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F R E E M a r c h 24 , 2 0 2 1 / Vo lume X L I , N umb e r 31 / O u r 47 t h Ye a r 

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ALL ABOUT ITHACA 2021

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MEDICAID MANAGED CARE LIAISON SUPERVISOR: The William George Agency is a residential treatment center licensed by OCFS which has a 29I medical clinic on our campus. We are looking for a Medicaid Managed Care Supervisor to oversee our contracts as well as the billing process with managed care organizations. Candidates should have proficiency in medical billing experience in a medical setting, with exceptional customer service skills. Prior supervisory experience is preferred.

YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST

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CONNECTIONS COORDINATOR: The William George Agency is a residential treatment center, licensed by the Office of Children and Family Services. We are looking for a CONNECTIONS Coordinator who has a dual role of performing a quality assurance function, as well as a training function for system users. CONNECTIONS is a web-based system which houses child welfare case information. We are looking for a candidate with a Human Services undergraduate degree and both child welfare and computer software skills.

For complete job descriptions, or To fill out an online application,

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MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT: A Part-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment facility. Evening (4pm-12:30am) and overnight (12:30am9:00am) weekend shifts. Supports the daily operations of the medical clinic by assisting residents, documenting and filing pertinent medical information, documenting medical information in the CONNECTIONS medical tab, and ** assisting the Office Manager in general administrative duties.

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WWW.WGAFORCHILDREN.ORG WWW.WGAFORCHILDREN.ORG/CAREER-OPPORTUNITIES CALL 607-844-6460 OR CALLOR607-844-6460

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Newsline Cornell sees spike in COVID cases, moves to alert level yellow

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F E AT URE S

Senate Majority leader, Chuck Shumer speaks in front ot Cinemapolis

COVID

ornell University has moved to alert level yellow after 78 positive COVID cases were reported over the past week. Level yellow means that incidence of the virus remains low, but indicators show increased or potential for increase in transmission. President Martha Pollack sent an email to students in which she outlined that about half of those positives are associated with first-year students living on North Campus, and many others are linked to community spread in Greek-life organizations, athletic teams, onand off-campus parties, and travel outside of Ithaca. The university had two "wellness days" in early March in lieu of a traditional spring break. At the March 16 County Legislature meeting, Joel Malina, Cornell's vice president for university relations, said those days likely contributed to the rise in cases. "Good weather no doubt added to too much of an enticement to fall short on follow through of all the behavioral guidelines," he said. In Pollack's message, she also noted that there has been an "extremely concerning" increase in the numbers of students who are consistently missing their required surveillance testing and failing to complete the daily check health assessments. "Moreover, some students have either refused to comply with contact tracing or provided false information," she added. "These students may think they are protecting their friends by not identifying them as contacts, but they are, in fact, putting themselves and

VOL.XLI / NO. 31 / March 24, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

R ESCUE PLAN

Sen. Chuck Schumer touts ‘Save Our Stages’ program during stop in Ithaca

S

enate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer stopped in Ithaca on Monday afternoon to promote the relief measures passed as part of the American Rescue Plan, which he called “the most significant piece of legislation in decades.” The plan was passed earlier this month and included $1.9 trillion worth of economic assistance through a variety of av-

enues, including a third round of stimulus checks. Standing beneath Cinemapolis’ marquee, Schumer touted the Save Our Stages provision, which includes $1.25 billion for independent live venues, performing arts organizations, independent movie theaters and cultural institutions, as well as allows venues to access paycheck protection plan

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▶  Weapon found- A 12-yearold boy found a loaded 9MM semi-automatic handgun in a ditch while playing outside on the 500 block of Spencer Road in Ithaca. Police responded to a report on March 22 at 1 p.m. The boy didn’t touch the gun and immediately went and got his mother, who called 911 and stood by until the police arrived.

loans. The Save Our Stages program will open to applications on April 8. He also spoke to the billions of dollars going to localities in the US; Ithaca will receive $17 million and Tompkins County will receive $19.82 million. Additionally, Cornell will receive $33 million, Ithaca College $11.89 million and Tompkins Cortland Community College $7.5 million. “My first priority has been relief,” Schumer said. Ithaca mayor Svante Myrick called the plan “remarkable,” and said he’s never seen a piece of legislation so large and progressive. He added that the money Ithaca receives is fairly flexible, and can go toward things like paving streets and bringing employees back from furlough. “This did not seem possible a year ago,” he said of the bill. Brett Bossard, owner of Cinemapolis, said the theater was “saved largely by relief efforts.” Adding, “This is not just a grant for art’s sake, it’s strengthening small businesses across the state.” Ithaca College employee Latishia Abdellatif spoke about the stimulus checks she had received and how as a single mother it’s given her financial relief as she’s struggled to make ends meet throughout the pandemic. “I had to make some tough choices,” she said. “I was hit hard. Me and my kids are sleeping better at night knowing we can turn the lights on the next day.” -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

N o t e

According to police the gun had the serial numbers scratched off and it is presumed to be stolen. Patrol officers secured the weapon as evidence and are working with the investigations division to see if the weapon has any connections to the recent shootings that have been reported in Ithaca. Police commended the boy’s actions,

saying they’re an example of “a textbook way to handle finding a dangerous item.” They added that he likely prevented further injury by getting the weapon off the street. IPD also wants to remind parents to have conversations with their child about how to handle similar situations, should they arise.

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Ithaca Celebrity Quarantine Film Festival��������������������������������� 31 #10 Greg Proops

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All About Ithaca������������������������������9 Special Section

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T Sports ��������������������������������������������������������31 Stage ��������������������������������������������������������� 32 Times Table ��������������������������������������������� 33 Classifieds �����������������������������������������34-36

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 1218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m T o n i C r o u ch , x 1211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Sharon Davis, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

City Common Council

PHOTOGRAPHER Community members, police express wide range of opinions on public safety reform By C a se y Mar tin

IN 4 WORDS OR LESS, DESCRIBE ITHACA.

P

“Liberal Safe Haven.” -Gessille D.

“Close knit, Exquisite & Pride” -Reagan P & Jackie L.

olice officers and community members showed up in numbers to the March 16 Common Council meeting, where they expressed everything from disdain to enthusiastic support for the Reimagining Public Safety proposal. A handful of Ithaca police officers spoke first, beginning with James Davenport, who has been with the Ithaca Police Department (IPD) since 2016. He said that throughout the years, as the city has dealt with major issues like mental health and substance abuse, the police department has essentially become “social workers with tasers and with guns.” “This reform presents the city of Ithaca with a once-in-ageneration opportunity to affect change in the community,” he said. He added that the reimagining police movement could allow the city to enhance agencies with family, drug and mental health counselors, leaving the police department to deal with matters of a criminal

nature. “That way individuals suffering would not feel criminalized due to a police response,” he said. “We would be available if there’s any risk of violence, but we wouldn’t have to be the primary responders. However, instead of doing that, we’re going to be abolishing one of the premier police departments in the state.” Davenport encouraged the council to “do what’s best for the community” and reconsider the current draft proposal as it’s written. Richard Wells, the president of the Police Conference of New York, said that the IPD shouldn’t have to pay for the mistakes of other police departments. “The proposal says just get rid of them,” he said. “They’ll be unemployed and can apply for their jobs back, but they’ve done nothing wrong. They’re professional and not objecting to change, but just to get rid of them for incidences they had nothing to do with is a very radical move.”

A person who was identified only as Jay said he didn’t think the police had to worry about losing their jobs, as they’d be getting more staffing and support in the proposal, which he said he couldn’t support. “I want to defund the police,” he said. “When you defund the cops you can redistribute those resources to other services. It will reduce crime at the root cause. […] The proposal doesn’t solve the problem, even though it might be better than what we have now.” Activist Yasmin Rashid, who is also running to represent ward one on Common Council, said that while she doesn’t think the proposal addresses all the community needs, she does think it’s a good first step. “If we don’t support it, there is no alternative at the moment,” she said. “This is a working document, so there’s room for adjustment. If we ignore it, we’ll be left with what we’ve had for decades […] There’s something new and progressive that needs to be done, and the community as a whole needs to continue to be vocal.” She also added that she thinks the police need to stop lobbying residents to speak up for them. “I don’t believe, at the moment, if we want to do what’s

best for the community that we should allow officers to participate in the fearmongering of community members and business owners about what will become of them,” Rashid said. “They should be in fear for their jobs, because the structure of policing has not done anything positive by way of being adequate in addressing marginalized communities.” One speaker, Angela Nash, directed her comments specifically at Mayor Svante Myrick. She said she thinks people who don’t live in Ithaca should still have a place to have their voice heard. “The way he speaks of us out of towners is like we blow into town and then leave, never to return,” she said. “We have to return to the city quite often for necessities […] It gives us as much of a stake in the public safety measures.” On the opposite end, however, Jordan Clemons applauded Myrick’s efforts for reform and said Ithaca has the opportunity to show the nation what policing can be. “I wanted to commend the mayor for taking such a bold stand for change,” he said. “Change isn’t easy […] History shows no matter how much we reform policing, the effects on the most vulnerable is still the same. We must have leadership

Mike Meskill, the son of a former legislator, said that traffic stops improve the safety of the community by catching people driving in a way that could cause harm before they actually do so. He also focused on the elimination of the Ithaca Police Department (IPD) and accused mayor Svante Myrick, who was not at the meeting, of trying to get out of the police union contract. “Maybe it’s time the question is asked whose idea it really was to get rid of IPD,” he said. County Legislator Deborah Dawson spoke on behalf of her constituent Fay Gougakis. Gougakis does not own a computer and has been avoiding using the computers at the public library during the pandemic. “[Gougakis] pointed out that people in her situation are

at an extreme disadvantage in so far as being able to access the executive order, the report, the news information,” Dawson said. “She felt that she was at a real disadvantage because she didn’t understand what the proposal entails.” Gougakis told Dawson that she was concerned by the recommendation to replace the IPD and thinks the timeline needs to be slowed. “She didn’t understand why the governor had imposed a hurry in this time of a pandemic,” Dawson relayed. “She expressed concern that a change as radical as reconstructing a police department shouldn’t be rushed.” The County Legislature is expected to vote on the proposal on March 30. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

continued on page 7

“Artsy, Unique & quirky” -Oswego Crew

County Legislature

County residents not happy with police reform plan

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“Cold, young and Beautiful.” -Ethan L & Caitlin R.

“Hilly, Bohemian & Outdoorsy” -Thomas D. & Josh K.

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handful of people virtually attended the County Legislature meeting on March 16 to express displeasure with the Reimagining Public Safety proposal. Former sheriff Peter Meskill suggested that the county separate itself from “the majority or all of the misguided attempts in Ithaca.” He also echoed some of the legislators’ own concerns from the previous meeting that the sheriff is an elected position. “The sheriff is elected by voters of Tompkins County and serves the people, not the county administrator or county legislators,” he said. 24–30 ,

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He also spoke out against the recommendation to reduce traffic stops, and instead suggested the county invest significant ongoing funds to provide mental health and social services to county residents. Ithaca police officer Matthew Schweiger said he believes there are serious flaws in the data collected and that there was little quality control during data collection. “How can we suggest such sweeping changes based on that data,” he said. “I cannot in good conscience support this proposal.”


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

Town Hall

County, city leaders meet with community members for police reform Q&A

O

n Mar. 18, the City of Ithaca and Tompkins County held a virtual Reimagining Public Safety Town hall titled “Lifting Voices of People of Color; While All Are Welcome.” The meeting was held in conjunction with Baptist Church of Jesus Christ of The Apostolic Faith, Calvary Baptist Church, Tompkins County Veterans Services and Tompkins County Office of Humans Rights. The zoom panel was made up of community members and city and county officials. City of Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick and Tompkins County Administrator Jason Molino led the meeting. They were joined by Rev. Ronald Benson, Rev. Nathaniel Wright and Rev. Ken Clarke Sr. as well as J.R. Clairborne, director of Tompkins County Veterans Services, Leslyn McBean-Clairborne, chair of the Tompkins County Legislature, and former police officer Brad Nelson. Sean Eversley Bradwell and Belisa Gonzalez, two Ithaca College professors who were part of the academic/research group and the communications/community working group of the reimagining initiative, were also on the panel. The collaborative is currently in its final stage, seeking community feedback on the proposed draft. Under Executive Order 203, New York State Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative, all municipalities with police departments in New York State must adopt a plan for police reform by April 1. The Zoom began with a short speech by McBeanClairborne, who stressed unity during this time of change. “The conversations that have ensued since we have

started this and the recommendations came out have spiraled down into us versus them and this is not what it’s about,” she said. This is about systemic change. This is about addressing and digging up the root of the problem, getting rid of that rotten root and figuring out how we grow a brand new system that treats everybody equitably and keeps everyone safe…” Myrick and Molino then gave an overview of the findings of the reimagining collaborative and the draft of the plan which was released back in February. Among the 19 recommendations is to replace the City of Ithaca Police Department with a Community Solutions and Public Safety Department. Reverend Benson expressed support for change, saying now is the time to take action. “We do need to address the mental attitude of our police department and the mental attitude of our society to bring about what we need and I am saying, ‘let’s go for it,’” he said. “...I think now is the time for us to push forward and make this effort.” Nelson was skeptical about any chances of reimaging public safety, saying the city had already had its chance to fix policing in years past, but failed to do so. “There’s one focus I cannot let go by the wayside, and that’s trying to listen to a proposal to change something externally when the change needs to come internally and it needs to come from how employees are dealt with and, more specifically, I’m going to say officers of color,” he said. He said that he remembers four times when officers of color had the chance to be put

in a position of authority but it didn’t happen. “I don’t want to refute the effort of what you all have done but I have to step back, rewind and look at the smaller picture for folks trying to tell me to reimagine something,” he added. “It doesn’t work for me.” Wright was in charge of reading the submitted questions, as due to the panelist setup, community members could not personally pose their questions or voice their opinions. One of the main questions from community members was why the recommended changes will take so long to implement, with many expressing a desire for immediate action. Community member Megan Cosgrove asked in the chat, “Why the 12 month wait to take big concrete steps forward on making mental health crisis services available to the community and shifting other responsibilities to unarmed responders?” She added that there are plenty of cities around the country already implementing similar programs. Molino said most of the timelines for the project still need to be developed and that this will take time to plan and get resources together. “Probably it’s a fair statement to say that it’s not quick enough and I think we all recognize it,” he said. “Some of this takes time to plan, to put resources together, I think what’s important is the ball continues to move forward, accountability and transparency stays in the forefront and resources are put towards it Myrick admitted that there would be “very little” immediate impact. “What it really is is an out-

line, or a road map, for the path forward and that road map would have to be filled out by months, and frankly years, of continued community input, collaboration and design,” he said. Myrick did say the first changes that can be implemented in the coming months will be creating the position of director of public safety and community, which a police chief would then report to. Myrick said that under state law, there still must be a police chief, but that the police chief will have to report to this new director position. Currently, Myrick said the search for a new police chief following IPD Police Chief Dennis Mayor’s resignation has not yet begun. Other initial steps will be designing the job descriptions for “community solutions” officers and transitioning the SWAT truck from the police department to the Tompkins County Department of Emergency Response. Myrick did not give an exact timeline for any of these proposed plans and said that any other changes will be much more gradual. There were also questions about plans for racial sensitivity training and better background checks on officers. Community member Katie Compton said in the chat, “I’m a bit disheartened by what I see as an underwhelming concern for the prejudicial biases that contribute to troubling interactions between some police and members of the community. Can you speak to any plans for racial sensitivity training and re-education as part of these new initiatives/” Community member Nialah Wilsone echoed this asking, “In this newly imagined system, what steps will be made to make sure diverse equitable hiring decisions are made?” “It’s also about starting from a fresh culture, a new culture in which the expectations for what gets rewarded and who gets promoted are clear to everyone from the jump.” Myrick responded. “This is something our department has struggled with for the past 20 years and it’s an old culture bumping up against a new culture.” Rya n Bieber Ma r ch

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30% Vaccinated Health Director Frank Kruppa said that nearly a third of Tompkins County residents have received the vaccine.

Cases Up Positive COVID cases have risen over the past week or so in Tompkins County, and particularly at Cornell. Wear a mask, wash your hands and social distance — this thing isn’t over yet!

HEARD&SEEN Tweet tweet Birds in the trees, music on the Commons — the sounds of spring are officially here. Chuck Spotting After his quick stop in Ithaca, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer wore his “Ithaca is Gorges” mask while he swore in the allfemale Senate Sergeant at Arms team in Washington, D.C.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

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QUESTION OF THE WEEK

How many people have you helped sign up for a COVID vaccine?

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

Even if the weather is mild, is March too early for sandals? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

ITHACA NOTES

Wanda and Devin

Mutual Aid

M a rjor i e O l d s

By St e ph e n Bu r k e

n the midst of a snowstorm, the old lady saw something come out of her garage. At first, it looked like a raccoon with long matted hair. In the daylight it was a cat. After contacting neighbors and Colter Nemecek in Animal Control at the SPCA, no one was missing a cat. After Colter heroically faced down the snowstorm and set a trap in the garage to secure the cat, the old lady worried what would become of this poor homeless critter. Enter Devin and his family: Devin’s mother: “I’m so moved by your picture of this poor cat! I don’t know how long she seems to have been missing. Is she in need of a temporary home? We had a calico cat who died two years ago at the age of 21, so I’m very familiar with the unique personality of these girls… In these cruel times too many cats AND people getting turned out in the cold!” Devin, an Ithaca native, grew up with cats since birth. In 2020, the last of his beloved childhood cats had died. Devin, a seventh grader, wanted a cat, his mother told me later. She contacted the old lady and said the cat in the photo was a calico. She said she and Devin would come and get the cat. They walked the poor cold, hungry cat to their house, and

fter the pandemic hit a year ago, three sites for food sharing suddenly and inexplicably, or at least without fanfare or introduction, appeared in different directions within four blocks of my home in Ithaca’s Southside neighborhood. They are modest fixtures: boxes, shelves and coolers accessible from the street at all hours. Giving and taking are unsupervised, anonymous, and random, but seemingly steady and orderly. The “sharing cabinets,” as they are called, are a project of a new group, Mutual Aid Tompkins. The group’s name might sound generic, but actually has distinct roots in a progressive movement with explicit political aims that distinguish it from traditional or mainstream charities. In fact, the term “mutual aid” intends, in part, to supplant the idea of charity, which is seen as merely a temporary reallocation of resources from haves to have-nots rather than a lasting solution to social inequities and the needs they systematically cause. Historically, the phrase “mutual aid” was popularized over a century ago in response to emerging powers that emphasized, or even mandated, competition and centralized control over sharing, cooperation, and community rights. Specifically, now as then, mutual aid means not just relieving shortages of food, housing, medical care, schooling, employment, and other needs and resources, but acting against systems that are seen as creating them. What are mutual aid groups? They are community groups, not professional organizations. They are generally run by volunteer members making decisions and sharing responsibilities without paid staff, entrenched leadership, hierarchy, or bureaucracy. Typically, resources are solicited from community members and local businesses rather than corporate donors, professional philanthropies or charities, or the government. Government regulations are shunned or resisted in favor of local autonomy. Distribution of aid is free of application processes, or imposed requirements of any kind. Goals and tactics are determined by those involved, relying on one another for expertise and guidance rather than on influences such as politicians, the media, or other external concerns. The concept of giving help is replaced, or at least augmented, by that of promoting self-determination. Direct aid is not depoliticized, nor disconnected from underlying causes that require change.

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A Wanda’s new life was about to begin. Devon’s mother reported back that afternoon: “She’s been brushed now and is sitting on the bed grooming her fur. She LOVES Devin and is already inseparable from him. A great matchup!” A few hours later: “He is through the roof with excitement over FINALLY having a cat again — and a cat so perfectly matched to him.” Next day: “Devin and Wanda (Devin’s name for new Calico) are best of friends! They’ve hardly been apart since she walked out of the cage yesterday. She is obviously tired from her ordeal but seems to be healthy otherwise.” Last report: “Wanda had a great day today, truly enjoying being a cat: chasing balls, running after toy mice, eating too much, and demanding multiple brushings. It’s so gratifying to see her bounce continued on page 7

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Individuals are encouraged to connect with their communities in what is considered a continuing struggle for equality, justice, and access to resources. Mutual Aid Tompkins has come a long way in a short time. There are scores of sharing cabinets throughout Ithaca and outlying areas, and brick and mortar sites in pop-up locations, some approaching regular or permanent status. There is a website, also a Facebook page, facilitating communication in the community, sharing information generally, and promoting developing projects that include, along with access to food, aid for issues such as housing, transportation, legal status, child care, and medical care. On a Youtube video, co-founder Josh Dolan speaks about the group’s genesis, which has deep social roots, but new urgency because of the pandemic and its devastation of health and the economy, particularly among the traditionally oppressed, least served, and most vulnerable. Dolan says, “We’re trying to fill some of the cracks that have been exposed by this whole crisis.” He speaks of “re-organizing society.” Co-founder Phoebe Brown, a longtime activist in Ithaca and the Black community, speaks on the video of mutual aid as an intrinsic part and continuing legacy of Black communities in America. She describes the current effort as “one foot in front of the other” in a ceaseless march. Over half a million Americans have died in the pandemic. Their bereaved loved ones are countless. Also countless are those who have lost livelihoods, financial stability, homes, and even access to food. Mutual Aid Tompkins aims to address these conditions one step at a time. As a peer group, it also aims to offer shared assistance with personal issues of solitude, depression, and hopelessness, through communal action, vision, and caring. Relatedly, possibly not least, it offers high spirits, even humor, in its efforts and connections. Some weeks ago, at the No Mas Lagrimas affiliate at the inlet at W. Buffalo Street, someone came to donate a new toaster oven, still in its box. “Does that box have my name on it?” someone asked. “No, why?” the donor asked, with a smile. “Are you implying that I stole this from you?” “No,” came the reply. “I’m implying that I want it.” There was laughter: No Mas Lagrimas, indeed. The transfer was made, and lightness arose, illuminating the place’s purpose and name.


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS back from what must have been a very traumatizing experience!” Devin headed to middle school after a fine run at the local ICSD elementary school. Lots of his friends joined him for the first semester of middle school. Then suddenly Devin was in school at home, due to the pandemic: “I have great teachers, and they have been very flexible and understanding. But there have been lots of computer confrontations. My old computer would burst into static with green colored lines across the screen, loud beeping noises. Yikes! But I was given a new computer and things have definitely improved.” “My friends and I link up in zoom meetings. Sometimes we meet up with masks and social distancing, and visit outside at each other’ homes. Last week I went to my friend’s home and we visited around a firepit, then we walked on a nearby trail. For even more fun we do a tabletop fantasy, like Dungeon and Dragons, associated with video games. These

are referred to as RPG, which stands for Role Playing Game.” “When school is out, we go to California. We have grandparents there and we’re building a cabin over time, so someday we can live in the cabin over holidays. The cabin is in a desert, where it rarely snows.” “Once we travelled to South Dakota, I had been fascinated with that state since I first saw it on a jigsaw puzzle. My other grandfather who lives in Arizona met us in South Dakota once and we visited Mt. Rushmore.” “I like lots of stuff about Ithaca too— nice people, good friends, good schools and good restaurants.” The old lady and Colter were thrilled that the calico cat, marooned in the snowstorm, found a loving home. On top of that, to get to talk with Devin! So tall and self-confident, articulate and interesting, we could hardly believe he was in middle school. So long, dear Wanda. We are so glad to think of you and Devin keeping each other company, enjoying life together in the middle of the winter of the pandemic.

CORNELL ALERT Contin u ed From Page 7

others at risk, including the most vulnerable among us." Students who fail to adhere to the required guidelines are in violation of the Behavioral Compact and are subject to disciplinary action. According to Pollack, a number of students and student organizations have already faced or are in the

process of facing "serious repercussions for their actions." Tompkins County case counts have also been steadily rising over the past week, largely due to the increase of cases at Cornell. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

COMMON COUNCIL Contin u ed From Page 4

and a collective that are ready to move toward that change […] I’m a visionary, I believe Ithaca has a responsibility to be the model for the rest of the nation in all areas of life. We have the perfect landscape and community and leadership to do so. I think reimagining police is that chance.” Resident Aaron Arm said that he thinks the two polarized opinions have come from a place of hearsay and misunderstanding, and that opinions have been “distorted by knee-jerk reactions.” Because of this, he urged Common Council to begin working on their messaging to better inform the public. “For anyone who has read the plan, it alleviates the burden on police. It supports police by strengthening their ties to the community and promoting wellness,” he said. “It does not call for abolishing police, but expanding the scope of public safety. But let’s be real, people are not going to read the plan. And if people are not going to read the document, their understanding will come from a pixelated meme. Please work on messaging that works on breaking down the important aspects of the plan, and spearhead a campaign to educate the town.” Gideon Casper agreed, and said that

those knee-jerk reactions are brought on by fear of losing security in something people know, but that things need to change anyway. “Something’s not working in America, something’s not working in Ithaca,” he said. “We have a mayor, thank God, who is progressive enough to hear ideas from residents. This is part of a progressive moment that is our opportunity to be a model for the US.” Resident Katie Anderson echoed those statements, saying that the current policing system already isn’t stopping crime or drug overdoses. “The needs of community members are not being addressed,” she said. “The efforts to provide incremental changes have not resulted in a broad feeling of safety in the community. […] There are certainly improvements to be made and I think [community involvement] will be a very important part moving forward as we try to change a system that has been in place for a long time.” The proposal will be discussed again at the City Administration meeting on March 24 at 6 p.m. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

THE TALK AT

Proposed recycling legislation deals devastating blow to community newspapers

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ew York State Senator Todd Kaminsky and a host of colleagues have introduced legislation that shifts the responsibility and costs of recycling from municipalities to the producers of packaging and paper products. The legislation is called the Extended Producer Responsibility Act, and in other countries around the world, newspapers have been exempted from these recycling initiatives. New York should follow suit. Newspapers have been treated differently in recognition of the fact that they provide a public benefit, that they can make a significant contribution to public education on recycling, and that they are not a packaged good like other materials in the recycling stream. Newspapers perform an important role in our democracy, and they are not a consumable product — there are no contents and no packaging — the two are indistinguishable. Treating newspapers like packaged goods discriminates unfairly against newspapers —the packaged goods industry makes no investment in the contents of their packages, just the packaging itself. Newspapers are good citizens, and they are cheerleaders and watchdogs for the communities they serve. New York’s newspapers will be pleased to enter into a voluntary agreement to support, promote and educate readers and community leaders about the importance of recycling. New York’s legislators should consider the devastating impact this legislation will have on newspapers, and subsequently, citizens’ access to local journalism. -Michelle Rea, executive director of the New York Press Association/ New York Press Service

We need change

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here has been a great deal of opposition from a variety of individuals and groups to the Reimagining Public Safety Initiative developed by the the City of Ithaca and Tompkins County. Some think it goes too far in its reorganization of policing and public safety, while others believe it doesn’t go far enough or even come close to addressing the mistreatment of communities of color by local law enforcement. And it is this mistreatment, bias, violence, and abuse that Black and brown people have endured for years that this plan is meant to address, not the experiences of the white majority. To negate or demean the stories of our fellow residents of color because they don’t match our Ma r ch

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own experience or because individual law enforcement officers are “good and dedicated people” misses the point entirely and denies reality. When any of our fellow residents suffer bias and unfair treatment at the hands of law enforcement, our entire community suffers as well. For an initiative to truly address these inequities, it must outline concrete ways to hold members of law enforcement who mistreat members of our community accountable. This plan lacks this major piece. There can be no compromise on the termination of an officer who mistreats or abuses a person of color, or any individual for that matter. Any “union” or “association” that has that type of power or influence is detrimental to the community and to its own members. Though current law or practice may prevent real accountability from happening now, this plan must emphasize and prioritize concrete steps to achieve this. There were some potentially positive aspects of the plan that require more specificity and transparency, including the use of unarmed public safety personnel and teams of social workers and mental health professionals to respond to nonviolent crime and crisis situations. How will nonviolent crime be defined, and who will be the unarmed public safety officers? Will this plan make it a priority to hire and train members of these oppressed communities to take on some of these roles? It has been suggested over and over that channeling resources and funds into programs for youth, employment, child care, addiction treatment, and housing will prevent crime and uplift people. How will this initiative make the rechanneling of funds a priority? Law enforcement is not the only system that mistreats people of color and other oppressed groups. I have worked in the human services field for years and that system needs to undergo drastic change as well, especially as we move forward in our county and in our nation to truly transform systems and eliminate inequities faced by communities of color and other oppressed groups. There are many opposing perspectives on how to move forward. One thing I do believe is that impacted people and members of grassroots groups should be involved in the planning and implementation of any initiative. We shouldn’t just ask their opinions in focus groups and then not involve them in the actual process, especially when, due to the mistrust and trauma they have suffered, participation in these conversations took great courage. I wish I had the answer on how to bring the community together to achieve this major transformation. I have always been one to push for common ground, .....compromise, however, being a white person, I am not the one who has been “compromised” by the system that needs to dramatically change. -Fran Manzella, Ithaca, NY

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Youth Hockey Live

Parents call the shots

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fter social distancing regulations limited crowd size for Ithaca Youth Hockey League’s games, the league turned to internet video. Volunteers (players’ parents) in the nearly empty stands stepped up to record the action on their phones so that those safely at home could still follow the games. Although parental live streaming features all the familiar technical mishaps: false starts, broken links, dead phone batteries, and the eternal landscape-versusportrait struggle, it also revealed sleeper talent hidden: brilliant live play-by-play commentators. Who better actually? These parents live and breathe hockey, regularly wake up at 3:30 a.m., tolerate smelly hockey bags in their living rooms and are unafraid of public speaking. Would swimming and diving parents so easily step up to become color commentators overnight? Does every swimming parent know off the top of his head how many pool lengths equal a hundred yards, or how the degree of difficulty affects the tally of diving scores? How do you even win a swimming meet, let alone explain the scoring algorithm live on the internet? But every hockey parent is a play-byplay commentator-in-waiting. Even if the lighting was poor and the images are pixelated, hockey's exciting back and forth and easy scoring, relayed through the animated voice of a mom or dad who knows most of the players’ names, made for an entirely watchable broadcast. Earlier this month, Ithaca’s under-14 boys team hosted Skaneateles at Cass Park rink and left wing Leo Scott’s parents provided the Facebook Live coverage from the stands, as they had for a handful of previous games. They went online as the teams warmed up. Leo’s dad, Ithaca College professor John Scott, called the game as Rex Rick O'Shay, a fiery alter ego he created for

the job. As Scott described the action for the full hour and 12-minute stream, Leo’s mother Karen Rodriguez, who happens to be a professional cinematographer by day, operated the camera (her iPhone). Ithaca won 3-2. And the game’s video was also a success.

You might expect an Ithaca hockey dad to eagerly trot out their best Canadian accent, à la Rick Moranis, but Scott’s “Rex” is a steady, more realistic character. Scott, who grew up in Nova Scotia, can access a more authentic folksy drawl than your average Ithacan. “Yessiree Bob... Skaneateles has been a team that is tough for Ithaca to beat,” Rex announced at the beginning of the game. “They are a scrappy team every year and it’s normally a close contest, so we’ll see

Ithaca Youth Hockey League parents, John Scott and Karen Rodriguez Broadcasting a game live from Cass Park on March 13 (Photo: Darlene Campbell)

The proof is in the data. Live viewers hovered around 17, but the video remains available on the club’s Facebook page and currently has 664 views. To put that into perspective, the March 10 Ithaca City Common Council Committee Meeting where one of the agenda items is whether to dissolve and redesign Ithaca’s police department currently has 271 views.

how it goes today. We’re infected with the virus, the virus’s name is hockey. Everybody’s got it, and the pucks are flyin!’” Parents for the other IYHA teams soon added live commentary to their streams too. Megan Wagenet and Ed Kelly, both parents of kids on under-12 teams, recently joined forces for an inter-city under-12 Game between Ithaca 08 Red and Ithaca 09 White.

GR EEN ENERGY

PEDC sends green building code on to Common Council for final vote, wants faster timeline

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he Planning and Economic Development Committee officially voted to send the Ithaca Energy Code Supplement on to Common Council at its March 17 meeting. The committee again expressed an interest in moving the timeline forward, but it remains to be seen what will be agreed upon by the council. Ian Shapiro, the founder and senior consulting engineer at Taitem Engineering who helped put the supplement together, said that there are arguments for both speeding up the timeline and keeping it as is. “You know, I think it’s pretty simple. If we accelerate, we’ll reduce carbon emissions faster. The argument for orderly transition is to test it,” he said. We’ve been testing it for years, but at the same time this is brand new for the city and the town so there will likely need to be tweaks.”

The town of Ithaca has also discussed accelerating the timeline, which currently aims to reach carbon neutrality by 2030. Nick Goldsmith, the sustainability coordinator for both the city and town, said he thinks the town is looking at moving it up by a year or two. “I’m comfortable with that,” he said. “A more moderate acceleration than five years seems to be a good strategy.” Committee chair Seph Murtagh said he’d be happy to move forward with shifting the timeline by two years, meaning the 2023 standards would go into effect once the code is passed. Other members agreed with that timeline. “People who have been pushing us to do this recognize how fast everything changes,” Murtagh said. “They realize how quickly the world is changing and the market is changing.”

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“I’ve usually called the 12U games for our team by myself ” Megan explained, “while another parent or team manager will update the scores and penalties in the comments section… It’s actually much more fun to do it with someone else as we can banter back and forth with each other.” Megan Wagenet is fully enmeshed in Ithaca hockey. Her brother played growing up, and her husband has coached IYHA teams since 2011. She has spent a lot of time at the Ithaca rinks. “I think I have a strong understanding of hockey and the game… Our family also supports both the women’s and men’s hockey teams at Cornell and we regularly attend as many games as we can, pre-COVID of course.” For Pamala Tan, who is the manager for the under-14 boys team and mother of center Samuel Holmes, the broadcasts have been useful beyond just spectating. “For games I cannot attend in person, I absolutely watch in the stream! I also share it with my family members outside Ithaca. They've watched the live streams from NYC, Washington state, and Florida. They love the commentary because sometimes it's hard to see what's happening, and they may not be as into hockey as we are. We also watch key parts of the livestream afterward, when Sam has had a goal, an assist, or a penalty. It's particularly gratifying to confront our 14-year-old when he initially claims he didn't understand why he had to spend time in the penalty box. When he watches the recorded livestream, he'll say, ‘Ooh. Yeah. I totally deserved that penalty.’” The League’s regular season is winding down now as we transition into spring. Perhaps this successful piece of pandemic life will continue even when restrictions are lifted. Live stream videos of the season’s games are available on the Leauges’ Facebook pages www.facebook.com/IthacaYouthHockey/ -Marshall Hopkins

Committee member Donna Fleming noted that the code is fairly complicated, and asked if the city would need to hire more staff to implement it. However, JoAnn Cornish, the director of planning and development, said she doesn’t see that happening at this point. “We’ve been bringing inspectors along with us,” she said. “We do plan to have training sessions, and so far we don’t see having to hire additional staff, but that remains to be seen. There is some concern it may add work to the inspectors’ jobs, but I think we can handle it in the routine inspections and routine analysis of the plans people submit.” At this point, Goldsmith said the plans the city and town are working on have essentially identical standards in their codes. “They’re virtually the same at this point,” he said. “Enforcement might differ, there might be differences in how it’s implemented.” The next step to adopting the plan is to have it approved by Common Council. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g


B e s t o s i t L i f n y g t i s n u I m t h aca m oC 2020 Lake Monsters 101

C SAs

g n i k i H X FL

g Buskin

Little Free Libraries

ALL ABOUT ITHACA

2021


1THACA

NUMB3RS

by the

57 Places in Tompkins are listed on the National Register of Historic Places

City- 5.39 Square Miles surrounded by reality 2016 Estimated Population: 30,756

The 16 wineries on the Cayuga Wine Trail produce an average 460,975.3 gallons of wine each year.

Race Breakdown: 70.5% white, 6.6% black, 16.2% Asian, 6.7% Hispanic or other 459 Veterans

That would be the equivalent to filling the gas tanks of 3,687 tractor trailers

17.2% foreign born individuals 94.2% have a high school degree or higher

There are 28,000 acres (43.75 square miles) of New York State Public Forests and Parks in Tompkins County

62.9% have a bachelor’s degree or higher 19.9% speak a language other than English

That’s 8.89 percent of the whole county!

Cayuga lake is 38 miles long. It stretches through 3 counties. It’s 425 feet deep at its deepest point. It covers 42,956 acres

There are 150 Waterfalls and Gorges in Tompkins County

24 Different species of fish live in Cayuga Lake Cayuga Lake is stocked with 60,000 Lake Trout, 25,000 Brown Trout, and 40,000 Atlantic Salmon each year

Cornell employs 9,757 regular and part time faculty and staff Over 23,620 total students attend Cornell University There are 161 steps to the top of Cornell’s Clocktower The Cornell University Botanical Gardens cover over 4,000 acres.

201 dead deer were removed from county roads in 2016

Ithaca College enrolls approximately 5,400 undergraduates - 2,100 men and 2,900 women and 400 graduate students

146 Does, 55 Bucks Most deer were killed on North Triphammer Road with an average 3.88 found per mile

Ithaca College employs 1,741 full and part time faculty and staff. Ithaca College’s main campus spans over 669 acres

94.6% percent of Ithaca Times readers said they were happy to see the student population go home for the Summer. 10

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ALL ABOUT ITHACA 2021 A bo ut the C ov er : N av el G a z ing I llus tr ati on B y M ar shall H opk ins

ON THE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m

AL L ABOU T ITHACA Buskers bring life, music to the streets of Ithaca

Arts & Entertainment����������������������������������������������������23

By Ryan Bieber

Ithaca embraces Little Free Libraries������������������14

E r i n S t e w a r t , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 1220 E r i n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 1218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m

The quirky boxes show off each neighborhood’s unique personality

Chris Eaton, Distribution

Navigating the region by foot

By Marin Langlieb

Hiking Through The Lakes ����������������������������������������14

J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m

By Lori Sonken

F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

By Peggy Haine

THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE COPYRIGHT © 2021, BY NEWSKI INC.

All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

Live Music in Press Bay Alley (Photo Casey Martin)

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Eat Well Community ���������������������������������������������������15

Cinemas Galleries Museums Theaters Local Music Organizations Festivals Book/Record Stores

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Here there be monsters�����������������������������������������������16

Golf Courses Pools Bowling Skating Parks

By Charley Githler

Government & Local Institutions���������������������������26

A look at the region’s web of CSA’s

Diving into the legacy of the beasts of the Finger Lakes

BE ST OF ITHACA Entertainment���������������������������������������������������������������18 Essentials������������������������������������������������������������������������19 Food and Drink��������������������������������������������������������������20 People�������������������������������������������������������������������������������21

C OMMUNIT Y L ISTINGS Area Attractions����������������������������������������������������������23 Visitor information Shopping Supermarkets Wineries The

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Municipal Government Higher Education Education Parking Waste Removal Services Voting City of Ithaca polling places: Town of Ithaca polling places Libraries Post Offices Transportation

Healthcare���������������������������������������������������������������������27 Hospital Clinic Aging Crisis Supportave services

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Taking it to the street BUSKERS BRING LIFE, MUSIC TO THE STREETS OF ITHACA By Rya n B iebe r

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nlike most street performers in Ithaca, musician Danny Gone (his stage name) sets up shop far away from the buzz of the Commons. On a cool October night, you can find him in the parking lot of Five Guys and Taco Bell off Elmira Road, a silhouette illuminated by the neon glow of traffic lights and fast food logos. Rain or shine, he stands on this corner, amplified guitar and voice reverberating over the din of speeding cars, playing for hours each day to make a living. This is the life of a street performer. Street performing, also known as “busking,” dates all the way back to medieval Europe, where local merchants invited entertainers to play in front of their stores to attract more customers. While the term “busker” wasn’t coined until 1851, the tradition has gone largely unchanged in the centuries since. Nowadays, a busker refers to a person who performs music or any other type of entertainment in a public place for tips or donations. If anyone embodies this lifestyle, it’s certainly Gone, who has been busking full-time for approximately 14 years. Over the past decade, he’s played everywhere from New York City to Asbury Park to Philadelphia. In the years prior, Gone worked various jobs as a fashion photographer, a sound engineer and a bicycle mechanic, among other things. When the stock market crashed in 2008, Gone said he was essentially faced with the choice of working as a barista or busking full-time. “It started to get iffy and things were very hit-or-miss,” he said. “I asked myself, ‘can I make enough money doing this to compete with Starbucks? … I don't think so, but I'm going to try.’”

Gone moved to Ithaca in January 2020 in order to support his mother, who is ill. When he first arrived, he played on the Commons and Aurora Street, but soon ran into trouble. Gone, who said he uses an amplifier to reach more of his audience, soon found himself at odds with the city of Ithaca Code Chapter 157-8, which prohibits street performers from using amplifiers without a permit. However, even after dropping the amp and negotiating with restaurant owners to only play on weekdays, Gone said he had the police called on him multiple times. “They think that us street musicians are powerless and that because we get punted around so much that we’ll do anything to avoid it,” Gone said. “I don’t want to get kicked around, but I’m not going to shut my mouth just because of the message.” Kris Lewis, operations director for the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, said that for the most part, the DIA encourages street performers, but asks buskers to follow the city code. “We think that they enliven the downtown and provide vibrancy, so for the most part, we are definitely interested in having street performers out on our Commons,” she said. “The code is just really common courtesy rules for people that are street performers. Most of the time, folks adhere to those if they know them.” After a few months, Gone packed his things and began searching for a new spot, a place he hoped would be well-traveled, socially distanced and safe to play without being kicked out. The parking lot of Five Guys, right off a busy interaction with a convenient spot near the traffic light, was his solution. Gone said many musicians can’t fathom why he would play in such a location, but that he makes the best of the situation.

Fiddler on the Commons (Photo: Casey Martin)

76749 Kendal Pool Ad for Ithaca Times T: 10 x 5.5

The gentle, comforting ripple of warm saltwater has an invigorating effect — especially during aqua-aerobics class. And, for Kendal residents Sara, Carol and Joann, the exercise is a fun, refreshing way to get fit — and get together. Living on the 105-acre campus at Kendal not only keeps them involved in the lifestyle they love, but connected to any future care they may need. And, from here, the story just keeps getting better. Come for a visit and tell us your story. Call 800-253-6325 877-891-7709 or go to kai.kendal.org kai.kendal.org/IT2 to learn more.

2230 N Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850

A not-for-profit continuing care retirement community serving older adults in the Quaker tradition. ©2014 KENDAL 76749_SkiingAd_IthacaTimes_pool.indd 12

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“You take a place that has no identity, and then you give it this warmth,” he said, likening his performance to placing a water fountain in a parking lot. “There's a sense of beauty that comes, and people really respond, so it’s the perfect connection.” Despite the steady stream of drivers rolling down their windows to listen and passengers getting out of their cars to tip, Gone said he was having a bad night. Since the pandemic hit, he said things have been even more unpredictable.“It’s up, down and sideways … It’s absolutely unintelligible,” he said. “I played up the street earlier in the day and made nothing, not a single thing. Then I came down here and made a little better than nothing.” Still, Gone emphasized that even before COVID, street performing was a risky career. “There’s nothing stable about this in any sense, not even slightly,” he said. “It will scare the pants off of almost anyone ... But I’ve never had a better job.” Gone is far from alone in this mindset. He is one of many performers in Ithaca who prefer to fly by the seat of their pants. Ketch Secor, now frontman and fiddler for the Grammy-winning band Old Crow Medicine Show, famous for their song, “Wagon Wheel,” got his start busking on the streets of Ithaca back in ‘98. “Ithaca was a real jumping-off point for me as a busker,” he said. “I needed a kind of proving ground, and Ithaca was perfect for that.” Old Crow was officially formed in Ithaca, which has a long tradition of folk and bluegrass music — something Ketch said was highly formative to the band’s sound. “We were just looking for a place to set up and practice drawing a crowd and learning showmanship,” he said. “It was so important to have a place to play when we were that young and weren’t good enough to get hired.” Millions of albums sold and decades later, Secor still hasn’t lost touch with his busking roots, just last week performing on a corner in Key West. “It was good to be back in touch with the muscle and remember and appreciate the place of the busker and the promise and the hope of it,” he said. “Even if the bottom falls out of the music business, I always got a job. I’m a street performer.” His advice to performers in the pandemic? “Keep your masks on and open up your cases, Ithaca... Every kid with his case out has a dream, and dreams are beautiful things in times like these.” Not every busker makes it as big as Secor, but at the same time, not all buskers aspire for fame either. Take Dexter Kozen, a Cornell professor by day and musician by night. A veteran of the open mic scene, Kozen found his passion for performing stripped away as the pandemic forced restaurants to close their doors. Now, he plays once every couple of weeks in the Commons as a way to “get the yuks out,” as he put it. “This is the only outlet right now for me,” he said. “I feel kind of pent up at home, so I gotta get out and do something like this every once in a while.” Kozen said he usually only makes around $20 but that he isn’t in it for the money. In fact,

all of the tips he receives go to charities of his choice. This particular night, he was raising money for United Way of Tompkins County, a local nonprofit with the goal of giving better access to health, education and financial stability for Tompkins County residents. “It’s always for charity … It’s not about the money,” he said. Busking isn’t just for musicians either. William Metro, better known as the Magic Man, has been performing in Ithaca for the past ten years, becoming somewhat of a local icon. Metro used to sell vacuums door-to-door before taking a leap of faith to perform his true passion, magic, which he has been practicing since he was 10 years old. In all of his years in Ithaca, Metro said he has never seen anything like the pandemic before. He said it has been particularly hard now that all the major events, like Apple Fest, have been canceled. “A lot of us lost money, and it’s been kind of rough without the events, but we've been making it work,” he said. “Making it work” may depend on who you ask, however. Although Metro has a mask tied around his neck, he rarely wears it unless explicitly asked. This has been a cause of concern for several businesses in the Commons, he said, though he has no current plans to change his ways. “I’m not doing anything differently than what I’ve been doing the last 10 years,” he said. “The masks aren’t really effective, I think.” Despite some complaints, Metro is optimistic about the future, especially now that businesses have begun to reopen. “It’s getting better though … Lots of people are out and about and businesses are opening back up and the economy’s rebounding,” he said. Back at Five Guys, Gone says he is uncertain about the future, but plans to keep performing through the winter and onward. “I suppose people would be pretty interested to know what this is like,” he mused aloud. “The interesting thing about this is that it is so different from what other people do. There’s this weird balance where people can’t decide whether you're homeless or who you are or what to do. They spend their lives trying to put everybody in boxes, and you freak them out because they have no idea what to do with you.” After Gone finishes another song, a young couple, arm in arm, approach him, tipping their spare change into his silver bucket. “You remind me of God in ‘Bruce Almighty,’” the boy said, referring to the movie in which Morgan Freeman plays God. “Freeman’s got a pretty good smile, you got a pretty good smile, so there you go.” “You just have a presence about you as well,” the girl adds. “It’s called fear,” Gone half-jokes with a laugh and a strum of his guitar. When the lovers leave, Gone turns around, reciting a phrase a fellow performer once told him. “You're famous from there to there,” he said, pointing from one end of the street to the other. Then with a chuckle and a hearty blow of his cigarette he smiled and asked, “That’s enough, right?”

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Ithaca embraces Little Free Libraries THE QUIRKY BOXES SHOW OFF EACH NEIGHBORHOOD’S UNIQUE PERSONALITY

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hances are, if you’ve walked around one of the local Ithaca neighborhoods, you might have spotted something that resembles a large mailbox filled to the brim with books. These Little Free Libraries, which are public book exchanges started by people or organizations, require just a weather-proof container to get started. Yet the stories from these libraries come just as much from the books that people borrow as the people behind these small spaces. Corinne Stern, owner of FLOOF Collage pARTy!, wanted her Little Free Library (135 Burleigh Dr., Ithaca) to reflect her artwork and her passion for reusing recycled materials. A while back, she found a wooden doll house, abandoned on the side of the road, which she knew would be perfect. Using a bit of engineering and clever crafting, she maneuvered a piece of leftover tin roofing to cover the dollhouse’s roof, acrylic panes from her photography to waterproof the sides, CDs to make it sparkle and piano keys to prop open the roof when people want to look inside. The handle to open the library? A high-heeled shoe from friends of hers who are shoe reps. “I’m an artist and an individualist — I didn’t want mine to be like anyone else’s,” Stern said, adding that she also wanted her library to be like an extension of her art shop. “With the pandemic, I can’t have art parties, so I was hoping it would attract people to look at my shop and say ‘oooh wonder what this is?’” Casey Carr’s library (403 Highgate Rd., Ithaca) is handcrafted and unique as well, which her friends Vikki and Dave made for her in exchange for one of her handmade quilts. Her Little Free Library, designed to look like her home, is filled with windows that are painted to represent a different room or person in Carr’s family. The windows also unintentionally

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By Ma r i n La ngl ieb

Little free library boxes in Ithaca. (Photos: Casey Martin and Provided)

The

represent Carr’s view of reading “as a window into the world.” Through her window in her actual home, Carr enjoys getting to see people stopping and peering into her library. She recounted one instance of a dad and his 3-year-old daughter picking out a book. After the daughter found one, her father scooped her up and put her on his shoulders. “She balanced the book on his head and read while they continued walking along,” Carr said, laughing. For Flannery Hysjulien, those small moments generated by the Little Free Library were part of the reason why she wanted to build one. She stated that she “loves things that encourage me to slow down and take a closer look.” Her library (225 Fall Creek Dr., Ithaca) is dedicated to her father, who she describes as a “gentle and generous man, a teacher, poet and book lover,” and who passed away from brain cancer in 2018. “Many summer days of my childhood were spent with my dad in the cool corner of a used bookstore, thrift shop or library,” Hysjulien said. “After his death, creating a Little Free Library felt like an opportunity to honor my dad and nurture community.” Especially during the pandemic, Stern, Carr and Hysjulien all mentioned the joy of getting to connect with others through the shared language of books. For Stern, it’s the excitement of knowing her books could be anywhere in Ithaca and potentially even passed along around the world. For Carr, she loves the idea of books being owned not by one person, but by the community. Hysjulien describes lending out books as like giving a piece of herself to others. “When we share books with neighbors and strangers, we practice — in a very small way — letting go of things we love, sharing our resources, nurturing curiosity and building community,” Hysjulien stated.

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Hiking through the Lakes NAVIGATING THE REGION BY FOOT By Lo r i So n ke n

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ozens of trails crisscross the Finger Lakes region, making Ithaca an ideal destina­ tion for all types of hikers, including fam­ ilies wanting to take a simple stroll in the woods and those desiring a vigorous workout. “My favorite places to hike include our local state parks, especially Upper Treman with the stunning views of Lucifer Falls and the heights and meandering trails along the water in Fillmore Glen, “ said Sigrid Connors, a vol­ unteer with the Cayuga Trails Club (CTC). The CTC offers easy, moderate and stren­ uous hikes – all posted on the club’s website at cayugatrailsclub.org. Connors leads three to sixmile-long hikes, each lasting from one to three hours. For those looking to take a simple walk, the 230-acre sanctuary surrounding the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at 139 Sapsucker Woods Road in Ithaca features four miles of flat trails and boardwalks. Another favorite, albeit steeper, spot is the Sweedler Preserve, an area protecting 3,000 feet of land bordering Lick Brook. Hem­lock, oak, maple and white pine trees dot the landscape and along with waterfalls. Sweedler is one of 34 preserves, including many with hiking trails, conserved by the Finger Lakes Land Trust (FLLT). Details about FLLT’s pre­serves can be found at gofingerlakes.org. To get to the Sweedler Preserve, take Route 13 south. Turn left on Sandbank Road just after Buttermilk Falls State Park. At the intersection, bear right on Town Line Road. Park on the right side of the road and follow the white trail. For those desiring a longer but rela­ tively gentle slope, there’s the approximately 8.4-milelong Black Diamond trail following part of the railroad line formerly operated by the Lehigh Valley Railroad that ran from New York City to Buffalo from 1896-1959. Accessible to hikers, bikers, runners and dog walkers throughout the year, the trail starts at Cass Park, just behind the Ithaca Chil­dren’s Garden, and runs to Taughannock Falls State Park. “Depending on the time and the day you can chose solitude or have plenty of company,” said Connors. She has spotted red-bellied woodpeckers, bald eagles, osprey and deer along the trail.

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For those wanting something more strenuous, the Abbott Loop in Danby State Forest is a good place to go. “The loop is a rigorous, uphill and downhill jaunt over eight miles long that will give you a workout,” and features a scenic view of Newfield and West Danby from “The Pin­nacles,” said Gary Mallow, CTC president. Cliff and Doris Abbott negotiated with the Department of Environmental Con­ servation to win approval of the trail in the 1980s. The Abbotts flagged, marked and cut much of the trail themselves, with help from volunteers. The loop is divided into two seg­ments – a 4.8mile western section and a 4-mile-long eastern section. “I love seeing the pretty wildflowers along the trail in spring and summer,” said Bar­bara Nussbaum. She and her husband, Michael, are volunteers responsible for maintaining the western section. To access the trailhead, take Route 96 B east to Danby. Head south on Michigan Hollow Road. Go approximately 3.5 miles and park on the right, at the trail’s south crossing marked with an orange blaze. Nussbaum enjoys lead­ ing all-day hikes covering 10-12 miles for the Finger Lakes Trail Conference and the CTC. She is working on completing for the second time the entire 585-mile-long Finger Lakes Trails traversing from the Allegany State Park near the Pennsylvania/New York border to the Catskills region. Gary Mallow, CTC president, likes the physical challenge associated with hiking as well as the mental aspects, such as “getting away from traffic, noise, the concerns of work and family and life. You enter a different world if you’re in the woods on the right day when the weather is good, the trees are leafing out and the birds are serenading you.” His favorite places include areas of the Danby State Forest and Shinadagin State Forest he maintains for the CTC and the FLTC. He also likes the abundant bird life and active beaver encampment at the Lindsay-Parsons Biodiversity Preserve, owned, preserved and maintained by the FLLT. “Hiking can be like a wonderful medita­tion and it is easier – at least for me – than sit­ting still for half an hour or longer,” Nussbaum said. n


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Eat Well Community

The Right Combination

ction

A LOOK AT THE REGION’S WEB OF CSA’S

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Prote

By Peg g y Ha i n e

he letters stand for “community supported agriculture,” but what’s that? According to Aaron Munzer, who with his wife Kara Cusolito runs Plowbreak Farm in Hector, a CSA is “a small investment in your health and wellbeing, and in the economic health of the area, preserving farmland and the agricul­tural economy of our area.” You buy a season’s share in the farm, and allow the farmer to plan, buy seed, prepare the ground, and plant the crops. Whether your yen is for fruit, vegetables plain or exotic, bread, dairy products, bread, pasta, and pastries, or flowers for your table, there’s a CSA for you, perhaps two or three. And if you’ve no time, space, or inclination for gardening, they’ll keep you in freshest roughage with a local pedigree. We checked in with a few of them to see what’s new on offer this year. One of the joys of summer is watching families coming out of the Sweet Land Farm fields north of Trumansburg, carrying bouquets almost as big as their children, starting with peonies, and following the season through to head-sized sunflowers. A bit later in the summer, farmer Paul Martin promises strawberries, eda­ mame, raspberries, cherry tomatoes, sauce toma­toes, tomatillos, basil, and more for the picking. Inside, already picked and clean, is a cornucopia of leafy greens, roots, tubers, tomatoes, eggplants, garlic, and, new this year, spring fennel, scal­ lions, and more. Now in its fourteenth season and with about 300 members, Martin and his merry crew of Tompkins County living-wage employ­ ees labored to move two large hoop houses this spring (no small feat) to make life cozier and more nourishing for tomatoes, basil, peppers, cucumbers, basil, eggplant, and even more basil. They also provide space for other CSAs to sell at their twice-weekly farm pickups, including Black Pearl Farm (feta and sheep’s milk yogurt), Wide Awake Bakery (bread, pastries, pasta), and Well­spring Farm (mushrooms). Together, Chaw Chang and Lucy Garri­ son are a force behind Stick and Stone Farm, on Route 96 close to Ithaca, a central pick-up spot for the Full Plate collective. They offer things like easy-to-pick raised beds made with locally grown locust logs, and their you-picks will include flowers and culinary herbs like

Dr. Pierre specializes in Family Medicine with a Focus on Wellness.

chives, oregano, sage, thyme, bergamot, and hyssop, as well as flowering rudbeckias, lupines, ornamental grasses and lobelia... and that’s just the beginning. They’ve also planted crops like sugar snap peas, cherry tomatoes, sauce tomatoes, basil, hot peppers and spice peppers, including Aji Dulce, an heirloom from Puerto Rico; Trinidad Per­fume, a non-hot habanero type, and plenty of shishitos, ground cherries, tomatillos, and okra. Remembrance Farm supplies the collective with wonderful salad greens, providing a salad-y bed for the collective’s onions, tomatoes, pep­ pers, pickling cucumbers, winter and summer squashes, melons, beets, carrots, scallions, peas, green beans, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and four kinds of kale. Remembrance’s Nathaniel and Emily Thompson are milking their herd of Devon and Kerry cows and will be provide a pasteurized milk share for Full Plate members this summer. According to Nathaniel Thompson, the cows are 100 percent grass-fed and certified organic/ biodynamic, and a basic share will be ½ gallon of milk per week. Remembrance Farm and Stick and Stone are the two main farms in the Full Plate Col­lective, but other farms provide special crops including potatoes from Three Stone farms and Hillside Farm and onions, leeks, Italian eggplants and slicing cucumbers from Blue Heron Farm. Side pickups at the collective include offerings from the Fingerlakes Fruit Bowl, Wide Awake Bakery, Double E Mushroom Farm, and Black Pearl Creamery. Among other recently developed CSAs is TC3 Farm, adjoining the TC3 campus, and overseen by Todd McLane, who also teaches sustainable farming and food systems. The CSA offers a free-choice slid­ing scale pickup with two share sizes, regular and deluxe, and two share options, full season or fall only. McLane is proud of the farm’s 150 different varieties of vegetables, herbs, and fruit, including strawberries, currants, and elderberries. Looking for more information, a specific sort of CSA, or a CSA near you? Check out the directory at http://ccetompkins.org/agriculture/ buy-local/csa-directory.

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Here there be monsters DIVING INTO THE LEGACY OF THE BEASTS OF THE FINGER LAKES By C h a rle y G ith le r

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Ilustration by Marshall Hopkins (clidastes drawing by: DmitryBogdanov)

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here is something about the Finger Lakes that suggests the possibility of supernatural and mysterious things. Legends and stories abound of hauntings, spirit rapping, utopian communities, ancient ruins, inexplicable phenomena, extraterrestrial visits and the occasional glimpse of a sasquatch. Among the most intriguing stories are the numerous reported sightings in the deepest of the lakes of large aquatic creatures: lake monsters. Each of the Finger Lakes has its own personality, of course, but the big lakes — Seneca and Cayuga — seem to fit within a different, more mysterious category. Their waters are colder, their moods are darker, their waves are bigger. You can travel on boats to and from the sea on these two lakes, and their sheer size seems to hint at the possibility of ancient aquatic megafauna. Native Americans believed Seneca Lake to be a bottomless lake with a monster that lived in its depths. Almost 40 miles long each and one to three miles in width, the pitch-black depths of both of them, hundreds of feet deeper than sunlight can penetrate, descend to depths below sea level. That reports of monsters in Cayuga Lake were numerous, perhaps even routine, in the 1800s can be inferred from a story in the January 5, 1897, edition of the Ithaca Journal. Incredibly, the piece reported that a recent sighting marked the 69th consecutive year in which there was a confirmed encounter with the monster nicknamed “Old Greeny.” The story went on to recount that members of the newspaper staff had been living in daily anticipation of Old Greeny’s appearance, and had refused reporting assignments that would have taken them near the lake because they were afraid of the monster. The 1897 incident was reported to have been by an Ithaca resident who was driving along the lake’s eastern shore and saw “what he knew must be the large, long sea serpent.” The story also quoted a “tramp,” however, who told a reporter that he believed it to be a muskrat. More sporadic and isolated reports of the creature continued until 1929, when people began reporting not one, but two creatures seen together along the lake's eastern shore. The creatures were described by witnesses as being approximately 12 to 15 feet in length. It was speculated that they might be: "...members of the Seneca Lake sea serpent family that found their way into the local waters through a subterranean channel which is believed to exist between the two lakes." Legends of tunnels connecting Cayuga and Seneca Lakes have long circulated, which anyone with a rudimentary grasp of the notion of water seeking its own level knows would be impossible. Occasional other reports of Old Greeny have certainly been made since then, including


a 1974 attack in which a teenage boy apparently had his arm broken by the bite of a large, eellike creature, and a 1979 encounter by a local professional diver of a submerged animal 30 to 35 feet in length. Still, all the reported sightings save one have been by one or two persons. The incident with the greatest number of witnesses, and therefore the most credible lake monster encounter, happened on the evening of July 14, 1899, on Seneca Lake. The sidewheel steamboat Otetiani, named to evoke the region’s Iroquois past, was traveling north toward Geneva from Watkins Glen with several dozen passengers at about 7 p.m. Then, as in 2018, sunset was at approximately 8:40 p.m., so there was plenty of daylight left, and it had been a sunny and seasonably warm (high 79) day. Somewhere between Dresden on the west side of the lake and Willard on the east side, pilot Frederick Rose reported that approximately 400 yards ahead of the boat was what appeared to be an overturned boat. Captain Carleton Herendeen examined the thing with his telescope, later describing its appearance as being “25 feet long with a very sharp bow and long-narrow stern”. Passengers began to gather. It was a group with some ostensibly credible witnesses, including two commissioners of public works, a police commissioner, the manager of the Geneva Telephone Company, and a geology professor. As Captain Herendeen completed his inspection, the pilot signaled the engineer to slow the boat down. The steamboat approached within 100 yards and lowered a boat to take a closer look. Suddenly, the object turned and began to move away. The captain immediately ordered “full speed ahead.” As the thing was moving slowly, the steamboat gained on it easily. The object turned again, this time toward the steamboat, and “raising its head, looked in the direction of the boat and opened its mouth, displaying two rows of sharp, white teeth.” Captain Herendeen declared that he would ram the creature and take it alive, if possible. Otherwise he would kill it, and either take it aboard or tow it to Geneva. This was the United States in 1899, when conservation of flora and fauna was still kind of a fringe idea. Out west, the bison population, perhaps 10 million in 1850, had been reduced to fewer than a thousand. Passenger pigeons, numbering in the billions in 1860, were on the brink of extinction. And so, the boat was turned so that it would approach the creature from the side at ramming speed. The deck of the steamboat was crowded with passengers who were ordered by the captain to put on life preservers. According to the Geneva Gazette: “Every eye on deck was fixed on the monster and hardly a person was breathing normally. While the boat was yet some distance from it, the monster again looked at the boat, sank out of sight and the boat passed over the spot where it had been.” As the steamboat approached within 50 yards of the creature, the captain gave the order to turn the boat so that its paddlewheel would strike the creature midway between its head and tail. The boat went ahead full steam and struck the monster with enough impact that many of the passengers were thrown off their feet. The mortally wounded animal lay in the water next to the steamboat. “It raised its head, gave what sounded like a gasp, and lay quiet. Its spinal column had been broken and it was dead.”

Lifeboats were immediately lowered and lines were strung around the body. Passengers and crew tried to secure the carcass. In the end, though, it proved too heavy or unwieldy and dropped into the water, sinking 600 feet to the bottom of Seneca Lake. The ship reached Geneva after dark and passengers began to tell their stories of the incident. While all agreed that a monster had been seen, differing versions of the length of the monster — from 25 to as much as 90 feet — strained the credibility of the accounts. The Rochester Herald said that Professor George R. Elwood, the geologist on board, and who had been in one of the lifeboats trying to secure the body, gave what was considered the “most careful and perhaps most trustworthy account.” He thought it was a clidastes, an extinct marine lizard from the mosasaur family that lived in what is now the United States until it disappeared from the fossil record at the end of the Cretaceous Period, about 66 million years ago. Lest skepticism get the better of us, consider that in December 1938, a South African fisherman caught a coelacanth, which is a fish thought to have been extinct since it disappeared from the fossil record at the end of the Cretaceous Period. Professor Elwood went on to describe the creature as “about twenty-five feet long, with a tail which tapered until within about five feet of the end, when it broadened out and looked much like a whale. The creature weighed about one thousand pounds. Its head was perhaps four feet long and triangular in shape. Its mouth was very long and was armed with two rows of triangular white teeth as sharp as those of a shark, but in shape more like those of a sperm whale. Its body was covered with a horny substance which was as much like the carapace of a terrapin as anything else of which I know. This horny substance was brown in color and of a greenish tinge. The belly of the creature, which I saw after the rope slipped and the carcass was going down, was cream white. Its eyes were round like those of a fish, and it did not wink.” What might it have been? It hardly seems likely that so many people could have imagined something so vivid if there had been nothing there. Lake sturgeon, indigenous to both big lakes, can live to be as old as 100 years, grow to nine feet long and 300 pounds. Their skin is a shark-like dull gray. Eels are darker but smaller, not getting much longer than five feet. Muskellunge can also get to over five feet long and weigh seventy pounds. Plus, they have rows of sharp teeth. None are apt to convince a boatload of people that they are in the presence of a twenty-five foot monster. It was suggested by cynics that the whole thing was a hoax perpetrated by the passengers and crew, which is also exceedingly unlikely. Dozens of people would have had to have kept the secret for the rest of their lives, while human nature suggests that no group larger than three people can be trusted to reliably keep a secret for a long weekend. The Geneva Historical Society can document at least 20 separate reported sightings of the Seneca Lake monster, most recently in 2013. Cayuga’s Old Greeny has a Facebook page. Clearly, the idea that the big lakes harbor mysteries beyond our knowledge is one that has a stubborn hold on our collective imagination. It’s part of the charm of living in the Finger Lakes.

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MASSAGE & BODYWORK | FACIALS | WAXING | SKINCARE

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April 3–5 | 10 am-5pm Join u socia s for a lly d bingo istant card scave nger hunt!

1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca NY museumoftheearth.org

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BEST COMEDIAN: Kenneth McLaurin

BEST LOCAL DJ: DJ Doughboy (Devan Carrington)

BEST LOCAL MASK MAKERS: To m p k i n s M a s k M a ke r s

Best of Ithaca 2020 By: Arle igh R o dge rs & B r ya n Va n C a mpe n , Ph otos: C a se y Ma r t i n

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or all intents and purposes, this is the Oscar Awards of Ithaca presented by The Ithaca Times. Each year, the Best of the best are nominated by the Ithaca Times

readers for the Best of Ithaca Awards. Hundreds of entries were submitted this summer as community members placed stakes in answering some of the most pressing questions of the year: What was the best entertainment? Who had the best

to it as well, with a dash of friendly competition mixed in. In light of this year’s events, we’ve chosen to include some new categories like Best Local Mask Maker and Best Activist, along with some old favorites. We hope you enjoy reading about the Best of Ithaca

food? Where served the best drinks? And so forth. Best of Ithaca is not only a chance for the community to highlight their favorite parts of living in Tompkins County, it’s an opportunity for nominees and winners alike to be celebrated for their contributions

award winners and finding out what your neighbors might’ve found so special about them. As always, congratulations to everyone who was nominated, and a special congratulations to the winners. As this year continues, be sure to reach out to us with your

suggestions for next year’s categories. It’s anyone’s guess what next year could look like. In the meantime, enjoy.

E N T E R T A I N M E N T it’s made us realize what a big role music plays in our lives. We’re very excited for what the future holds, and we can’t wait to get out and play again!”

Best Local Band: Fall Creek Brass Band Fall Creek Brass Band started more than 10 years ago as a group of young horn players, but has since experienced a resurgence and grown into a tight brass-funk group, according to music director Alec Staples. In past years, they have been seen at GrassRoots, Porchfest, Finger Lakes Thaw, Ithaca Festival and CFCU Downtown Concert Series, along with many other venues.

Best Theater Performance: Hangar Theatre

Best Music Performance: Fall Creek Brass Band Alec Staples told us, “All the members of FCBB would like to express our deepest gratitude for all of the love and support that we’ve received from our Ithaca community! We can always count on Ithacans to be ready to dance whenever we show up to play. The past six months have been very rough on the music scene, and

BEST SOLO ARTIST: Joe Crookston 18

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Hangar Theatre Marketing Director Thena Gitlin says, “Due to the continued impacts of COVID-19, we made the decision to replace all live artistic programming this summer with new, virtual experiences this March. We offered a completely virtual season consisting of five Mainstage plays, four KIDSTUFF plays, two The Wedge plays, a Virtual Lab Company, and online Next Generation School of Theatre classes for young people. The productions in our Mainstage season were all chosen for times of change and transformation: “The Skin of Our Teeth”, “Uncommon Excerpts and Others”, “The Wendy Chronicles”, “Queens Girl in the World”, “Honk Your Horn: Celebrate! Musical!

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Theatre!” and “Sense and Sensibility.” The success of our virtual summer season was possible because of a combination of our artists, our partnership with Ithaca College, and the support from our community. We plan to continue inspiring with virtual plays this fall, and we hope to produce a live virtual season next year.” Stay posted at www.hangartheatre.com.

Best Arts Event: Porchfest In a stroke of sour irony that pretty well defines 2020, Porchfest coorganizers Lesley Greene and Andy Adelewitz got this good news the day before Porchfest would have happened. “We’re incredibly flattered,” they said. “Porchfest is a celebration of Ithaca, so really, this honor belongs to our amazing creative community. It’s bittersweet in this difficult year, when Porchfest has been canceled like pretty much everything else, but we’re optimistic about bringing it back, as joyous as ever, when it’s safe to do so.”

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Best Solo Artist: Joe Crookston “OMG! I love that in this 2020 year where live music stopped and no shows happened, I was awarded ‘Best Solo Artist’. The less I do, the more I win! Oh, I would like to thank Ruth Bader Ginsberg for her fierce dedication to justice, and thank you to Rick Manning for his tireless work on the Waterfront Trail. I ride my bike on it and it makes me happy. Be safe and take good care, my Ithaca friends. Thanks for wearing your masks.”

Best Local DJ: DJ DoughBoy (Devan Carrington) Devan Carrington, or DJ DoughBoy, has been the Friday resident DJ at Silky Jones for a while, and has been gigging around town for the last five years. Born and raised in New York City, he was always surrounded by all genres of music, and credits his uncle Melvin and high school friend Byron Crooks for encouraging him to become a DJ.


“Being a DJ means more to me than just pressing play and buying some fancy equipment,” he said. “Music is powerful. My role is to facilitate fun, good vibes, aerobic movement and positive energy. A successful set to me is when a guest comes up and says ‘I was having such an awful week, but the couple of hours I spent here really helped.’ That is why I do what I do and living in Ithaca has given me the chance to give back to the community that has given so much to me.”

“First of all, I want to thank God and my family. Without the support of my

daughter Sankofa, my son Kenneth and my wife Sing Trece, I would not be here accepting this award. This honor is truly not mine alone. It has been a wonderful journey creating comedy in Ithaca. Bringing people together, providing stages for diverse voices to be showcased, and building positive community connections all around laughter has been fun to be a part of. I want to thank all the people who were part of this comedy journey with me. To the Tan Holmes

Duo, JSK, JYL, Uncle Joe and Big Tyme Barbershop, the venues that opened up their spaces to us, and everyone who came to a show and laughed at a joke. Anyone I didn’t mention directly, y’all are all included and I want to say thank you for the good times, new friends and great memories. Ithaca, stay safe, stay sane, socially distant and sanitized. Remember, life’s a joke, find the funny.”

Best C.S.A.: Full Plate Farm Collective

supporters. I love what I do and am very grateful to be able to work with such wonderful clients and colleagues in the Ithaca community.”

Best Thrift Store: Finger Lakes ReUse Center

Founded in Ithaca in 2005 by Stick and Stone, Remembrance and Three Swallows Farm (now the Youth Farm Project), the Full Plate Farm Collective CSA is a unique collective model CSA, where multiple farms work together to provide produce for the shared community. Owner Molly Flerlage told us, “Thank you to our members for the incredible outpouring of local food love this season. And thank you to the farm crews doing truly essential work every day to feed our community.”

Best Physical Therapist: Christine Trumble

Jessica Orkin terms FLRC as “a growing group of problem solvers.” And they are growing, with a new retail location, ReUse Community Hardware in the Triphammer Marketplace, and a new drop-off location at 700 West Buffalo Street. “We are honored to win “Best of Ithaca” this year!” said Orkin. “What makes our ReUse Centers so special? Daily we handle a lot of amazing locally donated materials and facilitate reuse for our community. We are always working, working, working to flow materials back into the community and make goods accessible to all.”

seeing, and find a way through it. It’s weird to leave characters and a world that have lived in my head for almost four years, but I’m glad the books have found an audience, especially here in Ithaca.”

Best Book Written by a Local Author: Bob Proehl’s The Nobody People

Best Comedian: Kenneth McLaurin

“This is so great to hear! I started writing these books in the summer before the 2016 election, as a way to make sense of some of what I was

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Best New Business: Odyssey Bookstore The Odyssey Bookstore at 115 W. Green St. was all set to open on March 14, according to owner Laura Larson, but the next week everything shut down. Odyssey officially opened on June 23 with a new website and curbside orders. “What a wonderful surprise!” Larson said. “Wow, we are all so excited and honored. Thank you so much, Ithaca! We are very excited to be a part of our amazing book-loving community. We are delighted to join a dynamic group of booksellers and places for people to find their books. It’s been an interesting journey to get here and we appreciate the many people who’ve helped create our space, who’ve joined our team, and who have chosen to stop by and talk books.”

Best Non-Profit Organization: G.I.A.C. A heartfelt THANK YOU to everyone who has supported the selection of

the Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) as non-profit of the year. Since 1972, GIAC has been serving our community because we believe strongly GIAC programming IS essential for this community to thrive. The staff and board are committed to our mission to provide multicultural, educational, and recreational programs focused on social and individual development. We are committed to providing programs and services that work to improve the quality of life for the people we serve; support the rights and needs of youth, families, underrepresented and disenfranchised populations; provide structured employment training for at-risk youth and adults; and fight against oppression and intimidation in our community. The practice of social justice is embedded in all GIAC’s programs and is needed now more than ever.A few of our many programs include the SchoolAge Child Care Youth Program/ Camp, Teen and Senior Programs, Chet Cashman Boxing, Alex Haley Pool, Conservation Corps, Basketball Leagues, and events, including the upcoming Harvest Dinner and Dr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast. We offer a successful and collaborative job training program – the Hospitality Employment Training Program (HETP). We don’t do these things alone and rely on our community partners and funders who support our grants and other funding applications. The recent financial generosity and love from the community helped us re-open summer and school year programs. We are positioned to expand with the purchase and reconstruction of the former Immaculate Conception School gymnasium. With the community’s continued love, we will keep GIAC’s vision of being “A Place to Be Me,” alive. For more information on how to support GIAC, visit http://giacgrows.com, the United Way of Tompkins County website, call (607) 272-3622, or email Director Leslyn McBean-Clairborne at lmcbean@cityofithaca.org or GIAC Board President Annie Perry at annieperry@twcny.rr.com.

Best Real Estate Agent: Jill Rosentel Jill Rosentel came to Ithaca 20 years ago looking for a more enlightened environment. She worked as a server and manager at Viva Cantina for seven years while attending college, transitioning into real estate after graduation. “I feel very honored and humbled to have such enthusiastic

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As Christine Trumble sees it, her IC education helped her pass her licensing exam, but it was her patients who taught her how to be a good physical therapist, and five years ago, she opened Trumble Physical Therapy. “My colleagues and I saw a huge void in addressing the needs of people with very personal, painful, life-altering and sometimes embarrassing issues that were poorly understood and infrequently treated. The community responded and now I have the best job in the world, surrounded by dedicated PTs and staff, making the world a little better, one pelvis at a time.”

Best Local Gift Shop: Sunny Days I just learned a few hours ago that you beautiful people have again awarded us Best Gift Shop. I’ve been asked to “say a few words” in acceptance of this award. Thank you isn’t sufficient.

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I know the struggle is real for so many of us right now, and I really appreciate those who took a moment to write our name on the ballot. It’s not at all about the “win,” it’s about the validation that what we’re doing has a positive impact on the community. Validation – whether in the form of a lovely honor like this, a purchase at our store or on our website, or a nice comment or like through social media – is a wonderful boost to help energize me to keep moving forward. We are keeping it super safe and remaining open (by appointment or walk-ins when no appointment in session, but only 1 group at a time), but understand that some you

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Best Home Improvement Contractor: Trade Design Build “This recognition floors everyone at Trade Design Build,” says Gideon Stone. “We are fortunate to have great clients, and our network of subcontractors and vendors in the area are a huge key to our success. However, this acknowledgement speaks volumes to the people we have on our team and their effort every day. Thank you to everyone who voted for us! We are looking forward to meeting those of you who are just learning about us now, so if you’re interested in any design or building services, check out our website and get in touch!”

Best Local Mask Maker: Tompkins Mask Makers

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may need to lay low for a while. I miss seeing your faces, but I totally understand and look forward to better days ahead. Stay safe, everyone! (Oh, by the way, in an attempt to be prepared for whatever these next few months bring, I’m regularly adding new products to our website – www. sunnydaysny.com – as safe as it gets with free local pickup or delivery!)

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The Tompkins Mask Makers Collective (currently made up of Draya Koschmann, Amanda Kellerson, Jillian Goldfarb, Stephanie Allen, Francisca Struve-Entelis, and Alfreda Kwakye-Talbot) is so honored to receive this Best Of Ithaca award! For us, selling masks is a way to facilitate the other work we do in the community, and we are incredibly grateful to our customers for their support! Our collective’s beginning was such a whirlwind in April, and we are so indebted to many local organizations. The Tompkins County Health Department and the Chamber of Commerce who have continued to refer businesses to us. Businesses like CFCU, Gimme Coffee, GreyHaven Motel, and WaterWorks who took a chance on a relatively unknown group of sewists to outfit their employees in fabric face coverings. Bike Walk Tompkins who provided much needed financial and tech support right when we started, and Mutual Aid Tompkins which has been an inspiration and a collaborator

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since the beginning. Greenstar Coop, Mama Goose, and Purity Ice Cream who stock our masks in their stores. Workforce NY, Sew Green, Quilter’s Corner and many individuals who supported our Youth Program this summer with time, publicity, and material/monetary donations. We thank all of our customers--it has been a joy to outfit your families in beautiful face coverings. Thank you for choosing local! And MOST IMPORTANTLY we want to give a shout out to all of the individual mask makers in Tompkins County who have sewn and donated masks both in collaboration with us and in separate efforts. You are AMAZING. We have learned so much from so many of you and are honored to be associated with you all.

Best Virtual Fitness Class: FLX Fitclub “We are excited to be voted Best Virtual Fitness Class in Ithaca,” says FLX Fitclub’s Chantelle Farmer. “We’ve been open for live group fitness classes since 2017, but like so many other businesses, we were forced to shut down in March due to the pandemic. After it became clear the closure was going to last more than a few weeks, we wanted to find a way to help our loyal members stay connected and motivated to keep up with their fitness. Our instructors worked hard to adapt to a new way of teaching, the team from Calf Audio did a fantastic job with our tech setup, and the participants in those first few classes gave helpful feedback that allowed us to improve the experience over time. One unexpected bonus is that now people who are on vacation, or even move or live across the country can still take classes and stay connected with us. We see the unique benefits of virtual and plan to continue offering that option. We are so thankful to have had the opportunity to adapt and improve, and we are grateful for the support of our amazing community!”


F O O D

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Best Bagel: Collegetown Bagels

Best Sandwich: Shortstop

Best Ice Cream: Purity Ice Cream

“We are so excited to have been recognized by the Ithaca community with the award of Best Bagel,” said owner Ramsey Brous. “It has been a fantastic journey, having been in business since 1976 at our original College Avenue location, and now having grown to five stores with a much broader product line. Our newest location at 420 College Avenue is going great and is such a fantastic space in a beautiful and historic building. It has been very well received and includes the most up to date technology to serve our customers while maintaining our unique, some say quirky, Ithaca style. While we scaled back the varieties of bagels of late, be on the lookout for some new special flavors in the near future.”

“On behalf of all of our employees here at Shortstop Deli, we are honored to be voted best sandwich in Ithaca, thank you very much,” said Shortstop’s owner Chuck Dong. “Being a locally owned and operated business, having the support of our community means everything to us, especially in these unsettling times of COVID-19. Born and raised in downtown Ithaca, I am proud to serve our community and keep the 40-year tradition of Shortstop Deli going into the future. Stop by and get your award-winning sandwich. We look forward to seeing you!”

Purity’s extensive flavor list, including Gimme Mocha Fudge, Chocolate Raspberry Truffle and Cookie Dough After Dark, makes a second appearance in a row for this award — and for good reason. These excellent, original flavors have certainly become a staple in Ithaca, and its desserts certainly live up to this reputation, too. See “Best Dessert” if you need more proof.

Best Burger: Ithaca Ale House Like many eateries, COVID-19 forced Ithaca Ale House to work with a smaller menu – and fewer burgers – for now. John O’Leary says that when they’re allowed to open to full capacity, all of their burgers will return. “We are honored again to win Best Burger. It is special to us, because it is voted on by our customers and it is a great feeling to win this award repeatedly. A huge ingredient in our burgers is the hard working staff that takes pride in what they do and appreciates the recognition of this award. We as a restaurant have been blessed to keep the same key employees year after year and it shows in all of our food.”

Best Pizza: Franco’s A repeat winner in the Best Pizza category, this is Franco’s third straight year nabbing the prize.Owners Salvatore and Frank Evola have found both cricial and commercial success since opening the West State Street pizzeria.

Best Wings: Wings Over Ithaca Wings Over has locations everywhere from Ithaca to Knoxville to Milwaukee — though contained to the general northeast of the country. Their Ithaca location is on Dryden Road, and offers sauces that range from traditional BBQ, to tropical mango habanero, to bold teriyaki and to eye-watering Buffalo. “Wings Over Ithaca is extremely proud to be a part of the Ithaca community and to be named Best Wings In Ithaca! Let’s celebrate with free delivery when you use code: BESTWINGS at Order.WingsOver. com. Thank you for your support and look forward to serving you again soon.”

Best Salad: Wegmans Marcie Rivera of Wegmans Food Markets PR said, “We are honored to be selected as Best Salad by the readers of the Ithaca Times. The support of our customers and their passion for excellent food drives our team’s high standards to provide incredible customer service every day. We are grateful for the opportunity to serve the Ithaca community and will continue to give you our best. Thank you, Ithaca!”

Best Comfort Food: Luna The around-the-world menu at Luna offers comfort food from all corners of the globe, though you’ll find your staples there as well. Banh mi meets baja fish tacos, which meets a huevos rancheros burrito, smoked gouda mac and cheese, a separate spot for fries and an excellent selection of burgers. The choices, which include options for vegans, vegetarians and gluten free diets, are seemingly endless, making it the perfect menu for a relaxed evening in — or any meal, really.

Best Outdoor Dining: Ithaca Beer Company When the pandemic shutdown began in March, no restaurant was better equipped to deal with social distancing than Ithaca Beer Company, located just outside of the city of Ithaca on a farm. The outdoor picnic tables, scattered around a large grassy field, were already a key draw for summer customers, though their home-brewed beer, including its flagship Flower Power IPA, and dinner menu were certainly a reason to return too.

Best Dessert: Purity Ice Cream Weather getting too cold for Purity’s ice cream? The shop, located on Cascadilla Street, offers the best homemade desserts too. Cupcakes, pies, muffins, cakes, cookies and brownies stand proudly inside

the glass display cases preceding the register — a tasty temptation for those looking for an ice cream alternative.

Best Food Truck: Silo Based out of Ovid, New York, Silo Food Truck is the collaboration between the “Chicken Wizard,” or Jesse Steve, and the “Biz Wiz,” Katie Foley. The food itself? A variety of chicken dishes in gravy or curry, mac and cheese with ham and pickles and fresh-baked cornbread complete with honey butter. “We love serving food in the midst of music, art, culture and celebration,” the website states. “We believe that life is what you dream it to be and that with hard work, integrity and community mindedness anything is possible! We take risks and embrace being uncomfortable… as we’ve learned that it’s the only way to achieve great things.”

BEST FOOD TRUCK: Silo

Best To-Go Experience: Taste of Thai One of multiple Thai restaurants in Ithaca, Taste of Thai stands out for its streamlined takeout experience, an aspect of their service many have been taking advantage of during the pandemic. The restaurant offers Grubhub and in-house delivery of its mountainous rice, noodle and curry dishes, just parts of a lengthy menu with delicious options.

Best Wine & Liquor Store: Northside Wine&Spirits At Northside, online shopping just became a little boozier. The 11,500 sq. ft. of retail showroom carries more than 6,000 brands, including many Finger Lakes wines. Choose from the liquor store’s top picks — the $10 Golden Gate Cellars 18 Cabernet Sauvignon from California or the $45 Louis Jadot 17 Savigny-Les-Beaune "Les Hauts Jarrons” from France. Spirits are available for pickup only. Northside is open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

BEST SANDWICH: Shortstop Monday-Saturday, and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Best Closed Business We’ll Miss the Most: Carriage House Once the primary and worth-thewait breakfast spot in Collegetown,

Carriage House Cafe will be most missed in Ithaca for its superb breakfast menu and buzzing atmosphere on a Sunday midmorning. In addition to its downstairs cafe, the upstairs of the restaurant was renovated into a cocktail room or meeting space. Though the restaurant was early to switch to delivery and takeout, it closed in June, the end of a defining legacy in the city of Ithaca.

P E O P L E

Best Social Justice Activist: Jordan Clemons Humbly, Jordan Clemons said “activist” is a title others often give to him for his work on Unbroken Promise Initiative, an organization to benefit those who have been “disenfranchised, marginalized and victimized by systemic oppression” in Ithaca. He said his mother, who died in 2016, had a significant impact on his life, starting from a young age when she taught him about the fight for equality for Black people in Ithaca. He said he also wanted to thank his family, those who have donated to Unbroken Promise, and Yasmin Rashid, a childhood friend and partner in Unbroken Promise, for the support they have given him throughout his life and community work. “We need people that really have a passion and have a conviction for all

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of humanity and for the world that we live in, and it starts right here in our backyard,” he said.

Best Primary Care Doctor: Alexandra Karnow Part of Cayuga Family Medicine’s providers, Karnow is part of a team of doctors that brings a “high-caliber, intelligent team of physicians and nurses serving our patients.” Her extensive experience ranges from her medical degree at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine to being a clinical assistant instructor for SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. In addition, she is fluent in Spanish and English and conversational in German, an excellent range that patients of all backgrounds can appreciate.

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Best Entrepreneur: Chantelle Farmer

“I’ve [specialized] in animal totems — but also love portraits, landscapes-the abstract and the surreal,” he said.

Although FLX Fitclub, which opened March 2017, closed temporarily in the spring, Chantelle Farmer, coowner and general manager, is back in business. FLX has since moved its typically indoor workouts like cycling to an outdoor venue, offering a pandemic-friendly group workout space. She said that although she is surprised to have won the award, she is flattered and thankful for the vote of confidence. “In terms of being an entrepreneur, I mean, my gosh, there's so many great business people in Ithaca,” she said. “I've seen a lot of people out in the community also having to do creative things to stay alive. So it's definitely been a tough, tough year for small business, and … I still have a lot to learn about owning a business, but I guess that's what makes it fun.”

Best Dentist: Ira Kamp

Best Veterinarian: Colonial Animal Hospital

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Colonial Animal Hospital opens its doors to your pets with a number of services for them, including alternative medicine like acupuncture or holisitc care “to look at all aspects of the entire animal and be open to using a variety of treatments,” according to their website. Under preventative care, the veterinary hospital also offers wellness exams, vaccinations and flea/tick/parasite control, essential to the health of animals — all while doing this with the utmost care.

Best Visual Artist: Ryan Curtis Nature-inspired artwork meets faded colors and layered patterns in Ryan Curtis’ artwork, created through experiential printmaking using wood, paper or raw canvas. According to his artist’s page, Curtis is inspired by human and animal forms, sacred geometries and nature.

Dr. Ira Kamp, this year’s winner for Best Dentist, said he appreciates that people would think of him and his work when voting for this award. He enjoys working in dentistry — and taking a break to jam out with his bandmate and wife Marnie O’Shea — because he said it is a profession in which people will be honest about their dental problems, or else risk a procedure that is more painful than they need. He said he is honored to receive this accolade because it shows people trust the work he provides. “[A dentist’s office is] a very authentic place to work,” he said. “I can have really straight conversations with people, and I really enjoy that.”

Best City Employee: Svante Myrick Mayor Svante Myrick thinks this award is a mistake — at least, he said via email, in comparison to the talented people that “knock [his] socks off every single day” and make Ithaca an ideal place to live and work. Another second-time winner in the “Best of Ithaca” section — last year it was for Best Elected Representative — Myrick also loves to read fiction and graphic novels when not scrolling through his inbox. “The best part about being Mayor of Ithaca is getting to live in Ithaca,” he said via email. “I love this city, I love the people who live here and I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve it. Every day, even the longest, hardest day, is a blessing.”

Best Local Philanthropist: Purity Ice Cream Without an $80,000 donation from Purity Ice Cream, the Alex Haley

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Municipal Pool at the Great Ithaca Avtivities Club may have never opened this summer. The pool was closed early on in the season due to both the shutdown restrictions and the city’s pandemic-related financial woes, however Phase 4 of reopening would have allowed the pool to open had it had the funding. That’s where Purity stepped in. Thanks in part to the ice cream shop’s donation, the pool opened and youth programming commenced.

Best Keeper of Local Knowledge: Carol Kammen Carol Kammen, chair of the Tompkins County Historical Commission, said she is delighted to be chosen for this award because recognizing the importance of local history is imperative. She said the collaborative efforts between herself and other historians in the county is what makes her job so special. “I'm so pleased because I'm not the only one who does local history,” she said. “There are a lot of us, and recognizing that it's important makes me very pleased for all of us.”

Best Tattoo Artist: Phoebe Aceto Operating out of Here’s To You Tattoo & Piercing Shop, Phoebe Aceto’s botanical and earth-inspired designs have exalted her to this award, something she said she is honored to receive. Though she said the job is often demanding, she enjoys the challenge. “There's a lot of talent in this town, and it just makes me feel really good … that clients put their trust in me like that,” she said. “My favorite part is to be able to really trust and follow my instincts more and that my clients trust that as well.


Community Listings Greenstar DeWitt Dewitt Mall, 215 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-8213 Monday – Friday 8 am – 8 pm Saturday & Sunday 9 am – 8 pm

Subject to change due to COVID-19 regulations

Area Attractions Visitor information

Greenstar Collegetown 307 College Ave (607) 882-2667 Mon – Fri: 8 am – 8 pm Sat & Sun: 9 am – 8 pm

Ithaca/Tompkins County Convention and Visitors Bureau Downtown Visitor Center: 110 North Tioga Street, Open Thur-Sat, 10AM5PM (607) 272-1313; (800) 284-8422 (toll-free) www.visitithaca.com

Nirvana Foods Bazaar 528 West Seneca Street, Ithaca, (607) 277-3300 Indian and South Asian Food & Grocery

Downtvown Ithaca Alliance 171 East State St. Center Ithaca Ithaca, NY 14t850 (607) 277-8679 Downtownithaca.com The Downtown Ithaca Business Improvement District is a New York state-chartered not-forprofit organization charged with the revitalization, development, promotion and management of downtown Ithaca.

P&C Fresh 315 Pine Tree Rd., Ithaca, NY (607) 272-5836 Open 6am - 10pm This is a large full-service, up-market store that is within walking distance of Cornell graduate housing. Tops Friendly Market 710 S. Meadow St.,Ithaca, NY (607) 275-8041 6AM to 10PM 2300 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY (607) 257-4952 6AM to Midnight You’ll find a wide selection of ethnic ingredients, sushi and an excellent bakery that meets the cooking needs of our diverse and cuisine-conscious community.

The Ithaca Times 109 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 277-7000 Ithaca.com

Shopping DeWitt Mall 215 N. Cayuga St. Ithaca, NY 607-273-6464 In this smoothly converted brick building, you’ll find the worldfamous Moosewood Restaurant, the comfortable (and delicious) DeWitt Café, GreenStar Oasis natural foods market, Cat’s Pajamas, Ithaca GuitarWorks and other retail stores. East Hill Plaza 327 Pine Tree Road Ithaca, NY 607-257-1725 An outdoor complex that includes Burger King, Collegetown Bagels, local banks and more.

Illustrations by Marshall Hopkins

Ithaca Commons Ithaca, NY The epicenter of Ithaca—located between N. Aurora and S. Cayuga Streets, and East and West State Streets—includes restaurants, clothing stores, art galleries, book stores, record stores, and much, much more. Ithaca Farmers’ Market Steamboat Landing off Third Street Ithaca, NY 14851 (607) 273-7109 Ithaca’s can’t-miss Farmers’ Market operates on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays at two locations in Ithaca, due to the coronavirus outbreak. The Saturday market hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Sunday market hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and runs from Spring through Fall. During parts of fall and winter, the market reduces its hours to just Saturdays 10:30-2 at Triphammer

Marketplace.. Plus be sure to check out the Wednesday market in East Hill Plaza, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m beginning 5/5/21. See Ithacamarket.com for hours and vendor information. The Shops at Ithaca Mall 40 Catherwood Road off North Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 607-257-5337 www.theShopsatIthacaMall.com This is home to the “big-box” national retailers such as Target, Best Buy and Dick’s Sporting Goods. Around the back you’ll find Regal Cinemas, which are temporarily closed due to COVID. The Triphammer Marketplace 2255 North Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 607-273-6851 www.triphammermarketplace.com The variety of retail, dining and service offerings at the Triphammer Marketplace include Ithaca Bakery, Ithaca Coffee Company, Gene’s Barber Shop, Finger Lakes ReUse, Triphammer Laundromat and much more.

Supermarkets Greenstar Cooperative Market 770 Cascadilla St. Ithaca, NY (607) 273-9392 https://greenstar.coop/ This market is open daily, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and features organic produce and homeopathic products and a cheap yearly membership.

Wegmans 500 South Meadow St., Ithaca, NY (607) 277-5800 Keep your head on a swivel because this place is packed with shoppers, and for good reason: there’s a staggering array of baked goods, fresh produce, deli items, meats and seafood in Ithaca’s largest market. And if you need a break from the aisles, there’s also a café, sushi bar and several buffet tables offering a variety of choices. Open 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.. Win Li Supermarket 374 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY (607) 277-6790 This is the largest Asian market in the Ithaca area. They have fresh meats, fish and produce as well as a wide variety of processed foods and specialty items. Ithaca Tofu Food Mart 23 Cinema Dr Ste F Ithaca, Open 10 am – 6 pm East Asian market located near the Triphammer Mall Ithaca Halal Meat and Grocery 110 W. Green St., Ithaca, NY (607) 319-9110 Offering halal foods on the border of Press Bay Alley. Open 8:00AM 10:00PM Ithaca Mini Mart 124 S. Cayuga St., Ithaca 607-319-0823 Open daily 9AM-9PM Ren’s Mart Asian Groceries 701 W. Buffalo St., Ithaca, NY (607) 319-5073

Trader Joe’s 744 S. Meadow St., Ithaca, NY 607-272-1420 Open 8AM-9PM. *Wed and Sun: the first hour of operation is service for senior customers (age 60 and over) and customers with disabilities who may need extra assistance

Wineries Check ahead of time for hours Cayuga Wine Trail See cayugawinetrail.com for a listing of the 16 wineries on both sides of Cayuga Lake. The region is most wellknown for its Rieslings and Cabernet Francs. Recently some wineries have begun to focus on Pinot Noir and Lemberger, both cool, temperate weather vinifera grapes. Ports of New York 815 Taber Street Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 220-6317 www.portsofnewyork.com/ Regular Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 12 noon - 6 pm Located along the Cayuga Inlet in the Northside neighborhood. A scion of Maison La Bouche of France and a producer of Meleau Specialty Wines, includes ports and other fortified wines. Six Mile Creek Vineyard 1551 Slaterville Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-9463 or toll-free (800) 260-0612 www.sixmilecreek.com Ithaca’s own winery features an especially lovely setting to enjoy memorable wines styled to a variety of preferences. A new line of distilled specialties, including Vodka, Limoncella and Grappa add to the tasting experience.

40 Catherwood Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (844) 462-7342

Galleries CAP ArtSpace A program of the Community Arts Partnership of Tompkins County, The ArtSpace gallery is located in the Tompkins Center for History and Culture at 110 N. Tioga Street. Monthly live and virtual exhibits. www.ArtsPartner.org Community School of Music & Arts (Temporarily Closed) 330 East State St.,Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-1474 www.csma-ithaca.org Aside from the “Music” side of this community school, CSMA houses excellent art by many local artists in its many galleries and hallways. With an emphasis on collaborative ventures with lesser-known artist groups, the galleries feature experimental, daring and aesthetically pleasing work. Corners Gallery 903 Hanshaw Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-5756 Visit: Tues/Wed By Appt Th/F/Sat 12-4pm. Located just minutes from Cornell University, the Corners Gallery specializes in Ithaca art by Ithaca artists. Here you’ll find paintings, prints and photographs depicting scenes of Ithaca, Cornell, and the Finger Lakes by local, regional and national artists.Women owned and operated.

Handwork Open 11AM-5PM 102 W. State/MLK St., Ithaca, NY https://www.handwork.coop/ (607) 273-9400 This unique cooperative in downtown Ithaca features crafts and fine art made by craftspeople and artists from all around the country. Members are required to work in the store several days a month and “sales clerks” are actually working craftspeople, so don’t hesitate to ask them about the work. The Ink Shop Printmaking Center 330 East State St., 2nd Floor, Ithaca, NY (607) 277-3884 www.ink-shop.org Visit by appointment-only at this time. Ithaca College: Handwerker Gallery (Temporarily Closed) 1170 Gannett Center 953 Danby Road, Ithaca, NY (607) 274-3018 The Handwerker Gallery will open during Spring 2021 with limited hours and attendance to aid in the efforts to abate Covid-19 transmission. Due to campus-wide access restrictions, the gallery will be open for Ithaca College students and staff, only. Neighbors (temporarily closed) A small art gallery founded in 2017 in a converted garage in Ithaca. Opening hours vary from week to week, please check our Facebook page for details or email to schedule an appointment.

Arts & Entertainment Cinemas Cinemapolis (Online Option) 120 E. Green St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 277-6115 www.cinemapolis.org Independent theater features art and indie movies, showcases local filmmakers and hosts film festivals. Cornell Cinema (Online Option) 104 Willard Straight Hall Ithaca, NY 14853 (607) 255-3522 www.cinema.cornell.edu Screening over 300 films a year, seven nights a week, Cornell Cinema runs the gamut with classic Hollywood cinema, international movies, cult classics, documentaries and experimental films as well as Ithaca premieres. They offer a free/ pay-per view virtual cinema season Spring ‘21. See website for details. Regal Cinemas @ Ithaca Mall (Temporarily Closed)

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526 Elm Street Ithaca NY 14850 North Star Art Gallery 743 Snyder Hill Rd, Ithaca, NY (607)323-7684 www.northstarartgallery.com In addition to fine arts, the North Star Gallery also offers visitors a chance to stay at their Airbnb next door. Open 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. State the Art 120 W. State St. #2, Ithaca, NY (607) 277-1626 www.soag.org Thu&Fri 12:00pm - 6:00pm; Sat&Sun 12:00pm - 5:00pm This members’ only gallery features rotating exhibitions on a roughly monthly basis. The space is lovely and intimate; works are carefully hung in between the two separate exhibition spaces. Expect high-quality work from artists both regional, national and international.

• Over 4,000 bolts of Fabric • Sewing machine sales, service & training • Books, patterns, notions and kits • Gift Certificates available

Museums Cornell University Lab of Ornithology (Temporarily Closed) 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca (607) 254-2473 www.birds.cornell.edu The CUMV Ornithology Collection currently consists of approximately 38,300 round skins, 700 flat skins, 1,000 spread wings, 5,500 skeletons, 1,400 fluid-preserved specimens, 3,200 egg sets, 590 nests, and 1,000 uncatalogued mounts.

www.e-quilterscorner.com

Quilters Corner

518 West State Street, Ithaca

110 North Cayuga St., Ithaca repstudio.com • 607-272-4292

M-F 10-5 • Sat 10-4 • Sun 12-4

Quilters Corner

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518 Westdown State Street, Ithaca hemlines go up and waistlines go in and out

607-266-0850

but well-fitted clothes never go out of style...

1566_Quilters corner_[B]_D18_V1 2.4 x 5.5 13th Jan 2015

102 The Commons 273-3192

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Museum of the Earth 1259 Trumansburg Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-6623 www.museumoftheearth.org This natural history museum hosts a collection of about 2-3 million specimens. Family friendly and bustling with energy Open Sat-Mon with advanced tickets required for visitors available on website.

Theaters The Actors’ Workshop of Ithaca (Temporarily Closed)

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Civic Ensemble www.civicensemble.org 607-241-0195 The Civic Ensemble season will include new plays about issues relevant to our community, and open dialogue about the questions they raise. Hangar Theatre (Online Viewing Option) 801 Taughannock Boulevard, Ithaca Phone: (607) 273-2787 www.hangartheatre.org The Hangar Theatre puts on a plethora of different productions during their season, including musicals, comedies, dramas, classics and regional premieres.

Schwartz Center of Performing Arts 430 College Ave., Ithaca 607-254-2700 https://pma.cornell.edu/

Local Music Organizations Cayuga Chamber Orchestra 110 N. Tioga Street, Suite 302, Ithaca A professional 35 member orchestra which performs a regular orchestral concert season, as well as a Sunday afternoon chamber music series, an annual Holiday Concert: Caroling by Candlelight and youth concerts. ccoithaca.org Cayuga Vocal Ensemble P.O. Box 95, Ithaca, NY 14851 The Cayuga Vocal Ensemble, is directed by Dr Sean Linfors (appointed in the spring of 2020). The Ensemble has been performing broad selections of choral music since 1976 to Ithaca audiences and around Tompkins County. Each season, the Ensemble usually presents three or four major concerts in Ithaca, often with guest musicians. cayuga-vocal.org Chamber Music at New Park ​New Park Ithaca 1500 Taughannock Boulevard Annual chamber music festival presenting world-class performers in a relaxed and natural venue on Taughannock Blvd in Ithaca. www. chambermusicatnewpark.com

Johnson Museum of Art (Temporarily Closed) 114 Central Ave, Ithaca, NY (607) 255-6464 www.museum.cornell.edu An internationally-renowned institution—and housed in a stunning building, designed by iconic architect I.M. Pei—the Johnson Museum is one of Cornell’s shining stars. Free and open to the public, exhibits range from avant-garde video art to iconic Impressionist works.

Sciencenter 601 1st St., Ithaca (607) 272-0600 www.sciencenter.org This kid friendly non-profit educational organization will appeal to the kid in every adult, too. This is a place where fun and science come together. Expect a large amount of interaction to go with your serving size of learning.

John’s Tailor Shop

The Cherry Artspace 102 Cherry St., Ithaca (607) 241-0703 thecherry.org A not-for-profit arts facilitator and presenting organization supporting a wide range of artists and arts organizations, in a variety of disciplines. The Artspace is a flexible, multidisciplinary arts and performance venue located on the banks of the Cayuga Inlet in Ithaca’s West End.

www.stateofithaca.org

Tompkins Center for History and Culture 110 N. Tioga St., on the Commons, Ithaca (607) 273-8284 ext. 228 https://www.tompkins-center.net/ With extensive and informative exhibits on aspects of Ithaca’s colorful history—everything from Ithaca’s boating history, to its most wild women—there’s much to be learned here. The History Center is requesting all visitors pre-schedule their visits at their web site and to review Health & Safety protocols before visiting the Exhibit Hall.

607-266-0850

...see what John the tailor can do for you.

105 Harvard Place, Ithaca (607) 339-9999 www.actorsworkshop.biz Performances are at a variety of venues around the area. The choice of plays does not hesitate to grapple with social issues. This is essentially an acting school that regularly stages productions.

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Ithaca College Theatre (Temporarily Closed) 953 Danby Road, Ithaca (607) 274-3345 Ithaca College brings to the stage stories from the 17th century right up into the 21st, reaffirming live theatre’s power to delight and inspire, provoke and activate. Kitchen Theatre (Virtual Viewing Option) 417 W. Martin Luther King St./W. State St., Ithaca (607) 272-0403 (admin office) https://www.kitchentheatre.org/ With stage classics, regional and world premieres, family fare and oneperson shows, “great conversations happen in the Kitchen.” State Theatre of Ithaca 107 West State Street, Ithaca, (607) 277-8283

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Cornell Savoyards Producing Gilbert and Sullivan operettas since 1953. They delight in exposing modern audiences to the wonderful wit and music of G&S. They also produce light opera, Broadway musicals, revues and singa-longs. https://www.facebook.com/ CornellSavoyards Cornell University Concert Series 101 Lincoln Hall, Cornell The Cornell Concert Series has been hosting musicians and ensembles of international stature since 1903. Originally featuring Western classical artists, the series presented Ravi Shankar in 1987 and has since grown to encompass a broader spectrum of the world's great art musics. www.cornellconcertseries.com


Dryden Area Intergenerational Band & Chorus The DAIBC provides a noncompetitive, fun, free summer music ensemble experience to anyone of any age or musical ability. www.daibc.org

Opera Ithaca Opera Ithaca brings professional opera to Ithaca, New York and the surrounding Finger Lakes and Southern Tier region. operaithaca.org

Finger Lakes Chamber Ensemble A chamber music ensemble, with a regular season of chamber concerts, solo and lecture-recitals performing in Ithaca and Lodi. www. fingerlakeschamberensemble.com

State Theatre of Ithaca The historic and restored State Theater is a venue for national, international and community performances and programming. www.stateofithaca.com

Ithaca Community Chorus (hosts four groups): www.ithacacommunitychoruses.org

Triphammer Arts 607-257-2043 2622 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca Triphammer Arts consistently brings together dancers and musicians from the area to resent high quality, audience-friendly music and dance productions both outdoors and indoors. www.operacowpokes.com

Ithaca Community Chorus & Chamber Singers (ICC&CS) Founded in 1976, the Ithaca Community Chorus and Chamber Singers includes over 100 and Tompkins County residents. The Chorus membership finds commonality in the dedication to learning and performing history’s best choral offerings. The Chamber Singers is a select sub-group of the Chorus. VOICES Multicultural Chorus Founded in 2002, VOICES expands Ithaca Community Choruses’s outreach to the Ithaca community and by creating a multicultural group of singers interested in learning, sharing, and singing songs from diverse ethnic choral traditions. Ithaca Gay Men’s Chorus Founded in the spring of 2009, the Ithaca Gay Men’s Chorus expands Ithaca Community Choruses’ outreach to the Ithaca community by embracing all men who wish to perform music set for the male voice. SummerSing Summer Sing is a summer choral project of Ithaca Community Choruses. Everyone is welcome. You do not have to know how to read music and there are no auditions. Ithaca Community Orchestra PO Box 6787, Ithaca NY 14851 The Ithaca Community Orchestra (ICO) supports community musical education through the rehearsal and performance of the classical orchestral repertoire, as well as music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. www.ithacacommunityorchestra.org Ithaca Concert Band Ithaca's official community band for more than 40 years, celebrating music-making for all ages. ICB offers free concerts throughout the year, including an outdoor summer concert series. ithacaconcertband.org Ithaca Underground A not-for-profit whose goal is to nurture a sustainable, all ages (and especially youth) supportive environment where music and art outside of the mainstream is encouraged and able to flourish. Presents events featuring national touring, regional, and local bands and performers on a year-round basis, averaging 40+ shows a year. www.ithacaunderground.com Music’s Recreation Music's Recreation is devoted to exploring new concert formats that integrate professional performance of a wide range of music with intriguing and educational commentary in a very informal atmosphere. https://www.musicsrecreation.org/ NYS Baroque 333 The Parkway, Ithaca 607-301-0604 Performs music of the Renaissance, Baroque and early Classical periods on period instruments. nysbaroque.com

Vitamin L 105 King St. Ithaca (607)273-4175 Vitamin L is a diverse group of 65 80 singers, ages 11 - 21, performing in Vitamin L concerts year-round in Central New York and beyond. The purpose of the Vitamin L project is to spread love and goodwill through music... to uplift and inspire young people and encourage positive character development, through music. vitaminl.org

Festivals Greater Ithaca Art Trail A program of the Community Arts Partnership of Tompkins County, the Trail gives people the opportunity to visit studios by appointment, on October special event weekends, and on monthly First Saturdays, along with plenty of virtual events. www.ArtTrail.com Spring Writes Literary Festival A program of the Community Arts Partnership of Tompkins County, the Festival features over 40 readings, panels, workshops and performances in May featuring over 100 local writers. www.SpringWrites.org Friends of the Library Book Sale 509 Esty Street, Ithaca booksale.org Spring 2021 dates: The first three weekends of May Each year, the Friends of the Tompkins County Public Library holds two book sales, one in the Spring and another in the Fall, to benefit organizations working for literacy in Tompkins County. The number of items available for each sale usually exceeds 250,000. Books, audio books, CDs, DVDs, records, puzzles, and games are items found at the Book Sales. Children’s Corner is especially well-stocked and Collector’s Corner is a separate area housing many unique items of special interest which are priced individually. One Fest Ithaca Late May/TBD Ithacaunderground.org One Fest is a musical festival put on by Ithaca Undergound showcasing two stages of metal, punk, hardcore, and noise - featuring regional and local extreme bands and artists. Ithaca Festival (Canceled 2021) Late May- Early June Downtown Ithaca and the Commons This over-40 year running festival of music and art is somewhat of an Ithaca tradition. With more live music than you can shake a stick at — both on The Commons and at Stewart Park — this weekend-long festival celebrates the richness of Ithaca’s social and artistic culture, with its highlight being the

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Supervision is recommended as this park is surrounded by streets and cars.

endlessly bizarre and joyous parade the first Thursday evening of the festival. Juneteenth Celebration June 19, 2021 Southside Community Center 305 Plain Street, Ithaca, (607) 273-4190 An annual celebration of this national event symbolizing the end of slavery — a day-long event involving music performances, a street fair, food and crafts vendors, and more.

Baker Park This park is a neighborhood passive park located in the triangle formed where Elmira Road, South Plain Street and Park Street meet. Baker Park has several large shade trees, an open lawn area, and benches. Brindley Park Brindley Park is the only remaining piece of the former Inlet Neighborhood Community Center which was built in the 1930’s in response to the social and recreational needs of Inlet neighborhood residents at the junction of Buffalo and Brindley Streets for use as a park.

Downtown Summer Concert Series Late June through mid-September The Commons, Ithaca, NY Listen to free live music every Thursday evening on the Commons. Local musicians perform all different styles, from classical to folk to rock to jazz. GrassRoots Festival July 22-25, 2021 150 Trumansburg Road, Trumansburg, NY (607) 387-5098 www.grassrootsfest.org The Finger Lakes GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance started as a concert to benefit local AIDS support organization AIDS work at the State Theater in Ithaca. GrassRoots is held the second last weekend in July. It is held at the Trumansburg Fairgrounds in Trumansburg New York, located about 10 miles north of Ithaca NY on Rt. 96 on the west side of Cayuga Lake in the very scenic Finger Lakes region of central New York. Ithaca Artist Market Early August, 2021 Each year, the Community Arts Partnership of Tompkins County organizes and facilitates a summer and winter juried show and sale of work by local artists. Artists exhibit paintings, drawings, photographs, collage, prints and sculpture. The Ithaca Artists’ Market has become a summer fixture after 20 years.

YMCA of Ithaca & Tompkins County 50 Graham Rd. W, Ithaca 607-257-0101

Barnes and Noble 614 South Meadow St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-6784

Odyssey Bookstore 115 W. Green St., Lower, Ithaca 607-269-5800 Open Tue-Sat 10-6; Sun 10-5

Sports & Recreation Golf Courses

Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Celebration January 2022 In partnership with the Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) and many other community organizations, The MLK Day of Celebration takes place at GIAC on Martin Luther King Day every January. Workshops, children’s activities, music and a free community luncheon all staffed by volunteers makes this a day on, not a day off.

Country Club of Ithaca 189 Pleasant Grove Road Ithaca, NY 14850-2601 (607) 257-0010 www.countryclubofithaca.com The 18-hole, par-72 course at the Country Club of Ithaca facility features 6,595 yards of golf from the longest tees. Designed by Geoffrey S. Cornish, ASGCA, the Ithaca golf course opened in 1900. Newman Golf Course (Temporarily Closed) 10 Pier Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-6262 The 9-hole “Newman'' course at the Newman Municipal Golf Course features 3,055 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 36 . The course rating is 35.2 and it has a slope rating of 113. Newman golf course opened in 1935. There are men’s and women’s tees, and it has an 18hole rating of 70.3. Reservations are required on weekends and holidays. Other sports areas:

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Cornell - Teagle Building 607-255-1318 Ithaca College Outdoor Pool & Kelsey Partridge Bird Natatorium (607) 274-1880.

Bowling (All closed until further notice) Bowl-O-Drome 401 Third St., Ithaca, (607) 256-2695 Helen Newman Bowling Lanes Cradit Farm Dr., Ithaca, (607) 2554200 Atlas Bowl 61 W Main St Trumansburg, NY (607) 387-3191

Skating Ithaca Skate Park Meadow Street and Wood Street Ithaca, NY 14850 Cass Park Rink 701 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca (607) 273-1090 Cass Rink offers public ice skating (October through March) and rollerskate nights (June through October) The Rink at Community Recreation Center 1767 East Shore Drive, Ithaca 607-277-7465

Parks

Alex Haley Pool (GIAC) 408 N. Albany St., Ithaca, (607) 272-3622 or (607) 277-6169

Allan H. Treman State Marine Park Just north of Cass Park, off Route 89, Ithaca (607) 273-3440, (607) 272-1460 (marina office, summer) Allan H. Treman State Park is one of the largest inland marinas in New York State. It boasts 370 seasonal, 30 transient and 30 dry boat slips. The park has picnic areas and playing fields and provides access to the Barge Canal and Seneca Lake. It is a marina only, there is no camping available and it is not the same as Robert H. Treman State Park. Allen Treman Park is located on Route 89, north of Ithaca, on the western shore and southern end of Cayuga Lake. (Limited Capacity)

Cass Park Pool 701 Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca (607) 273-1090

Auburn St. Park The park is actively used all year by residents of the neighborhood.

Pools

Alphabet Soup 171 The Commons, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-6885

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Autumn Leaves Bookstore 115 The Commons, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-8239

Comics for Collectors 124 W. State St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-3007

Winter Recess February 2022 During Winter Recess, Ithaca opens its doors to the pre-K – 12 community, offering you a chance to relax, refresh and renew among friends in a city built on education. You’ll discover a discounted week of outdoor recreation, indoor relaxation and entertaining education. We’ve put the whole city on sale, just for you.

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Ithaca Swimming Club Inc. 124 Uptown Road, Ithaca, (607) 266-9574

Buffalo Street Books 215 N. Cayuga Street (Dewitt Mall), Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-8246 www.buffalostreetbooks.com

First People’s Festival Early December Dewitt Park, Ithaca, NY The Multicultural Resource Center’s First People’s Festival is a celebration of indigeous peoples of New York State featuring traditional music, crafts, displays and foods. Festivalgoers will have an opportunity to learn more about the traditions of First Peoples and to unlearn the stereotypes learned about their culture.

Book/Record Stores

Angry Mom Records 115 East State St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 319-4953

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Bryant Park Development of East Hill began in earnest in 1908. The land was developed by the Bryant Land company in collaboration with attorney / developer Jared T. Newman, who was then Mayor of Ithaca. 45 Acres of the old Bryant Farm were subdivided into 161 building lots. Three open spaces were incorporated into the subdivision: Bryant Park, Maplewood Park and Campbell Park, of which only Bryant park and Maplewood Park survived. Today Bryant Park is located in the triangle formed by Bryant Avenue, Irving Place and Ithaca Road Buttermilk Falls State Park 112 Buttermilk Falls Road, Ithaca (607) 273-2440, (607) 273-5761 (summer), (800) 456-2267 (reservations) Buttermilk Falls State Park takes its name from the foaming cascade formed by Buttermilk Creek as it flows down the steep valley side toward Cayuga Lake. The upper park has a small lake, hiking trails through woodlands and along the gorge and rim, picnic areas and playing fields. The lower park has a campground, pool and playing fields, beyond which is Larch Meadows. Larch Meadows is a moist, shady glen and wetland area through which a nature trail winds. Park activities, including tours through Buttermilk gorge, are offered weekly from July 4th through Labor Day. Park open all year. Camping season from midMay to mid-October. Swimming area opens on June 20th All trails close November 10. Deer hunting, bow only, is permitted in season. Located on Route 13, south of Ithaca. Cass Park 701 Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca, (607) 273-1090 Cass Park is a regionally active park used heavily by residents from all parts of Tompkins County. In addition to the ice rink, and swimming pool, there are four tennis courts, 20 athletic fields, four of them lighted, playground equipment, an exercise trail, and a large picnic pavilion. Columbia Street Park Columbia Street Park is located between Columbia Street and Hillview Place, across the street from Hillview Park. This park is heavily vegetated and contains a stairway which connects to Hillview Park. Conway Park Conway Park shows up as public land as early as 1835. The park was known for decades as Lafayette Park, being renamed Conway Park in 1920 to honor former City of Ithaca Alderman Michael Conway, who died in action in France with the American Expeditionary Forces. Today Conway Park is an active neighborhood park located at the triangle of Cascadilla Street, Madison Street and Third Street. It has a half

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basketball court with three hoops, a play structure, and a large lawn area used for informal play. The play structure was built, using Community Development Block Grant moneys, by residents of the surrounding neighborhood in the spring of 1997. Cornell Botanic Gardens 124 Comstock Knoll Drive, Ithaca (607) 255-2400 As the arboretum, botanical garden, and natural areas of Cornell University, Cornell Botanic Gardens has a lot to offer – 40 natural areas spanning nearly 4300 acres of rich and diverse habitats. Collections include maples, oaks, crabapples, conifers, dogwoods, urban trees, and other species in a 150-acre pastoral setting. Specialty gardens in the arboretum include the Zucker Flowering Shrub Collection and the Treman Woodland walk. The 25-acre botanical garden features 14 specialty gardens. DeWitt Park De Witt Park, the oldest park in the City of Ithaca, is at the corner of Buffalo and Cayuga streets. Before it became known as De Witt Park, it was called Public Square Park. The park contains several war monuments, including monuments honoring local residents who served in The Civil War, WWI, WWII, The Korean War and the Vietnam War. Each year on Veteran’s Day, De Witt park is home to ceremonies honoring these local heroes. Hillview Park Hillview Park is located on the corner of Turner Place, Columbia Street, South Aurora Street and Hillview Place. This park is heavily vegetated, with many large trees, and contains two small play fields with a backstop Ithaca Falls Natural Area Ithaca has many beautiful gorges and waterfalls. One of the most famous is Ithaca Falls, which is 150 feet high and 175 feet wide. These stunning falls are visible from Lake Street, a short walk from downtown or Cornell. McDaniels Park McDaniels Park was donated to the City of Ithaca by Cornell University Professor Laurence McDaniels. He lived next to the land that is known today as McDaniels Park. He donated a portion of his land to the City for use as a park a few years before his death. This Park is a neighborhood passive park. The entrance is located at the intersection of Hook Place and Warren Road. The park is heavily vegetated with trees and shrubs. It contains benches, a picnic table and a grill. Robert H. Treman State Park 105 Enfield Falls Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-3440, (800) 456-2267 (reservations) Robert H. Treman State Park is an area of wild beauty, with the rugged gorge called Enfield Glen as its scenic highlight. Winding trails follow the gorge past 12 waterfalls, including the 115-foot Lucifer Falls, where visitors can see a mile-and-a-half down the wooded gorge as it winds its way to the lower park. Campers can choose from tent or RV sites or cabins. Enjoy nine miles of hiking trails, or swim in a stream-fed pool beneath a waterfall. Swimming is allowed in lifeguarded area only. Open year round. Camping season runs from mid-May to November 30. All gorge trails close November 10. Bow hunting for deer is permitted in season. Located on Route 13, 5 miles south of Ithaca, on Route 327. Stewart Park Stewart Park Road, Ithaca

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Stewart Park is a regionally active park with several facilities including tennis courts, a playground with several play structures including a carousel, athletic fields, a duck pond, a spray pool, a municipal golf course, and a bird sanctuary. Swimming is no longer allowed due to pollution and turbidity. Strawberry Fields The history of Strawberry Fields is connected to the Belle Sherman Elementary school off Mitchell Street in Ithaca. Previously, the land was owned by the City of Ithaca School District. In 1940 and in 1960, apartment complexes had been proposed for this land. On July 21, 1970, a 9.9 acre parcel was sold to the City for park use. Taughannock Falls State Park 1740 Taughannock Road Trumansburg, NY 14886 (607) 387-6739, (800) 456-2267 (reservations) Taughannock Falls State Park’s namesake waterfall is one of the outstanding natural attractions of the Northeast. Taughannock Falls plunges 215 feet past rocky cliffs that tower nearly 400 feet above the gorge. Gorge and rim trails offer spectacular views from above the falls and from below at the end of the gorge trail. Campsites and cabins overlook Cayuga Lake, with marina, boat launch and beach nearby. Boat Launch Site not suitable for any type of sailboat. The park also offers organized activities including tours through the Taughannock Gorge and summer concerts along the lakefront. Open year round. Camping season runs from April 24th to mid-October. The rim trail closes in winter; the gorge trail remains open.

(607) 273-1721 (Town Hall); (607) 273-1656 (Public Works Facility) www.town.ithaca.ny.us/ Located on beautiful Cayuga Lake, the Town of Ithaca is home to about 20,000 residents and is home to Cornell University and Ithaca College.

Higher Education

Village of Cayuga Heights 836 Hanshaw Road, Ithaca (607) 257-1238 www.cayuga-heights.ny.us/ A largely residential suburb located next to the Cornell campus within the town of Ithaca. It has one shopping area called Community Corners and ready access to shopping in the adjacent village of Lansing.

Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TC3) 170 North St. Dryden, NY (607) 844-8211 www.tc3.edu

Tompkins County Clerk 320 N. Tioga Street, Main Courthouse (607) 274-5431 www.tompkinscounty.gov

Cornell University General Information: (607) 254-4636 www.cornell.edu Ithaca College General Information: (607) 274-3011 www.ithaca.edu

SUNY Empire State College M&T Bank Office Building, 118 N Tioga St Suite 502, Ithaca (607) 319-2137

Education

Tompkins County Legislature 121 E Court St (607) 274-5434 www.tompkinscountyny.gov/ legislature Tompkins County Health Dept. 55 Brown Road Ithaca, NY (607) 274-6600 www.tompkinscounty.gov Tompkins County Environmental Health Division (607) 274-6688

Ithaca City School District 400 Lake Street Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 274-2101 www.icsd.k12.ny.us Grades K-12 are served in 12 school buildings, and the district has a total enrollment of approximately 5,500 students. The schools include: Ithaca High School (grades 9-12); Lehman Alternative Community School (grades 6-12); Boynton Middle School and DeWitt Middle School (grades 6-8); Belle Sherman Elementary School, Beverly J. Martin Elementary School, Caroline Elementary School, Cayuga Heights Elementary School, Enfield Elementary School, Fall Creek Elementary School, Northeast

Elementary School and South Hill Elementary School (grades K-5, some with pre-K programs). New Roots Charter School 116 North Cayuga Street P.O. Box 936 Ithaca NY 14851 (607) 882-9220 www.newrootsschool.org A high school (grades 9-12) charter school, tied to the Ithaca City School District, New Roots is open to all students in Tompkins County. Curriculum is focused on sustainability and entrepreneurship. Students will earn a Regents diploma. Cascadilla School 116 Summit Avenue Ithaca, NY 14850-4734 (607) 272-3110 www.cascadillaschool.org Cascadilla School is a preparatory school in Ithaca. It was founded in 1876 as a boys’ preparatory school for Cornell University. Serves as a high school, grades 9 through post graduate.

Parking Parking in Downtown Ithaca is easy because you have a number of options. You can park on the street or in garages for your convenience. Parking is FREE on weekends, and special holidays on the street. In the Garages, parking is FREE on weekends. On-StreetParking The City of Ithaca has installed pay stations downtown in order to provide multiple payment options.

Thompson Park Thompson Park is a small, triangularshaped neighborhood park on North Cayuga Street. It is primarily used for passive park uses, although it has been known as an outdoor volleyball site.

How Parking Kiosks Work: These pay stations use license plate recognition technology to track your parking, so you will need to know your license plate when you go to pay at the machine. Pay stations are currently located 1 station per every street block, but will soon increase to 2 per street block (one on each side of the street). For your convenience, you can also receive notification by text or phone call when your time is running out. Follow the prompts on the screen to enter your phone number. You can also pay for parking on your smartphone by setting up a Park Mobile* account either on your phone through the app store (Apple and Android) or online at a computer. Street Parking Rates: At metered spaces, the hourly rate is $1.50/hr with a minimum 1 hour purchase when paying with ATM/ credit card. You can purchase smaller time increments using cash or coin only. *Park Mobile parking transactions are subject to a convenience fee ($0.300.35 per transaction depending on Park Mobile subscription rate) Parking in Garages The parking garages charge $1.00 an hour to park between the hours of 2:00am and 11:00pm. The parking attendant is on duty at the garages until 11:30pm to collect any parking fees that may have accrued between these hours. You can pre-purchase hourly tokens/tickets for garage parking at $0.65/hr through the City Chamberlain’s office inside City Hall. Cayuga Street Parking Garage 235 S. Cayuga St. Ithaca, NY 14850-5509 (607) 256-7275 Long-term parking is offered by the Cayuga Street Garage located between Green and Clinton streets in downtown Ithaca.

Titus Flats/Ithaca Skate Park Titus Flats is located on South Meadow Street and Wood Street. It is a neighborhood active park with a full basketball court, a handball court, four softball fields, and a playground that was the result of a community build effort, funded by a Community Development Block Grant in 1994. Ithaca Skate Park is the first public concrete skatepark in CNY.

Dryden Road Parking Garage Dryden Road Ithaca, NY 14850 Seneca Street Garage East Seneca Street Ithaca, NY 14850 Green Street Garage Green Street Ithaca, NY 14850

Titus Triangle Park Titus Triangle is a small neighborhood passive park located in the triangle formed by Fair Street, South Street and Six Mile Creek.

Waste Removal Services The City of Ithaca provides a trash collection service for residents within the City limits, and trash is collected once a week. To determine the day of collection for your address, please call the Streets and Facilities Division office at 272-1718. Office hours are Monday-Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Residents need to place trash at the curb the night before the scheduled collection day as the crews start their day at 4 a.m. Criteria for placement of trash is as follows: Trash cans or plastic bags may be used. There are no specific rules governing the type of can or bag that may be used.

Washington Park The City blocks surrounding the park were laid out in 1832 by Simeon De Witt and his son Varick De Witt. By the end of the century homes were built on all the streets around the park. (For more information see De Witt Park) The park has been under municipal authority since 1847. It is located in a square created by Washington Street, Court Street, Park Street and Buffalo Street.

Government & Local Institutions

Trash Tags Trash collection is paid for through the purchase of trash tags. Residents can purchase tags at City Hall or at any of the local grocery stores. Full Tags are for up to 35 pounds of trash. One tag is $4.50 while a sheet is $27.00. Whole tag strips are to be used; tags torn in half will not be accepted. One tag is needed for each can or each bag of trash that is placed at the curb. If more than one bag of trash is put in a can, be sure that the

Municipal Government City of Ithaca 108 Green Street (607) 274-6570 www.cityofithaca.org Town of Ithaca 215 N. Tioga Street

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These have replaced traditional coin meters. Parking pay stations accept cash, coin and debit/ATM or credit cards.

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total weight of all the bags does not exceed the weight on the tag. The tag must be placed around the neck of the bag or on the bag itself. If trash cans are used, be sure to place the tag on the handle of the can so that it can be readily seen by the collectors. The weight of a can containing multiple bags/tags cannot exceed 70 pounds. Recycling Recycling is collected in the City of Ithaca every other week. More information about recycling can be obtained by calling the Tompkins County Department of Recycling and Materials Management at w(607) 273-6632. There is no fee or tag needed for this service, and Recycling bins may be purchased at 122 Commercial Avenue, Ithaca, NY. The Department of Recycling and Materials Management site is www. recycletompkins.org Yard Waste Note: Leaves and grass clippings are not to be raked into the street. Yard waste is collected in the City of Ithaca on a regular basis from April 1through late fall. Once snow falls, crews work on snow removal and yard waste collection is suspended. Yard waste tags are $9 for a sheet of 6 and can be purchased at Agway, GreenStar,, P&C Fresh, Cornell Campus Store, Dandy Mini-Mart (on W. Buffalo St.), Tops, and Wegmans. Yard waste is collected every other week on the opposite recycling weeks. Yard waste may also be taken free of charge to the Tompkins County Recycling and Solid Waste Center at 160 Commercial Ave., Ithaca. Criteria for placement of yard waste is: Only natural materials are considered yard waste (grass, leaves, branches, brush and the like). Yard waste must be placed in garbage cans (with the lids off) or in untied plastic bags. All brush must be tied in bundles. No brush or branches can be longer than four feet in length, and no branch can be larger than two inches in diameter. No bundle or container should exceed 50 pounds.

FOURTH WARD District 1 – St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, 109 Oak Ave.

Bridges/Cornell Heights 407 Wyckoff Ave, Ithaca (607) 257-5777 Family-style rental housing with coordinated aide service.

District 2 Tompkins County Public Works, 170 Bostwick Road District 3, 12 College Circle Community Center, 1033 Danby Rd.

Kendal at Ithaca 2230 N. Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY (607) 266-5300 A continuing care retirement community situated on 106 acres in the heart of the Finger Lakes District.

District 4, 11 Ellis Hollow Apartments, 1028 Ellis Hollow Rd., East entrance District 5, 6 BOCES, 555 Warren Road District 7 Kendal at Ithaca, 2230 N. Triphammer Rd. District 8, 9 First Congregational Church, 309 Highland Rd. District 10 Linderman Creek II Community Bldg., 201 Cypress Court

Libraries

Durland Alternatives Library (Currently Closed, but you can order books through the FLX Library System) 130 Anabel Taylor Hall Cornell University (607) 252-6946 www.alternativeslibrary.org Founded in1974, the library collection has focused on alternatives. The first books were about alternative communities & lifestyles in the 70’s. The collection has since grown to include a variety of topics, all with themes of social justice, ecology, and transformative action.

City of Ithaca polling places:

Ithaca College Library (Closed to public) 1201 Gannett Center Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 274-3182 Hours vary by season, people should check the library’s Web site — www. ithaca.edu/library — for hours. The library is open to the public for browsing, but only students and college staff may check out materials or access the databases.

THIRD WARD District 1, 2 and 3 – Belle Sherman Annex, Cornell Street

TC Office for the Aging 214 W. MLK Jr./State St Open Mon-Fri 8:30 am –4:30 pm (607) 274-5482 tompkinscountyny.gov/cofa

District 1 Museum of the Earth, 1259 Trumansburg Road

Tompkins County Board of Elections 128 East Buffalo Street Ithaca, New York 14850 (607) 274-5522 www.tompkinscountyny.gov/boe Voting in the City of Ithaca takes place in five different wards, with several polling places in each ward. Polling places are based on Election Districts. The election district is not the same as your County Legislative District number, but is printed on the voter registration acknowledgement card. Call the Board of Elections office for more information.

SECOND WARD District 1 & 3 – GIAC, W. Court Street District 2 – Titus Towers II, 798 S. Plain St. District 4 – Ithaca Town Hall, 215 N. Tioga Street

Aging

Town of Ithaca polling places

Vote by mail subject to change in response to state regulations.

FIRST WARD District 1 & 2 – Lehman Alternative School, 111 Chestnut St. District 3 – Titus Towers II, 798 S. Plain Street District 4 & 5 – South Hill School, 520 Hudson Street

Planned Parenthood 620 W. Seneca Street Ithaca, NY (607) 273-1513

FIFTH WARD District 1, 2 – Tabernacle Baptist Church District 3 – Alice Cook House, Stewart and University Avenue

Cornell University Libraries (Temporarily closed to public) Ithaca, NY 14853 (607) 255-4144 libpublicservices@cornell.edu www.library.cornell.edu The libraries offer guest borrowing privileges to qualifying individuals (see below). Users should apply at the Library Public Services Office, 116 Olin Library, and provide the appropriate documentation. Users applying for contract college Privilege Cards should apply at Mann Library. Fees are payable by cash, check or credit card. Hours: see www.library. cornell.edu for individual library hours.

Voting

607-273-5500 https://www.carsny.org/

Tompkins County Public Library (Open for pickup and curbside delivery) 101 E. Green St. Ithaca, NY 14850-5613 (607) 272-4557 tcpl.org Curbside Hours: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. – 6 p.m.

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Browsing/Internet Hours: Tuesday and Thursday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. Library loans can be arranged through the library’s online loan system. Curbside delivery is by appointment only.

(607) 277-7433 www.tcatbus.com The fare is based on where you board, not your destination or how far you travel. Single-ride trips originating in rural areas (Zone 2) cost more than trips originating in the Greater Ithaca area (Zone 1). Those fares are $2.50. Single-ride fares that originate in the Greater Ithaca Area (Zone 1) are $1.50, whether traveling in either zone.

Post Offices Main Branch U.S. Post Office, 757 Warren Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850-9998 (607) 375-6003

Ithaca Dispatch Inc. 615 5 Mile Dr., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 277-7777, (607) 277-CABS, 277-TAXI toll-free at (888) 321-1149.

Downtown U.S. Post Office, 213 N. Tioga St., Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 275-8777 Cornell University U.S. Post Office, 135 Ho Plaza, Ithaca, NY 14853 (607) 255-3907 Ithaca College U.S. Post Office, 953 Danby Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 274-3367 Ithaca Tompkins International Airport Terminal Address: 1 Culligan Drive Mailing Address: 72 Brown Road Ithaca, NY 14850-1248 (607) 257-0456 www.flyithaca.com Ithaca Tompkins International Airport is owned and operated by Tompkins County. Airline services available at the airport: Delta Air Lines Direct service from Ithaca Tompkins Regional Airport to Detroit. Delta Reservations: (800) 221-1212 American Airlines Service from Ithaca Tompkins Regional Airport to its hub in Philadelphia. American Airlines Reservations: 1-800-433-7300 Local Customer Service: (607) 2570808 United Airlines Flying from Ithaca Tompkins Regional Airport to Washington Dulles International Airport. United Reservations: (800) 864-8331 Arrivals & Departures: (800) 8246200 TCAT – Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit Inc. 737 Willow Ave. Ithaca, NY 14850

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Healthcare Hospital

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Collegetown Cab 630 Elmira Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 588-8888

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Cayuga Medical Center 101 Dates Dr., Ithaca (607) 274-4011 www.cayugamed.org Cayuga Medical Center houses 204 beds, employs over 1,200 health-care professionals, and has a medical staff of more than 200 affiliated physicians.

Clinic Convenient Care (Cayuga Medical Center Branch) (Services Temporarily Suspended) 10 Arrowwood Dr. (off Warren Rd.), Ithaca (607) 274-4150 Cortland Medical Center 134 Homer Ave. Cortland, NY (607) 756-3500 WellNow Urgent Care 740 South Meadow Street, Ithaca (607) 319-4563 Guthrie Medical Group 1780 Hanshaw Road, Ithaca (607) 257-5858 Ithaca Health Alliance 521 West Seneca Street, Ithaca (607) 330-1253 The Ithaca Health Alliance is a nonprofit community health organization which helps members pool their resources in order to create community health care. Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services (C.A.R.S.) 334 W. State. St, Ithaca

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Longview, an Ithacare Community 1 Bella Vista Drive Ithaca, NY (607) 375-6300 A residential senior community offering both independent apartments and assisted living located in the Finger Lakes region, high on South Hill overlooking Cayuga Lake.

Loaves & Fishes of Tompkins County 210 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca https://loaves.org/ Free Meals-to-Go. Fresh meals will be packaged to-go and served outside in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church. MWF- 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm, T/TH5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Organizations & Clubs American Legion 1231 Danby Road, Ithaca (607) 272-1129 American Red Cross 618 West State St., Ithaca (607) 273-6684 Big Brothers Big Sisters 1 James L Gibbs Drive, Ithaca (607) 273-8364 Cayuga Bird Club c/o Cornell Lab of Ornithology 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca (800) 843-2473 Cayuga Trails Club P.O. Box 754, Ithaca, NY 14851-0754 Family & Children’s Service of Ithaca 127 W. State St., Ithaca (607) 273-7494

Foodnet Meals on Wheels 2422 N. Triphammer road, Ithaca (607) 266-9553

Finger Lakes Independence Center 215 Fifth St., Ithaca (607) 272-2433

LifeLong 119 West Court Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-1511

Finger Lakes Land Trust 202 East Court Street, Ithaca (607) 275-9487

Love Living At Home www.lovelivingathome.org (607) 319-0162

Crisis Supportave services Advocacy Center HOTLINE: 607-277-5000 www.actompkins.org The Advocacy Center is dedicated to providing support, advocacy and education for survivors, friends, and families of domestic violence, and sexual assault in Tompkins County. Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service 124 E. Court Street Ithaca, ithacacrisis.org 24 Hour Crisisline: (607) 272-1616 Other Services: (607) 272-1505 Missinon to promote constructive responses to crisis and trauma, and to prevent violence to self and others through direct support and community education. Human Services Coalition 171 E. State/MLK Jr. Street, Ithaca (607) 273-8686 The mission of the Human Services Coalition is to enhance the delivery of health and human services in the Tompkins County area. Mutual Aid Tompkins mutualaidtompkins.com communityaidtompkins@gmail.com (607) 288-3252 Neighbors concerned about our communities and helping to make sure those most vulnerable and affected by COVID-19 get the help they need. No Mas Lagrimas/ No More Tears (607) 339-8344 facebook.com/ NoMoreTearsNoMasAlgrimas/ nmlagrimas.wordpress.com Supporting individuals and families of all backgrounds, cultures, and identities affected by economic and social barriers in meeting their basic needs and in empowering themselves to achieve their aspirations.

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GIAC (Greater Ithaca Activities Center) 301 West Court St., Ithaca (607) 272-3622 A center for all ages, particularly youth and teens. It serves the immediate neighborhood and the greater Ithaca area by providing multicultural, educational, and recreational programs focused on social and individual development. Ithaca Community Recovery Inc. 518 W.Seneca St., Ithaca (607) 216-8754 https://www. ithacacommunityrecovery.org/ Ithaca Womens Softball facebook.com/groups/58172200554/ Southside Community Center 305 S Plain St, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-4190 www.sspride.org Tompkins Community Action 701 Spencer Rd, Ithaca 14850 (607) 273-8816 309 S. Corn St., Ithaca 14850 (supportive housing services) (607) 216-0457 Tompkins County Workers’ Center 115 E. Martin uther King Jr. St./The Commons Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 269-0409 Tompkins Workforce New York 171 E. State St. #241 Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-7570 United Way 313 North Aurora St. #2, Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-6286 Veterans of Foreign Wars 423 W. State St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-5222

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Service Stability Strength “Tompkins provided extremely valuable advice, oversight, and support,” Dr. McAllister says. “So we could create a healing space for our community.

DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES of ITHACA Dr. Josie McAllister, Founder

When Dermatology Associates of Ithaca had outgrown their office space, Dr. Josie McAllister turned to a team who has been there for the practice every step of the way: Tompkins Trust Company and Tompkins Insurance Agencies. With guidance and financing help from Tompkins, Dr. McAllister was able to purchase and renovate a beautiful 8,000 square foot facility in Ithaca.

Visit TompkinsTrust.com or TompkinsIns.com. 3/21

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Insurance and investment products are not FDIC insured, have no bank guarantee and may lose value.

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#10 Greg Proops B y B r y a n Va n C a m p e n “Lupin,” “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” “Casablanca,” “The Cave of the Yellow Dog,” “Salaam Bombay,” and “Call My Agent!”

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ith the world on lockdown, what are we all watching? I posed that question to Greg Proops, a comedian, podcaster (“The Smartest Man in the World,” co-hosted by his wife, Jennifer Canaga), actor, voice artist and improv performer on both the UK and US versions of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and “Whose Live Anyway”, the touring version with Joel Murray (“Mad Men”), Jeff Davis (“Harmontown”) and Ryan Stiles (“Hot Shots”). On Saturday, March 27 at 8 p.m., the “Whose Live” crew present “Streamweavers” with special guests: founding SNL cast member Laraine Newman, Drew Carey and Gary Anthony Williams. Find out more at houseseats.live.

I spoke with Proops on the first day of Trump’s second impeachment trial back in February. Ithaca Times: Is everybody well? Greg Proops: Yeah, we’re just watching this impeachment trial. It’s insane. Oh, it was just garbage. It was complete incoherence, not one point made. Basically, it was white aggrievement. The problem is, the Democrats put a video together that showed them in a bad light, you see. There’s no reality going on. What do they have to defend, you know? And now they just showed Romney being told by Officer Goodman to run back the other way, and they showed Pence scuttle down the stairs because they were coming to kill them. IT: Yikes. GP: And still, a lot of them won’t admit that this happened, so there you are. IT: I’ve been interviewing celebrities about what they’re watching during the quarantine. GP: So you’ve run out of celebrities. IT: No, Mr. Proops! GP: [laughs] IT: What are you and Jennifer watching to stay sane? GP: I watched a bunch of old movies at the beginning of it, and then lately, we’ve watched all the French series, “Call My Agent!,” which is hilarious, even though in French it’s “Ten Percent.” Is there anyone who doesn’t understand that an agent gets ten percent? I wasn’t

sure why [laughs] they gave it the name of an ’80s sitcom. IT: Tell me more about it. GP: Oh, you haven’t seen this one? It’s on Netflix. And fantastically, one of the women in the cast is Liliane Rovère. And she’s from the ’50s, basically. And she’s in her ’80s. She was Chet Baker’s girlfriend. She was like a hipster jazz chick in the old days, and she’s sort of the gray eminence on the show. It’s a bunch of agents in Paris, and the plot’s like “Entourage.” You know how every week on “Entourage” it was like, “Oh my God, what if this movie doesn’t happen?” And then, “Oh, the movie’s happening.” So, it’s a bunch of French agents at counter-purposes with each other, at an agency. And they stunt cast every French movie star. So Christopher Lambert’s in it, and Nathalie Baye. Literally, it’s brimming with French movie stars. It’s a zany sitcom, they fall in love with their clients, they sleep with them, you know. But it’s entertaining and the cast is sexy. And [Liliane Rovère] is hilarious as the older [agent] — they let her smoke, which is awesome. No TV shows do that anymore. IT: Yeah, smoking means an automatic R rating. GP: Yeah, right? They’d have to put up the tobacco warning at the beginning of it. But it’s a French show, so I guess you don’t get punished for it. And then “Lupin” (Netflix), I don’t know if you’ve seen that one. It’s based on this old series about a diamond thief. It was written a hundred years ago, and they’ve updated it, so it’s this Black guy in Paris, and he’s a gentleman thief. He’s out to settle all scores, his father was killed by a rich guy when he was little. And he’s always 10 steps ahead of everyone, it’s really, really caper-y, which is what I love about it. It’s an actor named Omar Sy, who’s a huge star in France. So they’ve taken the whole “gentleman diamond thief in a top hat” thing from the turn of the century, and continued on page 30

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Arts&Entertainment

NON-ITHACA CELEBRITY QUARANTINE FILM FESTIVAL

Julie Adams, in the 1954 horror classic Creature From the Black Lagoon (Universal)

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CELEBRITY QUARANTINE Contin u ed From Page 29

kind of put it on its head. Instead, he’s a super-modern, techie good-looking Black guy who is gonna run down everyone who ever did him wrong. It’s like a really bitchin’ caper film. The art direction is really beautiful, I think you’d really like it. The first episode just grabs you, when you see what happened to him when he was little, it’s the same bad guy for a whole lifetime. It’s got that French thing going on. And then we watched “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix) with Viola Davis and Chad Boseman. IT: Oh, so good.

GP: It’s just smashing. August Wilson. IT: I think they should do all of his plays for Netflix. Do ‘em all. GP: Don’t you? I think they are. Denzel’s gonna put ‘em all on. He did “Fences,” and I think the new edict is that he was mates with August Wilson, and they’re going to make them all. Denzel’s in charge of casting and the directors. Viola Davis is so terrific in [“Ma Rainey”]. IT: Unbelievable. GP: Chadwick Boseman’s a little thin, you can kinda tell he’s not well. IT: What a loss. He was so great in the Spike Lee movie (“Da 5 Bloods”). GP: I agree. And in one lifetime to play Thurgood Marshall and Jackie Robinson

and Black Panther, and he wasn’t even, you know, 40? IT: What are the older movies you said you’d been watching? GP: Well, at the very beginning of the containment, I watched “Creature From the Black Lagoon” (1954), which I don’t think I’d seen since I was little. IT: That’s a great one. GP: Just fantastic. At one point I was watching “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004) and some other horrible…not “28 Days Later” but I said to Jennifer, “This is a little too on the money for me.” And the other night we watched “Dog Day Afternoon” (1975). IT: Sidney Lumet.

CELEBRATING OUR DOCTORS • M ARCH 30, 2021

to all of our outstanding physicians! During these unprecedented times, our region is fortunate to have a highly skilled team of physicians taking extraordinary care of our communities. Please join us in saluting the physicians of Cayuga Medical Center, Cayuga Medical Associates and Schuyler Hospital.

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GP: Oh yeah, Sidney is the greatest. My wife always accuses me of this, and it’s true: I will watch the same thing over and over and over again, for pure comfort or joy. I did watch “Casablanca” (1942) over again, because I felt like during this fascist regime that we got rid of, and we’re still fighting here, it’s a brilliant movie that’s still romantic and funny and dangerous. And everybody who is in the cast was a hero of the resistance in one way or another. Paul Henreid and S. Z. Sakall and the actor who played the croupier, he had escaped the Nazis; it’s a pretty wild tale of everyone in the movie. IT: And it was just a studio programmer, but boy, it just rose to the top of everything. GP: Written by 50 million people. I don’t think anybody really knows who wrote the lines. It got so convoluted. And then they put a good director on it. IT: Michael Curtiz, who worked in every genre. GP: Right? Yeah, he did. I don’t think they spent a lot of time on it or anything. It was one of those great ones that also was Best Picture. It actually got acknowledged the year it came out. Everyone loved it, it’s really effective. It putts right along. I’ll put it over “Citizen Kane” as the great American movie. “Citizen Kane” is about corruption and rot and horror and greed and malice and being a misshapen youth. But “Casablanca” lays it right out on you: you either are a Nazi or you’re not a Nazi. Or you’re about to join. And yeah, it’s idealistic and romantic, but I think that’s part of it. They were showing a bunch of women’s pictures on TCM for a hot minute, and one of them was called “The Cave of the Yellow Dog” (2005). It’s a beautiful Mongolian picture about nomads, directed by a woman (Byambasuren Davaa). It’s a very simple story; they’re nomads and they live in a yurt, and they travel across the prairie, and it’s all the things that happen to them. And the one little girl finds this dog; she brings it back. It’s just beautiful, and lyrical: the clothes they wear, and the yurt that they live in, and their lifestyle. Little children ride horses, because you have to. They’re nomads. It’s kind of a silent movie, almost. And the other one we watched was “Salaam Bombay!” (1988), where the director (Mira Nair) went to Bombay and cast all these street children, and totally treated them, she said, like an acting company. If they were late, she fined them. [laughs] If they didn’t know their s**t, she’d whip this group of street children into actors. And it’s about being a homeless child in Bombay, and it’s extraordinary. Unbelievably moving. Almost all of the actors aren’t actors. It’s really realistic. I think you’d really like it. It’s really colorful, it’s moving as the devil. The guy who was the lead in the movie, he’s like a middle-aged man now. He has a regular blue-collar gig in Bombay, he didn’t become a movie star off the back of it, but he’s an unbelievably captivating child actor. Read the full interview at Ithaca.com.


Sports

Blue and Orange By Ste ve L aw re nc e

I

recall interviewing my buddy Sean Norman when he realized his ambition of umpiring collegiate softball after working high school games for 15 years. Sean was proud to be climbing the ladder, he was gearing up for the increased travel and he really enjoyed it. Then… well, you know. He involuntarily took a year off. Last weekend, Sean settled in behind the plate for a doubleheader at SUNY Geneseo, as the hosts took on the University of Rochester. I asked him how difficult it was to rise into the ranks of college umpiring, and he said, “Think of moving up — to the college game, and then up to Division I — in terms of the players. At any given game, there are 30 to 40 players and two umps. It can be tough, but it helps to have the right connections and the availability.” Sean said that while the COVID situation did not factor in last weekend, plans were in place just in case. “I was told that my partner’s test results were not in yet, so I might be doing both games behind the plate. He could work the bases and still socially distance, but the results came two hours prior to game time, so we switched after the first game, as planned.” Sean — who works full-time at GIAC — plans to continue to work high school games, and he said, “In fact, I am the local

Sean Norman working as an umpire. Photo: SUNY Geneseo/Keith Walters

assigner for our association this year, and it will work out well because high school softball will start around the time college ball ends.” Sounding like he didn’t take too many foul tips in his mask, Sean said, “I did some travel team games last season, but this was the first college assignment I had done in nearly two years.” He laughed and said, “It took a couple of innings to shake off the cobwebs, but you know, after all these years it’s like riding a bike. It felt great to be back.”

● ● ●

I never really had too much in common with Jim Boeheim. He was an excellent college basketball player. I was not. He became the head coach at an elite Division I university, and he has held onto that job for 45 years. My resume is not similar in that regard. He has made millions of dollars. I have not. Yet… Over the past couple of years, I have come to see Boeheim in a different light. He has three kids. So do I. All three kids

are at different schools. I can relate. He and his wife, Julie, try their damndest to get to as many games and activities as they can. I really miss those days. I especially enjoy seeing Jim and Julie at Cornell basketball games, especially when they leave a Syracuse game and go pedal to the metal down Route 81 to see Jimmy play for the Big Red. Jim looks like he enjoys settling into the seats and being a spectator and a dad. While I do not know what it is like to coach a team in front of 30,000 fired-up fans, I do know what it’s like to watch my kid experience the proverbial thrill of victory and agony of defeat. Either way, I have — and will — do what I can to be there. It is my newfound sense of camaraderie with the Boeheims that makes it so enjoyable to watch them share the national spotlight with their son, Buddy, who has shot the lights out at the NCAA tournament. In doing so, Buddy has silenced the inevitable whispers of “Well, of course he gets to play, he’s the coach’s son,” and the country now knows what Syracuse fans have known for several years, and Jim and Julie have known since Buddy was a little kid: He plays because he works as hard as anyone else, he is a great teammate, and his long-range shooting skill puts him in a very small and sought-after group of players. Like everyone else, I really have no idea how far the Orange will go in this year’s Big Dance. I hope they go all the way. As a basketball fan, I was always rather indifferent about the Orange and their collective story. As a dad, I am loving this journey.

Summer Camp Guide COMING APRIL 21! Calling all summer camp administrators! Make sure your program is included. Contact us today at: larry@ithacatimes.com or call 607-277-7000 ext. 1214 Ma r ch

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Stage

A painful release

Syracuse Stage’s heartfelt ‘Annapurna’ shows that moving forward can offer peace, love By Barbara Ad am s

“T

here are other Annapurnas in the lives of men,” Maurice Herzog wrote, referring to those life challenges that demand extraordinary risks. In June 1950, Herzog and fellow climber Louis Lachenal were the first to conquer the 8,000-meter massif in the Himalayas, and it cost them enormously –– amputated fingers and toes. A different but no less painful kind of loss faces us in more ordinary circumstances –– like marriage, for example. Playwright Sharr White, in his play “Annapurna,” now streaming from Syracuse Stage, exposes such loss in a forced encounter between a husband and wife, 20 years separated. Their part-acrimonious, part-humorous face-off is all the more striking for occurring within an intensely confined space: a run-down mobile home in the remote Rockies of western Colorado. Emma (Dawn Stern) arrives unannounced, after two decades, to the isolated mountain retreat of her ex-husband, Ulysses (Stephan Wolfert). A former university professor and poet, Ulysses is now eking out his diminished days with a howling dog and little money. He’s surprised and irritated at Emma’s arrival, especially given her absolute silence after having disappeared mysteriously with their 5-year-old son so many years earlier. Finding ourselves in the cramped space of the trailer, we’re as surprised as Ulysses (“Holy crap!” is his first response), and Emma does little to clarify why she’s come so far after so long, with disturbing bruises and a few suitcases. She in turn is upset that her ex, with shaggy grey hair and an unkempt beard, is wearing only a greasy apron and a backpack (to carry his oxygen

tank). (It’s hot and he’s frying sausage, he explains.) The sight of the two of them dodging each other in the trailer’s narrow straits is the first hint of levity, their barbed exchanges the second. And we quickly recognize that familiar truth: a deep connection, long severed, can often revive just where it left off, with all the understanding, blindness, and intensity of yesteryear. Ably directed by Syracuse artistic director Robert Hupp, this 90-minute drama pulls us in close to this couple’s endless verbal sparring. (The actors, interestingly, are married in real life and their own mobile home serves as the setting.) The video design by Kate Freer does wonders in the small space –– and also offers us occasional relief with stunning aerial shots over the sunlit mountains. Dave Bowman’s lighting, Jacqueline Herter’s sound, and Lux Haac’s costumes all contribute (and we’re as relieved as Emma when Ulysses eventually dons tattered shorts and shirt). As Emma unpacks groceries she’s brought and tries to tidy up, we gradually learn that another visitor is expected imminently: their son Sam, now a grad student. He’s furious with his mother and has made a romantic hero –– a superman, a saint –– of his mysteriously absent father. And finally we learn that Sam has recently discovered the hundreds of long letters Ulysses has written his son each week –– Emma’s mother having hidden them from both Emma and Sam. To tell more would be too much, as it’s a gradual unfolding of the past missteps,

Dawn Stern and Stephan Wolfert star in ‘Annapurna.’

the crumbled lives, that’s the stuff of this drama. The most remarkable –– and final ––reveal is why Emma disappeared with her son in the first place, leaving her alcoholic husband bereft and confused. Ulysses’ drinking destroyed their marriage and though he sobered up, he traded heavy smoking for booze. Unable to afford medical treatment, he’s now barely surviving. Wolfert’s rendering of this intelligent, talented man laid low by emphysema and poverty is stunning. One attack, where he’s desperate for his inhaler (hidden in the cookie jar to keep the roaches out of it), is unnervingly real. “This is a purgatory on earth for me,” Ulysses explains, in ironic literary mode. “All my sins have brought me here, and I must sit and ponder them before I’m allowed to die.” Stern’s Emma, who has dramatically just burned bridges with her current husband, has her own sins but

confronts Ulysses relentlessly: “People care about you and you punish them for it.” We can’t go back, but if we commit, we can go forward: There’s no making amends, but we can make peace. The final scene of this unforgettably acted play provides a painful release and recognition. Holding a box of jumbled paper scraps, Ulysses reads exquisite lines of his recent poetry and Emma strokes his hair –– great love can sometimes offer great forgiveness.

Syracuse Stage “Annapurna” by Sharr White, is directed by Robert Hupp. Streaming at 7:30 all evenings through April 4. Tickets at Syracusestage.org or box office 315-4433275. Barbara Adams, a regional arts journalist, teaches writing at Ithaca College

Enjoy a Taste of Ithaca Walk-ins welcome for glasses or bottles Reservations recommended for tastings Hours: Sunday–Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 607-272-WINE (9463) www.SixMileCreek.com 3.5 miles East of The Commons, 1551 Slaterville Road (Rt. 79) 32  T

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Virtual Music Concerts/Recitals Celtic Fiddle with Vi Wickam w/ Franklin Taggart | 8:00 PM, 3/26 Friday | A free live-streamed concert featuring fiddler Vi Wickam. Vi exudes energy, passion, humor, and musical mastery in every performance. Visit TCFA.live for details.

Stage Digital Syracuse Stage - Annapurna | All Day 3/25 Thursday | Annapurna is the name of a massif in the Himalaya mountain range and the Hindu goddess of nourishment. A carefully balanced blend of sharp comedy and surprisingly tender drama that draws inspiration from both meanings of its title. available as video-on-demand thru 4/4 at www. syracusestage.org. | $30+ ëspit fire, drink gasoline (repeat) í | 7:30 PM, 3/25 Thursday | An original solo performance created and presented by Levi Wilson í21, will be available to view anytime until 4/25. The event, which includes a Q&A with internationally acclaimed performance artist Tim Miller, is free and open to the public. Viewers should go to YouTube.com/CornellPMA to watch the event. Benchmark (Virtual Performance) | 7:30 PM, 3/26 Friday | Second show on 3/27 at 2PM. As her memories begin to vanish, Ashley writes about her life as a single high school teacher of history, while storing reminders of her daily life on her phone. The sudden loss of that phone leads to new connections and the possibility of a changed future. Reserve your free ticket at†schwartztickets.com. Masters of Movement: as told by we, us, them | 7:30 PM, 3/26 Friday | Second show 3/27 at 7:30PM. Virtual Performance. Local performers use the art of movement to tell the stories of iconic people of color. In this final installment†Billie Blackroot shares the story of Billie Holiday.†www. thecherry.org

Art SIX VISIONS | 12:00 PM, 3/25 Thursday | State of the Art Gallery, 120 W Martin Luther King, Jr./State Street, Ithaca | Paintings, photographs and digital art by Frances Fawcett, Susan Larkin, Daniel McPheeters, Diana Ozolins, Nancy Ridenour and David Watkins, Jr. thru March 28, 2021. Call 607-277-1626 during business hours or visit our web site at https://www. soagithaca.org Eurythmic Light: American Pastoral Landscapes | 12:00 PM, 3/27 Saturday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road, Ithaca | By Brian Keeler.† It brings together more than 30 landscape works that share Keeler’s theme of the passage of time and the changes in the seasons of life. Painting with Coffee with Vanessa Varjian | 12:00 PM, 3/30 Tuesday | Artist Vanessa Varjian will lead adult participants in the process of making natural wood stains from common kitchen ingredients. For more information, and to register to receive the Zoom link for participation, visit www. tcpl.org/events

Movies

AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, Wojnarowicz weaponized his work and waged war against the establishmentís indifference to the plague until his death from it in 1992 at the age of 37. | 3 day rental available for $12

at a global leader who approaches challenging and complex issues with tremendous humility, wisdom and generosity towards all. | 3 day rental available for $12 Virtual Cinemapolis: Kuessipan | All Day 3/26 Friday | Two girls grow up as best friends in a Quebec Innu community. As children, they promised each other to stick together no matter what. But as theyíre about to turn 17, their friendship is shaken when Mikuan falls for a white boy, and starts dreaming of leaving the reserve that†is now too small for her dreams. | 3 day rental available for $12 Woodstock: The Movie | 7:00 PM, 3/26 Friday | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | A look at the legendary three-day music celebration in August of 1969 that drew half-million people to an Upstate New York farm. Limit 50 People Advanced reservations must be purchased by calling: 607-749-4900 | $10 Virtual Cinemapolis: Wojnarowicz | All Day 3/27 Saturday | A documentary portrait of downtown New York City artist, writer, photographer, and activist David Wojnarowicz. As New York City became the epicenter of the

Finger Lakes Environmental Virtual Film Festival | All Day 3/29 Monday | This year, the festival has expanded to a three week, all-online event. Each week features seven amazing selections available to view at your leisure. Festival passes and individual tickets are available to purchase.†https://watch.eventive. org/fleff War Horse: National Theater Live | 1:00 PM, 3/31 Wednesday | Cinemapolis, 120 E Green St, Ithaca | Appointment screenings available daily at 1, 4, 7, & 10. Based on Michael Morpurgoís novel and adapted for the stage by Nick Stafford, War Horse takes audiences on an extraordinary journey from the fields of rural Devon to the trenches of First World War France. | $15

Special Events Fake News and False Images: Sight, Sound, and Credibility in Handelís Operas | 5:00 PM, 3/26 Friday | The Ithaca Music Forum presents Dr. Ayana Smith of Indiana University who will discuss excerpts from three operas by Handel that demonstrate how Baroque era audiences engaged with visual and sonic perception, and will explore how scientific debates

Cornell Virtual Cinema: By the Grace of God | All Day 3/26 Friday | Three men go public and seek justice against the priest who abused them as boys.†cinema.cornell.edu Cornell Virtual Cinema: Crutch | All Day 3/26 Friday | The film chronicles the gravity defying life of Bill Shannon, an internationally renowned artist, breakdancer and skate(board) punk - on crutches.†cinema.cornell. edu Cornell Virtual Cinema: The Hand (Extended Cut) | All Day 3/26 Friday | Originally conceived for the omnibus film†Eros, this film - presented in this retrospective for the first time in its extended cut - tells the tale of Zhang, a shy tailor’s assistant enraptured by a mysterious client, Miss Hua.†cinema. cornell.edu

about sight and sound shifted during Handelís career. Email psilberman@ ithaca.edu for Zoom registration link.

Books

Live Virtual Fire Ceremony: Connecting to the Elements | 7:00 PM, 3/26 Friday | At our live virtual fire ceremony this month, we will be exploring how to connect with the wonderful elements of our amazing planet† For zoom login info see events at: connecting2spirit.com or call (607) 229-5161. Free and open to all.

Gina Nutt in Conversation with Jeannie Vanasco | 7:00 PM, 3/25 Thursday | Gina Nutt is the author of the essay collection Night Rooms and the poetry collection Wilderness Champion. Jeannie Vanasco is the author of the memoirs Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was a Girl and The Glass Eye.†www.buffalostreetbooks.com

Racism in America Webinar: Racism and Health Care | 7:00 PM, 3/29 Monday | Moderated by Akilah Johnson, national reporter for The Washington Post, the webinar will feature four Cornell faculty experts discussing the ways inequality and racism impact the American medical system and how these disparities affect both economic well-being and the health of minority populations.†https://as.cornell.edu/ public-engagement/racism-inamerica

Ready for Kindergarten: It’s All About Words | 6:30 PM, 3/29 Monday | Six-week fun and family-oriented virtual series on learning ways to incorporate language and literacy into your family’s day. Books and materials provided. Geared for families with children 0-5 years. Families outside Dryden are welcome to join. Link will be provided after sign-up. Contact talktimedryden@gmail.com to get sign-up link.

The Many Lives of Stewart Park: Past and Present | 7:00 PM, 3/31 Wednesday | Cayuga Nation fishing village of Neodakheat. Swampy farmland. Competitive rowing oasis. Trolley and amusement park. Home of Wharton, Inc. silent movie studio. And today, one of the area’s most popular recreational and cultural hubs! A free online event. Registration required. Register at: https://livesofstewartpark.bpt.me

Kids

Notices Dougís Fish Fry in Jacksonville! | 11:00 AM, 3/24 Wednesday | Jacksonville Community United Methodist Church, 1869 Trumansburg Rd., Jacksonville | Pre-order by calling†607-753-9184 ext. 2. DOUG’S Famous Seafood & Sides plus homemade desserts available! Proceeds will benefit the Jacksonville Community United Methodist Church.

Giving has a wonderful ROI TOMPKINS FINANCIAL WINS 2O2O

Corporate Philanthropist of the year

Virtual Cinemapolis: Francesco | All Day 3/26 Friday | Features unprecedented access to His Holiness Pope Francis, providing an intimate look Ma r ch

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Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

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On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

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Heavy Equipment Operations and Diesel Repair Technology program is designed to offer high school students essential skills in the operation and repair of heavy equipment and heavy-duty diesel trucks using the latest techniques and diagnostic equipment. The teacher will meet the needs of diverse learners when providing both classroom and hands-on training through a partnership between OCM BOCES Cortlandville Campus and All County Collision & Repair. Candidates must possess or be willing to pursue NYS teaching certification. Applications will be accepted online until 04/09/2021 at olasjobs.org/central. For more information, please visit our website at ocmboces.org/cte EOE

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SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Speech Therapists (7/6/121– 8/13/21) Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs. org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

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SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff from July 6, 2021 to August 13, 2021 and set up day on July 1, 2021. Special Education Teachers Teachers of the Deaf Music Teachers Speech Therapists Teaching Assistants Teaching Assistant/Interpreters Physical Therapists Occupational Therapists Occupational Therapy Assistants Physical Therapy Assistants School Nurses Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www. olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding Summer School, please visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

SUMMER SCHOOL TEACHERS AND TEACHING ASSISTANTS

OCM BOCES is looking for experienced Teachers and Teaching Assistants. Looking for teachers certified in the following areas: English 7-12, Math 7 & 8, Science 7 & 8, Algebra I & II, Geometry, Earth Science, Living Environment, Chemistry, Social Studies 7-11, Participation in Government, Economics, Physical Education, Special Education 7-12, Library Media Specialist, Spanish, and Health Sites are at the following locations: Wellwood Middle School, Cortland Jr. Sr. High School, Cicero-North Syracuse High School, and Camillus Middle School. Register and apply at: olasjobs. org/central For more information, please contact Aislyn Spencer at 315-431-8502. EOE

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Virtual Mock Jurors Needed; Earn $50!

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Nurse; Southern Cayuga Central School seeks an LPN or RN to fill an immediate vacancy; FULL TIME or PART TIME; salary DOE; apply online using the Support Staff Application at southerncayuga. org/644, click on the application in the right hand column. SCCS EOE

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TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

and LED signs Manufacturer Direct plus installation services. Signs available on NYSID Fiberdyne Labs, Inc. Frankford, NY Sales@Fiberdyne.com; WWW. Fiberdyne.com. Call or Click today: 315895-8470.

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Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

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PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

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Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


SERVICES LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

MEDICATION

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SERVICES

SERVICES

OVER $10K IN DEBT?

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Are you behind paying your MORTGAGE? Denied a Loan Modification? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1-855-439-5853 Mon-Fri: 8:00 am to 8:00 pm; Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm (all times Pacific) (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

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REAL ESTATE

820/Computer

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1000/Real Estate for Sale

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff:

Speech Therapists (7/6/121– 8/13/21)

Physical Therapists (7/6/21 – 8/13/21)

through Onondaga and Cortland

through Onondaga and Cortland

County. Interested applicants apply

County.

online at: www.olasjobs.org/central.

apply online at:

For more information regarding this

org/central. For more information

Summer School posting, please visit

regarding this Summer School

our website at:

posting, please visit our website at:

Interested

applicants

www.olasjobs.

www.ocmboces.org EOE

Saving a Life EVERY 11 MINUTES

alone I’m never

Life Alert® is always here for me.

Help at Home Help On-the-Go ®

I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!

Homeowner Funding is now offering homeowners a chance to make necessary energy efficient home repairs and will be offering its services to families who: 1. 2.

ARE UNABLE TO PAY CASH FOR NECESSARY HOME REPAIRS. CANNOT AFFORD HIGH OR ADDITIONAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS. HAVE BEEN TURNED DOWN FOR FREE STATE OR GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS.

REPAIR TO INCLUDE: ROOFING • SIDING • WINDOWS • DOORS & MORE...

with

GPS !

Batteries Never Need Charging.

For a FREE brochure call:

1-800-404-9776

Heavy Equipment Operations and Diesel Repair Technology program is designed to offer high school students essential skills in the operation and repair of heavy equipment and heavy-duty diesel trucks using the latest techniques and diagnostic equipment. The teacher will meet the needs of diverse learners when providing both classroom and hands-on training through a partnership between OCM BOCES Cortlandville Campus and All County Collision & Repair. Candidates must possess or be willing to pursue NYS teaching certification. Applications will be accepted online until 04/09/2021 at olasjobs.org/central. For more information, please visit our website at ocmboces.org/cte EOE

NOTICE TO NEW YORK RESIDENTS

3.

One touch of a button sends help fast, 24/7.

Diesel Repair Technology Teacher

following summer school staff:

Sites are at various locations

EOE

and

OCM BOCES has the need for the

Sites are at various locations

www.ocmboces.org

Heavy Equipment Operations

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

Money Is Now Available Through Approved Lenders to Qualified Applicants* for Home Repairs No Money Down

up to

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$25,000

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CALL TODAY: (800) 736-9629 or visit NYImprovementFund.com

*Approved applications will have the work completed by a quality repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING

Ma r ch

2 4 – 30 ,

2 0 2 1

/ T h e

I t h a c a T i m e s   35


BackPage

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

DiBella’s Subs

“The Best Sub You’ve ever had!” $5.00 off any purchase at

A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups And More! For Adults 50+

DiBella’s Subs

Lifelong

with Community Cash Coupon 222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

119 West Court St., Ithaca 607-273-1511

tclifelong.org

Engaging, Inclusive Officiating... ... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved ones and friends.

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS Macintosh Consulting

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149

*Acupuncture Works*

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c) www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-272-0114 ANIMALS LAND & SEA

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

FILM PRODUCER SEEKS VOLUNTEERS TO HELP PRODUCE NO-BUDGET FILM(S) NOT LOOKING FOR SCRIPT, SCRIPT IDEAS, ETC. WORK TO BE DONE IS WAY BEFORE FILM SHOOT(S) ORGANIZED, RELIABLE, SERIOUS ONLY RICHARDPRESTON615@GMAIL.COM

CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

FREE BREAK CHECK Brakes feeling spongy? Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd 607-882-6816

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

FREE TAX PREP

for Seniors 60+ Individuals with Disabilities Single Incomes below $35,000 Families Incomes below $57,000 IRS trained and certified volunteers Taxes will be prepared virtually at

LIFELONG 607-279-6617

ITHACA NEWS

Delivered to your inbox every day Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

Call Larry at 607-277-7000 ext 214

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

PIANOS Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services No job too big or too small

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26 South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS. Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation Custom made & Manufactured by

SOUTH SENECA VINYL Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com

John’s Tailor Shop John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

YOUR CBD STORE The only dedicated retail store for all things CBD 308 E. Seneca Street * Ithaca 845-244-0868

Free Medical and Holistic Care!

Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254 521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org Oil Change $19.99 Includes oil & filter 4 tire rotation & brake check with Community Cash Coupon Ithaca Auto Service 607-220-9183

Your Go-To Oil Change Stop Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop

DRIVE WITH US! OPEN INTERVIEWS!! APRIL 6 & 8 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Call for Info: 607-274-2128

334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816

150 Bostwick Road

Negotiated Wage and Health Benefits | NYS Retirement Pension Program | CDL/Paid Training | Equal Opportunity Employer ICSD is committed to equity,inclusion, and building a diverse staff. We strongly encourage applications from candidates of color. I C S D Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e r v i c e s 36  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/ Mar ch

24–30 ,

2 0 2 1

Diversity Enriches our workplace


Town & Country

Classifieds In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

AUTOMOTIVE 100/Automotive

| 59,200 Readers

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

BUY SELL TRADE

EMPLOYMENT

FREE

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Blue leather couch and matching recliner. Downtown Ithaca. Call 277-4136.

SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the

EMPLOYMENT SUMMER SCHOOL TEACHERS AND TEACHING ASSISTANTS

OCM BOCES is looking for experienced Teachers and Teaching Assistants. Looking for teachers certified in the following areas: English 7-12, Math 7 & 8, Science 7 & 8, Algebra I & II, Geometry, Earth Science, Living Environment, Chemistry, Social Studies 7-11, Participation in Government, Economics, Physical Education, Special Education 7-12, Library Media Specialist, Spanish, and Health Sites are at the following locations: Wellwood Middle School, Cortland Jr. Sr. High School, Cicero-North Syracuse High School, and Camillus Middle School. Register and apply at: olasjobs. org/central For more information, please contact Aislyn Spencer at 315-431-8502. EOE

430/General

following summer school staff: Physical

Therapists (7/6/21 – 8/13/21) Sites are

CASH FOR CARS!

We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS

Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY

Receive the maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. FAST FREE PICKUP 855-978-0215 (AAN CAN)

Drive out Breast Cancer:

Donate a car today! The benefits of donating your car or boat: Fast Free Pick-up - 24hr Response Tax Deduction - Easy To Do! Call 24/7: 855-905-4755. (NYSCAN)

110/Automotive Services AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH!

Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-5691909. (AAN CAN)

at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested ap-

400/Employment Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 214.

Heavy Equipment Operations Diesel Repair Technology Teacher

Heavy Equipment Operations and Diesel Repair Technology program is designed to offer high school students essential skills in the operation and repair of heavy equipment and heavy-duty diesel trucks using the latest techniques and diagnostic equipment. The teacher will meet the needs of diverse learners when providing both classroom and hands-on training through a partnership between OCM BOCES Cortlandville Campus and All County Collision & Repair. Candidates must possess or be willing to pursue NYS teaching certification. Applications will be accepted online until 04/09/2021 at olasjobs.org/central. For more information, please visit our website at ocmboces.org/cte EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the following summer school staff: Speech Therapists (7/6/121– 8/13/21) Sites are at various locations through Onondaga and Cortland County. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs. org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

org/central. For more information regarding this Summer School posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

425/Education ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS!

Begin a new career and earn your De-

gree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical

NURSE POSITION

Nurse; Southern Cayuga Central School

800/Services

seeks an LPN or RN to fill an immediate vacancy; FULL TIME or PART TIME;

salary DOE; apply online using the Sup-

port Staff Application at southerncayuga. org/644, click on the application in the right hand column. SCCS EOE

SPECIAL EDUCATION SUMMER SCHOOL

OCM BOCES has the need for the fol-

lowing summer school staff from July 6,

2021 to August 13, 2021 and set up day on July 1, 2021.

HEARING AIDS!!

Buy one/get one Free! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45-day money back guarantee! 1-833-585-1117. (AAN-CAN)

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE!

Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844-712-6153! (M-F 8am-8pm Central) (AAN CAN)

Special Education Teachers Teachers of the Deaf Music Teachers

Speech Therapists

Teaching Assistants

Teaching Assistant/Interpreters Physical Therapists

Occupational Therapists

Sites are at various locations through

Onondaga and Cortland County. Inter-

ested applicants apply online at: www. olasjobs.org/central.

For more information regarding Summer

School, please visit our website at: www. ocmboces.org EOE

BANKRUPTCY

No Contact Virtual. Ch. 7 Bankruptcy $500 Legal Fee. Must have e-mail access. Also Ch. 11 Business Ch. 12 Farm & Ch. 13 Foreclosure. Auto Accident Injury too. Call/text Mark Gugino. 144 Bald Hill, Danby 607-207-0888; bk@ twcny.rr.com

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS

EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-2421100. (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

DISH TV

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Do you owe over $10,000

to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

FIBER OPTIC PRODUCTS

CAN)

School Nurses

ithaca.com/classifieds

Participate as a mock juror in an online Cornell Law School jury research project; earn $50; 3-4 hours. Weekend times available. Email legaldecisionlab@gmail.com or call (607) 288-3248 for details!

To learn more, call 855-541-6634. (AAN

Physical Therapy Assistants

Your Ad

Virtual Mock Jurors Needed; Earn $50!

training available for Veterans & families!

Occupational Therapy Assistants

200/Buy / Sell / Trade DISH TV

plicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.

JOB OPPORTUNITY:

$18.50 P/H NYC $16 P/H LI Up to $13.50 P/H UPSTATE NY CDPAP Caregiver Hourly Pay Rate! Under NYS CDPAP Medicaid program you can hire your family or friends for your care. Phone: 347-713-3553 (NYSCAN)

SERVICES

TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

and LED signs Manufacturer Direct plus installation services. Signs available on NYSID Fiberdyne Labs, Inc. Frankford, NY Sales@Fiberdyne.com; WWW. Fiberdyne.com. Call or Click today: 315895-8470.

SERVICES SAVE YOUR HOME!

Are you behind paying your MORTGAGE? Denied a Loan Modification? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1-855-439-5853 Mon-Fri: 8:00 am to 8:00 pm; Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm (all times Pacific) (AAN CAN)

Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment?

New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

855/Misc. BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

LET US HELP!

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

OVER $10K IN DEBT?

Be debt free in 24-48 months. Pay a fraction of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877-590-1202. (AAN CAN)

1000/Real Estate for Sale OWN LAND IN NEW YORK

Our hunters will Pay Top $$$ to lease your land. Call now for free info packet 1-866-309-1507. www.BaseCampLeasing.com/Ref#NY11721 (NYSCAN)

1010/Commercial MARYLAND

Best selection of full/partial week rentals. FREE Color Brochure. Holiday Real Estate, Inc. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. $50 discount - new rentals. Code: “ToTheBeach2021”. (Expires: 2021-06-01) NYSCAN

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March 24, 2021  

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