Issuu on Google+

High School Program of Studies

The International School of Krakow is dedicated to excellence in the intellectual and personal development of tomorrow's world citizens.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction from the School Director

3

Philosophy and Curriculum

4

Grading Policies

4

Types of Diplomas

6

Awarding Course Credits

6

Citizenship and Service Learning

8

English

9

Mathematics

11

The Sciences

13

Social Studies

15

Native Language Instruction

17

Physical Education & Health

18

Foreign Languages

19

Technology and The Arts

21

2


Dear Students and Parents, The International School of Krakow’s Program of Studies booklet is an essential tool to assist you in planning your academic program. This booklet contains descriptions of courses offered in grades 9-12 and should be used to plan your program of studies. Before any course is selected, a number of concerns need to be understood and addressed: • ISK’s graduation requirements include a minimum of 24 credits. One credit is awarded for the successful completion of a full-year course with the equivalent of 40 minutes per day.

• •

Course Name

Credit

English

4

Native Language Instruction

4

Mathematics

3

Science

3

Social Studies

3

Foreign Language

1

Physical Education / Health

1

Electives

4

Concentration

1

course pre-requisites and credit value individual academic objections.

The Head of High School and the School Administration will assist you in making your course selections and in designing your four-year program of study. Please do not hesitate to consult them as you make your decisions about course selection. Sincerely, Mamie Heard Director

3


HIGH SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY AND CURRICULUM The International School of Krakow aims to provide children with an academically rigorous and intellectually stimulating environment, and to promote the development of creativity, critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Instruction is geared to the individual needs of the student. We seek to nurture a learning environment based on trust, respect, integrity, responsibility and concern for others. Our international curriculum at once celebrates the rich and diverse backgrounds of our students and focuses on concepts common to us all. In order to continually provide the best, and most truly international, education for our students, ISK blends together aspects of several different curricula to facilitate learning. For our core courses in Grades 9 and 10, we draw on standards from the US State of Virginia. For our languages, arts and health courses, we draw on additional standards from American Education Reaches Out (AERO), from the province of British Columbia, and from the national curricula of Poland, France and Germany. Some grade 11 and 12 courses follow the curriculum of the College Board in order to challenge our more able students and provide them with Advanced Placement college credit. Standards are reviewed regularly to make sure that we continue to provide the best learning environment for our students. ISK promotes balance in its students. Our high academic expectations are offered alongside a large variety of service learning activities, after-school clubs, CEESA events, and travel opportunities in order to encourage students to develop all aspects of the whole person and to reflect on their place in the world. As they learn to take risks, they develop greater open-mindedness, and a broader and more caring view of the world.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADING POLICIES Each quarter students in Grades 9 – 12 receive comments, letter grades and number grades in order to help describe their learning growth. Numbers are used for a product grade, and are meant to evaluate student work (major assignments, test, and other summative assessments). The number grades are determined from graded work as follows: Summative Descriptor Assessment % A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge 98-100 and skills, and the ability to apply them almost faultlessly in a wide variety of situations. There is consistent evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate. The student consistently demonstrates originality and insight and always produces work of high quality.

4

Product Grade 7


90-97

80-89

70-79 60-69

50-59 Below 50

A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them in a wide variety of situations. There is consistent evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate. The student generally demonstrates originality and insight. A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them in a variety of situations. The student generally shows evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate and occasionally demonstrates originality and insight. A good general understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them effectively in normal situations. There is occasional evidence of the skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Limited achievement against most of the objectives, or clear difficulties in some areas. The student demonstrates a limited understanding of the required knowledge and skills and is only able to apply them fully in normal situations with support. Very limited achievement against all the objectives. The student has difficulty in understanding the required knowledge and skills, and is unable to apply them fully in normal situations, even with support. Minimal achievement in terms of the objectives.

6

5

4 3

2 1

Students are expected to maintain product grades of 3 or above in all subjects. Students who do not meet this expectation will be reviewed to determine their readiness to advance to the next grade level. In some Middle and High School courses, no product grade is awarded. Instead, students are given a grade of “Pass” or “Fail” at the end of each semester. This grade is based on the approach to learning, as well as on formative or summative assessments considered by the teacher to be the most important during the semester. As a general guideline, students pass the course as long as they do not maintain a grade of “N” for approach to learning, or a grade pattern of 1 or 2 for assessments. Letters are used both as a measure of how well students are meeting individual course standards, and also for an approach to learning grade, which is an evaluation of the excellence, responsibility and respect with which they approach learning at ISK. The letters refer to the following descriptors: N A M E

student is not meeting grade-level expectations student is approaching grade-level expectations student consistently meets grade-level expectations student consistently exceeds grade-level expectations

Grade-level expectations are described more fully in the list of our curriculum standards, which is available to parents on the ISK website (Rubicon Parent). It is important to remember that not every standard is assessed or reported on each quarter.

5


TYPES OF DIPLOMAS ISK DIPLOMA: Students in the classes of 2013 and 2014 qualify for ISK diplomas. They must meet the graduation requirements as spelled out below. IB DIPLOMA: The International School of Krakow is a candidate school* for the Diploma Programme. This school is pursuing authorization as an IB World School. IB World Schools share a common philosophy—a commitment to high-quality, challenging, international education—that we believe is important for our students. Students in the class of 2015 and younger qualify for the International Baccalaureate Diploma, which requires more credits than an ISK diploma. Consequently, students who earn an IB diploma automatically receive an ISK diploma as well. The IB diploma is optional, so if students choose to pursue only an ISK diploma the total number of credits to graduate remains the same, although they are distributed differently. * Only schools authorized by the IB Organization can offer any of its three academic programmes: the Primary Years Programme (PYP), the Middle Years Programme (MYP) or the Diploma Programme (and in addition the IB Career-related Certificate). Candidate status gives no guarantee that authorization will be granted. For further information about the IB and its programmes visit http://www.ibo.org.

AWARDING COURSE CREDITS Each course taken at ISK is awarded a certain number of credits, depending on how many times per week the course meets. Periods at ISK last for forty minutes. In general a course which meets 5 or 6 periods a week earns one credit a year; a course which meets 2 or 3 periods a week earns ½ credit. To receive an ISK diploma, students must earn 24 credits, as outlined below. COURSE CREDITS FOR CORE COURSES: 17 The core course areas of math, science, social studies, English and native language meet between five and six periods a week. A minimum of three credits (or three full years) in math, science and social studies is required in order to graduate; a minimum of four credits (or four full years) is required in English and native language. The required number of credits for core courses will increase to 17.5 for students in the class of 2015 and younger. COURSE CREDITS FOR ENRICHMENT COURSES: 2 Enrichment courses are required courses, which are typically offered on a half-credit basis and completed in the 9th and 10th grade, before students begin to concentrate on a particular subject area or areas. The enrichment courses we currently require 6


are music, drama, art, IT, foreign languages and physical education/health. The required number of credits for enrichment courses will increase to 5 for students in the class of 2015 and younger. COURSE CREDITS FOR ELECTIVE COURSE: 4 ISK requires students to earn a combination of four credits from the following elective courses: Studio Art, Web Design, Yearbook and Newspaper, AP Studio Art, or Art History*. Students may choose which course they would like to take in order to fulfill the four-credit elective requirement. In addition, physical education and foreign languages may be counted as elective credit, once students have fulfilled their enrichment credits in those courses. The required number of credits for elective courses will decrease to 1.5 for students in the class of 2015 and younger. *Credit in Art History may be used for either elective credit or as a core credit in social studies. SELECTING A CONCENTRATION: 1 Upon graduating from ISK, students will earn the distinction of a course concentration in a subject area or areas. Students may choose any of the core, enrichment or elective subjects (except for physical education) in which to earn their concentration by earning one additional credit in any of these subject areas beyond the core, enrichment, and elective credit requirements. High school students are counseled about course concentrations by the head of high school and may earn up to two concentrations. This will no longer be a requirement for students in the class of 2015 and younger. SAMPLE HIGH SCHOOL COURSE PLAN (Class of 2013) Credits Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Core (17 credits) English 1 1 1 Native Language 1 1 1 Math 1 1 1 Science 1 1 1 Social Studies 1 1 1 Enrichment (2 credits) Foreign Language ½ ½ PE / health ½ ½ Elective (4 credits) Web Design (1/2) ½ Studio Art (1/2) ½ Yearbook and Newspaper (1) Art History OR AP Art History (1) AP Studio Art (1) PE or Foreign Language beyond the ½ enrichment requirement (1/2) Course Concentration (1 credit) Service Learning 0 0 0 7

Grade 12 1 1

1 1 ½ 1 0


SAMPLE HIGH SCHOOL COURSE PLAN (Class of 2015, ISK Diploma Candidate)

Credits Core (18 credits) English Native Language Math Science Social Studies Enrichment (5 credits) Foreign Language PE / health Drama / music / art / IT Theory of Knowledge Elective (1.5 credits) Advanced Art OR Advanced IT Group 6 elective Service Learning / CAS

Grade 9

Grade 10 Grade 11

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 2 1

½ ½ 2

½ ½

Grade 12

1 1 1 1 1

1 1

½

½

1 0

0

½ 0

0

SAMPLE HIGH SCHOOL COURSE PLAN (Class of 2015, IB Diploma Candidate)

Credits Core (21 credits) English (Group 1) Native Language (Group 2) Math (Group 5) Science (Group 4) Social Studies (Group 3) Enrichment (5 credits) Foreign Language PE / health Drama / music / art / IT Theory of Knowledge Elective (2.5 credits) Advanced Art OR Advanced IT Group 6 elective Service Learning / CAS

Grade 9

Grade 10 Grade 11

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 2 1

½ ½ 2

½ ½

Grade 12

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

½

½

1 0

1 0

½ 0

0

CITIZENSHIP AND SERVICE LEARNING PHILOSOPHY Service learning is a student-centered, educational philosophy which is characterized by a systematic approach to the teaching of values and civic responsibility, while serving the school, local or global community, and providing for the development of various skills. Service Learning is... 8


• • • • • •

Caring and learning – the blending of the affective and cognitive domains of the brain. Students working together on projects that address genuine needs in the school, local or global community. Connecting service work done outside the classroom with lessons in the classroom – an integration of service and curriculum. Students contributing their individual strengths and interests to projects while developing various skills. Students, teachers, parents, administrators and community members all working together to do something for the greater good. A systematic, guided approach to working on service learning projects through various stages throughout the year.

Although students earn no credit for Service Learning, it is a graduation requirement. Starting with the class of 2015, Service Learning in Grades 11 and 12 will be replaced by CAS (Creativity, Action, Service), during which students are expected to complete 150 hours of service learning outside the classroom. Credits: 0 Length of Course: Occurs out of school time, but structured within the curriculum at each grade level. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Required for students grades 9-12

CORE COURSE OFFERINGS Note: Course Offerings are subject to student enrollment and staff availability These are courses currently offered, or which have been offered in the recent past. IB Course Descriptions will not be included until the school has been authorized to teach the Diploma Program.

ENGLISH PHILOSOPHY The Language Arts Curriculum provides students with both the foundation to become active and effective members of their community and with the foundation for continued academic success. To this end, the curriculum is designed as an integrative approach to literature, grammar, and composition. The Language Arts program stresses the development of critical thinking skills, the cultivation of an aesthetic sensibility, an exposure to diverse ideas, and awareness, through literature, of the relationship between oneself and others.

9


LITERATURE AND WRITING I Literature and Writing I introduces students to a broad selection of literature, encouraging reading, reflection and analysis. The class focuses on specific outcomes concerning the following: 1. Oral Language, where students will plan, present, and critique dramatic readings of literary selections; and make planned oral presentations. 2. Reading Analysis, where students will read and analyze a variety of literature; read and analyze a variety of informational materials and nonfiction materials, including journals, essays, speeches, biographies, and autobiographies; and will read and analyze dramatic selections more closely. 3. Writing, where students will develop narrative, expository, and informational writings to inform, explain, analyze, or entertain; and edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 4. Research, where students will credit the sources of both quoted and paraphrased ideas; and use print, electronic databases, and online resources to access information. Credits: Course length: Grade Level: Prerequisites:

1 1 year 9 None

LITERATURE AND WRITING II Literature and Writing II introduces students to a broad selection of literature, encouraging reading, reflection and analysis. The class focuses on specific outcomes concerning the following: 1. Oral Language, where students will participate in and report on small-group learning activities; and critique oral reports of small-group learning activities. 2. Reading Analysis, where students will read, comprehend, and critique literary works, informational materials, a variety of poetry, and dramatic selections. 3. Writing, where students will develop a variety of writing, with an emphasis on exposition; edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing; and critique professional and peer writing; and use writing to interpret, analyze, and evaluate ideas. 4. Research, where students will collect, evaluate, organize, and present information. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 10 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Literature and Writing I

WORLD LITERATURE AND WRITING I World Literature and Writing I is a one-year course culminating in a standard level exam. The course aims to develop personal appreciation of literature and an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism. The course will introduce students to a range of literary works of different periods, genres, styles and cultures, from the ancient world until the present. Texts and themes are chosen by 10


the instructor. Composition and oral assignment are utilized to develop the students' ability to communicate fluently, creatively and succinctly. Students will be required to complete a rigorous reading regiment both as a class and independently. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Literature and Writing II or an equivalent Grade 10 course.

WORLD LITERATURE AND WRITING II World Literature and Writing II is a one-year course culminating in a standard level exam. The course aims to develop personal appreciation of literature and an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism. The course will introduce students to a range of literary works of different periods, genres, styles and cultures, from the ancient world until the present. Texts and themes are chosen by the instructor. Composition and oral assignment are utilized to develop the students' ability to communicate fluently, creatively and succinctly. The Great Books Program is integrated into the course, and students will be responsible for reading the 10 books assigned to them, some of which will be read as a class, some which will be read individually. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of World Literature and Writing I or an equivalent Grade 11 course.

AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION The course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature through the close reading of selected texts. Students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Literature and Writing II, World Literature I or an equivalent Grade 10 or 11 course. AP® students should demonstrate ability to handle the demands of the course work.

MATHEMATICS PHILOSOPHY The philosophy of the Mathematics Department of the International School of Krakow is that it is our responsibility to provide a program to fulfill the mathematics needs of a student body from many parts of the world. The student will develop mathematical 11


knowledge, reasoning, and concepts needed in problem solving. The student will see mathematics as it relates to many other fields of knowledge and will see connections between mathematics and daily life. The student will be prepared for further study in fields requiring mathematics. Note about technology: The Mathematics Department of the International School of Krakow requires all students in Grades 11 and 12 to own a graphing calculator, which will be a fundamental learning tool.

ALGEBRA I This course is designed for students to master their basic algebraic skills. Topics covered include theory of number sets; solving and graphing linear and quadratic equations, linear inequalities and systems of equations; laws of exponents with applications; algebraic manipulation of polynomials; introduction to functions and their graphs; introduction to radical and rational expressions. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: generally 8, but can be taken in high school by request Prerequisites: none

GEOMETRY This course furthers the study of Geometry with application of algebraic and logical reasoning skills. Topics covered include angle relationships, similar and congruent triangles, properties of quadrilaterals and polygons, circle theorems, right triangle trigonometry, 3-D figures. Students apply algebraic formulas, deductive and inductive reasoning and theory of logic to prove theorems. They apply geometric concepts to solve practical problems. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: generally 9, other grades by request Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I or teacher recommendation

ALGEBRA II This course furthers the study of Algebra. Topics covered include: complex numbers; operations with matrices and applications; linear programming; conic sections; further study of equations, systems of equations and functions: quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, and exponential. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: generally 10, other grades by request Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry or teacher recommendation

PRE-CALCULUS 12


This course introduces students to techniques used to handle discrete data and algebraic techniques necessary to learn the calculus. Topics covered include sequences and series; polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric equations; triangular and circular trigonometry; trigonometric identities and theorems used to solve practical problems. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of the course. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: generally 11 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and Geometry or teacher recommendation

APŠ CALCULUS AB This course introduces students to the college level calculus. Topics covered include: functions, analysis of their graphs, limits and property of continuity; definition, applications and computation of derivatives; definition, properties and applications of integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; techniques and applications of antidifferentiation. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of the course. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: generally 12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry or teacher recommendation

THE SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY We believe our science program should instill in the student an understanding and appreciation of the basic laws which describe our physical and natural environment, and should develop the various analytical and practical skills necessary to function successfully in an increasingly complex world. We provide a variety of learning experiences, designed to engage students at their capability level, but which will challenge them to reach their full potential. Students will also come to appreciate that science is not just a static body of information but rather an ongoing process. AIMS: 1. To develop in our students the ability and confidence to communicate their questions and knowledge through both spoken and written language and, when appropriate, through mathematical expressions and graphs. 2. To develop in our students the process skills of science, i.e. observing, classifying, measuring, questioning, experimenting, inferring, predicting, hypothesizing, and critically analyzing. 3. To enable our students to work as team members and to realize both the advantages and responsibilities of doing so. Scientific work in a safe and collaborative manner will be encouraged at all levels. 13


4. To develop in our students the abilities to plan individual experiments and to manipulate efficiently a variety of laboratory materials. Work in a science laboratory should ideally be exploratory and open. 5. To prepare students to become lifetime learners of science. Scientific issues of current and vital concern will be brought into the classroom, and students will be encouraged and helped to use the widest available range of resources. 6. To provide a program of studies that produces a student body that is scientifically literate across the disciplines. 7. To create awareness in our students of how science impacts society and the ethical responsibilities inherent in scientific endeavor.

BIOLOGY Biology is offered as a one-year course for 9th grade students. Topics covered will include: theory of science, biochemistry, biology of cells, human anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Additionally, students conduct quarterly individual/group research projects. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9 th th Prerequisites: Successful completion of 7 grade Life Science and 8 grade Physical Science.

CHEMISTRY Chemistry is a year-long course. The general chemistry topics include: structure of atom, the periodic law, chemical bonding, nomenclature and chemical formulas of compounds, acids, bases and salts, chemical reactions, chemical quantities, stoichiometry and electrochemistry. Laboratory experiments will be performed in each unit. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 10 th Prerequisites: Successful completion of 9 grade Biology

PHYSICS Physics is a laboratory and project-based course, and is meant to be taken at the same time as chemistry. Topics include: mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 10 th Prerequisites: Successful completion of 9 grade Biology

AP速 BIOLOGY The two main goals of the course are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and an appreciation of science as a process. Primary 14


emphasis is on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Three main areas covered are: Molecules and Cells; Heredity and Evolution; and Organisms and Population. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

AP® CHEMISTRY The course is described to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. It covers topics such as the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the basic concepts of thermodynamics. Students broaden their knowledge of specific facts of chemistry such as chemical reactivity and products of chemical reaction; relationship in the periodic tables; and introduction to organic chemistry. Students acquire experience in laboratory work and master their skills of making observations of chemical reactions; recording data; communicating effectively the results of experimental work. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Students should have completed a general High School chemistry course, and Algebra II. Approval from the previous year's science teacher is recommended.

AP® PHYSICS B/C AP® Physics is a university-level physics course designed for students intending to pursue studies in the field of science. It may be taken after completing Physics, or by recommendation of the teacher. Topics covered during the course(s) include: mechanics, kinetic theory and thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and modern physics. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physics and teacher recommendation.

SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY The Social Studies Department of the International School of Krakow wishes to expose students to a variety of approaches, which will enable them to answer the question, “How have I become the person who I am?” Students of social studies will understand themselves more thoroughly because they will have been trained in a variety of disciplines. By studying the record of human behavior, they may better view how people have attempted to solve difficulties similar to those which they themselves face today, and which they will face in the future as active and constructive members of society. 15


MODERN WORLD HISTORY Modern World History focuses on historical events and processes from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Within a historical framework, the course utilizes a thematic approach which includes a study of the fields of government, economics, philosophy, literature, the arts, science, and law, and which are representative of specific eras. Units on Polish history are incorporated periodically with particular emphasis on the twentieth century. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9 Prerequisites: None

MODERN WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND CURRENT EVENTS World Geography and Current Events completes the 9th grade social studies sequence. Within a scientific and humanitarian framework, the course utilizes a thematic approach which includes a study of the fields of physical, human, socioenvironmental, cultural- political, ecological, and historical geography, and relates them to events occurring in the world today. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 10 Prerequisites: Grade 9 Modern World History

AP速 WORLD HISTORY AP速 World History reflects the content of an introductory college course in World History. World History develops a greater understanding of the evolution of human societies through major global events and processes within the time period of 8000 BCE to present. The course offers balanced global coverage, with Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe all represented. Six themes are highlighted: the dynamics of change and continuity across the world involving major causes and processes; patterns and effects of interaction among societies and regions (trade, war, diplomacy and international organizations); the effects of technology, economics and demography on people and the environment; social and gender systems; cultural, intellectual and religious developments; changes in the functions and structures of state and in their attitudes towards states and political identities. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: High school course in World History Recommendations: Students should have a strong background in, and desire to study History.

CURRENT WORLD PROBLEMS Current World Problems is designed to help students become informed participants in world democracies. The course covers current world events from a historical perspective. Topics include regional problems as well as international concerns. It 16


explores the post Cold War world and the issue of globalization, including the historical forces that have brought globalization to the fore and the problems we face as an interconnected global community. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the Modern World. Credits: 1 per year Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: None

NATIVE LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION PHILOSOPHY A strong foundation in one's native language helps to aid communication in all other languages. Native English instruction courses follow a similar curriculum as Language Arts, emphasizing further development of English through writing, reading, research and drama, but with a focus on non-fiction. The non-English native instruction courses follow the national curricula of Poland, France and Germany, and are designed for students to easily return to their native countries in case they are not able to continue at ISK, and also to assist students seeking to attend university in these countries. Many parents who have moved away from ISK have taken the time to comment on how successfully their children have reintegrated back into the national school system, and it is a great strength of ISK that we are able to provide an international education while simultaneously maintaining students’ native language development.

NATIVE POLISH, NATIVE FRENCH, NATIVE GERMAN These courses follow the curricula of their countries, so vary widely in the literature studied. However, all are designed to closely monitor the oral, reading, writing and research skills of the students enrolled. There is a focus on literary analysis and critical thinking, but students are also encouraged to express their thoughts and ideas creatively through a variety of media. In some cases, it may be possible for students to prepare for the university entrance exams of their countries if the full course is completed through Grade 12. A list of standards can be viewed on the reference page of the school’s curriculum (Rubicon Parent). Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9- 12 Prerequisites: Native speaker of the language—to be determined by the instructor.

NATIVE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION I: RESEARCH The goal of this course is to help students develop strong research and critical thinking skills. Course topics include identifying the level of reliability of an information source, identifying bias - both in content and circumstantially, paraphrasing, citing sources, finding reliable sources on the internet, studying propaganda and its 17


characteristics, synthesizing information from different sources into a cohesive research paper, formulating good research questions, and presenting findings to classmates. The course will build off of students' interests, and students will have the ability to choose their own research topics within reasonable limits. Current topics and events will be used in order to make the material more relevant. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9- 10 Prerequisites: Proficiency in speaking and writing English

NATIVE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION II: PUBLIC SPEAKING AND DEBATE Debate topics will be chosen by the class as a whole from those that are most hotly debated currently. Students can choose from topics such as bio-ethical issues (cloning, designer babies), death penalty, the limits of freedom of speech, government surveillance, environmental issues, political issues, and any other topic of great interest to the class. Focus will be placed on building up strong arguments, and viewing logical holes in other's arguments. The class will learn about logical fallacies and be able to apply this knowledge in evaluating an argument. Debates will be held in a structured and safe environment which fosters team-work and good will. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11 -12 Prerequisites: Proficiency in speaking and writing English

ENRICHMENT COURSE OFFERINGS PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH Physical education emphasizes learning the rules and basic developmental skills in a variety of sport, fitness, and recreational activities. Students compete through matches, games and tournaments wherever applicable to encourage them to reach their highest level of performance. Throughout each activity the highest priority is placed on effort, sportsmanship and respect. Team sports include soccer, basketball, and volleyball. Track and field athletics includes running short and medium distances. The forest is used for orienteering and cross-country, as well as for sledding during the winter. Other outdoor activities take place around the school during all seasons. The fieldhouse is used for indoor activities, such as gymnastics, stretching, strength training and indoor games. Students are required to set personal goals for both cardiovascular fitness and strength training and are evaluated on three equal categories: 1. Motor skills and object control (both proficiency and improvement) 2. Fitness level 18


3. Team play and skill application (how skills are applied during games, and also the attitude, cooperation, teamwork, respect, sportsmanship, responsibility, enthusiasm and effort of the athlete) Health is a course that promotes awareness of the physical and emotional changes that occur in adolescents. Students integrate a variety of health topics, concepts and skills, and behaviors to plan for their personal, lifelong health goals. These include goal setting, personal development, career planning, awareness of risky behaviors, disease prevention, overall wellness and awareness of the community around them. Students demonstrate competence in their knowledge and skills. They see themselves as having an active role in creating a healthy lifestyle for themselves as individuals, for their families, and for the larger community. Credits: 0.5 credits per year Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-10, and PE as an elective in grades 11-12

FOREIGN LANGUAGES PHILOSOPHY The aims of foreign language study at ISK are to communicate in the target language in a wide range of situations and for a variety of purposes, to gain an awareness of and an appreciation for foreign cultures, to make connections to other disciplines, and use the foreign language to engage the multicultural community.

COMMON APPROACH TO THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGAUGES • Topics studied in class will reflect the reality of life and culture of the target language. • The choice of topic should be student oriented, stimulating their interest and creativity. • Learning is promoted through interactive activities where content, form and purpose of activities motivate learners to participate and to develop language control. • A variety of approaches will be necessary to develop students' view of language learning and a positive experience. • Appropriate resources need to be utilized in order to extend the learning experience beyond the classroom walls. • The cultures where the foreign languages are spoken will be studied. • Connections to other subject areas such as history, art, music and computer science will be made. • Students will gain an increased understanding of the nature of language by comparing the foreign languages to other languages that they know. • Students will use the foreign language to engage the community and world around them. 19


FRENCH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE Foreign French emphasizes the use of language for communication and helps students develop the ability to understand spoken French in various contexts; a French vocabulary sufficiently ample for reading newspaper and magazine articles and literary texts; and the ability to express themselves coherently, resourcefully and with fluency in both written and spoken French. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Open

GERMAN AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE High School Foreign German introduces students to a new language and culture by encouraging speaking, reading, and writing in German and by developing their capacity to live and work successfully in a multilingual and multicultural community. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Open

AP速 GERMAN LANGUAGE The course emphasizes use of the language for active communication. Students develop a strong command of vocabulary and structure, develop comprehension skills of spoken German in various situations, read newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary fiction and non-technical writings without the use of a dictionary, learn to express ideas orally and in writing with fluency and accuracy. The content includes the arts, current events, literature, sports and other topics. Extensive practice in the organization and writing of composition is also emphasized. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Advanced language skills

POLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE Foreign Polish focuses on effective communication and the application of formulating sound grammatical rules in the four areas of language learning: reading comprehension, writing, listening comprehension and speaking. Exercises will be based on authentic experiences, such as going to the cinema or restaurant, using everyday speech at school or with the family, and useful language for travel. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Open.

SPANISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 20


Students will learn basic vocabulary, grammar, proper pronunciation and listen and speaking strategies in order to communicate in Spanish orally and in writing. In addition, students will learn about the cultures of the various Spanish speaking countries throughout the world while connections to other disciplines such as history, art and music will be made. Students will gain a greater understanding of the nature of language by making comparisons of Spanish to other languages and students will engage the Spanish speaking community and world around them. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Open

TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS PHILOSOPHY The Grade 9 introductory computer, fine arts and performing arts courses are designed to enrich the program beyond PE and languages. They provide an introduction to each of these areas of study so that students have the skills, knowledge and experience to pursue them as elective courses in the future. They also develop creativity, performance and teamwork skills. The emphasis in each course is in producing advanced work that represents both the best individual and group efforts from each student. DRAMA Drama will delve into the history of theater. Students will examine theatrical contributions and styles from several countries and historical periods. An emphasis will be on the Renaissance to align with the subject matter across the curriculum. The works of Shakespeare will be one focus along with a variety of other plays, skits, and monologues. The students will develop their vocal and physical techniques, characterization, and stage discipline to improve their performance. Collaborative work, problem-solving, and reflection will be emphasized throughout the course. Credits: 1/2 Length of Course: 1 semester Grade Level: 9 Prerequisites: None

MUSIC In Music students will investigate certain areas of music in depth, in order to develop their knowledge and understanding, and also to broaden the focus of cross-curricular areas of study, for example, the Renaissance. Topics will include film music and soundtracks, music history (including analysis and critical thinking), music theory and composition, and performance. Credits: 1/2 Length of Course: 1 semester Grade Level: 9 Prerequisites: None

21


ART Studio Art is designed to develop basic skills and an interest in creating art. The principles of art are explored through a variety of approaches and media. Hands-on assignments build creativity, and encourage the students to view the world around them and to express themselves in different ways. Both two-dimensional and threedimensional projects will be introduced. Credits: 1/2 Length of Course: 1 semester Grade Level: 9 Prerequisites: None

IT Students in Information Technology assist in the planning and producing of the school yearbook. Skills and activities included in the class are long-term planning, team building, interpersonal communication skills, writing skills, graphic design, budgeting, marketing and bookkeeping. Students also study the basic principles and practices of journalism as they write stories for ISK’s online newspaper, the ISK Voice. Skills and activities include gathering information, interviewing skills, finding news-worthy stories, writing headlines and captions, and the ethics of journalism. Credits: 1/2 Length of Course: 1 semester Grade Level: 9 Prerequisites: None

ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS PHILOSOPHY Art is an unwritten language that deepens the understanding of people's interpretation of the world. It is the product that every culture leaves as a legacy and proof of their existence and humanity. It is a legitimate way of seeing the world and expressing ideas. The International School of Krakow’s Art program, in keeping with the school’s philosophy, is designed to promote the development of tomorrow's world citizens who will have the aesthetic knowledge to make critical decisions. Goals for students in the program are as follows: • Students will explore the elements and principles of art. • Students will build creative confidence and reflect personal viewpoints. • Students will enhance the ability to visualize. • Students will develop the use of imagination as a means of self-expression. ADVANCED STUDIO ART AND INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY The goals of the Advanced Art are to encourage creative and systematic investigation of formal and conceptual issues, to emphasize art as an ongoing 22


process that involves the student in informed and critical decision making, to help students develop technical skills and familiarize them with the functions of visual elements, and to encourage them to become independent thinkers who will contribute inventively and critically to their culture through the making of art. An introduction to art history provides a foundation for further study in grades 11 or 12. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 10 Prerequisites: Grade 9 Art

AP® STUDIO ART DRAWING & 2D DESIGN In AP© Studio Art & 2D Design, students prepare a portfolio which is submitted for evaluation. The portfolios share a basic, three-section structure, which requires the student to show a fundamental competence and range of understanding in visual concerns and methods. Each of the portfolios asks the student to demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery through the concentration section (Section II). In the breadth section (Section III), the student is asked to demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material techniques. The quality section (Section I) permits the student to select the works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Studio Art & 2D Design and/or teacher recommendation

ART HISTORY The course is designed to provide an understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. The course emphasizes understanding works in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of works of art. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art & 2D Design, World History and Literature

AP® ART HISTORY Art History provides an in-depth study into the historical world of art. Students in this class will be expected to study art from different genres across the prehistoric through to the modern era. This course will expose students to the historical connections between art and the human experience while fostering an appreciation for artistic influence. Credits: 1 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 11-12

23


Prerequisites:

Successful completion of Studio Art & 2D Design

COMPUTER SCIENCE PHILOSOPHY The Information Technology department philosophy is that all students should develop a variety of information management and computer productivity skills upon graduation. In our increasingly technology-based workplace these skills are a key requirement for placement in the world at any level. Consequently, we offer a mixture of broad and focused content throughout our course selection and incorporate an on line delivery system that allows students to delve further into a topic or reach out into new areas. The following four courses are offered on a rotating basis.

Creative courses DIGITAL DESIGN An introduction to the various aspects of presenting information through a variety of channels. The focus rests primarily on content design for web and print creation but sections are also devoted to other topics, such as computer animations, DTP and presentations. Theoretical issues may include the ethical, legal and cultural implications of digital technology, social cyberspace, net architecture, relational databases, human-computer interaction and Web 2.0. Throughout the course, students will use computer technology and digital media to create instructional, presentation or promotional materials. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: None

DIGITAL MEDIA An introduction to the various aspects of Digital Media. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key concepts of digital content creation and distribution, such as digital images, video, and audio. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with an overview of content creation and distribution using various tools such as digital photography and video devices, and digital editing software. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: None

24


Technical courses SYSTEMS SECURITY An introduction to the various technical aspects of Information Security and Assurance. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining vulnerabilities and implementing appropriate counter measures. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with an overview of the field of Information Security and Assurance. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of Security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, and an overview of Information Security Planning. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: None

INFORMATION SYSTEMS An introduction to various technical and administrative aspects of Information Systems. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key concepts related to information infrastructures such as systems implementation and high availability, information gathering and delivery, data structures, and system support architecture. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with and overview of the field of Information Management. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of Management activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include systems design and implementation planning, software platform evaluation, standardization, system procurement, asset management, and support architecture. Credits: 0.5 Length of Course: 1 year Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: None

25


HS_Program_of_Studies_2012-13