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POLICE REFORM

County, city approve Reform resolutions PAGES 5

VACCINE

REQUIRED

VAMP IT UP PART II

Cornell to require COVID Vaccines for fall semester

Theda Bara and her Ithaca-made film cause riots

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Online @ ITH ACA .COM

BURGERS & BREWS

THANK YOU, ACADEMY

Henry Stark reviews A look at some of the Ithaca Beer Co. 2021 Oscar shorts PAGE 13

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VOL.XLI / NO. 33 / April 7, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S

COMMENCEMENT

Cornell to host in-person commencement ceremonies,

Vamp it up, again!��������������������������� 8 Silent Movie Star Theda Bara and Her Ithaca-made Film Cause Riots

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ornell University has announced plans for an inperson commencement celebration May 29-30. Like its neighbors at Ithaca College, Cornell will not allow guests at the ceremony due to COVID restrictions, but the ceremonies will be livestreamed and recorded. Commencement will be held in Schoellkopf stadium. To minimize density, there will be a series of smaller ceremonies instead of one larger ceremony. According to a letter from President Martha Pollack, the school is still considering a variety of formats and final decisions will be informed by New York State guidance. Attendance will be limited to members of the class of 2021 in Ithaca-based programs including graduating seniors, graduating graduate and professional students, and students who completed degrees in August or December 2020. Members of the class of 2021 who currently reside outside of Ithaca but want to return for commencement will be offered a free room in one of the university’s residence halls. As stated above, guests will not be allowed and the university specified that family and friends will not be allowed to enter the stadium or other campus facilities under any circumstances. The school will also honor the class of 2020, who was not able to celebrate last year. There will be a virtual celebration on Sunday, June 13 as part of a virtual reunion and an in-person celebration for 2020 graduates and their families in Ithaca during Homecoming 2021, Sept. 17-19.

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T VACCINES

Cornell to require student vaccinations for fall semester

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ornell University announced that it intends to require vaccination for students returning to its Ithaca, Geneva and Cornell Tech campuses for the fall semester. Medical and religious exemptions will be accommodated, but “the expectation will be that our campuses and classrooms will overwhelmingly consist of vaccinated individuals,” according to a letter published by the school. The school said that students who are not able to obtain vaccination prior to arrival in the fall, or whose vaccination is not recognized by New

York state, will be expected to be vaccinated as soon after their arrival as possible. Despite the current pace of vaccination, Cornell is preparing for several scenarios: herd immunity, high levels of immunity and lower levels of immunity. The school is anticipating herd immunity which will allow in-person classes to return without any routine scheduled online option. With high levels of immunity — above 50% — the risk of in-class transmission in fully occupied classes will be equal to that of de-densified classrooms as long as seating

T a k e ▶  Legislature candidate - Vanessa Greenlee, a founder of the Mill Park Concert Series, a Leadership Tompkins alumna, and the communications and training lead for the Breeding Insight program funded by USDA at Cornell University, has announced her candidacy for the Tompkins County Legislature to represent District 8. The eighth district represents the Town of Newfield and a portion of the

adjustments are made and students and faculty wear masks. The school said that if they have not achieved full herd immunity but nearly all faculty and staff and the majority of students are vaccinated, the semester will begin with normal in-person instruction without a routinely provided online option, though with enhanced safety measures which would include the continuation of surveillance testing. If less than 50% of students have been vaccinated by the start of the semester, Cornell will begin with de-densified classrooms with a mix of instruction modes similar to the current semester until a higher threshold of vaccination is met. After sufficient herd immunity is reached, it’s anticipated the school would fully institute inperson classroom instruction. Ta n n er H a r di ng

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 1218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m T o n i C r o u ch , x 1211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Sharon Davis, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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Town of Enfield. Greenlee is currently running unopposed for David McKenna’s seat as he is retiring. The election is scheduled for Nov 2. “As a resident of Newfield for 8 years, I am privileged to have experienced the beautiful surroundings and natural resources that life in Tompkins County offers. It is time for us to do more so that our rural communities are resilient through times of uncertainty. Broadband

Art ������������������������������������������������������������� 14 Movies ������������������������������������������������������ 15 Times Table ��������������������������������������������� 17 Classifieds ���������������������������������������������� 18

expansion is an important step. Access to affordable, clean energy is another. The pandemic offers an opportunity to build back in ways that are different from before and more suited to our current climate reality.” Visit www.vanessa4tompkins. org for more information.

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

POLICE R EFOR M

PHOTOGRAPHER County Legislature approves Reimagining Public Safety resolution 11-2 By C a se y Mar tin

YOU’VE BEEN KIDNAPPED. 2 HOURS LATER YOUR KIDNAPPER RETURNS YOU BECAUSE YOU DON’T STOP TALKING ABOUT WHAT?

“Software engineering and ad networks.” -Mike B.

Ithaca Police Department’s S.W.A.T Mobile Command Vehicle (Photo: Facebook)

T “I’d talk about how money isn’t real – it’s all just numbers on a screen.” -Steve H.

“Building replica landmarks in Minecraft!” -Jaime B.

he Tompkins County Legislature approved the Reimagining Public Safety resolution (11-2), with Glenn Morey and Mike Sigler voting against it. The marathon meeting began with a failed amendment to the resolution. Legislator Anne Koreman wanted to amend a line which read “Evaluate the creation of a Tompkins County Public Safety review board.” She wanted to delete the words “evaluate the” and just have it say

COVID VACCINE

45% of county has first dose, Health Dept. looks to expand vaccination sites

O “Architecture and making art with Coffee beans & filters” -Julian H. & CiCi L.

“Stocks!” -Apoorva K.

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“Create a Tompkins County Public Safety review board.” The amendment was close, failing 7–6, but ultimately enough legislators believed that they couldn’t go ahead with creating a review board without first evaluating it to see what it would entail. “I think we should create one, but we should know what we’re creating,” Legislator Amanda Champion said. SWAT truck There was much debate over the original wording of

n April 6 vaccine eligibility was expanded to everyone ages 16+. Between that and the steadily increasing supply, it’s a natural question to wonder what’s next for vaccination in Tompkins County. According to the New York state vaccine tracker, 44,739 people have gotten their first dose in Tompkins County, while 24,633 are fully vaccinated. Currently, Cayuga Health Systems has administered 21,771 first doses and 12,946 second doses. Though the majority of these have been done at the mass vaccination site at the mall, the Health Depart7–13,

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ment and Cayuga Health have done some outreach in other ways. “We’ve been doing a lot of offsite vaccinations already,” Health Director Frank Kruppa said. In addition to the pop-up event at Beverly J. Martin Elementary School in February, during which 300 doses were distributed to eligible groups, the Health Department and Cayuga Health have also traveled out to income-based housing units, the homeless population and homebound residents to bring the vaccine to them. The Health Department has also been work-

the recommendation regarding the Ithaca Police Department’s (IPD) SWAT vehicle. Legislator Shawna Black originally proposed removing the recommendation that would have the county repurpose the SWAT vehicle from the city. She cited conversations with Lt. Jake Young from the IPD as her reason for leaving it with the IPD. “Lt. Young has been working with Common Council and has come up with a plan to repurpose SWAT and really reimagine public safety by using it as a tool,” she said. “For those of us who went on the tour last week it was really eye opening to see it was a central command center.” Black acknowledged the intimidating nature of the all-black vehicle, as well as the trauma it has caused people of color, and said that Young had suggested repainting it and working with a local group of students to design graphics for the truck. “We’re open to changes that are meaningful,” Young said. Young added that the department has already gotten quotes on the cost for repainting it and could do it quickly. He also said that if people take issue with storing weapons on the vehicle, officers are willing to store them in a different location. “Weapon storage is only about 3% of what’s on the truck,” he said. “The rest is life-

saving equipment, technology, protection, communication tools.” He also suggested doing outreach via YouTube videos to give community members more insight as to what the truck is and how it functions. However, there was some concern from council members that if the city decided to vote to repurpose the SWAT vehicle but the county deleted the amendment saying they would take it, the vehicle would be stuck in limbo. Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick was on hand in the meeting and said that if the legislature decided not to take the truck, the council would reprogram it for other things as well as make aesthetic changes to ensure the vehicle is purely a mobile command center. “The assumption is if the legislature decides they don’t want it, the city will retain ownership and pursue repurposing, but not without consultation with the county and the sheriff,” Myrick said. Black said it felt like the truck was something the county was getting dumped on their laps by the city. Myrick said that wasn’t the intent, and that the thought process behind the recommendation was that the city and county share a lot of dispatch and collaborative emergency response systems.

ing directly with Southside Community Center to provide vaccine doses for people that way too. A second 200-dose pop-up for West Hill and West End residents will be held on April 10, and the county and Cayuga Health are hoping to soon open smaller points of dispensary in more rural parts of the county. “Certainly looking at places like Newfield, Groton, and other parts of the county where it would be much easier if there was a location closer to them,” Kruppa said. Cornell University, Ithaca College and Tompkins Cortland Community College have all been approved as vaccination sites, but Kruppa said that doesn’t necessarily change anything at the moment. “It doesn’t mean they’re getting the vaccine,” Kruppa said. “It just means they have all the proper paperwork in.”

The state is in charge of allocating the vaccine doses, so it’s ultimately up to them which vaccination sites receive doses. “So we’ll just have to wait each week and see,” Kruppa said. “What I can say is we expect we’ll be vaccinating a large number of students at the mall site, so future clinics will have a lot of students that we’re able to vaccinate.” Kruppa added that he does think we’re moving nearer to the point where vaccine is readily available, and that he thinks by the time colleges and universities receive doses it’ll be about convenience. He also said if one of the schools were to receive a small allocation of doses, it could be easier just to have them reallocate it to the mall site where everything is already set up and ready to go.

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UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

POLICE R EFOR M

Unanimous: Common Council approves Reimagining Public Safety resolution

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thaca’s Common Council unanimously voted to approve the Reimagining Public Safety resolution on March 31. The resolution was due to the governor’s office on April 1 after Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed executive order 203 last summer, which required municipalities to reexamine their law enforcement agencies through the lens of marginalized communities in an effort to reduce unequitable policing toward Black and brown communities. The monumental vote came after six weeks of meetings and public forums in which everyone from council members, residents, parents of college students and Ithaca police officers had the chance to share their opinions. Department of Public Safety The resolution included the controversial recommendation to replace the Ithaca Police Department (IPD) with the Department of Public Safety (DPS). It was originally named the Community Solutions and Public Safety Department, but the name was amended on the floor during the meeting, and Mayor Svante Myrick and council members agreed to leave official naming conventions up to the task force created to implement the changes. For consistency’s sake, the department will be referred to as DPS for the remainder of this article. In the weeks since Myrick unveiled the proposal that

ment. Alderperson Cynthia Brock agreed, and Alderperson Seph Murtagh suggested new language that said “create a task force to design a new department…” Myrick was not in favor of this change, stating

Ithaca Common Council Unanimous approval vote in favor of the Reimagining Public Safety resolution (Photo: Zoom)

included the DPS as a replacement for the IPD, there has been much concern about the future of current officers. The mayor has been accused of trying to union bust (which he has repeatedly denied), and there were many concerns that officers may lose their jobs. However, the resolution preserves the roles of current IPD officers as the armed portion of the future DPS, which will also have an unarmed unit. Additionally, the resolution has stipulations in it that protect the Ithaca Police Benevolent Association (PBA), or the police union, as well as the benefits, ranks and retirement standing the officers have. Common Council members were mostly on the same page when it came to this recommendation. However, there was some discussion over the language and its implications. In its original form, the recommendation read: “Create a department — tentatively named the Department of Community Solutions and Public Safety (DCSPS) — led by a Superintendent who may be a civilian employee, to oversee various public safety functions in the city.” Alderperson Donna Fleming suggested amending the language away from creating a department without first creating a task force to study and design a new depart-

that he thought it was prioritizing creating a task force over creating a new department. “I’ve spoken at length about the benefits I see to building a new department,” he said. “We need to build a 21st century department that responds to our 21st century needs.” Alderperson Ducson Nguyen agreed and said he thinks it’s important to set a direction. “I’ve thought about this a long time and I’ve come to the conclusion that this is how we can achieve the cultural and accountability changes we’re looking for,” he said. After some more debate, Fleming’s amendment failed but Murtagh’s new language that would add a bullet to create a task force to implement the new department passed. SWAT truck Throughout the Reimagining Public Safety process, Myrick has made it clear that the SWAT truck has been one of the biggest issues cited by community members. Painted all black with the words “knock knock” on the top of the windshield, it’s undoubtedly meant to be an intimidating vehicle. In the original Reimagining Public Safety draft released in February, the idea was for the city to relinquish ownership of the vehicle to the county, which would add it to the Department of Emergency Re-

sponse and use it as a mobile command center. However, in the resolution approved on March 31, Myrick noted that he had added a resolution that dictates the city and county will jointly study how best to use that truck. IPD Lt. Jake Young has been in talks with the county and the city about the future of the truck and has said the department is open to repainting it to be less intimidating and militaristic. Alderperson George McGonigal was completely on board with the new idea. “I think we can get started on these adjustments right away,” he said. “I think we can take the guns out tomorrow. I think IPD already has plans to redesign and repaint the graphics […] This is an opportunity for IPD to prove that they really get we want to repurpose this vehicle.” What’s next After approving another amendment from Alderperson Laura Lewis that added a recommendation regarding improving community outreach and policing, the board went on to give their thanks to the groups who had participated in the process, including the PBA. “They’ve shown a lot of leadership,” Murtagh said of the police union. “They listened to our concerns and I’m getting the sense for the first time there are police officers who are listening and not immediately jumping to defensiveness and that gives me a lot of hope for the future. It has been appreciated and hasn’t gone unnoticed.” The vote passed unanimously, though the resolution creates no new laws and there is still much work to be done before the community sees any changes. “This is a baby step, a first step, a step in the right direction,” Alderperson Deb Mohlenhoff said. “It gives me hope that we have people who will come to the table and do the hard work.” Alderperson Graham Kerslick echoed that. “The work really just starts,” he said. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Ups The New York State vaccine tracker shows 44,739 Tompkins County residents have received a first dose of the vaccine, while 24,633 are fully vaccinated. The vaccine is now available to anyone ages 16+, so be sure to get an appointment! Downs A 73-year-old Brooktondale man was hit and killed by a car in the town of Caroline on April 1. The driver was a 26-year-old Brooktondale woman.

HEARD&SEEN Heard The Ithaca Police Department and the USDA are investigating “large and recurring irregularities into the disbursement of federally funded benefits” at Ithaca Halal Meat and Grocery. Seen Alderperson Ducson Nguyen read a proclamation from the City of Ithaca recognizing the 200th anniversary of Greek independence at the St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church on March 28.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

How do you plan to spend your stimulus check?

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

Which flavor of ice cream represents your spring? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

ITHACA NOTES

The power of music: Sarah & DG D

On Spring’s Trail

By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s

o r o t h y Sarah was “DG” Gif5-and-a-half when ford BanJohn was born. croft was a tenth Her father was generation Manensconced in his hattanite, born to PhD work at Cora surgeon and the nell. DG was busy managing RN of with three young Columbia Preskids. Sarah’s early byterian ER. DG memories were headed to Stanford, happy. She could her father’s alma walk with friends mater, for college. to Belle Sherman There, she met, fell and then Dewitt Jr. in love, and marHigh, the current ried Dixie Bob “D. Dewitt Mall since Bob” Gowin, who 1973. After a year was raised on a pony at the renowned farm in Ft. Worth, Markles Flats alterTexas. native junior high Sarah and Dorothy Gifford After Stanford, school (Jonathan the attractive young Daitch, principal), couple soon had two young children as Sarah attended as little of high school as their professional lives brought them to she could, managing to graduate in three Ithaca. Sarah was four years old when she years. arrived at their home on Dryden Road “Robin and I had plenty of indepenwith her parents and her brother Robin. dence and were comfortable,” Sarah said. DG wanted to live near a bus line, and “My father’s ‘home’ was his department. Bob could walk to the Education DepartMy mother, however, didn’t drive ‘til I was ment at Cornell.

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ummer is for hedonists, autumn for the melancholic, winter for the fatalistic. Spring is for the hopeful, those who seek signs and will believe in almost anything, since miracles by definition can never be commonplace, yet are inevitable. The other seasons are predictable. Summer will be hot. Each autumn week will have fewer leaves than the one before. Winter requires a heavy coat every day and there is no chance you’ll forget it. Spring is like a magic act. Out of nowhere comes a dove; a full bouquet of flowers. What next? On March 31 in Ithaca the temperature approached sixty. On April 1 it dropped 20 degrees and, like slightly manic magic, snow fell. Talk about change; talk about April Fools. April 1 was baseball’s Opening Day. Northern teams came home from Florida to play in freezing temperatures. Talk about being thrown a curve. Spring is an adolescent season: growing, trying, disappointing sometimes, but of necessity, in developing and blooming. It’s an exciting time, as seclusion is shaken off and a new go-round met, and uncertainty captivates and impels us. Fecundity requires seduction to have any results and at no other time will you feel so strongly you just have to get out of the house. You have someplace to go, as in spring simply “out” is a destination. It might not have cleaned up fully for you but, as an avid yet sudden visitor, chances are you won’t mind. In Ithaca you needn’t go far to be out in splendor. Two dramatic gorges and three creeks define the town, not just geographically but in character. The city is peaceful but with ever-coursing veins. The lake welcomes all that water, and also you, never more so than now with a Waterfront Trail you can placidly walk or bike with no joy-killing cars to dodge. The trail and Stewart Park, along its path, are perfect places to enjoy not just a sampling of nature but also human company, at comfortable social distance, but nonetheless comforting closeness. Recently I saw my friend Joe, like most a year-lost one, shopping. We caught up a while. He said, “Do you do anything?” I said, “Sure, I meet people for walks on the Waterfront Trail.” “Let’s do that,” he said. On the trail everyone you see looks happy. It’s not that they have nothing else to do,

but that they have nothing better to do, as in finer. It’s a good place to flee worries for a while. Not long after Joe and I started walking the path we were passed by an earnest-looking runner. “You can’t run away from your problems!” Joe called, in mock urgency but sufficiently sotto voce to amuse me (and himself) without the guy noticing and getting miffed. It reminded me that Joe is from Brooklyn and funny. (He is actually also a marathon runner, no anti-jock.) It might be t-shirt weather, but most people have jackets with them. One might need them for warmth and can definitely use the pockets: for a water bottle for the jaunt, along with the usual paraphernalia of keys, phone, wallet and now masks. Benches are placed strategically, perhaps less to rest legs than minds: look out at the water, hear the wind, sense the union of the two (and now you three) and let the day's headlines escape you, or you them. At the park the seating is more premium: along the lakeside are swinging benches built for two. A simulacrum of the playground, but suitable for adults, there are not many of them, and they’re coveted. If mindful of the role of parks in romantic milestones, one lets lovers have precedence, recalling with fond gratitude one’s erstwhile turn. Seniors also have seniority, for obvious reasons, but hopefully some secret shining ones too, in their hearts and minds. There’s also a turn for this for us, if we’re lucky. Not everything is so welcoming. It is nature, after all, which acts wildly rather than with cultivation. The ratio of goose droppings to human steps can be alarming. The lawn-as-lavatory latitude of the fowl is a reminder of their attitude toward us, which is unfavorable. If not for picnic and barbecue scraps, they probably would not tolerate us at all. As it is, they’re warning us not to get too comfortable. Meanwhile, decorously, at the water’s edge is a child with a bubble wand. It’s a lesson in wind power as the soap bubbles here travel further than in any backyard. The youth is learning about aerodynamics, like a little Chuck Yeager, while also bubbling giddily with laughter. The right stuff, indeed.


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS Contin u ed From Page 6

a teenager, and after John was born, she had her hands full.” When John turned 3, he suddenly became gravely ill with severe seizures. Over time his situation worsened and eventually the combination of seizures and medications left John permanently disabled. Sarah was busy with her life as a young teenager, but sensed her parents’ disagreements about John’s care. As is sometimes the case with busy young families, an unexpected tragedy can provoke a separation. D. Bob Gowin left Ithaca when Sarah was 13. “My mother and I had fine friends we met through International Folk Dance at Cornell. One of my older friends hired me at a new restaurant opening in the Dewitt Mall, where we had attended school.” Six months after Moosewood opened, Sarah began waiting tables, until a fellow Moosewooder suggested Sarah start cooking. “My mother was a particularly good cook, so I didn’t try my hand much at home,” she said. “I made my first souffle at Moosewood. For 50! My first quiche was baked along with six others I made. I called it ‘diving into the deep end.’ I worked for two years, plus three summers during college.” In the meantime, DG kept the family afloat, working first in Corner Bookstore and then Logos on the Commons. At 55 she attended nursing school and worked as a public health nurse until she retired. She swapped reduced-rent bedrooms to college students for childcare of John, and when Robin and Sarah went off to college, DG eventually turned the upstairs into a rental apartment. Music, especially piano, was central to Sarah’s childhood. DG had rebelled against the dance and music classes offered as a child; Sarah felt otherwise. “My best friend two doors up went to piano lessons when we were 6. I went along for the ride, and I loved them.” In high school the much sought-after piano teacher, Trudy Boden, suggested to Sarah, her student of many years, that the University of Austin piano faculty was top notch. “It was a fabulous program, nine full-time piano faculty,” Sarah said. “The university was huge — 41,000 people — but the department was small and supportive.”

Following graduation Sarah spent two years in Boston University’s piano performance program, returning home to begin a five-year apprenticeship with Trudy Borden. “I learned a tremendous amount as her student, and even more so as a teacher... We had nine students in common. I would teach three lessons and the fourth lesson I would observe, or we would teach together...This was a great way to begin my career, now over 40 years.” When DG gave up her home, she moved to a lovely downtown apartment building. It had so many advantages, until some of her strength and energy dissipated. “The elevator doors were so heavy, friends in the building could not manage to travel within the building,” Sarah said. “This was the hardest period for us — when [she] lived alone. We did not always agree about how much support was essential for her solo life to remain safe.” Eventually Robin, Sarah and DG settled on Bridges Cornell Heights. “This is a remarkable program and DG is well taken care of by attentive, supportive management and staff. Robin and I remain involved, but we are not taking care of DG day-to-day. We work through all minor and major decisions, and thanks to a bequest DG received, she can afford Bridges. As we learned, even the best livein programs are less expensive than the cost of having an aide around the clock.” When COVID made visitation in senior congregate care off-limits, DG also had to move to a different, albeit lovely, Bridges home. This was the first time Sarah could not help DG pack, unpack, and arrange her things. As the isolation wore on, both DG and Sarah longed for more contact. In early January, visionary owner and manager Elizabeth Ambrose offered Sarah a part-time temporary job. Twice a week Sarah brings her keyboard piano into DG and fellow residents’ houses. “I get to be with Mother, and she and her neighbors respond to the music I play. They often have questions and comments about the pieces…Sometimes I play classical piano pieces from long ago, or some of my brother Robin’s favorite Scott Joplin’s rags. ‘The Fireside Book of Folk Songs’ have a wide array of old classics for every occasion, set in beautiful arrangements.” Sarah has created a time and place to savor being with DG, music and friends.

YOUR LETTERS We must end militarism worldwide

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am happy to see that Common Council has passed a resolution to reimagine public safety, even in the midst of the trial for the murder of George Floyd. While we try to end police abuse, let's remember that it is really a subcategory of militarism worldwide. Militarism abroad is just as racist as police militarism here at home, and even more deadly and expensive. While George Floyd was being crushed in Minneapolis, children were being starved and bombed by U.S. weapons in Yemen. The United States maintains 800 military bases across our planet. It [holds] enough nuclear weapons to destroy all human life. These weapons are used each day to threaten entire nations with nuclear genocide. As we challenge ourselves to reimagine public safety, let's remember the rest of the world. There are two things we can do right now to make the world safer and more equitable. First, let's cut the military budget. Every proposal for COVID relief or the Green New Deal is met by claims that there isn't enough money. Meanwhile, elected leaders spend half of the federal budget to threaten, attack and spy on people across the world — mostly people of color. Second, let's rescind the Authorizations for Use of Military Force (AUMF). Since 2001 and 2002, all U.S. presidents have misused two AUMFs as blank checks to commit acts of war throughout the world. I ask our elected legislators Chuck Schumer, Kirsten Gillibrand and Tom Reed to work together on a bipartisan basis to cut funding for militarism and repeal the AUMFs. Both Ithaca and the world will be a safer place when we invest in life giving work rather than threats and attacks. -Todd Saddler, Ithaca, NY

Re: City Centre sells for $75 million, tax abatement will transfer

VACCINATION SITES Contin u ed From Page 4

For what feels like the first time, Kruppa is looking ahead in weeks and not months when it comes to a light at the end of the tunnel. “We’re excited about the amount of vaccine,” he said. “45% of residents have their first dose, and we’ve been able to open up our vaccine clinics to all the eligible folks who have put their names on our registry. So hopefully within a few weeks there will

THE TALK AT

be enough for anyone who wants it.” He reiterated the importance of educating the population to ensure as many people are getting the vaccine as possible to reach the herd immunity threshold of about 80%. “As more and more people get vaccinated we’ll see a relaxing of the guidance,” he said. “But we’re not there yet.” -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

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was shocked and disappointed to read that the tax abatement handout given to the original developers of City Center was transferred to the New York City based corporation that recently purchased it for $75 million. This is extremely regressive and unfair to middle class property owners who are burdened with one of (if not the) highest property tax rates in the country.

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Transferring this lucrative tax break to a wealthy non-local corporation adds insult to injury. How can the Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency justify such blatant coddling of non-local corporations at the expense of local taxpayers? We are forced to pay for their tax breaks, which drives up rents and puts home ownership beyond the financial resources of many local citizens. It also forces current homeowners to choose between paying many thousands of dollars in taxes, or doing needed home repairs, replacing a worn out car, paying off high interest loans, etc.. I suppose if the tax abatement hadn't been transferable, the sellers might have seen a decrease in their $25 million dollar profit. Perhaps their profit would "only" have been $15-$20 million without the transferable tax handout. Is there even one valid reason why local tenants, homeowners, and small investors should be forced to pay into the investment portfolios of these corporations? Perhaps the time has come for local property owners to write up our own tax abatements, and deduct it from our next property tax bill. If the City of Ithaca can afford to give massive tax breaks to a NYC based corporation, certainly it can afford to give them to struggling local middle class citizens. Let's start with 20%. Who's in? -Harry Hansteen, Ithaca, NY

Re: Common Council passing reimagining police resolution

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his should be astonishing, but then again Ithaca is 10 square miles surrounded by reality -- a reality that will hit residents hard in the coming years once the tax base leaves and the money runs out. -Richard Ballantyne via Ithaca.com

Re: Schill unofficially bests Pillar in special election Wow! Every vote counts. As the winner of another very close local election, let me be the first to say, you never know. I won my primary by one vote in 2019 & my general by more, but today my former opponent is the Town Clerk. I decided not to run in 2021, I hired her as my Deputy & the rest is history. Running for office is never truly a bad career move IMHO. -Ellen Woods, Enfield Town Notary, via Facebook

Write to us! Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

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VAMP IT UP, PART II Silent Movie Star Theda Bara and Her Ithaca-made Film Cause Riots By Aaron Pichel Continued from Part I. Visit Ithaca. com to read the prior installment.

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heda Bara, the world’s first international movie sex symbol, came to upstate Ithaca, New York, in 1919 to shoot a big-budget silent movie. During the summer of 1919, at the end of the last great pandemic, Bara filmed parts of the feature romance “Kathleen Mavourneen” (1919) for the William Fox studio. Bara’s presence in town made an indelible impression on Ithaca and on Ithacans.

“We were filming in what’s now the south end of Enfield State Park [presentday Robert H. Treman State Park],” Miscall said, “at an old house with a split rail fence for atmosphere. It was supposed to be in

Ireland. Hank Jones and I were two peasants hoeing potatoes, and Theda was [playing] the … daughter. She was supposed to call us over and ask to be helped over the fence.”

LOCAL ACTOR REMEMBERED THEDA

While attending Cornell University as an undergraduate engineering student, Leonard Miscall was moonlighting at the Wharton movie studio in Ithaca. “Picking up some spare cash like a lot of local people,” Miscall remembered in a 1977 interview at age 80, three years before his death. Miscall’s time as a student at Cornell from 1914 to 1919 coincided perfectly with the Wharton brothers’ most productive years in the silent movie business. One of Miscall’s first jobs at the Wharton studio was lettering intertitle cards. “I was very well-paid: 50 cents a subtitle, and in those days, 50 cents would go a long way,” Miscall reminisced. “I thought, ‘Gee, this is wonderful.’” Cornell tuition, at the time, cost $150 a year. Miscall moved up to playing in the background cast of silent movies as an extra. The pay was even better: $3 to $5 a day. Miscall recalled his fascinating interactions with Theda Bara during filming of his small part in “Kathleen Mavourneen” that summer of 1919: “I played an oaf,” Miscall recalled. “I was a great one for playing oafs.” 8  T

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Th e d a B a r a i n t h e c o u r t r o o m s c e n e o f “ K at h l e e n M av o u r n e e n .” ( P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f It h ac a M a d e M ov i e s) 7–13,

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“Hank had the top end [of Bara], facing the camera, and I had the legs. We started hoisting her over the fence. Well, Hank was the bartender at the Ithaca Hotel … and he had quite a [salty] vocabulary.” “It was entirely different from movie-making today. The films were silent, of course, and the director was always shouting at you, ‘Keep your head down, keep your lips moving.’” “So the director’s yelling, ‘Keep your lips moving!’ and Hank says [to Bara], ‘Why is it you Jewish dames have such big asses?’” “I started smiling, and Theda was getting mad. ‘Stop laughing you fresh [expletive], or I’ll hit you!’” “‘You smack me, I’ll smack you back,’ I said.” “And you should have heard the profanity from those sweet lips!” Miscall laughed. A few months after filming, Miscall and Jones were summoned back to the studio. “I was hoping it was [to get a job on] another scene,” Miscall recollected, “because I needed the money, but the receptionist said, ‘What did you guys do? [The boss is] really mad, you might get fired.’” “Finally, [George] Lessey” — a director at the Wharton studio at the time — “calls us in, and says, ‘Oh, here you are, I ought to throw you both out. Read this,’ he said.” Turned out the studio had received a stern letter from a particularly adept group of viewers, after their members had seen “Kathleen Mavourneen” and “heard” all of the salty language captured on silent film during the fence-hoisting scene. “And he hands us a letter from a deaf institute … down in Pennsylvania where they’d just shown the film and lip-read every word. They were very upset,” Miscall remembered.


film “one of the best performances of her career.” Critics even praised the Ithaca scenes, noting that Brabin’s “choice of locations and the glimpses of wood, glen, and waterfall add materially to the charm of the picture.” Motion Picture News commented: “With the Irish question among the issues of the day, ‘Kathleen Mavourneen’ will, it is believed, have a strong box office value outside of the fact that it is a big play by a big author, interpreted by a big star.” At the time, the “Irish question” was a bloody matter. From January 1919 through July 1921, the forces of the provisional government of the Irish Republic fought the Irish War of Independence against the British Army. Irish sentiments in the U.S. were running high, and the movie “Kathleen Mavourneen” unwittingly became a lightning rod for tensions. The Fox studio released the film in the fall of 1919 and played it in cities throughout the U.S. “Then,” as Bara’s biographer Eve Golden noted, “all hell broke loose.”

“But we kept our jobs,” Miscall reminisced bemusedly. “Miss Bara … was very nice.” ENCHANTING ITHACA

Bara fell in love with Ithaca. Just as the actress made a profound impression on Ithaca, Ithaca made a profound impression on her. “Up in that beautiful country,” Bara beamed, “dressed like a mountain girl, I never was tired. I’ve enjoyed making this picture almost more than any I’ve ever made.” As the cameras cranked (by hand — no electric motor-driven ones yet), Charles Brabin directed his star and Bara immersed herself in her new role. Bara was ecstatic: “Oh, but we had a good time in Ithaca,” she exclaimed, “and will you believe I milked a cow? Yes, I did, really, but I was the most surprised person around. And I adored running about in a short, full skirt.” When the Ithaca filming of “Kathleen Mavourneen” wound down, Bara got emotional about her time in town. “The only thing I regret,” Bara lamented, “is that I cannot stay here a month. The country is so beautiful ... like the end of a child fairyland.” Production on the movie ended around July 4, 1919. “Those sun-shiny days at Ithaca, where many scenes were taken,” Bara reminisced, “are among the happiest of my life.” “‘Kathleen’ was a delightful experience, and one I shall always remember,” Bara said, “for it marked the turning-point in my career.” Indeed, Bara would never again play another vamp role. Bara was so enchanted by the Ithaca area that she returned for a vacation two months after the production ended. “Charmed by the scenic beauty of the Finger Lakes region when she filmed a recent picture on Cayuga Lake, near Ithaca, Theda Bara has returned to spend several weeks in the region,” reported one magazine. BARA AND DIRECTOR BRABIN

The time in Ithaca in 1919 was not only a professional watershed, but also a defining moment in her personal life. Director Brabin and Bara began to fall in love during the production, and they wed two years later in the summer of 1921. Brabin caught Bara’s attention upon their first meeting at the Fox headquarters in New Jersey, before production began on “Kathleen Mavourneen.” “One morning they introduced us at the studio,” Bara recalled, “and informed me

FILM CAUSES RIOTS

Th e d a B a r a a n d ac t o r R ay m o n d M c K e e i n “ K at h l e e n M av o u r n e e n .” ( P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f It h ac a M a d e M ov i e s) that he was going to direct my next picture. I thought he looked, well, sort of intelligent, don’t you know? Not all directors — well, not all of them are what you’d call intelligent.” Bara was a feminist, college-educated, with a strong intellect of her own. “His mental brilliance was not the first attractive quality I noticed about him,” Bara blushed. “It was the way he walked. He stalked in, and in two strides crossed the room. It still fascinates me to sit and watch him approach me.” She and Brabin became even closer during and after filming “Kathleen Mavourneen” together. “And then,” Bara explained, “and then, oh, you know how those things, go, don’t you? I began to get interested in him, and he took me out to lunch, and we had some long interesting talks, and he came to my house to see my mother, and — well, I became engaged.” They got along famously; both had a bit of chameleon to them. Brabin was a Brit-

ish lower-middle-class butcher’s son playing an English gentleman in America, and Bara, who became synonymous with the vamp role, admitted, “I’m really a nice Jewish girl [from Cincinnati]. And that’s all.” “KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN” ON THE SILVER SCREEN

When “Kathleen Mavourneen” was edited and ready for release, producer William Fox rented one of the Shubert brothers’ grand Broadway theaters in Manhattan for the gala premiere of the film on August 19, 1919. “The attraction packed them in,” noted the trade journal Variety. “The house, despite the heat, was crowded to the doors.” Reviews were promising. Famed Hollywood columnist Louella Parsons (who, by the way, was once a screenwriter and an early collaborator of Theodore Wharton’s at the Edison studio) called Bara’s work in the

As “Kathleen Mavourneen” was distributed and exhibited, some Irish-American groups around the country voiced objection to the film’s cinematic depiction of abject poverty in Ireland. Other groups objected to the casting of a Jewish actress to play an Irish-Catholic lass. The mix of anger, wounded Irish pride and antisemitism made a toxic brew. One Irish-American group sent letters to theater managers, opposing the exhibition of “Kathleen Mavourneen.” “We feel it is our duty,” they wrote, “to protest strongly against what we call one of the most vulgar presentations of Irish life ever produced on the stage in this or any other country.” Riots broke out, bomb threats were called in, theater managers were badgered for showing the movie and film reels were destroyed by protesters. In one attempt to forestall problems, the manager of San Francisco’s Sun Theater met with and previewed the film for two Catholic priests and, at their suggestion, cut some scenes before the movie’s premiere. His effort was not enough to avoid incident. “We don’t want any of that [expletive] British propaganda shown in San Francisco!” shouted one Irish-American protestor at the Sun Theater manager.

continued on page 16

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LEGISLATURE Contin u ed From Page 4

“So it seems like a joint responsibility,” Myrick said. “It’s not something we just want to dump on our friends in the county.” Eventually, they settled on language that said the county would conduct their own analysis to the utility of maintaining it as a mobile communication center in the event the city of Ithaca decides not to maintain the truck. (See page five for the city’s decision.) Community involvement Legislator Henry Granison proposed two amendments that were passed. The first was to develop a plan that addresses

the community’s direct involvement in every aspect of implementing the recommendations contained in the draft report. Specifically, Granison mentioned community involvement in the hiring process. “The community should have a role,” he said. “Interviewing or whatever else to be involved in hiring new officers. When positions are open we know the police will be looking for more diverse candidates, but having a role for the community could also help.” There were some concerns about confidentiality issues, but Granison said they could have residents sign a confidentiality agreement if they were present for the hiring process. “It’s a way to involve the community in

every aspect of the final draft, because I want it clearly stated that the community is involved,” he said. The second amendment passed at Granison’s suggestion was to develop a comprehensive community policing and outreach plan to better connect law enforcement and residents. Legislator Dan Klein asked Granison to define what exactly he meant by community policing. “Police actually walk a beat,” Granison said. “They ride bikes, they interact with the community more. […] This would basically require cops to get out of their cars. I know that will be difficult for the county, but to the extent they can do it I believe it would be a benefit.”

We are Cayuga Primary Care

Legislator Deborah Dawson said she had trouble supporting the amendment just because the already short-staffed sheriff ’s department has a large county to patrol. “I’m having difficulty supporting this simply because community policing works best in the city,” she said. Sheriff Derek Osborne outlined some of the community engagement his department already does, but said he would be open to doing more. Granison also suggested a recommendation that would require law enforcement to reside within the area in which they work. While some legislators liked the idea in theory, they acknowledged that in practice it was too restrictive and would likely be detrimental to the Sheriff ’s Department. That amendment failed. Final vote The final vote was 11-2, with Sigler and Morey dissenting. Sigler said he agreed with 80% of the resolution, but ultimately voted against it because he was still disappointed about the rollout of the plan and he felt as if the city was trying to union bust the IPD. Morey did not speak on his decision. Chair Leslyn McBean-Clairborne said she was proud of the steps the county was taking. “None of these things comprehensively fix what’s been going on, but it’s all a step in the right direction,” she said. “As someone who is a person of color with lived experience, it’s very appreciated that we’re taking the steps to do something about it, not just putting it on the back burner. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

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Personal Health

Rootwork Herbals wins $10K grant Local business focuses on herbal products, education, health clinics, BIPOC support By Sydne y Ke l l e r

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manda David is the owner of Rootwork Herbals, a local business that operates throughout Central New York. David resides in Brooktondale, New York, and has been named a winner of Ball Canning’s “Made for More” Small Business Fund for giving back to her community during the COVID-19 pandemic. Rootwork Herbals offers herbal products, herb education, free health clinics and a BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and people of color) garden. Rootwork Herbals does not have a set location, but operates from several places, though David is a coowner of Bramble, an herb shop located in Press Bay Alley in Ithaca. David sells products in person at their store, but also operates out of her house by selling products online. David has her products made at a local farm and the BIPOC garden. David was chosen as one of 10 top finalists to receive a $10,000 grant on March 23 so that she can continue to expand her

business throughout the Ithaca community. Thousands of people across the nation applied for the grant. “I’m just so incredibly grateful,” David said. “That community support just really… is reassuring and allows you to feel good about the work that you’re doing in the community.” David said she is extremely grateful to Newell Brands for creating the “Made For More” Small Business Fund. Newell Brands launched the fund in December 2020 to support and admire small businesses who continued to support their communities throughout the pandemic. When the pandemic began, people turned to new ways of how to stay healthy, and David saw an increase in community support during this time. “A lot of people were seeking things that you could do at home, kind of alternative things to help support their immune

Amanda David (Photo: Provided)

system, to help maybe mitigate the symptoms.” Many people from all over the community came to the business for consultations, education about herbs for immunity and herbs for respiratory support and other facilities the business offers. David provides products for respiratory support and things for immunity. With the grant, David has plans to expand the clinic as well as having its in-person location at Bramble, and still providing products virtually. The grant money will help provide in-person space for clinics.

“It’s really amazing,” David said. “It’s really mind blowing... I just feel so blessed and honored and really want to make sure that we, in turn, are supporting the community because the community showed us so much support.” The BIPOC garden is one of the newest endeavors that David has begun, and the grant will also go toward helping to expand the garden. The garden is a great way for people to come out and connect with nature while also being safe and having the ability to social distance. “We’re hoping to be able to have more folks be able to come out and just connect to the land, learn about plants,” David said. Rootwork Herbals has continuously provided free herbal remedies to communities that do not have access, and she’s working on reaching out to grocery stores to sell her herbs as well. “We’re trying to come up with creative ways to still be able to support the community,” David said. David said that though her business has been able to keep up with the demand during this time, it was also sad because of how BIPOC businesses were blatantly affected more throughout the pandemic. “In our community and nationally, it became very highlighted and clear Black, indigenious and people of color were being affected in far worse ways than other folks, and so we wanted to focus the clinic on people who were being hit hardest through the pandemic.”

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Sports

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recall writing a piece a while back detailing a reply I put forth when I was asked what makes for a perfect sports story. I said I loved a story that featured a local athlete that works hard enough in high school to be named — let’s say — AllConference. The story gets better when that local athlete takes his or her talents to the next level and earns some recognition as a collegiate athlete. Imagine, I offered, if a local athlete steps onto ever-larger stages, and earns some national recognition. It was at that point that I thanked Kyle Dake for giving me a steady stream of material — from the time he started dominating as a high school wrestler to his thrilling second NCAA title. That was 10 years ago. Since then, Dake has kept the material coming. He made history by winning two more NCAA titles (becoming the first-ever NCAA wrestler to win four titles at four different weight classes) and he long ago set his sights on a U.S. Olympic team spot. He won two world titles, pressed on after being eliminated at two previous Olympic Trials and coming back from injuries, dug deeper after being told that the 2020 Games would be postponed for a year, and kept up his legendary brutal training regimen while becoming a husband and a father of two. On Saturday, it all paid off. And national media outlets lied… They lied, because several headlines screamed absurdities like “Dake Prevails in Olympic Trials Shocker,” or some other proclamation that Dake’s sweep of former Olympic gold medalist (and King of the Hill) Jordan Burroughs was entirely unexpected. Someone was not paying attention. This paragraph from Cornell Athletics’ website illustrates why Dake’s ascension to the summit of Team USA’s 74 kg mountain was not “shocking”: “Wrestling at both 79 and 74kg, Dake hasn’t dropped a freestyle match since January of 2018 with a 13-0 record against world and Olympic medalists. In total, Dake is 43-0 in that time frame and has outscored his opponents 331-41.” Those are not typos. Dake has been that dominant. Now he’ll represent the U.S. in Tokyo. Ironically, when a Cornellian last made an Olympic team — Dave Auble in 1964 — the games were held in… wait for it… Tokyo. I caught up with Dave, and we talked about the time we watched on the big screen from the edge of our seats when Dake won his historic fourth NCAA title,

and we agreed that it was very impressive that he was still improving, eight years later. I asked Auble (who won the 1959 and 1960 NCAA titles) how things have changed over the past 57 years, and he said “First, I want to say that I’m really happy for Kyle, and I have been associated with the Dakes for generations. His grandfather was the scorekeeper for our high school matches in the 1950s, and his dad, Doug, helped us win a national championship as an assistant coach at Ithaca College.” Dave added, “Things are better now, in part because the increased visibility has made the sport more legitimate. When I was wrestling internationally, we didn’t

even have a scoreboard. There were three judges, and if two of them were Soviets and you were an American, you were going to lose every time.” He added, “Now, coaches can throw in the towel on a questionable call, have a debate and maybe get the call overturned.” I brought up the fact that Auble and Dake share another piece of common ground in that they both made the Olympic team while raising young children. Auble was very clear that he is pleased that today’s wrestlers are able to take advantage of better funding streams and get jobs as assistant coaches that enable them to keep training at a high level, and he added that back in his day, that was rarely the case. “I made the Olympic team four years after college,” Auble stated, “and I had to work a construction job during the day and tend bar at night to support my family.” Some things, however, have remained the same for centuries. “When you get to that level,” Auble said, “you can’t drop your guard for a split second.” Asked if the improved officiating and funding make it tempting to come out of retirement, Dave — now 83 — laughed and said, “Yes, it does, and in fact, I want a match with Dake.” He did not specify which Dake.


Ithaca Beer Company offers a casual atmosphere, hoppy drinks and reliably good food

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By Henry Star k

he Taproom at the Ithaca Beer Company, near the Buttermilk Falls exits off Route 13 and Route 13A south of Ithaca, gives proof to the idea that to eat well and have a most enjoyable dining experience doesn’t have to include typical fine dining accoutrements. Here you’ll be offered paper napkins, plastic cutlery and Styrofoam-type dishes, all brought to the table by you, the customer. There are no servers, no silverware, no crockery, and the beverages, even the wonderful craft brews produced on site, are usually served in plastic cups. The prescribed routine is to select a table, if available, on the spacious outdoor patio or in the restaurant proper. After perusing the limited menu, you’ll join the queue at the counter and order the dishes you’ve selected. You’ll be

given a buzzer that will alert you when your meal is ready. Since many of the dishes are prepared to order, this could take some time. If the kitchen is a bit slow, I think you’ll be happy waiting because there seems to be a lighthearted atmosphere that pervades the establishment, and the food that is being prepared for you packs a lot of flavor and is served in attractively prepared and generous portions. In mentioning the limited menu, don’t expect a main course of meat and potatoes and a vegetable side. There are only three categories on offer: lighter fare, pizzas, and burgers & sandwiches. On recent visits I selected cheddar ale soup and minestrone soup (both $6) from the lighter fare portion of the menu. The cheddar soup was intense and creamy. (If I wasn’t attempting to be a sophisticated restaurant reviewer, I’d describe it as “cheesy.”) It’s made with a touch of their Flower Power IPA and a New York aged cheddar. The minestrone was chock full of vegetables, including potatoes, celery, onions, carrots, tomatoes and beans with saturated croutons. Curiously, a luncheon companion and I both thought the minestrone tasted just like Manhattan clam chowder with croutons. That is probably due to the generous inclusion of bay leaves and thyme. Also from the lighter fare section of the menu, I selected the sweet and sesame salad

Tidbits: -It is disappointing how many of the dishes, plastic silverware and cups get thrown away and what a small percentage are recycled. -The Ithaca Beer Company is planning to open a satellite in the new Student Agencies building in Collegetown in August. Watch this space in September for a review. A p ri l

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Arts&Entertainment

BREWS AND BURGERS

($12). This turned out to be a huge portion, attractively presented, even if on a Styrofoam dish. The salad included local greens, which featured small pieces of kale, orange slices and red bell peppers, all surrounding a large mound of brown rice. The whole salad was dotted by black specks of sesame seeds. I had to try the Taproom burger and was pleasantly surprised. Frankly, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy a burger so much in a brewery restaurant. I ordered it medium rare, and when I was summoned to pick it up, it was indeed, medium rare. It was served on an open-faced Ithaca Bakery brioche. I would have preferred a more generous portion of melted NYS cheddar. However the crinkly greens, pungent pickles and smoked garlic aioli complemented the beef quite nicely. Predictably, the Ithaca Beer Company restaurant has a complete menu of beer on tap. The most popular is Flower Power, which they distribute to 15 states in the East. It’s a “hoppy” IPA, but they also offer another strong ale with a strong hop character, CascaZilla, which I prefer. The atmosphere is spacious and light with tables well-separated, and overhead fans distribute fresh air from their up-to-date ventilation system. The music, which plays continuously, is not my taste, but at least the volume level is kept to a point where it’s not intrusive. The only time staff come into the dining area is to sanitize the tables and chairs when patrons leave. A few colorful hanging plexiglass panels separate some tables. I question how effective these are, but the bottom line for me is I feel safe there.

I t h a c a T i m e s   13


Art

Glitch art

State of the Art Gallery’s April exhibition shows off 7 local artists By Ar thur W hitm an

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t’s hard to imagine the local gallery scene without the State of the Art Gallery (SoAG). Founded in 1989, the downtown cooperative has represented many of Ithaca’s best known and most accomplished artists. It would be a mistake though to take its membership roll as representing everything worthy about art in the area. For its April exhibition, “15 Feet,” (through May 2) the SoAG has invited seven talented area artists to hang their work. It’s a reprieve from the gallery’s pandemicdriven diet of mostly predictable members’ group shows. Featuring artists diverse in person and in approach, “15 Feet,” though uneven, is a welcome intervention. From glitch art to folk art, it captures a variety of approaches less often seen in Ithaca’s formal galleries. With her five large cyanotypes—a photographic printing process that produces a cyan blue print—photographer and alternative media artist Laurie Snyder has the most commanding presence here. Composed of scraps from the artist’s garden, these deep blue direct contact prints — exposed in the sunlight — pay homage to the work of 19th century botanistphotographer Anna Atkins. “Oxalis” and “Ipomea Cardinalis” have a linear clarity, the latter recalling Matisse’s cut outs. “Dill Corona,” “Garlic Scapes” and “Papyrus” are softer, ghostly. Terry Plater, a former gallery member, is reprising “Train Ride (Dans le Train),” a panoramic oil painting from her show last year at the Community Arts Partnership’s ArtSpace. Painted on two adjoining canvases, the richly atmospheric piece captures a window view, looking out on an expanse of French countryside. Against an after-the-storm, late in the day mood, distant farm buildings and ghostly power lines memorialize a moment’s glance. Those of us without religiosity in our bones may be hampered in entering the imaginative world of Kim Schrag, whose paintings and drawings exude a didactic, storytelling approach. Loaded with allegories of human hubris and conflict as well as the devastation of nature, these are pieces that ask to be taken seriously. As gallery art, her work is most compelling when it has a certain material heft. Schrag’s four middle-size graphite drawings here lack that. Though intelligently conceived and drawn well enough, they lack the physical conviction needed to sell her weighty conceits. Her simplest composition, “Rising Water,” is the most memorable.

With five brightly colored mixed-media “Backpack” drawings, Elizabeth Wickenden McMahon brings out an irrepressibly personal take on the traditions of Cubist still life and the comic expressionism of the late painter Elizabeth Murray. The format of small framed works on paper seems insufficient for her expressive impulses — something larger, less safe seems called for here. McMahon’s closest artistic kin here is fiber artist Leanora Erica Mims. Mims is showing a series of geometric patchwork quilts influenced by the traditional African American quilting of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, as well as the contemporary politics of Black Lives Matter. Though these are all well done, I was particularly interested in her more unusual wall-work “Say Her Name: Atiana Jefferson — Bullet Proof Soul,” which memorializes a young Black woman killed by a police officer in 2019. The non-traditional quilt incorporates paper collage circles, text and unusually varied colors and patterns into a memorably disjointed whole. Yen Ospina, who showed last month in a virtual-only presentation sponsored by CAP, is a compelling (and here a conspicuously youthful) artist. Her small digital prints here explore by now familiar territory: resplendent queens, alien mythology, bold color and pattern, Art Nouveau curves. Werner Sun is a familiar presence in Ithaca’s gallery scene. Sun works with digital photo-manipulations, often incorporating “handmade” elaborations and sometimes spilling out into installation art. His recent “Big Bang” series — generously sampled here — transforms rephotographed images of glitchy computer screens, adding intricately pyramidal paper-folds. While the digital prints of SoAG member Stan Bowman are garish and hyperbolic, Sun’s work is characteristically lucid and measured. Even in the impossible dense, incantatory “Big Bang 12,” nuances of phantasmic color and faceted geometry ably translate digital experience into “unplugged” gallery art. As with the SoAG’s recent member exhibits, “15 Feet” might best be thought of as an anthology of tiny one-person shows. There’s a feeling here of these seven artists exploring their own separate tracks, only occasionally glancing at each other. Perhaps this is fitting for our times.


Movies

man finds his stolen bicycle and tries to get it back at any cost.

2021 Oscar Shorts

BVC’s Oscar Pick: “Two Distant Strangers”

Documentary (Short Subject)

“Colette” Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard “A Concerto is a Conversation”

A fresh crop of Academy nominated flicks screen at Cinemapolis and Cornell Cinema

Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers “Do Not Split” Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook “Hunger Ward” Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman “A Love Song for Latasha” Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan

By Br yan VanC ampe n

A

n excellent tradition continues as Cinemapolis and Cornell Cinema offer up this year’s Oscar nominees in the animated short film, live action short film and short documentary categories. Cinemapolis’ virtual cinema has them available through April 24 (check their website) and Cornell Cinema (CC) has them through April 29; CC’s deal is $12 per program and $30 for all three. Sharpen up your golf pencils and check out my thoughts on the animated and liveaction nominees to help bolster your office Zoom Oscar pool. I also pick my favorite short in each category.

Short Film (Animated)

I daresay Bugs Bunny had some of the same problems we see in Madeleine Sharafian and Michael Capbarat’s “Burrow”: in an animal epic styled after a round of the vintage video game “Dig Dug,” an everyman rabbit armed with a shovel tries to dig a home for himself underground, only to discover that he’s in a pretty crowded neighborhood. “Genius Loci” may be the boldest and most forward-thinking entry: Adrien Merigeau and Amaury Ovise’s film utilizes many different art styles, abstract shifts in tone and time, and bold, fractured editing as it tells the tale of a young loner who sees a mythic oneness beneath the world’s urban chaos. Styled in near black and white drawings over a white backdrop like a New Yorker cartoon, “If Anything Happens I Love You” by Will McCormack and Michael Govier uses shadows and minimalist settings to get at the reason why a married couple is so sad and angry; they’re grieving over the death of their daughter, killed in a school shooting. This is beautiful but raw stuff, sketches that illustrate an all-too common American tragedy. “Opera,” directed by Erich Oh, uses one slow moving camera angle shifting up and down toward a massive community contained within a pyramid. The structure contains many layers, levels and separate rooms populated by what seems to be hundreds of tiny ant-size creatures. Oh’s short has a slow but steady point of view and almost too much detail to absorb in one viewing. In “Yes People” by Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson, an apartment building contains many characters living a day in the life: an elderly couple, a goofy teenager and a music tutor. BVC’s Oscar Pick: “If Anything Happens I Love You”

Short Film (Live Action)

In Doug Roland and Sue Ruzenski’s “Feeling Through,” a young Black homeless man is looking for a place to sleep when he encounters another man who is deaf and blind. Roland’s film elevates the simple act of shopping at a bodega and waiting for a bus to a much more epic status. And you wouldn’t think that a father and daughter going to buy a fridge might merit as a story, but “The Present,” by Farah Nabulsi and Ossama Bawardi, turns an ordinary activity into a terrifying nail-biter that had me on tenterhooks until the very end. Oscar Isaac stars as a prison guard who gets a promotion to monitor convicts’ mail in “The Letter Room,” by Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan. A fundamentally decent man, the film tracks his time making connections with human beings inside and outside jail. A young Black man is just trying to get home to his dog, but he finds himself caught in a kind of “Groundhog Day” time loop of police violence and brutality in Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe’s “Two Distant Strangers.” It’s painful to admit how timely this film is; it feels like a modern-day episode of “The Twilight Zone.” It’s a narrative at least as old as “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure”: in “White Eye,” by Tomer Shushan and Shira Hochman, a

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I t h a c a T i m e s   15


VAMP IT UP Contin u ed From Page 9

Some Irish-American viewers found particularly appalling the scenes of Kathleen’s impoverished home with farm animals living in the building with the family. The San Francisco Chronicle reported on the unrest: “Objecting to scenes of dire poverty in Ireland as portrayed by Theda Bara in ‘Kathleen Mavourneen’ at the Sun Theater, a gang of young men attempted to wreck the theater, smashed the projecting machines and destroyed or took away the films last night. “The rioters objected to scenes in the picture showing two pigs in parlors of Irish cottages, chickens fluttering on stairways and other examples of dire poverty on the Emerald Isle. At last night’s performance a number of young men ranging in age from 19 to 22, according to [theater manager Abe] Markowitz, secured seats in the gallery near the projecting room, and during the picture yelled their disapproval of the film. “When the picture was through, one yelled ‘Get the picture,’ and a crowd made a rush for the operating room. The [projectionist] was pinned to the wall, and … the men smashed the [projectors] and other machinery in the room. “After smashing everything possible in the operating room, the crowd tore down railings, broke chairs, and did other damage in the upper gallery, and then

Th e da B a r a a n d h u s b a n d C h a r l e s B r a b i n o n a t r a i n voyag e i n 1 9 2 3.

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ran carrying with them two reels of the picture. Two more reels were torn during the excitement. “The police never caught the rioters. Markowitz estimated that the total damage added up to $5,000. He withdrew ‘Mavourneen’ and replaced it with … a comedy.” The wrath continued at other theaters. Some managers cut objectionable scenes and were able to screen without incident. Other theaters were not so lucky. By the time Fox pulled the movie from distribution, it had become an ugly but short footnote in Bara’s career. 7–13,

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THE LOST FILMS

Bara and Brabin met during production of “Kathleen Mavourneen,” and Bara’s biographer Eve Golden remarked on the “obvious electricity on the set between star and director.” The bond they formed then would last three and a half decades. Unfortunately, we cannot see the product of that electricity on the screen since “Kathleen Mavourneen” is considered a lost film, with no surviving copies known to exist. Most silent movies have not survived the ravages of time, especially because of the unstable, flammable nitrate film stock

on which the negatives and positive prints were exposed. The nitrate stock can spontaneously combust at any time, or dissolve into a sticky gelatinous mass, or simply turn to dust. Most of Bara’s films (all on nitrate) were lost in a terrible 1937 fire at Fox’s nitrate film storage facilities in New Jersey. Of Bara’s more than 40 films made between 1914 and 1926, only six complete prints still exist, with small fragments of several others surviving. The immensity of this loss for cinema history makes it difficult for a modern audience to fully comprehend Theda Bara’s stardom, persona and global impact. Like the lost Wharton inventory of Ithaca-made movies — which caught fire in 1929 and burned to ashes in an outbuilding at their Ithaca attorney’s property — the cultural loss is profound. While most of the movies made in Ithaca may be lost, the stories of their makers and the circumstances of their making need not be forgotten. Bara and Brabin’s works in Ithaca are examples of Ithaca’s important contributions to the world of cinema and are part of Ithaca’s cultural patrimony. Forgotten no longer. Special thanks to historical consultant Terry Harbin (founder of Ithaca Made Movies) for his decades of invaluable devotion to Ithaca silent movie history and research, for his sharing of the fruits of his work with everyone and for his valuable editorial assistance and fine-tuning. Thanks to S.K. List, Gail Dennis, and Naminata Diabate for editorial contributions. The author is an Ithacan, attorney, award-winning film producer and film historian. He is a graduate of Ithaca High School, Cornell University and Cornell Law School. He can be reached by email at ap44@cornell.edu. A digital version of this article with footnotes included is available upon request.


Virtual Music Concerts/Recitals

4/7 Wednesday Witek Trumpet Studio Recital at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Cornell (Virtual) Concert Series: Christian Sands | 7 p.m. | Cornell University, 144 East Ave Graduate Recital: Patrick Roche, percussion at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m.

4/8 Thursday Contemporary Chamber Ensemble at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

4/9 Friday Mary Hayes North Competition for Senior Piano Majors at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 2 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Trumpet Ensemble at Ford Hall | 7 p.m. | Virtual Junior Recital: Adrianna Anzalone, mezzo-soprano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

4/10 Saturday Graduate Recital: Claire Park, flute at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 12 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Junior Recital: Gillian Kroll, guitar at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 4 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Choir and Treble Chorale at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. Choir at Ford Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Virtual

4/11 Sunday Junior Recital: Michael Blum, piano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 2 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Orchestra at Ford Hall | 4 p.m. Junior Recital: Madison Hoerbelt, mezzo-soprano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Hockett

Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

4/13 Tuesday Junior Recital: Evan Sacco, bass at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 8:15 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

4/14 Wednesday Anthony Trionfo, flute and Albert Cano Smit, piano - The Angela and William Haines Young Concert Artists Residency at online | 7 p.m. Junior Recital: Andrew Becker, piano at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

Stage Spring Break-A-Leg Theatre Classes | 10:30 a.m., 4/7 Wednesday | Virtual | Next Generation School of Theatre Virtual Spring Break-a-Leg April 5-9, 2021 Virtual, join from anywhere! Under-Construction Cabaret | 7 p.m., 4/11 Sunday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Do you sing? Act? Juggle? Tell jokes? Write poems? Play the oboe? Do magic tricks? SOMETHING EVEN MORE EXCITING?!

Art Drawn to the Water A Virtual and Physical Art Show | 12 p.m., 4/9 Friday | Virtual | A Virtual and Physical Art Show - March 20 to May 16 The Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts presents a virtual art show experience of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Finger Lakes Andrew Ellis Johnson: Founder at Dowd Gallery | 4/12 Monday | Dowd Fine Arts Gallery, SUNY Cortland 40 Graham Avenue | Founder, an exhibition of large-scale ink and gouache paintings on paper and bonded marble sculptures, features Pittsburgh-based artist Andrew Ellis Johnson.

ing link available Apr 2-8 In Happiness (2014), filmmaker Balmès chronicled 8 year-old Peyangki’s initiation into a monastery and the arrival of electricity to his Varda by Agnès | 4/7 Wednesday | Virtual | RSVP for a FREE ticket Streaming link available Apr 2-8 The final film from the late, beloved Agnès Varda is a characteristically playful, profound, and personal summation of the director’s own Sing Me a Song | 4/7 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Ithaca Premiere\>2019 \> France/ Germany/Switzerland \> Directed by Thomas Balms In Happiness (2014), filmmaker Balms chronicled 8-year-old Peyangki’s initiation into a monastery and the Varda by Agnès | 4/7 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | 2019 \> France \> Directed by Agnès Varda With Agnès Varda, Sandrine Bonnaire, Herve Chandes The final film from the late, beloved Agnès Varda is a characteristically playful, profound, and Cornell Virtual Cinema: Synonyms | 4/9 Friday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | A faintly comedic, semiautobiographical film, tells the story of Yoav and his struggle to reinvent himself as French after moving to Paris from Israel.

Cornell Virtual Cinema: Wild Relatives | 4/9 Friday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Forced to relocate from Aleppo to Lebanon due to the Syrian civil war, an international agricultural research center must begin the laborious process of replanting its seed collection from the back-up bank located beneath the Arctic permafrost in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Virtual Cinemapolis: The Man Who Sold His Skin | 4/9 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Sam Ali, a young sensitive and impulsive Syrian, left his country for Lebanon to escape the war. To be able to travel to Europe and live with the love of his life, he accepts to have his back tattooed by one of the World’s most sulfurous contemporary artist. Virtual Cinemapolis: Slalom | 4/9 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | This riveting, Cannes-selected #MeToo drama from debut filmmaker Charlène Favier follows the relationship between a teenage ski prodigy and her predatory instructor. Virtual Cinemapolis: Shiva Baby | 4/10 Saturday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | A near college graduate, Danielle, gets paid by her sugar daddy and rushes to meet her neurotic parents at a family shiva. As the day unfolds, Danielle struggles to keep up different versions of herself, fend off pressures from her family and confront her insecurities without completely losing it. Virtual Cinemapolis: Oscar Shorts | 4/10 Saturday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | All three categories are available to view from home: Documentary, Animation, & Live

Action. Visit https://cinemapolis.org/ for details. “Wild Relatives” panel discussion | 12 p.m., 4/13 Tuesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | with a panel discussion featuring filmmaker Jumana Manna on Tuesday, April 13 at noon Ithaca Premiere>2018 > Germany/Lebanon/Norway > Directed by Jumana Manna Forced to relocate from Aleppo to

Special Events BIPOC Spring Mixer at Online | 5 p.m., 4/7 Wednesday | Join the Students of Color Coalition (SOCC) for a mixer to mingle with BIPOC organizations across campus!

Books Spring Break-A-Leg Theatre Classes | 10:30 a.m., 4/7 Wednesday | Virtual | Next Generation School of Theatre Virtual Spring Break-a-Leg April 5-9, 2021 Virtual, join from anywhere!

| 6:30 p.m., 4/8 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Reading by Camonghne Felix | 7 p.m., 4/8 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Register at: english. cornell.edu/zalaznick. Poet, writer, and political strategist Camonghne Felix will read from her work, sharing selections from her poetry collection Build Yourself a Boat. | Free The Gift of Gab: The Art of Public Speaking at Online | 3 p.m., 4/9 Friday | Virtual | We talk all the time. But there is a true difference between talking to a friend and speaking to an audience. With this workshop, learn how transform your gobbledegook into the Gift of Gab. Under-Construction Cabaret | 7 p.m., 4/11 Sunday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Do you sing? Act? Juggle? Tell jokes? Write poems? Play the oboe? Do magic tricks? SOMETHING EVEN MORE EXCITING?! Teen Writing Workshops | 4:30 p.m., 4/12 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street |

Virtual Toni Morrison Book Club and Making Meetup | 12 p.m., 4/7 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street |

After School Program for grades 6-11th | 4:30 p.m., 4/12 Monday | Metal Smithery, 950 Danby Road | Dates: April 12 - June24, 4:30-6:30PM Due to popular request, we now offer a once or twice weekly option.

Zine on Zoom | 4/7 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Youth writers in 4 th through 12 th grades are invited to help create and produce Tomfoolery, a quarterly publication of poems, stories, and art.

Family Book Club | 5 p.m., 4/13 Tuesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Family Book Club is for 4-8 year olds and their family. For now the family book club will be held on zoom.

Developing Characters Through Exercising Your Writing Muscles

Odysseys: Ithaca Writers on Exile, Wandering, and Searching

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Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. Two bedroom Collegetown Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-2421100. (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

DISH TV

425/Education

Your Ad

Your one Stop Shop

Since 1984 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca 607-272-1711 fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com

Heavy Equipment Operations

SPECIAL EDUCATION

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH!

Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-5691909. (AAN CAN)

COMMUNITY

800/Services HEARING AIDS!!

Buy one/get one Free! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45-day money back guarantee! 1-833585-1117. (AAN-CAN)

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/ mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE!

Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844-712-6153! (M-F 8am-8pm Central) (AAN CAN)

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855750-1612 (AAN CAN)

OVER $10K IN DEBT?

Be debt free in 24-48 months. Pay a fraction of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877-590-1202. (AAN CAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

SERVICES

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

877-516-1160

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Offer valid February 15 - June 6, 2021

New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

EMPLOYMENT

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value!

Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment?

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

1000/Real Estate for Sale OWN LAND IN NEW YORK

Special Financing Available Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

Our hunters will Pay Top $$$ to lease your land. Call now for free info packet 1-866-309-1507. www.BaseCampLeasing.com/Ref#NY11721 (NYSCAN)

820/Computer

NOTICE TO NEW YORK RESIDENTS

1010/Commercial

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Saving a Life EVERY 11 MINUTES

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Homeowner Funding is now offering homeowners a chance to make necessary energy efficient home repairs and will be offering its services to families who: 1. 2. 3.

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up to

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Penfield Central School District is seeking a dynamic and collaborative instructional leader with a focus on supporting the social and emotional needs of all learners. Ideal candidates will possess teaching and leadership experience, strong knowledge of student developmental levels and a passionate commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion for all learners. Interested candidates please visit www.penfield.edu, click on the Job Opportunities and follow directions to apply. EOE

DENTAL Insurance from Physicians Mutual Insurance Company.

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dental50plus.com/nypress

Includes the Participating (in GA: Designated) Providers and Preventive Benefits Rider. Product not available in all states. Acceptance guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. Contact us for complete details about this insurance solicitation. This specific offer is not available in CO; call 1-800-969-4781 or respond for similar offer. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN); Rider kinds B438/B439 (GA: B439B). 6255

with

GPS !

Help at Home Help On-the-Go ®

I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

Batteries Never Need Charging.

For a FREE brochure call:

1-800-404-9776 Donate Your Car & Help Grant A Child’s Wish

Looking for dump trailer experience, 48-foot doubles experience, and route driver experience. Great benefits including 401k, Medical, Dental, Vision, PTO. Pay ranging $50,000 to $75,000 a year. $5,000 sign on bonus!

Help Local Children And Get Free & Easy Towing

Visit WheelsForWishes.org or call (877)-798-9474

Benefiting

Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org

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BackPage

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

DiBella’s Subs

A Vibrant, Active Community Center

“The Best Sub You’ve ever had!” $5.00 off any purchase at

For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

DiBella’s Subs

Lifelong

119 West Court St., Ithaca

with Community Cash Coupon 222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

tclifelong.org

Engaging, Inclusive Officiating... ... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved ones and friends.

607-273-1511

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS Macintosh Consulting

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

*Acupuncture Works*

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c) www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-272-0114 ANIMALS LAND & SEA

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149 FILM PRODUCER SEEKS VOLUNTEERS TO HELP PRODUCE NO-BUDGET FILM(S) NOT LOOKING FOR SCRIPTS, SCRIPT IDEAS, ETC. WORK TO BE DONE IS WAY BEFORE FILM SHOOT(S) ORGANIZED, RELIABLE, SERIOUS ONLY RICHARDPRESTON615@GMAIL.COM FREE BRAKE CHECK Brakes feeling spongy? Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Bruces Pit-Stop

JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

334 Elmira Rd 607-882-6816

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

FREE TAX PREP

for Seniors 60+ Individuals with Disabilities Single Incomes below $35,000 Families Incomes below $57,000 IRS trained and certified volunteers Taxes will be prepared virtually at

PIANOS Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services No job too big or too small

LIFELONG 607-279-6617

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders

ITHACA NEWS

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26

Delivered to your inbox every day Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

(607) 272-6547

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS.

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext 214

Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

SOUTH SENECA VINYL

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

Custom made & Manufactured by

Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com

John’s Tailor Shop John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

YOUR CBD STORE The only dedicated retail store for all things CBD 308 E. Seneca Street * Ithaca 845-244-0868

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org Oil Change $19.99 Includes oil & filter 4 tire rotation & brake check with Community Cash Coupon Ithaca Auto Service 607-220-9183

Your Go-To Oil Change Stop Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop

DRIVE WITH US! OPEN INTERVIEWS!! APRIL 6 & 8 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Call for Info: 607-274-2128

334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816

150 Bostwick Road

Negotiated Wage and Health Benefits | NYS Retirement Pension Program | CDL/Paid Training | Equal Opportunity Employer ICSD is committed to equity,inclusion, and building a diverse staff. We strongly encourage applications from candidates of color. I C S D Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e r v i c e s 20  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

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Diversity Enriches our workplace


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

BUY SELL TRADE

EMPLOYMENT

DISH TV

Applications will be accepted online until 04/09/2021 at olasjobs.org/central. For more information, please visit our website at ocmboces.org/cte EOE

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405.. (AAN CAN)

100/Automotive CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY

Receive the maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. FAST FREE PICKUP 855-978-0215 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

110/Automotive Services AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH!

Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-5691909. (AAN CAN)

200/Buy / Sell / Trade

| 59,200 Readers

400/Employment Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 214.

ELEMENTARY TEACHER(S) LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALIST SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

— Southern Cayuga Central School announces openings for Elementary Teachers, Library Media Specialist, and a Special Education Teacher; effective September 1, 2021; deadline April 16, 2021; apply on OLAS and include letter of interest, resume, copy of certification & transcripts, proof of fingerprint clearance, reference letters; SCCS EOE

Heavy Equipment Operations Diesel Repair Technology Teacher

Heavy Equipment Operations and Diesel Repair Technology program is designed to offer high school students essential skills in the operation and repair of heavy equipment and heavy-duty diesel trucks using the latest techniques and diagnostic equipment. The teacher will meet the needs of diverse learners when providing both classroom and hands-on training through a partnership between OCM BOCES Cortlandville Campus and All County Collision & Repair. Candidates must possess or be willing to pursue NYS teaching certification.

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Speech Therapists (7/6/121– 8/13/21) Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Physical Therapists (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/ central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

425/Education ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN CAN)

430/General JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

520/Adoptions Wanted

AUTOMOTIVE

SERVICES

LOOKING TO ADOPT

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Family-oriented single woman looking to welcome a child into her life. Any ethnicity welcome, expenses paid. Please call (347) 470-5228 or my attorney: (800) 5823678 for information. (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

BANKRUPTCY

610/Apartments APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Downtown Studio Well lit furnished studio apartment just steps from the Ithaca Commons. Enjoy Being close to a variety of restaurants and businesses. Heat included. $975. Available August 5th. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. Two bedroom Collegetown Nice and spacious furnished 2 bedroom close to Cornell. Hardwood floors And high ceilings. Large bedrooms with ample natural light. Heat included. Tenants pay electric. $715 per person. Available August 5th. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing. One bedroom Collegetown Spacious furnished 1 bedroom. Large bedroom, eat in kitchen, private porch. 3 blocks to Cornell. Available August 5th. Heat included. Tenant pay electric. Call 607 273 1669 for more information or to schedule a viewing.

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-2421100. (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

HEARING AIDS!!

Buy one/get one Free! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45-day money back guarantee! 1-833585-1117. (AAN-CAN)

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE!

Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844-712-6153! (M-F 8am-8pm Central) (AAN CAN)

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-543-6440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services

A p ri l

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

DISH TV

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires: 7/21/21. 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/ mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

800/Services

The Generac PWRcell

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855750-1612 (AAN CAN)

1000/Real Estate for Sale OWN LAND IN NEW YORK

Our hunters will Pay Top $$$ to lease your land. Call now for free info packet 1-866-309-1507. www.BaseCampLeasing.com/Ref#NY11721 (NYSCAN)

1010/Commercial OCEAN CITY MARYLAND

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

OVER $10K IN DEBT?

Be debt free in 24-48 months. Pay a fraction of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877-590-1202. (AAN CAN)

Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment?

New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

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I t h a c a T i m e s   21

Profile for Ithaca Times

April 7, 2021  

April 7, 2021  

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