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F R E E J a n u a r y 2 0 , 2 0 2 1 / Vo lume X L I , N umb e r 2 2 / O u r 47 t h Ye a r 

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

ZOOM TOWN Can Ithaca attract the new crowd of restless remote workers?

DR. BROWN RESIGNS

COMMUNITY EFFORT

APPEAL DENIED

ICSD Superintendent Local response helps Appellate Court rules done Feb. 1. Boost GreenStar On Nagee Green case PAGE 5

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GRAMMY

MURDER &

A Q&A with Saxophonist Paul Winter

Local author explores Finger Lakes’ dark past

PAGE 13

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WINNER

MAYHEM


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Newsline

VOL.XLI / NO. 22 / January 20, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

Zoom Town��������������������������������������� 8 Can Ithaca attract the new crowd of restless remote workers?

COVID

Q&A: Paul Winter������������������������ 13

The ins and outs of getting a COVID vaccine Eligibility The current list of eligible individuals includes high-risk hospital staff, education workers, public safety, and people ages 65 and over. For a full list, visit the Tompkins County Health Department’s website. If you have questions about your eligibility, email COVID19vaccines@tompkins-co.org. If you don’t use email, you can call 2-1-1. Registration The Health Department sends out emails, Tweets, robo-calls and text alerts when new vaccination clinics are announced. At that time, you can go online and register for an appointment at https://apps3.health.ny.gov/ doh2/applinks/cdmspr/2/ counties?OpID=50501047. Kinney Drugs is also offering vaccinations for those ages 65+ when they have supply. While they are currently booked, keep an eye on their website for additional dates. Appointments are required without exception. If you are unable to register online, you can have someone else do it for you. For our older residents, you can call the Tompkins County Office for the Aging at (607) 274-5482 during business hours, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Appointment When you show up to your appointment, bring a government issued photo ID and your insurance card if you have one. You must also bring your proof of eligibility — if you’re eligible due to age an ID with a birth date on it is enough. If you are eligible due to your job, bring either a work ID badge with your title on it, a letter from your employer, a paystub or an active NYS-issued license.

A sit-down with a 7-time Grammy winner

NE W S & OPINION Newsline��������������������������������������������������3-7 Sports�������������������������������������������������������� 12

ART S & E N T E RTAINME N T Business

GreenStar leans on community support through pandemic

A

fter months of sustained cash loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic, GreenStar general manager Brandon Kane is feeling a bit more hopeful. “Things are better than anticipated due to the public’s response,” he said. “Now it’s all about keeping the momentum up.” At the beginning of December, GreenStar put out a press release detailing its financial struggles. At the time, they stated they were losing, on average, $55,000 per week for the past six months, and were forced to furlough 23 employees. The satellite stores in Collegetown and DeWitt Mall are also struggling, with sales down by 50% as students and the workforce have been largely absent; the DeWitt Mall location was closed from April until September. However, since informing the public of the situation at

the store, Kane said members and customers showed up in droves to shop in-store and through Instacart; people also bought more than $130,000 in GreenStar gift cards. Total sales went from $400,000 below 2019 in October, to $88,000 over 2019 by the end of the year. Despite the recent jump in sales, Kane said it hasn’t been easy. The store moved into its larger location on Cascadilla Street in May — a move that came at a difficult time but has proved to be essential. Without the extra space to carry more stock (and safely allow more people), Kane isn’t sure the store would have survived. However, the new store hasn’t been able to accomplish all the plans the co-op had for it. The dining area and children’s area is blocked off with tape, and empty metal carts normally used for the hot and cold bar sit idly inside. The deli

section is closed, and the action bar is currently dormant. “We had a whole plan and design for the store,” Kane said. “It was intended to be a community area.” Those plans came to a screeching halt in March, complicated by the fact the store was in the midst of a move. Plastic shields went up at cashier stations, cleaning staff doubled, the bulk food section closed and masks quickly became the norm. And as the pandemic has raged on and GreenStar has struggled, Kane said it’s important to make sure the employees are taken care of to keep morale high. “Employees were getting $2-$4 extra an hour on top of their normal hourly pay until November when we moved to a living wage,” Kane said. “That has cost us more than $500,000.” In fact, personnel is by far the biggest cost that GreenStar has shouldered during the pandemic. Between hazard pay, living wage and more cleaning crew, it’s been expensive, Kane said. “The grocery business is only as profitable as they are continued on page 7

T a k e

▶  No vaccines - New York State did not allocate doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to the Tompkins County Health Department for the week of Jan. 18. A limited number of doses are being delivered to local pharmacies; their booking processes are done directly through the pharmacies. A reduced supply of vaccine was

N o t e

delivered to the state from the federal government, and the state has redirected a significant number of doses to the state-run mass vaccination sites, including those near Binghamton and Syracuse. The Health Department expects more doses to be allocated to the county during the week of Jan. 25, and the Health Department continues to

work with the state planning for future allocations. This limited availability does not impact those who have already registered for their second dose of the vaccine. The Health Department said they will continue to communicate more information as it becomes available through press releases, their website, robocalls, and other methods.

Ja n ua ry

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Film������������������������������������������������������������� 15 Books����������������������������������������������������������16 TimesTable������������������������������������������������17 Classifieds������������������������������������������18-20 Cover: Zoom Town view of Ithaca Design: Marshall Hopkins

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L i s a B i n g a m a n , A cc o u n t R ep r ese n ta t i v e , x 218 l i s a @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m T o n i C r o u ch , x 211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Sharon Davis, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

ENFIELD

PHOTOGRAPHER Amid acrimony, Enfield approves new supervisor By C a se y Mar tin

YOU’RE MOVING INTO THE WHITE HOUSE THIS WEEK. WHAT’S ONE LUXURY ITEM YOU’D REQUEST TO BE THERE WHEN YOU ARRIVE?

“John Prine Albums, and my record player.” -Travis B.

Enfield Town Hall

A

t a special meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 12, the Enfield Town Board managed to appoint Acting Supervisor Stephanie Redmond as town supervisor after more than two-and-a-half hours of arguing, trading insults, failing to listen to one another, and making the same accusations over and over. The meeting, chaired by Redmond, was conducted via Zoom, and there were 34 participants logged on, including two former town supervisors, Ann Rider and Beth McGee. Because Councilperson Michael Miles resigned on Jan. 9, all three remaining board members had to vote in favor of appointing Redmond for the motion to pass. Redmond, a former elected councilperson, is an appointed deputy supervisor, and could not vote.

“Sheepskin Slippers!” -Jessica L.

“Stress-relieving hot tub.” Thomas B.

Councilperson Robert Lynch used this fact to his advantage and attempted to exact promises out of everyone in the meeting before he would agree to vote at all. After a lengthy privilege of the floor session, during which anyone in attendance has three minutes to speak, former supervisor Beth McGee and newly appointed member James Ricks supported Redmond’s appointment. Town Clerk Ellen Woods opposed the appointment because Redmond had accused her of fraud. Lynch suggested that Redmond’s appointment be put off until the Feb. 10 meeting. Lynch then read Miles’ resignation letter into the record. Miles said he resigned because of the “toxic nature” of the town’s government. “I thought simple détente was possible,”

COURTS

Appeal denied in Nagee Green case

“A good, strong bidet.”

D

-Wyatt M.

“yeah I don’t think I’d really want to move into the White House right now…” -Michelle L.

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Ithac a Times

istrict Attorney Matthew Van Houten announced today that the appeal filed by Nagee Green has been denied in its entirety. Green, now 27 years old, was convicted in 2017 by a Tompkins County jury of murder in the second degree for the 2016 homicide of Ithaca College student Anthony Nazaire, and assault in the second degree for the stabbing

/January

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of Raheim Williams, a second Ithaca College student. County Court Judge John C. Rowley sentenced Green to a term of 20 years in state prison. The Appellate Division of the New York State Supreme Court, Third Judicial Department, issued an 11-page decision today, denying Green’s appeal and affirming his convictions. Deputy District Attorney

he wrote, “I was wrong.” Redmond read an email from a resident who was concerned that, as of Jan. 7, she had not received her tax bill. Redmond said that the county assessor received similar calls from other Enfield residents. She used this opportunity to repeat her claim from a previous meeting that Woods’ change to the budget was illegal and had also delayed sending out the bills. Woods wished to respond to Redmond’s accusation, but it required a unanimous vote of the board to allow her to speak. Councilperson Virgina Bryant refused and instead read her motion to appoint Redmond as town supervisor. The motion was seconded by Ricks, but he said he would like to hear from Woods. Bryant agreed to do so. Woods explained that the tax bills were late because it was the first time she had ever sent them out and there was a learning curve. The town does not have a credit card, and she did not know where to get the money to put stamps on the bills. Former town clerk Alice Linton helped her find 1,400 stamps. While proofing the budget, Woods said she noticed that personal protective gear for the fire department appeared to be miscoded. She sought the advice of Tompkins County Assessor Jay Franklin and the town’s attorney Guy Krogh, who both thought it should come from the general fund, and she re-coded the line item without consulting the town board. “This was legitimately a mistake,” said Woods, “but it is also a mistake to accuse me of fraud.” She said earlier that day

she had corrected another fiscal error made by someone else and did not accuse anyone of fraud; she just fixed it. She also apologized to residents for the lateness of the tax bills. The board returned to the subject of Redmond’s appointment. Lynch asked the board why Redmond had to be appointed at his meeting. “What’s the urgency? We’re getting the job done. Bills are being paid,” he said. “She’s drawing the $24,000 supervisor salary.” During the ensuing discussion Lynch made many attempts to delay the vote, Ricks made many attempts to get everyone to rise above personal grievances, and Bryant attempted only to get her motion passed. Redmond, Woods, and Lynch went over old ground repeatedly. Lynch first threatened to abstain from voting, which would stop the process. Bryant and Ricks said they would resign if he abstained. Lynch responded by blaming them for forcing his hand. He then claimed there was “political maneuvering by people behind the scenes.” An impatient Ricks said he was obviously referring to McGee and told Lynch he was blocking Redmond’s appointment because he wanted to be supervisor himself. Lynch then said he would vote in favor of Redmond if she and Woods agreed to go to a mediator to settle their differences. Redmond agreed, but asked Woods to stop trashing her on social media. Woods insisted that as a citizen that was her right. Lynch then announced that

Andrew Bonavia wrote the brief and argued the case before the panel of justices. Paul Connolly of Albany, New York represented Green in connection with the appeal. Van Houten stated “This decision represents the final product of the extensive judicial review of the two trials of Nagee Green. Every legal challenge raised by the defendant was considered by the appellate court and found to be without merit. Nagee Green received two fair trials and was proven beyond a reasonable doubt to have committed the murder of

Anthony Nazaire. While nothing can bring Anthony back, this decision provides a measure of justice for his family.” Green has also been the subject of many calls from justice from the Ithaca community, particularly during protests against police this summer. Protesters sent a letter to the Ithaca Police Department asking for a review of the case over allegations that a police officer’s prior perjury was not disclosed to the defense team. That claim was not cited in the 11-page decision.

continued on page 7

-Ta n n e r H a r d i n g


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

SCHOOLS

Allegations emerge publicly after ICSD Superintendent resigns

Dr. Luvelle Brown

D

r. Luvelle Brown resigned from his position as Superintendent of Ithaca City School District at a meeting on Jan. 12. His resignation was accepted by the school board and is effective Feb. 1. Brown has taken a job as head of equity, diversity and inclusion for Discovery Education, a global education company. The resignation comes shortly after a group of advocates wrote to Commissioner Betty Rosa of the New York State Department of Education regarding complaints against Brown stemming from a contentious divorce. The letter opens with the following: "We write in response to the grave allegations regarding longstanding and grossly inappropriate use of public office and authority by the Superintendent of the Ithaca City School District (ICSD), Dr. Luvelle Brown, in his efforts to wage personal war against his former spouse and the mother of their two children, Ms. Anjanette Brown, by undermining her rights, silencing and humiliating her and destroying her reputation; as well as allegations of recurrent unethical conflicts of interest, and other areas of professional misconduct, such as the misuse of school and district staff, resources and facilities to

flout and evade court orders in a manner that has negatively affected the rights, protections and success of the children in the school system and the morale, behavior and work of teachers and staff. “We also write with concern about the refusal of the ICSD Board of Education to investigate the many points and material evidences provided in the substantive petition submitted by Ms. Anjanette Brown on November 22nd, 2020. In her meticulously detailed document, she provides numerous instances of unacceptable experiences of discriminatory treatment, marginalization, silencing, gaslighting and isolation she had suffered, of specific state, federal and school district policies violations, in all, she submits 200 pages of emails, reports, and even legal depositions that back up her accounts of abuse of power in the district and its deeply negative impact on her children’s educational development and wellbeing, leaving them with serious deficits in the customary benchmark reports. " The lengthy document goes on to include numerous other allegations against Brown on behalf of his ex-wife, Anjanette Brown. Like the letter mentions, the school board did receive a copy of Anjanette's complaints and allegations

against Luvelle, ICSD Board of Education Vice President Sean Eversley Bradwell confirmed. Bradwell said the board did conduct an investigation into the claims. "We found many of the claims to be without merit and others to be outside of the purview of school district business," he said. "It was clear to us that much of what was discussed was a long-running separation and custody dispute." He added that this had been going on over several years, and it wasn't the first time the board had received allegations from Anjanette. However Anjanette and Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, an advocate for women and children who serves on the Tompkins County Human Rights Commission, reject Anjanette’s portrayal as a vengeful ex-wife, and state that the Board of Education is unable to conduct an unbiased investigation into Anjanette’s claims. “In view of the relationship that several board members have with my children’s father where they socialize together, attend parties together, travel to football games together, it is clear that the Board of Education cannot serve as an objective body in an investigative scenario,” Anjanette wrote. “In addition, its refusal to address my well documented allegations of serious abuse of office indicates that the Board needs to be reformed with community members who are actually willing to protect the children of the Ithaca City School District regardless of who their parents might be.” Soyinka-Airewele wrote that she had written to the principal of Northeast Elementary School, the Commissioner of Social Services and (now former) Assemblyperson Barbara Lifton regarding Anjanette’s allegations, and though the conversations seemed productive, they were halted by the COVID-19 pandemic. She then arranged a meeting with Robert Ainslie, the president of the school board, in mid-October. “Sadly, those measures were countered by a tightening web of retaliative legal measures designed to break, bankrupt and silence Ms. Brown,” she said. According to Anjanette and Soyinka-Airewele, when the

board responded to Anjanette’s request for an investigation in late fall, they told her the matter was a family dispute between her and her ex-husband and outside of the board’s purview. They also urged her to address the issues “to the court that issued the order which has the authority to enforce the order.” For the full letter, visit https://peyibomi. live/2021/01/15/open-jointstatement-in-response-to-theicsd-board-of-education-andboard-vice-president-dr-eversley-bradwell/. For the school board’s part, Bradwell categorically denied that the allegations had anything to do with Luvelle's decision to resign. Instead, he pointed to a reevaluation of priorities after the death of Luvelle's mother and the fact that he had served 10 years in the New York State retirement system. "I think that pushed him to be more reflective about what he wants his life to include," Bradwell said. "I think it was the right opportunity at the right time." The letter detailing the allegations was sent to the Commissioner of the Board of Education on Jan. 5. "I'm quite certain the state will not look at this because there's nothing to look at, honestly," he said. "The board has completed its investigation and I'm sure there will be a receipt from the commissioner's office." The letter to the state specifically asked them to support Anjanette's "appeal for justice in this matter and to conduct a thorough, objective and transparent investigation with due protection for whistleblowers. Ms. Brown is not asking for intervention with personal matters." The letter also requests the state investigates "the ways ICSD denied her son provisions under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act," and that it holds the "Superintendent and the Ithaca City School District accountable to uphold its unified Code of Conduct and take the ICSD Board of Education to task for refusing to uphold Article 5300.20: Rights and Expectations of Essential Partners."

Yay! More Corporate Shopping! The signs are up at Trader Joe’s and Old Navy and Trader Joe’s has also added a “now hiring” sign. We can imagine the folks on the “Ithaca Needs a Trader Joe’s” Facebook page are pretty thrilled. Vaccine Hunt The process to get a vaccine has been increasingly frustrating as the dosage allotment has decreased and appointments have been snatched up quickly. Have patience and keep an eye on Ithaca.com and the Health Department’s website for the latest info.

HEARD&SEEN Gunfire IPD officers responded to a parking lot on W State St after hearing gunshots. They found two people injured. If you have any info, give the police station a call. Home Invasion Two people managed to escape out a window and flee to the police station after armed robbers forced their way into a residence. Again, if you have any information, let the police know.

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Which animal would you like to see on the commons next?

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

-Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

Ja n ua ry

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If the 2024 election were held today I’d vote for...

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Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

SURROUNDED BY REALITY

Dr. Lucia Jander: COVID, gratitude, fatigue and hope M

23andUs D

By M a rjor i e Z . O l d s any of us have turned to Dr. Lucia Jander, whom we know from her primary care medical practice with Ann and John Costello. Others met Dr. Jander through her work in our local nursing homes, these days beset by COVID-19: “So many staff members, paid little, provide difficult dangerous care, day after day, and through the nights in the trenches, with such compassion and goodwill. And administrators who creatively stretch their inadequate funding stream to care for the most vulnerable population during the pandemic.” For those with beloved family and friends seeking end-of-life care, they admire Lucia for her work as a hospice physician, now medical director, in this region’s renowned Hospicare. Every one of us will someday reach our final stage of life; patients and their families find themselves in uncharted waters whenever we reach that point. Today, Dr. Jander, juggling four children, a private practice and Hospicare concerns — all affected by COVID-19 — shares her guidance on how we can best weather the pandemic:

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By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r ear United States of America: Thank you for your submission of genetic material to 23andMe's state-ofthe-art Ancestry Analysis. 23andMe's Ancestry Composition report is a powerful and thoroughly-tested system for analyzing ancestry based on DNA, and we believe it sets a standard for rigor in the genetic ancestry industry. Your Ancestry Composition report shows the percentage of your DNA that comes from each of 50 populations. We calculate your Ancestry Composition by comparing your genome to those of over 330,000 people with known ancestry. When a segment of your DNA closely matches the DNA from one of the 50 populations, we assign that ancestry to the corresponding segment of your DNA. We calculate the ancestry for individual segments of your genome separately, then add them together to compute your overall ancestry composition.

Dr. Lucia Jander

“We are living in difficult times. What an understatement! Our lives have been upended, livelihoods shattered, about 400,000 Americans have died. This is more than all the U.S. war casualties since WWI whom we celebrate on Veterans’ Day. We are becoming numb

/January

continued on page 7

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If you have questions, please post in the 23andMe Community or contact Customer Care. Your results are as follows: Johnny Appleseed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Evel Knievel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Chief Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Jim Morrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Harriet Tubman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Belle Delphine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% John Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Studs Terkel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Kanye West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% That QAnon douche with the Loyal Order of Water Buffalo Headgear in the Capitol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Walt Whitman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Daniel Boone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Svante Myrick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Dwight Shrute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Cornplanter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Huey Long. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Elliot Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% P.T. Barnum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Anthony Fauci. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Sonia Sotomayor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Josh Hawley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% George Armstrong Custer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Randy Quaid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Stevie Budd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Rocky Balboa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Susan B. Anthony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Mario Mendoza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Billie Jean King. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% David Duke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Olivia Jade Giannulli. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Michelle Obama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Charles Ponzi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Megan Rapinoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Carl Sagan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Foghorn Leghorn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Sidney Bechet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Granny Clampett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% James Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Sarah Sanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Lance Armstrong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Willa Cather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Squeaky Fromme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Emma Goldman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% General Jack D. Ripper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Mindy Kaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Sacagawea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Zelda Fitzgerald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Emily Dickinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Elizabeth Holmes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100%


COMMUNITYCONNECTIONS Contin u ed From Page 6

to the COVID casualties. We need to keep reminding ourselves that behind the numbers are real people — parents, siblings, friends. One in 860 Americans has died of covid in the past 10 months — most of us will know someone personally dying of COVID before the pandemic is controlled. “In my professional life, I encounter people in crisis at Hospicare who are facing end-of-life issues. Over the course of the past several months, Hospicare has organized webinars about planning for death and dying, medical decisions, estate, financial and funeral planning. I was surprised how well-attended these events were. I think there is a bigger issue here — the pandemic has forced us to think about our own mortality in a much more concrete way. This can be scary though liberating — we can fear less what we can name and process. Hospicare is there for you when you need us. We are here to help in any way we can. “What is different now is we are all living in a mass existential crisis. We are asking ourselves, when and how can we get our lives back? We fear illness for ourselves or loved ones, we are uncertain about the future, we have lost control over many aspects of our lives — social connections, jobs, relationships. We fear for our kids’ social and emotional development, many of our elders have been sequestered and lonely for months now. Our country is facing major social and economic problems. “Gratitude: Ithaca has done much better than many other places controlling covid. There are many unsung heroes behind the scenes making this happen — contact tracers, sampling staff, vaccinators, lab personnel, staff in hospital, long-

term care and homecare. Many people work very long hours to cover exponential workload. Our community needs to express gratitude to Dr. Stallone and Dr. Evelyn at the helm of the Cayuga Medical Center management team; Dr. Plocharczyk heading the testing efforts, Dr. Klepack and Mr. Kruppa at our Health Department, Dr. Koretzky heading the Cornell COVID team--just to name a few of our leaders. There are scores of others! Covid has generated so much cooperation and goodwill within the medical community — we are doing our best for the benefit of all. “Fatigue: We are all tired — sick and tired of social distancing and restrictions. I want to remind us that the incidence of the disease is the highest now since the beginning of the ordeal. The leading cause of transmission is small group gatherings without masks. A highly transmissible mutation of the virus has been detected here. Fifty percent of transmission is from asymptomatic people. We have done so well for so long — please bear with it, wear your masks, socially distance, wash hands. This pandemic will be a defining event in our lives. I hope we make the best of it. “Hope: As we struggle through the coldest, darkest time of year, there is bright light on the horizon — the vaccine! One by one we may have the opportunity that people all across the globe are seeking: People are very sick and dying in every part of the world while the vaccines are being rolled out. People have been working around the clock to make safe, effective vaccines available ASAP. We have all heard naysayers, but if we follow the science, when it is our turn, we will grab the chance to protect ourselves, and others we come in contact with, especially those we love. The vaccine will reduce the spread of this deadly disease. When it is your turn to have this life-saving vaccine, ‘Step Up and Get Vaccinated!”

THE TALK AT

YOUR LETTERS To Senators Schumer and Gillibrand: Let’s put it plainly. I am a kid. I don’t have the body, mind, and experiences of an adult. But all of you adults reading this were once children. Children are the adults of the future, and when it comes to climate change, we’re talking about the future. We’ve seen the studies. Icebergs are melting, waters are rising. It feels like a video game, to be honest. So we need to build a ladder out of the hole we’ve dug for ourselves. But not only do we need solutions, we need ones that everyone can agree on. Why can’t just one party push through their ideas? One reason is that our nation is already divided -- one-sided solutions would only make things worse. Something that all people have in common is we share the same Earth. And it’s our responsibility to take care of it, together. So I was very happy to find a bipartisan bill for climate change. Again, I’m a kid, but here’s what I understand of this bill: It’s called the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act and was created by Republicans and Democrats in Congress. Different kinds of people like it locally, too. How does it work? It’s a rising fee on fuel companies. The fee starts low so it won’t hurt companies at first. The government then sends all the collected fees to Americans equally every month by check, to protect folks from rising prices. Studies say that most people in our county

and nation would get more money than they would lose. And the bill is meant for everyone to like, no matter your party: it won’t grow the government. It encourages businesses to innovate cleaner products. It protects low- and middle- income people. And it helps the climate. According to local climate activists, “The world’s top climate scientists, the IPCC, say we have 12 years to cut our global carbon pollution in half; and that one necessary way to do that is charging fuel companies for their pollution. Economists like this idea because it’s effective, quick and cheap. Columbia University experts agree that charging companies for carbon pollution is wise, for the climate and economy; and according to their research, this bill alone could do the lion’s share of what’s needed to reduce U.S. carbon pollution.” Along with being a child, I’m also a proud Democrat. But the sharp divide between Republicans and Democrats, the anger and lies separating this country, they scare me. We are the United States, are we not? And when I see leaders and their followers arguing about which side alone is right, I feel betrayed. To quote George Washington, “Are these the men with which I am to defend America?” With a new president in office, this is the perfect time to turn over a new leaf. Please help make America united again, starting with a bipartisan bill to help the climate and the country. -Julia Kleinberg, student at Boynton Middle School Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

ENFIELD ACROMONY Contin u ed From Page 7

GREEN STAR Contin u ed From Page 3

able to keep personnel costs down,” he said. “But it’s difficult to do that when you’re taking care of your employees.” The store did receive a PPP loan in the first round of CARES Act relief, but Kane said they aren’t eligible for the second round as of right now. Currently, the qualifier is that the store must be bringing in 25% less revenue. Kane said because of the bigger store, they aren’t bringing in 25% less revenue, but are definitely bringing in more than 25% less profit. However, he said there is still a chance that eligibility rule could change. As vaccine rollout continues, Kane said he’s hopeful that things will be approaching a more stable place by summertime and sections of the store will be able to

start opening up over the next few months. “We’re hoping by June there will be a critical mass of vaccines, plus better weather, an increase in tourism, and students returning at the end of the summer,” he said. “We could see some return to normal, revenue will increase, and we can open the hot and cold bar.” Despite a tumultuous 2020, Kane is feeling better about the future. “I have no doubt GreenStar can operate successfully,” he said. “The public turnout has been phenomenal. We’re very hopeful.” You can support GreenStar by shopping there in person or via Instacart for curbside pick-up or delivery. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

he was a “victim of political extortion” and that Ricks and Bryant were holding a gun to his head by threatening to resign. He was being forced to either vote against his conscience or “ruin my town.” Because Miles’s seat was still vacant, if Ricks and Bryant resigned, town government would not function. Lynch then accused Redmond of planning to immediately install McGee as deputy supervisor. Redmond dismissed this as absurd because McGee wanted no part of town government now. Redmond said she would go through the normal hiring process to find a deputy. Redmond pointed out the inefficiencies associated with being an acting supervisor as a reason for her appointment. She said no one in town, including Lynch, understands the finances well enough to do the job. She noted that she was only able to fulfill the supervisor’s duties because McGee had taken the time to train her. She complained repeatedly about Lynch Ja n ua ry

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and Woods’s use of social media to trash her job performance. She said several times that in order to protect the town, the supervisor must make sure that state laws were upheld. Ricks tried over and over to get Redmond, Lynch, and Woods to move past their differences and conduct the business of the town. As they continued to bicker, he openly entertained the idea of giving up his position on the board. Bryant seemed to ignore much of the back and forth and tried to bring the appointment to a vote. In a final bid to get his way before he voted, Lynch wanted Ricks and Bryant to promise to choose former supervisor Ann Rider to fill Miles’s seat. Bryant refused to make such a promise until Lynch voted for Redmond Lynch apologized to Woods and voted for Redmond. -Bill Chaisson 2 0 2 1

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It h ac a T im e s  7


ZOOM TOWN Can Ithaca attract the new crowd of restless remote workers? By Rya n Bieber 8  T

h e

Ithac a Times

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A

s the COVID-19 pandemic continues into 2021, many are bracing for the long haul. Across the country there has been a huge migration of people moving from larger cities to smaller towns due to the pandemic. As remote work becomes the new normal and people no longer need to commute to their jobs, many are looking to escape congested urban areas in favor of quieter and typically more affordable homes in smaller towns. The housing market has surged in popular getaway destinations like Cape Cod, Aspen and the Hudson Valley as a result of this trend, leading many to christen these places as “Zoom Towns.” For many house hunters, it’s possible that Ithaca may fit this bill as well. With a small, yet vibrant downtown and miles of rural farmland, Ithaca offers a happy medium for those wanting a change of scenery without completely losing city vibes. Ithaca has frequently been cited as a great place to live. In 2019, Ithaca was rated #5 on Forbes list of “Best Small Places for Business and Careers.” In 2018, it was named the 13th most innovative city in the U.S. by USA Today. Emory McLeod, office manager for Travis Hyde Properties, said she has definitely noticed an increase in people moving from larger cities to Ithaca. “I’ve only been here three months, but in the time that I’ve been here, we’ve gotten a lot of calls especially, from people from New York moving upstate,” she said. “I've heard a lot of people say things along the lines of they’re looking to move to a smaller town or like a slower lifestyle, or are looking to get out of the city.” McLeod herself moved from Philadelphia to Ithaca back in October after feeling trapped by city life during the pandemic. “It's been brutal in the city during COVID times because you can’t really go anywhere and there's not a ton of outdoor activities,” she said. “Ithaca’s just more COVID friendly … Everything's a little more spread out, there's fewer people, it's quieter and that is less anxiety producing when you do have to go out into public.” Peter Dugo, President of Arnot Realty, recently expanded his operations to Ithaca and said he also saw a notable increase in people moving to Ithaca from larger cities, especially compared to his properties in other areas. “It was so noticeable that our leasing team commented on it,” Dugo explained. “I’m not gonna say that people haven’t done

the same thing elsewhere, like our properties in Horseheads, but if they are, the numbers weren’t as dramatic as what we were seeing in Ithaca.” Tom Knipe, Deputy Director for Economic Development for the City of Ithaca, said that while the topic of Zoom towns is something on the City’s radar, there have been no concrete efforts to promote Ithaca as this type of place. “I think it's pretty early in the conversation, so there haven’t been any commitments made at this point to pursue some type of formal program like a remote worker attraction initiative, but I think that

ing to college students. Even though Hyde Properties might be selling more homes to people from out of state, their usual revenue streams have drastically decreased in light of remote learning. Dugo said that COVID-19 has also made doing things like house tours more difficult. He added that even though the pandemic has encouraged some people to relocate, many have chosen to stay put due to the inconvenience of moving during a pandemic. The increasing shift to remote work also means that there might be fewer office spaces rented downtown, which could also

To m K n i p e , D e p u t y D i r e c t o r f o r E c o n o m i c D e v e l o p m e n t at C i t y o f It h ac a it will and it should be discussed more,” Knipe said. “I think if we did anything, it would be leveraging existing efforts and resources with a subtle approach that's appropriate to our community.” Unfortunately, for many in the real estate and development market, the benefits of being a Zoom town do not outweigh the overall toll of the pandemic. McLeod pointed out that a large portion of business for property management like Travis Hyde deals with comes from rent-

be harmful to the economy. “The challenging side is that a number of our local businesses who may have had offices in our commercial centers are finding that they’ve been able to successfully transition to remote work, which means that in the long term their need for office space may shift,” Knipe said. Robyn Wardell, a second-year student in Cornell University’s City and Regional Planning Department, conducted a study in November and December 2020 about Ja n ua ry

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remote work trends in Ithaca and surveyed 22 businesses downtown. Through her studies she found that prior to the pandemic, 41% of the offices she surveyed did their work entirely in-office. Now, looking to the long-term, none of the respondents said they planned to work entirely in-office. Still, Wardell said that this is not the whole story as the need for office space will not completely disappear.  “It's pretty clear that over time, remote work is spiking during the pandemic and gradually going down,” she said. “With the footprint of offices, it seems like the needs over time will likely look the same that they did before the pandemic.”  Zoom towns can also play a role in driving up housing prices as people moving from larger cities may be willing to pay more for homes. This could be particularly problematic in Ithaca, a town that has struggled with a lack of affordable housing for years. Delia Yarrow, Director of Lending for Ithaca Neighborhood Housing, an organization that works to expand housing opportunities for low and moderate-income residents in Tompkins County, said that a new flow of people from larger cities could very well exacerbate the situation. “The basic thing to say is the market is already hard for people who are at or below the average income,” she said. “…So if there's an influx of people who are coming from places where the salaries are higher and can pay more for houses, that's going to be really difficult for low-income home buyers.” Knipe said that the town is committed to creating more affordable housing in Ithaca regardless of Ithaca’s potential as a Zoom town. “The housing market responds to supply and demand, so we need housing off all types to keep up with the demand and make sure that the people have access to those opportunities and the prices don't get driven up,” he said. Still, there is no guarantee that Ithaca will become a full-fledged Zoom town. As Dugo put it, the trend might be more short-lived than people think. “I’m one that doesn’t look at snap decisions based on just a few months worth of data,” he said. “There are a lot of restrictions in a place like New York City … but if those restrictions are lifted and the pandemic is less of a concern, there's a good chance that a lot of these people may choose to go back.”

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It h ac a T im e s  9


I HAVE A DREAM

Delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr., at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, in the March on Washington D.C. for Civil Rights

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we have come to our nation’s Capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on their promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God’s children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. 1963 is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials

and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood., I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plains, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day. This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning My country, ‘tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing: Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims’ pride, From every mountain-side Let freedom ring. And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvacious peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty, we are free at last.”

These are the words that moved a nation. We believe they are the best way to remember Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday, January 18th.

PHONE: 607-272-2602 guitarworks.com

DeWitt Mall 215 North Cayuga St. Ithaca, New York

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WANT TO MAKE A WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?

DIFFERENCE?

WE ARE HIRING!

YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A Full-Time position, MEDICAID MANAGED CARE LIAISON SUPERVISOR: The William George Agency working adolescents in ahas residential is a residential treatment with center licensed by OCFS which a 29I medicaltreatment clinic on our campus. We are looking a Medicaid Care off. Supervisor to position center. 3 ½ for days on, 3Managed ½ days This oversee our contracts as well as the billing process with managed care focuses relationship-building, mentoring, and organizations. Candidateson should have proficiency in medical billing experience in a medical setting, withyouth exceptional customer service skills.and Priorindependence. supervisory helping build self-reliance experience is preferred.

AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and AWAKE OVERNIGHT COUNSELOR: A Full-Time position, working with general recordkeeping and reporting. YOUTH CARE SPECIALIST: A Full-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential treatment center. 3 ½ days on, 3 ½ days off. This position focuses on relationship-building, mentoring, and helping youth build self-reliance and independence.

adolescents in a residential treatment center. 5-day work week. This position provides overnight supervision of residents and general recordkeeping and reporting.

REGISTERED NURSE - Weekends: Our Agency is looking for a Registered Nurse to provide weekend CONNECTIONS COORDINATOR: The William George Agency is a residential coverage at our residential treatment center treatment center, licensed by the Office of Children and Family Services. We are looking for a for CONNECTIONS Coordinator who has a dual role of performing a adolescents. Experience with adolescents quality assurance function, as well as a training function for system users. preferred, good communication, organization skills CONNECTIONS is a web-based system which houses child welfare case the ability multi-task. Responsibilities include information. and We are looking for a to candidate with a Human Services undergraduate degree and both child welfare and computer software skills. preventative health maintenance, evaluation, triage care, Aand record keeping. This position will MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT: Part-Time position, working with adolescents in a residential require treatment facility. (4pm-12:30am) and overnight (12:30amtwo Evening 12-hour shifts. Salary commensurate 9:00am) weekend shifts. Supports the daily operations of the medical clinic by with documenting experience. assisting residents, and filing pertinent medical information,

Special Election

Leslie Schill running for County Legislature

L

eslie Schill announced her candidacy for the Tompkins County Legislative District 2 seat recently vacated by Anna Kelles, our new NYS 125th Assemblyperson. This will be a special election to be held on Tuesday, March 23. Schill believes that her work as a planner, which promotes outreach, listening, discussion, compromise, and learning, are key assets for the job. “I am running to give something back to my community, to be a voice for progress. I have considered a run for local government for some time, but at this moment in our political history, I feel compelled to take action. This is truly a return to my public service roots.” Her platform is focused on public health. “I pledge to dedicate my efforts in 2021 as a County Legislator to addressing the COVID crisis locally. I will collaborate with our County Health Department to ensure that we get the message out to our residents and secure the resources required to efficiently deploy the vaccine.” Her campaign frames the values and needs of Tompkins County through a public health lens to: Prioritize personal wellbeing and mental health services Expand childcare options and child nutrition programs Develop more and affordable housing, in partnership with key local non-profits Rebuild Tompkins County’s healthy economy Preserve our environmental health through water and land quality improvement efforts A seasoned local planner with extensive experience working in government, Schill is a leader in her field and has produced initiatives that have yielded real change. These include restoring parks and develop-

SALARY Salary

$31,200.00 F/T Minimum $31,200.00 F/T Minimum Overtime available Overtime available Full time/Part time Full time/Part Flexible Hours time

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Health/Dental/Vision Health/Dental/Vision Life Life 401k 401k Personal/Sick Personal/Sick time time Meals Mealsprovided providedon onduty duty

Vacation

VACATION Generous vacation package Generous vacation package Requirements

Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED

REQUIREMENTS Valid NYS Driver’s License Diploma/GED

documenting medical information in the CONNECTIONS medical tab, and assisting the TO Office ManagerABOUT in generalTHE administrative duties. LEARN AGENCY AND OUR

ing new trails and community recreation centers while at the District of Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation. During her tenure at the Tompkins County The Planning Department, she co-authored an energy and greenhouse gas emissions element for the Comprehensive Plan; managed the local affordable housing funding program; and spearheaded regional efforts such as the Cleaner Greener Southern Tier Plan. Today, she is the University Planner at Cornell, heading up the Campus Planning Office, where her work includes stewardship of the Ithaca campus master plan, managing community-campus collaborative projects, and intermunicipal planning. Currently, she is the Vice Chair of the Tompkins County Planning Advisory Board and is a Program Oversight Committee member of the Community Housing Development Fund – a joint effort of the County, City and Cornell. Schill is a long-time Fall Creek community member where she has resided for the past 13 years with her husband, two children who attend ICSD schools, and their rescue pup, Hamilton. She will be running on the Healthy Community line. To speak with Leslie about your ideas and concerns for District 2, contact her at leslieschill.tcdistrict2@gmail.com or find her at https://www.facebook.com/leslie. schill.96/ Dr. Veronica Pillar is the only other person who has declared candidacy for this position so far. Pillar is a long-time activist and progressive, and was recently endorsed by the Working Families Party. She currently co-leads the Tompkins County chapter of Showing Up for Racial Justice and has worked with the Tompkins County Antiracist Coalition and Mutual Aid Tompkins. -Staff R eport

OPEN POSITIONS, VISIT US ONLINE AT:

TO LEARN ABOUT THE AGENCY AND OUR OPEN VISIT US www.wgaforchildren.org or POSITIONS, call 607-844-6460 ONLINE AT:

THE WILLIAM GEORGE AGENCY William George Agency WWW.WGAFORCHILDREN.ORG OR CALL 607-844-6460

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Sports

Zoom Buddies By Ste ve L aw re nc e

I

t’s no secret that my four decade history with Cornell Athletics — 10 years as an employee, 30 years covering them as a sports writer — has given me an abiding fondness for Big Red athletes, and I love watching them do big things in venues great and small. In the first quarter of the Cleveland versus Kansas City playoff game, I cheered

out loud when Browns center (and former Big Red player) J.C. Tretter snapped the ball, knocked a defensive lineman out of the way, and threw a block 20 yards downfield. A little later, I was on the phone with Cornell hockey goalie Austin McGrath, and I congratulated him on what was a lower profile, but just as impressive screen

appearance. As a member of the Big Red Pen Pals program, McGrath would go online — as he has done regularly for several months — and (virtually) hang out with his 9 year-old buddy, Henry Tompkins. Henry’s dad, J.T. Tompkins, sits in on the calls too, and while he gets just as excited, he tries his best to let Henry do most of the interacting. McGrath is a senior in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology, and he was a FirstTeam All-Ivy League goalie in 2019, with a 1.94 goals against average and a .925 save percentage. Like all athletes that have spent their lives preparing to play at the Division I (and perhaps beyond) level, Austin was looking forward to cherishing every moment of his time on the ice and

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with his teammates, but that’s not how things unfolded. I called McGrath at his family’s home in Alberta, and he told me, “When we learned that we wouldn’t be playing hockey this season, I came home, but I’ll be back on campus soon to finish up some in-person classes. It is definitely not how I thought things would turn out.” When asked about his history with the Big Red Pen Pals, Austin offered, “During my first year at Cornell, we would usually just go out and spend time with the kids, but with COVID, we’re doing everything virtually.” I asked J.T. Tompkins for his take on Henry’s Zoom friendship, and he said, “Like it has for many kids, it has been a tough year for him. They are trying to balance the in-class learning with the online stuff, and it has been difficult.” As for the match, J.T. (who manages the Ithaca Staples store) said, “The email came out of nowhere, and Henry needed a buddy so I was really happy.” J.T. was very forthcoming in sharing that one of the challenges Henry has been facing is the fact that his mom has been dealing with some serious ongoing medical challenges for the past several years. Some very perceptive matchmaking (orchestrated by school social worker Jamie McCaffrey) took place when Henry was paired with Austin, given the 22-year-old goaltender lost his dad to cancer around the time he entered college. J.T. told me, “When the email came, I thought ‘Nothing’s going to come of this,’ but I was wrong. It has been awesome.” J.T. added with a laugh and with somewhat of a confessional tone, “I sometimes find myself talking to Austin as much as Henry does.” J.T. went on to say, “When Henry and I did some hiking in the Adirondacks, we shared some of our photos with Austin. Henry is turning our photos and stories into a book, and he loves sharing it with Austin. It has been good for both of us, and I really appreciate it because, as we know, kids only want to hear so much from their dad. It’s really cool of Austin to keep reaching out. It has been really helpful.” Austin agrees that it has been a mutually beneficial connection. “I can relate to some of what Henry is facing,” McGrath stated. “It was tough enough dealing with something like that at 18, I can’t imagine going through it as a 9-year-old.” After he leaves Cornell, Austin (who is a biology major) has his sights set on continuing his education. “I am waiting to hear from medical schools in the U.S. and in Canada,” McGrath said, “and while I have a lot of time before I make any decisions, I am interested in surgery and orthopedics.” Hmm… NHL teams need orthopedic surgeons… Maybe hockey is not in the rear-view mirror after all…


A sit-down with a 7-time Grammy winner

B

G.M. Burns

andleader, musician, and seventime Grammy award-winner Paul Winter has a new album out, Light of the Sun, which was released in November of 2020. The new record features Winter singing and for the first time being the lead soprano sax player throughout the CD. Winter, during his early college days toured to 23 countries of Latin America and also performed in a jazz performance at the White House during the Kennedy Administration in 1962. Thus far he has performed in 52 countries, has released more than 60 records, and still has time to be interviewed by press all over the world. Winter has recently completed “Paul Winter’s 41st Annual Winter Solstice Celebration,” which is a full-length video special, themed Everybody Under the Sun, looking back over the four decades of the event and featuring iconic performances and highlights by the Consort and guest musicians. In this emailed interview, Winter talks with the Ithaca Times about his new record and his plans for the future. Ithaca Times: Do you feel your music helps to heal or reveal? PW: I can’t make any claims for how music affects anyone. Only listeners can do this. But I can speak about my own experience of music, both as a player and a listener. Playing my horn puts me back together. If I even just play a few long tones in the morning, I feel renewed. I most often play with eyes closed, and feeling the sounds in this totally aural realm takes me immediately into another zone, one that for me quickly transcends that of the cortical clutter that runs my life most of the time. If I then play a piece I love, say of Bach, or some melody from my own repertoire, I’m carried into a place of exaltation. My heart is smiling again. And my “gladitude” comes back. Our bodies love vibration. It’s what is going on in all our quadzillions of cells, all the time. And all of the systems that are constantly interweaving in this miraculous tapestry of our being, crave this motion. When you are playing an instrument, like a wind or a string, from which the vibrations are resonating through your body, this can awaken your central nervous system, circulatory system, respiratory system, and maybe even the soul system, wherever that may be. Playing music supposedly awakens our intelligence. Studies have shown that it improves kids’ abilities to learn (maybe also those of us over 39), and that they do better in math and other subjects. If this is true, then why aren’t we enabling kids to make music every day, instead of subjecting them to endless hours poring over words and other left-brain activities? This makes me wonder if a great part of our whole educational system is not absurd. I’ve tried meditating, numerous times, over the years, in contemplative traditions for which

I have great respect, like Zen. But I never could reconcile spending the vast amount of time that seems to be needed to get to a place I can reach in minutes playing music. Meditators sit for hours aspiring to a zone beyond thoughts. But there’s no vibratory awakening in play (although sometimes chanting is involved). In the sedentary mode, the systems of your body begin to wind down, and the only one that keeps active — the cortical — takes over and “comes to the rescue,” to keep you awake. So it seems to me that trying to quiet your thought processes with your thinker is like taking an alcoholic to a bar to have a drink and talk about his problem. Playing music with others, then, brings a whole additional level of nourishment. Making sounds together

Paul Winter

can be an experience of communing, which gives you a sense of relatedness to the world. I think we all deeply want that. And then when there is an audience listening, giving you license to put forth your musical offering, and affirming your expression by their appreciation – this is deeply gratifying. Fulfilling, I would say. As listeners, we each have our tastes, having to do with melodies or sounds we experienced growing up, or in different stages of our journey, or from memories of relationships, or places we remember, or wherever. And some of us like to hear musical adventures that are new, as jazz listeners often do. It’s a question of what music speaks to you. There are no absolutes or universals in the realm of esthetics. One man’s magic is another man’s misery. As the old saying goes: “Beauty is in the ear of the behearer.”

IT: Your recent album Light of the Sun was a different undertaking as a solo sax player. How were you able to make a new path with your music? PW: Since organizing my first band at age 12, in my hometown of Altoona, PA, I have always worn two musical hats: as player and as bandleader. But my love for playing my horn has long been overshadowed by my fascination with organizing ensembles. With my college jazz sextet, and with the Consort, which has been my forum since 1968, I’ve usually been content to play as a member of the ensemble. The premise of my bands has always been that of a musical democracy: everyone’s voice gets heard, but the overall ensemble sound is primary, just like with the big bands I so loved as a kid in the ‘40s and ‘50s. For many years, however, I did harbor the dream of creating an entire album featuring my soprano sax. Having turned 80 last year, I figured this was as good a time as any to do it. This is not really a new path for my music, but simply one project that shines a light on me as a player. This is the first of 52 albums in which my horn is featured throughout. I knew immediately that I wanted the album to be a celebration of light. With the title, “Light of the Sun,” I intend to embrace the many meanings we attribute to light: light as spirit, love, consciousness, human kindness, serenity, heart, exaltation, fire; the light that is integral to beauty; and the smile that reflects the sunshine in our heart. I immersed myself in the question: what is the music of light? Music is the common medium that can embody both the spiritual and physical aspects of light. I want to explore how music can transmute the essence of light into spirit-energy, for our wayward species, just as chlorophyll transforms sunlight, through photosynthesis, to create the energy that gives life to all plants. The musical pieces that awaken my heart are those that have a sublime melodic lyricism, in relation to the chordal progressions. They are pieces which, for me, have a miraculous quality of timelessness. And I have always marveled at this unique characteristic of music: if you are allured to a piece of music, you can listen to it countless times, and somehow the ear doesn’t tire of it; whereas the eye, most often, is always wanting something new. The recordings in “Light of the Sun” come from my three favorite sonic temples on the planet: the Kiva, of the Miho Museum; the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York, where the Consort and I have been artists-inresidence since 1980; and the Grand Canyon, which has been a place of pilgrimage for me for many years. These are places where I feel my horn realizes its true voice, acoustic spaces where its spirit-song comes alive. I feel this album, “Light of the Sun,” is my testament as a sax player. However, in saying this, I don’t mean to imply it is my last. Actually, I intend it as my first. I’ll still always be a bandleader, but maybe I’ll step out a little more. continued on page 14

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Arts&Entertainment

Q&A: Paul Winter

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PAUL WINTER Contin u ed From Page 13

IT: As a musician, what is the most difficult thing that you are confronted with now? PW: Mass media, and the dumbing-down of America. Mass media during recent decades has brought about the dumbing-down of our society. This is the most challenging thing I am facing both as a citizen and a musician. And I see it as the most ominous thing confronting our whole species, and the entirety of civilization. Mass media seduces people into being gullible spectators, and we then no longer think for ourselves. We abdicate our own intelligence. We no longer listen to our own voices. We are rendered less and less able to use our collective intelligence to solve the huge issues, such as climate change, and all the inequities and imbalances that have led so many people to feel disenfranchised. Only a severely dumbed-down society of media-sheep could have handed over the reins of their country to a Media-Monster, a pathological power-addict, dedicated to controlling and destroying America for his own personal gratification. Allowing this Monster to commandeer the White House has been the dumbest thing we have done in American history. His strategy for getting elected, and then tearing down the institutions of our government, and destroying civility in our society, has been: “Make America Hate Again.”

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For all these misguided media-sheep to have embraced as savior this “Manchurian Candidate” aberrant hominid, is beyond “shooting yourself in the foot.” It’s pointing the gun right between your eyes. In time, if our republic survives, I visualize that most of the media-sheep will arrive at the rude awakening that they have been snookered, by a master con-man. And then this odious name will come to be reviled, and be stricken from all buildings, enterprises and golf courses throughout the land. Think “Hitler Tower” in Berlin. Would that fly? We dodged a bullet on November 3, but the Monster, with his cabal of criminal cronies in the Senate, along with its flock of misguided sheep, are still going to be very much with us. And the “us” includes not just Americans, but the entire human species. For as America goes, so goes the world. IT: As an activist and one who has worked to save the environment – what are your concerns with President-elect Biden’s new administration regarding the environment and the future of the planet? And what are your concerns? PW: Joe Biden is a decent man, and I’m optimistic that he will at least consider making the right moves to protect the environment and the planet. But it’s hard to know all the many ways our politicians are bridled, once they get into office. I put my optimism in kids. I’ve had the great privilege of living with young children these last couple decades, and with them, I see the miracle of life, and how miraculous our species can be.

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If we can introduce them to the land, to the world of nature, and keep them away from the media long enough for their true instincts to blossom, then I think our species has a chance. I’ve long been fascinated with the allure of voices from what I call “the greater symphony of the Earth.” The door to that realm was opened for me the night I went to Dr. Roger Payne’s presentation about whale songs, in New York, in the spring of 1968. The poignant, bluesy, yearning voices of these humpback whales changed my life. Roger’s 1970 album, “Songs of the Humpback Whale,” which touched the hearts of millions of people around the world, probably did more for the cause of whales than all the books and talks and symposia put together. The voices of wolves also became part of my musical family around that time. Most recently, on my album “Light of the Sun,” I’ve recorded a new piece entitled “The Well-Tempered Wood Thrush” based on the song of a Wood Thrush who returned to the forest near my home five summers in a row, singing the same song, in C major. The four three-note phrases of his song happened to outline the first four chords of the C Major Prelude of Bach’s “Well-Tempered Clavier.” With the recorded voice of the Wood Thrush, along with the harmonies of Bach and rhythmic energy of Brazil, I aspired to create a piece that would convey the same life-affirming spirit that I hear in every Wood Thrush song. I imagine the creature voices as a gateway to nature, for us. If we can hear the beauty of their singing, and realize that their voices are

treasures of this Earth, just as the treasures of art for which we build museums around the world, then we may be inspired to save the habitats which these animals need to survive. And in this same way, if we realize the kindred essence in all creatures and cultures, and come to embrace the whole Earth as our home, we will find the ways to conquer climate change. Or we will not survive. No creature, in the history of the billions and billions of experiments that life has put forth, has trashed its own habitat, and survived. The jury is still out on our human experiment. IT: Would you like to add anything else about your music for our readers? PW: I am convinced that our listening faculty is the gateway to the deeper instincts of our human nature. My aspiration is to awaken in listeners a deeper sense of relatedness to, and a living resonance with, the entire community of life, with the Earth, and with the cosmos. Music can take us there, if it has sublime beauty. I have no illusion that my rarefied music can quell the juggernaut of mass-media culture. But we each must do what we can, and be grateful for those who are willing to listen. My realm is that of the “rare birds”: people whose ears are connected to both their hearts and their heads. I have long taken heart from the oftquoted words of anthropologist Margaret Mead: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”


Film

The other side of ‘heaven’ A new doc finds the darkness lurking in a Florida retirement community By Br yan VanC ampe n

C

inemapolis’s “virtual cinema” is currently offering one of the most interesting and surprising documentaries that you’re likely to see Lance Oppenheim’s “Some Kind of Heaven” (Magnolia-Los Angeles Media Fund-The New York Times-Protozoa, 82 min., 2020) tracks the lives of four residents of The Villages in Florida. The Villages in Florida is the largest retirement community in America. There’s a real Disneyland vibe here that sometimes borders on the “The Stepford Wives.” Everything is available within this sunny bubble. The Villages has its own rustic town square, stores, bowling alley and sports grounds. There is no end of recreational activities available to its 130,000 occupants: all kinds of dances and sports clubs and acting classes and on and on. But, as one of the people being profiled points out, it’s a bubble that they’re living in: “This is not the real world.” Oppenheim’s film introduces us to a married couple; she’s into athletics and

tennis, and he’s initially portrayed as a kind of goofy hippie. Then there’s a woman who moved to The Villages, can’t afford to go back north, and then her husband dies. She’s still grieving, and we follow her first tentative steps of meeting a new guy — he’s known as “The Margarita King” — and becoming more social. She’s the first person to admit that for her, The Villages is not exactly the Magic Kingdom. And then there’s an 81-year-old man living in his van on the property. He’s come here to meet an attractive woman with money, and hopefully move in with her (and get out of the van). He cherishes his freedom, but he needs a place to live. The first few minutes of the film play almost like a paid infomercial for The Villages. Everything is great, this place is magical, and everyone is dancing, prancing and busy. They all seem to have swallowed the Kool-Aid that everything is dandy. And at first, the profiles, aside from the grieving widow, feel very surface. And then, as with all really affecting documen-

Some Kind of Heaven (Magnolia Pictures)

taries, Oppenheim starts delving deeper into these four lives and finds some dark secrets. The hippie guy gets busted for possession of weed and cocaine, and the guy living in his van has fled a DUI charge in California and is a fugitive of the law. Documentaries like “Some Kind of Heaven” amaze me on a few levels. It’s amazing that filmmakers like Oppenheim

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realize that a well-to-do retirement theme park would provide such human drama, and it’s always amazing to me that there are people who would let down their barriers and let the world see them at their darkest and most vulnerable moments. There are a lot of buildings and walls that make up The Villages, and we get to see what’s really behind those walls.

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BOOKS

‘Murder & Mayhem’ Local author explores Finger Lakes’ dark, murderous past By An dre w Sul livan

M

ost may think serial killer Edward Rulloff is just about the only dark blemish in the history of the Finger Lakes region. However, there is a new book that reveals more sinister stories from the Finger Lakes’ past. Murder & Mayhem in the Finger Lakes explores lesser known crimes that took place in the 19th and 20th centuries in the counties that surround the Finger Lakes. Author Rikki Marcin said she came up with the idea of writing the book from her archival work for her job with the Watkins Review and Express. “My job was to go through the papers from 125, 150 years ago, and often the old newspapers would include a short paragraph about a murder that took place in another county,” Marcin said. “It piqued my interest. I noticed that there really aren’t any resources about these murders other than the old newspapers. So I thought it would be a good idea to assemble these into a book once I gathered enough information on the subjects.”

The book highlights 11 different individuals across different counties, including Seneca and Tompkins County. The first chapter centers on George Chapman from Waterloo, a white tailor who in 1828 was convicted and executed for the murder of Daniel Wright, a mixed-race hostler. “The Chapman case was the oldest one for which I could find a substantial amount of material,” she said. “What I found really striking about the case – first of all, it’s one of the very rare times in our country’s history that a white person was executed for killing a person of color, and this was a mere two years after New York State abolished slavery.” What also hooked her attention was the size of the crowd that viewed the execution. “The crowd that turned out for it was the largest that had ever assembled in Seneca County to that date as far as

anyone knows,” she said. “They discussed how people would walk from Pennsylvania and Ithaca and all over the eastern part of the state. At least 10,000 people gathered on Oak Island, possibly more. “They were talking about how people would climb trees to get a good view, and even decades later people were recalling the phenomenal size of the crowd and people’s reactions to it. As you can see, it kind of had the atmosphere of a Roman holiday — people would go out drinking afterwards and get in fights. It was like a carnival atmosphere.” The seventh chapter highlights Richard Barber, a Ulysses resident who in 1888 set the house of Richard and Ann Mason on fire and murdered Ann. “This case stood out to me … mostly because of the great extent his defense team put into asserting that he was mentally incompetent by reason of epilepsy,” she said. “I was contrasting this with another case in Livingston County where the defendant [James Williams], who was African American, was given a similar plea, which the jury totally rejected, and he ended up being sentenced to death at Auburn.

VISIONS PRESENTS THE TOMPKINS COUNTY DEBIT CARD

PHOTO CONTEST

“Barber’s sentence was eventually commuted into life in prison, but he was portrayed quite sympathetically in the press. They commented about how his inoffensive appearance contrasted with the brutality of the crime. For example … the scene in the jail, they described the prisoners smoking cigars and sitting around in their socks playing checkers; Barber was invited to play checkers with a one-armed inmate. That’s such a vivid picture that I didn’t want to leave out.” Marcin described the press throughout each of the cases in the book as a “Greek chorus.” “For example, they were lecturing the public about the dangers of intemperance in the Chapman case, actually quoting verbatim passages from the Bible,” she said. “Nobody really examined the motives of the murderers. They thought maybe they did it for material gain, for example. The psychological aspect was largely ignored.” Marcin said there were several other cases that she wanted to write about, but could not fit into the book, and that she plans on writing a sequel to this book on those cases. With this book, she said it illuminates the “ordinariness” of that collection of individuals. “Our culture is so focused on serial killers … I think that it obscures the fact that most of these murderers are not deviants or monsters,” she said. “They’re people who found themselves in circumstances that spun out of control. They’re motivated by very relatable emotions such as jealousy and grudges that were held for years.”

Just take a photo that you think best captures Tompkins County and send it our way. The person with the best photo submission will win $250 and another $250 will be given to a nonprofit of their choice. The winning image will also become a featured photo on a Visions VISA debit card that all members can order! Entries will only be accepted through January 31, so get them in now at visionsfcu.org/contest

1234 5678 9012 3456 GOOD THRU

01/23 VISIONS CARDHOLDER

16  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

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20 – 26 ,

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DEBIT

New York | New Jersey | Pennsylvania *Individual must be at least 18 years of age or older and a resident of Tompkins County, NY. (1) entry per person. Photo must be original work, appropriate for all ages, not include people, be taken in horizontal position, and must be taken in Tompkins County, NY. Entries must be uploaded at visionsfcu.org/contest; no alternate methods of entry apply. (1) winner selected by likes/reacts via Facebook; entry with the most likes/reacts votes will win. Entry period Dec. 7, 2020 to Jan. 31, 2021. Winner will be announced on Feb. 15, 2021 via social media and email. Winner must respond by Feb. 28, 2021 or prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be selected, based on the second highest number of likes/reacts. Winner will receive $250 and Visions will donate $250 to a nonprofit of their choice in Tompkins County, NY. Prize value may be reportable for tax purposes; must have valid US Social Security number to win. Winner must provide consent for their image to be reproduced in a variety of mediums and relinquishes ownership rights to the work. Winner will have a consent and release option for Visions Federal Credit Union to use their name, photo, or likeness in social media posts or future advertising and promotional materials. This contest sponsored solely by Visions Federal Credit Union, 24 McKinley Ave, Endicott, NY 13760, 800-242-2120. Federally insured by NCUA.


Virtual Music 1/20 Wednesday Hip Hop Dance and Culture | 5 p.m., 1/20 Wed

1/21 Thursday Sweat - Kitchen Theatre Company Script Club | 6 p.m., 1/21 Thu | Kitchen Theatre Company, 417 W. State / W. MLK, Jr. Street

1/22 Friday Vocal Foundations: a singing technique class | 1/22 Fri | Flight Performing Arts

1/25 Monday Break for Movies | 1/25 Mon, 101 East Green Street

1/27 Wednesday Symphoria Masterworks: Winter Reflections | 7:30 PM, 1/23 Saturday | Virtual concert, Virtual, Virtual | Ring in the new year with Symphoria, performing the beautiful and moving†Mother

and Child†by William Grant Still and Stravinskyís masterful†LíHistoire du Soldat. Tai Murray will be joining us via livestream and play a piece of her choosing. | Family Livestream $35, Individual Livestream $20

Art Uncertain Terrain | 12:00 PM, 1/21 Thursday | State of the Art Gallery, 120 W Martin Luther King, Jr./State Street, Ithaca | State of the Art Gallery’s first show of 2021 and seven gallery artists will show paintings, drawings, photographs, digital work and sculpture. Show dates: Jan. 7-31. Hours:† Thurs. & Fri., 12-6pm and Sat. & Sun., 12-5pm. “Topography of Light,” by Brian Keeler | 11:00 AM, 1/22 Friday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road, Ithaca | Fridays thru Sundays until 2/28/21. Community Arts Challenge Exhibit | All Day 1/26 Tuesday | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | The Annual Community Arts Challenge exhibit now

a failed attempt to destroy the universe.†Presented in collaboration with†Ithaca Fantastik | 3 day rental for $10

in its eleventh year is currently open to the public through the end of February at the Center for the Arts of Homer. The theme of this yearís challenge is ìWindowî with entries from local artists in art, photography, music, and writing. Call ahead for a viewing appointment. Letís Draw Together (Virtual Event) | 12:00 PM, 1/26 Tuesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Makerspace Librarian Cady will lead the group in fun drawing exercises, games, and activities. Teens and adults at all levels of expertise and ability are welcome. Attendees will need simple art supplies. Patrons can register at†https://www.tcpl.org/ events/lets-draw-together-virtualart-meet-1†to receive updates and the Zoom meeting link.†

a massive, self-contained utopia located in Central Florida. | 3 day rental available for $12

Notices

Virtual Cinemapolis: 76 Days | All Day 1/23 Saturday | On January 23rd, 2020, China locked down Wuhan, a city of 11 million, to combat the emerging COVID-19 outbreak. Set deep inside the frontlines of the crisis in four hospitals, 76 DAYS tells indelible human stories at the center of this pandemic. | 3 day rental available for $12 Virtual Cinemapolis: My Little Sister | All Day 1/23 Saturday | Lisa has bid goodbye to her ambitions as a playwright and the Berlin arts scene and now lives in Switzerland with her husband, who runs an international school. When her twin brother falls ill, she returns to Berlin. | 3 day rental available for $12

Film

Virtual Cinemapolis: Rock Camp: The Movie | All Day 1/23 Saturday | Summer camp meets Spinal Tap as we journey to Rockí ní Roll Fantasy Camp, where dreamers from across America and around the world gather to shred with their heroes ñ and learn to rock like the legends. | 3 day rental for $12

Virtual Cinemapolis: PG: Psycho Goreman | All Day 1/22 Friday | Siblings Mimi and Luke unwittingly resurrect an ancient alien overlord who was entombed on Earth millions of years ago after

Virtual Cinemapolis: Some Kind of Heaven | All Day 1/23 Saturday | First-time feature director Lance Oppenheim cracks the manicured facade of The Villages, Americaís largest retirement community ñ

Virtual ESL Talk Time | 3:45 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | The group is open to English learners hoping to improve their conversation skills. Visit tcpl.org for the Zoom link.

Virtual ESL Talk Time | 3:45 PM, 1/20 Wednesday | The group is open to English learners hoping to improve their conversation skills. Visit tcpl.org for the Zoom link.

Literary Arts

2021 Winter Ithaca Farmers Market | 10:30 AM, 1/23 Saturday | Triphammer Marketplace, 2255 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca | To comply with COVID-19 rules, vendors will be more spaced out than last year. Market will be in the atrium and in one of the empty storefronts.

Virtual Preschool Story Time | 10:30 a.m., 1/21 Thu | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St

Building Community Through Action | 12:00 PM, 1/25 Monday | Join IC groups for a panel discussion with local activists in the greater Ithaca area. Panelists Crista Nunez, Alexa Esposito, and Josh Dolan will share personal experiences and insights on how they have turned community ideals into action.†https://events.ithaca.edu/

Lifestyle

Parenting: The Hardest Job in the World | 6:00 PM, 1/26 Tuesday | Join other parents and guardians online via Zoom to discuss issues that directly influence parenting and family life in this FREE 8-week series, led by Mary Hicks & Zach Sims. Visit ccetompkins.org for more info.

Break for Books | 12 p.m., 1/20 Wed | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St

Teen Take & Make | 9:30 a.m., 1/21 Thu | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St Cornell Day of Data 2021 | 12 p.m., 1/27 Wed | Virtual

Pet Clinic | 6 p.m., 1/20 Wed | GYMSouthside Community Center, 305 S Plain St Virtual ESL Talk Time | 3:45 p.m., 1/20 Wed 2021 Winter Ithaca Farmers Market at Triphammer Marketplace | 10:30 a.m., 1/23 Sat | Triphammer Marketplace, 2255 N Triphammer Rd Virtual Series: What is Yoga? (Session 4/4) | 1/23 Sat | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St Virtual HistoryForge Transcription Sessions | 8 a.m., 1/23 Sat | The History Center in Tompkins County, 401 East State Street

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I t h a c a T i m e s   17


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BackPage

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W i n t e r ti m e s is Com i ng 20  T

h e

Ithac a T imes

/January

20 – 26 ,

2 0 2 1


Town & Country

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|

On Line |

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January 20, 2021  

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