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F R E E M ay 5 , 2 0 2 1 / Vo lume X L I , N umb e r 3 7 / O u r 47 t h Ye a r 

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

Could NYC-style rent control help Ithaca? PAGE 8

SWAT WHO?

SHOTS IN

COUNCIL

ARMS MANAGER Name, uniform, truck County celebrates 50K City explores govt. Changes coming COVID vaccines Restructure for SWAT PAGE 3

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THE LUCKIEST KIDS

ARTIST’S CATALOG

Marjorie Olds pays T’burg artist publishes Tribute to her mom Latest book PAGE 6

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Visions Federal Credit Union is here in Ithaca and we’re celebrating our arrival with the Maguire Family of Dealerships. Right now when you buy a new or used vehicle from Maguire and finance it with Visions, you can get really low rates – rates so low, they’ll only last the month of May. So, find the Maguire dealership near you at maguirecars.com and drive on over for these limited-time low rates from Visions – now here to serve you in Ithaca!

408 Elmira Road Ithaca, NY 14850

*APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates and terms available on new loans only. Certain relationship criteria are required to receive rates – ask for details. Credit union membership required with a $1 minimum deposit – certain restrictions apply. Check with a Visions Federal Credit Union representative for membership eligibility details. Loan rate based on creditworthiness, may vary from the rates shown, and is subject to standard credit criteria. Rates can change at any time. New Auto payment would be $226.26 on $15,000 at 2.75% A.P.R. with a 72-month term. Used Auto payment would be $246.85 on $15,000 at 3.00% A.P.R. with a 66-month term. Financing of maximum LTV up to 115% for qualified borrowers. Other terms available. This rate/term is only available for Visions members who make auto purchases at Maguire Family of Dealerships from May 1 to June 1, 2021. Visions Federal Credit Union is federally insured by NCUA.

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Newsline

F E AT URE S

POLICE

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continued on page 7

Ithaca is Tenants! �������������������������������������������8

Health Director Frank Kruppa speaks at the event. (Photo: Casey Martin)

Changes coming to S.W.A.T. and C.I.N.T teams temming from public input, feedback from focus groups and conversations with community members, the Ithaca Police Department and Tompkins Countty Sheriff ’s Office have announced a handful of changes to the joint-jurisdictional teams, SWAT and CINT. Both SWAT (Special Weapons And Tactics Team) and CINT (Critical Incident Negotiations Team) were born out of the death of IPD investigator Michael Padula in 1996 with the goal of being better prepared for a similar incident in the future. However, throughout the Reimagining Public Safety the SWAT truck in particular was brought up repeatedly when talking about militarization of police. According to a joint press release from IPD and the Sheriff ’s Office, the below changes “continue on the path of evolving with best practices, as well as making sure our mission, image and values align with our communities’ expectations.” Both teams will be renamed, with SWAT changing to Ithaca-Tompkins Specialized Response Team, and CINT changing to Ithaca-Tompkins Crisis Negotiation Team. The change went into effect on May 1. The newly named Ithaca-Tompkins Specialized Response Team will no longer serve no-knock search warrants solely for narcotics or drugs on any residence within any jursidiction. Additionally, the SWAT truck (from here on out referred to as Truck 99), will be repainted. Currently, the truck is all black with the words “knock knock” above the front windshield. It is in the process of being repainted white, and according to the press release, new letter and decal design will

VOL.XLI / NO. 37 / May 5, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

VACCINES

Health Dept., Cayuga Health celebrate 50,000 vaccinations

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fficials celebrated the 50,000 vaccinations administered in Tompkins County on April 29 with a ceremony outside of the mall vaccination clinic. “Congratulations to the Tompkins County Health Department, who has demonstrated through their collaboration with Cayuga Medical Systems what true partnership looks like,” said RoAnn Destito, commissioner of the New York State Office of General Services. “50,000 arms is a remarkable accomplishment.” Dr. Marty Stallone, president and CEO of Cayuga Health Systems, said that the operation would not have been possible without the full partnership between Cayuga Health and the county, which have worked together to provide free testing throughout the pandemic to all residents, as well as operating the mass

vaccination site. “In all, we are approaching 60% of our residents being vaccinated,” he said. “The results speak for themselves. It’s been a lesson in cooperation and trust.” The talk of partnerships continued, as County Legislature Chair Leslyn McBeanClairborne commended the “historic collaboration of leaders” that led to the accomplishment. “It’s been a community effort,” she said. “It hasn’t been Tompkins County. It hasn’t been Cayuga Health Systems. It’s truly a community effort.” She also touched upon the importance of making sure the vaccine is available to everyone, especially people of color, who she said are more likely to succumb to the illness. “We must do everything in our power to reach everyone and make the vaccine acces-

T a k e

▶  Shred Day- Tompkins Trust Company is hosting its annual shred day on Saturday, May 8 at the East Hill Plaza. This event is open to the public from 9 a.m. - noon. In collaboration with Finger Lakes ReUse and Recycling & Materials Management of Tompkins

sible to all,” she said. “[…] Reflecting on the past year, I have the utmost confidence that we will continue to get vaccines to everyone who wants one.” County Administrator Jason Molino also reflected on the past year, telling the story of the day he and the county schools’ superintendents decided to declare a state of emergency and shut down schools for an undetermined amount of time. “It was a decision made collectively, and that’s how we’ve continued in terms of our approach,” he said. “Whether it was partnering with our three higher ed institutions, community groups, Cayuga Health Systems […] it was the community that came together to make it work.” Molino also lauded the work of his staff, stating that if he had to do it all over again, there’s not a different team he would pick. Public Health Director Frank Kruppa, who Stallone called the “secret sauce of making this happen,” gave his gratitude for the work done by his staff and partners throughout the past year. “This didn’t happen by accident,” he said. “It took a lot of hard work by a lot of people.” He also encouraged the remaining 40% or so of unvaccinated residents in Tompkins County to make their appointments. “I’ve been joking about when I’m finally going to get a vacation here, so if those last 40% would get on board and get vaccinated I’d really appreciate it,” he laughed. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

N o t e

County, this event, which is open to all households, will allow members of the community to safely shred their confidential paper-based documents. To participate in Shred Day, all paper must be clean, dry and ready to be shredded. Ensure all papers are free from staples

and spiral binders. Additionally, limit recyclables to six boxes. Tompkins Trust Company reserves the right to limit the amount and size of material and to refuse anything it deems inappropriate. Additionally, boxes are unable to be recycled this year.

May

5 – 1 1,

Why haven’t we opted in to the Emergency Tenant Protection Act?

Grateful Dead Day��������������������� 13 State Theatre to stream live performance from Pink Talking Fish to honor Grateful Dead’s 1977 Cornell performance

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T Sports ������������������������������������������������������� 10 Personal Health ���������������������������������� 12 Film ������������������������������������������������������������ 14 Art ������������������������������������������������������������� 15 Classifieds ���������������������������������������������� 18

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m Sharon Davis, Distribution F r o n t J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

Planning

PHOTOGRAPHER Developers re-think Collegetown Innovation District By C a se y Mar tin

IF YOU STARTED A PODCAST, WHO WOULD BE YOUR PODCASTING PARTNER (DEAD OR ALIVE), AND WHAT WOULD THE SUBJECT BE?

“Jane Goodall. The podcast would be about nature and the awesome work she does.” -Anne C.

“My best friend at IC, Tommy, and we’d podcast about Lord of The Rings Lore.” -Livia F.

“Genghis Khan. Genghis Khan” -Porter D.

T

he Planning and Development Board got its first look at a proposal for projects in Collegetown in the 200 and 300 blocks of College Avenue. If the Catherine North and Catherine South project names sound familiar, it’s because late last year the same developers proposed the Collegetown Innovation District, which included similar projects as part of the Planned United Development (PUD) application. A PUD is used when the Planning Board and Common Council agree that the longterm community benefits of a project outweigh any effects of zoning changes made to accommodate the plans; developers make the decision to apply for a PUD. The original plan comprised 10 buildings, eight of which would have required fairly significant height variances. After a lukewarm response, developers John Novarr and Phil Proujansky have decided to go at the project in sections. Kathryn Wolf, an architect at Trowbridge Wolf Michaels

Landscape Architecture, presented the sketch plan to the board. The project is called Catherine Commons and is located on the west side of College Avenue at the intersection with Catherine Street. Catherine North is the name of the portion on the north side of Catherine Street, and Catherine South is on the south side of Catherine Street. “The Catherine Commons site was included in a PUD app last year and included other properties, and as we tried to move that project, it became clear it was overly complicated and moving too slowly,” she said. The developers decided to “focus on getting this area revitalized,” Wolf said. The proposal is designed to predominantly comply with existing zoning, and will include 340 apartment units, commercial space on College Avenue, a fitness center for residents, expanded sidewalks, pedestrian plazas and streetscape amenities. While “predominantly” in compliance with existing zoning, the developers are seeking

Police R eform

City moving toward Community Justice Center “I think my business partner and I would make a pretty…boring, but awesome podcast about advertising technology…” -Elizabeth B.

“Trump. Politics.” -Nauro C.

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he City Administration Committee unanimously approved the use of $124,430 for the establishment of a Community Justice Center (CJC) at its April 28 meeting. This came a week after the County Legislature’s Public Safety Committee approved $144,380 for the same thing. The county will fund $19,950 more than the city in order to pay for the project management software, which would be used across other departments in the county as well. The total funding of $268,811 breaks down into the following: · Project manager

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(director of the CJC) o Salary: $83,866 o Benefits: $44,197 · Data analyst (program analyst) o Salary: $69,285 o Benefits: $36,513 · Other operating expenses: $15,000 · Project management software: $19,950 Alderperson Graham Kerslick asked if the city anticipated hearing back from the state about the passed recommendations before approving this money, and asked for clarification about what exactly the roles of the employees will be. “We have not gotten follow

a height variance. At Catherine North, which comprises three buildings, the zoning allows for six stories and 80-foot buildings, while they’re proposing a 10-foot height variance with two additional floors. Catherine South, which has two buildings, includes a 78-foot building with seven floors, while the zoning allows up to 70-foot buildings with five floors. The thought is the project would mainly be aimed at college students given its location, but the board thought it would appeal to young professionals as well. Overall, board members were very supportive of the project. “I really like this proposal,” board member Emily Petrina said. “I’m so excited about the streetscape. Those renderings are what Collegetown should be.” She also added that she supports the height variances, though that is a decision the Board of Zoning Appeals will make. Board member Mitch Glass said he thinks it’s a good proposal for the area. “I think it’s the right project for Collegetown, and I’m surprised it’s taken this long to do something this nice,” he said. “I really like it.” 401 E. State St. McKinley Development Company’s 340,000 square-

foot apartment building was back in front of the Planning and Development Board on April 27 with one noteworthy change. Developers proposed to reduce the six-story building from 302 parking spaces to 267. Of those parking spaces, 115 would be reserved for residents, 122 would be for downtown office and retail tenants and 30 spaces for Gateway Commons residents. The 122 spaces would also moonlight as public parking after business hours. These changes were accomplished partly by eliminating parking on the first floor along the east wing and adding rentable storage units for both residents and the public. The development team also ran through some updated landscaping ideas, which has been a topic of much discussion throughout this process, as the board wants to make sure the space is attractive due to the public use of the property to access the creek walk. Overall, the board was pleased with the changes proposed. “I’m super excited about the removal of some of that parking,” Petrina said. Board member Garrick Blalock echoed that, adding “everything is an improvement.” -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

up from the state, and we don’t expect much,” Mayor Svante Myrick said. “It’s important we get moving and demonstrate to the community that we’re willing to invest.” Myrick added that the CJC would be based loosely on the Emergency Operations Center model the county uses. The project manager would be the director of the CJC, while the data analyst would focus on data and collection. Together they would work with the Ithaca Police Department, Tompkins County Sheriff ’s Office, Common Council and County Legislature to establish the framework for implementation of the approved recommendations, as well as identify and facilitate the next steps for community engagement. Alderperson Donna Fleming said she had to say her mantra, “City taxpayers are also county taxpayers,” before

asking if the idea would be for the CJC to exist forever. Myrick said that he doesn’t know that it’ll last forever, but that it would be around “certainly as long as it takes to implement the recommendations, which I assume will be several years.” County Administrator Jason Molino had clarified to the County Legislature the week before that the proposal was for a two-year pilot, and then they could reevaluate and measure the success. However, the $124,430 cost to the city would be an annual one. Alderperson Rob Gearhart asked where the funds would be coming from, as currently it’s not specified. Myrick said it had yet to be determined while they see if it could come from the $17 million COVID relief fund, any unspent funds from continued on page 7


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

CIty of Ithaca

City Administration exploring restructuring of government

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ig changes could be coming to the structure of city government. At the April 28 City Administration Committee meeting, a subcommittee charged by the mayor at the beginning of the year, proposed moving from a mayor-council government to a council-manager government. A mayor-council government, the closest to the way Ithaca operates, has a mayor elected separately from the council who is often full-time and paid with significant administrative and budgetary authority. The council is elected and maintains legislative powers, and some cities with this type of government appoint a professional manager who maintains limited administrative authority, which would be similar to Ithaca’s chief of staff Dan Cogan (who is stepping down this month). It’s the second most common form of municipal government and is most commonly found in larger, older cities or in very small cities. In a council-manager government, the city council oversees the general administration, makes policies, sets the budgets and appoints a professional city manager to carry out day-to-day administrative operations. The mayor in this form is usually chosen from among the council on a rotat-

ing basis. This is the most common form of government and is common in cities with populations over 10,000 people. This is also essentially how the Tompkins County Legislature works. The legislature appoints a county administrator, and the legislative chair is elected from within the legislature, not by the public. City Administration Committee chair Deb Mohlenhoff outlined a few of the challenges the current mayor-council government has, such as the fact the mayor is currently responsible for managing more than 400 employees across 11 departments, while simultaneously overseeing 18 city facilities that cover a wide range of activity and infrastructure, and preparing and administering a $79 million budget. An elected mayor is not required to have relevant administrative experience, and potentially continuous four-year turnover could lead to instability in administrative oversight and accountability. Additionally, Mohlenhoff pointed out that the chief of staff is an at-will position and only has the supervisory authority as delegated by the mayor, which could lead to a lack of clarity in reporting structure. She also said the mayor’s current compensation, which is a $58,000 salary, does not align with the position’s responsibilities. The chief of staff salary is more than twice that at $120,000. The subcommittee’s specific recommendations are to hire a city manager who would become the chief executive and report to the full Common Council. The council would hire or fire the city manager. The city manager’s responsibilities would include preparing the budget, while the mayor position would become a voting member of council, chair the council and set the agenda, and remain the chief elected official. Currently, the mayor only votes during council to break a tie. “We have not yet drilled down specifically the defined

responsibilities,” Mohlenhoff said. “We have to take a look at what responsibilities would be retained by the mayor and which would transfer over to the city manager. Things more appropriate for a chief executive officer would move over to the city manager.” She added that they would still need to figure out the appropriate level of staffing to support the new structure as well. While the report and recommendations were based solely on the general structure of city government and not specifically about who is in which role right now, current mayor Svante Myrick said he supports the change. “I think there’s a reason most cities our size have city manager roles,” he said. “I think this is a smart approach, and I’d support it. Certainly the challenges laid out, when you put it all on one slide, the staff and departments I have to supervise, I break out in sweats. It’s not working as well as it should.” A repeated concern among committee members was the timing of the change. The timeline presented by Mohlenhoff would see public input sessions in May and June, and then voting on it on the November ballot. “I’m just wondering if it makes sense to be undertaking this big of a change at the same time we’re reimagining public safety,” committee member George McGonigal said. “That’s two really big things.” Earlier in the meeting, the committee had approved sending a request for $124,430 to establish a Community Justice Center for final approval to Common Council. Mohlenhoff agreed with McGonigal’s point, and said that timing should be part of the conversation going forward, especially if implementation would interrupt the current mayoral term. For his part, Myrick said that there was no use waiting for a perfect time to make such a big change. “There’s certainly never a good time to do this,” he said. “But it’s like when the pilot says to put on your own oxygen mask before you can help other people, and as a government I don’t think we’ve done that enough. There will never be

a great time, but it’s as good a time as any.” Committee member Ducson Nguyen said that he generally likes the idea, but asked what the specific role of the mayor would be. Myrick said that he could see the mayor continuing to take on the legislative and public official duties. “I chair the IURA, Board of Public Works, neighborhood associations, TCAD,” he said. “There are more meetings than you even want to know about. And there will still be a need for that […] I think there’s also a chief public official for the city for ribbon cuttings, speeches at rotaries, things like that.” Mohlenhoff agreed, and said that it would be too jarring for the public to just eliminate the mayor position altogether. “For now, we felt like there wasn’t much data and rationale behind getting rid of the mayor’s position,” she said. “We’re thinking external responsibilities will fall to the mayor and internal responsibilities could end up on the city manager side.” Alderperson Donna Fleming agreed, and said that it would also continue to give people a voice to have a publicly elected mayor working alongside the Common Council–appointed city manager. Cogan added that one of the advantages to having a city manager is that the position would have even more accountability. “They talk about how a mayor is accountable once every four years, but a city manager is accountable every single month because they work for Common Council,” he said. “It makes Common Council more powerful and makes them able to hold their chief executive officer accountable for getting things done.” Overall, committee members were supportive. More specific language is expected at May’s City Administration Committee meeting, but the subcommittee wanted to make sure they were headed in the right direction. Mohlenhoff added that the first public feedback session could be expected in the latter half of May. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

May

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Ups About 60% of Tompkins County residents have at least one dose of the COVID vaccine, and 54% of the Cornell on-campus population is vaccinated. Positive cases are also down to just 44 at the time of publishing. Downs Police are searching for a suspect after a person was robbed at knifepoint last weekend. There were no injuries reported. Contact IPD with any info.

HEARD&SEEN Heard In alignment with new COVID guidance from the state, Cornell will now be allowing each graduate to have two guests at their commencement ceremony later this month. Seen A plan was unveiled at last week’s Planning Board meeting that showed the return of KFC to Ithaca, exciting news if you’re all aboard the fast food chain chicken sandwich train.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own grievances or praise, write news@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “U&D.”

GR ADUATION

2 guests per student at Cornell commencement

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ornell University President Martha Pollack announced that each graduate this year will now be able to bring two guests to commencement. Originally no guests were allowed, but the change happened after New York state released updated public health guidance for commencement ceremonies that allows up to 33% of capacity. Each graduate will receive two nontransferable tickets for guests to attend one of the in-person celebrations. All the details have not been worked out, Pollack said, but that plans will be adjusted over the coming weeks. "Additional information — including how tickets will be distributed, state-mandated public health and safety protocols that will need to be followed, and other important information — will be communicated directly with graduates as soon as the details are available," she wrote in a statement. At this time, it’s not clear whether Ithaca College, which is also holding a guestless ceremony, will follow suit.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

ITHACA NOTES

The Luckiest Kids

What we owe mothers

By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s

By St e ph e n Bu r k e

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e knew we were the luckiest kids in the neighborhood when we were little. So long as we took the youngest kid out with us, we could run around with our pals until everyone else was called in. Most of our neighbors went to parochial school, and their homes seemed orderly and scheduled. Our house was more free-range, free flow. All the big kids loved Ron, our baby, and when we plunked him down near our games, bigger kids would pick him up, or pat his head and say sweet things. He never cried, so he was just part of the gang and we all had fun. Our father dropped the big kids off before he went to the Washington Post early each day. We knew the next morning when an older kid tossed the newspaper on our front porch, we could search for Sam’s picture, even though we didn’t know how to read yet. After school, Sylvia, our mother, would sometimes join our baseball game in the backyard, and we would all scream and cajole her to just take one turn up at bat.

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She was our most reliable and impressive player. Almost every time up, she knocked a hit into the Ross’ backyard (automatic homer), where Rex, the dog, would chew on the softball. We would all dance around and cheer, but Sylvia usually had to go back inside to do something. Lots of times she did return later with Kool-Aid in big, brightly colored aluminum cups. If we clinked the cups or spilled the drink, she never seemed to mind. Sylvia would smile and hug and kiss us even when we were sweaty and dirty. Every so often, when the other kids were herded home, one of the mothers would seek me out and give me advice: “Marjorie, tell your mother you kids need a bedtime.” I would snuggle my face in Ron’s sweaty neck and mumble that I would pass that along to my mother. Some nights, as we were taking baths, Sylvia would inquire if there was any “news from the front.” I would say: “Mrs. continued on page 7

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other’s Day is upon us, and as with many holidays, in progressive Ithaca it is celebrated readily, but with a commitment to deeper meaning. Ithaca has groups like “Moms Against Bombs” (which you will see parading in the Ithaca Festival) reminding us that the American version of the holiday was first proposed 150 years ago as part of an encompassing national anti-war campaign led by women, who couldn’t even vote yet. Clearly, the saying that “mothers’ work is never done” applies to social justice issues. Currently, over 16 million children in the U.S. live in poverty. Hired child care, a necessity for families with two parents working outside the home, generally exceeds any other expense, including housing and food. Parental leave policies at U.S. workplaces are among the least advanced in the world. Affordable health care is largely an unattainable dream. There might be progress coming from the Biden administration. Its economic plan proposes $1.8 trillion in tax cuts and spending for workers, families and children, with increased taxes on corporations and the rich. Announcing the plan, Biden specifically repudiated “trickle-down economics,” a hallmark of the Reagan administration 40 years ago and conservative Republicans since. “Trickle-down economics has never worked,” Biden said. “It’s time to grow the economy from the bottom and middle out.” Younger Americans, born since the Reagan years, perhaps have never experienced, and might regard with incredulity, a time when families could maintain healthy economic status with only one working parent, and no need for hired child care. As an older American, I had that experience. Of course, one wishes to avoid the pitfall of considering past times better times: The present is always best, as the time that can be most fully experienced, shaped and shared. But personally, in a stable workingclass childhood, with one parent at a good (union) job and another at home, I had (I recall) a sense of safety and ease; or no sense of their lack. Beyond that there was independence and freedom fostered by security and closeness. Mothers make a gift of the world to their children, and of their children to the world. The details are different for everyone, and those of the following story are probably strictly historic, as in gone, as social situations have changed, but it is essentially a simple story of a mother’s

love, one I’d like to share for Mother’s Day. Years ago, children commonly ran errands to grocery stores for their mothers. Probably not so much today, with fewer (if any) neighborhood stores to walk to (are there any here now in Ithaca, with John’s Convenience on West State Street closed?), and children generally much more supervised, or fettered. (Every once in a while current news will feature a story of a parent being reported to the police by neighbors for letting children walk alone outside.) From my childhood, I remember one day an uncle, who worked for the utilities, visiting our house. His job had brought him to our neighborhood, and he stopped in for some coffee, cake and conversation on the clock. We were without milk for coffee, so my mother sent me to the grocery, a block away. Certainly I was delighted to go: with paper money, a respectable figure and noteworthy business patron. It was a somewhat exotic outing, in fact a multicultural and even bilingual one, as most stores in our primarily Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn were run by Eastern European immigrants who typically spoke Yiddish. The women wore scarves on their heads, and the men fedoras. They were friendly and affectionate toward children to a point that might have been embarrassing or daunting to some, but not me. I don’t remember exactly what happened this particular trip, but when I got home I recounted to my mother and uncle whatever excitement or incongruity I had found. I remember my mother’s smile and wide-open eyes, gifts she always gave when you spoke. My uncle, kind of a tough guy, was a little less enthralled, with the gift he personally generally gave, kind of a smirk with arched eyebrows, but I didn’t take it personally nor let it slow me down. I told the amazing tale and took my leave, like a good kid respectful of adults. From the next room, after some quiet, I heard them talking. “What is it with that kid?” my uncle said. “You send him out to the store and he’s gone five minutes. When he comes back, he’s got a ten-minute story.” “Yes,” my mother said. She let it sink in. “Isn’t it great?” What can’t, or don’t, mothers do? Big things and little? May our obligations to our mothers, both in our lives and society, be forever more realized and met.


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS

laughed. Sylvia was so full of life, so full of joy, if she read the story, we finally had to beg her to stop, when our stomachs and sides hurt from laughing too much. When Robertson said we should be called in we couldn’t stand another laugh — that before it’s dark.” Sylvia would smile and was our bedtime. pat her little snitch (me) on the head. We When I read the same books to my never had to defend ourselves to Sylvia. kids that long We knew she ago Sylvia read was on our side. to us, I was For Life. And surprised the at 99, she is still books were not our Champion actually that and our Hero. funny. Now that All the kids we are all old, shared a cozy so many things room in our we believed little house. as little kids, Almost everywe no longer one on our believe. But we street lived in still believe in similar little Sylvia’s love. houses; many of This Moththe fathers had er’s Day, I can bought them speak for my with GI loans. brothers, now Once we were spread around all snuggled the country. into whatever We are still the bed we chose, Luckiest Kids Sylvia would in the World come in and sit because we on one of our belonged to beds and then The author’s mother Sylvia Sylvia, to us, the we knew we greatest mother were in for a fun in the whole world. time. No matter what story Sylvia read, This Mothers’ Day sending our love to she made us laugh. And laugh and laugh. you Sylvia. Sure feeling very lucky. If we were too old for the book, we still laughed. If we were too little to follow the story, we laughed because everyone else Contin u ed From Page 6

POLICE REFORM Contin u ed From Page 4

the year so far, or elsewhere. There were also some questions about oversight, as the employees would technically be county employees but contracted by the city. “Who’s going to manage this part of the process?” Kerslick asked. “I’m unclear about who this project manager reports to.” Specifics of oversight are still to be determined, Myrick said, but it could fall to the city and council administration that

has been meeting regularly to work on this project. “But that’s still me guessing a little bit,” he said. However, the CJC employees will be expected to report bimonthly to both Common Council and the County Legislature. The funding will still have to be approved by the full Common Council before it’s official, and is expected to be up for vote at the June meeting. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

S.W.A.T. Contin u ed From Page 3

be completed later this year “with the help and input from our community.” The goal is to create a professional design that “is welcoming and representative of what the mobile command truck is primarily used for.” The weapons currently stored on Truck 99 will also be removed and stored elsewhere. The last change outlined is an update to the uniform color and equipment. Officers

serving on the specialized response team will look as similar to a uniformed offices as possible, switching to a blue or black uniform rather than a camoflauge one whenever possible. Camoflauge uniforms will be reserved for times that specifically require such a uniform, such as an operation in a wooded area. The process of updating the uniform color is anticipated to be going and take place over the next 12 months.

THE TALK AT

the Uyghur Muslims. While we would like to limit attendance to Cornell students for COVIDsafety reasons, I invite you all to visit our website (boycottchinanow.org), sign our pledge to boycott Chinese goods and stand with us on the right side of history. -Jonathan Davydov, Cornell University student

BCN Urges You to Take a Stand Against the Uyghur Genocide

L

ess than a month ago, I celebrated Passover here, in sunny Ithaca, separated by the pandemic from home. The pages of the prayer books my friend handed out that night were like any other: filled with Hebrew, accompanied with translations, sprinkled with stories and kitschy quick drawings. In a word, it was a standard prayer book. And yet, when we hit the middle of the book, I froze. A black and white photo of freshly liberated Holocaust survivors — gaunt and drowning in their pinstripe clothes — looked up at me, faces painted with the smirk of salvation I’m sure our ancestors shared as they fled Egypt. The caption below provided form to their wordless plea: “Pause to remember all who suffered here, pledge to oppose genocide wherever it may take place.” And so I paused, and so I pledged. Many are quick to cast the United States and China as being in some sort of new Cold War, analogizing the People’s Republic to be the USSR reborn. Such a comparison, I think, is wrong; China bears many more similarities, unfortunately, to one of our darker foes: Nazi Germany. The two countries are deeply embedded in the world economy, have successfully paralyzed the world from taking early action against their injustices, and soon will be two regimes that have concurrently hosted both the Olympics and a genocide program. That’s right: Against the backdrop of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics stands the uncomfortable fact that the Chinese government has placed over 1 million Uyghur Muslims into concentration camps. These men, women and children face unspeakable horrors daily. While what we know about the camps is limited thanks to China’s notoriously tight-lipped regime, the little information that we do have is damning enough. Within these camps, Uyghurs undergo ethnic cleansing, forced sterilization and organ harvesting, among other atrocities. Children are stripped away from their parents to be raised as ethnically “Han,” and adults are sold into slavery to be used as forced labor across the country. Their suffering is immense and indescribable. We cannot stand by in the face of these egregious human rights violations. That is why I founded Boycott China Now (BCN), a group determined to lead a consumer-led boycott to put pressure on China’s morally corrupt government. On May 7, at 6:00pm, BCN along with its allies will be hosting a rally on Cornell’s Arts Quad to protest China’s genocide of May

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Thank You District 125 State Assemblywoman Dr. Anna Kelles

O

n April 29, 2021, the League of Women Voters hosted events around the country to increase public awareness and engagement around the redistricting process and make sure the public’s voice is heard. Since redistricting occurs every ten years, this is a once in a decade opportunity to advocate on behalf of ourselves and our neighbors. The League of Women Voters of Tompkins and Cortland County would like to thank District 125 State Assemblyperson Dr. Anna Kelles for meeting virtually with members as part of the LWV People Powered Day of Action. We believe that our political maps should represent the people who live within them. New district lines can be drawn to intentionally decrease voters’ power based solely on their political party. We believe redistricting should be fair and transparent and involve the voters. People Powered Fair Maps™ advocates for redistricting processes that eliminate partisan and racial gerrymandering nationwide. -League of Women Voters

Re: It’s Electric: TCAT unveils electric buses on Earth Day New busses generally cost 250k-300k anyway. This is a fantastic investment and a great way to cut emissions, show our community’s values, and inspire youth for generations to come. - Damien Diamond, via Ithaca.com

Re: Guest opinion on April 28

T

he author of this opinion should take a moment and look at the current NYS Energy Code (which is a variation of a national standard code document developed with industry participation) to understand it would be changed. Ithaca is not unilaterally imposing an energy code where nothing existed before as is implied by the comments here. And the code will not drive uniformity. There are performance based options. Automatic anti government reactions are so out of date. Didn’t we learn anything from the pandemic about the value of good government in making our economy strong and our communities safe? -Gregory Thomas, via Ithaca.com

Write to us! To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

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It h ac a T im e s  7


ITHACA IS TENANTS!

Why haven’t we opted in to the Emergency Tenant Protection Act yet? By Rya n Bieber

R

ent reform is a rightfully hot topic in Ithaca and around the country. As the COVID-19 pandemic fuels job loss and people struggle to make ends meet, keeping a roof overhead becomes a significant hurdle. This is particularly problematic in Ithaca, where over 70% of the community is composed of renters and the affordable housing crisis looms like a dark cloud. Rent has been continually rising in Ithaca for the past decade, but the pandemic has brought the issue to the forefront. The creation of movements like the Ithaca Tenants Union (ITU) and the Solidarity Slate in 2020 and 2021 are just a few examples of how the increased push for rent reform has been forged in the fire of these intense circumstances. THE LEVELS OF DISCONNECT

More reform efforts don't necessarily equate to tangible change. In June of last year, Ithaca made headlines as the first U.S. city to cancel rent — only, that never actually happened. After months of protests in favor of rent cancellation, Common Council passed a resolution that would freeze rent payments, but any actual legislation met a standstill at the state level. The problem is in part due to a disconnect between local, state and federal governments. In March of last year, Gov. An8  T

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drew Cuomo issued an executive order tion the City of Ithaca can make in regards prohibiting cities and towns in the state to rent reform. As members of the Solidarfrom issuing pandemic relief efforts with- ity Slate and ITU will tell you, it all starts out approval from the New York Depart- with opting in to the Emergency Tenant ment of Health. This is the same depart- Protection Act (ETPA) of 1974. The ETPA regulates rent increases on ment where Ithaca’s rent cancellation buildings of six or more units that were resolution met its demise. For another example, one only needs built before 1974. Previously, the ETPA only extended to to look at the timeNew York City and lines on eviction the municipalimoratorium, which “We think a city ETPA would cover a lot of ties of Westchester, are meant to prethe larger low-income housing rentals in Rockland and Nasvent tenants who are unable to pay Ithaca, which is huge in terms of fighting sau counties downstate. rent from being gentrification and ensuring people can That all changed kicked out of their in June 2019, when homes. Back in afford their apartment.” Cuomo passed the March, the CDC -Angel DeVivo Housing Stability extended the federand Tenant Protecal eviction moratotion Act (HSTPA), rium until June 30. At the same time, In New York state, the which, among other things, removed many eviction moratorium was set to expire on of the limitations of the ETPA by making May 1, 2021, and has since been extended rent stabilization an option for all municipalities rather than just the counties mento August 31. Besides the contradicting dates, the state tioned above. If a city in New York declares and federal moratoriums don’t necessarily a housing emergency, in which the rental apply to the same people, leaving confused vacancy rate is 5% or less, they are eligible tenants to sort through the slew of conflict- to implement the ETPA. In addition to regulating rent increases, ing information. In this worrisome time, the ETPA “entitles rent stabilized tenants no one seems to be on the same page. to receive required services, to have their leases renewed, and to be protected from OPTIONS FOR OPTING IN Even with the tangled web of government eviction except on grounds allowed by law,” complicating matters, there is tangible ac- according to the NYS Homes and Commu5–11,

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nity Renewal, the state’s affordable housing agency (HCR). As such, the ETPA and the changes under the HSTPA are genuinely seen as shifting the law in favor of tenants as opposed to the landlords. Angel DeVivo, a member of the Ithaca Tenants Union, spoke of the benefits of implementing the ETPA in Ithaca, saying, “We think a city ETPA would cover a lot of the larger low-income housing rentals in Ithaca, which is huge in terms of fighting gentrification and ensuring people can afford their apartment.” George “Jorge” Defendini, a member of the Solidarity Slate who is running for Common Council, echoed this sentiment. “Opting in to ETPA which would put a lot of Ithaca on the road toward rent stabilization and protecting the city from forces of gentrification and pricing people out of their homes, but also in general strengthens the rights of tenants from landlords...” he said. The problem is Ithaca has yet to opt in to the ETPA, which is honestly a bit of a conundrum. For a city that was touted for its bold efforts to cancel rent, it's surprising that taking an initial step like opting into the EPTA hasn’t happened yet. Although the rent cancellation reform ultimately failed because the matter went out of the City’s hands, this time, Ithaca has direct control over the passing of the ETPA on the local level.


Defendini attributes Ithaca’s cold feet to a lack of “political will.” “Politicians didn’t do this of their own volition and free will,” Defendini said when explaining why Common Council tried to pass rent cancellation in the first place. “The push for rent cancellations is a product of grassroots organizations on a local level who pushed for these things.” DeVivo said that when it came to advocating for reform, people like Mayor Svante Myrick required a lot of “prodding.” “There's always more that he could be doing, and I think he’s been pretty ‘out to lunch’ for like the past six months,” DeVivo said. CREATING CHANGE FROM WITHIN

Right now, the ITU and the Ithaca Democratic Socialists of America are hoping the Solidarity Slate will be able to get Ithaca to opt in to the ETPA. The Solidarity Slate has three candidates running for Ithaca Common Council in 2021. Defendini is one of these members — Shaniya Foster and Phoebe Brown are the other two. The idea is to get elected and then further the push for ETPA from within Common Council. Defendini and Brown are both running unopposed in their respective wards, so the goal isn’t as far-fetched as it might sound. Still, even if all three are elected, the Solidarity Slate will only make up three out of 10 total Common Council seats. Six of the remaining seats will remain occupied by current members of the council until 2023. Essentially, there is no guarantee that the Solidarity Slate would be successful in convincing the board — but that doesn’t mean they are not going to try. “We’re going to have to talk to people and convince them that our vision is what the city needs and is representative of the people in Ithaca,” Defendini explained. Common Council primary elections are held on June 22, and the actual election is the first Tuesday of November, so even beginning to implement this plan will take time. Still, opting into the ETPA doesn’t have to wait for new elections to Common Council. As the rent cancellation movements from summer clearly demonstrate, if enough people protest in favor of a cause, it’s possible to create the political change the public wants to see.

with other reform efforts like the eviction feel that any one person is any less deservmoratorium and rent cancellation, it could ing of any sort of right and ability to colput many landlords in a tight space. Still, lect rent on a property they’ve rented out. landlords tend to not get a lot of sympathy. I don’t think that changes depending on Veronica Pillar, an Ithaca resident who your size.” Lane herself said she was against evicis running for Tompkins Legislature and advocating for housing reform, said ten- tion moratoriums and rent cancellation, as ants stand to lose more than landlords in it could severely cut into a landlord’s bottom line. She pointed out that the evicthe face of the pandemic. tion moratorium “I’m not trying is a way of “kickto say that tenants “If a tenant is truly affected by the ing the can down not paying rent isn’t a burden on landpandemic and really legitimately cannot the road” rather than addressing lords,” Pillar said. pay their rent, I hope they’re given the the problem, which “But it just isn't an resources in which they can apply and many critics of the equivalent burden to being unhoused.” seek assistance, because there are a lot moratorium have aptly cited as well. DeVivo said they of opportunities out there.” Certainly, when the feel a lot of landmoratorium evenlords are wrongfully -Kayla Lane tually expires, the “crying poverty.” potential for mass “Some smaller landlords might be struggling, but ulti- evictions is a very real threat. Instead, Lane suggested handling issues mately they own several properties,” DeVivo said. “They will have a roof over their on a case-by-case basis and connecting tenhead, and renters will not if they are evict- ants with resources to help them pay rent. “We should make sure that we are coned.” Many, including Myrick, have made the necting tenants in need with the proper important distinction to separate smaller means for help instead of hoping they know landlords who may only own one or two what programs are out there,” she said. “If properties from those that own dozens. a tenant is truly affected by the pandemObviously, those who own only a handful ic and really legitimately cannot pay their of properties will be far more affected by a rent, I hope they’re given the resources in single tenant not paying rent. In these cas- which they can apply and seek assistance, es, it’s important to make sure legislation because there are a lot of opportunities out there.” will not hurt smaller businesses. Working on a case-by-case basis is cerStill, when interviewed, Kayla Lane, board member and acting secretary of the tainly a valid option, as each tenant's situLandlords Association of Tompkins Coun- ation is unique. Unfortunately, this would ty, said she felt size shouldn’t necessarily often mean settling issues in court, someequate to how landlords should be treated. thing that puts a financial burden on both “I don’t necessarily believe that certain tenants and landlords. Additionally, aclandlords or their sizes have any leaning or cording to a 2020 COVID-19 evictions merit on this discussion,” she said. “I don’t survey conducted by the National Housing

RENTERS VS LANDLORDS

Those most negatively affected by the passing of the ETPA would likely be landlords. This alone wouldn’t necessarily wreak havoc on their income streams, but coupled

It h ac a P r o t e s t ag a i n s t e v i c t i o n s at t h e c i t y c o u r t h o u s e l a s t Au g u s t ( P h o t o : C a s e y M a r t i n) May

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Law Project, nationally, only 10% of tenants have legal representation while 90% of landlords do. Considering this, taking issues to court puts tenants in a precarious position. Settling out of court can be tricky too, especially if tenants aren’t properly educated on their rights as renters. “Many tenants don’t have the knowledge to protect themselves from landlord harassment and manipulation,” DeVivo explained. “A lot of the evictions in Ithaca are extralegal, so they don’t go through the courts, and it’s often them convincing their tenants that they should leave or they have to.” While there are indeed resources given to tenants, many of the programs are flawed, overly-complex and ineffective. In the end, they can negatively affect not only tenants but also landlords. As a recent New York Times article detailed, Congress has allocated billions of dollars in emergency rental aid to help people who fell behind on rent, yet little has reached landlords or tenants. The program requires hundreds of state and local governments to develop their own plans for distributing funds. But because no one is on the same page, efforts have been slowgoing So on the surface, it seems as if the desires of tenants and landlords are at odds. Any legislation for rent reform will take away income from landlords, and if everything stays the same, more and more renters will find themselves homeless. For her part, Lane said she feels that landlords are getting a bad rap, which hinders meaningful communication between tenants and landlords. “Right now we’re painted as the bad guy and unfortunately we have to bear that and it's just unfortunate that this is the relationship that comes out of this environment, and I hope this improves so we can work together towards a reasonable solution,” she said. Making this into a tenant versus landlord debate ignores the systemic problems that come from the confusing and contradicting legislature and reform efforts described above. Change can come from the different levels of government working more cohesively, although again, this is easier said than done. On the local level, taking small steps like opting into the ETPA can put Ithaca on a path to rent stabilization, even if this one move will not solve everything.

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It h ac a T im e s  9


Sports

Play Ball!

Jen na Plu e delivers the goods (Photo P r ov i d e d) “So far,” the coach said, “we are doing what we can with the limited gym time, and I give a lot of credit to the administration for working to get equal time for several sports.” He also expresses gratitude to assistant coach Al Plue, who, Begent said, “has a strong influence on the program.” Plue’s daughter, Jenna, will step into the circle again for the Little Red. Now a junior, Jenna has been the team’s pitcher since she was in 8th grade, and she, in Begent’s words, “puts her heart and soul into it, and is without question a college prospect.” Plue’s battery mate is Clara Tagliacozzo-Lee, and Begent is pleased to have two players he calls “our leaders” in the middle of the action. Regarding the lack of travel team players, Begent said, “We have some girls, like Madison Spencer, that play — or have played — for teams like the Conklin Raiders or the Lady Lions, but as you know,

By Ste ve L aw re nc e

W

hen talking to high school athletes from different sports in Ithaca, it is sometimes prudent to ask two different questions. If you are talking to a softball player, for example, the question is likely “Do you play on a travel team?” If you are conversing with a lacrosse or hockey player, the question is “On which travel team do you play?” Everyone knows that Ithaca has its sports passions, but that is not stopping the Ithaca High softball team from gearing up for the 2021 season. I spoke with Gordy Begent — now in his 9th season as the head coach — and he said, “Last year was tough… we had six seniors that lost out. 2020 was supposed to be our best year, the year we had been waiting for. We would have competed in the league and in Section IV.” This season, the Little Red will carry 14 girls on the roster, and Begent points out that the regulations related to busing are one of the residual challenges from the Year of COVID.

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this is a lacrosse and hockey town.” He didn’t sound like he was complaining, and he is excited to have a dugout full of enthusiastic players, like many others, he would clearly like to see a solid travel team formed and built locally. The Little Red are scheduled to play six games in the STAC and another six against local schools. When asked about “the lost year,” Begent said, “We talked about it, and the girls are very eager to take advantage of the opportunity to play. They will bring a lot of pride this year.” ● ● ●

On Sunday, I attended a memorial tree planting ceremony for Rebecca Ryan, who

passed in January as a result of a tragic accident. Beckie would have been 22 this week. I have written several stories about Rebecca’s mom, Jessica, who has worked tirelessly for many years to keep the adult women’s basketball league going, and if Beckie knew I was writing about her in a sports column, she would have had a really good laugh. She was gifted and passionate in the world of theater, but sports? Not so much… Of course, one does not have to be THE story to make it into this column, he or she just needs to be a PART of a good story. Jessica Ryan — knowing I am close to a person peripherally connected to

that story — shared it with me with great pleasure. As a third or fourth-grade student at Immaculate Conception, Rebecca played basketball, and while she ran up and down the court with as much enthusiasm as any other kid, nobody EVER passed her the ball. During one late-season game — much to the surprise of everyone — a kid with the first-name Ryan saw that Rebecca was open, so he passed the ball to her. Holding the ball like a radioactive hot potato, Beckie freaked out and just launched it in the direction of the hoop. Swish. She ended her basketball playing days with a shooting percentage that can never be exceeded. One for one. And done.

That kid named Ryan would go on to make a lot more passes, on the basketball court and on the lacrosse field. Ryan Sposito graduated from Ithaca High in 2018. He now plays Division I lacrosse at West Point, and his grandfather, retired Cornell lacrosse coach Richie Moran, stood next to me at Rebecca’s memorial ceremony. Richie loves the story of the assist that will never be forgotten. I do, too. Way to go, Ryan.

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I t h a c a T i m e s   11


Personal Health

save up to

Mask off

Mask guidance eases for the fully vaccinated, state to begin lifting restrictions

Choosing Safer Activities

on select floors

By Tanne r Harding

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Unvaccinated People

Accessible link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/participate-in-activities.html

Your Activity Outdoor

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Walk, run, wheelchair roll, or bike outdoors with members of your household Attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated family and friends

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Indoor

salon Protect yourself and others when s vaccination rollout continuesVisit a barber or· hair traveling by wearing a mask with more than 60% of Tompkins There are also big changes coming to County receiving at least one dose Go to an uncrowded, indoor shopping center museum stateorrestrictions. Gov. Andrew Cuomo of the COVID-19 vaccine, guidance has been continuously changing. According to announced that effective May 19, most Ride public transportbusiness with limitedcapacities occupancy will be removed in the CDC, people are considered fully vacNew York state. Businesses will only be cinated two weeks after their second dose a small, indoor gathering of fully vaccinated and limited by the space available for patrons in a two-dose series (PfizerAttend orunvaccinated Moderna) people from multiple households to maintain the required social distance of or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine sixmovie feet.theater This will apply across commercial (Johnson & Johnson). Until you meetGo to an indoor settings including retail, food services, these requirements, you should continue gyms and fitness centers, amusement and taking all the precautions of an un-vacciAttend a full-capacity worship service family entertainment, hair salons, barber nated person. shops and other personal care services. It Once you’ve met the criteria, you can Sing in an will indoor chorus also apply in places of worship. start to go back to some normalcy in your Additionally, beginning May 10, the life. Below is the CDC’s list of things you outdoor can start doing: Eat at an indoor restaurantsocial or bar gathering limit will increase from 200 to 500 people, and on May 19 the · Gather indoors with fully vachigh intensity indoor social gathering limit will increase cinated people without wearing a Participate mask orin an indoor, exercise class from 100 to 250 people. The outdoor resistaying six feet apart dentialvaccine gathering limit of 25 people will · Gather indoors with unvacciGet a COVID-19 be assume removed, and prevention the indoor nated people of any Prevention age from one • also Safety levels the recommended measures residenmeasures notother needed are followed, both by the individual and the venue (if applicable). tial gathering limit will increase from 10 to household without masks or staying six Take prevention measures • CDC cannot provide the specific risk level for every activity in 50 feet apart, unless oneFullyofvaccinated thosepeople: people has everypeople. community. It is important to consider your own personal wear a mask situation and the risk to you, your family, and your community wear a mask, stay 6 feet Venues that host things like sports, an increased risk forUnvaccinated severe people: illness before venturing out. apart, and wash your hands. performing arts, live entertainment and · Gather or conduct activities catered receptions can exceed the social outdoors without wearing a mask except gathering limits of 500 people outdoors in certain crowded settings and venues cdc.gov/coronavirus and 250 people indoors if all attendees · If you travel domestically, you do not need to get tested before or after travel, over the age of 4 can present either proof and you don’t need to self-quarantine after of full vaccination status or a recent negative COVID-19 test result, and the travel required social distancing can be accom· If you’ve been in contact with modated. someone who has COVID, you do not Beginning May 19, large-scale indoor need to stay away from others or get tested event venues will operate at 30% capacity, unless you have symptoms an increase from the current 10% capacHowever, there are still some safety ity. Large-scale outdoor event venues will measures you should still be taking, as the operate at 33%, a change that has allowed pandemic isn’t over yet. Cornell to let graduates have two guests · Wear a mask that fits snugly each in attendance at commencement. against your face when you are in indoor In the spirit of reopening, The Range public settings, gathering indoors with has announced it will begin offering live unvaccinated people from more than one household, visiting indoors with an unvac- music again starting June 1, and that everyone who attends will be required to cinated person who is at increased risk or show proof of vaccination. who lives with a person who is · Avoid large indoor gatherings · Watch out for symptoms of COVID-19 Less Safe

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State Theatre to stream live performance from Pink Talking Fish to honor Grateful Dead’s 1977 Cornell performance

T

By Sydney Keller

he State Theatre is holding an online performance of Pink Talking Fish Play DEAD on May 8 to celebrate the 44th anniversary of an infamous concert that took place at Barton Hall on Cornell’s campus in 1977. Grateful Dead performed at Cornell 44 years back, and it was the most legendary concert of their career. As a celebratory remembrance of this iconic concert, the State Theatre pays tribute to the concert on May 8 of each year. This year, you can stream the live performance remotely from 7–10 p.m. The link to the performance can be found at: stateofithaca.org/events The band, Pink Talking Fish, is coming to Ithaca to perform at this year’s celebratory performance and will be incorporating some

of the songs played by the Grateful Dead at the concert back in ‘77. Doug Levine, executive director at the State Theatre, oversees all operations for the nonprofit theatre. “We’re excited about it,” Levine said. “It’s gonna be a lot of fun.” Levine said he saw his first show when he was 12 years old, and that the first time he ever heard of Ithaca was from a cassette tape from the Grateful Dead concert of 1977. Levine said that when he first began looking at colleges, that cassette tape moment always resonated with him. “That [moment] is near and dear to my heart,” Levine said. The State Theatre is a central part of the Ithaca art scene, and Levine said he is happy to be involved in putting on the performance. “With that history of having the preeminent jam band having their best show here ever, I think it’s a worthy thing to celebrate it every year, if we can,” Levine said. Levine emphasized how his favorite part about being involved with the performance and the State Theatre is that he can be surrounded by what he loves, which in this case is music. “I just can’t fake my love or passion for live music, for the show, for all of this,” he said. Levine said he enjoys what he is doing at the State Theatre and all that the theater offers to the Ithaca community. “Just being able to be the driving force behind it makes me really proud,” Levine said.

“I do know that a lot of people enjoy what we do, they enjoy the shows and they support us in many meaningful ways too. They’re grateful for what we’re doing.” Levine said that they have done many livestream shows, but what’s different about this year’s performance is that they are partnering with a major organization, Relix Productions. They will be streaming on the Relix Twitch channel, which will help reach a broader audience beyond the Ithaca community. Levine said he believes over two million people will know about the performance and he hopes to see a good turn out. “I’m hoping that we see significant numbers, significant eyes watching the show and gaining respect for the State Theatre and what we do,” Levine said. Levine said he wanted to acknowledge that the State Theatre is a nonprofit and that they have been hit hard during the COVID-19 pandemic, so he hopes that even though the performance is free, people will consider to support the theater financially. “I truly hope people will understand all the work, time and effort put into this and give us back a little as well, support us through donations,” Levine said. Sponsors, including Visit Ithaca and Wegmans, have stepped up and allowed this year’s performance to be free of cost, and Levine said he is grateful to all the sponsors who were able to make this happen.

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GRATEFUL DEAD DAY

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Film

shuller adores the Tarantino aesthetic; he uses needle drops like Pat Benatar’s “Heartbreaker” to score most of the action set pieces. And now Odenkirk of all people is suddenly the least likely action hero…and the most welcome.

The titles tell you everything BVC looks at three action-horror thrillers that try harder

● ● ●

By Br yan VanC ampe n

I

f Bruce Willis starred in Ilya Naishuller’s “Nobody” (Perfect World Pictures-87North Productions-Eighty Two Films- Odenkirk Provissiero Entertainment, 2021, 92 min.) instead of comic actor Bob Odenkirk, there would be no surprise at all. Odenkirk plays an everyman family guy stuck on a treadmill of work and boredom. When he fails to protect his family during a home invasion, something snaps, and as he pursues the burglars and ends up killing a thug in the Russian Mafia, Odenkirk’s anonymous

schlemiel reveals what Liam Neeson in the “Taken” movies calls “special skills”. Odenkirk basically morphs into John Wick, which gives “Nobody” a blackly comic edge that wouldn’t be there if the usual suspects toplined the picture. I adore comedians and comedy writers, and for years Odenkirk was one of those guys who made great comedies like “Mr. Show,” “The Ben Stiller Show” and “SNL.” He mentored Tim and Eric, and struggled to become a film director. Then he got cast in “Breaking Bad” and “Better Call Saul” and started killing it as a dramatic actor in films like

Russell Crowe in ‘Unhinged.’

“The Post” and “Little Women.” Now he’s the Midwest Jason Statham. Who woulda thunk it? I was unfamiliar with director Ilya Naishuller as a director, but I was so knocked out by his work on “Nobody” that I checked Netflix and added his “Hardcore Henry” to my queue. You can tell that Nai-

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I threw on “Unhinged” (Ingenious Media-Burek Films-Solstice Studios, 2020, 93 min.) at the end of a long day, thinking I’d watch the first 30 minutes, get a good night’s sleep and catch the rest in the morning. In the first scene, Russell Crowe can’t balance his meds, melts down and burns his ex-wife’s house to the ground after killing everyone inside with a crowbar. So the next day, when Caren Pistorius (“Mortal Engines”) is driving her son (Gabriel Bateman) to school and honks at Crowe in traffic and passes him, we know she’s in deep trouble. “Unhinged” puts the pedal to the metal and never lets up until the end credits. Needless to say, I watched the whole thing, cringing and gasping the whole time as Crowe ups the ante and twists the knife. “Unhinged” certainly echoes Joel Schumacher’s 1993 man-run-amuck thriller “Falling Down,” but Crowe shows the pain and alienation beneath the road rage that makes his character more than an unstoppable monster. Carl Ellsworth wrote the script and Derrick Borte directed; I’d never heard of either of them, but I can’t wait to see what they make next. “Unhinged” has the feel of the second feature on a double bill, a stripped-down B-movie that ends up being more entertaining than the preceding A-movie. ● ● ●

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I’m sensing a pattern here. Here’s another talented filmmaker previously unknown to me. Christopher Landon, son of actor Michael Landon, has co-written and helmed the enjoyably twisted horror movie “Freaky” (Blumhouse ProductionsDivide/Conquer-Universal, 2020, 101 min.). As you might infer by its title, “Freaky” is a scary movie take on bodyswitch movies like “Freaky Friday” and “Vice Versa.” Vince Vaughn plays a serial killer who ends up swapping souls with a 17-year-old high school girl (Kathryn Newton). The plot is slightly funky, and I’m not sure I parsed the logic behind the big switcheroo, but it’s worth seeing for the performances of Vaughn and Newton, who really commit to giving two specific pairs of performances. Landon also knows the hoariest horror movie tropes and has a lot of fun both honoring them and also kidding them. Newton’s two besties are a gay teenage boy and a Black teenage girl; when the killer starts chasing them, the gay kid yells, “You’re Black! I’m gay! We’re dead!”


Art

An artist’s catalog

Trumansburg artist Barbara Page explores her past through an unusual medium b y Ar thur W hit m an

B

ack in 2008, Trumansburg artist Barbara Page embarked on what would become yet another of her obsessive multi-year projects. Finding oldfashioned checkout cards, now unneeded, inside some of her library books, the committed bibliophile began to document her current reading by decorating these with imagery. Using handwriting, drawing, rubber stamps and collage, Page transformed these quaint artifacts into playful works of art. Soon she was going back to her childhood, trying to reconstruct a lifetime of reading, arranged in — at least approximate — chronological order. The project was cemented when the artist found a two-drawer wooden card catalog in an antique store as well as, eventually, two thousand unmarked cards from a library supply outlet. The cabinet now holds over eight hundred completed cards, organized by year. (She continues to post new entries on her Instagram page.) Since

then, Page has exhibited work from the series — christened her “Book Marks” — at the Center for Book Arts in New York City and in various libraries and museums. Released last month by Bauer and Dean Publishers, “Book Marks: An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind” combines color reproductions of 434 decorated cards with an affecting, impressionistic memoir. Sections of cards — displayed four to a page in neat grids — alternate with six narrative chapters, each tracing roughly a decade of the artist’s life. The memoir sections begin with Page’s rural Pennsylvania upbringing, begun under the shadow of the Second World War. They take us through her time as a young faculty wife in Berkeley and Ithaca; her personal liberation as a pilot and art student; her years as a commercial painter; and finally through the commissions, personal projects and global travel that have occupied her over the past three

decades. Along the way, they trace a family life marked by mental illness and untimely death. References to her book life are interwoven throughout. Clearly Page values reading — and by extension, learning and art — as a form of imaginative self-definition and growth. Both a compelling standalone effort and a somewhat oblique commentary on her ongoing card catalog project, “Book Marks” will be of great interest to local art aficionados as well as lovers of memoir, travel, nature and literature. This is a beautifully produced hardcover: a rarity amongst local-interest publications. Although not an “artist’s book” in a strict sense — the book art genre generally includes handmade or individually altered pieces, rather than mass publications like this one — it can nonetheless be seen as literary-visual work of art. The interior layout is of particular note. In addition to the aforementioned checkout card intermezzos, illustrations interspersed with the main text include personal photos, images of the artist’s paintings (alas, too few for some of us), and choice book covers. Page is known to many Ithacans for her earlier project, “Rock of Ages, Sands of Time,” which like this one, takes on an elaborately conceived chronology: in this case, the history of life as traced in the Earth’s fossil record. This she captured in 544 small painted relief panels — each representing a million years of evolution — and had permanently installed as

a freestanding wall at the Museum of the Earth, which opened in 2003. Combining painstaking research with subtle imaginative liberties, the project bears comparison with her current one. Like “Rock of Ages,” both “Book Marks” projects can be seen as eccentric variations on what the theorist of comics Scott McCloud has called sequential art: discrete images arranged in a larger sequence to form a narrative, direct or oblique. While her card catalog version, one-of-a-kind, can be seen as an artist’s book (following the loose definition of “book” familiar to devotees of the genre), her latest effort can be seen a hybrid graphic novel: combining fiction and nonfiction, as well as conceptual abstraction and intimate personal narrative, into a complex whole.

Odyssey Books This Thursday, May 6, the Odyssey Bookstore in Ithaca will be hosting “The Art of Reading,” a discussion between the artist and Susan Curie, interim Tompkins County Public Library head librarian. The event, to be held on Zoom between 7 and 8 p.m., is part of this month’s virtual Spring Writes literary festival. More information can be found at the festival website (https:// artspartner.org/content/view/spring-writes).

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A full-time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-Day work week. AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This This position provides overnight supervision ofposition provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting. residents and general recordkeeping and reporting.

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The Joy of Color - an Introduction to Acrylic Painting Techniques | 5 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | 15 Steps, 171 East State Street | In this class Bill Deats will be teaching about mixing and using color in the painting process and basic painting techniques. This 1 1/2 hr class meets on 4 consecutive Wednesdays. Students receive a set of .75 oz Liquitex acrylic paints, a pal-

Music 5/5 Wednesday Concert Band at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

Dewitt Park Ithaca Farmers Market at Dewitt Park | 9 a.m., 5/11 Tuesday | This market is perfect for grabbing prepared food or groceries. Vendors set up around the perimeter of the park (across from Greenstar Oasis) with tents and tables.

5/6 Thursday Jorma Kakounen Concert in a Car | 8 p.m. | Dwyer Memorial Park, 6799 Little York Lake Rd Wind Ensemble at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

Film

Orchestra at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

5/7 Friday

Antigone | 4:30 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Virtual | RSVP for a FREE ticket Streaming link available Apr 30-May 6 Antigone is an Algerian-born teenager living in Montreal with her immigrant family.

Mary Hayes North Competition for Senior Piano Majors at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 2 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

Virtual Cinemapolis: Wet Season | 5/7 Friday | Virtual | As Mandarinlanguage teacher Ling continues with fruitless IVF treatment while taking care of her ailing father-in-law, she finds herself slowly drawn towards a promising student who seems to have been abandoned by his parents.

5/8 Saturday Cayuga Chamber Orchestra: Red Chair Spotlight Concert featuring Sera Smolen (Cello) | 3 p.m. | First Presbyterian Church, 315 N. Cayuga Street | $0.00 - $30.00

10th Annual Benefit My State: PINK TALKING FISH Play DEAD | 7 p.m. | State Theatre of Ithaca, State Theatre Box Office, 105 West State Street | Free

10TH ANNUAL BENEFIT MY STATE: PINK TALKING FISH PLAY DEAD 7 p.m. | State Theatre of Ithaca | Free - Register online for link at stateofithaca.org Tickets image from Dean Heiser’s book, Cornell ‘77 via Facebook

Stage

College, 201 Muller Center | It’s time

13th Annual Spring Writes Literary Festival - All Zoom. All Free! | 6:30 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Ithaca

Partnership’s annual “Spring Writes

now in its 13th year.

once again for the Community Arts Literary Festival”! This AMAZING varied and diverse Literary Festival is

Art

lette knife, and 6 acrylic paint brushes to keep. | $175.00 Drawn to the Water A Virtual and Physical Art Show | 12 p.m., 5/7 Friday | Virtual | A Virtual and Physical

Enjoy a Taste of Ithaca Walk-ins welcome for glasses of bottles Reservations recommended for tastings Hours: Sunday–Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 607-272-WINE (9463) www.SixMileCreek.com 3.5 miles East of The Commons, 1551 Slaterville Road (Rt. 79) 16  T

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“Bridges and Boats” Art Exhibition at North Star Art Gallery | 12 p.m., 5/7 Friday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road | This exhibition opens May 1st and runs through June. It includes paintings of man made creations of boats and bridges in natural settings. | Free Gallery Night Ithaca - Every First Friday of the month | 5/7 Friday | Virtual | First Friday Gallery Night is a monthly community celebration of the latest art showings taking place in and around Downtown Ithaca.

Concerts/Recitals

Listen to the Mothers 2021: COMEDY, MUSIC & s’MOREs | 4:30 p.m. | Ithaca by Firelight Camps, 1150 Danby Road | $25.00 - $250.00

Art Show - March 20 to May 16 The Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts presents a virtual art show experience of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Finger Lakes

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Virtual Cinemapolis: About Endlessness | 5/8 Saturday | Virtual | Simultaneously an ode and a lament, ABOUT ENDLESSNESS presents a kaleidoscope of all that is eternally human, an infinite story of the vulnerability of existence. Virtual Cinemapolis: Marighella | 5/8 Saturday | Virtual | A searing and


“Tompkins provided extremely valuable advice, oversight, and support, so that we could create a healing space for our community,” says Dr. McAllister.

Service Stability Strength

Virtual Cinemapolis: The County | 5/8 Saturday | Virtual | After her husband’s sudden and suspicious death, Inga learns the true extent of both her powerlessness and her late husband’s involvement with a bureaucratic farm co-op’s schemings. With an eye to the future, and with no other option, she aims to chip away at the co-op’s domination. Virtual Cinemapolis: Oscar Shorts 2021 | 5/8 Saturday | Virtual | All three categories - Animation, Live Action, and Documentary - are available to screen through May 13. Virtual Cinemapolis: 42nd Street Live NTL | 5/12 Wednesday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | VIRTUAL CINEMAPOLIS SCREENINGS FROM 5/12 – 5/18. Appointment screenings will be daily at 1pm, 4pm, 7pm, and 10pm.

DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES of ITHACA Dr. Josie McAllister, Founder

When Dermatology Associates of Ithaca had outgrown their office space, Dr. Josie McAllister turned to a team who has been there for the practice every step of the way: Tompkins Trust Company and Tompkins Insurance Agencies. With guidance and financing help from Tompkins, Dr. McAllister was able to purchase and renovate a beautiful 8,000 square foot facility in Ithaca.

Visit TompkinsTrust.com or TompkinsIns.com Insurance and investment products are not FDIC insured, have no bank guarantee and may lose value.

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energized portrait of one of Brazil’s most divisive historical figures, Afro-Brazilian poet and politician, the legendary Carlos Marighella – played by famous Actor/Musician Seu Jorge

interest in learning about social behavior is welcome to attend. This free event will be offered via Zoom. To register and find the Zoom link for participation, visit https://www. tcpl.org/

Special Events

virtual-toni-morrison-book-club-andmaking-meetup

13th Annual Spring Writes Literary Festival - All Zoom. All Free! | 6:30 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center | It’s time once again for the Community Arts Partnership’s annual “Spring Writes Literary Festival”! This AMAZING varied and diverse Literary Festival is now in its 13th year. Mother’s Day Hike at Smith Woods at Smith Woods | 1 p.m., 5/8 Saturday | Join Cayuga Nature Center and Cornell professor and PRI Trustee Emeritus Marvin Pritts on a guided Mother’s Day hike to learn more about what makes Smith Woods unique!

Books Virtual Toni Morrison Book Club and Making Meetup | 12 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | https://www.tcpl.org/events/

Spring Writes Poetry and Prose Open Mic | 6:30 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Virtual | Offered as part of Community Arts Partnership’s Spring Writes lineup, the virtual open mic is open to writers of all ages and experience levels. The event is also open to community members who want to be part of the audience. | Free 13th Annual Spring Writes Literary Festival - All Zoom. All Free! | 6:30 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center | It’s time once again for the Community Arts Partnership’s annual “Spring Writes Literary Festival”! This AMAZING varied and diverse Literary Festival is now in its 13th year. Zine on Zoom | 5/5 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Youth writers in 4 th through 12 th grades are invited to help create and produce Tomfoolery, a quarterly publication of poems, stories, and art. Spring Writes Literary Festival | 5/5 Wednesday | Community Arts

Partnership of Tompkins County, 171 East State St | 25 Panels, Performances, Readings, Events! All free. All zoom. Just Check out the Schedule and Register for the Events of your Choosing. | Free Personal Finance Lunch and Learn | 12:10 p.m., 5/6 Thursday | Virtual | The IC community is invited to join the School of Business this semester as we host a series of monthly webinars on a variety of personal finance topics, including Taxes, Housing, Budgeting, and Friends of the Library Book Sale | 10 a.m., 5/8 Saturday | Friends of the Library Book Sale, 509 Esty St. | Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale / 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m., Sat-Mon 5/1-3 / 509 Esty St / www.booksale. org. Over 250,000 books, DVDs, CDs, puzzles, games & more. In Your Own Backyard: Presented by Cornell Graduate Students | 2 p.m., 5/8 Saturday | Virtual | During this virtual presentation, Cornell graduate students will share current research about mental health. Anyone in the Ithaca community with an

Elusive Blue: the Rarest of Flower Colors | 2 p.m., 5/11 Tuesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Did you know that blue is the rarest flower color? Please join Brandon George, graduate student in Public Garden Leadership at Cornell University, for an in-depth talk on the color blue. Family Book Club | 5 p.m., 5/11 Tuesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Family Book Club is for 4-8 year olds and their family. For now the family book club will be held on zoom. Friends of the Library Book Sale: Senior Day at Regina Lennox Book Sale Building | 10 a.m., 5/12 Wednesday | Friends of the Tompkins County Public Library Spring Book Sale at 509 Esty St, Ithaca. Senior Day is Wednesday May 12: 10am-3pm, only for patrons age 60+ and those with disabilities.

Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 5/7 Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm. Family Book Club | 5 p.m., 5/11 Tuesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Family Book Club is for 4-8 year olds and their family. For now the family book club will be held on zoom.

Notices Trumansburg Farmers Market at On the corner of Route 227 & 96 … In the heart of Trumansburg | 4 p.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Enjoy live music, supper and shopping at the community-built pavilions and lawn tents for fresh locally grown produce, naturally raised meats, eggs, flowers, plants, crafts and products.

Kids

the Ithaca Farmers Market at Ithaca Farmers Market | 9 a.m., 5/8 Saturday | Visit the farmers market every Saturday, rain or shine, at the pavilion.

Toddler Story Time - Snow | 10:30 a.m., 5/5 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Join Miss Ashley on zoom for an interactive time of stories, songs and more. This program is geared toward toddlers is open to children birth through preschool with their caregivers.

Dewitt Park Ithaca Farmers Market at Dewitt Park | 9 a.m., 5/11 Tuesday | This market is perfect for grabbing prepared food or groceries. Vendors set up around the perimeter of the park (across from Greenstar Oasis) with tents and tables.

Scholarships Available for Youth Museum Membership and Summer Camp | 5/6 Thursday | Cayuga Nature Center, 1420 Taughannock Blvd | The Paleontological Research Institution (PRI) will continue to offer the Young Naturalist Access Program (YNAP) to youth in the community facing difficult circumstances in Tompkins County and boarding counties with free access to a special membership. Apply at www.priweb.org/ynap

Friends of the Library Book Sale: Senior Day at Regina Lennox Book Sale Building | 10 a.m., 5/12 Wednesday | Friends of the Tompkins County Public Library Spring Book Sale at 509 Esty St, Ithaca. Senior Day is Wednesday May 12: 10am-3pm, only for patrons age 60+ and those with disabilities.

SPRING WRITES LITERARY FESTIVAL

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE

THE 13TH ANNUAL SPRING WRITES LITERARY FESTIVAL - ALL ON ZOOM

10 A.M., 5/8 SATURDAY | 509 ESTY ST.

10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m., Sat-Mon 5/1-3 / 509 Esty St www.booksale.org. Over 250,000 books, DVDs, CDs, puzzles, games & more.

MAY 5TH TO MAY 16TH

25 Panels, Performances, Readings, Events! All free. All zoom. Just Check out the Schedule and Register for the Events of your Choosing artspartner.org/content/view/spring-writes

May

5 – 1 1,

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I t h a c a T i m e s   17


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

| 59,200 Readers

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

BUY SELL TRADE

BUY SELL TRADE

Drive out Breast Cancer:

The Morning Glory School is Enrolling!

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

100/Automotive

Summer & Fall 2021 Kindergarten Farm School- Montessori and Waldorf Inspired. Ages 4-6. Monday- Friday contact Jessie at : Morninggloryschoolinfo@gmail.com

CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

CAR TO KIDS

400/Employment

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

320/Bulletin Board

Ithaca’s only

FOOD SERVICE HELPERS

hometown electrical distributor

SUBSTITUTES NEEDED: P/T Food Service Helpers needed in Seneca County OFA Romulus Kitchen to assist in preparing meals for the elderly. May require Food Transport and delivering meals. Must operate your own vehicle. Clean NYS Driver’s License required. Equal Opportunity Employer. For more information contact the Seneca County Office for the Aging at (607) 869-9420.

Your one Stop Shop

Since 1984 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca 607-272-1711 fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com

RASA SPA JOB OPENINGS

Rasa Spa is excited to announce the opening of job postings at all three of their locations: Ithaca, Watkins Glen, and for the grand opening of The Spa at the Inns of Aurora in Aurora, N.Y. Rasa expects to fill dozens of roles in the coming months, with the greatest focus on its new location at The Inns of Aurora. Rasa’s locations in Ithaca and Watkins Glen have enjoyed consistent demand despite challenging restrictions and economic conditions, and the new Aurora location continues the well-respected brand’s growth. The state-of-the-art facility promises to be the Finger Lakes region’s premier wellness destination, creating local jobs and driving local tourism. Creating these exciting employment opportunities and tourism revenue, at a time when they are particularly needed, feels especially poignant and reflects Rasa and its partners’ commitment to the communities in which they operate. HUMAN RESOURCES CONTACT: Cynthia King, Spa Director: hiring@rasaspa. com, 202.409.4453 https://www.rasaspa.com/careers/ HUMAN RESOURCES CONTACT: Cynthia King, Director of Operations: abby@ rasaspa.com, 607.273.1740

Your Ad REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

Teacher of the Deaf

OCM BOCES has the need for an Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf to be located within the Cortland and Onondaga County areas. Successful candidate will provide academic support to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in district identified by local CSE’s. NYS Certification in Deaf and Hearing Impaired Grades K-12. Experience working with students who are deaf and hard of hearing required. Applications accepted online by 05/04/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at www. ocmboces.org. EOE

Water Technician

The Van Etten Water District is seeking candidates for a part-time Water Technician. The Water Technician performs a variety of jobs related to operation, maintenance, customer service, emergency service, construction and maintenance of the Van Etten Water District’s facilities and hydrant system. Applications and job description may be obtained at and applications should be sent to the Town Clerk’s Office, 6 Gee St., PO Box 177, Van Etten, NY 14889. Tuesday and Thursday 11 am – 4 pm and Wednesday 1pm – 6pm. Applications to be received by 4:00 pm on May 13, 2021. Town of Van Etten is an EOE employer.

425/Education

ithaca.com/classifieds

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINYL Ithaca WebsIte DesIgn Manufacture To InstallREPLACEMENT WINDOWS REPLACEMENT Do you have a business? WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate & WINDOWS

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18  T

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www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at I t h a c a 866-585-6050 Tori m e sFree / M Toll ata y 5 – 1 1 ,

866-585-6050

EMPLOYMENT

2 0 2 1

EMPLOYMENT

ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN CAN)

430/General

800/Services

JOB OPPORTUNITY:

COMPLETE CARE

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

520/Adoptions Wanted LOOKING TO ADOPT

Family-oriented single woman looking to welcome a child into her life. Any ethnicity welcome, expenses paid. Please call (347) 470-5228 or my attorney: (800) 582-3678 for information. (NYSCAN)

Special Education

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

DONATE YOUR

COMMUNITY

610/Apartments APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

HOME WARRANTY

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-877673-0511 | Hours Mon-Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

DELIVERY Part-Time Route Driver needed for delivery of newspapers every Wednesday. Must be available 9am-1pm, have reliable transportation, and a good driving record.

Call 277-7000

Two bedroom Collegetown Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call (607) 273-1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


805/Business Services

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

GUTTER CLEANING

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

HOME REPAIRS

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

MARYLAND

1010/Commercial

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

CLOG-FREE GUARANTEE

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

GU

BANKRUPTCY

OCEAN CITY

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TT

EXCLUSIVE LIMITED TIME OFFER!

NATIO

1

15% & 10 %

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Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

820/Computer

N

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

ER GUA

OFF

FINANCING THAT FITS YOUR BUDGET!1 Promo Code: 285

Subject to credit approval. Call for details.

1

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Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warrant COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 off 2 FREE Months! 866-44060+ parcels available: Lots, Acreage, Homes, Commercial Properties 6501 (NYSCAN)

SENIORS & MILITARY!

YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE *

+

5

% OFF

OFF

WE INSTALL

YEAR-ROUND!

TO THE FIRST 50 CALLERS ONLY! **

LIFETIME WARRANTY

1-855-478-9473

A FREE ESTIMATE

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST

*For those who qualify. One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. **Offer valid at time of estimate only 2The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 WA UBI# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H License# 2705169445 License# 262000022 License# 262000403 License# 0086990 Registration# H-19114

HAMILTON COUNTY

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

ONLINE AUCTION THROUGH TUESDAY JUNE 1

Property Address:

Trusted • Certified • Licensed • Fully Insured • FREE Estimates

175 Golf Course Rd., Lake Pleasant, NY 12108

1 Vacant Lot located near the end of Golf Course Rd on the left. This property has approximately 50’ of frontage on Golf Course Rd and approximately 60’ of shoreline frontage.

Auction Begins to Close Tuesday, June 1, 2021 at 10:00am ET. **Specific Registration Requirements, Take action today!**

The Gold Standard In Roofing

Time to raise the roof this May... Let Uncle Sam help pay!

For complete sale details:

www.AuctionsInternational.com 800 -536-1401, Ext. 110

Give that Roof a Facelift!

Have real estate you want sold? Contact us, we can help! Online auctions closing daily | www.auctionsinternational.com

Free estimate-fully licensed and insured installs over existing roof to save you money — 18 colors to choose from!

Gold Star is offering a stimulus check/tax return special!

Saving a Life EVERY 11 MINUTES

alone I’m never

NORMAL RATES

Life Alert is always here for me.

877-516-1160

518-281-6455

Call now and schedule an appointment!

One touch of a button sends help fast, 24/7.

NOTICE TO NEW YORK RESIDENTS

with

GPS !

FREE

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value!

Help at Home Help On-the-Go ®

Offer valid February 15 - June 6, 2021

I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

Special Financing Available

Batteries Never Need Charging.

For a FREE brochure call:

Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

1-800-404-9776 DENTAL Insurance

Donate Your Car & Help Grant A Child’s Wish

Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org

1. 2. 3.

ARE UNABLE TO PAY CASH FOR NECESSARY HOME REPAIRS. CANNOT AFFORD HIGH OR ADDITIONAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS. HAVE BEEN TURNED DOWN FOR FREE STATE OR GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS.

Money Is Now Available Through Approved Lenders to Qualified Applicants* for Home Repairs

Call to get your FREE Information Kit Benefiting

Homeowner Funding is now offering homeowners a chance to make necessary energy efficient home repairs and will be offering its services to families who:

REPAIR TO INCLUDE: ROOFING • SIDING • WINDOWS • DOORS & MORE...

from Physicians Mutual Insurance Company.

Help Local Children And Get Free & Easy Towing

250

$

OFF

®

REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

THIS COUPON NT F SE

OR

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator

Visit WheelsForWishes.org or call (877)-798-9474

LAKE PLEASANT SURPLUS REAL ESTATE AUCTION

PR E

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

TH

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

EMPLOYMENT

2

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

D

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

SERVICES

R

EMPLOYMENT

1-855-225-1434

No Money Down

dental50plus.com/nypress

Includes the Participating (in GA: Designated) Providers and Preventive Benefits Rider. Product not available in all states. Acceptance guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. Contact us for complete details about this insurance solicitation. This specific offer is not available in CO; call 1-800-969-4781 or respond for similar offer. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN); Rider kinds B438/B439 (GA: B439B). 6255

May

up to

$25,000

No Equity Required

CALL TODAY: (800) 736-9629 or visit NYImprovementFund.com

*Approved applications will have the work completed by a quality repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING

5 – 1 1,

2 0 2 1

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   19


BackPage A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

Lifelong

CLEANING SERVICES

“The Best Sub You’ve ever had!” $5.00 off any purchase at

DiBella’s Subs

with Community Cash Coupon 222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca Engaging, Inclusive Officiating... ... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved ones and friends.

Macintosh Consulting

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

*Acupuncture Works*

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c) www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-272-0114

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149 FREE BRAKE CHECK Brakes feeling spongy? Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

ANIMALS LAND & SEA

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd 607-882-6816

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

Ithac a T imes

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

DiBella’s Subs

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS

h e

toni@ithactimes.com

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP 607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

119 West Court St., Ithaca 607-273-1511 tclifelong.org

20  T

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at

/ May

5–11,

2 0 2 1

ITHACA NEWS

Delivered to your inbox every day Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext: 1214

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

John’s Tailor Shop John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org Oil Change $19.99 Includes oil & filter 4 tire rotation & brake check with Community Cash Coupon Ithaca Auto Service 607-220-9183

PIANOS

Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services No job too big or too small

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26 South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS.

Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation Custom made & Manufactured by

SOUTH SENECA VINYL Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com YOUR CBD STORE The only dedicated retail store for all things CBD 308 E. Seneca Street * Ithaca 845-244-0868

Your Go-To Oil Change Stop

Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

| 59,200 Readers

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

BUY SELL TRADE

Teacher of the Deaf

CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

400/Employment Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY FOOD SERVICE HELPERS

SUBSTITUTES NEEDED: P/T Food Service Helpers needed in Seneca County OFA Romulus Kitchen to assist in preparing meals for the elderly. May require Food Transport and delivering meals. Must operate your own vehicle. Clean NYS Driver’s License required. Equal Opportunity Employer. For more information contact the Seneca County Office for the Aging at (607) 869-9420.

RASA SPA JOB OPENINGS

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

320/Bulletin Board The Morning Glory School is Enrolling!

Summer & Fall 2021 Kindergarten Farm School- Montessori and Waldorf Inspired. Ages 4-6. Monday- Friday contact Jessie at : Morninggloryschoolinfo@gmail.com

Rasa Spa is excited to announce the opening of job postings at all three of their locations: Ithaca, Watkins Glen, and for the grand opening of The Spa at the Inns of Aurora in Aurora, N.Y. Rasa expects to fill dozens of roles in the coming months, with the greatest focus on its new location at The Inns of Aurora. Rasa’s locations in Ithaca and Watkins Glen have enjoyed consistent demand despite challenging restrictions and economic conditions, and the new Aurora location continues the well-respected brand’s growth. The state-of-the-art facility promises to be the Finger Lakes region’s premier wellness destination, creating local jobs and driving local tourism. Creating these exciting employment opportunities and tourism revenue, at a time when they are particularly needed, feels especially poignant and reflects Rasa and its partners’ commitment to the communities in which they operate. HUMAN RESOURCES CONTACT: Cynthia King, Spa Director: hiring@rasaspa. com, 202.409.4453 https://www.rasaspa.com/careers/ HUMAN RESOURCES CONTACT: Cynthia King, Director of Operations: abby@ rasaspa.com, 607.273.1740

OCM BOCES has the need for an Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf to be located within the Cortland and Onondaga County areas. Successful candidate will provide academic support to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in district identified by local CSE’s. NYS Certification in Deaf and Hearing Impaired Grades K-12. Experience working with students who are deaf and hard of hearing required. Applications accepted online by 05/04/21 at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at www. ocmboces.org. EOE

Water Technician

The Van Etten Water District is seeking candidates for a part-time Water Technician. The Water Technician performs a variety of jobs related to operation, maintenance, customer service, emergency service, construction and maintenance of the Van Etten Water District’s facilities and hydrant system. Applications and job description may be obtained at and applications should be sent to the Town Clerk’s Office, 6 Gee St., PO Box 177, Van Etten, NY 14889. Tuesday and Thursday 11 am – 4 pm and Wednesday 1pm – 6pm. Applications to be received by 4:00 pm on May 13, 2021. Town of Van Etten is an EOE employer.

SERVICES

SERVICES

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

520/Adoptions Wanted LOOKING TO ADOPT

Family-oriented single woman looking to welcome a child into her life. Any ethnicity welcome, expenses paid. Please call (347) 470-5228 or my attorney: (800) 582-3678 for information. (NYSCAN)

BUY SELL TRADE Special Education

100/Automotive

EMPLOYMENT

White-Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

610/Apartments APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. Two bedroom Collegetown Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call (607) 2731669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-7526295. (AAN CAN)

One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call (607) 273-1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

425/Education

800/Services

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

COMPLETE CARE

Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN CAN)

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

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DIRECTV

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GUTTER CLEANING

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HOME REPAIRS

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MEDICATION

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Place Your Ad Go to ithaca.com/classifieds

I t h a c a T i m e s   21

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May 5 2021  

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