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Online @ ITH ACA .COM

Turning the Corner Live theatre, local retail and the “streatery” PAGE 8

BUDGET SEASON

HERE TO STAY

ICSD proposes $145M budget

Post Office downtown Not going anywhere

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PERFECT INSIDE OUT New downtown med spa PAGE 23

BLEND

Coffee shop combines Plants and espresso PAGE 25


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Medigap policies are only available to people who already have Medicare Part A which helps pay for hospital services, and Medicare Part B, which covers the cost for doctor services. A Medigap policy covers only one person. If you and your spouse both want a Medigap policy you will each need to buy one. Call the marketing team at (607) 266-5300 to schedule a tour to see our facilities and learn more about lifecare at Kendal at Ithaca. Find us on the web at http://kai. kendal.org/ P.S Medigap insurance companies are required to follow federal government regulations which means they are guaranteed renewable even if the policy holder becomes sick (as long as the premiums are paid). 2230 N. Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 14850-6513

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(607) 266-5300 Toll Free: (800) 253-6325


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VOL.XLI / NO. 35 / April 21, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S

GEORGE FLOYD

Legislature comments on Chauvin conviction

Turning the Corner���������������������� 8 What loosening restricitons mean for live theatre, local retail and the streatery

Neighbors Gallery���������������������� 27 New April show of ceramic ceramic sculpture on West Hill

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elow is part of a statement from Leslyn ClairborneMcBean, chairperson of the Tompkins County Legislature regarding the conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. To view the entire statement, visit Ithaca.com. "Today we witnessed the conviction of former officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is our hope that this verdict sets precedent for future cases, as we’ve seen far too many people walk away after needlessly taking the lives of Black and Brown people in our country. "Over these past few weeks, horrific imagery on the news has been persistent, whether it’s a replaying of the footage of Mr. Floyd’s killing, footage from other recent killings by law enforcement officers, or fallout from horrendous gun violence in our nation. This follows a year of unprecedented suffering and trauma being broadcast 24/7 – we desperately need space for healing, and it is our hope that this verdict can help put us on that path. "Following this senseless killing we rose up and acknowledged that this is not what policing looks like – a knee on a man’s neck, shrouds of bullets following a no-knock warrant, racial profiling, none of this is what we entrust our law enforcement officers with nor is it what we should expect of them or accept from them. We took on a collaborative reimagining of public safety in our community so that we could prevent future tragedies from happening here, and to ensure a more harmonious and sustainable relationship between law enforcement and our communities. It is imperative that we build upon this work and push even farther to a place of more just outcomes and safer communities for us all.”

BUSINE S S TIME S From the inside out ����������������������������� 23 A Perfect Blend ������������������������������������ 24 A boulder way to exercise ���������������� 25 Biz Briefs ������������������������������������������������� 25

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T Film ������������������������������������������������������������ 28 Times Table ��������������������������������������������� 29 Classifieds ���������������������������������������������� 30

SCHOOLS

ICSD proposes $145M budget, 6% increase

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he Board of Education has revealed the proposed 2021–22 Ithaca City School District Budget. The total budget comes out to $145,179,885, which is up 6.09% from the year prior, an unusually large jump for the district. The increase comes from some contractual obligations, such as $2.69 million in salary increases and $1.89 million in employee benefits increases, as well as pandemic circumstances, with $1.19 million of the figure attributed to COVID-19 staffing. Additionally, non-personnel costs related to COVID, such as hand sanitizer, PPE and the like, account for another half a million dollars. According to Superintendent Dr. Luvelle Brown, the budget puts them at a tax levy increase of 2.96%, which he

said is right at the tax levy limit this year. Despite that, he said, he anticipates the tax rate will go down. It’s estimated that a $200,000 home will see a decrease of $7.60. Amanda Verba, the district’s chief operating officer, said Ithaca’s continued growth is to credit for the reduction in tax rate. “Because we’re an evergrowing community, those are more shoulders that can carry the burden of the tax levy,” she said. “That’s why we continue to see our tax rate go down.” She said some people may see a rise overall, but that it would be due to a change in assessed value by the Tompkins County Department of Assessment. Brown addressed the bigger-than-ever budget and said he wants the public to

T a k e

▶  Election news - The Tompkins County Board of Elections has issued MAILCHECK cards to registered voters in Tompkins County, which should be arriving now. These cards inform voters of important election dates and times in

know what it’s going toward. “Our community asks and expects us to do a lot, and we’re going to do a lot,” he said. “You heard young people tonight talk about what they want us to do, and we’re prepared to do just that.” Board member Ann Reichlin asked if the big 6% jump was a one-time thing stemming from specific needs. Verba said yes, and that the budget allows them to be agile in a changing pandemic. “There have been a lot of conversations in finance committee meetings regarding the uniqueness of the budget this year,” she said. “We know there are things we learned this past year that we have to continue to do. We need to make sure we have mental health supports […] We need to ensure our staff are ok and we provide wraparound support.” She added that the extra money gives the district the ability to be flexible while addressing new needs. Verba also said next year’s budget might continued on page 7

N o t e

2021, let voters know where their polling place is, and help the Board of Elections update addresses for Tompkins County voters that have moved. If a card is delivered at your address to someone who no longer lives there, simply mark the

card accordingly (“Not at This Address”) and put it back in the mail. The post office will then return it to the Board of Elections. With questions about MAILCHECK cards, voting, or local elections, call the Board of Elections at (607) 274-5522 or visit votetompkins.

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( P h o t o s : C a s e y M a r t i n)

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 1218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m T o n i C r o u ch , x 1211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Sharon Davis, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

DOW NTOW N

post office is a pillar of the city’s business district, with countless residents and commercial institutions dependent on its central location and easy accessibility for their postal needs, which is why I called on the USPS to keep it right where it is,” Schumer said in a statement. According to Ithaca Town Supervisor Rod Howe, they were able to negotiate a longterm lease that “builds upon the 20 year history of having the U.S. Postal Service as a tenant and importantly, as a downtown Ithaca presence.” Howe said that the lease is initially five years, with two five-year renewal options, meaning that the post office’s North Tioga Street location could be secure for up to 15 years. In February 2020, there was uncertainty over whether or not the North Tioga Street

location would consolidate with the post office on Warren Road. The month prior, the post office had renewed its lease for two years, but the brevity of it brought up concerns over the possible merging of the two offices. Schumer sent thenPostmaster General Megan Brennan a letter stating that relocating the downtown office would have a negative impact on businesses and residents, and urged the USPS to “quickly meet with local officials and stakeholders, and begin working with them to establish a mutually acceptable long-term solution.” He also outlined that downtown Ithaca is a largely pedestrian community and that moving the location to the Warren Road office, which is quite remote, would reduce accessibility for many. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Ithaca Times wins eight New York Press Assoc. awards

photos that draw in a reader to take notice. The copy editing on the ads is well done with strong call to action and layout on ads that allows the viewer to understand quickly what the advertiser is promoting. Strong

he Ithaca Times won eight awards at this year’s (virtual) New York Press Association’s 2020 Better Newspaper contest. The contest featured 2,440 entries from 151 newspapers across New York State, naming winners in dozens of different categories spanning everything from design excellence to the best coverage of niche industries. In a year that was dominated by COVID coverage and interrupted by a change in managing editor, we’re proud to have won awards across a variety of categories, including two first place prizes. Managing editor Tanner Harding shares her thanks with all the freelancers who contribute their time, energy and talents to the Ithaca Times, and to Marshall Hopkins, whose talents go far above even his many design awards. Overall Design Excellence: First place, Ithaca Times What they said: “Very welldesigned section bolstered by tremendous art. Best art and

classified section, well layed out and easy to read the listings.” Best Front Page: Third place in division three, Ithaca Times’ Marshall Hopkins What they said: “These front pages were very striking with their color schemes and headlines. The one that stood out the most to me was the grand reopening front page — very creative and loved the use of black and white with the red.” Coverage of Agriculture: Third place, Ithaca Times’ Arleigh Rodgers and Bill Chaison

What they said: “In this entry, the Ithaca Times offers detailed and insightful coverage for readers to enjoy.” Feature story: First place, division seven, Ithaca Times’ Adam Messinger What they said: “This is a fascinating feature that undoubtedly had been littleknown. The reporter does a terrific job of tying it to the local area. The outstanding details chronicled, even decades after they occurred, right down to the purple lipstick on the cigarette butt, made for a fascinating read. And talking with the only other author of Courtney Love's story in Ithaca actually made the story even more compelling. Terrific job. This story really separated itself in a very competitive category.” Best cartoon: Second place, division two, Ithaca Times’ Marshall Hopkins What they said: “Great cartoon. Makes a reader think, almost makes them laugh, if it wasn't so serious a topic.” Best Public Service or Nonprofit Special Section: Honorable mention, Ithaca Times’ Tanner Harding What they said: “It's great to read about a newspaper company taking responsibility for directing its readers to give and support local organizations. Very nice job!” -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

PHOTOGRAPHER Post office to remain downtown By C a se y Mar tin

YOU’RE A CONTESTANT ON JEOPARDY: WHAT’S YOUR AMUSING PERSONAL ANECDOTE YOU TELL THE HOST? (FUN FACT)

“I’ve been playing chess since High School. I’d have to talk about that.” -Chris R.

A

year after Sen. Chuck Schumer said he was going to get involved in keeping Ithaca’s North Tioga Street post office in service, he

announced a victory. The U.S. Postal Service was able to reach an agreement with the town, keeping the post office open. “Ithaca’s historic downtown

AWAR DS “When I was 12 I could name all 193 Countries. Now, not so much, maybe 50?” -Zoe P .

T

“I worked for the Miami Marlins for a season. It was a great experience!” -Daniel B.

“I make a mean Spaghetti Carbonara…” -Lauren M.

“I’m a lifelong Cowboys fan. We’d talk about that…it’s going to be a good season!” -Matt J.

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use of art across the category, by a long way. Every page pops. Clean, consistent design. Even though features seem different, it is clear they all belong in one publication. Part of good design is not over-designing and that stands out here. Clearly, sections are well designed, but nothing overwhelms the section and does not fit. Fun covers, too.” Advertising Excellence: Third place, Ithaca Times What they said: “This publication has great ad design, each ad having strong images and


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

EVENTS

D

Fashion Week returns to Ithaca this week

Additionally, on o w n April 24 there t o w n will be a vintage is your pop-up show in runway as Fashthe back reading ion Week reroom corner of turns to Ithaca Buffalo Street after a year’s Books. The absence due to bookstore will the COVID-19 also provide a pandemic. The collection of event, which reading materuns through rial on the topic April 25, doesn’t for people to look quite the peruse. same as in years “People will past, but Krisget to see these tina Thelen, one-of-a-kind business develpieces of vintage opment director fashion,” Thelen for the Downsaid. town Ithaca AlliEight differance, said they’re ent locations still trying to downtown will make people be providing feel exposed to either a sale different spring or promotion fashions downduring fashion town. week. Petrune “We’ve tried will also be givto devise differing away a free ent ways to do pair of sunit contactless, glasses with each while still being $50+ purchase, engaging and and Trader K’s entertaining and is offering 20% safe,” she said. off your entire Part of that purchase. is nixing the “We tried big in-person to find ways fashion show for to elevate the seven different event since we fashion-focused can’t have the videos created in same in-person downtown busievents,” she said. nesses. And even “They’re though the event more apparel may look a bit focused, and different this we’ll be doing year, Thelen a showcase on said the shopeach,” Thelen ping and fashion said. will still shine You should through. also keep your “People are eye out for the getting really traveling selfie great things in,” station, which she said. “It’s will have a red Fresh finds from Marie’s Vintage Fashion Pop-Up Sale, modeled by Carmeb of Buffalo Street Books. so great to see carpet and velvet those corals and road to make oranges and yelyou feel like The event will be book-end- lows showing up.” wearing at that moment. Our you’re on the runway even if -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g selfie station is definitely ‘come ed by local businesses showyou’re just in your latest paning off their goods at tables at as you are.’” demic loungewear look. Hilton Garden Inn to visitors She added that it was a way “Our tagline this year is ‘My in town. Benjamin Peters will to get people involved while Fashion, My Rules,’” Thelen kick off the fashion week and keeping things safe and low said. “We want people to Fibers will bring it to a close. density. celebrate the fashion they’re A p ri l

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Sweeeeeeet! Ice cream season is officially underway as Sweet Melissa’s is now offering packaged pints of four of their flavors — chocolate, sweet cream, lemon ricotta and blondies cookies & cream. Pick up a pint at Shortstop Deli! Shooting There was a drive-by shooting on Spencer Road last weekend. Bullets hit a residence but luckily nobody was injured.

HEARD&SEEN Murder A woman was stabbed at Pine Creek Campgrounds in Enfield earlier this week. She’s currently in stable condition, but the suspect was found deceased after committing suicide. Lake Wreck A boat rear-ended another boat on Cayuga Lake last weekend. Two men are currently being treated for injuries, and an investigation is ongoing.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

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QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Do you approve of New York’s new law legalizing recreational marijuana?

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

Which of these best decribe your summer camp experience? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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SPORTS

ITHACA NOTES

We’re Back! … Where Are We? R

Poetry Commotion

By St ev e L aw r e nc e

od Serling could have written a great opening sequence about fans feeling like they are in some parallel universe, going into a stadium to watch a football game, thinking about what they will wear to church on Easter Sunday and whether they will file their taxes the next day… High school football in April? That is indeed some Twilight Zone stuff… At Ithaca High this week, several student-athletes will see a real test of their time management skills. They will show up before school to take part in a practice session. The good news, according to Patrick Hovey, is that measures are being put in place to assure that too many demands are not being placed on these students to prepare them for their last football game of the season, attend classes, then stay after school for the first lacrosse practice of the season. Student-athletes finishing up football and starting lacrosse will not be required to take part in the usual number of practices to maintain eligibility. Hovey — an assistant coach for the Little Red football team and the head honcho for the boy’s lacrosse team — told me, “Luckily, the state allowed the football and soccer players to

attend three crossover practices (instead of six) and they won’t lose anything for lacrosse.” He added, “We (the coaches) have encouraged the guys to finish their commitment to their current sport before starting another.” The concentrated (and abbreviated) sports seasons and unusual sequence (winter sports started February, fall sports in March and spring sports in April) have required coaches to look at some things in new ways. In Hovey’s words, “We won’t have to manage their early season conditioning like we usually do (as they are already in shape), but we will make sure any bumps and bruises they are bringing in will be taken care of.” The already abbreviated football season was cut from six games to three, with two games canceled due to quarantine issues and another due to a spate of injuries. I asked Hovey if the players and coaches had any problems getting fired up to play a traditionally fall sport in the spring, and he said, “No… ‘getting into it’ was not the issue, it was not having time to do it. Every day, we wondered what we could have done with a little more time.”

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By St e ph e n Bu r k e

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his April is the 25th annual National Poetry Month, an event introduced in 1996 by the Academy of American

Poets. The Academy, founded in New York in 1934, promotes poetry through publications, awards, fellowships, resources for schools, readings and events. The event might resonate especially deeply among American locales in a place like Ithaca, a small town with a large college presence, significant literary history, lively arts scene, vast public library and multiple independent bookstores in the heart of its downtown. “From the Finger Lakes: A Poetry Anthology” is a 2019 collection of poems from over 100 writers from the Ithaca area, both established and lay. Cornell University’s most celebrated writers, E.B. White, Vladimir Nabokov, and Toni Morrison, are best known for their work in other genres, but also published poetry. Archie Ammons, recognized as one of America’s greatest poets, taught at Cornell from 1964 through 1998. He died in Ithaca in 2001 at age 75. Ammons won National Book Awards in 1973 and 1993. He won a MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called “genius award,” in 1981, the first year of its existence. “The Complete Poems of A.R. Ammons” was a publishing milestone released in 2017. It covers Ammons’ five decades of work in two volumes of over 1,000 pages each. Ithaca’s public library has a large range of Ammons’ work: dozens of books, including the anthology. The library’s poetry collection is comprehensive, and rewards not just the parochial reader. Ammons’ neighbor on the shelf, pleasingly enough, is Maya Angelou. Among the other poets best represented in the stacks are Adrienne Rich and Alice Walker. Still, the library adequately celebrates Ithaca’s own (or erstwhile), with multiple volumes each from Diane Ackerman, Albert Goldbarth and Roald Hoffmann. A visit to Autumn Leaves Used Books, a capacious used book store on the downtown Commons, might not necessarily reveal the most popular authors in Ithaca. Its inventory comes from random sources, and what’s on its shelves might actually reflect unpopularity, or why is it still there? But a conversation with owner Joe Wetmore provides an informative framework. Wetmore is not in the habit of buying titles he thinks are unpopular. In almost three decades of business, along with what he knew about literature already, and knows generally, he’s learned a lot about local tastes. Maya Angelou is probably the store’s best-selling poet, Wetmore says. Other modern (20th century) favorites include

Audre Lorde, Sylvia Plath, and the various Beat poets: Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti especially; and from classic literature, William Blake, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and W.B. Yeats. Angry Mom Records is in the same building as Autumn Leaves, and Wetmore says books of song lyrics are popular in his store, most notably those of Bob Dylan (who, to some controversy, won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016), Leonard Cohen, the Doors, the Grateful Dead, Bruce Springsteen, and Patti Smith. Buffalo Street Books, a seller of new books in the Dewitt Mall, is probably the best exemplar of current market favorites in Ithaca. Its offerings indicate the popularity of Mary Oliver, Louise Glück (winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize for Literature), and Ursula K. Le Guin (like White, Nabokov, and Morrison, best known for other works, but author of over a dozen volumes of poetry). The store features a selection of Black poets: Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, and Nikki Giovanni, among the veteran; among the newer, Elizabeth Alexander (who read at Barack Obama’s first inauguration), Kwame Alexander (who is also an award-winning author of children’s literature, and founder of Versify, a publishing imprint), Reginald Dwayne Betts, A. Van Jordan, and Nikki Wallschlaeger. Wallschlaeger has a poem titled “Just Because We’re Scared Doesn’t Mean We’re Wrong.” Apparently (as noted by a publication asterisk) it is a line from a song written by Emmylou Harris. It called to mind for me a line from an old Taj Mahal song (“Good Morning Miss Brown”) of roughly the same vintage: “If you ain’t scared, you ain’t right.” Poetry innovates while showing our connections. Reading reveals that and buying supports it: the intended reminders, one supposes, of National Poetry Month. At Buffalo Street Books I discovered that the late Malik “Phife Dawg” Taylor (1970–2016), the ground-breaking lyricist and singer of the legendary hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest, is the son of an award-winning poet, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor. I found out because her verse memoir, “Mama Phife Represents,” is for sale there; or will be again when they replace the copy I bought. Amanda Gorman, who turned the world on its ear this year with her poem at Joseph Biden’s inauguration, has yet to publish with a mainstream house. Her first such releases, scheduled for September, will no doubt be featured at Buffalo Street Books, but might require some planning and patience to acquire: They are among the most anticipated and preordered books in publication history. By which we might surmise that these are good times for poetry; and, possibly, much else.


THE TALK AT

YOUR LETTERS 41 Years Later, Ithaca College is in worse shape than it was in 1979

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Ithaca Little Red Lacrosse on practice field.

SPORTS Contin u ed From Page 6

I spoke with one of the parents presently dealing with the odd overlap, and Ellice Switzer told me, “Our son, Jack, is a junior, and I feel really sad for the seniors because we had (due to stadium upgrades) zero home games.” I asked Ellice if the shortened season and low roster numbers were disheartening to the football players as they prepare for the final game of 2021, and she replied, “Like the rest of the players, Jack loves football and was just happy to be able to play.” Putting a finer point on her son’s gratitude for the opportunity to play, she added, “He left the field in an ambulance in 2019 after a leg fracture, he went straight to the hospital and had a rod inserted in his leg.” She rolled her eyes and said, “That was a fun parenting moment.”

Like any parents, Ellice and Joel Switzer hope that Jack’s injury will be the last one to cost him any playing time, as he is on the radar for several collegiate lacrosse programs. “We’re really looking forward to the scholastic season, and after that, the club season,” Ellice offered. “It will be the only thing that will make me feel like we’re back to normal.” Looking at the upcoming lacrosse season, Hovey likes what he sees. “We have a core group of guys that played on the varsity team as sophomores,” he stated, “and they had their junior year canceled. They are hungry to get back on the field and represent Ithaca High lacrosse. There is a lot of pride involved. They are ready to go.” The Little Red will be led this year by senior co-captains Nick Cartmill, Colin Blakeslee and Zach Neely. Other seniors are Colden Goodrow, Justin Coolican, Cody Capalongo and Brett Wilcox.

ICSD BUDGET Contin u ed From Page 3

have a small decrease or a very small increase, but that they are still working with a lot of unknowns. Brown identified the district’s four goals, called Learning Forward, as students as partners and leaders, educator identity work, anti-racist curriculum for all and structures of support. Deputy Superintendent Lily Talcott said that the Learning Forward ICSD team has begun meeting and currently comprises 30 educators and eight students.

“We’re asking our students to partner with us in both professional development and curriculum design formally,” she said. “We may have informally asked students to be part of the process but now we’re really trying to hold ourselves accountable.” She added that the district is also working with a women of color–run group called Equity Consulting Group that is partnering with ICSD to find ways to ensure inclusion and equity in schools. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

graduated from Ithaca College in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in History. My professors, in the aggregate, taught me that the best way to predict the future is by looking back at historical context to help define potential predictable opportunities as well as deadly landmines. Do you follow that logic? It’s crystal clear to me that the College’s strategic planning essentially overlooked the deadly landmines. The BoT and SLT bear this responsibility. But the blame game only gets one so far. Yes, I place the blame on their doorsteps. But we should be more interested in how they intend to plug the holes while they craft a new plan that stabilizes the College while it moves forward. But for right now the key is stabilization. I know they’re super progressive, but they should recognize the need to follow a simple tactic which is: Stop, Stabilize, and Adjust. In historical context, the College has been guilty of moving too fast and too aggressively in a variety of areas without due consideration for the multitude of downside risks. This dates back to at least the 70s as I will point out below; I think that many of you may be shocked at what you read. Early in my senior year The Ithacan published the October 4, 1979 issue. Check it out for yourselves; you’ll find it in the paper’s archives. You will see on Page 7 a paid advertisement by senior faculty that will be enlightening. 41 years ago, there were flashing red lights and warning signs of dangers ahead. Read it, and you may weep. https://digitalcommons.ithaca.edu/ ithacan_1979-80/6/ Every Board of Trustees member, every president, every provost, every dean, and every faculty and staff member, since at least the late 70s, knew what lay ahead on the horizon. Yet the various Boards and Administrations kept blindly steering in the same direction. Winston Churchill wrote “Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it”. FULL STOP. -John Simon, Boynton Beach, Florida

home in Tompkins County you can expect to pay between $4-7,000 on property taxes each year. Not only is this a massive burden on residents, but for home buyers it also balloons escrow costs, leaving less money to put towards a down payment. Consider too the complex zoning in the city as well as recently proposed regulations. The Environmental Supplemental Plan will regulate everything from the amount of lighting allowed, heat sources you can install, and even the “window-towall ratio” of a home. These regulations may further cripple affordable housing development while forcing residents to adopt energy sources that are significantly more expensive and less reliable. From the Ithaca Times there are numerous period articles discussing affordable housing. Michael Nocella, “Why Is Ithaca One of the Least Affordable US Cities?”, 2014, and Josh Brokaw, “Solving the Affordable Housing Crisis”, 2015. In part they discuss how getting New York state to build key infrastructure for new development is a “byzantine process”, and how “the cost of doing business in Ithaca—or anywhere in New York State—is high”. It’s clear the problems described have only become worse. The current “solutions” (e.g. subsidies, tax breaks, and INHS) are not working. We need to address the root cause, and I encourage everyone to ask your representatives: What are you doing to reduce the tax burden? What are you doing to streamline and simplify development? -Jason Evans, via Ithaca.com

Re: Cornell students work to find ways to reach carbon neutrality in Ithaca

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hope the team remembers to include a plan for maintenance. Incentives are great, but when the companies that install such assets disappear after the initial incentive rush, it leaves strapped homeowners holding the ball. It’s important to have a local workforce trained and capable of maintaining new systems at reasonable prices. -Beth Fischi, via Ithaca.com

Write to us! Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

Re: Where’s all the for sale housing?

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ome buyers face obstacles erected by both the state and local government: Tompkins County has one of the highest property tax rates in New York State, which in turn has some of the highest tax rates in the country. For an average A p ri l

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TURNING THE CORNER What loosening restricitons mean for live theatre, local retail and the “streatery”

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By Ta n n e r H a r di ng , Sy dn ey K e l l e r a n d A r l e igh Rod ge r s

hings have been changing rapidly over the past few months as more and more people are being vaccinated in Tompkins County and throughout the state and country. As it stands currently, about 36% of people in the county are fully vaccinated, and nearly 60% of people have received their first dose. With eligibility open to everyone 16+, it’s not unreasonable to think the county could hit the 75-80% vaccination number needed to reach herd immunity sometime this summer. So what does that mean for residents? Well, with ever-evolving science and changing guidelines, it’s hard to say exactly. Local businesses are starting to relax some

of their capacity requirements, restaurants are looking forward to welcoming more people both inside and out, and there will be some live entertainment available this summer, something that was nearly impossible to find a year ago. “We planned at the beginning of this year to have the option of having all of our activities either remote or modified,” said Gary Ferguson, executive director of Downtown Ithaca Alliance (DIA). “We have the idea of doing remote things or doing a combination of remote and in person.” He said that this summer, the DIA plans on doing some activities on the Commons that won’t be huge draws that will create problem situations, but will at least allow

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for some in-person opportunities. Ultimately, Ferguson said the DIA wants to be ready for a variety of scenarios. “People in the county have really responded well to the vaccination process, and ultimately our decisions on events [are driven by] the state itself […] and the temperature of the community,” he said. “The state has to allow us to do certain things […] and we want to make sure people feel comfortable to be able to do something. We want to get the sense that people feel safe and perceive it as safe and reasonable.” He added that as regulations change, the DIA has set itself up to make some adjustments on the fly. “Our smaller things we can move faster on, but things like Apple Harvest Fest we’d

easily need a couple months to prep,” Ferguson said. “Right now we’re planning to do a modified version.” Tompkins County is one of the highestperforming counties in the state in terms of vaccination administration, a fact Ferguson said he thinks will help bolster tourism this summer. “People around the state are saying ‘where’s one of the safest places to be in New York state?’ It’s Tompkins County and Ithaca statistically, so I think that’s really been a drawing card to attract people to come here,” he said. “I think we’re going to get a good turnout. A lot of people will want to travel, and attendance here in Ithaca from visitors will be very strong.”


for us to allow for greater capacity and not feel uncomfortable with it.” Laura Larson is the owner of Odyssey Bookstore, which currently has a capacity of 12 people. Larson hopes to lessen restrictions on capacity inside the store or how long someone might stay in the store. “I think I’m really hoping that by the summer we’re not as worried about the capacity situation,” Larson said. Larson still plans to ask customers to sanitize and wear masks because she said it does not impact their shopping experience. “You could come into the store and still be browsing for books and having a good time,” Larson said. Odyssey Bookstore opened on June 23, 2020, during the pandemic, so Larson does not have experience with capacity prepandemic. “First we had to learn how to do COVID, and now we have to learn how to do non-COVID,” Larson said.

Here’s what you can expect from some of the different industries in Ithaca this summer. PERFORMANCE

The Hangar Theatre is ready to go allin with live, outdoor performances. Beginning with “The Realness” on June 17, The Hangar will have performances at their new outdoor space all summer, featuring shows such as “Once,” “Sweeney Todd,” “Queens Girl in the World” and closing with “The Odyssey.” “It’s going to be great,” said Shirley Serotsky, the Hangar’s artistic director. “These are great stories and great plays and great musicals. I have such confidence in the material we’re presenting this summer.” This comes after the theater did nothing in person last summer. “When it became obvious things weren’t getting better, we moved everything to virtual platforms,” she said. “This summer will be vastly different than last year.” It will also be a little different than going to see a show in pre-COVID times, too. Gatherings up to 200 people are allowed outside, so that will be the audience cap for shows. Additionally, spectators will have to do a pre-screen before arriving at the venue and will wear masks in the audience, according to managing director R.J. Lavine. “We’ve had a whole year to warm up to this, and there are a number of conditions people are used to,” she said. Lavine added that the company is working with Cayuga Medical System to set up testing protocols and that there will be an app for audience members to answer prescreening questions before shows. “Presumably if they don’t get the app to use, we’ll ask them the questions at will call,” Lavine said. “Whatever New York state deems to be protocol is what we’ll be doing.” All the company members will be vaccinated, Serotsky said, and the performers will not have to be masked during shows. However, the guidance regarding distancing on stage is still up in the air as guidelines from the actors’ union change regularly. As of now, there are no other live performances scheduled for this summer at The Kitchen Theatre, The Cherry Arts or The State Theatre, though there is a Queen tribute show schedule for Sept. 17. The Regal Cinemas movie theater at the Ithaca Mall is scheduled to open May 14, according to the website.

D e i r d r e Ku r z w e i l ow n e r o f S u n n y Day s ( P h o t o s : C a s e y M a r t i n)

RESTAURANTS

The Kitchen Theatre is also hosting an outdoor show called “Shape” from June 6–27 at Washington Park. RETAIL

As the weather gets nicer and summer inches closer, some local businesses are hoping to see changes in how many customers they can allow to shop inside their stores. Caleb Harrington is an owner of Home Green Home and Nothing Nowhere on the Ithaca Commons. His coffee shop is currently a 10-foot kiosk that sits at the checkout of Home Green Home. He hopes that as summer approaches he’ll be able to offer outdoor seating for his coffee shop customers. Harrington said that at his store they pride themselves on making customers feel welcome, which is hard to manage now with the store’s capacity of six customers. “So it’s like people come in, you try to get a little chunk of their life and then you try to push them out the door as fast as possible,” Harrington said. Harrington is waiting to hear back from Downtown Ithaca Alliance about getting a permit for outdoor seating as summer approaches. “My goal is to have everyone who is sitting on the Commons with a cup of coffee in their hands,” Harrington said. Comics for Collectors, a shop off the Commons, can hold up to seven people right now. The store is 955 square feet in

the sales area, but as more people become vaccinated, the store is able to hold more people. Owner Tim Gray said what customers can see come summer is that he will continue to be cautious of how many people shop in the store. “We will be regulating how many people come into our shop,” Gray said. “Whatever we feel is comfortable... We don’t want it to overflow and everything, so it's an uncomfortable and unpleasant shopping experience.” Sunny Days of Ithaca owner Deirdre Kurzweil allows up to eight people in her store. “It has only been in the last few weeks where we’ve allowed more people in,” Kurzweil said. “The flow has been naturally light enough that it didn’t stress me out except for many a couple of moments that passed quickly. Mostly it’s been sort of self-regulating.” Sunny Days of Ithaca hopes to allow more customers to shop in the store as it moves to a bigger location with twice as much space, just a few storefronts down from the old location on the Commons. Kurzweil opened her new shop on April 15 and has her old store open until that lease is up. “People will be able to flow through here without worrying... It’s much easier to keep socially distanced here then it was in the old space. So this is gonna make it easier

New York State’s current COVID-19 guidelines allow restaurants to operate at 75% indoor dining occupancy. With the April 1 reopening of the North Aurora Street “streatery,” businesses on Restaurant Row can expand their outdoor dining to the edge of the sidewalk while passersby walk in the road. One such restaurant participating in this renewed space is Luna’s Inspired Street Food. Kevin Sullivan, operator at Luna’s, said that because of the streatery, the restaurant is able to safely implement all its outdoor seating on the sidewalk. Along with strict rules around mask wearing, staff at Luna’s — approximately 90% of which are vaccinated, Sullivan said — must complete daily health checks before starting their shifts. Restaurant workers in New York became eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in Phase 1B. In-house contact tracing is conducted through contact information indoor diners give to staff, Sullivan said, though no contact tracing has needed to happen. “We have a great local community here, and we're happy to be a part of it,” he said. “There's a lot of people in a lot of jobs out there in this country that have deserved a lot more for a long time, and this pandemic has really weighed heavily on [the] service industry and some other industries where people … deserve better opportunities. You know, I'm excited to get back to a point that continued on page 10

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TURNING THE CORNER Contin u ed From Page 9

we can … continue improving in ways that actually improve our staff ’s lives.” A new business on restaurant row also working with COVID-19 restrictions is Hound and Mare, a breakfast spot that opened in December 2020. Owner Christine Lam said that since the streatery reopened, more customers have come into the cafe. Though she said she does not envision she will add more tables indoors, she

may add more tables to the two currently outside when the weather is consistently warm. Lam said that Hound and Mare’s employees generally work in one area their whole shift — the cooking staff remains in the kitchen, and the cashier works exclusively at the register, for example. All staff members have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, she said. Although she said she does not think an end to COVID-19 restrictions is close by, Lam said that she is excited for the time

she can see regular customers’ faces without masks. “I think, right now, we're very much in a place where it's like, we want our customers to feel welcomed and comfortable, but at the same time, we're trying to get them out as quickly as possible as well,” she said. “It's kind of this very weird … limbo.” Other restaurants outside Restaurant Row are also using their outdoor spacing to accommodate customers. Monks on the Commons, the restaurant attached to the Ithaca Marriott Downtown, had already incorporated outdoor

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dining into its repertoire. Makayah Little, server at Monks and front desk assistant at the Marriott, said that while New York state may expand dining or change its restrictions, Monks abides by Mariott’s standards, which she said are as strict or stricter than the state’s. Little said that like other restaurants, Monks requires staff to wear masks at all times while customers are required to wear them when not seated. In addition to its outdoor seating — which has fire pits and picnic tables — Monks recently reopened its indoor bar seating, separating customers with cork boards and the bartender from diners with a plastic divider. “We do have very limited seating, but it doesn't stop us from getting people in and out, letting people sit down and enjoy their food as well as our service to them,” Little said. “Nothing has really changed drastically since March [2020] because we still want to follow a lot of the safety protocols of COVID and because we've followed directly with the Marriott standard.” Waterfront restaurant Boatyard Grill had its best year open in 2019, owner Mark Campagnolo said. The restaurant is getting busier — like others, because of the warm weather and customers’ desires to get outdoors after being inside for so long — but Campagnolo said that it may take two years post pandemic to see those booming numbers again. Boatyard Grill experienced two COVID-19 exposures in September 2020. Since then, Campagnolo said that he and other managers at the restaurant became fully vaccinated, with approximately 80% of other staff members vaccinated. The restaurant typically closes in January every year for the winter, but Campagnolo said that it remained open until February this year, with heaters for outdoor diners. “Once the pandemic is quote–unquote over, I don't think it will be over in people's mind for a long time,” he said. “When that pandemic hit, it hit everybody equally across the board in 2020. So we’re all in the same boat together. But I think we're all … up against the same battle, and I think we’re all in the same pattern of coming out of it, with the same sort of apprehension or concern about how it's going to go after this thing is over.”


and meet specific criteria. Some programs may be registered as schoolaged child care programs through the Child Development Council but still call themselves camps. SUMMER CAMP GUIDE t

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO THERESA L. ALBERT OF TOMPKINS COUNTY YOUTH SERVICES FOR COMPILING THESE CAMP LISTINGS V isit U s at I thaca . com

IF YOU HAVE ANY CONCERNS OR QUESTIONS,

1. Speak directly with the director of the camp or program, 2. Contact Rene Borgella at the County Public Health Department, rborgella@ tompkins-co.org, 274-6600, or 3. Contact the Child Development Council at 273-0259 about camps operated by school-aged child care programs (SACCs).

GUIDE TO SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMS/CAMPS – 2021 ✱ The Ithaca Times and Tompkins County Youth Services Department are pleased to bring you this listing of summer camps and programs in and around our area. We are extremely happy that so many summer programs/camps will once again be offered this summer after coming through such an unprecedented and difficult year. A few tips as you decide on the most appropriate camp or program for your child(ren). ✱ COVID-19 - precautions and concerns. Camps/programs will be following NYS and CDC safety guidelines. Wearing masks and social distancing will be practiced. If you have questions and or concerns, contact the camp/program directly or check their website for details. Above all else, the health and safety of your child is most important. ✱ There are differences between “camps” and programs, workshops, or classes. Official camps must be registered with the New York State Health Department

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✱ Be sure to ask if full or partial scholarships are available. ✱ For parents who receive public assistance, contact the Department of Social Services regarding subsidized fees for 2021 camps, contact: Corrie Root @ 274-5612. ✱ Many camps will provide before and after supervision, making it feasible for working parents. Always ask and inquire about supervision provided outside of camp or program hours as well as any additional fees for the service. ✱ Inquire directly with the Camp Director regarding accommodations for youth with disabilities. The content was prepared as a public service by the Tompkins County Youth Services Department. The Department receives tax support from Tompkins County and the New York State Office of Children and Family Services. This information can also be found on the County’s web page www.tompkinscountyny.gov/youth

Enjoy and have a safe and healthy summer!

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4-H CAMP OWAHTA

We pride ourselves on creating experiences that have helped families and children succeed not only in the camp environment but also when camp ends. 4-H Camp Owahta provides youth ages 6 through 16 and (8 to 15 for resident camp) with enriching, memorable, and positive outdoor experiences. Located on over 120 acres of woodland, with over 5 miles of trails, and a beautiful pond, we have been providing over 60 proven years of high quality camping services to the Central New York region. AGES: 6 – 16 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 4 – Aug 20 CONTACT: Jackie Hartnett, jdh28@ cornell.edu , (607)391-2660, http:// cortland.cce.cornell.edu/4-h-youth/4-hcamp-owahta

ACTING OUT NY - MOVIE CAMP

Movie Camp is the main feature at Acting Out. Over the course of one week, campers work together as a team to create a short film whose plot themes mirror issues that are important to kids today. As the actors’ tackle scene work, character study, and line memorization, they also expand their emotional vocabularies, deepen their abilities to empathize and learn to communicate more clearly. A digital copy of our creation will be available to share with family and friends. AGES: 8-14 SCHEDULE/FEES: MOVIE CAMP ONE: June 28-July 2, 9am-3pm @ The Cherry Artspace; MOVIE CAMP TWO: July 12-July 16, 9am-3pm @ The Cherry Artspace; MOVIE CAMP THREE: Aug 30-Sept 3, 9am-3pm @ The Cherry Artspace; $400/ week CONTACT: Darcy Rose, darcy@ actingoutnewyork.com , www. actingoutnewyork.com

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ANNA’S MOVEMENT ARTS (A.M.A)

CONTACT: Anna Goehner, (607)342-7115, annasmovementarts@gmail.com, https:// annasmovementarts.weebly.com 9th ANNUAL YOGA & CREATIVE ARTS SUMMER CAMP Come celebrate Summer by exploring what we can create on paper with brush and paint, what it feels like to dance a story to music, and how concentrated we can get when we do breathing exercises and flow into yoga poses. Let’s learn how to be more mindful of our bodies & how we treat each other. Activities include yoga, art, dance, children’s garden, water activities, nature exploration, free play, games and reading. Held at Just Be Cause Center and Ithaca Children’s Garden. Masks and social distancing will be required. AGES: 6 – 12 SCHEDULE/FEES: One day camp: Friday June 25; Week long camps: June 28 - July 2; Aug 2 – 6; Aug 30 - Sept 3. Full day: 10:30am - 3:00pm; half day: 10:30am 1:00pm. Early bird discount ends May 1st!

FIGURE SKATING SUMMER PROGRAM

Come figure skate with us and improve your skills in a group environment. Program will take place at The Rink/CRC, 1767 E. Shore Drive Ithaca. Program activities include: group warm up, small group lessons, creative group choreography, on-ice dancing and practice/free skate time. Bring your favorite music! Special theme days include: glow in the dark skating, group skating videos, ice drawing, games and optional end of program performance. All levels welcome, however skaters must know how to skate. Masks and social distancing will be required. Registration deadline ends May 1st. AGES: 6 + SCHEDULE/FEES: Monday’s July 26,


Aug 2, 9, & 16; 5:30 - 7:00pm. July 21-23; 12 – 3 pm. Aug 17-21 choose 9 am – 3 pm or 12 – 3 pm

TWEEN/TEEN MOVE N’ MAKE CREATIVE ARTS SUMMER CAMP

How does moving our bodies inform our art making and vice versa? Are they both art forms? Can they be combined? Yoga, mindfulness, dance and breathe work will be our movement guides while nature sculpture, video making, collage and drawing will be our art making guides. Moments of calm contemplation and deep breaths will be plentiful, something Tweens and Teens will benefit from in these times! Possible swim day on Friday’s (TBA). Masks and social distancing will be required. Camp will be held at the Just Be Cause Center and Ithaca Children’s Garden. AGES: 12 – 16 SCHEDULE/FEES: June 28 - July 2; Aug 2 – 6; Aug 30 - Sept 3. 11:00am - 2:00pm Early bird discount ends May 1st!

SCHEDULE/FEES: Mondays – Wednesday; July 5-7; July 12-14; July 1921; July 26-28. Times vary. $16/hour or $20/90-minute Combo I and II class.

ART & SOUL AT THE CHERRY ARTSPACE

CONTACT: Kelley Hamilton, (315)4201122, hamiltonartsandsoul@gmail.com https://www.thecherry.org/art-soul/ INSIDE OUT

Multi-age, multi-disciplinary and performance-based! Songs, scenes, acting, singing, movement, dance, poetry, writing, art, improvisation, stagecraft and more. Every participant is featured in the final performance! From

movement, poetry, writing, art, improvisation, stagecraft and more. Every participant is featured in the final performance! The arts can pull at our heartstrings and provide comic relief. Express yourself while performing and exploring great examples of theatre, music, dance, literature and visual art. Held at The Cherry Artspace, 102 Cherry St. Ithaca. AGES: 10-18, Grades 6-12 SCHEDULE/FEES: One-week camp, August 9 – 13; 9:00am - 4:00pm; $275 TAKING ISSUE

A multi-age, multi-disciplinary performance-based camp! Songs, scenes, singing, acting, dance

ARMSTRONG SCHOOL OF DANCE

CAMP BARTON SUMMER FAMILY PROGRAMS

Dance School is located at 15 Catherwood Road, Ithaca. Armstrong School of Dance complies with NYS guidelines for COVID-19. CONTACT: Karen Gorsky, (607)2660209, karengorsky@gmail.com, www. armstrongdance.com Dance Arts Camp Daily classes in ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical and hip-hop styles. Camp also includes musical theater, arts and crafts and camp games too! Dancers will perform a camp show every Friday before pick up that families are invited to. AGES: 5-9 SCHEDULE/FEES: week sessions: July 6-9; July 12-16; July 19-23; July 26 – 30. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Before care: 8–9 a.m.; after care: 4–5 p.m. $225/week. Before & After Camp Care: $50/week.

Come to Camp Barton and experience all that it has to offer from an amazing jewel of a Waterfront to field trips and experiences throughout the Finger Lakes Region! Hope to see you this summer! Camp Barton will be hosting four fourday programs this summer designed for Scout troops, crews, provisional Scouts, and families! Camp adventures will cover everything from BSA Guard Adventure Quest (Lifeguard certification ages 15 and up) to Sailing on small and large boats, Jet ski and water Ski (ages 14 and up), a Triathlon Quest with canoeing, biking (bring your own), and hiking, to field trips to the Finger Lakes Attractions, and More! AGES: 11- 17 CONTACT: Chris Ambra, (607)648-7888, chris.ambra@scouting.org, https://www. bpcouncil.org/camping/campbarton/

PRE-TEEN/TEEN CAMP

This camp is especially designed for the level II, III, IV and Team level dancers. Camp includes daily lessons in ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop and lyrical styles of dance as well as choreography workshops, musical theater, hair/makeup, and arts and crafts. The camp has a theme chosen by the dancers to create their own performances. The dancers will end the camp with a performance outside in the parking lot. AGES: 10-17 SCHEDULE/FEES: Grades 5-12: Aug 2-6, Aug 9-13; 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Before and After Camp care available 8-9 am and 4-5 pm. $225/week; Before & After Care: $50/ week DANCE CLASSES

Weekly classes available for all ages 3-18 in ballet, tap, jazz and lyrical. Each class is a structured class designed for the individual student consisting of the basic positions, jumps, turns and connecting steps. AGES: 3 - 18

YMCA Camp Adventure is a traditional day camp program hosted at the YMCA and the YMCA Outdoor Education Center. Campers will participate in activities including swimming, field sports, archery, arts and crafts, music, team building and low ropes challenges, orienteering, plant and animal identification, nature craft, and SO MUCH MORE. All YMCA of Ithaca protocols are followed in adherence to guidelines by NYS Dept of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Coronavirus, and OSHA. AGES: 5–12 (must be 5 before camp begins) SCHEDULE/FEES: Weekly sessions July 5th - September 3rd running MondayFriday from 8:00AM-5:30PM. Camp will be held at the YMCA on Mondays and Fridays and at the YMCA Outdoor Education Center Tuesday-Thursday. CONTACT: Rachael Jackson, (607)2570101, ycamp@ithacaymca.com www.ithacaymca.com/camp-adventure

CAMP CODDINGTON

Broadway to Beyonce, Shakespeare to Sondheim and using the tradition of the Mandala, we explore our unique, personal journeys and how those can lead to a greater connection to each other. Staff includes professional actors and musicians from NYC! A truly authentic experience! Held at The Cherry Artspace, 102 Cherry St, Ithaca. AGES: 10 – 18, Grades 6-12 SCHEDULE/FEES: Two-week camp, July 26 - August 6; 9:00am - 4:00pm; $500

movement, poetry, writing, art, improvisation, stagecraft and more. Every participant is featured in the final performance! The arts are a vehicle for bringing attention to social and political issues. Explore plays, songs, dances, films and visual works that can change our world for the better. Held at The Cherry Artspace, 102 Cherry St., Ithaca. AGES: 10 – 18, Grades 6-12 SCHEDULE/FEES: One-week camp, August 16 – 20, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm.

MAKE ‘EM LAUGH, MAKE ‘EM CRY

CAMP ADVENTURE: Y.M.C.A. OF ITHACA AND TOMPKINS COUNTY

A Multi-age, multi-disciplinary performance-based camp! Songs, scenes, singing, acting, dance, The

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Camp Coddington is an outdoor summer camp located on 12 acres of beautiful woodland. Camp Coddington is offering a wide assortment of activities for youth entering kindergarten to ninth grade. Full day, partial day and extended care options are available. Daily activities include arts and crafts, music, nature exploration, sports, drama, science, wilderness skills, field games and more. Our weekly themes encourage and support imaginative play and value creativity. 2021 themes include: Spirit Week, Wacky Science, Talent Week, Going Home Messy and more! We operated in 2020 and are excited for summer 2021. Covid-19 safety protocols in place. AGES: 4 - 15 SCHEDULE/FEES: Weekly sessions: June 28 – Sept 3 (no camp on July 5). Fees – check website. CONTACT: Jennifer Dean, (607)277-

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CONTACT: Jackie McGowan, (646)5352267, info@camphighlight.com www.Camphighlight.com

CAMP HIGHLIGHT

CAMP WHITMAN ON SENECA LAKE

Camp Highlight takes place at South Mountain YMCA in Wernersville, PA. Highlight is a recreational experience for campers with LGBTQ+ caregivers. Camp runs for one week sleep away camp for children with LGBTQ+ caregivers in August and a weekend family camp in October. Activities include archery, arts and crafts, sports, swimming, and making forever friends . AGES: 8 - 17 SCHEDULE/FEES: August 15 – 22; $1,149.

Fresh air, laughter, splashing in the pool, padding on the lake, and the warmth of the campfire with friends at night. Camp Whitman is set on 117 acres on the shores of Seneca Lake, with fields, forests, and valleys to explore and is the perfect place to rejuvenate and reconnect this spring, summer and fall. Our sleepaway camp program offers one-week sessions for children 8-16, as well as a two-day program for children 6-8.

IC3’s Afterschool Program Now Enrolling for the 2021Ǧ2022 School Year

 Afternoon Snack is Included  Children Entering Grades  KǦ5 Fall of 2021 Are Eligible.

CORNELL INTERNATIONAL SUMMER DEBATE CAMP - CISDC

Email info@icthree to Secure Your Space for Fall! 

579 Warren Road, Ithaca ● (607)257-0200 ● icthree.org It hac a

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The Cayuga Nature Center provides an opportunity for nature enthusiasts of all ages to learn about environmental and outdoor education in a fun and engaging way. The Cayuga Nature Center day camp has been a staple of our educational outreach to the community since its establishment in 1986. Our curriculum approaches learning by integrating hands-on exploration, active game playing, and facilitating conditions for self-discovery of the many wonderful things to be found in our natural world. AGES: 4-12 SCHEDULE: June 28 – Sept 3. Check the website for fees, registration, discounts, and scholarships. CONTACT: Katelin Nelson, (607)2736260 x222, nelson@priweb.org https://www.cayuganaturecenter.org/ camp/summer-camp

Spend your week playing games and learning circus techniques such as aerial hammock, juggling, unicycling, tight wire, and more! This camp is open to youth ages 7-12 who are not currently participating in Circus Culture programming. Camp will run from 9am12pm. This year we will not be able to provide childcare before or after camp. AGES: 7-12 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 5-9; July 12-16; July 19-23; July 26-30. Camp hours are 9am-12pm. Please arrive no earlier than 8:45am for drop off, and please pick up promptly at 12pm. $150/week. CONTACT: Claire Dehm, claire@ circusculture.org, www.circusculture.org/ camps

New Location at 579 Warren Road  ICSD Transports to IC3 and  Parent Pick up is by 5:30 pm 

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CAYUGA NATURE CENTER SUMMER CAMP

CIRCUS CULTURE HALF DAY PROGRAM



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AGES: 6 - 16 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 4-9; July 11-16; July 18-23; July 25-30. $250-two-day program; $525 – one-week session. CONTACT: Leo Kone, (315)201-0193, director@campwhitman.org www.campwhitman.org

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Students, from all over the world, will learn debate skills, have practice debates, and receive instruction and coaching from Cornell coaches, faculty and lecturers. English proficiency required, prior debate experience not necessary. We will use the World Schools Debate format and techniques relevant to all debate formats. Students will engage with other international students through small breakout groups and in an intra-camp tournament. AGES: 12 – 18 SCHEDULE/FEES: Online for 2021, July 31- Aug 8; $600 CONTACT: Armands Revelins, aor4@ cornell.edu https://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cornell-debate/ international-summer-debate-camp

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY BIG RED SPORTS CUBS CAMP

The Cornell University Big Red Sports (CUBS) Camp is a week-long camp geared towards giving campers a unique introduction to several different sports and activities in a fun, creative and engaging summer camp setting. Camp is packed with outdoor games, storytelling, scavenger hunts, nature walks, sport-specific games, team-building activities, water fun and more! CUBS Camp offers varying camp curriculum options customized to cater three different age ranges - Pre-K 4-5; JV 6-10; Varsity 11-14. AGES: 4 – 14 SCHEDULE/FEES: check the website CONTACT: Samantha Park, (607)2551200, camps@cornell.edu , https:// cornellcamps.com/

DANBY ART CAMP

Exploration of fine art through watercolor, color pencil, field sketching and more in a country setting. Personal style and exploration is encouraged. Come make art four hours a day, five days a week in a beautiful countryside setting. Explore watercolor, charcoal, pastel, color pencil and field sketching while developing your own style. The program will be held at Camille’s studio in Danby, 9am to 1pm. All ages are welcome starting at 7 years old. The fee is $190/week. Half of the tuition is required to secure a space, the balance due first day of camp. Two half scholarships are available. AGES: 7 to 99 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 5-9, Aug 9-13; 9 am – 1 pm. $190/session. CONTACT: Camille Doucet, 272-8781, doucetcamille@gmail.com, www. camilledoucet.com

DANBY YOUTH SERVICES SUMMER PROGRAMS

Danby Youth Services will offer a variety of programs to youth that reside in the Town of Danby. Program offerings are currently being developed and will be announced soon. Programs will adhere to strict safety protocol to ensure the safety of youth, staff, and community members. Programs will take place in the Town of Danby at various locations and are developed with an emphasis on creativity, exploration, and good ol’ summer time fun! Please check the listed website for summer program updates or contact Melis Schildkraut for more information. AGES: 9 and up CONTACT: Melis Schildkraut, 272-2292, mas759@cornell.edu , http://ccetompkins. org/4-h-youth/rural-youth-services/rysprogram-sites/town-of-danby

DAY CAMP – CUB SCOUT MINECRAFT - LANSING

Come join us for Cub Scout Day Camp for all children, boys and girls, ages 5-10, scouts and non-scouts. If you are new to


Scouting, we can help you join as well! We can’t wait to see you! Cub Scout Day Camp this year will be at Lansing Rod and Gun Club! Day Camp here will be August 2-August 6, 2021. We’ll have crafts, games, Archery and more for our Scouts! This is open to scouts and non-scouts!!!! Throughout our programs will be fun as well as advancement! We may even have guest speakers and visitors! COVID-19 Safety protocols will be strictly followed as we are accredited by New York State Department of Health as well as our own BSA Standards! Come join us! AGES: 5- 10 CONTACT: Chris Ambra, (607)648-7888, chris.ambra@scouting.org, https://www. bpcouncil.org/camping/cub-scoutprogram-and-camping/ DRYDEN YOUTH SERVICES YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS – SUMMER SKIES Dryden Youth Services will offer a variety of programs to youth that reside in the Town of Dryden, Village of Dryden or Village of Freeville. Program offerings are currently being developed and will be announced soon. Programs will adhere to strict safety protocol to ensure the safety of youth, staff, and community members. Programs will take place in various locations throughout the Dryden area and are developed with an emphasis on outdoor skill building , nature exploration, and good ol’ summer time fun! Please check the listed website for summer programming information which will be updated soon or contact David Hall with the provided email address for further information. AGES: 10 – 13, Middle School age CONTACT: David Hall, 272-2292, dh67@ cornell.edu , http://ccetompkins.org/4-hyouth/rural-youth-services/rys-programsites/dryden-freeville

FLIGHT PERFORMING ARTS

www.flightperformingarts.com/summerprograms SUMMER MUSICAL THEATRE ACADEMY SESSION 1:

The Play’s the Thing for ages 11 -18. Budding young artists will engage in a joyful exploration of theater arts with theater professionals. As young artists improve singing, acting, and dance with theatre games, improvisation and general goofiness, they also develop a greater sense of self, empathy, and improved communication skills. The week’s efforts will culminate in a virtual Reality TV style sharing of our journey, showcasing a deep sense of accomplishment, a huge boost in confidence, and lots of great memories with new friends. SCHEDULE/FEES: July 12-16, 9 am – 3 pm. CONTACT: Sharon Costianes, sharon@ flightvoicestudio.com SUMMER MUSICAL THEATRE ACADEMY SESSION 2: MUSICAL THEATRE BOOT CAMP

for ages 11 -18. During this week-long session, young thespians will explore how to become a responsive team player on the stage. Develop intermediate skills in singing, acting, and dance through the playful application of technique in

each medium. As our young artists learn how to break down a character and develop tactics for effective storytelling, they also develop team building, and communication skills, improve physical fitness, and boost confidence and presence. SCHEDULE/FEES: July 19-23, 9 am – 3 pm. CONTACT: Sharon Costianes, sharon@ flightvoicestudio.com SUMMER MUSICAL THEATRE ACADEMY SESSION 3:

Musical Theatre as a Force for Good for ages 11 -18. Young artists will connect with causes that hold personal meaning for them, and through an anti-racist lens, learn to use the performing arts as a force for good in the world. Together we will tap into JOY, creating intentional safe space to explore themes centering on celebrating identity, social justice and other causes. A special focus on developing empathy, and deep listening skills both internal and external, as students share the stories that move them through singing, acting, and dance. SCHEDULE/FEES: July 26-30; 9 am – 3 pm. CONTACT: Sharon Costianes, sharon@ flightvoicestudio.com

GIRL SCOUTS OF NYPENN

PATHWAYS SUMMER CAMP

Comstock Adventure Center in Ithaca, NY, is located along the shores of Cayuga Lake and is a Girl Scout camp. Campers enjoy the unique natural surroundings created by the Finger Lakes while living in beautiful tree-top cabin village units. Comstock features nearly two miles of lakefront, offering a wide variety of water sports and a beautiful location to enjoy the sunrise or sunset. Enjoy performing arts, archery, STEM, hiking, outdoor living skills and more! We will have thorough COVID safety protocols prepared. Check the website for dates/times/ pricing. AGES: 5- 17 CONTACT: Mandi Miller, (315)698-9400, summercamp@gsnypenn.org , https:// camp170835421.wpcomstaging.com/ comstock/resident-camp/

GROTON SUMMER CAMP

Groton Summer Camp is a day camp for residents of the Town and Village of Groton. The camp will open on Tuesday, July 6th and close on Friday, August 13th. This year’s camp will feature nature exploration, arts & crafts, swimming, and walking field trips. Many new activities are being planned for 2021. All safety guidelines and COVID protocols will be strictly adhered to, with the goal of keeping campers, staff, and family members safe and healthy

ENFIELD SUMMER DAY CAMP

Enfield Summer Day Camp will be held at the new Enfield Community Center at 162 Enfield Main Road. There is a pavilion, playground, 2 open playing fields, access to the creek for exploration and a 6400 sq ft building for indoor shelter if necessary. Daily activities will include sports, crafts, STEM, outdoor education, outdoor games/activities, creek exploration, sprinklers and/or slip & slide. All campers will receive breakfast, lunch and snack daily. Please be aware that the camp will operate according to CDC/TC Health Dept guidelines/ recommendations. AGES: 4–13 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 6–Aug 13; 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. M-F. Enfield resident fee $900 for the 6-weeks; Non-resident fee $1200 for the 6-weeks. CONTACT: Vera Howe-Strait, Camp Director, (607)273-1413, howestraitv@gmail.com, www. enfieldcommunitycouncil.org The

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while enjoying a fun summer camp experience. Registration will be announced soon, please check the website or email Nick Wagner for questions or further information. AGES: 5 - 12 SCHEDULE: July 6–Aug 13 CONTACT: Nick Wagner, 272-2292, nw346@cornell.edu , http://ccetompkins. org/4-h-youth/rural-youth-services/rysprogram-sites/groton-town-village

HANGAR THEATRE’S NEXT GENERATION SCHOOL OF THEATRE

Next Generation School of Theatre classes will be back in-person in 2021! For students entering Grades 2-10. Experience a wide range of fun-filled summer classes that provide students with an unforgettable learning experience in the arts. We will be operating at reduced capacity, in a mostly outdoor setting, with COVID-19 safety measures in place to keep students comfortable and safe. SCHEDULE: July 5 – Aug 20; 9 AM – 3 PM. $325/week, financial aid is available. AGES: 6-15, Grades 2-10 CONTACT: Shirley Serotsky, (607) 2732787, education@hangartheatre.org , https://hangartheatre.org

HEAD OVER HEELS GYMNASTICS – SUMMER DAY PROGRAM

Located at 215 Commercial Ave., Ithaca. Come flip with us this summer! Our summer day program provides expert gymnastics instruction for children ages 4 years old and up. (Children must be potty trained). Our day program is for either children just beginning gymnastics or the gymnast with years of experience. All of our students will receive instruction on the gymnastics events and daily Open Gym Time! Visit our website for more information and to register! Summer Classes Available too!! AGES: 4 - 18 SCHEDULE/FEES: Full Day - 9:30am – 4:00pm; Half Day Morning: 9:30am – 12:30pm; Half Day Afternoon: 1:00pm – 4:00pm. FREE Before and After Care. July 5 – Aug 28 weekly sessions. CONTACT: HOH Office, (607)273– 5187, IthacaHOH@aol.com, www. headoverheelsgym.net

HIDDEN VALLEY 4-H CAMP

Cornell Cooperative Extension Schuyler County 323 Owego Street, Unit 5 Montour Falls, NY 14865 (607) 535-7161

Cornell Cooperative Extension is an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities and provides equal program and employment opportunities

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Operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Schuyler County for 75 years, Hidden Valley 4-H Camp offers six week-long overnight and day camp sessions running from July 4 through August 13. Located in Watkins Glen, NY, Hidden Valley has historic cabins and activity buildings and a spectacular outdoor setting with woods, open space, streams and waterfalls. Daily activities include arts & crafts, aquatics, sports & recreation, nature, and more. Special theme weeks and master classes Sum m er

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this year include Rocketry, Fishing, Culinary Arts, Music, and Backpacking. These unique, fun outdoor experiences emphasize positive social interaction, environmental awareness, and skill building. Our seasonal staff receive extensive staff training prior to the opening of camp, and throughout the summer season to help your camper have a camp experience grounded in what our 4-H program believes in – Positive Youth Development. AGES: 6-16 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 4 – August 13; $400/week overnight camp; $225/week day camp. Early drop-off and late pickup available for an additional fee. Some special activities and Master Camps require an additional fee CONTACT: Dayna Karius, 607-5356812, dk576@cornell.edu , www. hiddenvalley4hcamp.org

HITZ SUMMER BASEBALL CAMP

Players will receive instruction on all aspects of baseball fundamentals. There will be batting cages. Live games. Home run derbies and other fun challenging baseball activities. Any interested player should contact Chris DeLeo by phone or email asap. AGES: separate camps for those up to age 12 and 12+ CONTACT: Christopher DeLeo13153983824, hitzbaseballny@ gmail.com, www.hitzithacabaseball.com

IC3 SUMMER CAMP

Registration is honored on a first come first serve basis. Paperwork and payment or DSS approval must be received before securing your space. We provide a summer camp for 60 children going into Kindergarten through fifth grade. The program operates Monday – Friday; 7:30 am -5:30 pm. IC3 Camp is located within our main center located at 579 Warren Road, Ithaca, NY. The camp has indoor and outdoor play space and is a short walking distance from 2 playgrounds, a soccer field, and basketball court. There are 4 classrooms and both indoor and outdoor spaces which will provide room for children to play, explore and create. AGES: 5 – 10 SCHEDULE/FEES: 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM, weekly from June 28 – Sept 3; $265/ week. CONTACT: Staci Higgins (607)257–0200, office@icthree.org, www.icthree.org/ programs/ic3-summer-camp

ITHACA BALLET - SUMMER DANCE PROGRAM

The Ithaca Ballet welcomes dancers ages 8-18 for a summer dance intensive. We have more than 30 years of experience in training dancers with an intensive 3-week or 6-week program that provides a solid foundation in correct, classical ballet combined with modern and jazz classes for added strength, versatility and


ENGINEERING CAMP

freedom of movement. This summer will be an exciting opportunity for dancers to develop their dance skills and make new friends in a friendly and nurturing atmosphere. AGES: 8 - 18 SCHEDULE/FEES: Please check our website for up-to-date information. CONTACT: Mary Ann Erickson, summercamp@ithacaballet.org, www.ithacaballet.org

- FULL DAY for ages 8-17. 9-5 M-F. Campers start with Robotics (Lego Mindstorms programming), then Computer Aided Design (CAD) and 3-D Printing of actual 3-D objects (small toys and figures), break for lunch, then Game Making with ROBLOX and Minecraft play, or Building Web Sites with WordPress, or PC Building (optional take-home gaming PCs) and Drone Piloting! End with a Tech/LAN Party with Vive Virtual Reality! Science / STEM / STEAM. Full Day 9am5pm ($445 for 1 week, or $241 per week for 8 weeks).

ITHACA MEDIA ARTS

Ithaca Media Arts, 1458 Slaterville Road, Ithaca (near East Hill Plaza). Ithaca Media Arts campers learn valuable skills, build self-confidence and self-esteem, and above all – have fun! Ithaca Media Arts campers create and enjoy awesome Media and Tech: Lego & CGI & iPad Animation, Roblox Games, Video, Virtual Reality, Robotics, TV News, 3D Printing, PC-Building, Drones, and more! See website for full descriptions, dates, details. CONTACT: Cliff Roth, (607) 272-3580, info@ithaca-media.com, http://www. ithacamedia.org/camp MEDIA & TECH SUMMER CAMP FULL DAY –SCHOOL DAY - MORNINGS – AFTERNOONS FOR AGES 5 – 16.

Campers choose from Robotics, Lego Animation, Filmmaking, ROBLOX Game Making, Minecraft, CAD & 3D Printing, Stop Motion, CGI Animation, Acting, TV News, Web Design, PC Building (optional

MEDIA MAKER CAMP FOR AGES 7-14; 1-4 PM, M-F.

gaming PCs avail.), and Drone Pilot! Virtual Reality with Vive VR Painting (walk around it!). Science / STEM / STEAM! Lunch period in outdoor picnic area, recreation and breaks for snacks. Weekly from June 28 - Sept. 3. Optional late pickup and early drop off. Full day 9 am – 5 pm; ages 5-8 $395/wk or $215/wk for 8 weeks; ages 9-16 $445/

wk or $241/wk for 8 weeks. School day 9 am – 3 pm; ages 5-8 $295/ wk or $160/wk for 8 weeks; ages 9-16 $345/wk or $186/wk for 8 weeks. Morning Camp 9 am – 1 pm, or Afternoons 1 -5 pm; ages 5-8 $225/wk or $120/wk for 8 weeks; ages 9-16 $250/wk or $134/wk for 8 weeks.

SUMMER CAMP

A fun, varied media camp featuring Lego Animation, Claymation, Acting, TV News, Filmmaking, Photography, iPad and Computer Generated Animation (CGI). Create several projects each week, including a photographic slide show, animations, live-action dramatic scene and more. Great introduction to the worlds of film and animation. Individual and group work helps build team confidence too. Weekly from June 28 Sept. 3. $195 for 1-week, $104/wk for 8 weeks. ROBOTICS CAMP AGES 8–17. 9:00-11:00 AM M-F.

Build working robots and program them to move, follow a track on the floor, walk, speak and even battle each

Even a mask can’t dull our campers’ smiles!

AGES 4–12

REGISTER NOW! WWW.CAYUGANATURECENTER.ORG/CAMP

JUNE 28 – SEPTEMBER 3, 2021

Cayuga Nature Center 1420 Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca, NY (607) 273-6260 camp@cayuganaturecenter.org

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other (weekly Robot Wars on Friday mornings!) Start with plans, learn to modify or build from scratch. Learn engineering principles, programming (with object oriented coding), problem solving, and fun! Based on Lego Mindstorm NXT Robotics system. (Science / STEM / STEAM!) June 28 - Sept. 3, every week. $185 for 1 week; just $99/week for 8 weeks.

Video Production, iPad Animation, Sci-Fi and Cel & White Board Animation. Full Day 9-5 M-F, Fee: $445 for 1 week, $241/wk for 8-week film school camp), Mornings or Afternoons ($245 for 1 week, $134/wk for 8 weeks.) Cinemapolis screening! JR. LEGO ANIMATION & CLAYMATION CAMP AGES 4–9.

Enjoy making individual and group animations and playing and experimenting with Lego Animation and Claymation! No experience needed! Great for beginners. See your Lego and clay creations come to life! Weekly from June 28 – Sept 3. Four sessions daily, 9-10:30am, 11 am12:30pm, 1-2:30pm, and 3-4:30pm. Register for one, two, three or all four, with supervised breaks between sessions. $135 per week for one session, $225 for two sessions, $295 for three; discounts for 2 or more weeks

3D PRINTING CAD MAKER CAMP AGES 8–17.

Design your own toys or other objects using Computer Aided Design (CAD), then turn your designs into real things using safe, nontoxic plastic 3D Printing technology. Campers can even create a monster or other character to use in a camp animation project. Campers keep the toys and objects they make! Camp fee includes all materials. Very Science / STEM / STEAM! Weekly from June 28 – Sept 3. 11am-1:30pm, includes lunch period. $185 for 1 week, or just $99/week for 8 weeks. ROBLOX GAME MAKING & MINECRAFT AGES 8-17. 1:30-3:30 PM DAILY.

Make your own computer games to play on a browser, smartphone or the Xbox using the Lego-like Roblox Studio multiplayer game building platform. Campers create virtual places and can learn Lua programming to make a complete game. Minecraft activities too! Taught by Gerry Roth, author of “ROBLOX Building Guide” (most weeks.) Science / STEM / STEAM! (Multiple weeks suggested to build

complex games.) June 28 – Sept 3. $185 for 1 week; or $99/week for 8 weeks. JUNIOR FILMMAKER CAMP FOR AGES 5-8.

Campers work creatively, in the morning making Lego animations and Claymation, and then in the afternoon it’s time for acting in short skits and puppet shows or TV news reports. We also go outside to play when the weather is good (usually) or play inside. Includes a supervised lunch period and morning and afternoon snack breaks. Weekly from June 28 -Sept 3. Full day, 9am - 5pm. Fee: $395 for 1 week, or $215/wk for 8 weeks.

IPAD FILMMAKER & ANIMATION CAMP FOR AGES 7-17. 9AM-5PM M-F.

FILM & ANIMATION ACADEMY AGES 8-17.

Create your own animated or live action digital short! Learn a variety of production techniques, with a different focus in the mornings and afternoons each week, including Lego Animation, Acting, Claymation, Stop Motion, CGI Animation, TV News Production, Music

Summer Music Academy

Campers use iPads to create animation in the morning. In the afternoons we shoot live action videos. Use the iPad as a TV studio you can carry anywhere! Individual and group video projects using the Apple iPad as a camera, animation system and for editing. (Plus, see camp creations on a huge movie screen at the Cinemapolis movie theater in September!) Weekly from June 28 – Sept 3. Fee: $445 for 1 week, $241/wk for 8 weeks. Optional late pick-up / early

A residential, supportive environment with other musicians from across the northeast.

PERFORM AT YOUR HIGHEST LEVEL.

HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION July 11–24, 2021 • Entering grades 10–12 • Orchestra, wind ensemble, voice, and jazz programs

drop off. BUILD YOUR OWN COMPUTER CAMP AGES 10-18. 1 TO 5PM M-F.

Learn to build a fully functioning PC and take it home after camp is over! Explore a computer’s inner workings. Understand how parts work, connect, and influence overall performance. Use our practice PCs, or choose optional take-home PC (Basic, Mid-Range, High Performance Gaming or Ultimate Gaming.) Science / STEM / STEAM! Available by the week, June 28 – Sept 3. $250 for 1 week (additional fee for take-home PC options, see site). TRY-IT CAMP ages 4-17. Unsure if Ithaca Media Arts is the right fit? Try-It Camp is an easy way to check us out. A low-cost, low-risk, no-commitment way to try Ithaca Media Arts Summer Camp. Get a taste of several different fun and creative activities from the Tech and Media / Animation camps. This is a ONE-DAY, 3-hour program offered 11am - 2pm on Tuesdays or Thursdays starting June 30 and most weeks in July and Aug. Includes lunch period in our picnic area (bring lunch). Fee: $50, one session.

ITHACA YACHT CLUB, YOUTH SAILING PROGRAM

Youth sailing offered weekly throughout the summer. Instruction offered by US Sailing certified instructors for all experience levels, racing optional. Rain or shine, 8:30-4:30 daily. Must be 8 to participate. Wholesome goodness on Cayuga Lake in a supervised and safe setting. Limited capacity so please register early! Non-refundable. AGES: 8 – 17 SCHEDULE/FEES: Weekly sessions late June – August. CONTACT: Sue VanderMeer, ithacayc. youthsailing@gmail.com, http://ithacayc. org

JEWELRY SUMMER PROGRAM FOR TEENS

The Metal Smithery is woman-owned and operated by Ithaca local, Elaan Greenfield, who has been a metalsmith since 2007. For incoming 7th-11th grades, ages 12-17. Spend the week making jewelry using metalsmith tools

Congregation Tikkun v’Or Ithaca Reform Temple

Spirit Community Justice

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION July 25–31, 2021 • Entering grades 7–9 • Band, orchestra, and voice programs Learn more at ithaca.edu/sma.

In-person, or on-line, we bring community together: * Creative Shabbat services * Innovative Religious School classes * Inspiring holiday celebrations, * Adult classes, and so much more We welcome interfaith families.

info@tikkunvor.org www.tikkunvor.org (607) 256-1471

2550 North Triphammer Road

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and techniques such as the jewelers saw, dapping and doming tools, drilling, finishing, forming with hammers, texturing and stamping, light soldering with the torches, aluminum can casting, filing, patinas, riveting, as well as other things like resin and polymer clay. AGES: 12 – 17 SCHEDULE/FEES: August 2-6; Aug 1620, 9 am – 3 pm CONTACT: Elaan Greenfield, hello@ metalsmithery.com, https://www. metalsmithery.com

JYC YOUTH SERVICES YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMING

JYC Youth Services will offer a variety of programs to youth that reside in the Towns of Caroline and Ithaca and the Villages of Cayuga Heights and Lansing. Program offerings are currently being developed and will be announced soon. Programs will adhere to strict safety protocol to ensure the safety of youth, staff, and community members. Programs will take place at various locations and are developed with an emphasis on creativity, exploration, and good ol’ summer time fun! Please check the provided website for updated summer program information to be released soon, or email Beth Bannister at the email address provided for further information. AGES: 10-13, Middle School age CONTACT: Beth Bannister, (607)272-

2292, bab47@cornell.edu http://ccetompkins.org/4-h-youth/ruralyouth-services/rys-program-sites/jointyouth-commission

KIDS KUNG FU SUMMER SESSION

Exploring Kung Fu lessons through play and immersion in nature. A safe space to socialize and be active with other kids. Kung Fu isn’t just a martial art; it is the process of developing a skill through patient practice. Anyone can learn Kung Fu! We will provide a safe space to socialize with other children and stay active. Children will be outdoors for much of the time. COVID-19 protocols will be strictly followed to ensure everyone’s safety. AGES: 7 – 13 SCHEDULE/FEES: Mon-Fri, 9A-12P; Sessions: 6/28 - 7/2 $179; 7/19 - 7/30 $350; 8/16 - 8/27 $350. *Discount for our members CONTACT: Isadora Herold, 277-5425, kids@centerlinestrong.com https://www.centerlinestrong.com/ summer

KNIFE SUMMER PROGRAM FOR TEENS

The Metal Smithery is woman-owned and operated by Ithaca local, Elaan Greenfield, who has been a metalsmith since 2007. For incoming 8th - 11th graders, ages 13-17. Make a fixed blade steel knife from start to finish! You will also make a custom leather sheath for

your knife and a custom knife handle. We will make knives from start to finish using a combination of hammer, forge, and anvils, as well as power tools such as a bench grinder (belt sander), and drill press along with design with a laser cutter/engraver, leather working, and so much more! AGES: 13 – 17 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 5-9; July 19-23; August 30-Sept 3, 9 am – 3 pm. CONTACT: Elaan Greenfield, hello@ metalsmithery.com, https://www. metalsmithery.com

LANSING YOUTH SERVICES YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS – SUMMER SKIES

Lansing Youth Services will offer a variety of programs to youth residing in the Town of Lansing. Program offerings are currently being developed and will be announced soon. Programs will adhere to strict safety protocol to ensure the safety of youth, staff, and community members. Programs will be held in various locations in the Town of Lansing, often at the beautiful Myers Point Park. Programs are developed with an emphasis on nature exploration, creativity and good ol’ summer time fun! Please check the listed website for updated summer programming information or email Travis Judd for further information. AGES: 10-13, Middle School age

CONTACT: Travis Judd, (607)272-2292, ttj22@cornell.edu http://ccetompkins.org/4-h-youth/ruralyouth-services/rys-program-sites/lansingtown

LEARN TO ROW CLINIC

Join Cascadilla Boat Club this summer in a fun and safe introduction to the sport of rowing, taking place at the Cascadilla Boathouse in Stewart Park. These Learn to row clinics are a fun and safe introduction to the sport of rowing. Each week-long clinic covers all aspects of rowing, including equipment, water safety, rowing technique, and boat handling. The focus of learn to row is developing skills to become a life-long rower. These half-day clinics are open to participants entering grades 7-12 in the fall. During each 3 hour session, students will spend time on land and on the water under the supervision of our fantastic coaches. SCHEDULE/FEE: Clinics are weekly starting July 5th - August 6th; Monday – Friday; 9 am - 12:30 pm. $200/clinic, Reduced fee of $100/clinic is available. Please see website for details. AGES: 12-18, youth in grades 7-12 CONTACT: Sara Cebry, (571)278-5559, sarabethleach@gmail.com www.cascadillaboatclub.org/learn-torow1.html

LIME HOLLOW SUMMER

Get Help Paying for Summer Camp

childdevelopmentcouncil.org (607) 273-0259

SUMMER SESSION JUNE 28 - JULY 2 (1 week) JULY 19 - 30 (2 weeks) AUGUST 16 - 27 (2 weeks) Mon - Fri, 9am - 12pm Ages: 7-13 Sign up: centerlinestrong.com/summer OR email: kids@centerlinestrong.com OR call: 607-277-5425 No experience necessary! • Outdoor adventures! • Kung Fu games! The

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ADVENTURE DAY CAMP

Lime Hollow Nature Center, 338 McLean Road, Cortland. Kids getting dirty while exploring nature, socializing, enjoying fresh air and getting exercise – that’s what our adventure day camps are all about. Lime Hollow’s summer day camp provides adventure and intellectual exploration for kids in preschool through high school. Our hands-on approach helps our campers connect to nature. Please check the website for specific summer program information, or email Rachel Busch at the email address provided for further information. AGES: 3 - 17 SCHEDULE: Refer to the website. CONTACT: Rachel Busch, info@ limehollow.org, (607) 662-4632, www. limehollow.org

SCHEDULE/FEES: Aug 2-6; 9:30 am – 3:30 pm. $300 Students must provide their own bag lunches for the week. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org HARP CAMP

Welcome to the Opus Harp Camp! This camp is aimed for harpists of all abilities for both lever harp and pedal harp. The course will include a masterclass for each student (bring a solo piece that you’ve been working on!), technique drills, and ensemble - including a performance

STRINGS, PIANO & FLUTE)

Musical improvisation is one of the ways humans can learn to express their innate creativity. At this in-person camp, students will improvise using exercises and games. They will develop a sense of freedom and virtuosity making music in many styles, playing over different chord progressions. This camp will focus on the foundation of bass lines in supporting expressive melodies and rhythms. Time will be split between indoor and outdoor activities to align with safety practices. AGES: 8-17

OPUS ITHACA SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Opus Ithaca School of Music, located in the lower level of St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Ithaca, 402 N. Aurora Street, Ithaca. Opus will use large rooms, outdoor areas, and small groups to keep all safe during Covid 19. Needbased scholarships are available. https:// opusithaca.org/ (607)-220-3026

FLUTE CAMP

Join us for a week of Flutist Fun! Daily activities will include ♪ Private instruction and SMALL group lessons with Elizabeth Shuhan and Juliana Pepinsky ♪ Flute games ♪ Hearing professional flutists in recital ♪ Meeting new friends. AGES: 8-18

of Catherine Kontz’ Flyways and Amy Turk’s arrangement of Bad Guy by Billie Eilish. All of this will culminate in a performance for friends and family on the final day of the camp. We can’t wait to see you there! AGES: 8-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 29-31; 9:30 am – 3:30 pm; $200. Students must provide their own bag lunches for the week. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org IMPROVISATION CAMP (

SCHEDULE/FEES: Session 1 (Ages 8-11) 9:30 am - 12:00 pm; Session 2 (Ages 1217) 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm; $225. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org JAZZ CAMP

Join us for a week of jazz, improvisation, jazz history, listening, and all things jazz! We will have introductory-level groups, as well as more advanced groups, based on experience and ability. Faculty will include Paul Merrill, Peter Chwazik, Mike Treat and more. This camp is for drum, bass, guitar, piano, brass, and woodwind students. Instructors include Opus Ithaca

LOVE TO SEW? WANT TO LEARN? SIGN UP NOW for a sewing camp at SewGreen for ages 8-11, and 11-14 Register online at www.sewgreen.org or visit us at 112 N Cayuga Street downtown Ithaca 607-319-4106 20

KODALY MUSICIANSHIP CAMP

Come experience the joy of making music through songs, games, and creative activities! Students will explore the foundation of musical literacy and aural skills by developing their singing voice, internalizing the beat, experiencing musical comparatives (high vs. low notes, fast vs. slow, etc.) beginning notes and rhythms, and an introduction to a variety of instruments. Come learn, sing, and play with Opus faculty member, Melissa Rooklidge, and guest artists! AGES: 5-7 SCHEDULE/FEES: August 30-Sept 3, 10:30 am-12:00 pm; $190. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org PIANO CAMP

CHOIR CAMP

Come experience the joy of choral singing! Choir Camp will include rehearsals with a variety of songs, vocal and performance techniques, activities with solfège and rhythms, musical games, diction, movement, and more. Come learn with Opus faculty member, Melissa Rooklidge, and guest artists! AGES: 9-13 SCHEDULE/FEES: Aug 23-27; 10:30 am – 12:30 pm. $200 CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org

jazz faculty and friends. AGES: 12-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: June 28-July 2, 9:30 am – 3:30 pm; $300. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org

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Opus Ithaca School of Music Piano Camp for students ages 8-18. This camp is for pianists who have taken at least 2 years of private piano lessons. We will place students in the appropriate level for camp based on their ability and experience. Instructors include Andi Merrill and Jessica Caporizzo. AGES: 8-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 19-23; 9:30 am – 3:30 pm; $300. CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org TEEN MUSIC THEORY WORKSHOP CAMP

Students will enhance their musical skills through music theory, aural skills, and music history. This workshop will explore a variety of keys, intervals, chords, harmonic and melodic analysis, compositional techniques, and more. Come learn with Opus faculty member, Melissa Rooklidge, and deepen your musicianship skills! AGES: 13-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: August 16-20, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm; $190.


CONTACT: Elizabeth Shuhan, lizshuhan@ opusithaca.org

director@southworthlibrary.org www.southworthlibrary.org

SEWING CAMP I

SPORT INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY ACADEMY

Love to sew or want to learn? SewGreen, located at 112 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, will offer weekly camps mornings 9 am noon in July & August. Campers learn to use a sewing machine to make projects like a cuddle monster and a mini-quilt. Sewing machines are supplied and a materials fee covers everything else. Camp size is limited to 4. Sewing stations are several feet apart and each camper will have their own set of tools. The space is well-ventilated and frequently sanitized. AGES: 8-11, going into Grades 3, 4, or 5 SCHEDULE/FEES: 9 am – Noon, weekly camps during July & August; $150/ week + $20 materials fee. Scholarships available. CONTACT: Wendy Skinner, 607-3194106, ithacasews@gmail.com www.sewgreen.org

At the Sport International Hockey Academy, our concept is “Total Hockey” and the accent is on learning through our highly qualified international staff and advanced techniques. We maximize the student’s potential as a hockey player, concentrating primarily on improving each individual weakness with the emphasis on repetition. Our staff of professional hockey educators are under the common belief that fun and hard work are the main components in the skill development process. AGES: 6-17 SCHEDULE/FEES: Aug 17 – 21 at The Rink; $400; 8:15 a.m. (drop off ) - 4:15 p.m. (pick up) CONTACT: Robert Baldwin, 1-800-7246658, info@siha.com https://siha.com

SEWING CAMP II

SUMMER COLLEGE FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Love to sew or want to learn more? Join a weeklong SewGreen camp for ages 11 to 14, 1-4 pm Mon-Fri, available in July & August. Campers learn to use a sewing machine to sew projects including simple clothing. Machines are supplied, and a materials fee covers everything else. Camp size limited to 4. Sewing stations are several feet apart, and each camper has their own set of tools. The space is well-ventilated and frequently sanitized. AGES: 11-14, going into Grades 6, 7, 8, or 9 SCHEDULE/FEES: 1 – 4 pm, weekly camps during July & August; $150/ week + $20 materials fee. Scholarships available. CONTACT: Wendy Skinner, 607-3194106, ithacasews@gmail.com www.sewgreen.org

SOUTHWORTH LIBRARY SUMMER PROGRAMS

W. Main Street, Dryden. Programs and events for all ages from July 5 - August 20. Current health and safety regulations will be followed. All programs require registration and are open to all. Check the website for details. Free weekly Kid’s Club for PreK to grade 7 at the library or local park, weather permitting. (Gr K-2 T; Gr 3- 7 TH; PreK F) for science, crafts, games using Tails and Tales themes. Registration is required, and you can sign up for one week or all. Lunch is provided. Wildlife Wednesday includes guests and visitors and is open to all. School aged programs are from 12- 2 pm, PreK from 11:30 am - 1 pm. Teen Takeovers every Friday from 3:30 - 5 pm with snacks, crafts, board games, activities and book clubs. AGES: 2-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 5 – August 20; FREE CONTACT: Diane Pamel, 844-4782,

on rati t s i N! Reg OPE W NO

Ages 4-7 Field, F orest, & FUN!

Summer college gives you the chance to experience the kind of uncommon and inventive courses you’ll take as an undergraduate. Open your mind, unleash your creativity, and start your college life early at IC. Students participating receive 3 college credits. Co-curricular, performative (music, fine arts, theatre), and social events are scheduled online in the evenings and on weekends, as pre-college students have the chance to mingle with our incoming first-year students. Our 5-Week Summer College is fully online and runs from July 5 - August 6. Courses are synchronous Monday - Thursday, Fridays are synchronous. Meet times are either 9:3011am or 1:00-2:30pm. AGES: 14-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: July 5 – August 6, fully online. CONTACT: 274-3143, summercollege@ ithaca.edu https://www.ithaca.edu/summer-collegehigh-school-students

Register at Ithacawaldorf.org

Limited Spaces available

Half Day & Full Day options

@ IthacaWaldorf

next July 5-August 20 LIVE Weekly Classes from 9am-3pm

For students entering Grades 2-10

SUMMER PIANO INSTITUTE

This year’s institute will be held June 26 - July 3, on the beautiful Ithaca College campus. Participants in the Ithaca College Summer Piano Institute are fully immersed in piano study. The Ithaca College School of Music invites talented young pianists for 8 days of intensive piano study in the heart of the Finger Lakes. Much of this year’s programming will remain as in the past with adjustments to stay safe. Detailed health and safety protocols will be published for families and students to review together, pending the latest updates from NY State. Instructional and residential activities are anticipated to be operating in person in summer 2021, with some programs also offering hybrid instruction for students who prefer to The

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Experience a wide range of fun-filled summer classes that provide students with an unforgettable learning experience in the arts! We will be operating at reduced capacity, in a mostly outdoor setting with new safety measures in place. Financial aid is available.

Visit Hangartheatre.org/next to learn more and enroll today!

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Sponsored By:

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AGES: 10-13, Middle School age CONTACT: Ethan Cramton, (607)2722292, egc24@cornell.edu http://ccetompkins.org/4-h-youth/ rural-youth-services/rys-program-sites/ trumansburg-ulysses

participate online. AGES: 12-18 SCHEDULE/FEES: June 26 – July 3 CONTACT: Deborah Martin, 274-1562, pianoinstitute@ithaca.edu https://www.ithaca.edu/summer-pianoinstitute

TUSCARORA SCOUT RESERVATION CUB RESIDENT CAMP

TOWN OF ULYSSES RECREATION CAMP

Town of Ulysses summer recreation camp and swim bus. Summer camp for children in grades K-6. Activities include; recreation, adventure activities, arts, and swimming. Camp operates July 6 - Aug 13th. The summer recreation camp will be held at the Trumansburg Fairgrounds this summer and will include swimming at Taughannock State Park. SCHEDULE: July 6 – August 13. Monday - Friday, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm daily. Pre and post camp care will be available daily, as well as half-day morning options. FEES: $135/wk; $35 deposit; $125/wk per each additional family member. $ 95/ wk ind/family reduced lunch qualified; $ 55/wk ind/family free lunch qualified AGES: 5-12, Grades K-6 CONTACT: William Glennon, (607)3875767 x 236, recreation@ulysses.ny.us https://ulysses.recdesk.com/community/ home

TRUMANSBURG/ULYSSES YOUTH SERVICES YOUTH

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DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMING

Trumansburg/Ulysses Youth Services will offer programs to youth that reside in the Town of Trumansburg and the Village of Ulysses. Program offerings are currently being developed and will be announced soon. Programs will adhere to strict safety protocol to ensure the safety of youth, staff, and community members. Programs will take place

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at various locations in the area and are developed with an emphasis on creativity, exploration, and good ol’ summer time fun! Please check the provided website for updates regarding summer programming which will be released soon. For further information please contact Ethan Cramton at the email address provided below.

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Come to Cub Scout Resident (Overnight) Camp at Tuscarora Scout Reservation located in Windsor, NY , July 4-10. Full Week and Half-Week sessions available! Come with your Pack, come as parent and child or come as a provisional with our provisional Cub Scout Pack! Cub Scouts earn advancements while participating in Crafts, Games and Sports, Archery, BB’s, Swimming, Aquatics, Nature Programs and hikes, Campfires and more!! Come experience Cub Scouting in the outdoors and join us at Tuscarora this summer!! AGES: 6- 10 CONTACT: Chris Ambra, (607)648-7888, chris.ambra@scouting.org, https://www. bpcouncil.org/camping/cub-scoutprogram-and-camping/


BusinessTimes

Plants and Coffee in the old Fall Creek Pictures building Cayuga Climbs bouldring gym takes shape

From the inside out MOTHER-DAUGHTER DUO OPEN HOLISTIC MEDICAL SPA ON THE COMMONS By Tanner Harding

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ocated in a chic office overlooking the Commons, Galvanic is a medical spa run by a motherdaughter duo trying to bring holistic health and beauty to

Ithacans. “It’s really more of a medical practice,” owner Jessica Doto said. Galvanic opened in February in an office above the American Crafts building on the Commons on the corner of Tioga Street. A true family business, Doto’s husband put up walls to create separate office spaces for her and her daughter Francesca Figueiredo. The large windows let in plenty of natural light, and two black lounge chairs sit by the big windows overlooking the Commons. “That’s our IV station,” Doto commented. People who have either specific medical needs or are just feeling a little tired at work can make an appointment to have nutrients administered through an intravenous tube. “After 48 hours people say ‘wow I feel really good,’” Doto said. “I think that’s the nice part of it.”

Jessica Doto and daughter Francesca Figueiredo owners of Galvanic Skin Care, Medical Spa on the Ithaca Commons

Doto is a nurse practitioner who works in the ICU at Cayuga Medical Center and said she wanted to bring her medical expertise to different beauty treatments to create a way for people to find overall wellness. The practice has a strong focus on high-end skincare, medical-grade peels, dermal fillers, nutritional counseling, medically supervised weight loss and IV nutrients. Figueiredo is a licensed esthetician and provides many of the skin care services, as well as makeup application and eyelash extensions. Formerly New Jersey residents, Doto and her husband moved to Ithaca about four years ago when he retired. “We vacationed up here for many years,” Doto said about Ithaca. “We sold everything and moved up here […] Best decision we ever made honestly.” A year or two later, Figueiredo followed.

“I lured her away,” Doto laughed. “When we decided to do this I asked if she’d be interested.” Both point to the fact that their overall wellness goals are more aligned with people they’ve met in the Ithaca area, compared to the people they treated in New Jersey. “In New Jersey they were a little more beauty focused, this is more holistic,” Doto said. “I really wanted to make this more of a wellness practice and less of a beauty practice. At this point in my life and career, I don’t think I want to be in that market anymore.” Figueiredo agreed, and said she wanted the chance to bring a more personal touch to her services. “A lot of places that do injectables or skincare have people coming in and they just want what they saw on Instagram, and that’s not always what’s best for them,” she said. “We put a focus on doing a really

good consultation before anyone does anything.” Doto echoed that. “The industry is full of cheap and fast, and it cheapens our industry,” she said. “So we really wanted to focus on a more personalized, consultative approach. If you’re unhealthy, no matter how many needles I stick in your face you won’t feel better.” As a nurse practitioner, Doto said it was her medical experience that first got her interested in injectables about 15 years ago, and said she thought that if the time came that she wanted a little filler, she wanted to know more about it. “It was something that grew from there and migrated over time and into the skincare and health parts,” she said. “It was something that took my mind off the heaviness of my other job. I take care of really, really sick people on a daily basis. So to be in an environment like this where people are looking for help about skin or to be happier […] it’s more of a happy place in medicine.” For Figueiredo, it was her love of art that led her to become an esthetician, but she echoed her mom’s sentiments, and said it’s rewarding to be part of a process that makes people feel good. “I always had an interest in art, and then I got into makeup from there. I thought to myself, ‘well, I’m good at art, how do you make money from that?’” she laughed. “So that was my segue into it. […] I also had an interest in biology, so that’s when I got into skincare. It’s been great, I love it because we do see all different types of people, and it’s really nice to see someone leave when they have a good result and they’re so much happier. […] I do get to help people and then I also get to do someone’s makeup on their wedding day, so it’s seeing someone at their best moments.” To learn more about services offered or to book an appointment online, visit www. galvaniclife.com.

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B usiness T imes

A boulder way to exercise

   Choose Eagle Envelope as your printer    and become part of our

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CAYUGA CLIMBS, A BOULDERING GYM, IS SET TO OPEN NEXT MONTH By Tanner Harding

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*$19.99/month + †$100 off Installation: Requires 36-month monitoring contract with a minimum charge of $28.99/mo. (before instant savings) (24-month monitoring contract in California, total fees from $695.76 (before instant savings) and enrollment in Easy Pay. Service and installation charges vary depending on system configuration, equipment and services selected. Offer includes (i) $9.00 instant savings per month applicable only towards monthly monitoring charge for the first 12 months of initial contract term (total value of $108.00) and (ii) $100 instant savings on installation with minimum purchase of $449 after promotion is applied. Traditional Service Level requires landline phone. Excludes ADT’s Extended Limited Warranty. Upon early termination by Customer, ADT may charge 75% of the remaining monthly service charges for the balance of the initial contract term. Limit one offer per new ADT customer contract. Not valid on purchases from ADT Authorized Dealers. Expires 4/15/2021. Interactive Services: ADT Command Interactive Solutions Services (“ADT Command”) helps you manage your home environment and family lifestyle. Requires purchase of an ADT alarm system with 36 month monitoring contract ranging $45.99-$57.99/mo with QSP (24-month monitoring contract in California, total fees ranging $1,103.76-$1,391.76), enrollment in ADT Easy Pay, and a compatible device with Internet and email access. These interactive services do not cover the operation or maintenance of any household equipment/systems that are connected to the ADT Command equipment. All ADT Command services are not available with all interactive service levels. All ADT Command services may not be available in all geographic areas. You may be required to pay additional charges to purchase equipment required to utilize the interactive service features you desire. General: Additional charges may apply in areas that require guard response service for municipal alarm verification. System remains property of ADT. Local permit fees may be required. Prices and offers subject to change and may vary by market. Additional taxes and fees may apply. Satisfactory credit required. A security deposit may be required. Simulated screen images and photos are for illustrative purposes only. ©2021 ADT LLC dba ADT Security Services. All rights reserved. ADT, the ADT logo, 800.ADT.ASAP and the product/service names listed in this document are marks and/or registered marks. Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Third-party marks are the property of their respective owners. License information available at www.ADT.com or by calling 800.ADT.ASAP. CA ACO7155, 974443, PPO120288; FL EF0001121; LA F1639, F1640, F1643, F1654, F1655; MA 172C; NC Licensed by the Alarm Systems Licensing Board of the State of North Carolina, 7535P2, 7561P2, 7562P10, 7563P7, 7565P1, 7566P9, 7564P4; NY 12000305615; PA 090797 DF-CD-NP-Q121

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Keith Liao and fiancé Beth (Photo: Casey Martin)

fter getting into rock climbing while living in Boston, Keith Liao thought bringing the activity to the Ithaca area would be a natural fit. Liao is currently preparing to open Cayuga Climbs, a bouldering only gym with 15foot walls for climbing. “It’ll be about 2,000 square feet of boulding,” he said. “But there’s room to expand if we get enough members.” Liao went to physical therapy school in Boston, and one of his classmates was interested in the sport and decided to bring him along one day. “I like the mental plus physical aspects of it,” he said. “It’s not like the more purely physical sports where it’s pure training. You can spend a lot of time thinking about where to place your hands or feet to get past where you thought there was a physical barrier.” Liao worked as a physical therapist for four years, and then went back to school to get his MBA at Cornell University. While he was a student there, he started using Cornell’s climbing gym, and this helped him find a gap in the market here. “It’s hard to access their climbing gym if you aren’t a student or affiliate,” he said. “I thought the public would definitely appreciate having something open to everyone.” He said Cayuga Climbs will operate similarly to a regular gym in that people

can purchase monthly memberships. He will also offer day passes and five-pack passes, as well as a family pass and a beginner’s introductory plan. Because he wants beginners to feel safe and comfortable at his gym, the beginner’s pacage would offer a safety video and time with him to go over falling strategies to prevent injury. He also said it’s important for people to learn how to climb without just relying on their arms. “Bouldering is pretty beginner friendly,” he said. “There are no ropes, so you don’t need to know any knots or anything. There will also be a beginner’s section on the wall.” And if you do fall, you’ll land on 14 feet of soft foam to ensure your safety. There will also be a retail aspect to the gym, Liao said. He plans on having a climbing shoe store so people can try climbing shoes on in person, because he said it’s difficult to order them online. There will also be weight training equipment and a recreation area with a ping pong table. Cayuga Climbs is located at 53 Hall Road near HitZ batting cages. The tentative opening date is May 1. For more info, visit https://www.cayugaclimbs.com/.


B usiness T imes

A Perfect Blend

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Sierra and Matti Sgrecci(Photos: Casey Martin)

BOTANIST COFFEEHOUSE IN FALL CREEK COMBINES COFFEE, BAKED GOODS AND PLANTS GALORE By Tanner Harding

ith the opening of Botanist Coffeehouse at 1201 N Tioga St (the old Fall Creek Pictures building), Matti Sgrecci accomplished a longtime dream. And all it took was a little help from a friend. Sgrecci met Stacy Twigg, the owner of Ithaca Flower Shop a number of years ago. Twigg did the flowers for Sgrecci’s wedding, and the two hit it off and stayed in touch. At the time, Sgrecci was working for Coffee Mania in Cortland, and Twigg was beginning to think about leaving her shop in Fall Creek and opening a storefront in Cortland instead. “We were thinking about how cool it would be to put the things we love together in one place,” Sgrecci said. “So it seemed like a perfect opportunity to take over the space her shop had been in. It was set up to be a good space for a café, with really nice light.” They decided to go for it, with Twigg opening up shop in Cortland and Sgrecci transforming the flower shop into her dream café.

“I had pipe dreams for a number of years of having a place with coffee and baked goods,” she said. “I thought maybe I’d have a food truck someday, but there was nothing concrete. So it all just kind of came together that way.” Those conversations between the friends started early-to-mid 2019, and Sgrecci officially left her job in November of that year. They started renovations the next month and planned to open in spring 2020. “We probably would have gotten there,” Sgrecci said. “Our build-out was finished early April 2020.” However, COVID had other plans. Due to the pandemic, the health Department wasn’t issuing any new operating permits at the time, and ultimately ended up pausing inspections for new facilities for nine months, Sgrecci said. “We were definitely bummed, but it was sort of better off we didn’t open and then have to close and open again,” she said. Just before Christmas in 2020, Botanist Coffeehouse finally got its inspection and Sgrecci hurried to finish the final details to

open in January of this year. Some of those finishing touches include a conspicuous number of plants — both an homage and a partnership with the café’s former tenant. “It’s definitely part of the décor as well, I always wanted to have a jungle vibe, but we also have a ton of plants that are for sale,” Sgrecci said. “And now the flower shop has its main location in Cortland and there’s no coffee there, but if people want to place a special order there, they can pick it up at Botanist.” As for the coffee shop’s menu, Sgrecci describes it as a traditional espresso menu with a personalized coffee blend roasted by Coffee Mania that they use for drip coffee and cold brew. She also keeps the shop stocked with fresh baked goods. “Probably our cinnamon rolls and scones are our most popular,” she said. Sgrecci didn’t go to pastry school, but said she’s always been a baker and has always loved to cook and bake. “When I was younger I didn’t understand that you could make that your career path,” she laughed. “It was just kind of what I did for fun.” A p ri l

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Sgrecci went to college for animal science and then got her master’s degree in journalism. She eventually started working at a café called Dulce Delight, and stayed there for four years. “I really liked working in a café and wanted to learn more about coffee and the barista side of things,” she said. “That got me started working in the industry and after that I went to coffee mania and worked there for a year and a half, which was a more intensive coffee experience.” Since opening a few months ago, Sgrecci said the response has been “extremely encouraging and extremely nice.” “You worry people who were interested when you first announced would lose interest, but that’s shown not to be the case,” she said. “Fall Creek is a very walkable neighborhood so lots of people who live two blocks away are excited to have a place to walk to.”

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B usiness T imes

Biz Briefs Tioga State Bank’s Bob Fisher Elected Chairman of Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA)

Tioga State Bank’s President and CEO Robert M. Fisher has been elected Chairman of the Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA). “I’m honored to serve as ICBA chairman and to represent the nation’s community banks in supporting the financial needs of their customers during this important stage of our nation’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic," Fisher stated. "Community banks stepped up more than ever over the past year with their unwavering support to their customers through PPP lending, and I’m proud to continue ICBA’s efforts to ensure their important work continues for the benefit of Americans nationwide.” A fifth-generation community banker, Fisher served on the New York State Banking Board from 2007 to 2011. He also is a current member and past chairman of the Independent Bankers Association of New York State. In addition to his banking affiliations, Fisher serves as chairman of the Lourdes Ascension Hospital board in Binghamton and sits on the board of the Pursuit, formerly known as the New York Business Development Corp. Tioga State Bank, N.A. provides financial services to the Southern Tier of New York State and Northern Pennsylvania with eleven conveniently located offices in Broome, Tioga, Chemung and Tompkins counties. The bank’s website address is tiogabank.com.

Cancer Resource Center hires new executive director

After conducting a national search, Kim Pugliese was selected from a competitive pool of candidates. Kim succeeds Marilee Murphy, and the Board would like to thank Marilee for her significant contribution. Over the past two years, Marilee’s leadership has strengthened CRC’s operations and delivery of its services and programs. Pugliese brings experience as a development and human resources professional, and most recently served as Director of Strategic Human Resources for Challenge Industries. Her skills and experience, combined with the outstanding staff and board of CRC, will ensure that anyone affected by or living with cancer will continue to receive extraordinary support and services. “I have known Kim for years and could not be more thrilled to hand over the reins and for her to lead CRC into its next chapter,” said Marilee Murphy, CRC’s outgoing Executive Director. “I am confident that the organization and community will be in excellent hands given the qualities she brings to her work and leadership.” “I am grateful to be offered this opportunity to join an agency that is so important to our community.” Pugliese said. “I know firsthand the difference hope and support mean to someone touched by cancer. I am honored to be able to work with such a truly inspiring team of staff and volunteers and dedicated board. My hope is to continue to build on the strong foundation Marilee created in order to grow the agency’s outreach so no one within reach suffers alone.” Pugliese has a diverse background of experience, education, and leadership. As

Director of Development & Marketing at Challenge Industries, she created new systems to track annual giving, implemented a strategic communications and major gifts program to rebuild relationships with donors and key community partners, as well as reimagined the annual awards event as a major public-facing initiative. Taking on the role of Director of Strategic HR and Compliance three months before the pandemic, she led an HR/QA team virtually to strengthen, transition and streamline operational processes; created opportunities to keep staff engaged during an unprecedented crisis while working to develop People Programs to promote professional development and a positive workplace culture; and catalyzed crossprogram collaboration to ensure program and revenue growth. “We celebrate Marilee and her many achievements while at CRC, and we look forward to welcoming Kim and working together to ensure a strong and hopeful future for the organization and the community we serve,” Board President Jason Hungerford said.

Visions Federal Credit Union to Open New Branch in Cortland County

Visions Federal Credit Union is excited to announce that its newest branch will be opening at 137 Clinton Avenue, Cortland, NY, later this year. The branch will mark Visions’ first in Cortland County. “Our members in Cortland County have asked for an office for some time, and we’re excited to make it happen,” said Ty Muse, Visions’ President/CEO. “We’re looking forward to bringing more members in and sharing all the good that Visions can do.” The new office is expected to open in late fall at the site of the former Tim Hortons. Members can expect more information from Visions and their social media channels in the months to come.

Rasa Spa opening new location in Aurora

Rasa Spa is opening a new location at The Spa at the Inns of Aurora in Aurora, N.Y. The Spa at the Inns of Aurora, with treatments designed and delivered by

Rasa Spa, is scheduled to open its 15,000 square-foot campus in late Spring 2021. Facilities include 10 treatment rooms, a salon, seasonally inspired café, saunas (including a large outdoor co-ed sauna), indoor and outdoor hydrotherapy options, steam rooms, fireplaces, an outdoor fire pit, and a commanding view of Cayuga Lake. The opening has prompted hiring for all spa positions, including Licensed Massage Therapists and Estheticians, hair stylists, nail technicians, receptionists, and support staff. The state-of-the-art facility promises to be the Finger Lakes region’s premier wellness destination, creating local jobs and driving local tourism. Creating these exciting employment opportunities and tourism revenue, at a time when they are particularly needed, feels especially poignant and reflects Rasa and its partners’ commitment to the communities in which they operate. Additionally, to accommodate the new influx of guests the Spa will bring, the Inns of Aurora is hiring additional team members for its hospitality and culinary operations: servers, cooks, bartenders, dishwashers, housekeepers, and maintenance staff. “We’re anticipating our busiest season yet,” says Sue Edinger, Chief Operating Officer at The Inns of Aurora. “We’ve recently expanded our overnight guest capacity with the opening of our fifth hotel, Zabriskie House, in 2019. Combined with the opening of The Spa, the new popularity of driving-distance vacations, and the general eagerness to travel once the pandemic subsides, we couldn’t be more optimistic or enthusiastic for the upcoming summer and fall seasons.” “This is a really exciting partnership for us and has been a decade in the making,” says Rachel Hogancamp, co-founder of Rasa Spa. “The depth of treatment that will be possible in this new space is really extraordinary, and it aligns with our holistic approach to wellness. Luxury wellness spas that are designed to this standard of quality, in a wonderful location like this, are few and far between. We think that the level of sophistication this campus offers for wellness professionals will be a big draw, and we’re looking forward to expanding our world-class team.”

Cornelia Laemmli Orth, Music Director

Chamber Music: French Masters Sunday, April 25th @ 3:00pm

See schedule at:

ESPNIthaca.com

First Presbyterian Church, Ithaca

In-person & Livestreamed

Christina Bouey Rosemary Elliott Miri Yampolsky

Tickets must be reserved in advance

Xak Bjerken

Saint-Saëns: Violin Sonata No. 1 Ravel: Trio for Piano, Violin, Violoncello

CCOithaca.org

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New April show of ceramic ceramic sculpture on West Hill

F

A rt h u r Wh itm a n

or local art and culture enthusiasts, the shuttering of Cornell and Ithaca College to the general public over this past year has been a loss. Although often neglected or only narrowly publicized, an immense variety of concerts, performances, public lectures and art exhibitions — often free — enhance the local cultural life immeasurably. It hurts to see them gone (or gone virtual). Over the past few years, Mara Baldwin, director of IC’s Handwerker Gallery, has moonlighted with Neighbors, an independent gallery run out of her home. Now enjoying enlarged digs on West Hill, the “alternative space” continues to host quirky and unusual offerings despite COVID-19. Baldwin makes good use of her connections to both academia and independent creators. I haven’t been able to share all her enthusiasms, but the space is a genuine alternative to the familiar spins of the more mainstream local venues. Currently (and through May 2), Neighbors is showing “No More Chicken Nuggets, Mommy,” a show of ceramic sculptures by 2021 Cornell MFA candidate Grace Sachi Troxell. It’s the only student show that most Ithacans are likely to see for a while. Fortunately, it’s a strong one.

Neighbors is held in a converted garage and the rough (though not too rough) space suits Troxell’s work well. Drawing off of the perennially influential sixties movements of Post-Minimalism and eccentric abstraction, the young artist is slip casting homegrown vegetables and constructing freely built clay forms around steel armatures. Combining small casts in scattered groupings on the floor with larger freestanding mixed-media pieces, “No More” is a warm, inviting show. The exhibition title announces a moral spirit that suffuses — but doesn’t overwhelm — this playful, sensuous work. Taken from a childhood vegetarian protest, it’s an apt nomination: both comically surreal and deeply earnest. Two tall pieces provide an anchor for the show. “No More Chicken Nuggets, Mommy” and “Venus Ovulating” were baked in a wood-fired kiln built recently by the artist. Composed of clay worked over steel armatures and chicken wire, they have a gritty, industrial look. Standing like a dark sentinel in the gallery’s back left corner, the show’s titular piece is an outlier in more than one sense. While most of the works here follow the tendency in contemporary art to take sculpture “off the pedestal,” this one incorporates the “pedestal” into the work. Recalling modernist sculptors like Brancusi and (especially) the earlier Giacometti, the piece suggests a rough still life on a sleek table. “Venus” is the only piece here not to make use of slip cast vegetation. A black lumpy form, vaguely anthropomorphic, is crowned with loops of thick steel wire festooned with little lumps of white clay.

Fired in an electric kiln, “Regenerative Agriculture” is particularly rich. Composed of cast vegetables fused together and grainily colored in black and purplish and reddish pinks, the mid-size piece is a strange mutant, covered in distinctly sexual protrusions. A plaster cast human foot slips out from the bottom, highlighting a metaphoric conflation of the vegetal and anthropomorphic that is Troxell’s abiding inspiration here. Several “vegetable conglomerations,” collectively entitled “Clay Babies,” comprise the rest of the show. They’re part scatter art, part harvest. Mostly raw toned with splotches and dustings of pigmented color, these gourd and root vegetable medleys are compellingly odd. In her artist’s statement, Troxell cites the contemporary aesthetic philosopher Yuriko Saito as an inspiration for her mission to reclaim the beauty of “misshapen or ugly vegetables.” As she writes, “By bringing slipcast vegetables into sculptures, I am seeking to harness the aspects of vegetables that are typically discouraged: their misshapenness, which is also their personality, and their acts of seemingly playful improvisation, which are also acts of creative survival.” While contemporary art — and art coming out of the MFA culture in particular — is filled with strident claims of political and other kinds of extra-artistic importance, it’s rare to see work that fully lives what it promises. It surely helps that Troxell comes from an artistic family (her father, Robert Troxell, is a printmaker and sculptural ceramist) and that her pre-graduate school resume includes a diverse background in painting, textiles, ceramics and sculpture. “No More” is a richly encompassing show that ought to reward the sustained exploration of anybody with an interest in contemporary sculpture. A p ri l

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NEIGHBORS GALLERY

“No more Chicken Nuggets, Mommy” Work by Cornell MFA candidate, Grace Sachi Troxell

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Film

Ithaca Celebrity Quarantine Film Festival #11 Annie Burns “Palmer,” “Servant” and “Jaws” By Br yan VanC ampe n

W

ith the world on lockdown, what are we all watching? I posed that question to singer-songwriter Annie Burns of the Burns Sisters Band. They will be performing at the Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts in an outdoor socially distant show on June 26. Annie Burns: I got myself a new Mac and so I get Apple TV with that, so I have seen some pretty cool things. There’s a movie called “Palmer” that I think is really good. Ithaca Times: It was directed by the actor Fisher Stevens (“Short Circuit,” “Hail, Caesar!”). AB: Justin Timberlake was in it, and he’s really good in it. I didn’t know he was that good of an actor. It’s just a beautiful film — painful and beautiful. Definitely worth seeing. I don’t want to give away too

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much, but Justin Timberlake plays this guy who’s just getting out of jail. He did stupid and grew up rough. And he moves back in with his mother, and she rents to a young woman and her son, in a trailer out in the yard. And he develops a relationship with the little boy because the mom is kind of addicted to drugs and stuff. It’s a beautiful story about how people end up helping each other, even though they weren’t expecting it. IT: Stevens was talking about “Palmer” on a podcast and said that one of the movies they watched for research is a favorite of mine, “Paper Moon” (1973). AB: Oh, cool! That was great and [Tatum O’Neal] won the Oscar when she was [10] years old, didn’t she? IT: I think she won the Oscar because Peter Bogdanovich shot all of her scenes

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in master shots without cutting. You see her acting in real time. AB: I’ll have to rewatch that. It’s beautifully filmed, I remember that. IT: And Madeline Kahn. AB: Yeah, Madeline Kahn, my God. “Bone structure.” I remember that line. “You gotta have bone structure.” IT: [laughs] That’s great. It’s funny how lines like that stick in your head. AB: I’m a big movie watcher. I get addicted to certain shows. I’m watching this show on Apple TV with the woman from “Six Feet Under” and it’s called “Servant.” It’s really good, and there’ll be a new one on Friday. It’s got a lot of good actors that I haven’t seen in a long time. It’s [made by] M. Night Shyamalan (“The Sixth Sense,” “Split,” “Unbreakable”). It’s kinda scary. IT: Did I see somewhere that you rewatched “Jaws” (1975) again?

AB: I did watch “Jaws.” I was young when it came out, I was so freaked out by the beginning scene that I freaked out and left the theater. I watched the whole thing with my husband Bruce, it was so cool! It was not as scary as it was to me back then. IT: It’s more suspense than gore. You really don’t see the shark until the end of the movie. AB: When did that come out? IT: 1975. AB: I heard that music, and the woman in the water, and I was like, “I gotta get out of here.” [sings] Dun-dun-dun-dun-dun… IT: My dad and I were driving to Colorado for a family reunion and my dad had brought the novel. And I was so freaked out by that opening that I was too scared to see the movie. I’ve never actually seen it in a theater, just at home on HBO or Blu-Ray. AB: That’s how it affected me. I like going to the movies alone, and now I’m staying home. I like having the movie experience.


Virtual Music

Arts presents a virtual art show experience of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Finger Lakes

Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | Burrow, **Genius Loci; **Opera; **If Anything Happens I Love You;

Film

Yes-People: PLUS A SELECTION OF ADDITIONAL ANIMATED SHORTS (from the Academy shortlist)

Concerts/Recitals

4/22 Thursday Graduate Recital: Sungmin Kim, organ at Ford Hall | 7 p.m.

4/24 Saturday Graduate Recital: Angela King, trumpet at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 12 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Rev. Robert Jones Sr. | 7 p.m. | Virtual Jazz Vocal Ensemble at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

4/25 Sunday Chorus at Ford Hall | 3 p.m. | Virtual Cayuga Chamber Orchestra: Chamber Music Series No. 3 (French Masters) at First Presbyterian Church, Ithaca | 3 p.m. | First Presbyterian Church, 315 N. Cayuga Street Junior Recital: Maria Vincelette, clarinet at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 4:30 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

4/26 Monday Wind Symphony at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

4/27 Tuesday Jazz Lab Ensemble at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

4/28 Wednesday Cornell Concert Series: Pacifica Quartet | 7 p.m. | Virtual Campus Band at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

Art Drawn to the Water A Virtual and Physical Art Show | 12 p.m., 4/23 Friday | Virtual | A Virtual and Physical Art Show - March 20 to May 16 The Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine

| 4/28 Wednesday | Virtual | The story of the art revolution sparked by the Impressionist movement, along with an unveiling of 50 previously unseen works by Impressionist masters Manet, Caillebotte, Renoir, Monet, Cézanne, Signac, Sisley and Morisot. Appointment screenings will be daily at 1pm, 4pm, 7pm, and 10pm.

Fandango at the Wall | 1 p.m., 4/21 Wednesday | Virtual | Streaming through 4/26. cinema.cornell.edu Virtual Cinemapolis: La Boheme - The Met Live in HD | 4/21 Wednesday | Cinemapolis, 120 E Green St | The appointment screenings will be daily at 1pm, 4pm, 7pm, and 10pm through 4/27. Soleil Ô | 4/21 Wednesday | Virtual, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | Streaming link available through Apr 22. cinema.cornell.edu | Free Cornell Virtual Cinema: Smooth Talk | 4/23 Friday | Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | Through 4/29. Laura Dern gives a revelatory performance as a teen girl whose summertime idyll of beach trips, mall hangouts, and innocent flirtations is shattered by an encounter with a mysterious stranger. cinema. cornell.edu | Free Cornell Virtual Cinema: Our Time Machine | 4/23 Friday | Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | Through 4/29. Chinese conceptual artist Maleonn undertakes a monumental theatre piece, Papa’s Time Machine, performed by life-sized mechanical puppets, as a way of connecting with his father, after his father is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. cinema.cornell.edu | Free Virtual Cinemapolis: My Wonderful Wanda | 4/23 Friday | Virtual | A delightful satire of the haves and the have-nots set against the backdrop of a gorgeous lakeside villa in Switzerland. Cornell Virtual Cinema: Oscar Shorts: Documentary | 4/24 Saturday | Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | A Love Song for Latasha; Do Not Split; **Hunger Ward ; Colette;

Cornell Virtual Cinema: Oscar Shorts: Live Action | 4/24 Saturday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | The Present – Farah Nabulsi (Palestine, 25 min.) Feeling Through – Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski (USA, 19 min.) Two Distant Strangers – Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe Cornell Virtual Cinema: The Spy Behind Home Plate | 4/27 Tuesday | Cornell Cinema, Willard Straight Hall, 136 Ho Plaza | Through 4/29. A documentary about Moe Berg, a Jewish baseball catcher behind the plate in the golden age of the major leagues who joined the OSS in WWII to spy on the Nazis’ atomic bomb program. Q&A with filmmaker Aviva Kempner Q&A, on 4/29 at 7:30pm cinema.cornell. edu | Free Virtual Cinemapolis: Secret Impressionists: Great Art On Screen

Books STEAM Book Club: Journey of the Pale Bear | 3:45 p.m., 4/21 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Vinyasa Yoga at Fitness Center | 5 p.m., 4/21 Wednesday | Vinyasa is a style of yoga characterized by stringing postures together so that you move from one to another, seamlessly, using breath. Commonly referred to as “flow” yoga. Verdant Views: Global Climate Stories | 3 p.m., 4/22 Thursday | Virtual | Our changing climate poses great challenges for humanity around the world: extreme weather events, sea level rise, flooding, drought, wildfires and more.

Writing Program alumna Susan Choi (MFA ‘95) returns to Cornell for a virtual reading.

Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm.

Teen Writing Workshops | 4:30 p.m., 4/26 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street |

Notices

We Read Diverse Books: The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane | 4/28 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | The library will be offering a monthly virtual book discussion to discuss novels centered on characters with diverse cultures, ethnicities, and life experiences.

Kids Virtual Preschool Story Time | 10:30 a.m., 4/22 Thursday | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St | Stories, songs, and activities with a different theme each week. Geared to ages 3-5. Video link will be posted on our Facebook and Instagram pages.

Earth Day Trivia 2021 | 7 p.m., 4/22 Thursday | Join hosts Kenneth McLaurin and SingTrece to test our collective climate knowledge while enjoying an evening of laughs and a chance to win prizes from your favorite local businesses.

Scholarships Available for Youth Museum Membership and Summer Camp | 4/22 Thursday | Cayuga Nature Center, 1420 Taughannock Blvd | The Paleontological Research Institution (PRI) will continue to offer the Young Naturalist Access Program (YNAP) to youth in the community facing difficult circumstances in Tompkins County and boarding counties with free access to a special membership. Apply at www.priweb.org/ynap

Reading by Susan Choi | 7 p.m., 4/22 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Novelist, winner of the National Book Award, and Creative

Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 4/23

Virtual Baby Storytime | 10:30 a.m., 4/23 Friday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St |

Enjoying the Swimmer’s Journey | 7 p.m., 4/22 Thursday | Virtual | Led by Shane Eversfield, this virtual workshop is for anyone interested in deepening their enjoyment of swimming. Eversfield will discuss pool swimming to improve technique and how to train heart, body, and mind so that your swimmer’s journey is enjoyable and empowering. tcpl.org/ events | Free Seed Giveaway | 10 a.m., 4/24 Saturday | CCE-Tompkins Education Center, 615 Willow Avenue | For 2021, our Horticulture Program is planning to hold a series of seed and plant giveaways of curated collections of seeds and donated seedlings. | Free Student Governance Council Meeting | 7 p.m., 4/26 Monday | Virtual | Come meet with your student representatives to discuss current issues and take action! View on site | Email this event Library Board Meeting | 6:30 p.m., 4/27 Tuesday, 8484 S. Main St | Monthly Library Board of Trustee Meeting. The Public is welcome. For more information please contact Beth at director@lodilibrary.net

Fully Local.

Totally Mobile. Send Money Fast.

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A Concerto Is a Conversation Cornell Virtual Cinema: Oscar Shorts: Animation | 4/24 Saturday | A p ri l

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Town & Country

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BackPage A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

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277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

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Town & Country

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10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

| 59,200 Readers

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MARYLAND

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

2 0 2 1

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