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URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS | ALUMNAE MAGAZINE 2017

Curing cancer

Finding Christ

clean energy

through the arts

in others

Ending poverty Manufacturing

Inspiring

Uniting the world

Being empowered to reach for the stars

Sustaining the earth

Leading

with a grateful heart

Coding

creatively

Exploring the universe

Nurturing families


Faithfully dedicated to changing lives.

Mike and Mary Terry believe in the value of Catholic education. That’s why they are investing in the future of Ursuline Academy, our next generation of leaders, and the communities they will serve.

“To provide the best opportunities to our daughters, nieces, and grandchildren, we must step up to support them in the ways we can. This is why Mike and I have committed to a planned gift to Ursuline Academy, to help as many deserving students as possible reach their potential goals in life.” Mary Deloache Terry ’73 The Mike & Mary Terry Family Foundation

To learn more about planned giving and the Ursuline Society, visit www.ursulinedallas.org/plannedgiving or contact Christy Frazer, Director of Institutional Advancement, at 469-232-3584 or cfrazer@ursulinedallas.org.


CONTENTS

2017

Issue

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DEPARTMENTS 2 Alumnae Board 12 High Notes 16 Living Serviam 26 On Campus 34 The Ursuline Spirit 36 Ways of Giving 38 Vital Statistics 42 Photo Gallery 46 Bears’ Buzz

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COVER STORY OUR TOMORROW Reflecting on Ursuline’s new strategic roadmap, alumnae offer points of view on five strategic imperatives which will guide the future of the Academy.

Homecoming 2016:

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High Notes

On Campus:

Ursuline launches a new, memory-making Homecoming Weekend. View the fun with photo spreads.

Highlights of professional, volunteer, and personal accomplishments submitted by Ursuline alumnae.

Ursuline unveils dual-taught classes and celebrates 20 years of partnership with its sister school in China.

PRESIDENT Gretchen Z. Kane gkane@ursulinedallas.org Published annually for Ursuline Academy of Dallas Alumnae and the Ursuline community. URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS 4900 Walnut Hill Lane Dallas, Texas 75229 469-232-1800 www.ursulinedallas.org

PRINCIPAL Andrea Shurley Ed. D. ashurley@ursulinedallas.org ALUMNAE OFFICE Claire Blanshard Webb ’97 Director of Alumnae Relations cwebb@ursulinedallas.org Aubree Auletta ’12 Alumnae Relations Associate aauletta@ursulinedallas.org

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ADVANCEMENT OFFICE Christy Frazer Director of Institutional Advancement cfrazer@ursulinedallas.org COMMUNICATIONS Valerie Oates Director of Communications voates@ursulinedallas.org Kelly Morris Communications Associate kmorris@ursulinedallas.org

URSULINE SISTERS OF DALLAS Sr. Lois Castillon, O.S.U. Prioress srcastillon@ursulinedallas.org DESIGN SullivanPerkins CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Blake Photography Judy Nordseth Photography Deborah Kellogg Jim Olvera Jim Reisch Brandon Thibodeaux Brandon Wade

Copyright 2017 by Ursuline Academy of Dallas. All rights reserved.

URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS

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ALUMN AE BOARD

Reaching Out Creating alumnae connections. That’s a big part of what Ursuline Alumnae programs are all about, all year long. To strengthen ties between the alumnae and Ursuline, to nurture alumnae sisterhood, to preserve and share the Ursuline heritage, and to promote opportunities for spiritual, social, intellectual, and professional enrichment. Here we are, at a glance.

Back Row, L to R: Wells Gibbons Housson ’93, Aubree Auletta ’12, Jane Hensley ’06, Jenn Paull ’07, Kathie Kahn Wood ’87, Catherine Baetz Maurer ’98, and Maxine Kijek Sims ’82; Front Row, L to R: Claire Blanshard Webb ’97, Lauren Johnson Housh ’96 (President), Cristina Gandia Niver ’06, Sister Lois Castillon, Maribeth Messineo Peters ’85, Shannon Long ’04, and Ann Fritsche ’06;

Not pictured: Apryl Dominguez Churchill ’91, Nicole Lattner Fox ’00, and Amy Brown Staas ’88 (resides in California)

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8,900+ TOTAL URSULINE DALLAS ALUMNAE LIVING IN 28 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

2,030

Outside Dallas

33% WHERE WE LIVE

67%

54

ATTENDED ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION EVENTS IN 2016

URSULINE DALLAS ALUMNAE FACEBOOK GROUPS

In Dallas

388

OUR COMMUNITY BY THE NUMBERS

ALUMNAE WHO ARE ALSO CURRENT PARENTS OR PARENTS OF ALUMNAE

$149,244 29 DONATED BY UA ALUMNAE ON ALUMNAE GIVING DAY 2016

UA ALUMNAE SOCIAL, PROFESSIONAL, AND REGIONAL GATHERINGS HELD EACH YEAR

3,000+ 17,590 LIKES ON UA ALUMNAE FACEBOOK

6,651 STAY IN TOUCH!

ALUMNAE EMAIL ADDRESSES IN THE UA DATABASE Update your contact information at ursulinedallas.org/alumnae

HIGHEST FACEBOOK REACH TO DATE – ALUMNAE GIVING DAY

D I D Y O U K N OW ? 205 care packages sent to UA alumnae college freshmen in 2016 7,012 number of eggs hidden on St. Joe’s lawn for Alum Easter Event 2016 180 pounds of gummy bears ordered for Homecoming Weekend 2016

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HOMECOMING WE E KE ND

Homecoming 2016 was a huge success! From the decorated hallways, Golden Girls’ Luncheon, and inaugural alumnae volleyball games to the community Mass, Parents of Alumnae Reception, and Awards Luncheon and Celebration, it was a true homecoming for all. Golden Girls’ 50th Reunion Luncheon

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F R I DA Y N I G H T INTRAMURALS COCKTAIL PARTY

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HOMECOMING WE E KE ND

Class of 2001 Class of 2006

F R I DA Y NIGHT PHOTO BOOTH

Class of 1991 Class of 1996 Trophies given out to the winners of the Alumnae Games

S AT U R D A Y A LU M N A E GAMES

Alumnae Games winning team, Team Serviam

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Hosts Sue and Tom Merkel visit with guests

S AT U R DAY N I G H T PAR E NTS O F ALU M NAE RECEPTION

S U N D AY A L U M N A E AWA R D S L U N C H E O N A N D C E L E B R AT I O N Members of the Class of ’46

The Alumnae Awards recipients

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HOMECOMING WE E KE ND

REUNION CLASSES

1981

Top Row, L to R: Angelique Reagor, Karen Young Smith, Susan Heine, Andrea Breedlove, and Patty Sullivan; Next Row: Mary Jane Neuhoff Brezette, Heather Sullins McCord, Linda Thomas White, Lydia Mason De Leo, and Karen Elias Ray; Next Row: Donna Cardinale Hill, Christina Beckman Neuhoff, Anne Parigi Michels, and Molly Gallagher Kolski; Floor: Maureen Mitchell Hafertepe, Lily Corrales Shaw, Marcie Fincher, Veronica Fuqua Young, Kim Kunecki Cardinale, Kate Phelps Fischer, Anna Martinez Gonzalez, Stacey Daniel, Ginger McKnight Chavers, Katherine Burns McKool, Julia Jernigan Gibson, Sara Trizza Willeford, Anne Vilfordi Arneson, Teri Wailes, and Shanon Rust

1986

Top Row, L to R: Bridget Lenzen Johnson, Courtney Weber Slusher, and Karen Hatcher Thompson; Middle Row: Cindy Maus and Kellie Stevens; Floor: Perri Beathard, Ann Wensinger O’Connor, and Maureen Keating Vance

1991

Top Row, L to R: Audrey Mu Fan, Jenny Putchinski Carroll, Emily Caffey Gossett, and Mari Hinojosa Jones; Next Row: Jennifer Slovak Link, Jennifer Kim Wilson, and Stacey Reese North; Next Row: Melina McKinnon Cain, Sonya Lehmann, Rosalind Griffis, Megan McTiernan, and Amy Sorensen; Floor: Chithra Arumugham Volluz, Casey Hibbard, Alicia Alcala Frederick, Michelle Schulz, Julie Dittlinger Vrla, and Jackie Wick Bennett

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1996

Top Row, L to R: Sarah Yates Welsh, Mary Madden Melle, and Stephanie Gerdes Lampes;

Middle Row: Shea Furlong, Ana Gonzalez, and Stephanie Brinker; Floor: Tiffany Pinto Tepper, and Kelly Matula Dickerson

2001

Top Row, L to R: Megan Roberts Almand, Valerie Loehr, Taylor Hummel Coursey, and Elizabeth Roath Garcia; Middle Row: Erica Velasco Velasquez, Allison Gulick, and Melissa Sepeda;

Floor: Fay Tal Placido, Megan Hughet, and Lucia Welch Luschek

2006

Top Row, L to R: Jenna Hogan, Kelly Haeusler, Jessica McCallister Tullos, Diana Garcia de Quevedo Beardsley, Tanner Hartnett, Rebecca Loegering, and Jane Hensley; Next Row: Heather Yang, Rhea Rivera, Elizabeth Kernodle, Laura Tulli, Kate Rehkemper, Meredith Elkins, and Meredith Rooney; Next Row: Colleen Pitts, Meredith McGroarty, Hayley Zimmerman, Christina Pucheu, Antje DeSalvo, Sarah Shade Zarling, Cara McConnell, and Lena Gummelt;

Next Row: Melanie Wortley Mitchell, Vivi Tran, Cynthia Ortiz, Ann Fritsche, Katie Kerr, Celeste Escobedo, Sofia Ramirez, Cathryn Snyder, Lauren Navarro, and Celenne Nunez; Bottom

Row: Samantha Cosgrove, Cristina Gandia Niver, Grecia Gallegos Crosby, Elena Doskey, and Charlotte Gruber

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2016

HOMECOMING WE E KE ND

2 0 1 6 S I S T E R M A R I E S TA AT S R E C I P I E N T

Everybody Knows Her Name Rose Hemstreet is a true Ursuline fixture. This happens when you greet every person who walks through the school’s front doors for 43 years. Rose was the warm and welcoming presence greeting everyone as they stepped through the main entrance. Candy was always on her desk. “When you walked through those doors and saw her smiling face, you instantly knew you were home,” Director of Alumnae Relations Claire Blanshard Webb ’97 says. “She is a friend to all, and everyone who knows her simply adores her.” Rose didn’t graduate from Ursuline, but she might as well have. She moved to Dallas for her husband’s career in 1960. Soon after her oldest daughter, Julie, enrolled at Ursuline in 1971, Sister Frances Marie, the school’s then-principal, offered Rose the position. Rose’s four other daughters also graduated from Ursuline: Margaret ’76, Lenore ’78, Virginia ’81, and Joan ’86, but so many more Ursuline girls consider her “family.” “It has been an honor and a privilege to be part of the Ursuline community,” says Rose.

Rose Hemstreet

2016 YOUNG ALUMNA

Envisioning a Better World No challenge is too big for E lisa R ingholm , Class of 2004. She’s worked for the Latino Union of Chicago, a non-profit that improves immigrant workers’ economic conditions, and co-founded Café Chicago, a worker-run cooperative that roasts, packages, and distributes organic coffee. “I’ve realized that Serviam doesn’t exist in a vacuum,” Elisa says. “Serviam is about healing the brokenness of the world.” Elisa led a sexual assault awareness group at Loyola University Chicago and later graduated Cum Laude in 2008 (anthropology and environmental science major and Spanish minor). She also spearheaded the multicultural Chicago Coalition of Household Workers Project and became a founding member of Koinonia House, an interfaith intentional community in Chicago. Elisa now works as the Director of Finance and Operations for the Story of Stuff Project in San Francisco. The organization strives for a healthier planet. “I’ve worked as an ally alongside day laborers who are fighting against wage theft, domestic workers lobbying for basic legal rights, and survivors who come together to heal from sexual violence,” she says. “I’m forever changed.”

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Elisa Ringholm ’04


by Aubree Auletta ’12

2016 SERVIAM ALUMNA

Made for the Stage Miki Bone Melsheimer, Class of 1979, has a long love for theatre. When she’s not directing and producing plays, she’s writing them. Miki, a theatre major from Texas A&M University, is currently the Managing Director of the Contemporary Theater of Dallas. Miki has worked in professional and educational theatre for more than 30 years. In 2013-2014, her award-winning play about cultural acceptance, Division Avenue, was produced in New York City, Dallas, and Jerusalem, Israel. “In a world where the computer screen filters human communication, 21st century theatre is more important than ever because it demands that we unplug and engage in person as a community,” says Miki, an Ursuline theatre teacher from 2000-2008. Education and adoption causes are her biggest passions. In November 2015, Miki traveled to Romania to address the Romanian Senate Committee on adoption issues. Her Romanian-born daughter, Annmarie, a current Ursuline sophomore, also lives the Serviam motto. In December 2015, Annmarie received an award at the ESPN Bahamas Bowl for her fundraising efforts benefitting the Ranfurly Home for Children. Miki’s latest production, As We Lie Still, is a new theatrical property that features the work of an award-winning creative team. It ran through November 20th at Contemporary Theatre of Dallas.

Miki Bone Melsheimer ’79

2016 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNA

For the Love of Law Follow your dreams at any age. Just ask T eresa T olle . Teresa, Class of 1956, went to law school at age 42. She “put herself in God’s hands” and earned a law degree at St. Louis University after serving as a Daughter of Charity for 24 years. “I wanted to focus on one service that I believed in very much,” says Teresa, who joined her two older brothers with law degrees. “It really motivated me and provided a service to the poor. It was the right thing to do.” In 1985, Teresa became an Assistant District Attorney in Dallas. She later worked in the Public Defender’s office and became Magistrate Judge for the County Criminal Courts. Teresa was elected Judge in Dallas County Criminal Court #4 in 2007. She retired from the bench in 2014. “I could see how the poor get caught in the legal system, in this thing we call justice, and it was very oppressive,” she says. “I wanted to do anything I could to alleviate that particular suffering.”

Teresa Tolle ’56

(Photos: Kristina Bowman)

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HI GH N OTE S

High Notes To follow are highlights of recent professional, volunteer, and personal accomplishments submitted by Ursuline alumnae. To read more, visit www.ursulinedallas.org/highnotes. Monica Prachyl Cohran ’71 received Nancy Bowen Brown ’70 has a new mission writing a devotional blog for caregivers of all kinds. In today’s world, many people find themselves in the role of caregiver, caring for elderly parents, disabled children, or siblings. Nancy has spoken with many of these caregivers and shares their unique stories on her blog. Every other week, she presents a short story about one of these caregivers and describes what strategies have helped him or her cope. She includes inspirational verses from Scripture and prayers to help struggling caregivers cope with the everyday challenges they face. To read her stories, visit www.faithfilledcaregivers.com

The Catholic Foundation’s Work of Heart Award which recognizes exceptional teachers who provide a Christian example and work tirelessly for students and the community. Monica has taught English at Ursuline for 23 years and is the co-moderator of Esse, Ursuline’s literary magazine, which has won five-straight Columbia Scholastic Press Association gold medals. In the Heart of Texas by Ginger McKnight-Chavers ’81

Ginger McKnight-Chavers ’81 has written her first novel, In the Heart of Texas, a wry, humorous commentary on the complexities of race, class, relationships, politics, popular culture, and celebrity in our current society. It has been featured in Parade Magazine and USA Today’s blog. Monica Prachyl Cohran ’71

Regina Fonts Morris ’82 is the Theresa Ackels Kemp ’77, an Ursuline

Nancy Bowen Brown ’70

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Distinguished Alumna, presented the success of her Victory Train Initiative to more than 200 people at the Women in the Know Luncheon in Dallas. The Victory Train is an ongoing collaboration outside Atlanta, Georgia, of churches, businesses, schools, governmental entities, and service organizations, all coming together as partners, to build a continuous pipeline of mentoring and educational opportunities, for children and their parents, beginning at birth and following them all the way into adulthood. Visit www.victorytrain.org for more information.

Chief Development Officer at Catholic Charities of Dallas. Julia Frasco Santosuosso ’05 works with her as Catholic Charities’ Special Events and Marketing Coordinator.

Mary Kelly ’83 became the CEO of Productive Leaders after retiring from the Navy and is celebrating the launch of her leadership book, Why Leaders Fail and the 7 Prescriptions for Success, as part of her leadership conference speaking series.


Melinda French Gates ’82 Receives The Presidential Medal of Freedom Congratulations to Melinda French Gates ’82, who with her husband Bill Gates received the 2016 Presidential Medal of Freedom in ceremonies at The White House on November 22. The nation’s highest civilian honor, the Medal of Freedom is presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors. Bill and Melinda Gates established the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in 2000 to help all people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing countries, the foundation focuses on improving people’s health and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty.

Jennifer Houston Scripps ’95 has been named Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs for the City of Dallas. She previously served as Vice President of Revenue Operations for the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

Moose the Worry Mutt Goes to Doggie Daycare by Kristen Ohlenforst ’96

Taili (Terri) Song Roth ’86

Kristen Ohlenforst ’96, who has her

Taili (Terri) Song Roth ’86 is a celebrity, portrait, and advertising photographer based in L.A. and Palm Springs, California. Her images of talent, including Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Helen Mirren as well as many others, have appeared in publications such as Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, People, Hello, Desert Magazine, and more. Visit her website at www.tailisongroth.com Sisters Jill Peterson Burns ’89 and Kelly Peterson Gasink ’93 are the co-founders of Austin Cocktails, a line of bottled craft cocktails made with natural ingredients, premium spirits, and sweetened with a splash of organic agave nectar. The cocktails, including Fred’s Ruby Red, Cucumber Vodka Mojito, and others, are featured in iconic venues, such as Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall, and were also served backstage at last year’s Emmy’s.

Aimee Baillargeon Griffiths ’90 is the new Chief Operating Officer at Café Momentum, a Dallas restaurant that offers culinary and restaurant training for at-risk youth who have spent time in juvenile facilities, helping them realize their full potential.

The Chew: An Essential Guide to Cooking and Entertaining by Ashley Archer ’95

Ashley Archer ’95 has published a cookbook entitled The Chew: An Essential Guide to Cooking and Entertaining. Ashley is a producer on ABC’s The Chew, which won a daytime Emmy for Outstanding Talk Show/ Informative Show in 2016.

Catherine Baetz Maurer ’98 has joined Ursuline Academy as Chief Development Officer. She had most recently served as Assistant Director of Development for the Edwin L. Cox School of Business at Southern Methodist University as a key member of the development team which raised $102 million in endowed and operating support for academic programs. Catherine Baetz Maurer ‘98

Ph.D in psychology and practices in Dallas, is now a published author. Her first book, Moose the Worry Mutt Goes to Doggie Daycare, which teaches children how to grow from “worrier to warrior” by learning to change their thoughts, debuted within Amazon’s Top 50 children’s books covering the subjects of new experiences, emotions, and feelings.

Catia Ojeda Goldberg ’97 returns as Terri Quinn for Season 2 of Just Add Magic, an Amazon Studios family series about a girl and her two friends who stumble upon her grandmother’s mysterious cookbook in the attic and discover some far from ordinary recipes.

Margot Martin ’98, a former professional ballet dancer, recently opened The Ballet Burn, a work-out experience that incorporates elements of ballet technique, yoga, functional movement, and dynamic cardio tracks. The Ballet Burn is located in Dallas’ Preston Center.

Avery Smith ’98 founded the consultancy firm Responsibility for Human Dignity (R4HD) which strives to improve corporate ethics by expanding the definition of corporate responsibility. Visit www.r4hd.com for more information.

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HI GH N OTE S

High Notes

(continued)

Jennifer Wong Walker ’01 has been appointed by Texas Governor Greg Abbott to the Texas Board of Architectural Examiners, a multi-profession regulatory agency in Austin, that oversees the examination, registration, and professional regulation of architects, interior designers, and landscape architects.

She moved to Germany in the fall of 2016. Check out her latest blogs at heleneinbetween.com which follow her journeys through life.

Carolina Thomas ’05 was featured Victoria Neave ‘99

Victoria Neave ’99 was elected to represent District 107 in the Texas State House of Representatives last November. An attorney and long-time community advocate, she plans to write legislation and support laws that benefit everyday Texans and working families. Her law firm, Neave & Scott, PC, represents individuals and businesses in civil litigation and employment law.

in the Spring/Summer edition of Inside Bauer, the University of Houston magazine, for her work as the social media manager for Otterbox. Additionally, she made a cameo in Otterbox’s recent commercial which announced Peyton Manning as their new spokesperson. Run the World: My 3,500 Mile Journey Through Running Cultures Around the Globe by Becky Wade ’07

Becky Wade ’07 released her first book,

Mary Padian ’99 returns for another season of A&E’s Storage Wars, a reality TV series in which Mary bids against other individuals for the contents in abandoned storage units. Mary’s online store, www.marysfinds.com, carries many items from her purchases of abandoned storage units.

Sarah Elizabeth Dewey ’05 in the 50th anniversary issue of Southern Living

Jami Fernandez ’01, a Major in the United States Air Force, is an Aeromedical Evacuation Director of Operations and ensures America’s wounded warriors are safely medically transported from the place they are injured to a higher echelon of care back in the United States.

Sarah Elizabeth Dewey ’05 is co-owner of Jolie and Elizabeth, a southern contemporary women’s clothing company, featured in the 50th anniversary issue of Southern Living for its contemporary twist on a classic fashion design. Jolie and Elizabeth is based in New Orleans.

Helene Flournoy Sula ’05 spent six years working in social media and online advertising before becoming a full-time blogger in 2015. She was named Dallas’ Best Blogger in 2014 and 2015.

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Run the World: My 3,500 Mile Journey Through Running Cultures Around the Globe, the story of her year-long exploration of diverse global running communities from England to Ethiopia (9 countries, 72 host families, and over 3,500 miles of running) investigating unique cultural approaches to the sport.

Christina Mullen Carroll ’07, Associate Attorney at Lynn Pinker Cox & Hurst, LLP in Dallas, was part of a team recognized by The National Law Journal for the 15th highest jury verdict in the nation for 2015. The trial involved breach of fiduciary duty and fraud in an oil and gas dispute.


Sheri Sullivan ’07, owner of Sweet

Andrea Coldwell ’12 was a

Katherine Allen ’14 is a junior at The

RiCreations, a bakery in downtown Rockwall, Texas, bakes for a purpose. Sheri is just one of 8,000 bakers nationwide who donate birthday cakes for the non-profit Icing Smiles, an organization that provides birthday cakes to families with critically ill children. This past July, Icing Smiles presented their 10,000th cake.

member of the volunteer team from Dell participating in Introduce a Girl to Engineering on February 27 at The University of Texas at Austin. Andrea completed her B.S. in Computer Science with highest honors at UT Austin in May 2016, and accepted a full-time position with Dell after graduation.

University of Texas at Austin studying Plan II Honors and Mechanical Engineering. She is the co-founder of the university’s first non-dilutive pre-seed capital fund for students, the Genesis Program. Supported by the Longhorn Engineering Advisory Delegation (LEAD), Genesis provides UT students with mentors, investment experience, and early-stage funding for their businesses.

Raleigh Ward ’12, Assistant Account Executive at Leo Burnett, worked with Always on the #LikeAGirl advertising campaign which aired worldwide during last summer’s Olympics. She and her team hope the campaign will inspire girls around the world to keep playing #LikeAGirl.

Jacqueline Gibson ’15 spent last summer working as a software development intern at Microsoft’s headquarters in Seattle while volunteering with Code Cadets teaching sixth grade students about computer programming. Jacqueline is a sophomore at The University of Texas at Austin pursuing a B.S. in Computer Science.

A cake baked by Sheri Sullivan ’07

Morgan Uber ’11 was announced as a Patriot League Network correspondent and primary on-camera host. She produces stories regarding student-athletes, coaches, and other sports programs.

Jesse Patterson ’16 Emily Merkel ’13

Emily Merkel ’13, a senior at Catholic

Morgan Uber ’11

University, completed Marine Officer Candidate School at Quantico this past summer. Of the 270 candidates in her company, 180 finished the 10-week training school. Upon her graduation from Catholic University this May, she will be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant.

Jesse Patterson ’16 has trained with circus performers through the Lone Star Circus School since she was 10 and has taught hula hoop performing at the International School in Dallas for three years. Jesse is currently attending the National Centre for Circus Arts in London.

We want to hear from you! Send your professional, service, and leadership accomplishments to alumnae@ursulinedallas.org, and we’ll share in our monthly e-newsletter, Connects, and on the Alumnae High Notes page www.ursulinedallas.org/highnotes.

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LI VI NG SERVIAM

ITH A

P L E A

NG W I T N

PU

RPOS

The Student Alumnae Association service project was a historic one. Students joined Ursuline alumnae and Ursuline mothers for the first time to volunteer at the Texas Trees Foundation TXU Energy Urban Tree Farm and Education Center in Dallas. More than 60 people volunteered at the October event. “It’s different from anything I’ve ever done,” says SAA President Hallie Tomlinson, who volunteered with her mother Marissa. “It’s awesome to get to know the alums and extend an invitation to the Mothers’ Club. We’re involving more of our community.” Volunteers helped mulch trees and clear brush. The non-profit partners with various companies for 150 planting projects a year. The education center plants 11 species of trees, which are native and naturalized to Texas. The most common trees are Chinese Pistache and Bald Cypress. Urban and Community Forester Tyler Wright says the center’s main goal is tree education. “We’re actually starving the tree when we throw the leaves away,” he says. “Mulch helps retain the nutrients and water. Trees actually only need water once a week to survive.” Freshman Colleen Parro volunteered with her mom, Lisa, sophomore Breanna Beckham volunteered with her mom,

Kelley, and Sheri Sullivan, a 2007 graduate, volunteered with her mom, Vanessa, and sister, Destany, who is a freshman at Ursuline. “She’s out there learning all about Serviam,” Mothers’ Club President Kelley Beckham says. “It’s so good to experience that with her. She’s taking the lead. She’s setting a good example for me.” Sheri remembers taking a video with her younger sister at an Ursuline track meet when she was only 2½ years old. “Little did we know a decade later she’d be coming to Ursuline,” Sheri says with a smile. “This is so special. My parents established the foundation of my community service, but Ursuline just enhanced it.” Hallie, a senior, says the service project will only grow from here. The SAA works closely with the Alumnae Office throughout the school year. “I will for sure come back and be a part of this next year and the years to come,” she says.

Location: Texas Trees Foundation TXU Energy Urban Tree Farm and Education Center

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by Kelly Morris

Jonnyka Bormann ’88 (left) and Veronica Pesantes ’88 (right). (Photo: Patrizia Montanari)

The Birth of The Onikas How long have Veronica Pesantes ’88 and Jonnyka Bormann ’88 fed off of each other’s creativity? Since Donna Housey’s art class in 1986. Soon a high school nickname, “The Onikas,” spurred one of their most fulfilling ventures. What is the most fulfilling thing about your company?

What current product are you most proud of?

Veronica Pesantes: The entire process is rewarding. Even the obstacles, like funding a self-financed business and production timelines, are fun when experienced with your best friend.

VP: Our new capsule apparel collection. The fabric was inspired by a family of barn swallows that nest on Jonnyka’s porch and by a prophecy as well. My personal favorite is the three-tiered sun dress that makes every woman feel like a flamenco dancer.

Jonnyka Bormann: There is such personal satisfaction in being able to create something tangible from just an idea. When that creation involves supporting the traditions of artisans, it is even more fulfilling.

JB: Ditto on the sundress. It’s so comfortable and flirty. I’m also proud of the fact that we mixed our prints for this dress, an impromptu decision while the samples were being sewn.

Both of you give a lot of credit to Ursuline molding you as adults. What is the best thing you learned at Ursuline?

What advice do you give to someone who wants to take a leap with a passion project?

VP: Ursuline taught me to value sisterhood. It is something that has marked my life and that I hope to pass along to my two daughters. Serviam has really guided me through many professional incarnations from my not-for-profit work, teaching yoga, and my work in education. It is simply the best motto to follow. JB: One lesson that stayed with me is honoring the individual and valuing others. We were always encouraged, like in Mrs. Housey’s class, to develop our own identity and vision, but also respect others and their perspectives.

VP: Take a cue from Nike – Just Do It. Everything born of good intention and creativity will make a difference. It’s never too late to start. We are in our mid-40s. I am a single mom, but that never stopped me. In fact, it drives me to work harder. JB: Stay true to yourself and your vision. The most amazing and successful people I’ve worked with never wavered in their belief in themselves and their vision, even if they were going against popular trends or status quo. Individual expression is so important. Our ideas create the world around us.

What is the best trip you’ve taken together? VP: Recently, we traveled with a journalist friend to Ecuador. I got to experience my homeland through Jonnyka’s eyes. We visited the indigenous women weavers who make our knits and stayed at colonial haciendas. JB: Our India trips are a constant sensory overload. Every moment and street scene is photograph-worthy. We even learned how to drive a rickshaw.

(Photo: Patrizia Montanari)

V

eronica learned how to print on textiles during a yoga retreat in India in February 2015, and three months later, the pair designed a handbag line for Bloom & Give, a company started by the husband of a high school friend. The profits went to girls’ education in India, and in December, they designed their first scarves. “I truly believe this business was born there, doodling and giggling – much to Mrs. Housey’s chagrin – in that sophomore class,” says Veronica, who graduated from Ursuline with Jonnyka in 1988. “We sat at a little table off to one side, and our teacher always encouraged collaboration and self-expression.” The Onikas is a lifestyle brand inspired by the romance of travel and artisan-made goods. Products are made by global artisans who work in traditional methods that have been handed down to them through generations. Collaborations span the globe from India to Ecuador. The best friends recently paid homage to their alma mater with a homecoming scarf, which can be purchased at www.ursulinedallas.org/homecoming. “Our first thought was the Ursuline Serviam crest,” Jonnyka says. “We also focused on the Ursa Minor constellation. When we discovered the constellation in repeat made an interesting pattern, it all just clicked.” Veronica lives in Miami, and Jonnyka lives in Austin.

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It’s a multi-cultural world, after all.

Living to a ripe old age of 150 will not be unheard of.

The media determines “Who’s Who and What’s What.” To live and lead in a global village requires empathy, imagination, and wisdom. Curriculum redesign will call for an emphasis on creativity and imaginative thinking skills.

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Young and mature adults respond generously to the call to service. Emerging technology breaks open the confinements of traditional time and space options for learning.

Consumerism rules. Whoever has the most toys wins.

Effective problem solving and decision making require collaborative and design thinking.

The arts provide important catalysts for analogical and metaphorical thinking and problem solving.


FROM T HE PRE SIDE NT

by Gretchen Z. Kane

W

HEN I WAS A YOUNG GIRL IN THE 60’S, I LOVED TO WATCH SHOWS LIKE THE JETSONS AND DREAM ABOUT WHAT “COOL THINGS” THE FUTURE MIGHT HAVE IN STORE FOR US. I WONDERED WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE TO HAVE VIDEO CHATS OR FLAT SCREEN TVS OR SMARTWATCHES (ALTHOUGH THESE WERE PROBABLY

FIRST SEEN IN DICK TRACY COMIC STRIPS) OR DRONES, OR ROBOTIC VACUUM CLEANERS. WAIT…WE ACTUALLY DO HAVE ALL OF THESE TODAY. UNFORTUNATELY, THOUGH, WE STILL DO NOT HAVE FLYING CARS THAT FOLD INTO BRIEFCASES. ALAS, WOULDN’T THAT SOLVE THE PARKING ISSUES HERE AT OUR WALNUT HILL LANE CAMPUS?

As we look to the future of Ursuline Academy of Dallas, OUR planning processes must take into account the changing contexts of the world, the church, American culture, and education. Although we can’t fully predict the future, we can determine the significant trends shaping the world in which we live, our society, religious faith and the Catholic Church, and the ways students learn. These trends offer a good starting point for conversation on

Contexts and strategies, of course, are ever changing. But, which could have the most positive implications if executed fully? Which would have the greatest negative implications if ignored? Focus groups and surveys yielded a broad array of topics and trends for discussion, each having a direct or indirect impact on the young women we teach, care for, and guide. A full year’s planning included data collection, data analysis, focus group discussions, and crowdsourcing of priorities.

which may be most important and what implications

From this vast amount of constituent input and

exist for our future.

educational research – and a strategic planning

During Ursuline’s recent strategic planning process we reached out to members of our entire community, asking them to think about the world our Ursuline

facilitator with great expertise assisting us – Academy and Board leadership were able to develop a new strategic roadmap to direct Ursuline’s future.

students will inherit – one which will offer careers, innovations, and technologies yet to be created.

For this year’s LOGOS cover story, we invited five Ursuline Alumnae to share their views on the five strategic imperatives which make up this new roadmap to guide how we translate our wonderful traditions into new contexts for new generations of Ursuline students. We hope you enjoy reading their thoughtful reflections in the pages to follow. >

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Cover Story OUR FIVE STRATEGIC IMPERATIVES

MISSION & VALUES: Embrace the Ursuline Academy mission statement and core values as anchors in a changing and turbulent world.

by Kathleen Kairies Schenck ’97

I have stayed true to my path through the grace and values I developed while at Ursuline.

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Teaching Inspiration Graduating from Ursuline in 1997, I knew that I wanted to pursue a career in public service. Serviam guided my career decision to become a public school teacher, and I am driven every day by my belief that every child, despite their socioeconomic status or personal background, deserves access to a world class education. When I chose to begin my teaching career in Washington, D.C., public schools 10 years ago, I knew that working with students from diverse academic and personal backgrounds would be the most challenging, yet rewarding teaching assignment. Over the years, moving from D.C. public schools to teaching in a charter school in D.C., to working with ESL students in Dallas ISD, I have navigated times of personal challenge in my career. Yet my students have always taught me much more than I could ever teach them. In moments of doubt, I often questioned my choice to work in turbulent environments, not seeing a clear answer to difficult questions. However, I have stayed true to my path through the grace and values I developed while at Ursuline. And I remember that respect for the individual, a commitment to service, empathy, and the development of critical thinking skills guide my response to dilemmas, conflict, and change. As I walk through the Ursuline campus almost 20 years later, I am a different person. Yet my return to Ursuline as a teacher is inspired by what remains the same: a tradition of connecting to others, as well as connecting back to myself, through service. Shaped by experience, various jobs, and my relationships, I now view the world through different eyes. However, despite the change in my understandings and perspective, the halls of Ursuline are home, and I return to them to teach in the same rooms I studied in years ago. I hope the same for my students, that the Ursuline mission may ground them in the values of service, community, faith, and peace, and that they may always return to these values during times of uncertainty, change, and progress. A Dallas native, Kate Schenck is in her tenth year teaching and has been a member of the Ursuline English faculty since 2014. She formerly covered economics for The Asahi Shimbun newspaper and was an editorial producer for CNN International.


STUDENT-CENTERED FOCUS: Examine and further develop the school’s programming related to student personal growth, leadership, and well-being.

Loving to Lead A summer internship before my senior year at Ursuline changed everything for me. I shadowed health care providers at the Agape Clinic, a free clinic in East Dallas. People waited hours to be seen, and it was shocking to witness the need for healthcare for the underserved in my city. It was a fulfilling experience, and I continue reflecting on it as I shape my future career. I’m majoring in neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin, and I hope to go to medical school and earn a master’s degree in public health. With public health, I can continue my service with the community, work on prevention, and tackle health problems before they’re an emergency. It’s important for me to work with low-income families and be a part of the solution. Through Ursuline’s strong academics, I learned the organizational and time management skills that have been necessary for success in college. I know the study habits that work for me such as group studying and talking with my teachers to solidify course material. One of the most important opportunities Ursuline gave me was the chance to lead. At Ursuline, I was President of the Biomedical Club and loved being an Ambassador. I also hosted an exchange student from Chile my freshman year and traveled to South Africa my senior year. I’m currently the managing editor of the Texas Undergraduate Research Journal and am involved with a community-organizing fellowship at Austin City Hall. My strong foundation keeps me grounded in my faith and open-minded to new experiences. My beliefs might be challenged, but I can defend the principles that are precious to me. Ursuline’s global education prepared me to listen to people whose religious and cultural backgrounds are different from my own. These experiences have helped me emerge as a global citizen. Ursuline emphasized morality and high ethical standards, and without that background, I would not have found my voice to lead. At Ursuline, I gained the self-confidence to be a difference maker. Shadhi Mansoori is a junior at The University of Texas at Austin in the Polymathic Scholars program in the College of Natural Sciences. She plans to pursue an interdisciplinary thesis in her senior year and a certificate on health of Hispanics in the U.S.

by Shadhi Mansoori ’14

My strong foundation keeps me grounded in my faith and open-minded to new experiences.

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Cover Story

ATTRACTING AND RETAINING TALENT: Recruit, retain, and reward a mission-congruent, talented, and diverse faculty and staff.

by Susan Hayes Raffo ’74

Living the Mission In my second career as a school administrator, I have witnessed the staggering difference between outstanding faculty and staff, and outstanding faculty and staff who live the mission of the institution. Within our Ursuline Academy community, our history, legacy, and clear philosophical direction enrich us with a strong sense of identity. Without any doubt, we know who we are and what we stand for. This conviction is a tremendous asset when determining institutional priorities, and when inviting new members into our community. The paramount objective of an Ursuline Academy education is to provide students with a strong foundational knowledge which includes skills to be critical global thinkers, creative problem solvers, and collaborative communicators of the highest personal character. To achieve this objective, the school must commit to both hiring and retaining faculty, staff, and coaches who are talented, creative, experienced, and outcome-focused. They also must maintain a high standard of professional excellence, be diverse and inclusive, and serve as inspirational and effective role models for our mission and community values. It is these last two characteristics that differentiate an Ursuline educator, and an Ursuline education, from all others. Continuing the personal development of these individuals through a wide variety of professional growth opportunities will foster the development of leadership and skills in their respective fields. The educational philosophy, community values, and mission of Ursuline, as lived through its faculty and staff, will serve to nourish the character of our graduates. Investment in these community members will ensure continuation of our mission for generations to come.

The school must commit to both hiring and retaining faculty, staff, and coaches who are talented, creative, experienced, and outcome-focused.

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After retiring from a distinguished 30+ year career in technology and pharmaceuticals, Susan Hayes Raffo ’74 joined Sacred Heart Schools in Atherton, California, as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. She is a past chair of the Ursuline Academy Foundation Board, was named Distinguished Alumna in 2009, and was the recipient of the President’s Award in 2012.


OUR SETTING: Imagine and design holistically the interface among time, space, and place.

The “Quiet” Third Teacher As a designer, I am continually striving to better understand the inherent relationship between people and the built environment. I am challenged daily with finding an efficient yet physically beautiful solution to a client’s complex spatial and organizational problem. This professional experience has allowed me to see firsthand the power of a well-designed physical environment can have in positively influencing the emotions and behaviors of a building’s users. Thoughtful buildings have the ability to create communities and reinforce our culture by becoming tangible manifestations of our shared values. There are few building types for which this positive influence and sense of community is more impactful than in learning environments. Physical classrooms and other educational environments work in conjunction with adults and peers as the quiet “Third Teacher,” directly shaping a student’s ability to successfully absorb, synthesize, and evaluate learned curriculum. Traditional, single-subject focused classrooms formed by rows of desks and walls of blackboards no longer adequately support our cultural and educational shift towards innovation, collaboration, and technological integration. In response, the design of educational spaces has shifted towards the development of flexible, multidisciplinary areas, which support varied learning and teaching styles, promote socialization, and encourage creation among students and teachers. Under this new strategic initiative, Ursuline has the ability to rethink and renovate our existing facilities and create new environments that are dynamic, and future-forward. It is critical to the success of Ursuline’s mission, in the total development of the individual young woman, that we support and provide forward-looking learning environments – environments that embrace a holistic and agile approach to both learning and teaching, are readily adaptable to new technology and teaching resources, build community, and are representative of the Ursuline ideals. Emily Caffey Gossett ’91, IIDA, LEED AP, is Senior Design Manager at Gensler, the world’s leading collaborative design firm. She is a member of the Building and Grounds Committee of the Ursuline Academy Board of Trustees.

by Emily Caffey Gossett ’91

Thoughtful buildings have the ability to create communities and reinforce our culture.

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Cover Story

FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY: Adopt the policies, practices, and financial modeling that project and create long-term sustainability without sacrificing affordability.

by Vicky Pitts Lattner ’69

143 Years and Counting

Financial sustainability has become something of a buzz phrase in both the non-profit and for-profit worlds. But what does it mean? It is the ability of an organization to sustain itself over the long term, to perpetuate its mission. It embraces not only finance but also leadership succession, adaptability to the changing education environment, competition, and strategic planning. Ursuline has shown remarkable sustainability throughout its history, considering the Academy was founded in a four-room wooden building in 1874 with just 7 pupils. I don’t believe the Ursuline Sisters were thinking about sustainability then, but how to make it through tomorrow!

The playing field for education has changed a lot over the past 143 years – with new technology, online learning, an increasingly global society, and much more. So if we were to envision a plan to sustain the Ursuline mission for the next 150 years, what would that plan look like? Endowments are a significant pillar of any school’s sustainability. To ensure that Ursuline Academy is still operating more than a century from now, we will need major growth in our endowments to support scholarships, faculty needs, and our campus setting. The availability of meaningful financial assistance is fundamental to sustaining a diverse student body and the affordability of an Ursuline education. A strong faculty endowment which provides ongoing professional development for our teachers encourages research, innovation, and new approaches, which all translate into measurable benefits for student learning. Plant and facility endowments offer a necessary source of funds to maintain the beautiful campus and to invest in new facilities as required for generations of Ursuline girls to come. Currently 87% of Ursuline’s annual revenue comes from tuition. Identifying alternative sources will make Ursuline less dependent on tuition to fund operations. Annual giving will continue to be key in supporting our signature programs – excellence in teaching, global relationships and cultural exchanges, and leadership in technology – and provide the margin of excellence that distinguishes an Ursuline Dallas education. As an Ursuline alumna and daughter, niece, aunt, and parent of alumnae, I know the women in my family have all received an exceptional education and so much more. What resonates most may be different for each of us – spiritual formation, intellectual growth, service to others, or friendship and a sense of sisterhood – or all of the above! And now we all have an opportunity to be part of the future of Ursuline Academy. Looking toward the next 150 years, we are abundantly grateful for that privilege.

Vicky Pitts Lattner ’69 earned her MBA from Southern Methodist University. She was a CPA for eight years before becoming the Chief Financial Officer for Southwest Media for 10 years. Currently, Vicky is Chairman of the Board of Trustees at The Catholic Foundation.

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For Wellness Sake by Andrea Shurley, Ed.D. Principal, Ursuline Academy

I am heartened daily by how many girls turn to God when they feel stressed or worried.

As Ursuline educators, we are constantly asking ourselves if we are serving the girls as they need for their growth, health, and success. We set the bar high and then do the work to get there. The National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) conducted a broad-reaching survey on student wellness in the 2015-2016 school year. The respondents, all from NAIS schools, identified anxiety (87%) as among the most common student-related health and well-being concerns. This trend is on our minds as we consider the school environment into which our students arrive every day. Studies suggest that there are ways schools can help students work through times of difficulty, and Ursuline is taking action to help where we can. Sleep deprivation is common among today’s teens, and Ursuline’s 8:45 a.m. start time meets strong suggestions from multiple research sources that teens do better when they can get a little more sleep. Ursuline’s model of Advisory, combined with a faculty who care deeply about their students, is structured to support greater student well-being. In 2014, researchers Jerusha Conner, Sarah Miles, and Denise Pope studied the effect of teacher support on high achieving students in academically focused schools. They found that students benefit from knowing that teachers care about them, and experience further benefit when there is also one adult “confidant” at school. This past October, during Teen Wellness Week at Ursuline, the Personal Counseling program featured speakers and other content focusing on how to have a positive body image, engage in healthy relationships, and understand how nutritious food is fuel. These topics and others were received positively by the students and certainly had strong effects on many. We believe in our hearts that Serviam and prayer contribute to our students’ well-being. Service reminds them that they have a place in the larger world where they are needed, and the act of serving takes them out of their world for a short while – providing the gift of perspective. I am heartened daily by how many girls turn to God when they feel stressed or worried. When it comes to the well-being of our students, it is hard to imagine ever checking a box as “done.” And so we strive, we hold them in our hearts, and we challenge ourselves daily to meet them where they need us and to help them through the incredible and occasionally daunting years of high school.

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ON CAMP US

Wellness Week Be the Best You

Don’t tell Olympic Gold Medalist Michelle Carter you can’t be pretty and dominate your sport. “I throw a ball in some dirt and I wear lashes and lipstick when I do it,” says Michelle, who became the first American woman to win an Olympic medal in the shot put since 1960. “You can be all woman and be the best in the world.” Michelle’s visit to Ursuline was part of Wellness Week in October. The annual event, organized by the Personal Counseling Department and the Dean of Students’ Office, looks at issues relevant to the emotional and physical well-being of teenagers. “I love encouraging girls to be the best they can be,” says Michelle, who attended Dallas-area Red Oak High School. “High school is the time you’re figuring out stuff, and you’re growing. I just want them to know they can accomplish their goals and dreams. Sometimes things happen. You can’t control it, but you can control how you react to it.”

Michelle says her gold medal win didn’t set in until she was inducted into The University of Texas’ Hall of Honor in October. Michelle graduated from UT in 2007. “Everybody’s body is created to do something different,” she says. “I’m not meant to flip around like Gabby Douglas, but Gabby Douglas can’t throw the shot put like I can.” What is the best advice she received growing up? “My dad always told me the five P’s: ‘Proper preparation prevents poor performances.’” Her dad, Michael, won the men’s shot put silver medal at the 1984 Olympics and won three Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers. Michelle plans on competing at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. She also stays active with her You Throw Girl Confidence Camp.

Arabic at Ursuline A Beautiful Language

Ursuline’s Arabic Program has grown, and Regan Seckel ’12 knows just how much. Regan was in Ursuline’s first Arabic Class in 2010. Now the school will take its first academic trip to Morocco this summer. Regan graduated with an International Relations and Global Studies degree from The University of Texas in 2016 and currently takes language classes at Moulay Ismail University and the Arab-American Language Institute in Meknes, Morocco. She was there when Ursuline Arabic teacher Camelia Benhayda and World Languages Department Chair Maluza Escamilla came for an exploratory visit in July. “I looked up and recognized Mrs. Benhayda, my Arabic teacher my senior year. It made me realize just how small the world is,” says Regan.

Arabic is now the fifth most spoken language, with nearly 300 million Arabic speakers worldwide. Mandarin Chinese, also offered at Ursuline, is the most widely spoken language worldwide (more than one billion speakers). “The Arabic program at Ursuline opened so many incredible doors for me,” Regan says. “I couldn’t be more grateful.”

LOGOS ALUMNAE MAGAZINE 2017

2010

Ursuline’s first year offering Arabic.

72

students currently taking Arabic.

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native-speaking teachers. Camelia Benhayda joined Ursuline in 2010. Hadil Issa started teaching Arabic at Ursuline this school year.

Camelia Benhayda (L) and Hadil Issa (R) teach Arabic at Ursuline.

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BY THE NUMBERS


by Kelly Morris

Collaborative Teaching

Students benefit from new dual-teaching model Rachel Clark, Danny Poellot, Olivia Ide, and Megan Schott have always enjoyed teaching, but they admit they’re having more fun than usual this year.

Olivia Ide (L) and Megan Schott (R) teach Portrait of the Medieval World to juniors and seniors.

Ursuline unveiled two dual-taught classes this school year. Clark and Poellot teach Engineering Design Innovation, and Schott and Ide teach Portrait of the Medieval World. Both teachers are in the classroom each time the class meets. “The students enjoy it when we play off each other,” says Poellot, who teaches Computer Science while Clark teaches Physics. “We get excited about what we’re teaching.” Engineering counts as a Science or Computer Science credit, and Portrait of the Medieval World counts as a History or English elective. The Age of Enlightenment will be offered Spring Semester. “The students who sign up for it as an English elective are getting such a great dose of history, and the same goes for the students who sign up for it as a History elective,” says Schott, an Ursuline English teacher who studied the Medieval Period for her Masters and doctoral research. “We talked about literature, war, chivalry, and religion.” Projects become more innovative because each teacher plays to his or her strength. Clark was a structural engineer at LA Fuess Partners. Poellot, a Computer Engineering Major at Southern Methodist University, worked as a digital design engineer for 10 years. Ide’s background is in Art and Architecture. Dean of Academics Elizabeth Smith said each student sees the 21st-century skills of collaboration, creativity, and communication in action in dual-teaching classrooms. “Each teacher’s strength is going to speak to different students, so it’s a way of reaching all students,” Smith says.

In Portrait of the Medieval World, juniors and seniors wrote Arthurian legends and made stained glass windows. In Engineering, juniors and seniors worked on a design project to improve the flow of traffic inside and outside of Ursuline. Students made formal drawings and designed apps with App Inventor. Students also designed 3D-printed rockets for a straw rocket launcher.

“There are students who might not be as good in math and science, but because they’re creative thinkers, they’re doing really well as problem solvers,” says Clark. “We give them real-world problems. You might fail the first time, but you know what? It’s OK. You know this doesn’t work. Now, try something else.” The teachers are learning from each other, too. “We definitely model the college format. We’re going to look in depth at a period of time and look at it from as many angles as possible,” says Ide, who is Ursuline’s Social Studies Department Chair. That collaboration is a one-of-a-kind benefit for a student. “The passion is always there because it’s content the teachers love,” Smith says.

Rachel Clark (L) and Danny Poellot (R) teach Engineering Design Innovation to juniors and seniors.

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ON CAMP US

Celebrating 20 Years On October 6, Ursuline Academy celebrated the 20-year anniversary of its groundbreaking partnership with Huaxia Girls’ School of Beijing. The festivities coincided with a visit of 12 students and 3 administrators from Huaxia, marking the 27th such exchange between the two schools.

T

he cornerstone of Ursuline’s sister school relationships, the Huaxia partnership has provided the foundation of the Academy’s global program which now includes 10 sister schools around the world. “This special partnership helps our teachers and students engage in the global community,” says Gretchen Kane, Ursuline’s President, in her remarks at the ceremony. “It gives them opportunities to see, hear, feel, and discuss firsthand the impact of customs, traditions, and ways of thinking quite different from their own. “It also gives the students, at Ursuline and at Huaxia, the opportunity to develop the critical skill sets essential for global leadership: an appreciation of cultural diversity, global connectedness to people and issues, cross-cultural communications skills, and the capacity to adapt and be flexible to change.” During her first visit to Dallas in 1996, Huaxia founder Dr. Li Yiru was looking for a school to serve as a model for the new girls’ school she planned to open in China.

The parade begins in the rotunda.

Celebrating sisterhood.

“She was impressed by Ursuline’s long history, traditions, academic excellence, education of the whole person, and motto of Serviam,” says Dr. Hua Yang, a close friend who was with Dr. Li on that visit, and who later became an Ursuline educator. “When we were waiting in the rotunda we saw a girl reading a book in the courtyard under a blossoming crepe myrtle tree. I think at that moment, Dr. Li made up her mind.” “The main thing is people are similar everywhere,” says Shaun Underhill, who was Principal at Ursuline when the partnership was established. “We plant the seeds for students to have open eyes and minds.” “We have been so enriched by the exchange of ideas, particularly by our exchanges with educators,” says Sister Margaret Ann Moser, O.S.U., President Emerita. “We have a shared passion in girls’ education and developing the talents and gifts of the individual students. Our shared mission is helping these girls become the best that they can be.”

At the top, Mandarin characters for 20.

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The 2016 student delegation from Huaxia Girls’ School and Ursuline host students.

THE FIRST YEARS

August 1996

Dr. Li Yiru and Dr. Hua Yang visit Ursuline in Dallas.

September 1996 Modeled on Ursuline Academy of Dallas,

Huaxia opens with150 students, becoming the first all-girls school to open in China since the Cultural Revolution.

June 1997

Formal partnership agreement is signed in Beijing on June 21, the first of its kind between schools in the U.S. and China.

September 1997 Dr. Li Yiru and Huaxia administrators visit

Gretchen Kane presents Huaxia Executive Principal Mrs. Liu with the gift of a commemorative platter.

Ursuline in Dallas for the first in a series of 27 educational and cultural exchange visits between the two schools.

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GRADUAT ION

Young Women of Faith THE CLASS OF

2016

Despite the threat of rain, Ursuline’s youngest alumnae, the Class of 2016, graduated in an outdoor ceremony on May 29. The initial stress of potentially having the ceremony inside quickly moved to feelings of nostalgia and joy, once girls started taking their curtseys. Upon the final thankful curtsey in front of the Sacred Heart statue, the graduates realized their years as students at Ursuline had come to an end. “I kept thinking about the ‘bookends’ – the first time I walked past the Sacred Heart statue compared with the last. I could almost visualize the proud, stubborn little rebel girl of fourteen growing into a wiser young woman of faith,” Katie Gross ’16 says. Katie, recipient of the Sister Emmanuel Award, felt both surprised and humbled when honored at graduation, calling the award one of the greatest honors she has ever received. “Ursuline was the place where I learned to have courage, to love and serve God, to take risks, and to create meaningful relationships with my peers. To think that I could attend such an amazing school was incredibly humbling, and honestly, unbelievable,” she says. Annabel Stollenwerck ’16, also a recipient of the Sister Emmanuel Award, reflected on the unique Ursuline atmosphere as well.

“I consider myself so blessed to have been able to attend a school like Ursuline where there is such an atmosphere of support and love for one another,” she says. The Class valedictorian, Victoria Robertson ’16, echoed a similar sentiment, saying Ursuline gave all its graduates impressive academic capabilities along with an “incredibly strong spirit of service.” “We really are the embodiment of the service-oriented millennial,” she says. “A lot of where that service comes from is Ursuline and what it teaches us about Serviam and what it means to be a true member of a community.” While the ceremony marked the last time these girls would roam the halls of Ursuline as students, many of them see the graduation as a new beginning, a time when they take the lessons learned to carry with them into the future. Mirroring the feelings of many graduates from the Class of 2016, Katie says, “I have no doubt that I will call upon my Ursuline formation to tackle the challenges and responsibilities of the next chapter of my life.”

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UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE ACCEPTANCES BY STATE For a complete list, visit www.ursulinedallas.org/ collegeacceptances2016

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by Alexandra Muck ’16

UA CLASS OF 2016

204 graduates 163 with honors 586 merit scholarships offered *

totaling $28 million

116 National Honor Society members 2 National Merit Finalists 9 National Hispanic Scholars 19 National Merit Commended

*Total Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and Summa Cum Laude.

Class of 2016 Honorees (left to right), Annabel Stollenwerck, Victoria Robertson, Katie Gross, and Alexandra Muck

“Wherever you may go, keep with you

the same tenacity, passion, and social consciousness that you have fostered here at Ursuline. Stand up for what you believe in, whether it is big or small, popular or unpopular, possible or seemingly impossible. Use your future success to leave an indelible mark on our community and on the lives of those whom you meet.” Victoria Joan Robertson ’16 Valedictory Address

“That is perhaps the most important lesson we have learned from each other and from Ursuline: to have faith… we must have faith to move through life successfully. With this class I have seen tremendous faith... It’s fully ingrained in the notion that every person here has something to contribute to the world...”

Alexandra Grace Muck ’16

Salutatory Address

About the author: Alexandra Grace Muck, Salutatorian of the Class of 2016, recipient of the Sedes Sapiente Award, editor-in-chief of The Bear Facts, Ursuline Academy’s student newspaper, and editor-in-chief of the award-winning student literary magazine Esse, is a freshman at the University of Notre Dame. URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS

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A plethora of possibilities! That’s the message Ursuline students

hear when alumnae return to campus on Career Day to share their professional passions. Ranging from book authors and lawyers to business managers and physicians, more than 60 alumnae participated in the 2016 Career Day event, sparking interest in a wide variety of opportunities that could shape a student’s future. “I thought it was inspiring to see what choices were available in the next 10 years or so and to see what careers Ursuline alumnae take on,” says sophomore Catherine Cook.

In addition to the strong turnout from presenters, Career Day 2016 also benefited from a makeover. The single keynote

speaker format of past years was replaced by robust panel discussions in four fields – healthcare, business, government, and non-profit. Students were also able to engage with alumnae in four individual sessions.

“Ursuline empowers young women to be whoever they want to be,” says Claire Blanshard Webb ’97, Director of Alumnae

Relations. “Our alumnae demonstrate the strong foundation that an Ursuline education provides. Inspired by such great role models, today’s students will be that much better prepared to make their own mark.”

CAREER DAY 2016 1

URSULINE CAREER DAY: BY THE NUMBERS

1954:

Ursuline’s first Career Week

6 Fields including representatives from St. Paul’s Hospital, Titche-Goettinger Department Store, and The Dallas Morning News

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2

2016:

Career Day

60 Alumnae presenters 40 Different career fields represented


by Aubree Auletta ’12

URSULINE PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK (UPWN) What is it? A forum for professional women and alumnae. Where does it take place? Locally and nationally. What does it do? Provides leadership and career-mentoring to students as well as helps connect alumnae to others in their community.

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How can you get involved? Visit www.ursulinedallas/upwn for more information. 6

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1. Patsy Shropshire demonstrates her role as a Physical Therapist to a student. 2. Monica Austin, Carolyn Thomas Murray ’87, Linda Thomas White ’81, Taylor Custer Crosby ’02, and Meredith Rooney ’06 3. Kathleen Nolan Morrison ’93 discusses her position as a Technology Alliances Marketing Manager. 4. Kris Davidson ’93, of Kris Davidson Photography, and Mary Beth Koeth ’01, of MBK Photo, LLC., exhibit expertise in their field. 5. Students enjoy learning about the different career possibilities available to them. 6. Regina Escamilla ’08 shares with students about her role as a manager at YouTube. 7. Panels replace the usual keynote speaker. Kathleen Flatley Hickman ’76, Janelle Moore ’95, Jennifer Salmon Tooker ’87, and Kate Kilanowski ’98 educate students on government. 8. Career Day 2016 featured more than 40 different fields and 60 presenters. 9. Preparing to go to their next session, a group of sophomores are eager to learn more.

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T HE URS UL INE SPIRIT

An imaginative essay by Sister Lois Castillon, O.S.U.

A Trinity of Trust Angela Merici, Pope Francis, and Ursuline Academy The spirit of St. Angela Merici energizes me. The spirit of Pope Francis fascinates me and gives me hope. Each morning when I have coffee, I sit on my patio under the stars with a new or waxing or waning moon. My prayer time becomes a coffee conversation with Angela Merici, Pope Francis, or both. delicious banquet. It is not by proselytizing that the Church grows, but by attraction.”

It is not by proselytizing that the Church grows, but by attraction.

Pope Francis

St. Angela added this encourage-

ment: “Persevere faithfully and joyfully in the work begun.” (Last Legacy)

“What about our world today,” I

wondered. “With our many challenges, the tragedies of war and persecution, and our deep desires to mend our

T

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he three of us have the best conver-

Pope Francis spoke first. “I know

sations. Here is a sampling of their

how much you all love the spirit of

words – something I want to share with

service. Your hearts and hands are full

each of you. Use your imagination as I

of Serviam. Do you remember my words

picture our conversations.

from Evangelii Gaudium?” he said.

“What do you want me to share

“Perhaps you could ask each of

with our Ursuline family today,

them to appear as people who wish to

especially as we end this Year of Mercy?”

share your joy, who point to a horizon

I asked them as I sipped my coffee.

of beauty and who invite others to a

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broken earth, what can we do? What do you suggest, Angela? Your 16th century Italy was so similar to ours.”

Angela nodded, tears in her eyes.

“I helped others in war-torn Brescia and I traveled to console Catarina Patengola after she lost her husband and sons. I tried to be there for her,” she said.


“Sister Lois, I am always with you

eyes and see the misery of the world,

Center and the music building. I sing to

and the Ursuline Academy family so I

the wounds of our brothers and sisters

our God of creation a song of praise!”

see how they are helping to mend our

who are denied their dignity, and let

broken earth. Your students are truly a

us recognize that we are compelled to

St. Angela and toasted them with my

sisterhood as they reach out to one an-

heed their cry for help.” (Misericordia

coffee cup.

other and live Serviam from their hearts.

Vultus)

morning talking with you. I would love

“Since I love the beauty of God’s

He added, “I see all the ways you,

I turned to Pope Francis and

“What a joy to spend this early

creation, I saw something wonderful on

your Ursuline Sisters, your co-workers,

to have our conversation close with the

your campus outside of the Bear

alumnae, parents, and students try to

prayer of peace by St. Francis of Assisi,”

Necessities door. There is a school

serve and share of their plenty. I hope

I said.

cultivated garden. Your students care

they keep on doing that. It is what

for the earth as they plant and harvest

makes Ursuline Academy of Dallas a

circle, a trinity of trust. Perhaps you, our

your community garden.

living dynamic testimony of 143 years

reader, can join us?

of living your mission.”

“Then they want to take the

harvest to St. Theresa of Calcutta’s

“But you cannot stop with people

Missionaries of Charity in your city of

only, Sister Lois,” Pope Francis continued.

Dallas. Tell your students and your

generous alumnae that I am always in

mistreated our common home as we

your midst, lending aid to your prayers.”

have in the last 200 years. (Laudato

Then Pope Francis raised his

Si). How glad I am to see your school

cappuccino, looked into the star-studded

work with recycling and having LEED

sky and sadly spoke, “Let us open our

structures like The French Family

“Never have we so hurt and

And so we did, joining hands in a

Lord, make me an instrument of

your peace:

where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy.

I am always in your midst, lending aid to your prayers. S t . A n g e l a M e r i c i

Persevere faithfully and joyfully in the work begun.

St. Angela Merici Sister Lois Castillon, O.S.U., is Prioress of the Ursuline Sisters of Dallas and Director of Mission and Heritage at Ursuline Academy.

URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS

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WAYS OF GIVING

Honoring a Servant Leader The Father Jack Deeves S.J. Faculty Endowment The best teachers always want to become better teachers. They thrive on challenging opportunities to be students themselves, to master their craft in ways that offer the greatest benefits to student learning. The Father Jack Deeves S.J. Faculty Endowment will fund planned professional development at Ursuline so essential to institutional, departmental, and individual growth. Father Deeves holds a special place in the hearts of the Ursuline family. Hundreds of girls traveled north on Inwood from Ursuline to take his physics classes at Jesuit and cheer for Jesuit sports under his coaching. In 1993, he made the journey south to join Ursuline as a physics teacher and department chair, theology teacher, and beloved Chaplain. He is fondly remembered as Ursuline’s favorite Jesuit.

For more than 30 years in Dallas, his ministries

included teaching and counseling, cheerleader moderator and coach, as well as performing weddings, funerals, and baptisms for students and their families. He had a boundless love and care for others, always ready to offer a pun or joke, a warm smile, a helping hand. His impactful legacy is echoed in remembrances of colleagues, students, and parents:

“Father Jack Deeves was one of the most gentle, kindest men

WAYS OF GIVING

I have ever known. His genuine love for every girl at Ursuline came through in the classroom, in the hallways, and even at lunch. He always wanted to do lunch duty so he could talk with the girls. He brought his love of Physics to the classroom at

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Ursuline for many years. He was the bridge between Science and Theology. The more he learned about the universe, the stronger was his belief in God, and he shared that with the girls daily.” Maureen Sullivan, Chair, Science Department

“He had a love for his subject matter, too. You got excited

because he was so excited about what he could teach you. His enthusiasm was contagious!” Victoria Oates Borchers ’02

“He had a passion for solving problems and imparting

knowledge. Perhaps that is why he loved physics. He would run experiments in class, sometimes dangerous with open flames, always beaming from ear-to-ear at the transformation before him. He loved his students and they loved him back.” Jim Duda, Jesuit Class of ’85

“I don’t remember the grade my daughter made in his class

… but Father Deeves wanted to recognize her, he said, not for her grades, but for the way she stayed engaged and helped to keep others engaged in his classroom. That tells you something about what he valued most about his teaching … that every girl be motivated to learn and to believe she can succeed.” An Ursuline Parent

URSULINE FUND Every day support for every girl

Endowed Gifts

The Ursuline Fund

Lunch With A View

Mardi Gras Ball

• Future of Ursuline depends on strength of endowments • Priority needs are for scholarships and faculty support • Foundation provides for safe, effective asset management

• Funds essential for annual operating expenses • Bridges the gap between tuition and actual cost of an Ursuline education • Provides for competitive faculty salaries, excellence in academics, athletics, arts, and other student programs

• All net proceeds benefit needs-based scholarships • Brings Dallas business community together to hear speakers of interest • Features remarkable individuals, thought-leaders, and role models

• Annual auction event with all net proceeds benefiting scholarships • Event also recognizes named gifts to new scholarship and faculty endowments

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HOW THE URSULINE FACULTY ENDOWMENT SUPPORTS PLANNED PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Providing financial support for institutional, department, and personal growth goals.

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Professional Learning Groups

formed in 2016-17, composed of

3-7 teachers each, are exploring new approaches, best practices, and other strategies in the areas of pedagogy,

“When we would get distracted, distraught, or stressed in class, Father Deeves would unleash his classic MGM Lion Roar, a fan favorite and a memory that still brings a smile to my face.”

subject area knowledge, technology, leadership, global connections, and mission and heritage.

Lindsey Duda ’01

To learn how you can support the Father Jack Deeves S.J. Faculty Endowment contact: Christy Frazer Director of Institutional Advancement 469-232-3584 cfrazer@ursulinedallas.org

The President’s Circle

Alumnae Serviam Circle

Ursuline Society

• Includes donors making gifts of $5,000 or more in a fiscal year • Donor report and website acknowledgment • President’s Circle Dinner in April

• Includes alumnae contributing $2,500 or more in a fiscal year • Donor report and website acknowledgment

• Charitable planned gifts help ensure the long-term financial stability and future growth of Ursuline Academy • Donors naming Ursuline as a beneficiary are recognized as members of the Ursuline Society

To learn more, visit: www.ursulinedallas.org/giving

URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS

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VI TAL S TATISTICS

Marriages Brandy Lane ’88 to Robert Darrow Angela Petersen ’95 to Cesar “CJ” Alaniz Kristen Ohlenforst ’96 to Manny Gonzalez Megan McClendon ’97 to Daniel Rios Mnikesa Whitaker ’97 to Justin Haaheim Lindsey Randolph ’98 to John Walsh Christine Sidhom ’98 to Joel Smart

Sarah Campbell ’12 and Jon Erickson Alex Huffman ’00 and Matthew Caldwell

Kendell Hall ’99 to Ryan Bachik Mauri Whitacre ’99 to Matt Hinterlong Alex Huffman ’00 to Matthew Caldwell Megan Penney ’01 to John Hughet Melissa Sepeda ’01 to Jeremiah Kraus Kathryn Sheaffer ’01 to AJ McKeon Elizabeth Poulikis ’03 to Aaron Kozaks Margaret Siebert ’03 to Barry Erskine Valerie Bishop ’04 to Bobby Pearson Lauren Walther ’05 to Jeff Keslin Lacey Baldridge ’07 to Austin Tschudy Kristin Kuhn ’07 to Paul Hlebowitsh Erin Sullivan ’07 to Adrian Baca Elizabeth Gehrki ’07 to William Karper

Elizabeth Gehrki ’07 and William Kent Karper

Erin Sullivan ’07 and Adrian Baca, Ursuline crew coaches, pose with their team.

Natalie Crain ’08 to Jake O’Brien Katie Dennis ’08 to Cameron Ford Caroline Hoffman ’08 to Jonathan Sterling Juliette Leavey ’08 to Andrew Maria Laura Moran ’08 to Phillip Denkler Eryn Murphy ’08 to Dylan Berry Kathryn Bentley ’09 to Andrew Butler Gabie Frisbie ’09 to Patrick Hodges Carolina Kennington ’09* to Geoff Cronin Mia Morris ’09 to Joe Doyle Caty Mills ’10 to Logan Miller Hannah Petersen ’11 to Spencer Sharp

Lauren Walther ’05 and Jeff Keslin

Allie Ryan ’11 to Adam Gilliland Cooper Safford ’11 to Jon Ryan Harris Sarah Campbell ’12 to Jon Erickson Marisol DeLeon ’12 to Austin Burleson *Former Student

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Eryn Murphy ’08 and Dylan Berry Kristen Ohlenforst ’96 and Manny Gonzalez


Births Boys Katie Boes Calacci ’90 Joanna Rebone Chabot ’96 Sarah Gette Pope ’96 Gaby Bucio-Andersson ’97 Alison Camp Hazelwood ’97 Rebecca Hinyard Neumann ’97 Andrea Schoeneberger Shields ’97 Kristen Smith Stratton ’97 Shelley Myers Watson ’97 Maggie Haning Works-Leary ’97 Kimberly Martinez Wright ’97 Lisa Panchasarp Tran ’98 Casey Cummins Daly ’99 Mari Hidalgo King ’99 Katey Nicosia ’99 Danielle Daboub Shermer ’99 Ashley Lattner Young ’99 Kate Sanders Roberts ’00 Catherine Kim Hompesch ’01 Melissa Sepeda ’01 Kate Hurtekant Straight ’01 Claire de Filippis Wiggins ’01 Rita Allegro Strickler ’03 Perry Woods Barnett ’05 Caitlyn Sanders McGowan ’06 Ali Ruzo Bianchini ’07 Marisol DeLeon Burleson ’12 Calla Spatz ’12 Girls Erin Erdman Ortiz ’96 Megan Hanlon Bailey ’97 Daniela Luna Campoz ’97 Brooke Nicosia Helms ’97 Elizabeth Huber ’97 Meaghan Kroener Janson ‘97 Michelle Pfluger Leedy ’97 Leslie Parmley Ren ’97 Hillary Dunn Deck ’98 Julie Smathers Deshler ’98 Kristen Hooks Gaughan ’98 Stacey Alexander Golightly ’98 Mia Wood Humphreys ’98 Paige Harnden Sidhom ’98 Ashley Morgan Ternan ’98 Kendell Hall Bachik ’99 Anna Todaro Feeler ’99 Ana Ramon Sherman ’99 Nicole Lattner Fox ’00 Ashley Smith McMillan ’01 Blaire Baldridge Trammell ’01 Amanda Thomason Suchecki ’02 Alison Stern Crowson ’03 Laura Rowley Losinger ’03 Elizabeth Lindner Mosman ’04 Allison Dunne Darnell ’05 Shannon McQuown Rivers ’05 Cristina Gandia Niver ’06 Mary McKillop Paltzer ’07 Cooper Safford Harris ’11 Barbara Pruit ’12

Anastasia Grace, daughter of Shannon McQuown Rivers ’05

Mary McKillop Paltzer ’07 and husband Seth with new daughter Alexis

Renate (Renee) Jewel, daughter of Alison Stern Crowson ’03

Cristina Gandia Niver ’06 and husband Nick with daughter Carla Cooper Safford Harris ‘11 and daughter Remy Raye

Scarlett, daughter of Amanda Thomason Sucheki ’02

Rita Allegro Strickler ’03 with husband Mark and three sons (from L to R) Luke, newborn Anthony, and Nicholas

Sutton and Palmer, children of Nicole Lattner Fox ’00

Tucker, son of Perry Woods Barnett ’05

Caitlyn Sanders McGowan ’06 and husband Chris with son Sanders Tate

Aspen Gray, daughter of Liz Huber ’97

Andrea Schoeneberger Shields ’97 and husband Tim with son Quinton URSULINE ACADEMY OF DALLAS

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VI TAL S TATISTICS

In Memoriam Alumnae: Mary Louise Moser Bosworth ’37 Bernice Hardy Porto ’37 Sister Kathleen Barnes, O.S.U. ’38 Charlene Rowlett Duncan ’39 Virginia Hughes Wildes ’40 Constance Carmody Halfpap ’42 Jean Ryan Roberston ’43 Rosemary Dolan ’44 Margaret Furlow Dundas ’47 Donna McCann McKelvey ’48 Elizabeth “Hope” Evans Verhalen ’48 Kathryn Grant Leach ’49 Mary Helen Hagar Shockey ’49 Jean McRedmond Bonnen ’50 Eleanor Beaupre Blaylock ’51 Diane Adams Cook ’56 Michele Ridings Heald ’56 Mary Elizabeth “Bette” Gilmore Ary ’61 Nancy Beth McCullah Henry ’62 Elizabeth McBride Meyer ’64 Carol Ann Smith Zaenglein ’64* Mary Anne Moran ’65 Rosemary Slackney Goodwin ’66 Sharon Ryan ’66 Betty Reichenstein Fluet ’70 Judie Guthrie Grau ’77 Carol Simmons Martin ’79* Mary Koegler Bak ’84 Jana Jeffrey ’85 Mia Rich ’85 Dawn Shine Jamison ’91* Leslie Klim ’99 Morgan Dunn ’12 Madeline Limber ’14

Hope Verhalen’s plaid and flower cross

Husbands of: Gloria Kupper Murphy ’47 Diane Adams Cook ’56 Michele Ridings Heald ’56 Barbara James Taylor ’57 Joan Sazama French ’60

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Margaret Mahaffey Jasper ’64 Eileen Maull Dombeck ’66 Nancy Lehn Whaley ’74 Anna Wolf Klein ’75† Susan Sullivan Hinrichs ’76 Alice Franklin Sclarandis ’78* Lisa Curtiss Korkmas ’80 Mothers of: Kathleen Clancy McDonald ’63 Susanne Abright ’64† Susan Roberts Maxwell ’68 Mary Ellen Bret ’69 Layne Burgess ’69 Kathleen Wildes Hart ’70 Monica Prachyl Cochran ’71 Maria Gutierrez Doskey ’71 Janice Buechler Svatek ’71 Anne Bienfang ’73 Elizabeth Roberts Guest ’73 Cristina Gutierrez Moore ’73 Patricia Roberts Young ’73 Karen Burgess Bland ’74 Deborah Cummings Dunne ’74 Elizabeth Fulbright ’74 Maria Gutierrez Brady ’75 Charlotte Prachyl Sheaner ’75 Mary Alice Buechler Monk ’76 Nancy Buechler Campbell ’77 Anna Guterrez ’77 Nancy Fulbright Hafner ’77 Nancy Bienfang Hogan ’77 Mary McDonald ’77 Frances Fulbright ’79 Mary Lively Comer ’80 Chrissy James Grindinger ’80 Dana Marie Descourouez Martinez ’81† Carrie Slater Stewart ’81 Holli Burgess ’82 Melissa Pearson Byrne ’83 Rebecca Woodall Daniels ’83 Margaret Davis ’83† Frances Knochel Giles ’83 Jennifer Jones ’83 Cecilia Gutierrez Kernodle ’83 Elizabeth Schuster Nowak ’84 Monica Ruiz Carpenter ’85 Debbie James Snellings ’85 Maria Velasco Brown ’86 Allison Clancy Hinshaw ’87 Erika Louis ’87 Maribelle Velasco ’87 Tina Schuster Small ’88 Beth Autrey Adams ’90 Beth Hudson ’91 Elizabeth James Koury ’94 Kelly Matula Dickerson ’96 Laura Van Buskirk ’14

Fathers of: Barbara Smith Hanley ’72* Kathy Murphy Maldonado ’68 Mary Jo McGehee Dorn ’69 Claudia Vilfordi ’69 Heather Malone Johnson ’71 Anne Marie McGehee Richmond ’72 Janet Smith McClurg ’73 Linda Burt ’74 Teresa Vilfordi Korman ’74 Margaret McGehee O’Donnell ’74 Ellen Smith Pryor ’74 Teresa Daly Walther ’74 Jennifer Vilfordi Dove ’76 Patricia Murphy Pardue ’76 Dana Flynn Beachner ’78 Teresa Murphy Norwood ’78 Cidney Jo Cook Ayotte ’80* Mary Flynn ’80 Carol Smith Leyendecker ’80 Anne Vilfordi Arneson ’81 Kathryn Phelps Fischer ’81 Karen Pustejovsky Klein ’81 Monique Matthews Mannering ’81 Nancy McGehee ’81 Lynn Feather Bell ’82 Mary Smith Campise ’82 Elizabeth Campbell Maner ’82 Laura Phelps Shaw ’82 Beth Ann Dobransky Buckley ’83† Diane Feather Burr ’83 Julie Murphy Dao ’83 Elizabeth Padgett Vincent ’83 Cheryl Pustejovsky ’84 Jennifer Pasqua Scarlott ’84 Shannon Flynn-Mayfield Workman ’84 Monica Ruiz Carpenter ’85 Linda Guerra Dyer ’85 Jennifer Nady Montgomery ’85 Colleen Murphy Ramey ’85 Angela Sincleair Bowman ’87 Jill Feather ’87* Kristi Lemmons ’87 Courtney Cate Henry ’88 Cindy Banchetti Tull ’88 Cynthia Pustejovsky Belknap ’90 Julie Dobransky Kuehn ’90 Amy Pustejovsky Rodgers ’92 Stella Mulberry Antic ’94 Caroline Bird Bourret ’94 Lauren Johnson Housh ’96 Elizabeth Caroll ’97 Bridget Bird Nims ’98 Adrianna Lacarra ’02 Anamari Lacarra ’05 Sara Whaley ’06 Anne Flinchbaugh ’07

Katherine Klein ’07 Mary Margaret Mason ’10 Kelly Klein ’11 Michelle Klein ’13 Shelby Mason ’13 Step-father of: Melissa Hale Devereaux ’96 Sons of: Mary Charlotte Totebusch Whaley ’42 Mary Eileen Shine Abell ’48 Jeanette Robinson Emmons ’53 Betty Neilon Dunn ’63 Colleen Cook Collins ’72 Trish Scarborough Wegner ’82 Daughters of: Patricia Richardson Ryan ’35† Jane Mathias Reichenstein ’37 Mary Dugan Gilmore ’40† Monica Phillips Slackney ’41† Marlene Ackels Mallick ’51 Brothers of: Rita Hunt Maher ’46 Carol Hunt ’48† Mary Helen Hagar Shockey ’49† Claire Campbell ’51† Julie-Ann Post Kress ’51 Justine Gallerano Jennings ’52 Nora Ann Hagar Wogar ’53 Josephine Gallerano Windham ’54 Carol Campbell Conway ’55 Andrea Fertitta Foster ’60 Mary Ann Gallerano Krebbs ’63 Ruth Ann Berry Wofford ’63 Penny Carroll Moser ’64 Georgette Gallerano Horne ’68 Louise O’Keefe Gannon ’79 Kay Abell Beecherl ’80 Julie O’Keefe Allred ’82 Elaine Bennett Catloth ’83 Marlo Messina Rees ’89 Sisters of: Anna Catherine Moser Endom ’31† Mary Jane Furlow Keene ’43† Dorothy McRedmond Weed ’51 Joan McCullah Zikowsky ’51 Frances McRedmond ’53 Nora Ann Hagar Wogan ’53 Kathleen McRedmond Kahil ’54 Mary McCullah Uloth ’54† Alice McRedmond ’56† Sister Ellen McRedmond ’59 Joan McRedmond Cannon ’61 Julie Moran Travis ’61


Patricia McBride-Warren ’62 Francis Elaine McDermott Morrill ’63 Kathleen Ryan McCown ’64 Patricia McDermott Elmore ’66 Judy Reichenstein Pierret ’66 Patricia Ryan Dubberley ’67 Mary Teresa Reichenstein Lothery ’68 Mary Ryan Millwee ’70 Margaret Ryan Steinhoff ’71 Anne Simmons-Benton ’74 Martha Reichenstein Doyle ’75 Elizabeth Ryan Galvin ’75 Faith Guthrie Burk ’76 Nancy Reichenstein Dobbs ’85 Suzanne Klim ’02 Isabella Limber ’16 Step-brother of: Brigid McCarthy Ryan ’78 Mary Colleen McCarthy McGaha ’80 Maureen McCarthy Toscano ’82 Sara McCarthy ’86 Grandfathers of: Monica de la Cerda ’91 Alicia Alcala Frederick ’91 Celia Plattner Maguire ’91 Kimberly Blades Askew ’93 Allison Johnson Charlesworth ’94 Melissa Blades Brewster ’96 Joanna Rebone Chabot ’96 Melissa Hale Devereux ’96 Kristen Smith Stratton ’97 Colleen Johnson Johnson ’98 Kathleen Korman Smith ’98 Katie Layton ’99 Kendall Plattner Antosh ’01 Tiffany Johnson ’03 Brittany Dove Melo ’03 Claire Gallerano VeNard ’03 Stephanie Carpenter Warnock ’04 Kathleen Gallerano ’05 Lindsay Dove McDonald ’05 Lori Rebone ’05 Claire Rebone ’06 Lindsey Pryor ’07 Mary Campise Yeager ’07 Sophie Campise ’09 Chelsea Champion ’09 Emily Pryor ’10 Taylor Vilfordi ’10 Phoebe Campise ’11 Anne Gallerano ’11 Kaitlin Carpenter ’12 Lana Dove ’12 Kelsey Korman ’13 Abigayle Brunts ’15 Catherine Beachner ’16 Molly Flynn ’16 Helen Brunts ’17 Nikki Carpenter ’18 Sophie Chester ’19

Grandmothers of: Miki Bone Melsheimer ’79 Cindy Munoz Bouchard ’81 Melissa Bone Hayes ’83 Melissa Miramontes Carpenter ’84 Laura Pederson Vganges ’86 Alicia Alcala Frederick ’91 Kathryn Pederson ’93 Anne Harry Hay ’94 Kristin Clancy Ciccarelli ’96 Ashley Dunne Comstock ’96 Monica Harry Esposito ’96 Janice Yllana Ezell ’97 Claire Chandou Broussard ’98 Maddie Huffman Harrison ’98 Ellen Harry Henrard ’98 Courtney Hassell Moffett ’98 Julia Neely Null ’98 Amy Dunne Henderson ’99 Ana Herrera Rodriguez ’99 Alexandra Huffman ’00 Elizabeth Klein ’01 Mallika Rao ’01 Elaine Cochran Snow ’01 Emily Klein ’03 Natalie Brady McCall ’03 Mary Maxwell ’04 Stephanie Carpenter Warnock ’04 Allison Dunne Darnell ’05 Rosie Descourouez ’06 Elena Doskey ’06 Elizabeth Kernodle ’06 Erin Cochran ’07 Jolie Delcambre ’07 Katherine Klein ’07 Alexandra Bret ’08 Caitlin Taylor ’08 Aleshia Bret ’10 Catherine Hughston ’10 Sarah Hafner ’11 Kelly Klein ’11 Caroline Kernodle ’12 Jennifer Klein ’12 Michelle Klein ’13 Abigail Byrne ’14 Jacqueline Grindinger ’14 Kimberly Ruhnke ’14 Madeleine Delcambre ’15 Kendall Fox ’15 Caroline Grindinger ’17 Eleanor Grindinger ’17 Kinsley Cook ’16 Kelsey Cook ’18 Meghan Deasy ’19 Hannah Hughston ’19 Madelyn Walton ’20 Great grandmothers of: Analisa Miramontes ’10 Hanna Munoz ’10 Kaitlin Carpenter ’12 Kylie Clancy ’17 Nikki Carpenter ’18 Abbie Miramontes ’18 Katherine Annmarie Melsheimer ’19

Uncles of: Kathleen Maher Peddie ’69 Claudia Vilfordi ’69 Teresa Vilfordi Korman ’74 Maureen Maher Wittum ’74 Jennifer Vilfordi Dove ’76 Debbie Philp Hughes ’78 Anne Vilfordi Arneson ’81 Jennifer Staubach Gates ’84 Michelle Staubach Grimes ’86 Stephanie Staubach Phillips ’87 Traci Trapani Beasley ’90* Amy Staubach Mentgen ’95 Christina Miller ’95 Laura Whitacre Sandler ’98 Mauri Whitacre Hinterlong ’99 Katie Layton ’99 Adrianne Pierce ’99 Jordan Catloth ’20 Aunts of: Sister Mary Theresa Moser ’53 Sister Margaret Ann Moser ’56 Donna Keene Baade ’65 Sandra Cuellar ’65 Lupita Cuellar Allen ’69 Maria Cuellar Sikkel ’69 Lolita Cuellar Sims ’70 Kathleen Moser Barr ’71 Maria Cuellar Paternostro ’71 Carol Moser Grantham ’73 Nora Cuellar Jacobs ’73 Sharon Cuellar Moffett ’73 Barbara Bray Wall ’73 Sandra Cuellar ’75 Marguerite Bray Murchison ’75 Nancy Bray Martin ’76 Fredrika Cuellar Newton ’77 Carol Keene Proctor ’77 Elizabeth McCown ’98 Lindsay Galvin Drakeley ’99 Kelly Galvin ’01 Tara Galvin ’09 Eliza Palter ’16 Great uncles of: Kathleen Korman Smith ’98 Jessica Gates Whitsitt ’02 Brittany Dove Melo ’03 Lindsay Dove McDonald ’05 Jordan Gates ’11 Lana Dove ’12 Kelsey Korman ’13 Grace Anne Grimes ’19 Hailey Elizabeth Mentegen ’20 Great aunts of: Ursula Gonzales Blanchard ’87 Erica Gonzales Dominguez ’92 Megan Moser Daigle ’93 Kelly Moser Mickan ’93 Margaret Moser ’94 Genevieve Barr ’01 Jane Murchison Hvidt ’06

Caitlin Barr McCormick ’07 Laura Wall ’08 Caroline Gonzales ’12 Zoe Gonzales ’12 Lauren Gonzales ’17 Fathers-in-law of: DeeAnn Baillargeon Smith ’82 Melissa Miramontes Carpenter ’84 Anne Marie Kahn Vaughan ’89 Mia Wood Humphreys ’98 Stephanie Pohl Nawaz ’98 Mothers-in-law of: Marion Dunne Glenn ’61 Helen Saleh Roberts ’70 Karen Pustejovsky Klein ’81 Kelly Moore Cook ’85 Melissa Sylvester Rachuig ’86 Tierney McClellan Thompson ’89 Tessa Bisignano Aschner ’97 Brothers-in-law of: Carol Hunt ’48 † Sheila Trapani Meeks ’66 Laura Wolf Spears ’74 Anna Wolf Klein ’75† Olivia Franklin ’76 Susan Wolf Robertson ’77 Barbara Wolf Johnson ’79 Martha Wolf ’81 Sister-in-law of: Margaret Murrin Moser ’31 Grandmother-in-law of: Rita Strickler ’03 Nephews of: Josephine Shine Hale ’49† Nancy Shine Sullivan ’61 Barbara Neilon Furst ’63† Catherine Cook Phillips ’70 Nieces of: Alice Dugan Yeargan ’38† Rita Ann Dugan Gibbons ’49 Cousins of: Shannon Long ’04 Emily Wisner ’12 Kendrick Hawkins ’19 Priscilla Sulli ’19 Grandsons of: Catherine Stanton Cook ’44 Andree Guillot Hawkins ’67

Alumnae Memorial Masses are held quarterly to remember our loved ones. Please share any losses in the Ursuline community with the Alumnae Office at alumnae@ursulinedallas.org. *Former Student †Deceased

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PHOTO GAL L E RY

K IN G • NETWOR AE D O O H R E S IS T UMN YOUNG AL T T E S • S IE R O M ME NGERE UPWN • RA

L • N AT IO N A I G R A S Y A D R E E R CA ARD ID E N T S • M PA S T P R E S H A V I E W T LUNCH WI

C O C K TA I L S AT C H R I S T M A S

YOUNG ALUMNAE BACK TO CAMPUS LUNCH

R A N G E R E T T E R E U N I O N AT T H E S P R I N G S H O W

UPWN AND JESUIT ALUMNI A S S O C I AT I O N N E T W O R K I N G E V E N T

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C A R E E R D AY R E C E P T I O N

R E A L E S TAT E P R O F E S S I O N A L S G AT H E R I N G C H I C A G O R E G I O N A L G AT H E R I N G

D E N V E R R E G I O N A L G AT H E R I N G

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PHOTO GAL L E RY R K IN G D • NETWO S IS T E R H O O O U N G A L U M N A E • Y S M E M O R IE S NGERETTE UPWN • RA

AL Y • N AT IO N C A R E E R D A ENTS • MARDI GRAS ID S PA S T P R E TH A VIEW LUNCH WI

UPWN NETWORKING EVENT

1 9 7 8 C L A S S M AT E S

PA S T A L U M N A E B O A R D P R E S I D E N T S ’ L U N C H LUNCH WITH A VIEW

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AT L A N TA R E G I O N A L G AT H E R I N G

U P W N N AT I O N W I D E E V E N T

M A R D I G R A S K I C K - O F F PA R T Y

U P W N FA L L B R E A K FA S T

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BEARS ’ BUZZ

All in the Family Ursuline held the second-annual UA Families Picnic on October 13. The event is Ursuline’s new twist on the Big Sis-Lil Sis Picnic.

E

very student is paired with at least one other student

“My UA family can guide me and mentor me in my next few

from each grade through an online matching system.

years at Ursuline,” freshman Sholape Fashemo says. “I love it.”

Students ate lunch with their UA Family on Ursuline’s Front Lawn or St. Joe’s Lawn. “I like to call the sophomores Big Sisses, the juniors Grand Big Sisses, and the seniors Great-Grand Big Sisses,” says Dean of Students Kayla Brown of the school’s more than 200 UA Families. “Expanding the family to all grades gives the

Many agree the larger family fosters a stronger sense of unity. “I like the bigger family because it promotes Ursuline’s goal of a larger community throughout your Ursuline experience and after,” junior Alex Tedeschi says.

girls the opportunity to know more students. Every year, a

It’s one more smiling face to see in the hallway, too.

freshman will be added to an existing family.”

“It’s way cool,” senior Isabel Parigi says. “Everyone has

Freshmen, especially, appreciate advice on classes and what

someone to look up to.”

to expect at UA.

ursulinedallas Ursuline Academy of Dallas >

<3 uahoneybuns and 238 others ursulinedallas Perfect day for a #UAFamiliesPicnic uahoneybuns What a cute picture! #MascotApproved

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JOIN US FOR MARDI GRAS FEBRUARY 25, 2017

Visit www.uamardigras.org

N O V 10-12

2017

Save the date! Ursuline Dallas Alumnae


ALUMNAE SAVE THE DATES 2017 February 21 – UPWN Dallas Jesuit Networking Event

June 20 – UPWN Dallas Networking Event

February 25 – Mardi Gras

August 20 – Memorial Mass

March 15 – Alumnae Board Nominations Due

October 15 – Ladies Bingo

April 15 – Alumnae Easter Egg Hunt

November 3-4 – Holiday Bazaar

April 15 – Alumnae Award Nominations Due

November 10-12 – Homecoming Weekend

April 18 – UPWN Dallas Breakfast

December 17 – Young Alumnae Cocktails at Christmas

April 30 – Memorial Mass

February 10, 2018 – Mardi Gras 2018

May 28 – Class of 2017 Graduation To learn more, contact the Alumnae Office at alumnae@ursulinedallas.org or visit www.ursulinedallas.org/getinvolved.

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Ursuline Academy of Dallas LOGOS 2017  

Ursuline Academy of Dallas LOGOS 2017