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F A L L | WSPRING I N T E R 22018 016

G N I K TA THE

ew n o w t ing c u d o r s m int a r g ro p e e r g de e t a t s e to th

D A LE


3 4

o u t s ta n d i n g student hr program recognition

5

introducing

6

idaho’s first

t h e m ta x

mha program

7

o u t s ta n d i n g

8

entrepreneur

9

d . a . d av i d s o n

student leader

challenge

investment

10 11 12

DEAN SINCE 1978

T O M O T T AWAY, P H . D . dean, college of business

i n c o m e ta x a s s i s ta n c e icbsc students write and publish a book

fund

FROM THE

volunteer

13

pd hosts an

14

introducing

15

n e w a s s o c i at e

etiquette dinner

n e w fa c u lt y

&

deans

This year, to continue our support of the University’s

F

orty years ago, the College of Business

healthcare mission, we also welcomed the healthcare

stood as the only business school in

administration program to the College.

the state to hold accreditation by the

I hope that you will enjoy reading about the numerous

Association to Advance Collegiate

opportunities and success stories that hold true to our

Schools of Business (AACSB). Today, with

prestigious accreditation and make our College unique.

the dedication and hard work of our faculty

Due to the innovative and experiential education our

and staff, we are proud to have received

faculty provides, CoB students continue to receive

continued accreditation after a routine and

a valued education from a local, affordable and

rigorous review.

accredited institution.

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a s s i s ta n t


FEATURE STORY

B

raving the transition from the academic

college student, I know what that’s like.”

to

the

professional

can

be

As the culminating professional experience of

is

no

her graduate studies, Scott has joined five other

different for Krystal Scott, the College’s

students in the International Collegiate Business

2017 Outstanding Student Achievement Award

Strategy Competition (ICBSC), a 12-week business

recipient. “I’m an academic. School has always

simulation concluding in an on-site intensive in

come naturally to me. But, there are no A’s and

Anaheim, CA. Despite her thorough business

B’s in the real world,” said Scott, who began her

background, she was initially very intimidated by

college career at the young age of 16. And yet,

this realistic preview of the challenges of business

despite the challenges, Scott is still performing

leadership. She soon learned to enjoy the

wonderfully.

challenge, however, because of the opportunity

After finishing her bachelor’s degree in 2017 with

to create. “I found myself building Excel models

a double major in exercise science and human

from scratch—something I never thought I would

resource management, Scott decided to enter

do.” Through the challenge, she has learned that

ISU’s MBA program. “I decided I didn’t like the

“there’s always more to learn, especially in the real

sciences, but business just came naturally to me.”

world.”

While in the graduate program, Scott has used

As Scott looks ahead to finishing her MBA in August

her natural business acumen and love of learning

2018, she hopes to work in the government or non-

to help undergraduate students who are making

profit industries. “I’m seeking fulfillment by helping small

similar decisions about what to study. “I love seeing

businesses make a difference in their communities.”

intimidating,

and

world

the

same

the relief on their face as they get a plan and a structure in front of them. As a first-generation

ISU.EDU/COB/BULLETIN

real-world classroom

professional development

faculty & staff

SUCCESS FROM THE

BEGINNING K R Y S TA L S C O T T 2017 outstanding student


4|

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professional development

faculty & staff

HR CURRICULUM

A L I G N E D W I T H H I G H S TA N D A R D S NEW RECOGNITION

T

opens doors for students he

Bachelor

Business

As a result of the College’s alignment with these

Administration (BBA) in management

guidelines, students enrolled in the HR emphasis

with

program are eligible to apply for the group’s

a

of

concentration

in

human

resource management was recently

Certified Professional exam (SHRM-CP).

acknowledged by the Society for Human

According to the SHRM’s website, “earning your

Resource Management (SHRM) as being

SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP credential makes you a

fully aligned with its HR curriculum

recognized expert and leader in the HR field —

guidebook and templates.

and a valuable asset to your organization, keeping

Throughout the world, 463 programs

you and your organization more competitive in

in 352 educational institutions have

today’s economy. This professional distinction sets

been acknowledged by SHRM as

you apart from your colleagues, proving your

being in alignment with its suggested guides and templates.

high level of knowledge and skills.” Students may qualify for the exam if they are in

The importance behind SHRM’s initiative to

their final year of study, are in good academic

improve HR programs is acknowledged in the

standing and have a minimum of 500 hours of

guidebook by Daniel R. LeClair, the executive

practical HR experience.

vice president and chief strategy and innovation

To learn more about the exam and guidelines,

officer of the College of Business’s accrediting

visit shrm.org.

body, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International).


5|

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professional development

faculty & staff

GOING BEYOND IN

TAXATION INTRODUCING THE NEW master of taxation degree

career path for our students.” According to the

has an 88 percent first-time pass rate among

fter unanimous approval by the

National Association of Colleges and Employers,

College of Business MAcc students.

State Board of Education, the

the national starting salary for MTax graduates

Students joining the MTax program can complete

Master of Taxation (MTax) program

may be as high as $79,231, though that number

their degree in one year as two eight-week

was launched in fall 2017 with five

is likely to be lower locally. Even still, MTax

courses are taken in fall and spring, while summer

students beginning in the program.

graduates are likely to enjoy a “significant salary

and capstone courses are offered periodically

“Experts in taxation are in demand in southeast

premium” over less specialized degree programs.

throughout the program. Students can also

Idaho and nationally,” said the Chair of the

Adding to the existing graduate education in the

graduate with a MTax and Master of Business

Accounting Department and Associate Dean,

accounting field, the MTax compliments the Master

Administration (MBA) degree by adding one

Daniel Ames. “There simply aren’t enough tax

of Accountancy (MAcc) program by offering

semester of study.

experts available locally or nationally. Students

a specialized degree in taxation. Students also

“The overwhelming support of the University

would need to travel more than 100 miles away

receive training in individual, corporate and

and the State Board of Education speaks to the

from Pocatello to find another MTax program,”

partnership taxation along with estate planning.

demand for the degree and the confidence these

said Ames. “This degree program helps bridge

In addition, the MTax prepares students for the

entities have in the quality of our faculty and the

that gap and provides another outstanding

Certified Public Accountants (CPA) exam, which

potential of our students,” said Ames.

A


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faculty & staff

I

n fall 2018, the College of Business will

operations and quality, healthcare informatics,

Ottaway, “the combination of evening classes

launch the state’s first Master of Healthcare

and so forth,” said Farnsworth.

and online learning will maximize student access

Administration degree program.

With the introduction of an Idaho-based MHA

and program flexibility for both full and part-time

“The MHA is the preferred degree for

degree, aspiring healthcare leaders will have the

working professionals. Interested students will also

healthcare administration professionals,” said

opportunity to pursue their graduate education

have the option to pursue dual MHA/Master of

Tracy Farnsworth, MHA founding director and

locally. In the past, aspiring MHA students were

Business Administration (MBA) and MHA/Doctor

associate dean of the College of Business.

required to pursue fully online or out-of-state

of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree options.”

“The MHA greatly enhances one’s professional

programs.

Farnsworth notes, “Our vision is to create one of

preparation, opportunities and earning potential

The MHA program at ISU will also be highly

the most highly regarded MHA programs in the

for both entry-level and mid-careerists in the

student-oriented; roughly one-half of the 48 credit

western U.S. The program has been designed

healthcare field. The MHA curriculum is focused

hour program will be conducted in evening,

to meet and exceed all accreditation standards

on the administrative and business domains of

classroom-based sessions originating (or via live

of the Commission on the Accreditation of

healthcare, including leadership and governance,

streaming) from Meridian, Pocatello or Idaho

Healthcare Management Education (CAHME)

planning and marketing, accounting and finance,

Falls. The remaining courses will be offered online.

which represents the most distinguished standard

According to the College of Business Dean, Tom

for graduate healthcare management education.”

INTRODUCING

IDAHO’SFIRST

M A S T E R O F H E A LT H C A R E A D M I N I S T R AT I O N P R O G R A M


7|

T

his

semester,

Professional

Development

Director

Assistant

Ney

announced

first

over the last two semesters. “I try my best to be

Outstanding Student Leader Award

a welcoming presence for the members,” said

recipient in six years.

Lewis. “Learning to manage a lot of people has

to

the

resurrect

the

been a completely new experience and a great

Outstanding Student Leader Award

opportunity for me to grow.” Lewis said she has

and John and I both felt like Emerald

enjoyed the chance to learn from others and

Lewis should be the first recipient,” said

replicate great ideas to help improve the club.

Professional

Assistant,

Over the past two semesters, Lewis has

Gail Hunt. Lewis, an informatics major,

organized at least eight events with guests

is the president of the Informatics

from Farm Bureau, Idaho Central Credit Union,

and

Melaleuca,

Development

Computer

Science

Student

Buchanan-Edwards,

Analytics and the FBI in addition to more social

“The group’s membership had been

events like a LAN party and the National Day

declining for the past few years,” said

of Civic Hacking at ISU.

Department Chair and Advisor for the

The College’s Outstanding Student Leader Award

Club, Kevin Parker. “Last year we only

began in 2006 and was awarded two more times

had a handful of students attending

in 2007 and 2012. As part of the award, students’

meetings.

After

receiving a personal trophy for their keeping and their

president,

she

immediately

became began

faculty & staff

Clearwater

Organization (ICS).

Emerald

professional development

After all of her efforts, Lewis brought the club from a depleted membership to 20 - 30 members

wanted

Dean

real-world classroom

club’s ‘public face’ and liaison,” said Parker.

John

“We

and

feature story

names were etched on a plaque which now hangs in

to turn things around.” Lewis and

the Student Community Center.

Parker set out on the task of making

“I’m hoping to make the award much more

new business contacts and arranging

consistent every year to celebrate the hard work

guest speakers. “She put in countless

our student leaders have put in to keep their

hours contacting businesses, making

clubs, and the opportunities that go with them,

arrangements, and serving as the

going strong,” said Ney.

BUILDING SOMETHING

FROM NOTHING EMERALD LEWIS 2018 outstanding student leader


feature story

REAL-WORLD CLASSROOM

professional development

faculty & staff

STUDENT ENTREPRENEURS

RISE TO THE CHALLENGE S U C C E S S A S F I R S T- T I M E C O M P E T I T O R S I N T H E

I

idaho entrepreneur challenge

n the fall 2016 semester, eight groups of students from

across the country.

varying Idaho State University (ISU) colleges banded

For ISU’s first time competing in the IEC, the results

together to participate in the Idaho Entrepreneur

were nothing short of impressive.

Challenge (IEC). The student groups were coached

Winning first place in the category of Agriculture

by Jeff Street, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship

and Agriculture Technology and $15,300 in cash

and Economic Development (CEED). The challenge offered

was WynderHUB (top photo) with students

$100,000 in prizes divided between the four categories of

Colby Borup, Miguel Rangel, EJ Lopez,

winners and allowed students to introduce ideas, products

Morgan Rasmussen and Mike Day.

and services to a panel of judges and compete in Boise for

Runners-up were iuveni Duality (bottom

the funds to help move their businesses forward.

photo) with students Gabby Kane

Students submitted five-page business plans and 60-second

and Camie Parsons and SpareSpace

“elevator pitch” videos as part of the first round of judging.

with students Jonny Henderson and Tim

The results of this round brought six of the eight ISU student

Mohlke, both receiving $6,300.

teams into the finalists group competing against 70 other

Winning Best Marketing Display for a prize

applicants. The finalists (center photo) included the products

of $1,550 was Turtle Back Technology with

“iuveni Duality,” “RX Project,” “Smart Lawn,” “SpareSpace,”

students Thomas Brumpton and Jared Cantrell.

“Turtle Back Technologies” and “WynderHUB.” Learn more

For the students, the competition represented an

about each product here.

amazing opportunity. “The challenge was on a

These students competed against 20 other finalist groups

much grander scale than anything I’ve worked on.

from six other schools across Idaho and, much like the TV

We really had to hash out every detail or at least

show, “Shark Tank,” students were assessed by high-level

have thought about it,” said Henderson, co-founder

judges from various corporations and universities from

of SpareSpace.


feature story

THE PITCH - OFF

F

professional development

faculty & staff

ollowing ISU’s first year competing in the IEC, the U.S.

As a first step, CEED used a portion of these funds to introduce the U.S.

Bank Foundation generously committed to a three-year,

Bank Pitch-Off event in early December to help 2018 IEC participants

$100,000 investment in the CEED program.

prepare for the competition in Boise. At the Pitch-Off, students gathered in

“CEED is humbled by this generous gift and show of support

the Student Union Ballroom to present their product and service ideas to

from U.S. Bank,” said Jeff Street, Director of CEED. “Recognition

a panel of judges, competing for a chance to win cash from U.S. Bank.

by such a successful organization as U.S. Bank really lifts up the

“The first annual Pitch-Off was a smashing success,” said Street. “The

efforts of the center.”

consensus of the judges was that the students were an amazing and

With the help of U.S. Bank, CEED will promote, support and

inspiring group of young people which was an encouragement to all of us

develop new businesses in Southeast Idaho while creating a culture

about the future of business and entrepreneurship in Idaho.”

of entrepreneurship among students by equipping them with the tools necessary to develop their innovative ideas.

MASTER

I

real-world 9 | classroom

INVESTORS

Last year, the ISU student investment fund

n October, Aaron Buckalew of D.A. Davidson

generated a 17.9 percent return versus 16.2

& Co. visited the D.A. Davidson Student

percent for the S&P 500, resulting in a profit-

Investment Fund Class (FIN 4451/5551) to

sharing check of $3,233.44.

speak with students and to present a check to

Pictured from left to right: (front row) Daniel

the College of Business.

Ortiz Flores, Joe Hughes, Katherine Robinson,

Each year, D.A. Davidson & Co. provides $50,000

Aaron Buckalew, Austin Rothe, Yukang Bai; (back

to ISU and 19 other universities for student teams

row) Brooke Rammell, Sarah Gadbery, Dablu

to manage. Each school gets a profit-sharing

Gurung, Garrett Critchfield, Andrew Burtenshaw,

check for half of their returns beyond five percent.

Christopher Miedema.


real-world 10 | classroom

feature story

T

professional development

faculty & staff

RECORD RETURNS

his year’s Volunteer Income Tax

Konicek noted that the volunteers also

Assistance (VITA) program finished

offered a Facilitated Self Assistance (FSA)

off the tax season by filing more

program this year. “FSA allows individuals

returns than ever before, a trend

come in and use a tax program that is

that has continued for the past three years.

supported by VITA. Here, we have students

Prior to implementing some new strategies,

and myself in the room to answer questions

under the direction of VITA Advisor and

when necessary,” said Konicek.

Clinical

Dawn

The College again surpassed the average

Konicek, the program filed a consistent

returns filed by other schools of a similar

70 – 80 returns each season. In 2014,

size. Konicek said many larger schools with

the number of returns filed jumped to 200,

a greater surrounding population than ISU

followed by 185 in 2015, 261 in 2016

file close to 500 returns with more student

and 320 in 2017. This year, students filed

members. At this rate, the College is on

a whopping 430 returns over the course

track to file just as many, if not more, returns

of two months, the second largest year-to-

than schools like Utah State University in

year increase the CoB’s program has seen

the coming year with significantly fewer

so far.

members, between 25 - 30 students.

Accounting

Professor

SUBMITTED BY: Luke Gilbert, MBA - Finance

T

mentoring and intensive training in financial analysis.”

he Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation is known

In 2017, four others and myself represented the College of Business at the

around the world as the gold standard for financial and

competition in Boise where we placed second, only half a point behind the

investment professionals. Every year, the CFA Institute hosts

winner. Five university teams from around the state competed in an intensive,

its CFA Research Challenge, which it describes as “an annual

five-month financial research project in which we analyzed US Ecology, a

global competition that provides university students with hands-on

publically traded waste management company based in Boise. The Challenge


feature story

A

fter

three

months

preparation

and

STEPPING UP TO THE

of

COMPETITION

a

competition in Anaheim, CA

graduate

real-world 11 | classroom

students

Holly Powell, Kevin Andrus, Luke

professional development

faculty & staff

The team began by creating a product, writing a business plan and making strategic “quarterly” decisions on a weekly basis in a computer-simulated business environment. These decisions were based on production, research

Gilbert, Wiebke Boeckmann, Curtis

well as runner-up for Overall Simulation Performance.

and development, marketing, financing

Steinfeldt and Mikel Lozano returned

“Our students particularly impressed the judges with their annual

and human resource information. The

from

Collegiate

report,” said Alex Bolinger, associate professor of management and

team then created an annual report

Business Strategy Competition (ICBSC)

advisor for the ICBSC team. “One of the judges even pulled me

prior to undergoing the 48-hour on-site

as first place winners for the Best

aside to explain that it was the best annual report she had come

competition in which they made eight final

Written Documents which included a

across in her time judging the competition and that it looked like a

decisions based on simulated scenarios

business plan and annual report, as

professional publication.”

and were judged on quantitative metrics.

the

International

culminated with an on-site presentation where we defended our valuation

financial analysis, I learned to engage qualitative measures like the SWOT

and investment recommendation of US Ecology to a panel of judges, all

analysis and Porter’s Five Forces.

CFA Charter holders themselves. The event in Boise also allowed us to

Each team was assigned a CFA mentor who provided feedback and guidance

network with accomplished finance professionals.

throughout the process. Our mentor, Jason Ballow, helped us a great deal in

Throughout the process of developing the report, I was given a glimpse

preparing for the presentation. Overall, the experience was both extremely

of what the CFA encompasses. In addition to the quantitative aspects of

rewarding and enjoyable.


feature story

real-world 12 | classroom

professional development

faculty & staff

Myers, Professor Alex Bolinger, Kristine McCarty,

Within the book, readers will enjoy photos of the

Kitanna Belnap, Maria Keller and Kaitlyn Barkley,

school’s first football team in 1902, learn that

worked to sort through hundreds of archived

ISU once had both an airport and skating rink on

photos and documents to tell ISU’s story from the

campus, and read about the integral role that the

perspective of a student.

military played in saving and supporting ISU. The

The book begins with ISU’s origins as the Academy

book includes rare images, such as the “Shanty

of Idaho in 1901, covering academics, student

Town” where some students, unable to afford on-

life, athletics and campus buildings, as well as

campus housing during the Great Depression,

n the fall 2016 semester, students researched,

more contemporary photos of the campus since it

lived in cardboard boxes, milk wagons, or tents

co-wrote and published a book on the history

won recognition as a university in 1963.

next to present-day Davis Field.

of Idaho State University as part of Arcadia

“Writing a book as a group in less than three

“The students had a wealth of information to

Publishing’s “Campus History Series.” The

months presents all kinds of challenges and our

choose from and I think readers will enjoy seeing

class (pictured left to right below) comprised of

students really stepped up to make this book a

rare photos going all the way back to the turn of

Jenna Hopkin, Kirk Long, Jordan Withers, Melissa

success,” said Bolinger.

the last century,” said Bolinger.

MEET THE

AUTHORS STUDENTS PUBLISH A BOOK

I

on the history of isu


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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

faculty & staff

NEW MANNERS

PD HOSTS CERTIFIED ETIQUETTE INSTRUCTOR

N

ow in its fifth year, the Professional

Etiquette Dinner.

“It was really an enjoyable experience and a

Development program’s week of

“In the past, we have had a speaker from our

good chance for education in a non-academic

events has continued to grow, so

sponsoring business host a lunch for students in

setting,” commented student Alaina Robson,

much in fact that this year, Director

the Student Union,” said Ney. “These speakers

a marketing and management major. “It was

John Ney and his team decided to stretch the

were always great, but this year we felt it was

a great opportunity to step out of your comfort

events throughout the month of September.

time to really make this event bigger and more

zone, and was awkwardly fun.” Robson found

“With

memorable for students and cover some things we

that Gould had a great way of making something

maybe hadn’t heard in the past.”

fun that could be perceived as stuffy and boring,

lengthening the event would enable more student

Earlier in the year, Ney said he had the opportunity

by inserting humor and her own anecdotes into

participation” said Ney.

to meet Callista Gould, owner and operator of the

the lessons.

The activities stretched from September 12 to the

Culture and Manners Institute.

“Our visiting employers really enjoyed the event as

22, including the usual events like the Resume

“Callista is a certified etiquette instructor,” said

well,” said Ney, who also invited the Career Fair

Round-Up, the Career Fair, Meet the Firms and the

Ney. “I think it was an extremely beneficial and

recruiters to the dinner and assigned them seats

Accounting Career Vision Symposium. In addition

unique opportunity to bring her in for our students.”

with groups of students studying relevant fields to

to these major opportunities, students were also

Instead of an “Etiquette Lunch,” the PD team

their open positions. “Many employers had never

given a chance to practice their interview skills in

organized an “Etiquette Dinner” held in the

seen such an interesting and informative event

mock settings. Students heard from Ben Davidson,

Rotunda of the Stephens Performing Arts Center.

like this when visiting for a college career fair. It

Vice President of HR & Training at Idaho Central

Students were required to dress up, enjoy a

was a great success.”

Credit Union as he shared his insights on “How to

networking event with Gould guiding them through

Ney said he plans to bring Gould back for next

Land Your Dream Job.”

proper networking etiquette, then sit down to a

year’s Professional Development Month.

One major upgrade to this year’s events was the

formal three-course meal.

the

participation

number both

of

events

increasing,

and we

student felt

that


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professional development

FACULTY & STAFF

WELCOMING

NEW FACULTY I N M A R K E T I N G & H E A LT H I N F O R M AT I C S

This year, the College of Business welcomed two new faculty members to the management and marketing department as well as a new program director for the health informatics department, each bringing new backgrounds

ISU. Hanson received her Ph.D. in Marketing from Texas A&M University after working in the industry for Cisco Systems, The Clorox Company

and 24 Hour Fitness in marketing research and analytics. She loves working with interesting research questions and is

ROSE, PH.D.

N

icole Hanson, Ph.D., is excited to be joining

ALEX

NICOLE

HANSON, PH.D.

and research perspectives to the classroom.

A

lex Rose, Ph.D., comes to Idaho State after two years at Murray State University’s Bauernfeind College of Business and a visiting position with the University of South Carolina’s Moore School of Business. His

Ph.D. is from the University of Arkansas’s Sam M. Walton College of Business, while his BA and MA (both in sociology) are from

currently researching the areas of food marketing and brand

the University of South Carolina. Rose’s research focuses on the

crises. In her free time, Hanson enjoys hiking, cooking, scenic

sociology of markets, examining how social forces and structures

drives, playing with her dogs and reading. After some time in

influence markets and consumers. In the classroom, he brings

Idaho, she hopes to add skiing, snowshoeing, rock climbing

innovative pedagogy and a cultural view of market phenomena

and kayaking to the list.

to courses from principles of marketing to integrated marketing communications.


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professional development

faculty 15 | & staff

N E W A S S O C I AT E & A S S I S TA N T

VELMA

PAYNE, PH.D.

DEANS

V

elma Payne, Ph.D., is the program director of health informatics in the College of Business, with a dual appointment as assistant professor in the Kasiska Division of Health Sciences. Payne has had a progressive 35-

year career in information technology before entering academia. Her entrepreneurial spirit resulted in co-ownership of a non-profit LLC that developed healthcare computer applications to enhance clinical practice. Her research focuses on diagnostic errors, patient experience and engagement, use of feedback and metacognition to enhance clinical reasoning, cognitive aspects of medical decisionmaking and the impact of cognitive heuristics and biases on diagnosis.

I

n the fall 2017 semester, the College of Business conducted two searches for the associate dean and assistant dean positions. Daniel Ames had filled the associate dean

position in the interim after Joanne Tokle’s move to the Office of Academic Affairs, while the assistant dean position, previously held by Clinical Accounting Professor Michele O’Brien-Rose, was unfilled. After the search, the committees made the recommendation to hire Ames for the associate dean position and John Ney, current director of professional development for the assistant dean position. As part of their roles, Ames oversees curriculum issues including scheduling and students’ academic concerns, while Ney’s focus is on analyzing and improving retention to increase graduation rates and play a role in developing the College’s strategic marketing and recruiting plans.


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