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Shooting Stars Three television-radio seniors

on deck

start over

Freshmen prepared to play multiple roles on softball team, page 23

win College Television Award for documentary, page 13

The college should redo the branding options after negative posts, page 10

The Ithacan College sees rise in 2011-12 Off the map applications Thursday March 24, 2011

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Student interest in the college’s D.C. program lags behind London and L.A. BY Patrick Duprey staff writer

BY Kyle Robertson staff writer

See Applicants, page 4

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After a recent leap in applications, the Ithaca College Office of Admissions will pick the class of 2015 from the largest selection pool of students in three years. The college received 13,424 applications for the 201112 school year ­—­­ almost 300 more than last year and 700 more than in 2009-10. The last MAGUIRE said time admissions applications for reached simischolarships lar highs was increased. in 2008, when applications totaled 13,546. In 2009-10, application numbers saw a drop of more than 800 to 12,752. Eric Maguire, vice president of enrollment and communication, said the college’s acceptance limit for 2011-12 is set around 9,000 students, equating to 67 percent of the applicant pool. Maguire said 8,500 students have been admitted so far, and the college has set next year’s enrollment goal at 1,650 new students — the same as last year’s goal. So far, 297 students have submitted paid deposits, 202 of which were from early decision applicants. “We are still very confident in our ability to hit those numbers next year,” he said. Maguire said the college took a new recruiting measure by hiring two regional admissions counselors in Boston and New York City. Maguire said scholarship programs on campus have seen a boost in applications. This year, the college received 359 applications for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholar Program, a scholarship for minority students. After the amount for the award increased from $18,000 to $25,000 last year, 217 applications were submitted. Malinda Smith, director of the program, declined to comment. Matthew J. Fee, director of the Park Scholar Program, a scholarship covering the full cost of a communication student’s education, said his program sent a new electronic newsletter targeting high school freshmen, sophomores and juniors. “Previously, we only sent information to high school seniors during the fall of their senior year,” he said. “These tools have really helped to spread the word about the Park Scholar

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Senior Molly Wernick anticipates a career in the nonprofit sector, so she applied to Ithaca College’s Washington Semester Program, knowing the nation’s capital is also the capital of national nonprofits. After being awarded a communications and membership internship at the Center for Nonprofit Advancement, Wernick was ready to spend a semester in Washington, D.C. “This experience is kind of like my training wheels to what comes May 23 when I am no longer in college,” Wernick said. However, this personal and professional experience comes with often frustrating inconveniences. Though several students said while they enjoy the program and do not regret their decision to enroll, they also expressed concerns with limited course options, housing policies and the stagnant low interest in the program. Tom Bohn, the former Washington Program director from Spring 2005 to Summer 2008, said the program was designed in the mid-to-late 1990s after the Los Angeles Program began to flourish. Bohn said he and faculty members were seeking an internship-focused program like L.A., to appeal to students of different majors, such as politics, journalism, art and sociology. During his tenure as director, Bohn said, program enrollment never reached his goals of between 20 and 30 students per semester, double the average enrollment. Enrollment has remained steady at an average of 10-15 students throughout the program’s history.

Limited classes

With a limited number of course options, Bohn said students are discouraged from enrolling in the program

System Map Design by Yu-Chen (Jane) Chen

See waSHINGTON, page 4

Proposed Pell Grant cut ignites student concerns By Nicole Ogrysko staff writer

After Ithaca College sophomore Shane Galley had difficulty footing his tuition bill for school, he took off the second semester of his freshman year to work and earn money to pay for college. Since returning to campus, Galley picked up working 20 to 25 hours a week at Starbucks to save for school. “Mostly if I want to be here, I have to do it for myself and work for it,” he said. “Working a parttime job restricts me from doing extra activities on campus, so it gets pretty hard.” Galley said he gets scholarships and a $5,550 Pell Grant, a federal financial aid initiative for low and middle income students. He saves $8,000 he earns from his part-time job for next year’s tuition bill. But, with a recent Republican proposal to slash $5.7 billion from the Pell Grant program circulating through the federal government, Galley and other students across the nation are worried that affording college could become even more difficult. These potential cuts are part of H.R. 1, a larger spending bill that pushes for $61 billion in cuts

Sophomore Shane Galley, who has a Pell Grant, speaks to Susan Mott, a representative in the Office of Student Financial Services, on Monday. graham hebel/The Ithacan

from all areas of government. The House of Representatives passed the bill last month, but it was rejected by the Senate. Now, the federal government operates under a temporary resolution until both Congress chambers draft a new budget resolution. The budget proposal includes a

plan to reduce the maximum Pell Grant award of $5,550 by $845, as well as eliminate the program entirely for about 10,000 students. Pell Grants are determined by a student’s financial need, tuition and plans to complete the degree as a full- or part-time student. Speaker of the House John

find more. online. www.theithacan.org

Boehner said spending cuts are crucial to reducing the federal debt in a press release last month. “Cutting federal spending is critical to reducing economic uncertainty, encouraging private-sector investment and creating a better environment for job creation in our country,” he said. Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY) spoke out against Pell Grant cuts during a visit to Cornell University on Monday. Besides expressing the importance of investing in education, Hinchey said the cuts would it make it difficult for 2,200 Cornell students afford tuition. Mike Morosi, press secretary for Congressman Hinchey, said more than 14,000 college students in the 22nd District receive Pell Grant aid. “We’re going to work to make sure that in that process, these cuts to Pell Grants are something that aren’t considered and aren’t on the table as we negotiate a final plan,” Morosi said. If the budget is passed, Galley said he plans to look for off-campus housing to offset the costs of living at the college or may be forced to transfer to a less expensive school.

See pell grants, page 4


[ Thursday Brie f i ng ]

2 The I thacan

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

Nation&World Libyan tanks back off Western city

International airstrikes forced Moammar Gadhafi’s forces to withdraw tanks that were besieging a rebel-held western city yesterday, residents said, while people fleeing a strategic city in the east said the situation was deteriorating amid relentless shelling. Western diplomats, meanwhile, said an agreement emerging about NATO would take responsibility for a no-fly zone over Libya after the United States, which has effectively commanded the operation until now, reiterated that it was committed to the transition. NATO warships were to begin patrolling off Libya’s coast yesterday to enforce the U.N. arms embargo. The international coalition continued airstrikes and patrols aimed at enforcing a no-fly zone and protecting Libyan civilians early yesterday, but the report that Misrata was targeted could not immediately be confirmed.

Radiation hurts Japanese tourism

Images broadcast worldwide of Japan’s crippled nuclear complex and reports of food and water contaminated by radiation have battered its reputation as a safe destination, triggering an avalanche of cancellations by foreign tourists. In Ginza, a famous Tokyo shopping district, the foreign tourists who usually throng familyowned kimono stores and upmarket outlets like Prada are nowhere to be seen. A Japanese tourism official, Atsuya Kawada, said that with emergency work at the Fukushima nuclear plant and quake relief still under way, it was too early to count the cost. The Cabinet announced yesterday that disaster losses could reach $309 billion, while a spike in radiation levels in Tokyo tap water prompted a warning to not feed it to infants. Shock waves are spreading through the global tourism industry as companies from Beijing and Bangkok to the United States and Europe lose profitable bookings for Japan. Outbound flights from Japan are packed as foreigners and some Japanese flee, but planes fly in nearly empty.

NY nuclear plant under scrutiny

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is making a top priority of reviewing the Indian Point power plant located north of New York

this week 24

thursday

Writers of IC, a public reading sponsored by The Writer’s Collective, will go from 7 to 8 p.m. in Clark Lounge.

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City near a geologic fault line, New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. Cuomo said up to 6 percent of the U.S. population lies within a 50-mile radius of the plant and “evacuation isn’t even a feasible concept.” Opponents of the Westchester plant 35 miles north of New York City have new ammunition following the nuclear crisis in Japan, brought on by an earthquake and tsunami. NRC spokesman Neil Sheehan said the meeting yielded several agreements. He said state officials will join NRC inspectors as they review the plant’s ability to withstand stronger earthquakes. When the reactors were built in the 1970s, they were intended to withstand the region’s most serious earthquake in history. But new seismic data shows greater resilience may be warranted.

WikiLeaks targets Indian minister

India’s prime minister is struggling to defend himself amid a growing furor over a WikiLeaks cable alleging government corruption. The opposition harshly criticized Manmohan Singh’s government during hours of parliamentary debate yesterday following the release of a U.S. Embassy cable alleging the ruling party bought lawmakers’ votes to pass a crucial nuclear deal. Singh told a raucous Parliament that no one from his party acted unlawfully during the 2008 vote. Singh’s government has been hit by a series of corruption scandals in recent months.

NAACP notes leadership diversity

The NAACP’s newly revived Worcester, Mass., chapter elected a 28-year-old openly gay black man as its president this month. In New Jersey, a branch of the organization outside Atlantic City chose a Honduran immigrant to lead it last year. And in Mississippi, the Jackson State University chapter recently turned to a 30-something white man. Founded more than a century ago to promote black equality, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is seeing remarkable diversity in its leadership ranks — the result of an aggressive effort over the past four or five years to boost NAACP membership and broaden the civil rights or-

Rebuilding from remains

From left, Yoshito Goto and his wife Toshiko clean up their home, which was damaged by the March 11 tsunami, yesterday in Kesennuma, Japan. Japan’s police agency says more than 9,500 people are dead after the earthquake and tsunami and another 16,000 are missing. Shizuo Kambayashii/associated press

ganization’s agenda to confront prejudice in its many forms. NAACP branches have been recruiting gays, immigrants and young people who grew up in a world far removed from the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling that outlawed school segregation. Now, leadership positions that were once held only by blacks are being filled by members of other racial or ethnic groups.

Deaths escalate at Ukrainian zoo

An Indian elephant called Boy, the pride of the Kiev Zoo, collapsed and died in his enclosure. Around the same time, Maya the camel succumbed to a digestive illness, and Theo the zebra died after crashing into a metal fence. The animals keep dying at the Kiev Zoo. Animal welfare groups say dozens if not hundreds of animals have died at the zoo in recent years because of malnutrition, a lack of medical care

and mistreatment — and some suspect that corruption is at the heart of the problem. Naturewatch, a British-based animal welfare group, is among the organizations calling for the 100-year-old zoo to be closed and its animals sent elsewhere in Europe. New managers appointed in October said nearly half of the zoo’s animals either died or mysteriously disappeared over two years under their predecessors, and a government audit found that thousands of dollars were misspent as animals were illegally sold and funds earmarked for their food and care disappeared. Ukrainian prosecutors have also opened an investigation. Some activists suspect a secret real estate deal is in the works, so the zoo can be closed down and the prime land that it sits on in the center of Kiev can be sold. SOURCE: Associated Press

corrections

march 24-March 30, 2011 friday

Shabbat Dinner will begin at 7:15 p.m. in Muller Chapel. Forever Young, an event that will feature board games, contests, crafts and food, will go from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. in Emerson Suites.

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saturday

Relay for Life will be held from 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. in the Ben Light Gymnasium.

add your event Drop events for “This Week” in the marked box in The Ithacan office, or email Assistant News Editor Kelsey O’Connor at koconno3@ithaca. edu by 5 p.m. Monday.

Public Viewing Night will go from 8 to 10 p.m. in the Clinton B. Ford Observatory.

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sunday

Catholic Mass will be held at 1 and 9 p.m. in Muller Chapel.

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monday

The All College Faculty Meeting will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. in Textor 102.

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tuesday

Internship Prep, sponsored by the School of Business, will take place from noon to 1 p.m. in Room 114 of the business school. The All College Faculty Meeting will take place from 12:10 to 1:05 p.m. in Textor 102.

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wednesday

Evensong, a Protestant Community worship service, will begin at 9:30 p.m. in Muller Chapel. A Slice of Good, a presentation by Scott Wiener of Scott’s Pizza Tours, will take place from 11 to 11:50 a.m. in Textor 103.

It is The Ithacan’s policy to correct all errors of fact. Please contact Alexandra Evans at 274-3207.

copy editors Andrew Casler, Alexa d’Angelo, Sara Friedman, Dina Grimaldi, Rebecca Hellmich, Lilly Miller, Ryan Sharpstene, Carly Sitzer, Carly Smith, Juliana Stiles, Rachel Stokes.

Got a news tip?

Contact News Editor Taylor Long at tlong2@ithaca.edu or 274-3207.

Multimedia Can’t get enough of our stories? There’s even more online. Check out our multimedia at theithacan.org.

In Depth

Learn about the local food movement in Ithaca in the fourth installment in a series of multimedia special projects.

Video

Check out this week’s 1-on-1 with senior Ali DeCirce of the women’s lacrosse team.

Video

Hear students sound off their opinions regarding U.S. airstrikes on Libya in this week’s Snap Judgment.


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The Ithacan 3

Community contributes to Japan relief By mike mccabe staff writer

Students and local organizations are engaging in the national effort to raise money for victims of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. After a tsunami hit Japan on March 11, destroying property, killing thousands and causing a nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, the country is in need of donations. Student organizations at the college, such as the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Alliance, are finding ways to contribute to the local relief effort. Sophomore Julianne Feller, president of the college’s SPJ chapter, and senior Jacqueline Palochko, opinion editor of The Ithacan, are organizing a benefit concert to raise money. Feller said several acts have committed to performing at the concert, but they are still reaching out to student organizations and performing groups to help with the benefit. The money raised from the concert will be donated to the American Red Cross. Feller said the concert is scheduled for April 13 and will be held in Emerson Suites. AAA is also helping raise money. In addition to hosting a table at the benefit concert, club president Sherry Shen said her organization will spend the rest of the semester contributing to the relief effort. “I really felt like it was my responsibility as the leader of the club to do something for the people of Japan because of what had happened there,” Shen said. Shen said the club will make origami cranes throughout the rest of the spring semester and mail them to an initiative started by the Bezos Family Foundation called, “Students Rebuild.” For every crane received, the foundation will send $2 to support the Japan relief effort. “There’s a lot of personal meaning behind origami cranes,” Shen said. “Cranes are very sacred creatures within Japanese culture. The cranes are supposed to represent healing and support.” AAA will also be selling shirts that say “Ithaca is Gorges” in various Asian languages and donating proceeds to the American Red Cross, which in turn will funnel donations to the earthquake relief effort. Shen said proceeds from the organization’s Asia Night next month, a celebration of Asian cultures, will also donate proceeds from their dinner to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund for Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami. Yuko Mulagetta, director of enrollment and

By Brian Rank staff writer

Residents sift through rubble yesterday in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami that hit the nation March 11. The local Red Cross and Salvation Army are collecting donations for the relief effort.

Shizuo Kambayashi/associated press

communication, said she will take part in making origami cranes for the benefit concert along with AAA. Mulagetta, who has family in Japan, said she feels the impacts on a personal level and looks forward to coordinating with other students to help the Japanese people. “We have a very small Japanese community, but we can get together and think it through,” Mulagetta said. “This is still the very beginning.” Students and locals can also contribute to the relief effort by shopping at Wegmans, which is taking part in the effort to raise money for Japan. According to Wegmans’ website, the company will accept customer checkout donations that will go to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund for Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami, until April 2. The customers may donate as much as they choose, with 100 percent of proceeds going to the fund. K Minnix, communications director of the Tompkins County Chapter of the American Red Cross, said Red Cross chapters across the country are collecting monetary donations to give to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund for

Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami. “There’s nothing we’re doing in terms of going there, because the Japanese Red Cross is a very strong organization,” Minnix said. “They’ve got two million volunteers, and they’ve got a lot of experienced disaster relief people working with them.” Minnix said the American Red Cross committed $10 million to Japan as of March 17. Maj. Carl Carville, commanding officer of the Ithaca Salvation Army, said the Ithaca Salvation Army is also collecting donations for Japan. “What we’ve been asked to do is to receive donations for Japan, and as we receive them we pass them on immediately to our headquarters, who again moves them on to the folks in Japan,” Carville said. Mulagetta said it is crucial for students at the college to realize the impacts a disaster of this magnitude has on civilians and do what they can to lend a helping hand. “We thought we should get together and help Japan,” Mulagetta said. “This is a disaster that you’re not going to see for a century.” To get involved with the concert, contact Julianne Feller at jfeller1@ithaca.edu.

Students lose interest in green community By mimi niggel

contributing writer

A decrease in the size of the Ithaca College Sustainably Conscious Living community this year seems to indicate a lack of interest in the once-popular living community. Ronald Trunzo, associate director of residential life, said the SCLC, currently located in Terrace 02, once housed as many as 62 students, but since 2009, this number has steadily decreased. Currently there are 16 students living in the dorm, and this number is not expected to change next year. The SCLC, which was established in 2006, is the college’s only sustainable living community on campus. Marian Brown, special assistant to the provost and vice president of academic affairs, said the amount of interest in living in the SCLC determines how much space is allotted. “They respond to student interest,” she said. “At one point the interest was so strong, it was the whole building.” Brown said she is not sure what caused the decrease in interest. The goal of the community is to

Center grants Izzy Awards to journalists

provide housing where students share similar lifestyles and learn about the sustainability movement. The SCLC features low-flow shower heads and sink faucets, fiveminute shower timers, automatic occupancy lights and composting. Brennan McKenna, the SCLC resident assistant, said the purpose of the community is to foster environmentally friendly behaviors. “It’s a place where like-minded individuals can come and learn about sustainability and everything that encompasses sustainability,” he said. Although the SCLC is officially the only sustainable living community on campus, McKenna said in the end it is just like all the other residence halls. “It’s more about behavior and trying to encourage each other to not use our lights as much and eat things that have less of an environmental impact.” McKenna said. To be a resident in the SCLC, students apply through HomerConnect. If selected, they must attend three academic programs, complete two outreach hours and attend community dinners and meetings.

Margaret Keating, co-president of Ithaca College Environmental Society, discusses the 2011 Power Shift conference March 10 at a club meeting. Kevin campbell/the ithacan

McKenna said the SCLC prioritizes community outreach on campus through different projects such as minimizing wasted food and cleaning up natural lands owned by college. McKenna said he believes it is important for individual students to strive to be sustainable, no matter which residence hall they live in. Margaret Keating, co-president of the Ithaca College Environmental Society, said she thinks the college should expand the composting effort of SCLC to all the residence halls.

“A lot of people have suggested having access to composting in the dorms,” she said. “That’s another big, campus-wide thing that campus facilities just doesn’t think is feasible.” Brown said she wishes students would keep in mind that they can also be sustainable in other residence halls. “It’s no accident that three of the Quads — Clark, Hood and Talcott — are Energy Star buildings,” Brown said. “Because that is the most sustainable option you can choose, the traditional residence hall.”

The Park Center For Independent Media has chosen journalist Robert Scheer and “City Limits,” an investigative reporting magazine, to receive the third annual Izzy Award for independent journalism. Jeff Cohen, director of PCIM, said the COHEN said the center grants center only awards awards to inde- independent media outlets pendent journalists and publications that ask questions dropped by mainstream media outlets. The Izzy Award is one of the few awards that solely recognizes independent journalism. The award honors the late Isidor “Izzy” Feinstein Stone, a renowned investigative journalist who investigated government in his own “I. F. Stone Weekly.” Scheer is an independent journalist who helped found the news site Truthdig and published a book titled “The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street” in September. Cohen made the selection along with two judges: Robert McChesney, professor of communication at the University of Illinois, and Linda Jue, director of the G.W. Williams Center for Independent Journalism in San Francisco. He said the judges selected Scheer because of his book — which makes the financial crisis comprehensible — and for his weekly column on Truthdig. He said Scheer goes beyond the “opinion ranting” of other columns. “He does heavy reporting in each column,” Cohen said. “He’s almost in a league of his own.” The other recipient, City Limits, is a nonprofit magazine based in New York City that publishes investigative reports six times per year. Cohen said PCIM chose to recognize City Limits for its in-depth reporting, which focuses on issues faced by minorities, immigrants and the poor. He said the quality of reporting from freelancers guided by an editorial staff of only two people took the judges by storm. Jarrett Murphy, editor in chief of City Limits, said the award makes the time and financial sacrifices of the staff worth the effort. “It’s a tough time to be a journalist and try to do it as a non-profit and to do investigative stuff independently,” Murphy said. “It’s really, really nice when someone reaches out and kind of recognizes what [we’re doing].” Scheer and Murphy will speak at an award ceremony at 7 p.m. April 11 in Emerson Suites. Maura Stevens, associate director of PCIM, said the selection this year highlights the difficult work of small publications. “I hadn’t known about them until they were nominated, and their reporting blows me away,” she said. “I’m proud that the Park Center for Independent Media recognizes the work of less-wellknown journalists.”


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Grant cuts may impact attendance Pell Grants from page 1

“I don’t want to do that, but you have to do what you have to do,” he said. Anthony Hopson, assistant vice president for community and government relations, said 22 percent of the student body receives a Pell Grant. He said losing significant funding to the grant program will make college less affordable for students. “Ithaca College and other HOPSON said colleges are very the college is concerned about concerned about the ability for the potential cut. students to attend next year,” Hopson said. “The biggest impact is on accessibility to students, particularly those students who rely on grants or financial aid to attend school.” Since many students at the college make plans to fund the next year’s tuition the year before, Hopson said he is concerned the cuts could force students not to attend and would impact the type of services the college provides. The Office of Student Financial Services declined to comment. Hopson said the college has reached out to state and national governments and expressed it is not in favor of the grant cuts. Junior Alex Canovas said he pays his tuition through a variety of scholarships, federal aid and a Pell Grant. Canovas said these potential cuts would force him to find other options to pay for his senior year of college. Since his major in the music school has strict requirements, Canovas said he wouldn’t transfer elsewhere. “I’ve finished enough of school at this point that I possibly might just drop out and not finish my degree and just see if I could perform,” he said. “It would change the path of my life greatly.”

Wide range look to IC Applications from page 1

program and start recruiting students much earlier in their academic careers.” Maguire said out of 493 applicants for this year’s Park Scholarship, 15 will be accepted into the program, and funding for the Park Scholar Program as well as the number of awards available has not changed. President Tom Rochon said he was pleased by the amount of strength and diversity in this year’s application pool, which he attributes to the college’s reputation for student welfare. “I anticipate continuation of recent trends resulting from our focus on educational excellence through IC20/20 and our increased commitment to telling the IC story to external audiences,” Rochon said.

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

College looks to bolster DC program Washington from page 1

for fear that they’ll be unable to meet the college’s course requirements. “In a sense, you are taking a semester out,” he said. “You’re kind of just removing yourself from Ithaca College.” The program offers two courses each semester and three one-credit weekend seminars, Deborah Curry, director of the program, said. This semester, the core courses are “Media and Politics,” taught by John Milewski, a television radio host at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, and “The Arts of Public Washington,” taught by Heather Bowling, an art history lecturer. Each course meets once a week for about two and a half hours in the same apartment building where students live. As part of the D.C. program, students are required to maintain 12 credits to be full-time. Curry said students typically carry a six-credit internship and take at least two three-credit courses. Junior Rebecca Coffman said attending a three-hour night class after a full day’s work can be difficult, but she said the professors are generally understanding of students’ internships and assign less work than classes at the Ithaca campus. “It’s kind of annoying to get to class, but once we’re there, everyone’s really engaged and everyone participates,” she said. “It’s not bad at all.” Though she said she enjoys both classes, Coffman said the limited number of course options is a drawback to the program, as both classes revolve around specific subject areas — art and politics — that not all students are interested in. “You either like art, or you don’t like art,” she said. “So if you don’t like art, you hate that class.” Curry said the program has always offered two courses and three seminars. Students are not required to take the courses offered in Washington, and students can opt to take online courses through the college while studying away. Wernick said more course options would be ideal and would give more leeway to students who may be unable to enroll in the program while simultaneously meeting degree requirements. “If they had more courses to offer, that would be incredible,” she said. “I wouldn’t have had that initial stress of, ‘Is this something I can do because it may or may not meet my academic needs?’”

Controlled housing

When students arrived at the Woodley Park residential area, owned by Washington Intern Student Housing, the semester began on a promising note. Students said the apartments are in a safe neighborhood, sitting on Connecticut Avenue close to the Metro line and National Zoo. From there, students said their initial impressions went downhill. Wernick said the apartments were “bland,” “unfortunate” and contained a litany of imperfections such as unlevel floors, tough mattresses, missing refrigerator shelves and a mixture of mold and rust under the shower handle. Prior to WISH’s management, Boston University managed the building. Curry said on Dec. 31, the university’s management lease expired, and the college chose not to renegotiate. As a result, WISH now manages the property, which includes

Under the radar

housing, classrooms and office facilities. Students are required to live in the Woodley Park property. Coffman said she first realized the problems with WISH’s “ridiculous and completely obsolete policies” when students wanted to host family and friends. WISH policy dictates that only same-sex overnight guests are permitted in the apartments. “[The guest policy is] oppressive by gender, which especially goes against Ithaca College’s attitude,” Coffman said. Under WISH rules, guests must be approved by roommates and registered by the building manager. Guests can’t stay longer than two nights without special permission from the building manager. Junior Elizabeth Kinsman said she did not foresee such strict housing policies when she decided to spend a semester in Washington. “We are all coming from college residence hall policies, but this seemed a little extreme,” she said. One WISH rule prevents any open flames and another prohibits alcohol consumption in the apartments if any resident assigned to live in the unit is under the age of 21. Wernick said she worried these policies would prevent her from properly celebrating the Shabbat, or Sabbath. As a Jewish custom in recognizing the Shabbat, a blessing is placed on candles on Friday evenings, and after the lighting of candles and washing of the hands, there is a blessing over wine, she said. With the help of Curry, Wernick said accommodations were made to allow her to normally observe the Shabbat in her room. Curry said the WISH rules are stricter than Boston University’s policies, which the college, as well as other schools, asked WISH to continue. Dan Lewis, general manager of WISH, declined to comment on student concerns. Curry said the policies are WISH’s trial rules for the spring semester, meaning they are subject to change with deliberation based on balancing student preferences with WISH’s privacy, safety and liability concerns. It is ultimately WISH’s decision as to what policies are enforced, she said.

Student enrollment for the London and Los Angeles programs has consistently been greater than the D.C. program.

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D.C. Program L.A. Program London Program

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Junior Elizabeth Kinsman works on her laptop in her Washington, D.C. apartment. Though students in the college’s Washington program enjoy their internships, some have had problems with their housing.

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Spring‘09 Fall‘09 Spring‘10

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Source: Washington semester program, Office of international programs and The Ithaca L.A. Program Design by Yu-Chen (Jane) Chen

“The whole relationship is developing, is evolving,” she said. “[WISH is] trying to kind of feel their way as to where the policies should be.”

STAGNANT INTEREST The program generally attracts between 10 and 15 students a semester, with a higher enrollment in the spring than fall. Under his watch, Bohn said the highest enrollment count was 24 in Spring 2006. Consistently, enrollment numbers for the Washington program have remained lower than those for the college’s London and L.A. programs. Bohn said it would take more students to force the college to accommodate better housing and more class options and faculty. “It’s a little hard to commit extensive faculty or administrative resources to a program that enrolls 10 to 15 students per semester,” he said. Curry said interest in the D.C. program may be small in comparison to London and L.A., but she doesn’t view the two as competitors. Instead, she said the three all offer their own advantages to different sources. To market the program, Curry speaks to classes and department heads, hangs posters around campus and host information sessions. Karen Emnett, manager of administrative operations in the Office of the Provost, said the college allotted the program a budget of $230,000 for this academic year. Despite the low enrollment, she said the program’s budget has not varied significantly in recent years, nor is it expected to change in the near future. She said it’s difficult to determine the program’s budgetary impact because the amount of students it attracts to the college is incalculable. “Having IC students studying off campus, such as in D.C., L.A. and London, opens up opportunities for other students to attend IC and live on campus as well,” she said. “Thus, the budget implications aren’t just about tuition and costs inside an individual program like D.C. It’s a bigger conversation.”

Looking to The Future “It’s kind of an invisible program,” Bohn said. “It always has been.” Bohn said students aren’t as interested in Washington as they are with London and LA. Bohn said London offers an “exotic” abroad experience, and L.A. enjoys strong connections to the Park School curriculum. “The students themselves have to have an interest in going,” he said. “For an awful lot of students, Washington and the internships in Washington and the courses in Washington don’t seem to quite link with where they’re going.” Curry said she plans to offer online classes and independent studies to enhance flexibility in meeting the college’s course requirements. “What we’re seeing ourselves as a program is being a leader of experiential education and civic engagement and leadership,” she said. Even though she said the program has some negatives, Wernick, similar to other students, said it has opened her eyes to the possibilities made available to students at the college. “I came down so I could figure out my future,” she said. “Now, I have so much more exposure and perspective — and curiosity more than anything — of what’s out there.”


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Tapping into the land Course offers hands-on experience making and selling natural products By ryan sharpstene staff writer

While students across campus were frantically pulling all-nighters studying for midterm exams, freshmen Madeline Rublee and Jennie Ciota were pulling an all-nighter boiling sap to make maple syrup. “We really wanted to do the night boil,” Rublee said. “It’s a lot like camping out — there was a campfire and everything. There really isn’t a lot of opportunities for an experience like that on the Ithaca College campus.” The all-nighter Ciota and Rublee pulled was for the environmental studies course, Natural Resources and Ecology: Farming the Forest. The course offers students the chance to not only produce their own maple syrup but also produce, market and sell mushrooms and honey. Taught by Jason Hamilton, associate professor of environmental studies and science, the course has only been around this semester, but variations have existed for more than five years. Students in the class begin their class work indoors, growing oyster mushrooms. In February and March, students tap, boil and produce their own maple syrup. As the weather warms, students this semester will begin to grow shiitake mushrooms outdoors and build beehives for beekeeping and honey production. Most all of the products grown by the students are then marketed and sold based on current prices. Hamilton, who plans to offer the

course again in Spring 2012, said the mushroom production and beekeeping process will be facilitated by students as an independent study in the summer and fall. Weeks earlier, Ciota and Rublee traveled to the college’s sugar bushes on South Hill to tap several maple trees for the boiling process of maple syrup production. “A couple of weeks ago, we went down to the sugar bushes and drilled into the tress and put in a little spout on the hole and hung buckets,” Rublee said. “When the weather was right, the sap started flowing into the buckets. Now, we go down there to get the sap, and we hold it in storage tanks until they are full and ready for boiling.” Hamilton said more than five years ago he and a student started experimenting with growing shiitake mushrooms on the college’s property in Newfield, N.Y., and eventually at the college's Natural Lands on South Hill. In time, students began growing the mushrooms in both indoor lab facilities and outdoors at the college’s natural lands. Hamilton said throughout the semester, the 21 students in the class gain an experience comparable to running a business. “We have somewhere between 50 and 75 trees tapped right now,” Hamilton said. “[Students] have to go out and get the sap and then boil it and make the syrup. Then they have to go through the marketing and selling process, so they are really getting the

From left, seniors Victor Shelden and Valerie Newman collect sap from tapped trees for the Natural Resources and Ecology class. After collecting it, they boil it to get rid of water content. Students also produce mushrooms and honey. kevin campbell/the ithacan

whole process from start to finish.” Hamilton said students from all academic backgrounds are welcome to take the course. “It is about the relationship between humans and the environment,” Hamilton said. “In all of these systems people have to eat and live, so there has to be some sort of economic aspect. The students are really getting a holistic view of what environmental studies is about.” Students not only produce products but also keep an updated blog. As spring and summer approach, Hamilton said the next phase of the class will be to start producing honey.

Sophomore Hannah Whitehead, class bee manager, said because the class is just beginning to build the beekeeping infrastructure this semester, she does not expect the students taking the course as an independent study in the fall semester to produce large amounts of honey. “We are not sure if we are going to get any honey, but we definitely hope we do get some,” she said. “But establishing healthy beehives is the real goal for now.” Hamilton said besides the practical knowledge of growing and marketing, he hopes students will take away a deeper understanding of how to use

resources around them later in life. “What I want [students] to do is look at creative ways to look at the relationship between humans and the natural world and how is it that we as humans in the 21st century are going to live in this place and time,” he said. Rublee said despite the long nights, the lessons from the class are more than worth the hours. “Yeah, pulling that all-nighter was intense, but when you get to look at that bottle of golden syrup, it is totally worth it,” she said. To read the class blog, visit www.icntfp.blogspot.com.


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First year book to spark debate BY SAra friedman staff writer

“Ransom,” David Malouf ’s retelling of “The Iliad,” was selected as the Ithaca College First-Year Reading Initiative book for the class of 2015. “Ransom” tells the story of one of the oldest recorded wars in human history from a fresh perspective. The novel describes the battle of two great warriors, Achilles and Hector, and the determinaROCHON said the tion of Priam to recover the selection will help body of his son. The book students solidify was written in 2009. their worldview. The selection differs from previous selections like “Walden” by Henry David Thoreau and President Barack Obama’s “Dreams from My Father,” because it puts an old story into a contemporary context. The reading initiative was instituted at the college in 2007. President Tom Rochon said he thinks “Ransom” will interest students and ignite discussions in the classroom. “I’m excited about this First-Year’s reading selection, which I think will deeply engage incoming freshmen to think about important questions about the world we live in and our place in it,” he said. Bruce Henderson, First-Year Reading Committee member and professor of communication studies, said the committee chose “Ransom” because it will do a good job of introducing students to reading at the college level. “The novel is written quite well, so it gives students a very strong artistic experience while raising issues that stand back to the start of Western civilization that are relevant today,” he said. Bashar Hanna, associate provost for academic programs and initiatives, said the committee received suggestions for the

reading selection from faculty and other members of the college community before choosing 12 books to read and discuss. The committee then narrowed its selection down to six books Rochon considered and ultimately chose from. David Garcia, executive associate dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences, said the committee debated the pros and cons of several books, but “Ransom” was always the front-runner. “We were focused on books that would provide a breadth of discussion ... for a variety of disciplinary conversations and things about which there could be some kind of disagreement,” he said. Hanna said the book will be introduced to incoming students online and during welcome week. Networking devices like IC Peers and myHome enable the college to encourage discussions about the book among students before they come to campus in the fall, he said. “The thought is to have our facilitators, the faculty and staff, who will facilitate discussions during welcome week, start engaging with the incoming class in the late spring and early summer,” Hanna said. Garcia said the committee wanted a book that would encourage classroom discussion and could be easily integrated into a variety of different courses. “We asked ourselves how well the book would lend itself to first-year programming, the session that all first year students go to and beyond that,” he said. “We wanted it to figure into things that we might do for all students and also what individual faculty might do for their individual classes.” Hanna said he favored the book because it discussed the conflict of war in a way that opens itself up to critical analysis. “It introduces our students to an incredibly well written book, and it should resonate with them as they begin life’s journey on how to critically assess writing,” Hanna said.

Perfect harmony

IC Voicestream strikes a chord with students Sunday as they kick off Ithaca College Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Club’s Pump Up Week. The week of events, which included and tie-dyeing and cookie decorating, was organized to raise awareness of the disorder on campus. alex mason/The Ithacan


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College & City Medical editor to speak about health in media

Nancy Snyderman, chief medical editor at NBC News, will be this year’s Jessica Savitch Distinguished Journalism Lecturer at 7:30 p.m. April 7 in Emerson Suites. She will give a lecture titled, “Health and Media.” Snyderman has reported on a wide range of topSNYDERMAN ics that affect society and has traveled the world extensively. She reported from many of the world’s most troubled areas. Her lecture coincides with World Health Day and also serves as the kickoff for the “Media for Social Responsibility” mini-course. The lecture is hosted by the Roy H. Park School of Communications. The Jessica Savitch Distinguished Journalism Lecture Series brings a broadcast journalist to campus each year to honor the legacy of Jessica Savitch, a 1968 Ithaca College graduate who became an award-winning anchor and correspondent.

Ceremony to showcase student achievements

The first annual Office of Student Engagement and Multicultural Affairs Recognition Ceremony will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. April 14 in the Park Auditorium. The program is designed to honor students for their service, leadership and academic achievement. Honorees will include recipients of the Peggy R. Williams Awards for Academic and Community

Leadership, Rashad G. Richardson “I Can Achieve” Memorial Scholarship, William Scoones Community Service Award and others. Recipients of the awards will be notified of their status by April 1.

Tompkins County and sponsored by the Park Foundation. To sign up for the service, visit www.tompkins-co.catalogchoice.org.

Grad to lecture on poetry by American modernist

“Burnout: Rising from the Ashes” is a facilitated discussion open to faculty, staff and administration will explore ideas for developing resiliency, balancing varied aspects of life, understanding perfectionism and finding ways to align values and activities to be energized rather than depleted. The discussion will take place from noon to 1:30 p.m. tomorrow in the School of Business Room 301. Mary Tomaselli, director of employee and organizational development, and Deb Harper, director of counseling and wellness, will facilitate the discussion. The moderator will be Mara Alper, associate professor of television-radio. The discussion is sponsored by the Faculty Development Committee, The Center for Faculty Excellence and the Office of the Provost.

Robert Volpicelli ’09, will give a lecture at 5:30 p.m. today in the School of Business Room 103. The lecture is based on a project titled, “American Objects,” and concerns the work of the American modernist poet, VOLPICELLI Marianne Moore. Volpicelli graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English and an honors minor. Volpicelli is a Ph.D. candidate and Sparks Fellow at Pennsylvania State University.

Local program to reduce unwanted mail and waste

To combat unwanted mail, Tompkins County has joined four other communities across the country to debut a waste prevention initiative that will allow locals to stop unwanted phone books, catalogs, coupons and credit card solicitations at the source. This free service, designed by Catalog Choice, may help Tompkins County shed thousands of pounds of waste. Tompkins County joins Chicago; Kansas City; Marion County, Oregon; and Berkeley, Calif., in partnership with Catalog Choice. This mail preference service is for

Discussion to investigate ways to revitalize energy

Volunteer spots available for upcoming conference

Spots are still available for volunteers at the 2011 National Conference on Undergraduate Research. The conference will go from Wednesday to April 2. All volunteers get a free T-shirt and first-year students get their names submitted into the FYE Showcase Event raffle for a $250 Amazon.com gift card. Students interested should visit www.surveymonkey.com/s/88J2VRZ.

Public Safety Incident Log FEBRUARY 13 CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Circle Lot 1 SUMMARY: Person judicially referred for underage possession of alcohol and for an open container of alcohol. Patrol Officer Brad Bates. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported an unknown person damaged a card reader. Investigation pending. Sergeant Terry O’Pray. EXPOSURE OF PERSON LOCATION: West Tower SUMMARY: Caller reported an intoxicated person urinated in the hallway. Person transported to CMC by ambulance and judicially referred for disorderly conduct, exposure of person and irresponsible use of alcohol. Sergeant Terry O’Pray. CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Caller reported an incoherent person entered a room twice. Person located and declined medical assistance from ambulance staff. Person judicially referred for irresponsible use of alcohol. Sergeant Terry O’Pray.

damage to card readers. One person judicially referred for guest responsibility and one referred for providing false information. Patrol Officer Brad Bates. CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Clarke Hall SUMMARY: Person transported to CMC by ambulance and judicially referred for irresponsible use of alcohol. Sergeant Terry O’Pray. CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Rowland Hall SUMMARY: Person transported to CMC and judicially referred for irresponsible use of alcohol. Fire Protection Specialist Enoch Perkins. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported an unknown person tampered with one card reader and then damaged another. Investigation pending. Sergeant Terry O’Pray. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported an unknown person damaged a card reader. Investigation pending. Sergeant Terry O’Pray.

EXPOSURE OF PERSON LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: One person judicially referred for indecent conduct. SASP.

CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported a person acting disruptively and using profanity. One person judicially referred for indecent conduct. Sergeant Terry O’Pray.

CONDUCT CODE VIOLATION LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported people were identified and interviewed regarding

V&T VIOLATION LOCATION: Flora Brown Drive SUMMARY: During a vehicle stop, driver was arrested for DWI and issued uniform

New women’s magazine to feature life on campus

Her Campus Ithaca College — a collegiette’s guide to life — launched Tuesday. Her Campus Ithaca College, an online magazine made especially for college women features campus news, events, profiles and polls. Her Campus Ithaca College is a place for women to get personalized information about campus events. As a branch of HerCampus. com, the content of Her Campus Ithaca College is written by students and is a supplement to the national content that is created for college women everywhere. To read the magazine, visit www.hercampus.com/ithaca.

Seniors to vote for art in new digital media lab

As part of the senior class gift, Phase II of the Digital Media Lab in the library, student artwork will also be showcased. The senior class is hosting an art competition to display artwork from the class of 2011. Artwork submissions will be initially displayed at the Toast to 2011 event tomorrow. Voting will be open to all members of the senior class during the event. Competition winners will have their artwork displayed in the Digital Media Lab, and the top three submissions will receive additional prizes. All artwork must be digitally created and born, including but not limited to digital photography, computer graphics, digital manipulations and digital composite pieces. The theme for the piece is “What inspired you at Ithaca College.”

For more information, visit www.ithaca.edu/intercom.

Cornell to host summit for business propositions

Young adults will get the chance to pitch their best business ideas in a competition for a $1,000 cash prize. The We Live NY summit will take place today until Saturday at the Statler Hotel and Conference Center at Cornell University. The purpose of the summit is to showcase how young adults have found purpose and are making progress in New York state. The five programming tracks include Business and Entrepreneurship, Health and Wellness, Civic and Political Engagement, Cuisine and Culture, and Community and Regional Revitalization. Lt. Gov. Robert Duffy, former mayor of Rochester and Sen. Tim Kennedy will speak at the summit. Registration at the door is $40.

Wildlife Fund asks world to shut lights off for hour

The World Wildlife Fund is asking the world to shut lights off for one hour, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday. The initiative aims to raise awareness about global climate and energy issues. Bike Ithaca will host its annual Earth Hour Bike Ride. Participants meet near Gaia the Turtle in Cass Park and take a bicycle ride around the Cayuga Waterfront Trail in the park. This event is open to the public. For more information about the Earth Hour Bike Ride, visit www.bikeithaca.org.

selected entries from february 13 to february 16.

traffic tickets for Ithaca Town Court for failure to keep right, DWI and aggravated DWI with a blood alcohol content of .18% or higher. Person was judicially referred. Patrol Officer Brad Bates. MEDICAL ASSIST LOCATION: Boothroyd Hall SUMMARY: Caller reported an individual with abdominal pain. Individual transported to CMC by ambulance. Patrol Officer Christopher Teribury. LARCENY LOCATION: Z-Lot SUMMARY: Complainant reported an unknown person stole a GPS unit from a vehicle. Investigation pending. Master Patrol Officer Jeffrey Austin. BURGLARY/UNLAWFUL ENTRY LOCATION: East Tower SUMMARY: Caller reported an unknown person entered an area and possibly stole a stereo. Investigation pending. Sergeant Ron Hart. FIRE ALARM LOCATION: Hilliard Hall SUMMARY: Fire alarm activation was accidentally caused by a dirty detector. Detector cleaned and system reset. Fire Protection Specialist Enoch Perkins.

FEBRUARY 14 CHANGE IN CASE STATUS LOCATION: Office of Public Safety SUMMARY: Officer interviewed a person regarding damage to card readers reported on Feb. 12 in the Terraces. Incident reclassified from criminal mischief because device was previously broken.

Officer issued appearance ticket for the Ithaca Town Court for disorderly conduct, and this person was judicially referred. Master Patrol Officer Donald Lyke. CHANGE IN CASE STATUS LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported an interview was conducted regarding the falsely reported incident reported this date from Alumni Hall. One person was judicially referred. Patrol Officer Christopher Teribury. FALSELY REPORTING INCIDENT LOCATION: Alumni Hall SUMMARY: Caller reported a person posted a threatening message on a social network account. Investigation pending. Patrol Officer Christopher Teribury. UNLAWFUL POSS. OF MARIJUANA LOCATION: Campus Center SUMMARY: Officer reported a person smoking marijuana. Person was removed from building. Patrol Officer Brad Bates.

FEBRUARY 15 FIRE ALARM LOCATION: Center for Music SUMMARY: Fire alarm activation was accidentally caused by a person dusting. System reset. Patrol Officer Andrew Schneider. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Officer reported an unknown person pulled a card reader from the wall. Investigation pending. Master Patrol Officer Donald Lyke.

MEDICAL ASSIST LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Caller reported a person was experiencing chest pains. Person was transported to CMC by ambulance. Master Patrol Officer Donald Lyke. LARCENY LOCATION: Ben Light Gymnasium SUMMARY: Caller reported an unknown person stole several cameras and a tripod. Investigation pending. Sergeant James Landon.

FEBRUARY 16 UNLAWFUL POSS. OF MARIJUANA LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Two people judicially referred for unlawful possession of marijuana. Patrol Officer Andrew Schneider. MVA/PROPERTY DAMAGE LOCATION: Terraces SUMMARY: Caller reported a two-car MVA. Report taken. Master Patrol Officer Bruce Holmstock. For the complete safety log,  go to www.theithacan.org/news.

Key cmc – Cayuga Medical Center CCV – College Code Violation DWI – Driving while intoxicated IFD – Ithaca Fire Department IPD – Ithaca Police Department MVA – Motor vehicle accident RA – Resident assistant SASP – Student Auxiliary Safety Patrol V&T – Vehicle and Transportation


Opin ion

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editorials

‘Ready’ for an identity?

After negative posts about the branding survey, the college needs to start over before continuing with the project

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fter negative Facebook statuses and tweets about Ithaca College’s branding survey, it may be time for the Office of Marketing Communications to go back to the drawing board. The survey featured images designed to communicate that the college is “forward thinking, confident, professional, well-prepared and ready for the future.” The expression “Ready or not” with “not” being crossed out was also used. A final report and analysis will be available in May, but participants have already expressed disappointment. Facebook statuses and Tweets to the college mentioned that the “ready or not” expression with “not” being crossed out makes the college seem unsure of themselves. Statuses said the blue and white logo made the college seem as if it was an online institution or hospital. Students tweeted that they didn’t understand the meaning of some of the posters, and many of the posters were badly designed. According to the Office of Marketing Communications, the statement “ready or not” is designed to portray the college as an institution that creates graduates who are “ready.” The college should strive to find a more unique expression. Most students at institutions leave feeling more prepared for careers than when they began. We need something that sets Ithaca apart and makes us “ready.” Some of the posters also need to be redesigned. There should be no confusion as to what the message is. The Office of Marketing Communications needs to listen and implement changes based on responses. In doing so, the campus can move forward with a new public face for the college that members are proud of. Students may be ready to move forward, but the Office of Marketing Communications isn’t.

Helping Japan In the aftermath of the destruction, college students need to help victims

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n March 11, an 8.9-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Japan, creating a devastating tsunami that destroyed homes, cities and farms, and wreaked havoc across the country. The natural disasters caused three reactors at a nuclear power station to face partial meltdowns and fires, leaking radiation into the atmosphere. In light of the tragedy and chaos, college students need to step up to help. As of Monday, the official death toll was more than 8,600 people and projected to rise to nearly 20,000. Thousands of people are missing, while others struggle to find food, fuel and shelter among the wreckage. Elderly and ill people have filled evacuation centers. The World Bank announced Monday that it estimates the disaster could cost Japan $235 billion. After natural disasters and enormous tragedies, college students, especially at Ithaca College, have been at the forefront of the effort to give and volunteer. In 2005, students raised more than $45,000 for Hurricane Katrina, and last year, students raised more than $1,000 for Haiti through a concert. Students must rally together to provide support and relief for Japan. Whether it’s by organizing and attending events to raise money, giving blood to the Red Cross or shopping at businesses that are making donations, all efforts will make a difference. It can be as easy as texting REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10. Students have the tremendous resources and sheer numbers to band together and make a difference. Now more than ever, Japan needs our help.

your letters Park hopes for potential new major

I was delighted to learn about the IC Game Developers Club’s recent awards, and I’d like to take this opportunity to share some great news. Faculty from the Park School of Communications and the computer science department have been meeting over the past two years to develop an exciting new interdisciplinary major — emerging media. It was just approved by the College Academic Policies Committee; we now await the New York State Department of Education’s approval and registration for a new degree. Students will be able to select tracks in computational media, media design and production, or entrepreneurial media and will work in teams that reflect the composition of professional work groups that design,

and recognize that our students have the interest and talent to become the next new media innovators and entrepreneurs. Diane Gayeski Dean of the Roy H. Park School of Communications LETTER POLICY The Ithacan welcomes correspondence from all readers. Please include your name, graduation year, organizational or college title/position and phone number. Letters must be 250 words or less. The Ithacan reserves the right to edit letters for length, clarity and taste. All letters must be received by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. All letters must be signed, submitted in writing and either e-mailed to ithacan@ ithaca.edu or delivered to Park 269.

comment online. Now you can be heard in print or on the Web.

Write a letter to the editor at ithacan@ ithaca.edu or leave a comment on commentaries and editorials at theithacan.org. Letters must be 250 words or less, emailed or dropped off by 5 p.m. Monday in Park 269.

The Ithacan Elizabeth Sile editor in chief Casey Musarra Managing editor Jacqueline Palochko opinion Editor Taylor Long news Editor Alexandra Evans news editor Kelsey O’Connor assistant news editor Kelsey Fowler accent editor

produce and develop markets for new media including games (both entertainment and educational), social media strategies and smartphone apps. Television-radio and strategic communications will be bringing on new professors to teach additional courses on emerging media economics, design, and programming, and the cinema, photography and media arts department already includes writing for gaming in several courses. Last but not least, our very first Alumni Roundtable in Los Angeles in February focused on transmedia programming. The Park School’s legacy in new media goes back to 1980 when we ran the first public workshop in the world on interactive media and began teaching the first courses in this field. It’s an honor to continue that tradition of innovation

269 Roy H. Park Hall, Ithaca College Ithaca, N.Y. 14850-7258 (607) 274-3208 | Fax (607) 274-1376

Megan Devlin assistant accent editor Andrew Weiser Sports editor Kevin McCall assistant sports editor Michelle Boulé photo editor Graham Hebel photo editor James Earl assistant photo editor Kaydi Poirier online media editor

ithacan@ithaca.edu www.theithacan.org

Marissa Smith chief copy editor Lara Bonner chief proofreader Yu-Chen (Jane) Chen design editor Molly Apfelroth assistant design editor derek rogers sales manager evan kirkpatrick online editor michael serino ithacan adviser

Single Copies of the ithacan are available free of charge from authorized distribution points on the Ithaca College campus and in the ithaca community. Multiple copies and mail subscriptions are available from the office of The Ithacan. Please call for rates.


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Guest commentary

Helen Thomas makes anti-Israeli remarks again

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uring spring break, former White House correspondent Helen Thomas was honored as a keynote speaker at the College Media Adviser’s annual Media Convention in New York City. While she began discussing her defining role as the first female federal reporter and reveling in her glory days with former presidents, the discussion made a sharp turn toward her strong advocacy for anti-Israeli occupation and offensive comments about Palestinian invasion. Thomas brewed the same heat from the crowd as she did Megan Devlin from President Barack Obama last June with her remarks. After saying Jews should “get the hell out of Palestine,” she created a political uproar. Though she had the freedom of speech to make such a statement, Thomas made the right decision to retire upon the announcement. Giving weight to Obama’s claims, Thomas reiterated her criticized point that Israelis need to “stop taking what doesn’t belong to them” and “go home” to Poland and Germany. While she made a public statement in June — saying, “I deeply regret my comments I made ... regarding the Israelis and the Palestinians. They do not reflect my heartfelt belief that peace will come to the Middle East only when all parties recognize the need for mutual respect and tolerance” — Thomas did not back herself during this presentation. While Thomas’ suggestion for Israel was earnest, the rhetoric of her tactical approach is highly one-dimensional. Her over-generalization sparked heated side chatter among the audience members. Hands shot up from every angle, eager to grasp the microphone and have a dialogue with Thomas. During Thomas’ discussion, a third-generation Israeli student with Holocaust-surviving ancestors from Poland asked for advice about what she should do for her people in this time of crisis. Thomas’

Andrew Weiser

Newest trend to group text

T Christine Tatum, former Society of Professional Journalists’ president, talks with Helen Thomas at CMA’s media conference March 15 in New York City. Thomas made anti-Israeli comments when she spoke.

Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

response: “Stop taking what doesn’t belong to you.” The Israeli government, not the people, is ordering its military troops to occupy checkpoints along the West Bank and Gaza, and to evacuate Palestinians from residential buildings in order to house Israeli refugees. Instead of criticizing the Israeli government and its socially constructed institution for perpetuating injustices, Thomas collectively grouped all Israelis into one category. This rhetoric is dangerous, especially when such comments victimize people of different denominations. It skews and simplifies our understanding of the sociopolitical problem in the Middle East. Regardless of the Israeli citizens’ sentiments about their government’s policies, Thomas’ solution is impractical: the Israeli people should evacuate Israel and go to foreign nations or rely on

U.S. intervention to dismiss the internal problem. It ignores the structural issue at hand. The history embedded in this dispute does not call for separation of people based on religious ideology. It calls for the unification of national citizenry. Looking from an outsider perspective requires a holistic review of Israel’s situation. If the U.S. is to provide any support, it should be that of empowering citizens to solve their own domestic problems. If we do not recognize the importance of Israelis helping themselves, we risk repeating history. We risk victimizing innocent people and perpetuating political unrest with hasty solutions. Megan Devlin is a freshman journalism major and assistant accent editor of The Ithacan. Email her at mdevlin2@ithaca.edu.

faculty research

Nickelodeon has strong presence throughout world

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he following is an excerpt from the essay “Media Regulation and the International Expansion of Nickelodeon” written by Kati Lustyik, assistant professor of television-radio. The essay was published in the “Journal of Children and Media” in February. Children’s television has become one of the most crowded and competitive markets in the entertainment industry. Unfortunately, with a few notable exceptions, communication scholars have paid relatively little attention to either the growth or the international scope of children’s television. In the introduction to “Children, Young People and Media Globalisation,” Ulla Carlsson argued that the lack of scholarly research incorporating the “themes” of media globalization and children, is a “more or less virgin soil.” As she stated the problem: “Much has been written about, on the one hand, the globalization of the media, and on the other hand, young people and media, but seldom do these two discourses meet.” It is our intent to bring these two discourses together by documenting children’s branded entertainment and its distribution in the global market, using Nickelodeon, a multimedia brand that has come to represent a lifestyle and a particular philosophy of entertainment that connects to young people around the world. Owned by Viacom, Nickelodeon is one of the “big three” —

Weiser’s Domain

Kati Lustyik, assistant professor of television-radio, stands with SpongeBob Squarepants in October 2010 in New York City. Lustyik studied children’s media.

with Disney and Cartoon Network — media corporations that dominate the children’s global media marketplace. Nickelodeon programs such as “Rugrats,” “SpongeBob SquarePants” and “Dora the Explorer” are available today in close to 400 million households and in more than a 147 territories worldwide via 24-hour Nickelodeon channels or branded program blocks. By the end of the 1990s, Nickelodeon was present throughout Asia via different regional feeds and a growing number of

Courtesy of Kati Lustyik

country-specific channels such as NickIndia. Nickelodeon International’s management team perceived Greater China as a “huge challenge” requiring even more “thought, resources and a comprehensive strategy” than any other markets in the world, and stated, “We want to be [in China], and we are figuring out ways to do so.” Viacom’s CEO, Redstone, described as a “global go-getter,” has been patient and resourceful by gradually extending its corporation’s reach toward

the 370 million Chinese children and teenagers who were guarded from the direct reach of Western media. According to a New York Times article, Viacom’s “aggressive courting of Chinese youngsters” could pay off even if “a sliver of a demographic that now exceeds the population of the entire United States” is captured. When the state-controlled China Central Television launched a dedicated children’s channel (Channel 14) in late 2003, Nickelodeon was finally able to establish a programming block with shows such as “CatDog” and “The Wild Thornberrys,” which became immediate “top-rating performers” among viewers in 120 million households. The co-operation contract with CCTC was seen as “the beginning of a long-term cooperation between two media giants,” and Viacom executives felt “extremely honored” to be among the first content partners. When SpongeBob SquarePants, already syndicated in 170 markets in 24 languages, finally debuted in China in late 2005, it “catapulted to the No. 1 position in China across all cartoon programs in just four weeks,” and interestingly, a large portion of its audience constituted not only kids but also young adults. Kati Lustyik is an assistant professor of television-radio. Email her at klustyik@ithaca.edu.

All opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of The Ithacan. To write a guest commentary, contact Opinion Editor Jacqueline Palochko at 274-3208.

he first thing all my friends asked me when they found out I got a Blackberry Smartphone was “What’s your pin?” Blackberry Messenger, or BBM, is Research in Motion’s instant messaging service that has every self-respecting Blackberry user glued to his or her keypad or touch screen in a way that standard text messaging never could. Though BBM is almost instantaneous, it is limited to Blackberrys and isn’t available to Android or iPhone users. This messaging service is something that is free, fast and visually appealing with its chat-like feel and interface. Its groups feature has arguably sparked the next step in messaging — group chat. With a slew of new group messaging apps captivating the tech scene — making the barbecue almost seem like an afterthought — at this year’s South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas, it’s apparent that people are embracing this new trend in mobile technology. But what sets group messaging services like Kik Messenger, GroupMe, Beluga and Fast Society apart is they offer an experience that the current social media players, Facebook and Twitter, cannot offer in terms of messaging. Facebook is about communicating with friends, just as much as it is about playing Family Feud, but a status message isn’t the way to go about asking your friends, “Where is everyone going tonight?” More likely than not, users will get a reply from that random person who they “friended” during orientation and not from their immediate circle of Friday night regulars. Now Twitter is best used to broadcast information to a large following, rather than foster one-on-one interaction. Different features like @replies and direct messages can accomplish a more intimate form of communication between users but is cumbersome and leaves people searching for more than 140 characters. This is where group messaging takes off. Group messaging is set up in a way that allows users to communicate with the people they would most likely text or BBM — and not the suspect person who started following them on Twitter after a tweet about Phil Collins retiring from music. Group messaging changes communication. There’s no fancy method of delivery or hoops to jump through; it’s simply a way to contact people in an interruptive fashion through SMS or push notifications. It’s a way to restructure and create social circles on the fly, while specifying how private or public, with GroupMe’s “joinable” groups, users want their conversation to be.

andrew weiser is a senior journalism major. Email him at aweiser1@ithaca.edu


Opinion

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The I thacan 11

Guest commentary

Helen Thomas makes anti-Israeli remarks again

D

uring spring break, former White House correspondent Helen Thomas was honored as a keynote speaker at the College Media Adviser’s annual Media Convention in New York City. While she began discussing her defining role as the first female federal reporter and reveling in her glory days with former presidents, the discussion made a sharp turn toward her strong advocacy for anti-Israeli occupation and offensive comments about Palestinian invasion. Thomas brewed the same heat from the crowd as she did Megan Devlin from President Barack Obama last June with her remarks. After saying Jews should “get the hell out of Palestine,” she created a political uproar. Though she had the freedom of speech to make such a statement, Thomas made the right decision to retire upon the announcement. Giving weight to Obama’s claims, Thomas reiterated her criticized point that Israelis need to “stop taking what doesn’t belong to them” and “go home” to Poland and Germany. While she made a public statement in June — saying, “I deeply regret my comments I made ... regarding the Israelis and the Palestinians. They do not reflect my heartfelt belief that peace will come to the Middle East only when all parties recognize the need for mutual respect and tolerance” — Thomas did not back herself during this presentation. While Thomas’ suggestion for Israel was earnest, the rhetoric of her tactical approach is highly one-dimensional. Her over-generalization sparked heated side chatter among the audience members. Hands shot up from every angle, eager to grasp the microphone and have a dialogue with Thomas. During Thomas’ discussion, a third-generation Israeli student with Holocaust-surviving ancestors from Poland asked for advice about what she should do for her people in this time of crisis. Thomas’

Andrew Weiser

Newest trend to group text

T Christine Tatum, former Society of Professional Journalists’ president, talks with Helen Thomas at CMA’s media conference March 15 in New York City. Thomas made anti-Israeli comments when she spoke.

Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

response: “Stop taking what doesn’t belong to you.” The Israeli government, not the people, is ordering its military troops to occupy checkpoints along the West Bank and Gaza, and to evacuate Palestinians from residential buildings in order to house Israeli refugees. Instead of criticizing the Israeli government and its socially constructed institution for perpetuating injustices, Thomas collectively grouped all Israelis into one category. This rhetoric is dangerous, especially when such comments victimize people of different denominations. It skews and simplifies our understanding of the sociopolitical problem in the Middle East. Regardless of the Israeli citizens’ sentiments about their government’s policies, Thomas’ solution is impractical: the Israeli people should evacuate Israel and go to foreign nations or rely on

U.S. intervention to dismiss the internal problem. It ignores the structural issue at hand. The history embedded in this dispute does not call for separation of people based on religious ideology. It calls for the unification of national citizenry. Looking from an outsider perspective requires a holistic review of Israel’s situation. If the U.S. is to provide any support, it should be that of empowering citizens to solve their own domestic problems. If we do not recognize the importance of Israelis helping themselves, we risk repeating history. We risk victimizing innocent people and perpetuating political unrest with hasty solutions. Megan Devlin is a freshman journalism major and assistant accent editor of The Ithacan. Email her at mdevlin2@ithaca.edu.

faculty research

Nickelodeon has strong presence throughout world

T

he following is an excerpt from the essay “Media Regulation and the International Expansion of Nickelodeon” written by Kati Lustyik, assistant professor of television-radio. The essay was published in the “Journal of Children and Media” in February. Children’s television has become one of the most crowded and competitive markets in the entertainment industry. Unfortunately, with a few notable exceptions, communication scholars have paid relatively little attention to either the growth or the international scope of children’s television. In the introduction to “Children, Young People and Media Globalisation,” Ulla Carlsson argued that the lack of scholarly research incorporating the “themes” of media globalization and children, is a “more or less virgin soil.” As she stated the problem: “Much has been written about, on the one hand, the globalization of the media, and on the other hand, young people and media, but seldom do these two discourses meet.” It is our intent to bring these two discourses together by documenting children’s branded entertainment and its distribution in the global market, using Nickelodeon, a multimedia brand that has come to represent a lifestyle and a particular philosophy of entertainment that connects to young people around the world. Owned by Viacom, Nickelodeon is one of the “big three” —

Weiser’s Domain

Kati Lustyik, assistant professor of television-radio, stands with SpongeBob Squarepants in October 2010 in New York City. Lustyik studied children’s media.

with Disney and Cartoon Network — media corporations that dominate the children’s global media marketplace. Nickelodeon programs such as “Rugrats,” “SpongeBob SquarePants” and “Dora the Explorer” are available today in close to 400 million households and in more than a 147 territories worldwide via 24-hour Nickelodeon channels or branded program blocks. By the end of the 1990s, Nickelodeon was present throughout Asia via different regional feeds and a growing number of

Courtesy of Kati Lustyik

country-specific channels such as NickIndia. Nickelodeon International’s management team perceived Greater China as a “huge challenge” requiring even more “thought, resources and a comprehensive strategy” than any other markets in the world, and stated, “We want to be [in China], and we are figuring out ways to do so.” Viacom’s CEO, Redstone, described as a “global go-getter,” has been patient and resourceful by gradually extending its corporation’s reach toward

the 370 million Chinese children and teenagers who were guarded from the direct reach of Western media. According to a New York Times article, Viacom’s “aggressive courting of Chinese youngsters” could pay off even if “a sliver of a demographic that now exceeds the population of the entire United States” is captured. When the state-controlled China Central Television launched a dedicated children’s channel (Channel 14) in late 2003, Nickelodeon was finally able to establish a programming block with shows such as “CatDog” and “The Wild Thornberrys,” which became immediate “top-rating performers” among viewers in 120 million households. The co-operation contract with CCTC was seen as “the beginning of a long-term cooperation between two media giants,” and Viacom executives felt “extremely honored” to be among the first content partners. When SpongeBob SquarePants, already syndicated in 170 markets in 24 languages, finally debuted in China in late 2005, it “catapulted to the No. 1 position in China across all cartoon programs in just four weeks,” and interestingly, a large portion of its audience constituted not only kids but also young adults. Kati Lustyik is an assistant professor of television-radio. Email her at klustyik@ithaca.edu.

All opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of The Ithacan. To write a guest commentary, contact Opinion Editor Jacqueline Palochko at 274-3208.

he first thing all my friends asked me when they found out I got a Blackberry Smartphone was “What’s your pin?” Blackberry Messenger, or BBM, is Research in Motion’s instant messaging service that has every self-respecting Blackberry user glued to his or her keypad or touch screen in a way that standard text messaging never could. Though BBM is almost instantaneous, it is limited to Blackberrys and isn’t available to Android or iPhone users. This messaging service is something that is free, fast and visually appealing with its chat-like feel and interface. Its groups feature has arguably sparked the next step in messaging — group chat. With a slew of new group messaging apps captivating the tech scene — making the barbecue almost seem like an afterthought — at this year’s South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas, it’s apparent that people are embracing this new trend in mobile technology. But what sets group messaging services like Kik Messenger, GroupMe, Beluga and Fast Society apart is they offer an experience that the current social media players, Facebook and Twitter, cannot offer in terms of messaging. Facebook is about communicating with friends, just as much as it is about playing Family Feud, but a status message isn’t the way to go about asking your friends, “Where is everyone going tonight?” More likely than not, users will get a reply from that random person who they “friended” during orientation and not from their immediate circle of Friday night regulars. Now Twitter is best used to broadcast information to a large following, rather than foster one-on-one interaction. Different features like @replies and direct messages can accomplish a more intimate form of communication between users but is cumbersome and leaves people searching for more than 140 characters. This is where group messaging takes off. Group messaging is set up in a way that allows users to communicate with the people they would most likely text or BBM — and not the suspect person who started following them on Twitter after a tweet about Phil Collins retiring from music. Group messaging changes communication. There’s no fancy method of delivery or hoops to jump through; it’s simply a way to contact people in an interruptive fashion through SMS or push notifications. It’s a way to restructure and create social circles on the fly, while specifying how private or public, with GroupMe’s “joinable” groups, users want their conversation to be.

andrew weiser is a senior journalism major. Email him at aweiser1@ithaca.edu


12 The Ithacan

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011


Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

Ree l su

accen t

The Ithacan 13

ccess Film ek Cre l l a F sy of urte os co t o h P

s

Documentary wins College Television Award by Matthew Biddle Senior Writer

While other students are keeping busy with homework this semester, seniors Lauren Brauchli, Anna Campbell and River Lauren Ferris are preparing to jet to Los Angeles to walk the red carpet at a glitzy awards ceremony amongst industry leaders like “Glee” creator Ryan Murphy and television personality Tom Bergeron. The trio will be honored as winners in the documentary category of the College Television Awards in two weeks for their film, “Bound by Hope: One Family’s Story,” which they originally produced for their Video Workshop course last fall. “Bound by Hope” follows the Scoble family of Emmaus, Penn. At three months old, 4-year-old Joshua Scoble was diagnosed with Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, a rare genetic disease where muscles and tendons calcify, turning them into bone over time. The award is presented by the Television Academy Foundation, the same organization that gives Emmys to professional productions. The group will receive an Emmy statuette and cash prize for first, second or third place in their category. In its history, Ithaca College has

won this award only once before, in the news category for “Newswatch 16” in 2004. Steve Gordon, assistant professor of television-radio and the team’s professor for Video Workshop, is also a member of the Education Committee for the Academy. He said winning the award is a huge achievement, as there were 565 entries from 154 universities. “Park School productions are competing with the top film schools, and that hasn’t happened for years,” Gordon said. “It helps put us on the map as a real contender in the documentary category.”’ Raising awareness is a priority for the Scobles, since funding for research usually comes from families of FOP patients. According to the International FOP Association, there are currently only 700 diagnosed cases worldwide. Stacy Scoble, Joshua’s mother, said the family allowed the girls to film them because the documentary represented a way for the family to educate people about this disease. “Joshua was misdiagnosed, and they ended up doing surgery on his back, and that’s the worst thing in the world to happen,” Scoble said. “To me, the more people that know

about it, the less the chances of errors and misdiagnoses.” Scoble said small injuries or falls can cause flare-ups, and surgery only makes the condition worse. Eventually, FOP patients become permanently immobile, usually by their mid-40s. “Day-to-day life is a challenge,” Scoble said. “It’s very difficult to keep him away from any kind of trauma or injury. I want him to live a full life, ... but to an extent, we have to hold back just to protect him.” Ferris found the family after seeing them in a “Today Show” segment and approached them about being the focus of a documentary. After meeting the family, the group felt they could make a great film and help raise awareness at the same time. Starting in October, the documentary team drove more than three hours to Pennsylvania on weekends and followed the Scobles through their daily activities. Ferris said the team edited footage and contacted composers back on campus throughout the entire shoot. “We were down there almost every weekend for at least a month,” Ferris said. “One time we had to get up at 4 a.m. to shoot because we shot as soon as Josh woke up.” In the documentary, viewers are taken along as Joshua and his parents head to the county fair and go trick-ortreating for Halloween and enjoy the local playground. In a particularly emotional scene, Joshua’s father David Scoble breaks down when discussing how limited Joshua’s life will be and how much he

wants to share his pastime, hunting, with his son. Though films are rated on overall quality, Gordon said this emotional portrayal set “Bound by Hope” apart. “It’s sad and yet it’s hopeful, and I think that automatically gives it real power,” Gordon said. Brauchli said the family was incredibly open with them, which helped the film be successful. “They let us into their lives, which for some people can be very uncomfortable,” Brauchli said. “It can be difficult at times, but they know they need to do anything possible to tell people about this disease.” The film first screened at the course’s end-of-the-semester event in December. Brauchli said despite its emotional subject matter, the audience seemed to enjoy the film. “It can be difficult to watch because it’s tough to see a 4-year-old boy suffering,” Brauchli said. “You realize how lucky you are, and you appreciate everything you have in your life.” Scoble said she and her extended family enjoyed working with the filmmakers and the final product. “The way they put it together and what they got across to the audience, it was perfect,” she said.

Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

Campbell said for her and Brauchli, who have known each other since first grade, the award is a culmination of years working together on projects. “This is our final major piece in college and for it to win the top award is such validation both for our friendship and everything we’ve been working towards for the greater part of our life,” Campbell said. Though they never expected to win the award, Campbell said, they all agreed they were glad to show the universality of the family’s struggle. “It’s not just about disease,” she said. “Stacy says at the end of the film that Josh has so much pain every day of his life, and he’s still such a happy kid. It puts your life in perspective: this little boy has so much to deal with, so maybe my problems aren’t so bad.” To view the trailer, visit www.wix. com/fallcreekfilms/boundbyhope.

From left, seniors Lauren Brauchli, River Lauren Ferris and Anna Campbell pose with their equipment. They won a College Television Award. Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

Left: A still from “Bound by Hope” of Joshua Scoble’s back. He was diagnosed with Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progessiva, a disease that turns his muscles into bone, at three months old. Above: Scoble and his dad get ready to go trick-or-treating. Right: In another scene, Scoble shares a moment with Elmo. Courtesy of Fall Creek Films


[ a ccentuate]

14 The Ithacan

Hot or Not

Th ursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

This week’s hits and misses

Staff Writer Cady Lang rates the most and least stylish updates and modern touches to the swinging ’70s fashion this spring.

Hot

Maxi dresses These flowing dresses are the perfect update to any girl’s wardrobe. The long skirt elongates any silhouette and is forgiving to bodies that might still be hanging onto extra pounds from the holidays. They come in a variety of prints and styles from tribal Ikats and empire waist styles to cinched waists and stripes. Maxi dresses are excellent transitional pieces; wearers can layer them with a pair of leggings for extra warmth during Ithaca’s chilly spring while adding a cardigan or floaty scarf on top for an urban, street-style look. Once the weather warms up, wearers can lose the leggings and sweater for a more casual look with a pair of flats or sandals.

Lukewarm

Wide-legged jeans High-waisted, wide-legged jeans reminiscent of Farrah Fawcett in her Charlie’s Angels days are en vogue right now. While the wide-legged trouser style is flattering because it visually lengthens the wearer’s legs, it also means the wearer must wear a pair of heels (preferably a pair of platform espadrille peep toe wedges, in keeping with the ’70s trend) to prevent hems from dragging on the ground — impractical on Ithaca’s hilly campus. Also, the high-waisted style doesn’t suit all body types, making it hard to pull off without a small waistline.

Not

Jumpsuits Even though jumpsuits have been advertised as being “one easy piece,” they’re hard to pull off even for the savviest of dressers. First of all, the jumpsuit is one piece but has little sartorial flexibility like the maxi dress as a transitional piece because of its construction. Secondly, wearing pants as a part of one piece of clothing is something better left to babies and firefighters.

Fiddling around

From left, sophomore Riley Goodemote on the mandolin, sophomore Aidan Boardman on the acoustic guitar and junior Andrew Thomson on the bodhrán drum play Monday in the Whalen Center for Music in a St. Patrick’s Day event hosted by Damhsa Ceol Agus Craic.

alex mason/the ithacan

wtf

Self-Proclaimed English Perfumer Gets Grimy with Fecal Fragrance

With countless glass bottles of every color, shape and size lining the shelves of cosmetic stores and beauty aisles, it’s often deceiving that each bottle of perfume contains a distinctive scent to match its signature look. That’s why Jammie Nicholas launched his truly original perfume line, Surplus. Nicholas was inspired by “The History of Shit,” a book analyzing the role of feces as a building material for cosmetics. It suggests that pleasant smells are used to cover bad smells, so Nicholas figured bad smells could cover pleasant smells. He decided to extract “essential oils” from his own specimens to produce his first bottle of Surplus. If this fecalfragranced spray does not repulse scent-sniffing shoppers, it will most definitely trigger a few gag reflexes. — Megan Devlin

catching CRAZE

Formalized Felt Fedora Headgear Makes Appearance on Urban Scene

With organic wool felt, a handmade visor brim and classic fedora style, Soulland Adler has a new trend for hipsters. The menswear company’s remixed version of the fedora cap brings a new urbanized edge to formal wear. The headgear features a sleek visor brim but retains its classic appeal with sophisticated colors ranging from camel-toned beiges to dark navy blues. Not only is the design distinctive — a dashing addition to anyone’s summer wardrobe — but also authentic. Crafted in a small Copenhagen factory, Adler’s fedora cap is made using traditional Scandinavian hat-making practices, making fancy hat wearers not just look but feel the part. — Megan Devlin

quoteunquote There’s nothing worse than a fat coke head. — Former world heavyweight champ Mike Tyson on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” about his drug use before getting sober and becoming vegan.

celebrity

OOPS!

Totting up legal trouble

Expecting daddy-to-be Ryan Phillippe is facing some legal heat from ex-girlfriend Alexis Knapp, who now, after months of keeping quiet, insists the soap opera star is her baby’s father. Knapp hired lawyer Mark Vincent Kaplan, famed for representing K-Fed during his divorce and custody battle with Britney Spears, to ensure Phillippe takes a paternity test. While the actress says she’s preparing to become a single mom with or without the actor’s help, Phillippe is still trying to explain to his own mother why people call him a D.I.L.F. With what looks like baby No. 3 on the way — he has two with his ex-wife Reese Witherspoon — maybe it’s time to trade in the big boy tires for some training wheels, Ryan. — Megan Devlin


Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

ACCENT

The Ithacan 15

Play tells tragic British history of child laborers By Megan Devlin

Assistant Accent Editor

Ever wonder what today’s international corporations have in common with 18th-century English working conditions? Ithaca College’s production of “Coram Boy” unveils the answer by drawing connections between a socially unjust past and present day labor practices. Adapted by Helen Edmundson from the award-winning children’s novel by Jamila Gavin, Ithaca College Theatre’s rendition of “Coram Boy” illuminates the hidden secrets of the working class in the Georgian era of industrialized England and connects workers’ struggles to modern day. With its dark and bloody backdrop of infant murders and child slavery, the play reveals one boy’s passion for George Frideric Handel’s music and his watchful protection of an orphaned slave boy. The characters live in a society where the shift toward industrialization has caused mass migration and exploitation of the poor. In order to create the inhumane and dark world of the play, senior Erin Coen, assistant director, said her job is to help sculpt the actors to convey the play’s sensitive nature. “There’s some pretty shocking content in the play,” she said. “This story is so beyond what we consider our reality in modern day. So it’s the kind of play where you watch and say, ‘That was really interesting, but how does it connect to my everyday life?’” To answer this question, Coen said the directors work with the dramaturge to provide the actors with figures and tools to help them believably recreate the time period and connect the audience to the play’s content. Sophomore Patrick Mazzella, who plays the lead role of Meshak, the mentally damaged and mute son of Otis, said the musical component of the show helps portray the main plot along with the characters’ personal stories. Meshak seeks refuge from the cruel reality of the world in his affinity for God and the angels. The cathedral is his escape from the harsh

Sophomore Partick Mazzella, as Meshak in “Coram Boy,” saves an infant from the murderous Otis, played by junior John Gardner. The play follows orphaned child laborers in England.

Juan Tamayo/The Ithacan

treatment he faces from his abusive father. In this sense, Mazzella said the music students infuse the play and bring it to the next level. “It’s a different atmosphere when the music students are there than when it’s just us working on scenes,” he said. “When the music students are there the whole show just comes together and it’s really just a spectacular place to be.” With a complete score, the full choir made up of mostly music students amplifies the theatrical experience. Coen said musical selections by Handel support the play’s story line, and the female musical theater majors’ strong training enables them to execute the required vocal style for their youthful roles.

“They have to learn how to sing like choirboys,” she said. “It’s a very pure, clear tone with no vibrato.” In addition to musical support, Mazzella said he needed additional resources to develop his tormented character. He said it was a challenge to embody Meshak without having any personal exposure to his troubled reality. “The hardest part is that he lives in a world that doesn’t give him a chance,” Mazzella said. “I guess the hardest part is trying to understand the circumstances he’s trying to live in. They’re just brutal and harsh and not humane.” To illuminate the play’s social justice aspect, senior dramaturge Emily Viterise said she shows

actors the connection between slavery of the past and present during the rehearsal period. She said the play’s program will include logos of companies that still practice child labor, showing the audience this continuing issue. “It’s a very interesting topic to bring a new, modern day element into a historic show, and it’s a way to bring people in and have this new information on top of history,” she said. Coen said the ensemble focuses on each component to emphasize the severity of child slavery and exploitation. “Everything helps tell the story, from the costume to the set, and the lights and sound help enrich that,” she said. With more than 60 scenes and locations, the set incorporates everything from the vastness of the cathedral to the looming feel of the forest trees. Coen said having multiple sets was a challenge when planning scene changes. She said the cinematic feel of the script called for her to make the changes as seamless as possible. “We wanted to keep true to the world of the play, so we have the servants move the scenery,” Coen said. “This is such a rich world that play takes place in that you don’t want to just take the audience out of that mind-set.” The Georgian costuming is also true to the historic era. Coen said it helps illustrate the characters’ social classes. From aristocrats adorned with lush collars and wide-hipped ladies in long gowns to the poor “rag people” wearing earthy tones, there are characters from all walks of life. Coen said the multifaceted nature makes producing “Coram Boy” a challenge and is the main reason why many other schools do not perform it. “As we began the process, it seemed a lot bigger than we thought it would, but we’ve really risen to meet that challenge and embraced it,” Coen said. “Coram Boy” opens Thursday, with a preview Tuesday, and runs through April 3 in the Hoerner Theater. Tickets are $5.50 to $11.


16 The Ithacan

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011


Accent

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The Ithacan 17

Live culture inspires new gluten-free shop BY Lara Bonner Chief Proofreader

Looking through the window of the newest eatery in Ithaca, it is customary to see a little girl in a blue dress and rain boots diving fearlessly into a ball pit or munching happily on some candied ginger or an avocado. With its magnetic chalkboard walls, stage for live music and cozy seating, Culture Shock, Marian Flaxman’s new restaurant on South Cayuga Street, inspires exactly this kind of fun-loving behavior. With 5-year-old daughter Aurora by her side, Flaxman created a funky, healthy hangout spot in Ithaca that combines two kinds of live culture: the healthy, live cultured food — fermented foods that have bacteria that help digestion — on the menu, and the live culture of art and conversation. Flaxman has celiac disease, which prevents the small intestine from absorbing gluten, a protein found in foods such as wheat, and has been vegan and vegetarian in the past. She is also a certified holistic health coach. After her daughter was born and also diagnosed with celiac disease and other food allergies, Flaxman said she had to change the way she was eating, inspiring her to open Culture Shock at the beginning of March as an entirely gluten-free restaurant with vegan options. “That got me into just like playing with food more, and then playing with salad more, in particular, and using salad as a base for every meal,” she said. Salads are one of the main menu

items at Culture Shock, and each salad is an artistic creation that contains a live cultured food item such as kombucha or kimchi. Some traditional cultures, such as those in Korea and Russia, always contain a fermented food element, such as sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, or raw cultured yogurt and cheese. “Fermented foods are really good for you because they’re really high in live, healthy bacteria, which support your immune system and your digestion,” Flaxman said. “So then you come to our culture where people always have digestive problems — they’re always getting sick; no one knows why. We’re missing that from our food system.” Flaxman said she wanted to create a place to help bring live cultured foods back into everyday eating in a way that wouldn’t turn people off. For example, another one of the big items on the menu is the tart frozen yogurt, which is live cultured and also local, like most of the other foods. Customers can also take a swim through the ball pit in the corner, hang out at the bar, listen to live music and admire local art on the walls. With bright purple lights, green paint and the vibrant dressings on the salads, Culture Shock is a treat for both the eyes and the taste buds. “We’re all coming together over a bubbly drink that’s full of live culture and a bubbly person on stage who’s full of living culture,” she said. Flaxman said part of why she feels Culture Shock will be successful is the energy her staff brings to the job.

Owner Marian Flaxman puts the finishing touches on a salad with egg at her new restaurant Culture Shock. The menu focuses on live cultured food items, such as raw cultured yogurt and sauerkraut, and is gluten free.

Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

Ithaca College sophomore Ben Lloyd, an employee at Culture Shock, said he applied because he thought it sounded like the coolest job he could imagine. When he was hired, he realized he had been right — everything from the atmosphere to the food impressed him, he said. “I couldn’t ask for a better boss, and the food is the best food I’ve ever had,” he said. “When I made my salad on the first day, it was the best salad I’d ever had in my life. So everything about this place is pretty awesome.” Flaxman said she hoped Culture Shock would help fill a void in Ithaca in terms of the lack of child-friendly restaurants downtown. “People will enjoy it for a lot of different reasons,” Flaxman said.

“Anyone who wants somewhere they can come hang out ... and not worry about being stressed out about ‘Is my kid being too loud’ or whatever. They’re not; they’re in a ball pit. It’s all good. They can draw on the walls. Literally, we have chalk.” Her daughter Aurora is living proof the restaurant is still appealing to kids despite the emphasis on healthy foods kids normally stray away from. “I like the ball pit,” she said. “I like the kombucha.” First-time customer and Ithaca resident Molly Rohrer was blown away by the Fratboy Salad and jasmine kombucha she ordered, and said she found the atmosphere pleasantly different from other eateries.

“I love the local art especially, and the decorations are great,” she said. “And the whole live culture thing is pretty cool.” With its overarching philosophy of experimenting with different things and having fun doing it, Lloyd said he would recommend Culture Shock to anyone and everyone. “You can chill in the corner with couches, you can jump in a ball pit, you can listen to live music and you can eat amazingly healthy food,” he said. “It’s just completely different, and the atmosphere in here, there’s just nothing like it.” Culture Shock is located at 109 S. Cayuga St. Visit the restaurant’s website at www.tasteliveculture.com.


Accen t

18 The Ithacan

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

Display frames iconic American art

hot dates

thursday

by Matthew R. Reis staff Writer

From fast-food chains to celebrity tweets and the clothes people wear, iconography is everywhere. Undergraduates of Cornell University’s History of Art Majors’ Society did an adequate job selecting the works featured in “iCON: Consuming the American Image,” an exhibit depicting the heavy influence “iCon” of icons in everyday life. The Johnson The presentation stacks up Museum well with other professionally Our rating: HHH designed exhibits displayed at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum. It consists of photographs, lithographs and magazine covers, among other forms of media. Though the pieces are evocative and challenge socio-political constructs, they do not mesh well together. For example, the Time Magazine cover celebrating the power of individuality placed a little too close to a nude photo of Marilyn Monroe. “Consuming the American Image” is too broad a topic to cover in such a small exhibition space. Though the curatorial team makes a decent attempt to work with the allotted space, the mere 33 items on display don’t do the theme justice, especially because icons, such as symbols and advertisements, have been ubiquitous in America since the country’s inception. The selection was inspired by popular artists like Andy Warhol, whose Campbell’s soup prints were extremely influential. Elliot Erwit’s 1955 “Southern Charm” photo is the most important work on display. The silver gelatin print displays the hues of black and white tones, resulting in a highly contrasted image. The frame shows a weathered black woman walking under a painted “Southern Charm” advertisement. Erwit poignantly snaps the shot as the woman steps under the “m,” showing the skewed notion of 1950’s southern hospitality. Surprisingly, only one religious work was on display at the museum: Audrey Flack’s “Macarena Esperanza.” The piece depicts a figure whose graceful praise and tears streaming down her cheeks will remind viewers of traditional representations of the Virgin Mary. The work speaks to Christians, but it isn’t the most

Tom Olson, a local blues guitarist, will play from 6 to 9 p.m. at Stella’s Restaurant. Music is free for diners, who are also invited for tastings of local wine and cuisine.

ART Review

Tunes For Trails, a Stevie Wonder tribute, will be featured at this year’s annual benefit show for the Cayuga Waterfront Trail. It will begin at 9 p.m. at Castaways. Tickets are $15 at the door.

friday

Forever Young, a ’90s throwback event sponsored by IC After Dark, will be held from 9 p.m. to midnight in Emerson Suites. Food and games will be provided. Admission is free. Freshman Elizabeth Gough looks at an oversized image of Andy Warhol’s classic Campbell’s soup can print. This 1960s design has preserved its identity on American shelves throughout the decades.

Juan Tamayo/the ithacan

modern or contemporary icon best suited for this collection. Female sexuality is also dominant in the exhibit. Ruth Bernhard’s “In the Box – Horizontal” is feminine, passive and natural. The female figure is shown in all its glory but isn’t raunchy like Bert Stern’s portrait of Marilyn Monroe, who is nude from the waist up and in a pinup pose. Ellsworth Kelly’s untitled 1971 screen print depicts a black rectangle above a white one; however, it isn’t representative of American iconography. The meaning of the print is ambiguous and leaves viewers guessing, possibly about the polarizing nature of Civil Rights Movement during the previous decade. However, James Montgomery Flagg’s 1915 wartime propaganda poster “Be a U.S. Marine,” is crystal clear. The striking imagery of a marine proudly standing in front of old glory conveys

American patriotism. It especially resonates with exuberant young men, suggesting that average Joes can become rough, battle-hardened soldiers. The exhibit interestingly mixes modern art of the early 18th century with contemporary pieces from post-World War II. When viewed as separate works of art, the pieces are highly representative of the era from which they emerged. While the show’s selection is very limited and some works are reused from recent exhibits, big names like Andy Warhol and his artful muse Marilyn Monroe are well represented. Die-hard patriots fond of Americana art may not find anything new at the exhibit, but for the average viewer, it’s worth a glance. “iCON: Consuming the American Image” is on display at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum now through June 12. Admission is free.

Staff writer

After launching 15 records in less than two decades, R.E.M. has gone three years without releasing a new album. But the band returns to the stage with its most recent, “Collapse Into Now.” R.E.M. While not earth“Collapse shattering, this album Into Now” gives listeners 12 new Warner Bros. Our rating: tracks consistent to HHH the band’s sound but with a modern twist. Shifting away from post-punk and new wave, R.E.M.’s early refusal in its career to incorporate cliché guitar riffs or synthesizers helped establish its timeless sound. Often politically charged, the group’s compositions

Album Review

have preserved its distinct sound, allowing R.E.M. to remain a forerunner in the rock world. While the album features R.E.M.’s traditional soulful wailing, the vocals are cleaner and more developed, showcasing the band’s desire for more personal and expansive songs, instead of its traditionally fast, political music. Opening track “Discoverer” is the album standout. Like “All The Best,” it doesn’t sound like classic R.E.M. music. It has an exciting and fuller but less eclectic sound and presents a more mature and sincere side of the band than previous albums. “Oberlin,” “Oh My Heart” and “Me, Marlon Brando, Marlon Brando And I” include the expected twangy vocals and strong acoustic guitar — to the point where tired listeners might think

saturday

Lost Sailors, a local Grateful Dead tribute band, will perform at 10 p.m. at Castaways. Tickets are $6 at the door.

sunday

Not From Wisconsin, an alternative country and indie rock band with guest Valerie Orth, will begin at 7 p.m. at Felicia’s Atomic Lounge. Admission is free.

Odd sound redefines band

Alternative rock originator showcases crisper vocals by lucy walker

Live Jazz, a weekly dance social with live music, will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at Oasis. Admission is free.

by Alexandra Palombo senior Writer

It’s disjointed, synthesized and strangely beautiful. With “The King of Limbs,” Radiohead returns to its rightful alternative rock throne on a Radiohead wave of experi“The King of mental sounds. Limbs” Radiohead XL Records starts its spacOur rating: ey opus with HHH “Bloom,” a dizzying blend of piano runs, warped orchestras and Thom Yorke’s strong and static tenor voice. Each song builds to the next with more guitars and different drums, creating the effect of one intense stream of sound throughout the album. For fans of the upbeat and cheerful album “In Rainbows,” this CD might be a bit of a shock. “The King of Limbs” is eerily calm and

Album Review

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

they’re hearing a remake of an R.E.M. classic. And with lead singer Michael Stipe mumbling soulful lyrics and cramping them together, “Mine Smell Like Honey” sounds like a botched-up studio recording from the ’80s. “Collapse Into Now” certainly won’t redefine rock or turn the musical world upside down, but it’s an enjoyable and well-crafted collection that R.E.M. aficionados will appreciate for its balance between tradition and innovation.

returns to the band’s experimentation with new and odd sounds. “Feral” rearranges musical components of the track, forming a rich soundscape and skewed vocal puzzle, while the echo-loop of Yorke’s voice in “Separator” makes the song dreamy and peculiar. Mixing large-scale strings with hundreds of synthesizers, the album is a weird and original sound emblematic of the group.

Courtesy of xl Records

quickies “Last Night On Earth” The British indie folk band’s third album is a dramatic change of style. Departing from its folky sound, the once-accent-tinged vocals are replaced with heavily synth-pop beats, making the band less distinctive. courtesy oF vertigo record

“Live on I5”

“When You’re Through Thinking, Say Yes”

Noah and the Whale Vertigo Records

Soundgarden A&M Records Seattle grunge band Soundgarden’s latest live album from their tour in 1996 features classics like “Black Hole Sun.” The album proves the band still has its niche and fan base.

Yellowcard Hopeless Records

Returning from a two-year hiatus, Yellowcard’s seventh album is a solid compilation. The lyrics aren’t stellar, but the pop-punk violin is superb. courtesy of Dine hopeless Records

courtesy oF A&M Records

compiled by lara bonner


Accen t

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The Ithacan 19

Stringy elements demoralize fairy tale [ Uninspired retelling of Brothers Grimm plot neglects moral focus by danielle torres contributing Writer

A fantasy thriller full of twists, including one on a classic, “Red Riding Hood” tells the story of a young maiden who breaks all the rules but never suffers the consequences. In the classic Brothers Grimm tale, Little Red “Red Riding Riding Hood wanHood” ders through the Warner Bros. woods, straying Pictures from the path where Our rating: she encounters a HH wolf. In this film, Red, otherwise known as Valerie (Amanda Seyfried), is older and frequents the forest to meet with her childhood playmate Peter (Shiloh Fernandez), who she secretly loves despite an arranged marriage with the affluent Henry (Max Irons). Aside from the dramatic love triangle, a werewolf plagues Valerie’s wood-shrouded village, promising death to every victim. Tired of living in terror, the villagers decide to hunt the wolf. Conflict ensues when a legendary werewolf hunter, Father Solomon (Gary Oldman), discovers the creature is really a villager who remains in human form by day. Well-known director Catherine Hardwicke, who directed “Twilight” and brought disappointment to fans of the novel with the film’s mediocre script and cast, pleasantly surprises viewers with her use of strong visuals in “Red Riding Hood.” The use of handheld cameras does a fine job showing the perspective of the erratic werewolf. Hardwicke’s flair for unusual angles builds tension throughout the film. In one scene,

ticket stub

]

valid friday through thursday

cinemapolis The Commons 277–6115

today’s special 7:25 p.m. and Weekends 2:25 p.m. True Grit 7:05 p.m. and Weekends 2:05 p.m.

Film Review

the last lions 7:20 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. and Weekends 2:20 p.m. and 4:20 p.m. biutiful HHH 8:45 p.m. and Weekends 4 p.m. Barney’s Version 9:15 p.m. and Weekends 4:15 p.m.

Cloaked in her signature red robe, Valerie (Amanda Seyfried) scurries from the village into the dangerous woods. She warily wanders through the forest and veers off the path, hoping to avoid the vengeful werewolf plaguing the town. Courtesy of warner bros. Pictures

the camera shoots from behind the eyeholes of a metal mask, shifting between each one to propel the audience into the frustration and drama. This tension is perfectly controlled, and the film progresses at a steady pace that leaves viewers fully engaged as the plot unfolds. While the script contains some blatant attempts to incorporate original fairy-tale lines, like “I’ll huff and puff and blow your house down,” Hardwicke’s cinematic fable poorly meshes such iconic elements into the film. It also deviates from the tale’s original moral of filial piety and warning against talking to strangers with the absence of motherly precaution.

Little Red Riding Hood’s trademark cloak does not appear until 20 minutes into the film. Among her middle-aged gowns and modest dress, the cloak has no real significance and is treated as any ordinary garment. While there aren’t any particularly memorable lines, all are delivered well by the cast. Seyfried does a wonderful job balancing drama, courage and naive curiosity in her role of Valerie. She completely commits to her scripted character, from bone-chilling encounters with the wolf to passionate love scenes with Peter. However, some scenes don’t resonate with the film’s historical period. Hardwicke includes an erotic dance

Guiltless acting drives crime plot

segment that doesn’t work for a story set in the Middle Ages. This playful dance is much better suited for a scene in a contemporary dance club rather than a conservative village celebration. The raunchy choreography diverts from the film’s plot. “Red Riding Hood” is well made but is nothing spectacular. Hardwicke doesn’t revamp the Brothers Grimm tale but crafts a movie with borrowed elements. If viewers want strong visuals, some eye candy and a mild thriller, this film is worth seeing. “Red Riding Hood” was written by David Johnson and directed by Catherine Hardwicke.

Edgy performance stirs up suspense By Alexandra Palombo senior writer

By Alyssa Frey staff Writer

Matthew McConaughey sheds his shirt along with his typical pretty boy image in “The Lincoln Lawyer” as he plays Mick Haller, a fierce defense attorney who represents the scumbags of Beverly Hills. Based on Michael Connelly’s novels about Haller, who works “Lincoln on legal cases from the back of his Lawyer” automobile, “The Lincoln Lawyer” Lionsgate Our rating: boasts a surprisingly well-rounded HHH1/2 cast whose acting drives a compelling story line and keeps viewers guessing throughout the film. The plot is simple: Haller gets a call from a potential client, Louis Roulet (Ryan Phillippe), a wealthy and handsome young realtor. Reggie Campo (Margarita Levieva), a good-looking prostitute, accuses Roulet of beating and raping her after meeting at a local nightclub. Roulet proclaims his innocence and that the accusation is a ploy to steal his wealth. What unfolds is a twisted, characterdriven story and courtroom plot that develops into a film that keeps viewers at the edge of their seats. Despite the low expectations many moviegoers had for McConaughey because of his rom-com past, he shines in this film. He speaks every line with conviction and intent. While Phillippe’s looks seem to be his biggest strength, his acting excels in this flick, living up to the bad boy reputation he earned years ago in “Cruel Intentions.” Marisa Tomei brilliantly co-stars in this courtroom drama, playing both Haller’s ex-wife and the assistant district attorney who he regularly faces in court. Tomei spans the two worlds with ease, applying her mean streak to the law yet maintaining her motherly poise and nurturing role as a single parent.

However, there were several downfalls to the anticipated flop. Throughout McConaughey’s adventures in his Lincoln, the camera makes quick and awkward movements between the city skyline and the actor, seeming as if a rave were happening in his vehicle. These movements confuse the viewer about what is actually taking place in the scene. Director Brad Fruman’s strength in casting and acting in “The Lincoln Lawyer” overwhelmingly outweigh the film’s weaknesses, including shoddy camera work and exaggerated multiple endings. It’s a captivating story that keeps viewers wanting more. The film’s quality is equivalent to that of Mick Haller’s Lincoln: clean, classic and desirable.

Liam Neeson has carved himself quite the niche as a thriller-action hero and keeps up his strength in the international crime thriller “Unknown.” The film opens with Dr. Martin Harris (Neeson) and “Unknown” his wife Elizabeth (January CPTC Jones) preparing for a conOur rating: ference in Berlin. But when HHH Harris forgets his luggage and returns home for it, he gets into a car accident and ends up in a coma for four days. When he finally wakes up, Harris discovers his entire life has been taken over by an imposter. The plot has been done before, but what separates this story from the rest is the superb acting of Neeson and his cab driver, Gina (Diane Kruger). Neeson captures the gruffness of his character, but is still likeable. As he roves the streets of Berlin, begging people to believe his story, the audience can’t help but feel his anxiety. Kruger is wonderful as Neeson’s fearless cab driver who tries to help him recall his past. On the other hand, Jones’ acting is a flop. She plays the same wooden character as she does on “Mad Men” — a bored housewife with little empathy. When Harris disappears and Elizabeth pretends to not know him, Jones is nowhere near convincing. If viewers are able to look past the obvious problems and suspend their disbelief for two hours, they can enjoy a great thriller made worthwhile by Neeson’s acting.

“Lincoln Lawyer” was written by John Romano, adapted from the novel by Michael Connelly and directed by Brad Furman.

“Unknown” was written by Oliver Butcher and Stephen Cornwell and directed by Jaume Collet-Serra.

Film Review

Film Review

Attorney Mick Haller (Matthew McConaughey) leans against his 1980’s Lincoln Town Car. Courtesy oF lionsgate

the illusionist HHH 7:10 p.m. and Weekends 2:10 p.m. The king’s speech HHH1/2 7:15 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. and Weekends 2:15 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. black swan HHH 9:35 p.m. and Weekends 4:35 p.m.

regal stadium 14 Pyramid Mall 266-7960

diary of a wimpy kid 2 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m. Sucker punch 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m. limitless 1:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m. the lincoln lawyer HHH1/2 4 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Paul 2:10 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. battle: los angeles 2:20 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. mars needs moms 3:45 p.m., 6:10 p.m., 8:50 p.m. red riding hood HH 3:25 p.m., 6:10 p.m., 9 p.m. the adjustment bureau HHH 3:50 p.m., 6:20 p.m., 9:10 p.m. beastly HH 2:30 p.m., 8:10 p.m. rango 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m. hall pass 4:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.

cornell cinema 104 Willard Straight Hall 255-3522

For more information, visit http://cinema.cornell.edu.

our ratings Excellent HHHH Good HHH Fair HH Poor H


20 The Ithacan

for rent

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houses. Located on Kendall Ave. Available

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Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

Blogs Videos Podcasts Photo slideshows Movie reviews Live music recaps Theatre reviews Feature articles Profiles and Q&As

Covering every angle of campus.

The Ithacan

The Ithacan 21


Divers ion s

22 The Ithacan

dormin’ norman

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

sudoku

By Jonathan Schuta ’14





7

5 3 9 6 3

By Charles Schulz

1 

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8 5 4 1 6 3 8 8 7 6 2 5 6 1 4 2 3 9

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PeanutsÂŽ

8 5 4 1 6 3 8 8 7 6 2 5 6 1 4 2 3 9

Š Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

7 2 4 9

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answers to last week’s sudoku 

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27

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37

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crossword ACROSS 1 Comics mutants (hyph.) 5 Loud squabbles 9 Do the wrong thing 12 Fluency 13 John, in Russia 14 Give — — break 15 Brownie morsels 16 Bulldog’s quality 18 From Juneau 20 Low dice roll 21 Suppositions 22 Here, to Pierre 23 Montezuma, e.g. 26 Make lovelier 30 Osaka yes 31 Rain slicker 32 Cousins of “um� 33 Leaning on

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27 28 29 31 34 35 36 37 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 48

Key point Amigo of Fidel Double curve Chow mein additive Statuesque model Sipped slowly Put money on Horrified Cause-and-effect law Portico Europe-Asia range Large fishhook Cop’s rounds Nights, in want ads Stack of wood Former JFK arrivals Rx monitor

answers to last week’s crossword M A M A

L A T E R

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D E B N E E A K A C H A H E D E MOS

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2


sports

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The Ithacan 23

Immediate impact

Eight freshmen on the softball team look to contribute early and often from the dugout to the diamond From left, freshmen Sam Bender, Jillian Olmstead and Jackie Branco have helped the Blue and Gold to an 8–2 record overall this season. michelle boulÉ/the ithacan

batters in the first five innings. Junior catcher Erinn Jacobi was behind When the softball team takes the field the plate for both of Olmstead’s starts. She for its home opener Sunday against the said Olmstead’s composure set her apart University of Rochester, almost half the ros- from the other young pitchers the team faced during their road trip to Florida. ter will consist of new faces. “She has been doing everything that Eight of the Bombers’ 23 players are freshmen this season, and all of them are looking the coaches ask of her and does it with a to contribute to the team in any way they can. composure that you don’t normally see in Freshmen pitchers Jillian Olmstead and Sam a freshman pitcher,” she said. Bender was able to use her velocity and Bender, designated player Jackie Branco, second baseman and outfielder Julianne Vincent, deception in the Blue and Gold’s 9–5 victory and catcher and third baseman Sydney Folk against Saint Joseph’s College. During the have turned in dominant performances and game’s final 2 1/3 innings, she surrendered set the tone for the newcomers through the only two hits. Bender, who specializes in throwfirst 10 games. Olmstead has shown she can be successful ing the screwball, said her early success at the Division III level, as she combined with resulted from bullpen sessions with senior senior captain Allison Greaney on a no-hitter catcher Kerry Barger. Bender said Barger in the Bombers’ five-inning season-opening noticed she was tipping pitches and helped shutout March 13 against Pine Manor College. her lower her release point. “I tend to hang a few pitches, so she told Olmstead said once she was able to maintain her velocity, all of her other pitches just me to reach for my pockets and keep my body low,” Bender said. fell in the right spots. Barger said Bender put in the extra time “When my velocity was constant, I felt like I could throw any type of pitch,” she during preseason workouts to improve her said. “At first, the fastball came the easiest to discipline on the mound. “She really came through as far as hitting me, but once I mastered my curveball, I felt her spots and maintaining control and comlike I could fool hitters by placing the ball.” She followed up with a one-run vic- mand over her pitches,” she said. Despite the loss of Alyssa Brook ’10, who tory over the University of Massachusetts Boston three days later, in which she led the softball team in complete games, struck out five strikeouts and ERA last season, the Bombers’ pitching staff still has a strong mix of veteran leadership and rookie talent, Head Coach Deb Pallozzi said. “We still have Britt Lillie and Allison Greaney, who contributed a lot to our championship run last season, and we wanted our new, younger pitchers to contribute to the team sooner rather than latFrom le er,” she said. ft, fresh man Ja Kissing Greaney said this m er at pra tice yes ie Nash talks year’s freshmen have terday in w Ben Lig ith sophomore come in more ready to ht Gym Meghan n michel asium. le

By Kevin Mccall

Assistant sports editor

BoulÉ

/the it

hacan

come together, she can get back to the bacontribute than past freshman classes. “All of them have been really open about sics of recognizing the pitch and crushing everything the coaches have asked of them at it,” she said. Folk, who will see more playing time bethe plate and in the field without any comhind the plate since Barger injured her knee, plaints,” she said. Pallozzi said she keeps the freshmen said the fast start has convinced the freshengaged while they’re not on the field with men their diligence will result in another a new concept she calls Eagle Eyes, where championship run. “We’re all buying into all the hard work players watch for opponents’ mistakes. “While they’re on the bench, they’re we’ve been putting in both on and off the going to try and steal signs and watch for field, and now that we’ve seen positive results missed bases because those types of things over the break, we’re motivated to contribute to the team in any way we can,” she said. can win ball games for you too,” she said. Lillie said the freshmen contribute in alAnother role the freshmen will be responsible for, while in the dugout, is to keep track most every aspect of the game. “A lot of them have the range to play many of statistics. The numbers will be used for the gradient system Pallozzi is using this season different positions around the field,” she said. “The versatility they have helps us with depth. to track offensive output and pitching. In addition to the pitchers, the Blue and Their hard working personalities are evident Gold have two adaptable players in designated in their attention to detail.” Barger said the freshman class has shown player Jackie Branco and Julianne Vincent, who is capable of playing second base and all a high level of maturity throughout the early three outfield positions. Vincent has even seen part of the season. “They’ve been able to carry themselves time at third base in two games this season. Vincent said she was looking to con- and interact with the team well, and I don’t tribute to the team in a variety of ways, see any difference between us seniors and the freshman class,” she said. especially on defense. “Fundamentals will help us win close games,” Vincent said. “A dropped fly ball or ground ball makes all the difference in the late innings.” Branco said senior pitcher and outfielder Britt Lillie, who led the team in extra base hits and total bases last season, has helped her figure out what pitches to expect in certain situations. “In high school it was more like ‘See the ball and hit it,’” she said. “Here it’s more of really making mechanics work and being prepared for certain types of pitches so you can make solid contact.” Lillie said she has focused on Branco’s approach at the plate, at third runner y. e h t a which includes keeping her shoulks an t chec yesterd Vincen ing practice ulÉ/the ithac ders square during her swing. e n n a r li bo u u d e J l ll l n a e a b mich “Once the mechanical aspects Freshm r fielding the fte a e s a b


Sports

24 The Ithacan

The Hot Corner Casey Musarra

Big Dancing with upsets

U

nlike Charlie Sheen, I’m bi-losing. My greatest achievements end at winning a signed Ithacappella CD off of a raffle ticket I found on the ground. OK, fine — slight exaggeration. I do often find myself on the losing end of bets, though. In the seven years I’ve competed in fantasy sports leagues, I’ve only won once; the same is true for March Madness pools, though I’ve been competing in those significantly longer. For the past three years, I’ve been playing in an NCAA tournament pool with fellow Ithaca College students and alumni. By some stroke of luck (aka the upset gods) I came out on top with $50 last year, and I only needed Duke to advance to the championship, not even win. This year, the stakes have been raised. With the title of lone two-time “Balls Deep” champion and a chance to win $90 in our little pool, I’m getting serious. My strategy, and it’s not failsafe as this year’s West bracket proved, is to go with at least one upset in each of the initial brackets. If you went with Richmond and Morehead State, more power to you. This strategy can of course backfire when you’re playing in a pool of people picking only higher seeds and/or cooler mascots. Well, as always, the upsets keep rolling. As I seem to do every year, I went a little upset-crazy in the first round — only I called all the wrong ones. Sure, I had Marquette, but I didn’t come out with an edge because everyone had Marquette. And an 11, 12 and 13 seed all in the Southwest? Give me a break. The Southeast was almost equally weak, if not more so, for me. I went with Utah State as my mother lode upset, advancing to the Sweet 16. Two words: epic fail. And damn Old Dominion losing by a bucket at the buzzer. I’m by no stretch an expert bracketologist — probably not a great thing to admit as a seasoned sports writer, but even the brainiest bracket men fail sometimes. It’s similar to being a professional baseball player or meteorologist — one of those few jobs where you can fail more often than you succeed and still find work. As for now, I’m glad I didn’t go with all No. 1 seeds as many tend to, particularly this year. With the Sweet 16 round beginning tonight, I’ve got five of my Elite Eight and all of my Final Four teams still standing. Though my national champion pick isn’t too original in Kansas, I banked on the big No. 1 Ohio State falling to the young Kentucky squad, which could give me those few extra points that no one else in the bracket will earn. All I can do now is cross my fingers and say, “Go Jayhawks.” casey musarra is a senior televison-radio major. Contact her at cmusarr1@ithaca.edu.

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

Juniors lead the way early in season By harlan green-taub staff writer

The warm temperatures and sun in California did not translate to hot play by the baseball team during spring break. While the Bombers managed to salvage one win from the trip, a 7–2 victory over Cal Lutheran University on Saturday in their final game on the West Coast, they were outscored 78–26 in their five losses. Junior Tucker Healy, who closed out the victory over Cal Lutheran with two innings of shutout baseball, said while some of the losses may have seemed lopsided, the results do not indicate how close some of the games were. The Blue and Gold are “We played well 4–1 when they score six or more runs in a against some of the best game this season. teams in the country,” Healy said. “But at the same time, it was a reality check. While we were able to stay competitive, we realized early on these games weren’t going to be cakewalks.” In several games, the offense stepped it up, scoring more then five runs on three different occasions, thanks in large part to the juniors. Junior Teagan Barresi leads the team with 19 hits and 13 runs batted in to go along with a 1.270 on-base plus slugging percentage. Barresi, a transfer student from St. John Fisher College who hit .353 last season, said the work he has put in with the coaching staff this offseason has paid off. “Me and [Head Coach George Valesente] talked in the offseason, and he told me I’d have a chance to come in here and prove I could start,” Barresi said. “I’ve had a lot of instruction from [Assistant Coach Frank Fazio] just improving my swing in the offseason, and so many guys are hitting well right now that it’s become contagious.” Fellow junior Matt Keller is second on the team with a .436 batting average and a team-high three stolen bases in three attempts. Another junior, pitcher Ian Rebhan, enjoyed his best outing as a Bomber to date, throwing 4 1/3 innings of two-hit shutout baseball in the Bombers’ 9–2 loss to Claremont Mudd Scripps College on March 18. Senior Dan Lynch said Rebhan and Healy provide a spark to the team this season. “Ian has a live arm, and Tucker is one of the

stat check

Junior second baseman/shortstop Matt Keller makes a throw to first base during practice Tuesday at Freeman Field. Keller is currently second on the South Hill squad with a .436 batting average. rachel orlow/The ithacan

best closers in the country,” Lynch said “We expect big things out of both guys this season.” But the juniors aren’t the only class that has been productive early in the season. Senior outfielder Rob Zappia, who was the starting quarterback for the football team this past season, said the trip allowed him to get to know some of the talented underclassmen. “A lot of the freshmen and sophomores have big roles on the team this season, and it was nice for some of the older guys to get to know them a little better,” Zappia said. One standout freshman so far this season has

been shortstop Tim Locastro, who has started all 10 games for the Blue and Gold, posted a .298 batting average, belted one home run and contributed eight RBIs. As the Bombers prepare for their home opener Saturday against Keuka College, Zappia said, the team views the spring break games as a tool for learning where it needs to focus. “We know we have a solid team this season, and going through some tough losses shows us what we need to do to get to that level of play,” he said. “We were able to work out some of the kinks that come early in the season, and we’re ready to roll.”

Ultimate Frisbee club grabs championship title “We’ve been playing great ultimate; let’s just get it together and play like I know we can.”

By andrew weiser sports editor

On March 19, the Ithaca College men’s ultimate Frisbee club became the most recent team to bring a trophy back to South Hill. The club, also known as Nawshus Ultimate, won the High Tide Tournament Saturday in Brunswick, Ga. The club competed in pool play for the first two days of the tournament before being reseeded for single elimination competition. During the first two days, the club went 5–1, with its only loss coming in an 11–10 game against Goucher College. In the championship match against the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, the club emerged with a 13–12 win and its first High Tide tournament title. Sports Editor Andrew Weiser sat down with the club’s captain and senior Chris Giblin to talk about the team’s title run and what it’s setting its sights on next. Andrew Weiser: What was the club’s practice schedule during the year and leading up to the High Tide tournament? Chris Giblin: During the winter months, we typically have one or two times in the gym each week, and I try to supplement that with two or three workouts each week so that we’re constantly staying in shape.

AW: Did the club’s play change after the time-out? CG: We ended up coming back to tie it at six after that time-out. I’m not a speech master, but whatever I said changed in the players’ minds. I guess the time-out did help. The rest of the game was pretty close, and we ended up winning 13–12. AW: How did it feel to win the tournament for the first time? CG: It was utter jubilation; I’ve never been a part of anything like it. After we won, the team was so happy, and we were running around tackling each other.

Men’s ultimate Frisbee club captain and senior Chris Giblin looks for an open teammate March 15 during the High Tide Tournament in Brunswick, Ga.

photo courtesy of Pat Holland

AW: After going 7–1 to reach the championship, how did the club perform in the title game? CG: We just came out so flat in the finals. We started terribly and were dropping easy passes, and we just

fell behind 5–0 right off the bat. The other team wasn’t even playing particularly well; they were basically just exploiting our mistakes. We were just giving them the game. So after it was 5–0, I called a time-out, and we just took a breather. I was like,

AW: How does the championship experience factor into members’ mind-sets as they prepare for the Nut Buster Tournament on Saturday and Sunday in Indiana, Pa.? CG: This was a huge boost in morale, and I’m pretty much certain no one is going to be, “OK, we won this tournament, the season is over.” Everyone is going to be, “Yes, we won this tournament; let’s build off it. I love the feeling of this success, let’s go win sectionals.” It’s just adding fuel to the fire.


Sports

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The Ithacan 25

Getting in the zone Squad strengthens relationships during spring break training by chris Barriere staff writer

More than 2,700 miles from campus, the men’s lacrosse team sprung into its new season over spring break. A pair of games in California helped build chemistry and provide just the spark the team was looking for. Since 2007, the Bombers have traveled to San Diego and Whittier, Calif., for two regular season games during spring break. Along with playing lacrosse, the Blue and Gold goes out to team dinners and spends some time off the field and on the beach together. Head Coach Jeff Long said this year’s trip helped strengthen the team dynamic. “We got to know each other very well,” Long said. “The kids are really tight together during that week. We all know what direction we need to take and what we need to work on.” Last season, the juniors and seniors started a tradition on the beach by playing a game they call “Lax Ball.” The team splits in half and draws a line in the sand tossing the ball back and forth using mini lacrosse sticks. The objective is to get the other team to drop the ball. Junior Tom Mongelli said the chemistry formed in games like Lax Ball translates to the field. “Everyone is able to open up and everyone is able to trust each other,” he said. “Just being able to rely on each other adds a whole new aspect to everything.” For the freshman, the trip offered

a chance to get more acquainted with their new teammates. Junior captain Tom Mongelli said the new players are more confident on the field after becoming familiar with each others’ play in California. “It’s real important that they’re comfortable with us out there,” Mongelli said. “They know that they’re an Ithaca Lacrosse player; it doesn’t matter their age. They have the right to say what they want on the field, and people are going to listen to them.” One freshman who made his presence known in California was midfielder Jake Long. He had a goal and an assist in the game against Whittier College on March 16 and was the only freshman to make the starting lineup. “I came to this school knowing I potentially would have an impact on the team,” Jake Long said. “Being able to start was a great thing for me, and I am really proud of it.” Jake Long said the relationship he built up with his teammates during the trip definitely contributed to his success in the game. “When I came into the school I didn’t know anyone, and then once I met the team they became my best friends,” he said. “Just being with the team on and off the field was a great experience for me.” But the trip wasn’t all fun and games for the squad. There were still two regular season games at stake and a reputation to maintain. Since their

From left, sophomore Marc Roberts tries to prevent sophomore Riley Austin from getting to the goal during practice Monday at Higgins Stadium. In two games during spring break, the Blue and Gold outscored opponents 20–12. michelle boulÉ/the ithacan

annual spring trip began in 2007, the Bombers are 9–2 all-time. This year, the Blue and Gold split their two game series, beating New England College 13–4 and falling to Whittier 8–7. Mongelli said the team didn’t know much about their opponents coming in, so their practice leading up to the games was similar to their daily practice in Ithaca, focusing on man-up plays and fast breaks. The Blue and Gold’s game against New England started with senior Jay Lucas dodging his defender taking the ball towards goal. After beating the Pilgrims goaltender for the first

goal of the game, Lucas turned and gave a look to his teammates that pushed young players like Jake Long to want to win the game for the team. “He just gave us a look like we had this all day,” Long said. “Our whole team’s confidence boosted after that one play.” Meanwhile, the loss to Whittier marked the first of the season for the Bombers and only their second loss in California since 2007. Jeff Long said the loss helped establish where the team stands at this point. “We have to sharpen up all over,” Jeff Long said. “It’s definitely

early in the season. You can tell just with some of the turnovers and not finishing some of the shots.” He said the squad came in overconfident in its loss and needs to focus on putting shots on net. With the Bombers back on the east coast, Jeff Long said they will use the lessons learned from the trip to build on the rest of the year. “Everyone got on the plane [in the] morning in great spirits ready to strap it back up,” Long said. “We’re looking forward to getting back on the turf and putting the work suit back on and seeing what we can accomplish here.”


26 The Ithacan

Sports

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

Heptathletes adjust to added events outdoors by nathan bickell staff writer

While successful track and field athletes are talented at running, jumping or throwing, for heptathletes, it takes the ability to perform at a high level in all three. Led by indoor national champion junior Emma Dewart, the multi-event athletes on the women’s track and field team look to carry their success indoors in the five-event pentathlon to the outdoor track in the sevenevent, two-day heptathlon. Dewart said most of the Blue and Gold’s heptathletes arrive on South Hill with a background in sprinting and jumping but don’t plan on being multi-event athletes at the collegiate level. “We kind of joke about it,” she said. “If you come in as a sprinter and a jumper, you’re going to end up being a multi.” The indoor pentathlon is made up of the long jump, high jump, shot put, 60-meter hurdles and 800-meter dash. The heptathlon adds the javelin and 200meter dash and replaces the 60-meter hurdles with the 100-meter hurdles. Dewart said the only difference in training for the two events is practicing the javelin. The heptathlon requires athletes to have the strength to throw shot put, the technique for hurdles, explosiveness for sprinting and jumping, and the stamina to survive all that and run the 800-meter dash at the end. One great event can’t single-handedly win a heptathlon. Freshman Rachel Brown said the ability to remain composed through stellar and sub par performances is the key to success. “If you did bad, you have to get that out of your mind and start fresh for the next one,” Brown said. Dewart said the heptathetes usually work on three events a day, often spending 40 minutes high jumping, 40 minutes working on the shot put and then run 200 meter repeats at the 800 meter pace. At the conclusion of two days of competition

Junior Emma Dewart clears a hurdle at practice Monday at Butterfield Stadium. Dewart, who won the indoor title in the pentathlon this past season, is one of six multi-event athletes on the team.

graham hebel/the ithacan

comes the final and most grueling event — the 800-meter dash. Sophomore Amanda Rissmeyer said no Bomber heptathletes are natural middledistance runners, so the event causes dread. Dewart said the run tends to make her nervous. At nationals she held a slim lead going into the 800 and needed to stay within a second of Gustavus Adolphus College senior Janey Helland. Dewart sat on Helland’s heels

the entire race and finished in 2:24.60, a season best by seven seconds, and 0.15 behind Helland, holding on to a nine-point victory. “It’s the last event, and you’re exhausted,” Dewart said. “A lot of the time — for example at nationals — the win or your place comes down to the 800.” Brown said at the end of a multi-event competition there is a sense of relief no matter

the quality of the performance. “No matter what your time was you are just excited that the 800 is over and the whole thing is done,” Brown said. Each heptathlete specializes in different events. Rissmeyer qualified for nationals in the high jump last year, Brown’s specialty is hurdles, junior Ashley Dlubac is the strongest thrower among the heptathletes and junior Hannah Evans excels at long jump. Dewart has qualified for nationals individually in the high jump and hurdles. Rissmeyer said with the range of specialties improves the entire group of heptathletes. Everyone has their own area of expertise,” she said. “So you need help in a specific area, you can go to one of your teammates, not just a coach.” The Bombers’ multi-event athletes have both elite level talent and the depth that overwhelms opponents. In addition to national champion Dewart, Rissmeyer placed fourth at the Eastern College Athletic Conference championships March 5 at The Armory in New York City, N.Y. At the indoor state championships Feb. 26 at St. Lawrence University, the Bombers had four of the nine competitors in the event, including juniors Ashley Dlubac and Hannah Evans, who placed second and third respectively. Rissmeyer said heptathletes tend to be the first ones to get to practice and the last to leave because they have seven events to train for. “We’re at practice early to practice javelin and sometimes we end up being there later because we don’t get to shot put until the end,” Rissmeyer said. “[Head Coach Jennifer Potter and Assistant Coach Mary Wallenbeck] have us do everything so we’re prepared for everything and it’s not a shock.” Rissmeyer said the running events are weighted heavier, so it is easier to score points in those races than the field events, but being passionate about every opportunity is key for competing in multiple events. “You have to love it,” she said. “If you don’t love it, it’s not going to work.”

Look online for game stories from these sports:  TODAY

• 10 a.m./5:30 p.m. Men’s and women’s swimming and diving at NCAA Championships in Knoxville, Tenn.

TOMORROW

• 10 a.m./5:30 p.m. Men’s and women’s swimming and diving at NCAA Championships in Knoxville, Tenn. • TBA. Gymnastics at National Collegiate Gymnastics Association Championships in Eau Claire, Wis.

SATURDAY

• 10 a.m./5:30 p.m. Men’s and women’s swimming and diving at NCAA Championships in Knoxville, Tenn. • 10 a.m./10:30 a.m. Women’s and men’s track and field at Ithaca College/SUNY-Cortland Invitational in Cortland, N.Y. • Noon. Women’s lacrosse vs. SUNY-Cortland at Higgins Stadium • 1 p.m. Softball at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute • 1 p.m. Baseball vs. Keuka College at Freeman Field • 1 p.m. Men’s tennis vs. St. Lawrence University at Ithaca College Tennis Courts • 3 p.m. Men’s lacrosse vs. SUNY-Maritime College at Higgins Stadium • TBA. Men’s and women’s crew at Ithaca Duels on Cayuga Inlet • TBA. Gymnastics at National Collegiate Gymnastics Association Championships in Eau Claire, Wis.

SUNDAY

• 1 p.m. Softball vs. University of Rochester at Kostrinsky Field • TBA. Baseball vs. DeSales University in Lakewood, N.J. • TBA. Women’s crew vs. Marietta College on Cayuga Inlet

WEDNESDAY

• 4 p.m. Men’s lacrosse vs. St. John Fisher College at Higgins Stadium • 4 p.m. Baseball vs. SUNY-New Paltz at Freeman Field Bold = Home game michelle boulÉ/the ithacan

The Ithacan

online | theithacan.org/sports


[the buzzer]

Thursday, M ar ch 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

The Ithacan 27

where we stand

2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

W

L

Win%

6 4 4 2 0

3 5 8 8 4

.667 .444 .333 .200 .000

W

L

Win%

8 7 7 6 6

2 2 3 4 5

.800 .778 .700 .600 .546

Softball*

Ithaca College Alfred University St. John Fisher College Utica College Rochester Institute of Technology

6 1. 2. 3. 4. 6.

St. John Fisher College Ithaca College Rochester Institute of Technology Stevens Institute of Technology Utica College

1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Baseball*

Staying in check

From left, sophomore Ryan Bratton chases down sophomore Mike Earley during an intramural floor hockey game Tuesday in Ben Light Gymnasium. The 28-team tournament started Monday with playoffs set to begin April 13.

Graham Hebel/The Ithacan

Women’s Lacrosse*

Hartwick College Nazareth College St. John Fisher College Stevens Institute of Technology Ithaca College

by the

W

L

Win%

3 4 4 4 2

0 1 1 1 1

1.000 .800 .800 .800 .667

*Empire 8 rankings

numbers

21

The number of goals the men’s lacrosse team scored in their two-game series over spring break. See story on page 25.

8

The number of RBIs freshman shortstop Tim Locastro has contributed to the Bombers baseball team through the first 10 games of the season. See story on page 24.

the foul line

Weird news from the wide world of sports In a move that may put him in the class with Michael Jordan and Deion Sanders as multi-sport pro athletes, Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Chad Ochocinco will be trying out for a Major League Soccer team while the NFL labor disputes continue. Ochocinco, a six-time Pro Bowl selection who set the record for most receiving yards per game during the 2006 NFL regular season, began his four-day tryout with Sporting Kansas City on Tuesday. Ochocinco has some kicking experience, as he knocked an extra point through the uprights in an exhibition game against the New England Patriots back in August 2009. “I’ve always said that soccer is my No. 1 sport,” he said to Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer following the game. “I think Ronaldinho would be proud of me right now.” Though the brash NFL star said he used a soccer ball to warm up for NFL games and practices, it remains to be seen whether he can compete on a professional level with football players who exclusively use their feet. — Kevin McCall

play of the week Teagan Barresi Junior Baseball Barresi currently leads the Bombers with a .538 batting average, 13 RBIs and 26 total bases through the first 10 games of the 2011 regular season. He went 2-for-4 at the plate in Saturday’s 7–3 win over Cal Lutheran University.

comfortable in the e8 Primarily a shortstop, Barresi played at Empire 8 rival St. John Fisher College his first two seasons before transferring to South Hill before this season. He had five hits in the Bombers’ first two games against the College of Mount Saint Vincent and SUNY-Old Westbury, then added a home run in a 16–3 rout of SUNY-Plattsburgh on March 6. He scored two runs in a 13–5 loss to Whittier College on March 16. Barresi earned all-conference honors his first two seasons while playing multiple positions in the infield and outfield. He won the Empire 8 Rookie of the Year Award in 2009.

they saidit

We’re not better than Old Dominion. We’re not better than Pittsburgh. We just had the ball last. Butler University head coach Brad Stevens after a 71–70 win over the University of Pittsburgh on Saturday, which gave his team a spot in the Sweet 16.


28 The Ithacan

photo finish Capturing the Bom bers at their be s t

Thursday, M ar ch 24, 2011

Open season

From left, senior Ali DeCirce drives past Buffalo State College junior Mariah DeBolt in the Blue and Gold’s season-opening 13–10 win Tuesday at Higgins Stadium. In their inaugural game at Higgins Stadium, the Blue and Gold were fueled by hat tricks from DeCirce, junior Nicole Borisenok and sophomore Tracy Rivas, and 10 saves from freshman goalie Jess Worthman. michelle boulÉ/the ithacan


/03.24.2011