cycling access. “The obvious one is the connection right under the bridge,” Demarest said. “The infrastructure is already in place.” In an answer to a question about waterfront improvements, Morse reiterated his commitment to providing access to the water.

“We would bring that capital to the table to create what we call the rental marina there,” he said. “We’re not looking at large boat infrastructure, that already exists, but public access to the water for paddle craft and all forms of small recreation boats.” He said that ultimately he hopes all the aspects of the project come together to cre-

ate an “economic engine” that will benefit both visitors and residents. VISIUM DEVELOPMENT GROUP

Perhaps best known for their handful of buildings on College Avenue or the Neighborhood of the Arts project on Cherry Street, Visium Development Group decid-

VISIUM DEVELOPEMNT GROUP’S PROPOSAL

N

Sketch Sketch views views of the of the Stays Stays (left) (left) andand the the Anchor Anchor (right) (right) building building facades. facades. Both Both buildings buildings make make ample ample use use of available of available natural natural light, light, views, views, andand access access to the to the water. water. Balconies Balconies andand large large window window openings openings are are an integral an integral partpart of the of the experience experience of each of each building. building. Facade Facade materials materials are are envisioned envisioned as high-quality, as high-quality, durable, durable, andand inspired inspired by materials by materials found found in and in and around around the the Marina Marina andand Ithaca’s Ithaca’s West West EndEnd context. context. Layers Layers of color of color andand material, material, as well as well as landscape as landscape elements, elements, aidaid in bringing in bringing the the building building forms forms to atohuman a human scale. scale.

FINGER LAKES DEVELOPMENT’S PROPOSAL

continued on page 10

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ed to go all-in with affordable housing on the Inlet Island site. Patrick Braga, Visium’s vice president of development, presented a plan that included three mixed income residential buildings with about 120-125 units, including studios, one-bedrooms, two-bedrooms and three-bedrooms. The units would serve households making between 30-100% of area median income (AMI), making the estimated range $18,000-$60,000. There would be roughly 5% of units at the 30% AMI range, 25% at 50% AMI, 25% at 60% AMI, 20% at 80% AMI and 25% at 100% AMI. In their submitted proposal this breaks down to four units, 32 units, 31 units, 24 units and 32 units respectively. The plan also included a public park, 11 the retention of the auxiliary Coast Guard building, a Main Street style retail block, a three-level parking garage, a complete streets makeover of Taughannock Boulevard and a staircase that connects the Taughannock Boulevard (Route 89) bridge down to the Cayuga Waterfront Trail. “The waterfront has seen a lot of interest from market rate and luxury development, so as a counterpoint we propose something truly inclusionary,” Braga said. The income ranges would be spread evenly through the three buildings, which in plans are shown set slightly askew for visual interest. The public park also had a modern twist, fractured into distorted, oblong pieces and separated by walking paths. The complete streets makeover of the boulevard would include shade trees, an ADA-compliant sidewalk, raised crosswalks, a floating bus stop with shelter and 60 on-street parking spaces. Dylla said he felt the residential buildings and parking garage were a bit boxy, and asked if they could be “treated more interestingly.” He also asked if there would be retail at the ground level. Braga explained that there is 5,400 square feet designated for retail on the Main Street block, but added that there is a challenge because of the low-income housing tax credits. “It gets complicated when you try to do mixed-use with for-profit retail,” he said. However, Braga added that they were exploring the option of activating ground floors in other ways, such as with community spaces, non-profit spaces or gyms. Alderperson George McGonigal asked if there would be playgrounds for any families residing in the buildings, and Braga ac-

Inlet Inlet Island Island RFEI RFEI Submission Submission

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INLET ISLAND Contin u ed From Page 9

knowledged daycare could be a good fit for the ground floor programming. Dylla also pointed out that the two other proposals include hotels. “In general, many of us have viewed this site as an obvious location for a hotel on the waterfront,” he said. “Why did you choose not to go that route?” Braga said the development team at Visium believes public land should be used to

meet the most pressing public need, “which is affordable housing,” he said. Committee member Charlie Hamilton asked if there was going to be access to the water for the public. Braga said they hadn’t explored that, but it could be possible. FINGER LAKES DEVELOPMENT

The third and final project was presented by developer Steve Flash, the owner and operator of Finger Lakes Boating Center on Inlet Island. This development team comprises developer Jeff Rimland who is

developing the Ithacan tower on the Green Street Garage project, as well as Nick and Costa Lambrou of Lambrou Real Estate which is developing nearby City Harbor, and the Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services (INHS). This proposal has two separate buildings, one called The Anchor, and the other The Stays. The Anchor would be an affordable housing unit, with 50-56 affordable units serving a range of 30-120% of AMI. Each unit would have its own private balcony, and the ground floor would have ame-

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nity space. The building would be managed by INHS. “It’s an exciting opportunity to provide high-quality, mixed-income housing on Inlet Island,” Joe Bowes from INHS said. The Stays would be what Flash called a “hometel,” with 78-90 units for extended stays. “It’s not exactly apartments but not exactly a hotel,” Flash said. “Each unit will have a kitchen and washer and dryer so you have to do your own dishes and laundry, and you can stay for a few days, a week, a month, or months.” He said he could see The Stays being an attractive option for locals looking for a waterfront staycation, visiting college professors, or as intermittent housing for folks looking for a permanent place to live in the area. Developers plan for 10% of The Stays’ units to be two-bedroom, 25% studio and 65% one-bedroom. All will have balconies, some private and some shared with a divider. The site would also include amenities like a dog park, playground, picnic lawns, an outdoor plaza and 225 parking spaces. The buildings would also have flat roofs to allow for solar panels, and there will be waterfront trail connections and sidewalks to encourage pedestrian and bicycle transportation. The Coast Guard auxiliary building would also be maintained and improved. Flash also added that they are proposing a dock at the north end of the island for public use.


Sports

Impressed, But Not Surprised By Ste ve L aw re nc e

F

or those tuning into the coverage of the 2020 Olympic Games later this year, the chances of hearing “… an alumnus of Cornell University” just increased, as Taylor Knibb — Cornell class of ’20 — just punched her ticket to Tokyo by winning the World Triathlon Championship Series race in Yokohama, Japan. With the victory, Knibb earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team. Those aware of Knibb’s performances over the past few years are not surprised by her success, given she is a two-time U.S. Junior National Triathlon Champion. Just 23, she becomes the youngest woman triathlete to ever represent Team USA at the Olympic Games. While at Cornell, Knibb was a two-time Academic All American, a two-time First Team All-Ivy League selection, and, according to Cornell’s website, Knibb “won the NCAA Elite 88 Award in cross country for the highest grade point average of all competing at the NCAA National Championships in 2018.” And, as if being an Academic All American and an elite Division I runner

Taylor Knibb

left her feeling like she could add something else to her plate, Knibb walked onto the Big Red swimming and diving team in 2019, and put up points at the 2020 Ivy League Swimming and Diving Championships. I caught up with Mike Henderson — now in his fourth season as the Alan B.

'53 and Elizabeth Heekin Harris Head are held later this year. Winkler made the Coach of Women's Track & Field/Men's 2016 team while still enrolled at Cornell. and Women's Cross Country at Cornell Henderson and I spoke about the — who called Knibb “a joy to work with.” pride that accompanies watching Cornell He added, “Everyone who knows Taylor athletes make the U.S. Olympic Team is aware of her motivation, her drive and (wrestler Kyle Dake earned his spot last her competitive spirit, so no, we are not month), and the coach said, “Not only are surprised. Impressed, but not surprised.” they world-class athletes, we all know that Looking back at Knibb’s final act at they have made incredible sacrifices to get Cornell, Henderson said, “She finished the where they are. That’s why we celebrate.” swimming season and jumped right into ● ● ● the indoor track season with little (specific) preparation, but she did well and was Congrats to the Ithaca College women’s preparing for a fantastic outdoor season.” lacrosse team, as the Bombers made an That was in the spring of 2020, and we all impressive playoff run after suffering know what happened next… their first loss of the season in the Liberty After graduating, Knibb turned her League championship game. The selection considerable focus to full-time traincommittee deemed the Bombers worthy ing, and she is now residing in Colorado, where she can better access the U.S. Olym- of an NCAA tournament spot, and the Bombers proved they belonged there, as pic Training Center. I asked Henderson if evidenced by the impressive takedown Knibb’s cycling was as strong as her Division I swimming and running capabilities, of #2 Washington and Lee in the Quarterfinals. The Bombers won two NCAA and he said, “She is a very elite cyclist — it has always been her strongest event — and playoff games in one season for the first if she wasn’t a triathlete I believe she’d be a time ever, and finished at 14-2. world-class cyclist.” ● ● ● The Cornell track teams were on the bus returning from a meet last weekend, A couple of weeks ago, I shared (Ithaca and virtually every phone was tuned into High softball coach) Gordy Begent’s Knibb’s triathlon. She was in control for prediction that junior pitcher Jenna Plue most of the race, but as Henderson said, would be bringing the heat this season, “You never know… a flat tire can change and that is indeed the case. In back-toeverything.” back games last week, Plue struck out 18 The team will also be pulling for Big batters on Friday, and followed up the next Red alum Rudy Winkler, the hammer day with another 15 Ks. That’s bringin’ it. thrower who will be vying for his second broberts;Boston;HSC Associates Heating & Air Conditioning;A93943-537939;4.9x2.7-4c (21Sp-B2) Olympic team roster spot when the Trials Make no payments for 6 months when you finance a new Lennox® system for as little as

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Cornell

HedTK

Author Roxane Gay to speak at Cornell commencement Bl aine Fr ie dl and e r

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uthor and cultural critic Roxane Gay – whose writing explores feminism, race, body image, her own life, contemporary social topics and fiction – will be the Cornell Senior Convocation speaker for the 153rd graduating class, the Convocation Committee for the university’s Class of 2021 announced May 13. Gay will give the virtual Convocation address on Friday, May 28 at 8:30 p.m., streamed on live.alumni.cornell.edu. The live virtual Convocation address will be accessible to only Cornell students, faculty, alumni and staff. The recording will be posted on CornellCast by early June. Following Convocation, the university’s Commencement ceremonies will take place in four installments Saturday, May 29 and Sunday, May 30. After the seniors endured nearly three semesters of a global pandemic, the

needle of societal change in a certain direction,” said Hassaan Bin Sabir ’21, committee chair. “Roxane Gay has reached great heights being true to her own story and expressing her own voice.” Sarah Brice ’21, a public relations chair on the committee, said Gay’s combination of inspiration and verity made her a strong choice. “This academic year has been like no other,” she said. “The seniors sought a speaker who would applaud us and inspire us as we enter the ‘real world’ – motivating us to follow our dreams and create change – but also to be real with us.” Gay is a contributor to The New York Times and Georgia@ithacatimes.com 607-277-7000 a visitingx220 professor at Yale Roxane Gay University. In her newly Newspaper: established online Masterclass, she teaches writing for cconvocation committee sought to define social change. the graduating class in order to pinpoint a Her writing has appeared in Best speaker. The group saw its class as resilAmerican Short Stories 2012, A Public ient, empathetic, creative, revolutionary Space, McSweeney’s, Tin House, Ameriand possessing integrity. can Short Fiction and Virginia Quarterly Gay, committee members said, blends Review. those attributes. “In her writing, she has Gay’s first novel, “An Untamed State” embodied authenticity, while shifting the (2014), tells the story of a Haitian-Amer-

Ithaca Times/Fingerlakes News

by Betsy Schermerhorn Director, Marketing and Admissions

TRY RESISTANCE FOR BETTER RESILIENCE When it comes to exercise many seniors consider their daily walk enough to keep them healthy. While walking can be an excellent cardio workout on a daily basis, adding resistance training a few times a week can build resilience, overcome the natural loss of muscle mass, and increase agility and stability in a way cardio alone cannot. However, it is not a good idea to simply run out, purchase resistance equipment, and start working out. It is important that your program be designed specifically for your condition and abilities by a professional. You may find the right personal trainer at your local gym, or try working with a certified physical therapist.

—Heather McDaniel President, Ithaca Area Economic Development

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ican woman (like Gay) who survives kidnapping. Kirkus Reviews called the novel a “cutting and resonant debut.” That same year, “Bad Feminist,” a collection of Gay’s essays, became a New York Times bestseller. In 2016, Gay wrote Marvel Comics’ “Black Panther: World of Wakanda.” Her “Difficult Women” (2017), a national bestseller, told stories of unforgettable women. “Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body” (2017) mined her own emotional struggles with obesity to explore society’s shared anxieties. “At its simplest, it’s a memoir about being fat – Gay’s preferred term – in a hostile, fat-phobic world,” reviewer Carina Chocano wrote in the New York Times. “At its most symphonic, it’s an intellectually rigorous and deeply moving exploration of the ways in which trauma, stories, desire, language and metaphor shape our experiences and construct our reality.” Gay earned her bachelor’s degree at Norwich University in Vermont; a master’s degree at the University of Nebraska; and a doctorate at Michigan Technological University. Client: “Our class sought a speaker who would not only celebrate with us, but use her own experiences and perspective on the true challenges and opportunities to empower us,” Brice said. “The Class of 2021 is diverse in identity, background, experience – and we believe the graduates will be energized by Roxane Gay.”

Strengthening the body’s largest muscle groups through functional movement will translate to improved performance at daily tasks such as climbing stairs, carrying groceries, and playing with grandchildren. If you’re new to strength training, don’t worry about equipment. Focus on performing exercises using your bodyweight to so you can learn proper form before adding extra challenges like equipment. Call the marketing team at (607) 266-5300 to schedule a tour to see our facilities and learn more about lifecare at Kendal at Ithaca. Find us on the web at http://kai.kendal.org/ P.S Resistance and weight training can be an excellent tool for coping with chronic conditions such as sarcopenia and frailty.

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‘THE FLOATING BRIDGE’

Japanese ceramics exhibit in Syracuse bridges generational gap

L

By A rt h u r Wh itm a n

ong known for clay, the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse renewed its devotion to the medium in the ‘70s. Under the recently deceased director Ronald Kuchta (1935-2020), the museum made a strong commitment to ceramics as a contemporary art.

Now extended through July 4, “The Floating Bridge: Postmodern and Contemporary Japanese Ceramics” explores a roughly two decade period when the museum’s collecting priorities converged with a generational shift in the way many of the country’s ceramists conceived their art. Artists born in the middle decades of the twentieth century shifted away from the self-conscious folk traditionalism that defined the previous generation. They embraced a then radical individualism as well as a cavalcade of international influences. Assembled by the Everson’s ceramic curator Garth Johnson and drawn primarily from the museum’s extensive collections “Floating Bridge” aims to link this broadly defined postwar generation — emblematized by Sodeisha, an association founded in 1948 and dissolved

50 years later — with work being made by younger artists today. Despite the avowed individualism and radicalism of many of these artists, variations on familiar vessel forms abound. These range from quite traditional to distinctly avantgarde. Other Japanese ceramists of the period delved into abstract and surrealist sculpture. Two “Form of the Earth” stoneware pieces (1988) by Shiro Hayami (b. 1927) combine joined pillow-like forms with subtle but rich facture. The Japanese-born American ceramist Jun Kaneko (b. 1942) is known for his exploration of painterly surface effects — an approach he puts to compelling use in “Sanbon Ashi No. continued on page 14

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Arts&Entertainment

An Unselfish Articulation of Form” by Nakamura Kimpei in 1989

I t h a c a T i m e s   13


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1” (1960-68), a three-legged stoneware creature of sorts. Other ceramists here respond to characteristically post-modern art movements such as assemblage, Funk Art, Pop Art, and Process Art. Mishima Kimiyo (b. 1932) and Nakamura Kimpei (b. 1935) both deploy trompe l’eoil (“fool-the-eye”) technique to parody contemporary mass culture. The latter’s “An Unselfish Articulation of Form” (1989), in earthenware, is a stunning piece of realistic mock assemblage. On-loan from the Syracuse University Art Museum, a small selection of vessels highlight the mingei (“folk craft”) aesthetic popular in the early to mid-twentieth century. With their rustic, austere surfaces and conservative forms, they illustrate a point of departure for the more eclectic approaches here. Pieces by acknowledged masters Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) and Kawai Kanjiro (1890-1966) fit unobtrusively alongside works by anonymous potters working in traditional kiln centers. Contemporary works borrowed from the Jason Jacques Gallery in New York City bring the (loose) historical narrative into the twenty-first century. Born in the seventies and eighties, these young ceramists often eschew any readily identifiable sign of Japanese identity or tradition. Working in porcelain, Katsuyo Aoki (b. 1972), engages in elaborate Baroque pastiche — that well-worn postmodern trope — while Osamu Kojima (b. 1973) mimics geological landscape in stoneware and glass. More compelling is an untitled porcelain and stone piece (2015) by Takuro Kuwata (b. 1981), one of the

A large piece of artwork by Japanese artist Sadashi Inuzuka

most influential younger artists, displaying his signature punk insouciance. Atop a wrinkled, golden colored mound rests a painterly rainbow splash — crowned by what resembles a turd. … Finishing up this week (through May 21) at Point of Contact Gallery near Armory Square, a section of the Syracuse University graduating MFA student exhibition “Carrying the Thick Present” devoted to “fabulation” is also worthy of notice. (The other two, covering “intimacy” and “trauma,” are not open to the general public due to COVID-19.) The show includes otherworldly, frequently compelling work in sculptural installation as well as video and film. I cannot do justice to the six young artists here but I wanted to highlight the work of Catherine Spencer, who is doing highly interesting work in the juncture between abstract painting, mixed-media sculpture, and installation. Covered in metallic sheeting and bathed in luridly colored lights, her walkin sculpture room “Subliminal Stimuli” has a glam, sci-fi aesthetic rooted in the work of Post-Minimalist artists like Eva Hesse and Keith Sonnier while nodding to contemporary digital culture. Larger individual sculptures, abstract but evoking the body, incorporate such unlikely materials as a broken sink base, garden cages, bed sheets, yarn, and electroluminescent wire — the latter offering a sense of “drawing” with light. Smaller foam pillows, spray-painted and “made special” with sequins and embroidery are scattered and suspended. All-in-all, an immersive object-setting, rich both in overall atmosphere and variously-scaled details that invite continued exploration and reverie.


Anime Artistry

Mega-manga mania By Br yan VanC ampe n

Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba

I

haven’t seen all that much manga and anime. I haven’t seen all of Hayao Miyazaki’s films by any means, but I have seen a few of the genre’s touchstone movies, like “Akira” and “Ghost in the Shell.” I also liked more recent entries like “Your Face” and “Weathering With You.” Truth be told, the real anime fan in the family is my cousin Brett; when I visited his place in Louisiana, he pretty much had a comfortable recliner, a giant TV and three boxes of

anime videos. His knowledge of the genre puts mine to shame. So, I don’t see flicks like “Demon Slayer - Kimetsu no Yaiba the Movie: Mugen Train” (Sony-Toho-Aniplex-Ufotable, 2020, 117 min.) every day. It’s one of the boldest, craziest blasts of comic kinetic energy I’ve ever seen. I’ve been going to the Elmira Drive-In for more than a decade and I can say that my weekend screening was hands-down the best audio-visual experience I’ve ever had there, the best

drive-in experience I’ve ever had. Constant Companion was in agreement; the sound and picture were immaculate. Directed by Haruo Sotozaki and written and produced by Ufotable, “Demon Slayer” is a theatrical sequel to a TV series on Netflix, but it works for newcomers as well. Five demon slayers board a Harry Potter-esque train in order to combat any demon attacks. The characters are helpfully color-coded: Tanjiro wears a green and black checkered cloak, Nezuko, a young girl, lives in a basket hauled by Zenitsu, a cowardly type clad in shades of dandelion, and Inosuke is a muscle-bound kid who wears a boar’s head. Then there’s The Flame, Hashira Kyōjurō Rengoku, the rock star of slayers. His entire clan has hair that looks like licks of fire, or autumn leaves. The slayers end up being put to sleep and imprisoned in their own dreams while the evil Emmu begins casting various spells. More than that I shall not reveal. The action and intrigue are well staged and sustained; there’s a lot of inner monologuing as the slayers ponder their own powers and bravery and weaknesses. I especially liked the way that each character’s emotional state is reflected in several different animation styles from realism to abstract to surrealism; each character seems to have about six to eight different ways of being seen. There’s nothing else out there quite like “Demon Slayer”. ● ● ●

“The Mitchells vs. the Machines” (Netflix-Columbia-Sony Pictures Animation-Lord Miller Productions-One Cool Films, 2021, 109 min.) was originally intended for theatrical release but due to COVID, it was sold to Netflix; see it on the best screen with the best sound that you can find. A mark of a great movie is how fresh and well-thought out it is despite a generic high concept premise. You think you’ve seen it before: a dysfunctional family battles an army of robots. But “The Mitchells vs. the Machines,” produced by Chris Miller and Phil Lord (“The Lego Movie”), is as funny, well-structured and surprising as the best Pixar movies. Katie Mitchell (Abbi Jacobson), the older daughter, is a classic misfit who can’t wait to escape her suffocating family — Danny McBride voices the dad, a dead ringer for comedian Brian Posehn, Maya Rudolph is the mousy mom, and director and co-writer Mike Rianda plays dinosaurobsessed younger brother Aaron — and go to film school and make movies. Her dad cancels her plane ticket and decides to take her across the country on one last family road trip. They stop at a dinosaur-themed rest stop when the robots attack. I wouldn’t want to spoil the way the plot unfolds, because the story is half the fun. Miller and Lord also produced “Spider-Man Into The Spider-Verse,” and “The Mitchells vs. the Machines” continues that style of all manner of styles crammed together with energy and style.

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Virtual Music Concerts/Recitals

5/21 Friday Concert: Al DiMeola (Rescheduled) | 8 p.m. Two Faced | 8 p.m. | Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. | $10.00 $25.00

5/22 Saturday Bon Jovi- An Encore Drive-In Nights Concert at Greek Peak Mountain Resort |

5/23 Sunday Cayuga Chamber Orchestra: The Return of the Orchestral Series | 3 p.m. | First Presbyterian Church, 315 N. Cayuga Street | $30.00

5/26 Wednesday The Wailers | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | $15.00 - $30.00

Stage Trap Door at South Side Community Center | 4 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Southside Community Center, S. Plain St. | Combines text, dialogue, music, and sound design to create an unforgettable theatrical experience on foot in Ithaca. Tickets at thecherry. org. Premieres 5/20 and will run Fridays thru Sundays, 5/21-5/30. Walks begin every fifteen minutes at the Southside Community Center in Downtown Ithaca. Regio (Royal) | 7:30 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Virtual | Contemporary dance, storytelling, and mojigangas, larger-than-life Mexican puppets, are used to uncover the experience of Latinx immigrant workers in meat factories impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Reserve your free ticket at schwartztickets.com. | Free Community Soup | 7 p.m., 5/24 Monday | Online (Zoom), online | Join Civic Ensemble for a storytelling event to build connection. | Free

Art “Bridges and Boats” Art Exhibition at North Star Art Gallery | 12 p.m., 5/21 Friday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road | This

exhibition opens May 1st and runs through June. It includes paintings of man made creations of boats and bridges in natural settings. | Free The Gallery at South Hill exhibit Andrew Paine paintings | 5 p.m., 5/21 Friday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gallery at South Hill exhibition of paintings by Andrew Paine. | Free

Film Blackbird Film Festival | 5/20 Thursday | SUNY Cortland, 21 Graham Avenue | | Free Virtual Cinemapolis: Dementia Part II | 5/21 Friday | Virtual | Suzanne wasn’t always this confused. She wasn’t always dead either – When an ex-con takes a job as a handyman for an unstable elderly woman to avoid a parole violation, it becomes a choice he may regret. Virtual Cinemapolis: Drunk Bus | 5/21 Friday | Virtual | A recent graduate whose post-college plan is derailed when his girlfriend leaves him for a job in NYC. Michael comes face to tattooed face with a 300-lb punk rock Samoan who challenges him with a kick in the ass to break from the loop and start living. Virtual Cinemapolis: Rockfield | 5/21 Friday | Virtual | The story of two Welsh brothers who built a studio in the attic of their farmhouse and started recording with their friends. Kingsley’s new wife, Ann, left her job in the local bank to do the books, and they continued farming all the while. Virtual Cinemapolis: Two Gods | 5/21 Friday | Virtual | A Muslim casket maker and ritual body washer in Newark NJ mentors two kids –

Furguan, a confident 12-year-old who comes from a rough home, and Naz, a 17-year-old who has been fighting through his own struggles as a young black man growing up in Newark. Virtual Cinemapolis: RK/RKAY | 5/22 Saturday | Virtual | A charming “meta-movie” about filmmaking itself in his newest, RK/RKAY tells the story of a film director whose main character usurps control of the plotline, and eventually, real life. Virtual Cinemapolis: Enfant Terrible | 5/22 Saturday | Virtual | When 22-year-old Rainer Werner Fassbinder storms the stage of the ‘Antitheater’ (Anti-Theatre) in Munich, 1967 and seizes the theatre production without further ado, nobody suspects this brazen nobody to become one of the most important post-war German filmmakers.

Special Events A.B.E. All Black Everything Virtual Arts Festival | 6 p.m., 5/19 Wednesday | Virtual | In Ithaca, Arts and Culture are what we do, and this year’s A.B.E. All Black Everything Arts Festival is bringing you Black Arts and Culture bound to stir your soul. 2021 Spring Garden Fair & Plant at Farmers’ Market Pavilion | 2 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Ithaca Farmers’ Market | | Free Open Goat Yoga at Lively Run Dairy | 9 a.m., 5/22 Saturday | Come and relax, giggle and laugh during our

1h goat yoga sessions. Become the playground for our goat kids, set new intentions, learn some moves! Open classes . Spilled (Soy) Milk Film Discussion with Director | 12 p.m., 5/25 Tuesday | Virtual | Professor and Director Changhee Chun will show excerpts from the film, which highlights the rich diversity of Asians & AsianAmericans in Ithaca, NY. Learn more and register at https://www.tcpl.org/ events. Part of TCPL’s AAPI Heritage Month Events. | Free

Books Science on Tap welcomes Dr. Noah Tamarkin | 5 p.m., 5/19 Wednesday | Dr. Author Chuck D’Imperio | 7 p.m., 5/20 Thursday | Dryden Village Hall, 16 South St. | Author Chuck D’Imperio speak on his newest book, Open House, which features the Southworth Homestead. Call Mary Hornbuckle at (607) 898-3461 to pre-register. | Free Enamel earrings | 6:30 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Metal Smithery, 950 Danby Road | Enter the colorful world of enamel! In this two hour class you will make a pair of copper enameled earrings of any size or shape or design you would like. Homemade Gnocchi: How to make a classic Italian dish. | 11 a.m., 5/22 Saturday | 15 Steps, 171 East State Street | Gnocchi is a general word for a type of Italian pasta or dumpling that has existed since Roman times. While they are not difficult to make there are a few rules that will ensure success. Students will learn the ways to prepare delicious potato gnocchi and a simple sauce for 2 to take home | $80.00 An Evening of Mystery: Crime Fiction Reading and Discussion | 6 p.m., 5/25 Tuesday | Virtual | ocal authors will discuss the varied nature

of Horseheads, 2943 Westinghouse Rd. | Doug’s Fish Fry TOGO will be in the church parking lot from 11am to 6pm. Menu includes Fish Fry, Fish Sandwich, Shrimp, Clams and more. Bake sale also available. | Free Trumansburg Farmers Market | 4 p.m., 5/19 Wednesday | Enjoy live music, supper and shopping at the community-built pavilions and lawn tents for fresh locally grown produce, naturally raised meats, eggs, flowers, plants, crafts and products. 2021 Spring Garden Fair & Plant at Farmers’ Market Pavilion | 2 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Ithaca Farmers’ Market | | Free ComedyFLOPs’ Virtual Improv Show To Benefit Loaves & Fishes! | 7 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Streaming, https://www.youtube.com/ComedyFLOPs | ComedyFLOPs invites you to a virtual improv show to support Loaves & Fishes. | Free Scrap Metal Fundraiser - Dryden School | 9 a.m., 5/22 Saturday | Dryden High School, 118 Freeville Rd. | The Dryden Sports Boosters are hosting a scrap metal drive fundraiser on Saturday, May 22 from 9am to 1pm and Sunday, May 23 from 2pm to 5pm. Ithaca Farmers Market | 9 a.m., 5/22 Saturday | Visit the farmers market every Saturday, rain or shine, at the pavilion. The Landlords Association of Tompkins County | 5/24 Monday | Virtual | Meetings are for members only. Rental property owners interested in these meetings are invited to join. For more information go to https://landlordsassociation.com/, email LATC@LandlordsAssociation. com , or call 607- 257-2382. Dewitt Park Ithaca Farmers Market at Dewitt Park | 9 a.m., 5/25 Tuesday | This market is perfect for grabbing prepared food or groceries. Vendors set up around the perimeter

of crime and mystery writing and read selections from their work. www.tcpl. org/events/ | Free STEAM Book Club Reads Prairie Lotus (ages 9-12) | 3:45 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Virtual | The May 26 club will read Prairie Lotus by Linda Sue Park, about a young Asian-American girl living in the mid-west in 1880. Learn more and register at https:// www.tcpl.org/events/steam-bookclub-prairie-lotus. | Free YA Book Club Reads Patron Saints of Nothing (Teens) | 4:30 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Virtual | The May 26 club will read Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay, about a Filipino-American teen who travels to the Philippines to uncover the truth about his cousin’s death. Learn more and register at https://www.tcpl.org/ events/ya-book-club-reads-patronsaints-nothing | Free

Kids Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 5/21 Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm. The Wailers | 8 p.m., 5/26 Wednesday | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | The legendary Wailers continue their quest to bring reggae to the forefront of the world’s stage. | $15.00 - $30.00

Notices Virtual Chair Yoga | 10 a.m., 5/19 Wednesday | Virtual | Led by certified yoga instructor Caryn Sheckler, this weekly class will focus on gentle stretching to help adult participants develop better balance and flexibility. Each class will include mantra, breath, meditation, and exercise in a relaxed and joyful virtual setting. Doug’a Fish Fry TOGO | 11 a.m., 5/19 Wednesday | First Presbyterian Church

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F/T, 11-Month, Coordinator of Substance Abuse/Intervention anticipated position available 7/1/21 in the Youth Development/Student Services Department at T-S-T BOCES. Responsible for coordinating various school prevention, intervention, and education programs. Detailed job posting & requirements, including residency on the County or BOCES website: www.tstboces.org Apply online by 05/31/21 at: www.tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Email: hr@ tstboces.org

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Looking for work? We are hiring!

The William George Agency has openings: YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A FullTime position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 3 ½ days on, 3 ½ days off. This position focuses on relationship-building, mentoring, and helping youth develop coping skills and build self-reliance. AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting. CARPENTER: A Full-Time position, working in a residential treatment facility. 5-day work week, 8am-4:30pm. Requires general carpentry skills, roofing, building repairs, as well as providing vocational supervision and training to youth. REGISTERED NURSE: A Full Time position in a residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills & ability to multi-task, includes preventative health maintenance, evaluate, and triage care and record keeping. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN APPLICATION, visit us online at: www.wgaforchildren. org/career-opportunities/ or call 607-844-6460 The William George Agency Salary: $31,200.00 F/T Minimum, Overtime available. Full time/Part time, Flexible Hours Benefits: Health/Dental/Vision/ Life/401k/ Personal/Sick time/ Meals provided on duty/Vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED The William George Agency

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Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at I t h a c a 866-585-6050 Tori m e sFree / M Toll ata y

DRIVER NEEDED

Ehrhart Energy has immediate openings for Class B EDL Drivers with Tanker & Hazmat Endorsements. No Endorsements, we will work with you so you can get GREAT PAY, Bonus Plans, Medical including Dental and Eye Care, 401k contributions. Join the team today in Trumansburg. Call 607 387-8881 or email us at: bcummings@edplp.net

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINYL Manufacture To InstallWINDOWS REPLACEMENT WINDOWS We DoREPLACEMENT It forAll Call Free Estimate &

3/54( 3/54( 3%.%#! 3%.%#! 6).9,

EMPLOYMENT

2 0 2 1

EMPLOYMENT Special Education Teachers (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) – Looking for teachers with experience in a 12:1:1/12:1:4 setting. Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online by at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from 7/6/21 to 8/13/21: Teaching Assistants Located at various sites within Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

425/Education ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN CAN)

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

610/Apartments APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

RENTALS Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call (607) 273-1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

800/Services DRIVE WITH US! ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers & Aide Positions. Interviews by appointment

Call for info: 607-274-2128 Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place.

Two bedroom Collegetown

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


SERVICES

SERVICES

COMPLETE CARE

BANKRUPTCY

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

HOME WARRANTY

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-877673-0511 | Hours Mon-Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

DIRECTV

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

805/Business Services

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

LET US HELP!

MEDICATION

GUTTER CLEANING

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

COMPUTER & IT PROGRAM! TRAINING

DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

HOME REPAIRS

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warrant COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 off 2 FREE Months! 866-4406501 (NYSCAN)

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)v

SERVICES

855/Misc.

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

SPECIAL EDUCATION OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from 7/6/21 to 8/13/21:

Teaching Assistants 1010/Commercial OCEAN CITY

The Generac PWRcell

820/Computer

SERVICES

SUMMER SCHOOL

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

MARYLAND

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

Located at various sites within Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

1. 2. 3.

ARE UNABLE TO PAY CASH FOR NECESSARY HOME REPAIRS. CANNOT AFFORD HIGH OR ADDITIONAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS. HAVE BEEN TURNED DOWN FOR FREE STATE OR GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS.

REPAIR TO INCLUDE: ROOFING • SIDING • WINDOWS • DOORS & MORE... Money Is Now Available Through Approved Lenders to Qualified Applicants* for Home Repairs No Money Down

up to

$25,000

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CALL TODAY: (800) 736-9629 or visit NYImprovementFund.com

*Approved applications will have the work completed by a quality repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING

15% & 10 %

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Homeowner Funding is now offering homeowners a chance to make necessary energy efficient home repairs and will be offering its services to families who:

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90+ Vendors • 21,000 Sq. Ft. Open Daily 10-5 • Closed Tuesdays earlyowego.com Exit 64 off I-86 607-223-4723

CLOG-FREE GUARANTEE

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator

ER GUA

OFF

FINANCING THAT FITS YOUR BUDGET!1 Promo Code: 285

Subject to credit approval. Call for details.

1

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YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE *

+

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TO THE FIRST 50 CALLERS ONLY! **

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OFF

WE INSTALL

YEAR-ROUND! LIFETIME WARRANTY

1-855-478-9473

A FREE ESTIMATE

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST

*For those who qualify. One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. **Offer valid at time of estimate only 2The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 WA UBI# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H License# 2705169445 License# 262000022 License# 262000403 License# 0086990 Registration# H-19114

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alone I’m never

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value! Offer valid February 15 - June 6, 2021

Special Financing Available Subject to Credit Approval

Life Alert® is always here for me.

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

One touch of a button sends help fast, 24/7.

DENTAL Insurance

with

GPS !

from Physicians Mutual Insurance Company.

Call to get your FREE Information Kit

1-855-225-1434

Help at Home Help On-the-Go ®

dental50plus.com/nypress

Batteries Never Need Charging.

I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

Includes the Participating (in GA: Designated) Providers and Preventive Benefits Rider. Product not available in all states. Acceptance guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. Contact us for complete details about this insurance solicitation. This specific offer is not available in CO; call 1-800-969-4781 or respond for similar offer. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN); Rider kinds B438/B439 (GA: B439B). 6255

May

For a FREE brochure call:

1-800-404-9776 1 9 – 25 ,

2 0 2 1

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   19


BackPage A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

Lifelong

#GETVACCINATED

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

OAR: 272-7885 910 W. State St., Ithaca EVERY Saturday May 1 to June 19th, 10am - 2pm.

CLEANING SERVICES

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP 607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

ITHACA NEWS

“The Best Sub You’ve ever had!” $5.00 off any purchase at

DiBella’s Subs

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS

Engaging, Inclusive Officiating... ... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved ones and friends.

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

*Acupuncture Works*

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c) www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-272-0114

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES

ANIMALS LAND & SEA

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26 South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS.

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd 607-882-6816

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation Custom made & Manufactured by

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years

SOUTH SENECA VINYL Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com

Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

John’s Tailor Shop

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149 FREE BRAKE CHECK Brakes feeling spongy? Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext: 1214

with Community Cash Coupon 222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

Macintosh Consulting

PIANOS

Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services No job too big or too small

Delivered to your inbox every day Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

DiBella’s Subs

119 West Court St., Ithaca 607-273-1511 tclifelong.org

Oil Change $19.99 Includes oil & filter 4 tire rotation & brake check with Community Cash Coupon Ithaca Auto Service 607-220-9183

COVID vaccine! OAR is now offering information and sign up sessions for you to get Comfortable getting your vaccine. Transportation an Issue? No Problem - let us assist you!

John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

Your Go-To Oil Change Stop

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org

Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816

AND

MAY M AY LOAN LOA AN N SALE

Visions Federal Credit Union is here in Ithaca and we’re celebrating our arrival with the Maguire Family of Dealerships. Right now when you buy a new or used vehicle from Maguire and finance it with Visions, you can get really low rates – rates so low, they’ll only last the month of May. So, find the Maguire dealership near you at maguirecars.com and drive on over for these limited-time low rates from Visions – now here to serve you in Ithaca! *APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates and terms available on new loans only. Certain relationship criteria are required to receive rates – ask for details. Credit union membership required with a $1 minimum deposit – certain restrictions apply. Check with a Visions Federal Credit Union representative for membership eligibility details. Loan rate based on creditworthiness, may vary from the rates shown, and is subject to standard credit criteria. Rates can change at any time. New Auto payment would be $226.26 on $15,000 at 2.75% A.P.R. with a 72-month term. Used Auto payment would be $246.85 on $15,000 at 3.00% A.P.R. with a 66-month term. Financing of maximum LTV up to 115% for qualified borrowers. Other terms available. This rate/term is only available for Visions members who make auto purchases at Maguire Family of Dealerships from May 1 to June 1, 2021. Visions Federal Credit Union is federally insured by NCUA.

20  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/ May

19–25 ,

2 0 2 1

New Auto Loans Rates as low as

2.75% APR* (up to 72-month term)

Used Auto Loans Rates as low as

3.00% APR* (up to 66-month term)

408 Elmira Road Ithaca, NY 14850


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

BACK TO SCHOOL!

Looking for work?

BUS DRIVERS NEEDED

100/Automotive CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers: by appointment. Call for info: 607-274-2128. Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place.

COORDINATOR of SUBSTANCE ABUSE/ INTERVENTION

F/T, 11-Month, Coordinator of Substance Abuse/Intervention anticipated position available 7/1/21 in the Youth Development/Student Services Department at T-S-T BOCES. Responsible for coordinating various school prevention, intervention, and education programs. Detailed job posting & requirements, including residency on the County or BOCES website: www.tstboces.org Apply online by 05/31/21 at: www.tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Email: hr@ tstboces.org

Delivery Driver

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

FREE PIANO

Lauter (1920) Upright in excellent condition. Recently tuned (609) 319-4140.

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

DRIVER NEEDED

Ehrhart Energy has immediate openings for Class B EDL Drivers with Tanker & Hazmat Endorsements. No Endorsements, we will work with you so you can get GREAT PAY, Bonus Plans, Medical including Dental and Eye Care, 401k contributions. Join the team today in Trumansburg. Call 607 387-8881 or email us at: bcummings@edplp.net

HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST

400/Employment

| 59,200 Readers

F/T Provisional, Human Resources Specialist position available 7/5/21 at T-S-T BOCES, coordinating a variety of Personnel and Employee Benefit programs. Detailed posting & requirements, including residency on the County and BOCES website: www.tstboces.org Apply online by 5/28/21 at: www.tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Email: hr@ tstboces.org

We are hiring!

The William George Agency has openings: YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A FullTime position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 3 ½ days on, 3 ½ days off. This position focuses on relationship-building, mentoring, and helping youth develop coping skills and build self-reliance. AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting. CARPENTER: A Full-Time position, working in a residential treatment facility. 5-day work week, 8am-4:30pm. Requires general carpentry skills, roofing, building repairs, as well as providing vocational supervision and training to youth. REGISTERED NURSE: A Full Time position in a residential treatment center for adolescents. Experience with adolescents preferred, good communication, organization skills & ability to multi-task, includes preventative health maintenance, evaluate, and triage care and record keeping. FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS, OR TO FILL OUT AN APPLICATION, visit us online at: www.wgaforchildren. org/career-opportunities/ or call 607-844-6460 The William George Agency Salary: $31,200.00 F/T Minimum, Overtime available. Full time/Part time, Flexible Hours Benefits: Health/Dental/Vision/ Life/401k/ Personal/Sick time/ Meals provided on duty/Vacation package REQUIREMENTS: Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED The William George Agency

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Special Education Teachers (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) – Looking for teachers with experience in a 12:1:1/12:1:4 setting. Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online by at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from 7/6/21 to 8/13/21: Teaching Assistants Located at various sites within Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

425/Education

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN CAN)

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

610/Apartments APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. Two bedroom Collegetown Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call (607) 273-1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

SERVICES

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM

COMPLETE CARE HOME WARRANTY

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-877673-0511 | Hours Mon-Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)

May

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

1010/Commercial OCEAN CITY MARYLAND

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

GUTTER CLEANING

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

800/Services

The Generac PWRcell

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

HOME REPAIRS

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warrant COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 off 2 FREE Months! 866-4406501 (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

1 9 – 25 ,

2 0 2 1

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DRIVE WITH US! ICSD Transportation Services is conducting OPEN INTERVIEWS for Bus Drivers & Aide Positions. Interviews by appointment

Call for info: 607-274-2128 Equal opportunity employer, offering competitive wages, great health and pension benefits, paid CDL training, rewarding community work with families and children. Diversity Enriches our Work place. I t h a c a T i m e s   21

Profile for Ithaca Times

May 19, 2021  

May 19, 2021  

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