SA Jewellery News (SAJN) • March 2021

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• What jewellers will be talking about this year • Diamond market set for full recovery by 2024 • De Beers announces 12 ambitious 2030 goals • CoNNect with customers and build your brand

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SAJN | CONTENTS

contents Editor: Adri Viviers Tel: +27 (0)11 883-4627 Cell: 084-261-1805 E-mail: adri@isikhova.co.za Managing Director: Imraan Mahomed E-mail: imraanm@isikhova.co.za

Creative Director: Joanne Brook E-mail: joanne@isikhova.co.za Operations Director: Thuli Majola Tel: +27 (0)11 883-4627 E-mail: thuli@isikhova.co.za Director Brand Strategy: Jenny Justus Cell: 083-450-6052 E-mail: jenny@isikhova.co.za Media Specialist: Ian Starnes Cell: 082-052-8428 E-mail: ian@isikhova.co.za Media Specialist: Lamees Mahomed Cell: 084-590-5123 E-mail: lamees@isikhova.co.za Media Specialist: Lori Zavattoni Cell: 083-229-7873 E-mail: lori@isikhova.co.za Media Specialist: Gail Keogh Cell: 082-929-4935 E-mail: gail@isikhova.co.za Media Specialist: Ruwayda Mahomed Cell: 072-383-3203 E-mail: ruwayda@isikhova.co.za Copy Editor: Anne Phillips Distribution: Ruth Dlamini and Direct Marketing Solution

SA Jewellery News is published by: Isikhova Media (Pty) Ltd, Physical: 10th Floor, Metal Box, 25 Owl Street, Milpark, Johannesburg, South Africa. Website: www.isikhova.co.za

6

10. NEWS • De Beers to fund designer in SA, Botswana, Namibia or Canada • World-renowned industry giant Jose Hess passes away • US$2 million available in 2021 GIA scholarships • EJP Project Head Colin Campbell retires • New beginnings for Veronica Anderson Jewellery • JZA magazine abuzz for Issue 2

Courtesy De Beers

Publishing Director: Jason Aarons Cell: 074-400-6677 E-mail: jason@isikhova.co.za

• Rescheduling of Hong Kong international industry fairs

16. WHAT JEWELLERS WILL BE TALKING ABOUT THIS YEAR Victoria Gomelsky, JCK’s Editor-in-Chief, has put together a guide to the five major trends that will change the way jewellery is made, bought and sold in the year, and decade, to come.

18. DE BEERS ANNOUNCES 12 AMBITIOUS 2030 GOALS The De Beers Group recently announced 12 bold sustainability goals for the coming decade, including achieving gender parity throughout its workforce, supporting 10 000 women entrepreneurs in its diamond-producing partner countries and becoming carbon-neutral within its own operations by 2030.

31. HELPING INDEPENDENT DESIGNERS ENGAGE WITH CUSTOMERS SA Jewellery News (SAJN) and JZA – Your Jewellery Magazine’s UK (London-based) media alliance partner, CoNNect Agency, is a brand development agency which offers South African designers an invaluable bouquet of brand recognition strategies.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


CONTENTS | SAJN

Official Journal of the Jewellery Council of South Africa and the Diamond Dealers’ Club of South Africa. www.jewellery.org.za www.ddcsa.co.za

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36. ANGLO AMERICAN TO MOVE CORPORATE OFFICE TO ROSEBANK Eighty-one years after Anglo American first set up its headquarters at 44 Main in Johannesburg’s then thriving inner city, the global mining giant is moving its headquarters from the central business district to the suburb of Rosebank.

32. NOT JUST ANOTHER JEWELLERY BRAND Keeva Trends recently opened its exclusive handmade jewellery store in Parkhurst, Johannesburg. By locally manufacturing all its jewellery pieces, it aims to grow SA’s local economy. SAJN caught up with its founder, Venesia van den Berg.

35. BRAND MANAGEMENT • The new generation of Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual Submariner • Hublot launches new Big Bang Tourbillon Automatic Orange Sapphire • Disney Mickey Mouse X Keith Haring collection by Swatch

39. DIAMOND MARKET SET FOR FULL RECOVERY BY 2024 The diamond supply chain will return to prepandemic levels between 2022 and 2024, led by economic recoveries in China and the USA, according to Bain & Co.

• Diamond market set for full recovery by 2024

NeverNoT

• De Beers announces 12 ambitious 2030 goals • CoNNect with customers and build your brand

On the cover SA Jewellery News (SAJN) and JZA – Your Jewellery Magazine’s UK (London-based) media alliance partner, CoNNect Agency, is a brand development agency which embodies a new wave in brand recognition strategies. Jewellery and fashion are the CoNNect Agency’s passions

41. BUSINESS BAROMETER

and it lives with those aesthetics in mind. It

A monthly survey conducted by SAJN among industry players on a national basis.

from around the world, each with their own

42. A STONE OF MANY COLOURS Little Gems is one of SAJN’s favourite pages in the magazine. Penned by our beloved editorial doyenne, the late Alice Weil, it will still continue to weave its magic with flair and with the unyielding love Alice had for jewellery, gemstones and watches.

APOLOGIES SAJN would like to apologise for the gremlins which sneaked into our February issue’s delivery schedule and for any inconvenience this may have caused. We thank you for your patience, understanding and continued valued support.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

• What jewellers will be talking about this year

represents a myriad of jewellery designers unique niche approach to design. South African designers who would like more information can contact them via DM on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/theagencyconnect/ or e-mail: info@theagencyconnect.com. SAJN will be sharing more exciting and innovative initiatives with the CoNNect Agency in the coming months. Visit their website at: https://www.theagencyconnect.com/.

The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the owners, the Jewellery Council of South Africa, the Diamond Dealers’ Club of South Africa, its members, the publisher or its agents. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of its contents, neither the owners, the Jewellery Council of South Africa, the Diamond Dealers’ Club of South Africa, the editor nor the publisher can be held responsible for any omissions or errors; or for any misfortune, injury or damages which may arise therefrom. The same applies to all advertising. SA Jewellery News© 2021. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage retrieval system, without prior written permission from the publishers. ISSN 1817-5333.

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ED’S NOTE | SAJN

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ourselves. We lose a trusted and honest voice. A good mentor is someone who supports and encourages us to reach for higher goals, to take the next step and pushes us to succeed. The perfect mentor is one who is experienced in an area where we might need a little extra help because we lack knowledge, confidence or experience. A good mentor helps us stay accountable to our goals. They help us focus and remain on track. When we become frustrated and want to give up, they push us harder and keep us going. I learnt something early in life – that there is always someone more knowledgeable than I and that it is great to have someone off whom to bounce ideas. I have also realised that a great mentor does not tell you what to do: they find ways to bring out the best in you.

IN THIS ISSUE OF SAJN, AS WE DID IN THE previous issue, we mourn the deaths of several renowned national and international industry icons. As tributes for them poured onto various social media platforms, one word that stood out for me was “mentor”. In our lives there are dozens of people who have managed to be very successful at what they do, and these individuals provide a wealth of information and wisdom, as long as we are able to tap into it. This issue also marks the month in which one of my personal mentors and a beloved colleague, Alice Weil, would have celebrated her 102nd birthday. When a mentor dies, there is a unique kind of loss and heartbreak. We lose the future lessons we will no longer be able to learn from them. We lose a person who saw in us the potential for more than we could see in

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Alice for a while before she passed away. Who knows what stories and gems of wisdom I missed? However, I do not believe we ever really say “goodbye” to a great mentor, as the conversations and lessons we have shared with them never leave our minds. I have met many remarkable people in our industry who have more skills and insights than they realise. Your knowledge can have a profound effect on someone and the advice, support and guidance you offer can become an invaluable resource to others. To see potential and talent in others and develop and nurture it is no small thing. That is how you contribute, connect and build a lasting legacy. There is no substitute for a great mentor.

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SAJN | NEWS

De Beers has pledged to donate US$13 641 to support skills development for a jewellery design student in one of the four countries in which it operates. The Provenance Award, part of the De Beers Group Designers Initiative, will go to an upand-coming designer in SA, Botswana, Namibia or Canada, the miner said. The company will announce the winner at its Shining Lights Awards later this year. De Beers launched the award to celebrate the second iteration of ReSet, its initiative to highlight the positive impact of natural diamonds on mining communities. Named ReSet Forever Love, it will feature items by Kristina Ferenchuk,

Ami Masamitsu and Louis Tamlyn, three recent graduates of London’s Central Saint Martin’s design school. The miner asked these designers to create jewellery that represented the concepts of “love” and “forever” in the 21st century. The final collection includes rings, necklaces and a brooch using rough and polished De Beers diamonds ranging from 0,30-1,30ct. “Through challenging themselves with questions such as whether ‘forever’ is possible in a rapidly changing world, or whether sustainability is the ultimate expression of love to our communities and planet, these three innovative designers have crafted an inspiring

Courtesy De Beers

DE BEERS TO FUND DESIGNER IN SA, BOTSWANA, NAMIBIA OR CANADA

and thought-provoking collection featuring responsibly sourced diamonds,” says Colby Shergalis, Senior Vice-President: Brand Marketing at De Beers. De Beers launched the first partnership in the initiative, ReSet Collective, in October. That featured pieces by American jewellery designers Jade Trau, Jennie Kwon, Julez Bryant, Sara Weinstock and Zoë Chicco. – Rapaport

WORLD-RENOWNED INDUSTRY GIANT JOSE HESS PASSES AWAY Jose Hess, the world-renowned jewellery designer and beloved industry leader, died peacefully at his home in St Augustine, Florida, USA on 9 February 2021 at the age of 87. Hess served as CIBJO’s first American President from 1997-2000. During that period, he worked hard to nurture a new generation of leadership for the international jewellery business. He was also a founder of both the American Jewelry Design Council and the Contemporary Jewelry Design Group, and was a guide to emerging young designers and a consultant for jewellery companies around the world. He taught at New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology, where he helped create a

framework course for jewellery students that is still offered today. Hess was married for 33 years to Magdalena “Maggie” Hess, a renowned designer in her own right. She survives him along with four children – Lawrence, Francine, Aaron and Josef – and four grandchildren. “Jose is a one of a handful of people who one can truly describe as having changed our industry and he left it a better place,” says Gaetano Cavalieri, CIBJO’s current President. “In many respects I owe my position to him, for it was he who more than 20 years ago insisted that if I really wanted to make a mark, I needed to devote myself to public service. I succeeded

him as President, but he never left my side. He was my role model, my mentor and my friend. “Jose was compassionate and generous, with a keen sense of humanity and community,” continues Cavalieri. “In many ways, he embodied the cosmopolitan industry of which we’re all part, with a strong feeling of pride in where he came from [at the age of five, Hess emigrated to the USA from Nazi Germany together with his family, narrowly escaping extermination in the Holocaust] and a remarkable degree of comfort in all the places to which life had taken him, from Europe to South America and then to the USA, which he loved dearly. He was also a brilliant jeweller, raising the level of our craft to fine art.”

US$2 MILLION AVAILABLE IN 2021 GIA SCHOLARSHIPS The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is inviting students from around the world to apply for its scholarships. Whether you are new to the gem and jewellery industry or a veteran seeking to expand your knowledge, education from GIA will equip you with the tools to succeed. A scholarship from GIA makes achieving your educational goals financially attainable. The institute is accepting scholarship applications until 31 March 2021 for classes that run from JuneDecember this year. The scholarships are open to prospective students around the world. For this application cycle, all prospective students may apply for distance education programmes, with limited on-campus scholarship availability due to COVID-19-related capacity restrictions. For

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details on eligibility, how to apply and required documents, visit: GIA.edu/gem-educationscholarship-instruction-information. “In the previous scholarship application cycle, we received a record-breaking number of applications which shows that now, more than ever, students are in need of financial support

says Duncan Pay, GIA Senior Vice-President of Education and Chief Academic Officer. “This cycle was also the first time we began offering need-based scholarships. We’re committed to helping make GIA education accessible to all as we continue to evolve the way we recruit and engage with our students.” The number of scholarships awarded, as well as the amount of each award, will vary by campus location. Changes to the scholarship application cycle were made after assessing how to effectively deliver programmes and courses during the pandemic. GIA has awarded more than US$15 million in scholarships since 2010, helping more than 3 000 students study at GIA schools around the world and through distance education

to transform their education goals into reality,”

programmes.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


Natural or Laboratory-Grown?

The GIA iD100® gem testing device distinguishes natural diamonds from laboratory-grown diamonds and simulants instantly and accurately.

Learn more at store.GIA.edu ©️GIA 2020. GIA®️ and the GIA logo are registered trademarks of Gemological Institute of America, Inc.


SAJN | NEWS

NEW BEGINNINGS FOR VERONICA ANDERSON JEWELLERY After 15 years at The Firs in Rosebank, Veronica Anderson Jewellery (VAJ) has relocated its business online. “In our new streamlined guise, our emphasis will remain on personal contact and the service we’ve always offered. We’ll continue working closely with our wonderful goldsmiths and will still have direct access to all gemstones needed,” says founder and owner Veronica Anderson. VAJ is a contemporary jewellery gallery showcasing the work of local goldsmiths and jewellery designers. “Each piece is handmade and a one-off and reflects the creativity and

outstanding talent of South African designers,” says Anderson. “Our bespoke service gives our customer a link to the creative talent and skills of over 40 artist/jewellers, offering endless possibilities when it comes to personalised and unique jewellery. “South African jewellery stands out internationally in terms of strong design elements. Passion, creativity and energy are what one has come to expect from our local talent. We celebrate all of this at VAJ and are proud to be associated with developing and promoting local designers,” says Anderson.

JZA MAGAZINE ABUZZ FOR ISSUE 2 JZA – Your Jewellery Magazine, SA’s first and only dedicated consumer retail jewellery magazine, is a hive of activity as it swings into production with its second issue, which goes online 18 March. “Issue 2 will up the ante and boast a 2021 storybook of seasonal excitement, beauty and jewellery passion,” says Editor-inChief Jason Aarons. “Team JZA is thrilled by the phenomenal local and global response to the magazine from our industry peers, retail

community and, above all, consumers. And we’re doubly delighted to announce that Issue 2 will be even bigger than Issue 1!” For all brand advertising and marketing queries, contact Jenny Justus, Director and Brand Strategist, on tel: 083-450-6052 or (011) 883-4627 or e-mail: jenny@isikhova.co.za. For editorial-related queries, contact Jason Aarons on tel: 074-400-6677 or (011) 883-4627 or e-mail: jason@isikhova.co.za.

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SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


NEWS | SAJN

RESCHEDULING OF HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRY FAIRS After consultation with industry representatives and key stakeholders, a decision has been made by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) to reschedule the HKTDC Hong Kong International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show and the HKTDC Hong Kong International Jewellery Show to 2-6 July 2021. The HKTDC has been closely monitoring the development of COVID-19, which is a common concern for all parties involved in the fairs taking place in Hong Kong. “The safety of our exhibitors and buyers has always been our top priority. Also, with many pandemic-related travel restrictions remaining in place, exhibitors

and buyers may have had difficulty joining the Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show on 1-5 March 2021 and the Jewellery Show on 3-7 March 2021, as originally scheduled,” says the HKTDC. The twin fairs will be held at AsiaWorld-Expo. Details of the arrangements will be provided to exhibitors in due course. “We’d like to express our gratitude to exhibitors, pavilion organisers, industry associations and buyers from around the world for their tremendous support for HKTDC events. We’ll continue making every effort to help the industry capture business opportunities through multiple channels and platforms,” says the council.

EJP PROJECT HEAD COLIN CAMPBELL RETIRES Project Head and MD of the Ekurhuleni Jewellery Project (EJP) Colin Campbell has retired, after being involved in the jewellery industry for nearly 50 years. Campbell began his career in jewellery in London in 1972. He immigrated to SA in 1982, where he was involved with the EJP from 2009 until his retirement. The EJP is a non-profit training

centre and start-up incubator which supports emerging jewellers by providing them with access to minerals, production services and fully equipped workshops, culminating in nationally recognised qualifications. Under his leadership, the EJP assisted over 80 students through its theoretical and practical jewellery skills training programmes, with a successful uptake of over 60% of these students entering full-time positions within the jewellery sector. Campbell served as Chairperson of the

Jewellery Manufacturing Association of SA’s Executive Committee from 2014-2018, during which time he also served on the Executive Committee and board of the Jewellery Council of SA. “I’ll miss the people very much,” says Campbell. “During my time in the jewellery industry, I was privileged to meet truly interesting and incredibly talented individuals. I’ll also miss seeing the development of the industry.”


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INDUSTRY | SAJN

A legacy of excellence It was with great sadness that the industry learnt of the passing of Uwe Koetter on 16 February. He was the founder of one of the most renowned jewellery design and manufacturing businesses in South Africa, Uwe Koetter Jewellers. ESTABLISHED IN 1968, UWE KOETTER Jewellers quickly gained a reputation for cutting-edge design, master craftsmanship and a finely-trained eye for detail. To this day, Uwe Koetter is regarded as a highly skilled purveyor of magnificent gold and diamond jewellery, which resulted in the company receiving a slew of prestigious awards. Uwe Koetter Jewellers’ website tells the story of the company and Koetter’s humble beginnings. At the tender age of 20, he completed his studies in jewellery design in his hometown of Hamburg, Germany. As the top student in his class, he was offered a job in Namibia. One year after having relocated to Windhoek, Koetter decided to visit Cape Town for a holiday. He immediately fell in love with that city, which very much resembled his hometown. On the same day he arrived there, he was not only overwhelmed by its sheer beauty, but also found a job. Koetter simply walked into a jewellery store asking whether they had a vacancy for a goldsmith. A somewhat startled gentleman responded to the impromptu question with the challenge: “If you can work, yes. Otherwise, no.” As many would say, the rest is history. Koetter immediately relocated to Cape Town and proved himself in his new position. Throughout his time in it, he garnered many valuable insights into the industry, collected equipment along the way and, being a natural entrepreneur, forged plans for his own business. It was not much later, in 1968, that he started

his own company – a one-man show in Adderley Street, Cape Town. Here, a safe was immediately bought – ostensibly to store gold, other precious metals and gemstones, but in fact, containing only Koetter’s sandwiches! Before long, though, neighbouring shopkeepers and their friends became his clients and the sandwiches were replaced with more valuable items. A well-loved story from Koetter’s earlier business years goes as follows: on a rainy Friday afternoon, a rather scruffy-looking man walked into Koetter’s shop. The man was dressed in a faded overall and mucky gumboots, so Koetter assumed he was there to ask for money. To his surprise, however, the man told Koetter that he had a 1ct diamond he wished to have set. The only problem was that he did not have the stone on him. Koetter did not think much of it, assuming he would never see the man again. But the next morning, an impeccably groomed gentleman entered the shop, bearing a 1ct stone. The scruffy-looking man from the previous day turned out to be an engineer (hence

the mucky boots and faded overall) who had popped into Koetter’s shop still dressed in his working clothes. Furthermore, the gentleman was of royal blood! So much for the assumption that he had been seeking a handout! Sweat, hard work, dedication and commitment enabled Koetter’s company to flourish. For weeks on end, he would travel upcountry to lecture and give presentations. As his English was by no means fluent and his Afrikaans virtually non-existent, Koetter asked whether he could lecture in German. It was with this spirit, coupled with humour, that he attracted many new clients from afar, as well as the honoured position of being the judge of a koeksister competition! The business grew with time and in due course, larger premises were required. Its popularity took the business from Adderley Street to St George’s Mall, to Amway House and, finally, to its current state-of-the-art showroom in the Cape Quarter Lifestyle Village. Uwe Koetter Jewellers’ unique combination of talent and skills is the reason it has won numerous prestigious awards. De Beers, Integrold and the Jewellery Council have all recognised its exquisite creations. As a result, Koetter built relationships and diligently served some of the world’s most recognised and illustrious individuals for 53 years. He will be remembered as a kind, gentle and softly-spoken man who always strove for perfection, laughed often and reminded those around him that the little things mattered as much as the big ones. SAJN extends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and colleagues. * A tribute page celebrating Koetter has been created at: https://uwekoetter.com/tribute-tomr-uwe-koetter/.

Sweat, hard work, dedication and commitment enabled Koetter’s company to flourish. For weeks on end, he would travel upcountry to lecture and give presentations. As his English was by no means fluent and his Afrikaans virtually non-existent, Koetter asked whether he could lecture in German. It was with this spirit, coupled with humour, that he attracted many new clients from afar. SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

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SAJN | INDUSTRY

What jewellers will be talking about this year IT IS BOTH COMFORTING AND DEPRESSING TO realise that most people around the world feel exactly the same way about 2020: Thank. God. It’s. Over. And yet for jewellers, the year was marked by some unexpected ambivalence. As the pandemic raged on, people in lockdown ceased spending on travel and experiences, and turned their sights on buying meaningful gifts of enduring value. As a result, jewellery sales remained resilient and, in some cases, even soared. Deciphering the contradictions of the postCOVID economy will be even more challenging than interpreting the market’s mixed signals in 2020. Below, we have put together a guide to the five major trends that will change the way jewellery is made, bought and sold in the year – and decade – to come. Brace yourselves! The recovery will be digital It should come as no surprise that online sales were retailers’ saving grace this past year in the USA, and not just during the spring lockdowns. Mastercard SpendingPulse reported that while total holiday retail sales from 11 October-24 December (excluding automotive and gasoline) increased by 3% compared with 2019, online sales grew by a staggering 49%. If you remember one thing about the future of selling jewellery, it is the importance of crafting a digital-first strategy. Over the course of the past year, we heard from retailers who began the year as traditional bricks-andmortar holdouts and quickly transformed into online evangelists once the pandemic took hold. We spoke to one store-owner who began a series of pre-owned watch and jewellery auctions over Zoom. Many others added chat functionality to their websites or learnt how to connect remotely with clients using video calls. Embracing a digital-first world view, however, does not mean giving up on bricks-and-mortar. A well-executed omnichannel approach – which allows for that by-now ubiquitous “buy online, pick up in store” option – is the only

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Victoria Gomelsky, JCK’s Editor-in-Chief, has put together a guide to the five major trends that will change the way jewellery is made, bought and sold in the year – and decade – to come.

way jewellers will survive in the new year and beyond. Resistance really is futile. Jewellery styles will remain low-key – but once we are safely out of the COVID woods, all bets are off As the virus continues to plague our communities, social distancing mandates will ensure that many workers remain remote. What is interesting, however, is how many pundits expect the work from home (WFH) trend – or its more exciting cousin, work from anywhere (WFX) – to persist long after the final lockdown ends. That means we can count on the prevailing jewellery aesthetic, at least for the first half of 2021, to be low-key, with a focus on simpler, more contemporary designs that can be worn at home. “Imagine daytime couture meets loungewear” was how Hong Kong private jeweller Nicholas Lieou described it. The focus on shoulder-up adornment – in keeping with our new Zoom-ready working lives – will, of course, be a key trend, as will the bright colours and optimistic motifs that began trending in the second half of 2020. But the future of jewellery style is not all modesty and restraint. Many forecasters are suggesting that once the vaccine is widely available, the tech breakthroughs of the past year – including everything from advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) to SpaceX’s successful rocket launch – will fuel a boom in productivity that will juice the economy and have us all dancing on tables. Do not be surprised to see a rush for long, flapper-style pearl necklaces, oversized cocktail rings and jewels that capture the Roaring ’20s zeitgeist. The pre-owned jewellery category is ripe for the picking No-one disputes the strength of the preowned watch market. Valued (conservatively) at US$15 billion worldwide, the category had a banner year in 2020. Consider this: according to pre-owned watch retailer WatchBox, the secondary market price for the Rolex Daytona reference 116500LN (retail: US$13 500) in November 2019 was US$24 000. It dipped slightly in March, to US$20 000, and then vaulted to US$28 000 in November.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


INDUSTRY | SAJN The jewellery industry is ripe for a similar phenomenon, but it requires a more formalised approach to the pre-owned category. Right now, the second-hand luxury business belongs to a handful of e-commerce resale pioneers such as RealReal and 1stDibs, neither of which is a jewellery specialist. A new player in the space, London-based Omneque, aims to be an online destination for “rigorously authenticated antique, vintage and pre-owned jewellery”. But at present, there is plenty of room for competing players. Augmented reality will become mainstream, with AI not far behind If you follow jewellers Delfina Delettrez, Lydia Courteille, or Emily P Wheeler on Instagram, you may already have “tried on” their earrings or played around with their designs. Thanks to Ukrainian-based augmented reality (AR) specialist Atelar, which develops AR filters using Facebook’s Spark AR Studio software, the designers all began to experiment with AR during the pandemic. The AR experiences are still, mostly, novelties – fun to try and share – but it remains to be seen whether they can convert browsers to buyers. There are, however, promising signs that the technology is on the verge of going mainstream. In September, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg posted a trailer to YouTube giving the world a sneak peek of the smart glasses his company is developing through its new Reality Labs division. “I’m excited to share that we’ve formed a multi-year partnership, starting with building and releasing our first pair of smart glasses next year,” Zuckerberg said. “They’re going to be the next step on the road to augmented reality glasses and they look pretty good, too.” On the heels of AR is the industry’s broader acceptance of AI, which is already being used to help jewellers design and manufacture jewellery more efficiently, grade diamonds more intelligently, ship jewellery more cost-effectively and do any number of other jewellery-related tasks better. To prep yourself for the coming machine-learning revolution, we suggest a marathon movie session with our favourite cinematic renditions of AI: Her, Ex Machina and, of course, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Now that the calendar has turned, companies which pledged to do better in 2020 will have to demonstrate how they’ have changed, or risk being called out on social media for their inaction. On 2 June, 2020, for example, Cartier posted a black square on its Instagram feed

Companies will be held accountable The racial reckoning that began last May, following the killing of George Floyd, prompted an industry-wide conversation about diversity, racism and white privilege.

accompanied by the following statement: “As a maison, our creativity is nurtured and inspired by the diverse cultures of the world. We find our own richness in this diversity and we stand firmly against all forms of racism directed towards the black community. At this

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

moment, we are examining our own company to identify actions we can take that will result in real change. #BlackoutTuesday.” Accountability will be a guiding force in 2021 – and not just on issues that affect black communities. Companies that have committed to corporate social responsibility and ethical sourcing will be asked to prove that the vows they made in 2020 were more than platitudes. And while there are more constructive ways of dealing with inaction than social media shaming, “cancel culture” – or the practice of withdrawing support from companies or people who have done something considered offensive or objectionable – is not likely to disappear anytime soon. – Republished with permission from JCK.

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All images are courtesy of De Beers

SAJN | DIAMONDS

The De Beers Group recently announced 12 bold sustainability goals for the coming decade, including achieving gender parity throughout its workforce, supporting 10 000 women entrepreneurs in its diamond-producing partner countries and becoming carbon-neutral within its own operations by 2030. THE 12 GOALS ANNOUNCED BY THE DE BEERS Group form part of Building Forever, the diamond mining giant’s commitment to creating a positive, lasting impact that will endure well beyond the discovery of its last diamond. “This commitment sits at the heart of everything we do, embedded within our commercial strategy, to ensure we maximise the positive impact of diamonds on their journey from discovery to retail,” says the group. While Building Forever is not new for De Beers, through the launch of these goals it is commit-

ting to accelerating its progress, galvanising its employees, partners and consumers across more than 30 countries in which it operates to realise a shared vision for a better future. The goals are based on four pillars: leading ethical practices across the industry; partnering for thriving communities; protecting the natural world; and accelerating equal opportunity. They include the following: Leading ethical practices across the industry By 2030, De Beers will: • Extend its best-practice principles (a set of leading ethical, social and environmental standards) beyond its value chain to advance industry standards. • Provide the origin and impact of every dia mond it discovers and sells. • Deliver scalable solutions to improve the live lihoods of artisanal miners.

Partnering for thriving communities By 2030, De Beers will: • Achieve priority UN Sustainable Develop ment Goal 3 (SDG3) health targets in all its partner communities. • Establish skills partnerships in all its partner communities. • Have supported four jobs across its partner countries for every one job at its operations. Protecting the natural world By 2030, De Beers will: • Be carbon-neutral across its operations.

We’ve made significant progress in recent years as we’ve sought to deliver positive outcomes throughout the sector and in our partner communities, but we recognise that there’s still much more that we can do. 18

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


DIAMONDS | SAJN

De Beers announces 12 ambitious 2030 goals • Reduce its water footprint by 50%. • Achieve a net positive impact on biodiversity. Accelerating equal opportunity By 2030, De Beers will: • Achieve equal opportunity, including gender parity, for employees across its workforce. • Support 10 000 women entrepreneurs and engage 10 000 girls in STEM (science, tech nology, engineering and mathematics) subjects. • Increase the diversity of creative talent in the diamond jewellery sector.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

Bruce Cleaver, CEO: De Beers Group, says: “As the world’s leading diamond company and in recognition of the United Nations’ call for a ‘Decade of Action’ to deliver the sustainable development goals, we have both a unique opportunity and a profound responsibility to create lasting benefits for the people and places where diamonds are discovered. This is why our Building Forever sustainability framework is central to our business strategy, and why we’ve set ourselves these 12 ambitious goals. We’re committed to supporting a

lasting, positive impact that will endure well beyond the discovery of our last diamond and it’s only by pushing ourselves to do more that we can maximise long-term benefits.” Katie Fergusson, Senior Vice-President, Sustainable Impact: De Beers Group, adds: “Diamonds have a deep connection to the natural world and the communities near where they’re found. We’ve made significant progress in recent years as we’ve sought to deliver positive outcomes throughout the sector and in our partner communities, but we recognise that there’s still much more that we can do. “On our journey to 2030, we’ll continue to innovate, challenge ourselves and learn from our partners as we work to achieve these ambitious goals.” All 12 of the 2030 Building Forever goals, as well as the operational plans, investments and milestones that underpin them, are the outcome of a multi-year programme to stretch the organisation’s vision of the positive, lasting impact it could make. It involves all parts of De Beers’ business, as well as both long-term and new partners, aligns with national and community development priorities and has been embedded in operational and leadership scorecards and incentive structures.

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Finest Gemstones, Beads & Unconventional Diamonds Whatsapp for quotes 076 162 3741 Email: gems@ajanta.co.za Tel: 021 422 4677 www.ajantaafrika.com


Monthly educational insert An SA Jewellery News and Jewellery Council of South Africa initiative

Written by Dr Petré Prins, Gems and Jewellery: The South African Handbook is an introduction to gemstones, jewellery and store management.

The following is an extract from Gems and Jewellery: The South African Handbook

After two years' post-graduate research at Cambridge University, UK, and 10 years as senior lecturer in geochemistry and mineralogy at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, Dr Prins, in 1982, started Prins & Prins Diamonds, a leading supplier of diamonds, gemstones and fine jewellery in Cape Town.


ISSUE 16

ISSUE 16 GEMSTONES A-Z OPAL

Characteristics

Opal is a mineral with an amorphous crystal structure and a chemical composition of SiO2.nH2O. Its water content is normally 3-10%, but can be as high as 30%. It consists of tiny, tightly packed silica spheres. When the size of these spheres is similar, they act as a diffraction grid and the passing light is dispersed as a unique flash of rainbow colours.

Precious opal has a very distinct play of colour and is best described by determining its background colour. This can either be black, grey, orange or, more commonly, white. The pattern of colour play is described as “pinfire”, “flame”, “ribbon” or “harlequin”. When the overall palette is blues and greens, it is described as “peacock” opal. When reds and orange dominate, it is called “fire” opal. When opal does not display colour flashes, it is known as “common” opal.

“Harlequin” pattern of colour play in opal. Precious boulder opal in ironstone matrix. 5 cm pieces.

Opals are mainly found in Australian desert sands. Coober Pedy and Lightning Ridge are among the most famous localities in Australia. These deposits were formed 65 million years ago when inland seas disappeared and silica-rich groundwater seeped into cracks and clay layers to deposit thin layers of opal. Precious opal is also mined in Tanzania, Ethiopia and Somaliland. Opal in sedimentary rocks

Coober Coober perdy Pedy

Opal in volcanic rock Desert sandstone

Lightning Ridge

Andamooka White Cliffs

“Pinfire” peacock opal cabochons.

Varieties Among the many opal varieties with which a jeweller may come into contact are:

White opal (also called milky opal) - when colours flash over a white background. Black opal - play of colour against a black or other dark body colour. Boulder opal - thin veins of colourful opal in a copper tone host rock called iron-stone. Fire opal (also known as Mexican opal) - has little play of colour, is semi-transparent and has a dominant orange colour. Jelly opal (also called water opal) - colourless and semitransparent. A dark backing will improve its colour flashes.

Lore The early Romans treasured opal as the king of gems, as it held within it the colours of all others. Shakespeare called it the “queen of gems”. Unfortunately, it obtained a reputation as “the bringer of bad luck” because of a novel by Sir Walter Scott. In his book Anne of Gierstein, the heroine, Lady Hermione, had an enchanted opal which, when it lost its lustre, was blamed for her death. Today, opals are back in fashion and used as the birthstone for October.

Heart-shaped white opal cabochon.

Black opal cabochon.


AN INTRODUCTION GEMSTONES TOA-Z GEMSTONES

Value

Care

The value of opal is determined by its background colour and the intensity and variation of its colour flashes.The finest black opals of 1-10ct with dominant red flashes can cost US$2 000-4 000/ct, while those with green and blue flashes can cost US$600-1 500/ct.

Opal is a relatively soft mineral (H=5) and may scratch if worn carelessly. It contains traces of water and when exposed to prolonged heat or sudden temperature changes, may crack as it dehydrates. Never clean opal jewellery in ultrasonic cleaners. To store, keep it in a closed container with a wet cloth.

Treatments and synthetics Opal is also made in the laboratory. A qualified gemmologist can identify synthetic opal by recognising a typical lizard skin-like texture in the colour flashes under magnification.

PADPARADCHA

Sugar-treated opal.

Opal is often treated. White opal is made to look black by soaking it in a sugar solution and then in acid to carbonise the sugar. Colour play is enhanced by impregnating opals with polymers. The latter treatment is difficult to detect. Assembled opals

The rarest and most expensive sapphire colour is a delicate mix of pink, peach and orange Unique lotus flower colour called padparadcha. The name of padparadcha sapphire. is derived from the Sinhalese word for “lotus blossom”. Because the colour of a lotus flower changes during its lifetime, experts often argue whether a sapphire can be called a padparadcha or not. The finest padparadchas come from Sri Lanka, but dealers often sell peachy-pink sapphires from Africa and Madagascar as pads.

Opal is often made into doublets and triplets, ie, a thin slice of opal is glued between a dark perspex or bakelite backing and a colourless perspex (or quartz) top. Triplets of 7 mm diameter can cost up to US$15 per piece.

Padparadchas are difficult to price. Fine gems of 1-3 cts may cost US$1 000-2 000/ct.

ASSEMBLED OPALS

This is the name given to a copper-bearing, blue-green tourmaline. The original discovery at Paraíba, Brazil, produced small gems with an “electric or neon” blue colour. These gems are still the most expensive tourmalines to be found. Recent discoveries from Madagascar produced larger and less vivid stones which are of lesser value. Some gemmologists insist that only those from Brazil should be described as Paraíbas.

Solid opal, polished cabochon Doublet - opal top on bakelite base Opal triplet - perspex top, sliver of opal, bakelite base Splinters of opal set in perspex on bakelite base

PARAÍBA

Paraíba tourmaline, 2,3ct.

PASTE A name commonly applied to glass imitations of gemstones. These imitations can vary from moulded stones (note the rounded facet edges) to well-cut facetted stones. Their colours are unlimited. The addition of lead oxide increases the RI, the density and the fire (dispersion) of the glass.

Varieties of fire opal.

Identification of glass imitations is easy. Spherical or elongated bubbles and flow lines are often visible. Another test is to clean the stone properly and, with a toothpick, put a small drop of water on its surface. On glass or any amorphous material, the drop will spread, but on a crystalline gem, the drop will retain its shape. A steel file will scratch even the hardest glasses.


ISSUE 16

PEARL The wonderful world of pearls was described in Chapter 10. Topics include their cultivation, classification, valuation and care.

PERIDOT Peridot is the gem variety of the mineral olivine, a magnesium and iron silicate. It is the birthstone for August. It occurs in Oval polished yellowish-green to green and greenishperidot, 6ct. yellow colours and may be confused with demantoid garnet, which some jewellers call olivine. It is also known under the misnomer “evening emerald”. The first known peridot was supposed to be the most valuable part of a pirate’s loot. When the pirate disappeared, the secret of the lovely green gem was lost. Centuries later, the Egyptians discovered the site on St John’s Island in the Red Sea, today known as Zebirget. Peridots from this island became world-famous in later years. Other producing countries are the USA, Australia, Brazil and Burma. Care Peridot is not a tough stone and is best reserved for jewellery other than rings. It should be set with care and not exposed to heat. Supplies are plentiful and prices quite reasonable, 5-10ct fine qualities cost up to US$60/ct, while larger stones, 10-20ct, may fetch up to $150/ct. Stones larger than 50ct decrease in value per carat.

PYRITE Pyrite is an opaque greyish-yellow mineral, also known as fool’s gold, and is used under the name “marcasite” in jewellery.

PYROPE Pyrope is a brownish-red to red garnet which is seldom used in jewellery. It occurs as small crystals in kimberlitic rocks and is often associated with diamond. When cut, it appears dark purplish-red and is incorrectly called “Cape ruby”.

QUARTZ

Gems cut from crystalline quartz are normally transparent and facetted from a single crystal, whereas those from microcrystalline varieties are normally opaque and cut cabochon. •

Crystalline varieties (only the most important varieties are mentioned here)

Rock crystal - colourless and transparent. Smoky quartz or cairngorm - transparent, light to dark brown and sometimes incorrectly called smoky topaz. Rose quartz - semi-transparent to translucent pink. Often made into beads and ornaments. Milky quartz - translucent to opaque white or greyish quartz. Gold quartz - milky quartz containing native gold inclusions. Citrine - a transparent faint yellow to dark yellow-orange brown variety, incorrectly called topaz. Amethyst - a transparent light to dark purple variety. When very pale pink, it is called “rose of France”. Ametrine - also called trystine, this is a quartz from Bolivia and Brazil that displays both purple and yellow colours in the same crystal. Sagenitic quartz - characterised by eye-visible, needle-like inclusions. The needles are often the mineral rutile, which is normally golden brown in colour and the resultant gem is called Venus hair stone. When the needles are thin black tourmaline, it is called tourmalinated quartz or Cupid’s arrows. When the needles are very fine and orientated in the same direction, it may show a cat’s-eye effect. Aventurine quartz - yellow, grey, normally green quartzite (smaller interlocking quartz grains) that contains many tiny highly reflective or intensely coloured inclusions of hematite or mica. May be confused with sunstone and jade. Praesolite – a transparent pale green quartz, often incorrectly called “green amethyst”.

Quartz (SiO2) is the most ubiquitous single mineral. About 12% of the earth’s outer crust consists of quartz. There are two sub-species: • crystalline; and • microcrystalline quartz.

Cairngorm (smoky quartz) and rose quartz.

Green quartz, also known as praesolite (11,4ct).


GEMSTONES A-Z

Jasper - an impure chalcedony normally in brown, yellow to red colours. Blue lace agate - a light blue banded chalcedony with beautiful wavy layers of paler colour. Golden rutile needles in quartz, called Venus’s hair.

Rock crystal (4 cm high) with green quartz interior.

Aventurine quartz cabochon.

Tiger’s eye - a pseudomorph of quartz after crocidolite asbestos, usually yellowish-brown, but can be bleached or stained to produce bull’s eye (reddish) or a greyish-blue variety. South Africa is the main supplier.

Sagenetic quartz, fancy cabochon shape with tourmaline needles called Cupid’s arrows.

Carnelian cabochons.

Black onyx cabochons.

Identification The conchoidal fracture, absence of any cleavage, a vitreous lustre and its constant RI of 1,544-1,553 serves to identify quartz from its many imitations. •

Microcrystalline varieties

The name “chalcedony” applies to all of the many gem varieties of semi-transparent to translucent cryptocrystalline quartz. When its colour varies from white to grey, blue-grey and black, the name “chalcedony” is used. However, when chalcedony has another colour, it is known as:

Carnelian - low-intensity red to orange colours. Sard - a darker brownish to red-brown variety.

Polished slab of sardonyx geode.

Sources Without doubt, Brazil has been the most prolific producer of gem quartz. Other South and North American countries also produce fine qualities. Namibia produced some amethysts and blue lace agate, while India is well known for a variety of agates.

RHINESTONE

Chrysoprase - a light to medium yellowish-green variety, sometimes confused with jade.

A gem imitation made from glass with internal coloured swirls or a foiled back.

Bloodstone - also called heliotrope, dark green chalcedony with red-brown (jasper) spots.

RHODOCHROSITE

Moss agate - a white to light grey chalcedony with dendritic (tree-like) black or green inclusions. Agate - a translucent chalcedony with curved or irregular bands of different colour.

Rhinestone set in gold pendant.

Onyx - a translucent chalcedony with coloured bands that are parallel. All dyed chalcedony is normally called onyx. A black massive cryptocrystalline opaque variety is often cut cabochon and used as cufflinks. Sardonyx - a banded black and white onyx with alternate bands of red-brown sard.

Polished slab (12 cm) of blue lace agate.

Rhodocrosite cabochons, 8-13ct.

Most rhodochrosite is opaque with a bacon-striped (white and pink) appearance and is crafted into eggs and ornaments. It is a manganese carbonate mineral and rarely occurs as transparent pinkish-red crystals. These are normally quite included and seldom larger than a few carats. South Africa, Peru, Japan and the Sweet Home mine in Colorado are the main producers. Fine-


ISSUE 16

quality, 1-3ct facetted translucent gems can range from US$75-100/ct.

a centrepiece in the Imperial State Crown of England, is not a ruby at all, but a natural rough crystal of red spinel.

Rhodocrosite has a distinct cleavage, is relatively soft (H = 3,4-4) and should not be used in rings. Do not use steam or ultrasonic cleaning methods.

Origin

RHODOLITE Rhodolite is a light to dark purplish red garnet. It is paler than either pyrope or almandite.

Value

ROCK CRYSTAL The transparent colourless variety of quartz.

ROYAL LAVULITE

Royal lavulite cabochon.

Also known as sugulite or Royal azel (from the town Hotazel in the northern Cape, which is the gem’s only source). It is an opaque material with a striking purple colour and often used as carvings, beads and cabochons. It was discovered in the 1980s, promoted extensively and fetched quite high prices in the USA due to its unique colour. It is a tough stone with average hardness (5,5-6,5).

RUBELLITE

Rubellite, 10ct, from Namibia.

Rubies from the Magok mine in Burma (now Myanmar) are considered the finest due to their intense saturated red colour. This colour is often described as pigeon’s blood. Other sources are from Thailand, Pakistan, East Africa, Madagascar and Vietnam.

Rubellite is a term loosely applied to tourmaline with a pinkish-red to red colour. It is normally quite included and is priced for its colour – the more pure and intense reds are the most expensive. Prices normally range between US$65-90/ct.

The more saturated (intense) the colour, the more expensive. However, a slight variation in colour can affect value dramatically. Secondary colours of purple and orange may detract from the price. Pinkish overtones may increase the value. Size is also important, as large fine gems are quite rare. Fine 1ct Burmese rubies can range from US$2 500-4 500/ct, while extra-fine can fetch up to US$8 000/ct. Extra-fine gems larger than 5ct can go as high as US$20 000-30 000/ct. Fine rubies from other localities range in price from US$1 000-3 000/ct. However, small good-quality rubies which are normally used in jewellery should not cost more than US$600/ct. Enhancements Nearly all rubies have been heat-treated to improve their colour and clarity. Recently, a high-temperature process (whereby the elements beryllium and chromium are infused into the crystal structure) has been developed which dramatically improves the colour of rubies. The red colour of such gems is located only in its outer layer and, when chipped or re-polished, the colourless interior may become visible. These enhancements can easily be detected by a gemmologist and should be disclosed to the client. Synthetic rubies

RUBY Ruby is the transparent red variety of the mineral corundum (Al2O3). Trace amounts of chromium cause the colour. It is the birthstone for July. Oval cut ruby, 3,2ct.

Lore Ruby has long been recognised as a valuable gem. In Sanskrit, it is described as ratnaraj, the “king of gems” and in the Bible, it is mentioned as one of the gems in the breastplate of the high priest.The famous 170ct Black Prince Ruby, mounted as

Synthetic rubies have been made since the beginning of the 1900s. Since then, various methods of ruby synthesis were developed and synthetic rubies were sold worldwide as a less expensive alternative. To the jeweller, it is quite a challenge to distinguish between a natural ruby and those made by man, especially if the gem is relatively inclusionfree. Trade names such as Ramaura and Chatham are used to indicate the laboratory from where the synthetic ruby originates.


GEMSTONES A-Z

SAPPHIRE

Value

Sapphire is a gem variety of the mineral corundum (Al2O3) and occurs in all the colours of the rainbow, except red, which is reserved for ruby.

The value of sapphire is mainly dependent on colour, but if its Kashmir origin is certified, the price may double. Visible colour banding and the presence of inclusions will also affect the value. Fine-quality blues (1-2ct) from Sri Lanka and Thailand can cost US$1 000-2 000/ct, while the price of pinks can vary from US$600-1 200/ct. Fine padparadchas are difficult to price and can vary from US$1 500-2 500/ct. Large blue star sapphires are very rare and a fine 5ct gem may cost up to US$2 000/ct. The smaller black/grey star sapphires are inexpensive at US$10-15/ct. Diffusion-treated sapphires in glorious pinks and yellows should cost about US$100200/ct. Enhancements

Colours of sapphire.

Lore The name has been traced to the Sanskrit word sanipriya, meaning “dear to the planet Saturn”. It is also the birthstone of September. When Prince Charles gave Lady Diana Spencer an 18ct royal blue Ceylon sapphire engagement ring, the gem received worldwide attention and a Lady Di ring became a “must- have” item. The most important loose sapphire is probably the Star of India, a 563ct, semi-round double cabochon on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Origin

Nearly all sapphires are heat-treated to enhance their colour and clarity. Cracks may be filled with a borax glass and when “cooked” in a melt containing iron and titanium, these elements will diffuse into the crystal structure of the sapphire to render the outside skin of the gem a darker colour. Yellow sapphires are sometimes irradiated and may lose their colour if exposed to intense light. These enhancements must be disclosed to a prospective buyer. Ninety-nine percent of Kashmir and Yogo Gulch (USA) sapphires are untreated - thus their exceptional prices. Synthetics Synthetic sapphires have been made since the late 19th century and many antique jewellery pieces contain such stones - much to the surprise of their owner. The two most common types are produced by: • The flame fusion method; and • The flux method.

Sapphire is mined in more than a dozen countries.Those from Kashmir in India have a milky, velvety, saturated blue colour, often described as cornflower and are highly sought-after. From Burma (Myanmar) come dark blue sapphires close in value to those from Kashmir. Sri Lanka produces sapphires in all pastel colours. A special variety with a pinkish-orange colour (lotus blossom) is called padparadcha and is the highest-priced of all sapphires.Thailand and Australia produce extremely dark blue sapphires which sometimes have a greenish tint. Kenya, Zambia and, recently, Madagascar are modern sources of sapphires of all colours which are normally darker than those from Sri Lanka. The Yogo mine in Montana, USA, is famous for its untreated, natural blue sapphires.

SARDONYX

India is also a famous source for star sapphire in black and grey to purplish colours.

Sardonyx is onyx with layers of sard (reddish-brown) alternating with white or black layers.

Modern methods, called the Czochralski-pulled and the hydrothermal processes, are also used to produce synthetic sapphire and ruby. Identification The lack of inclusions may typify a synthetic sapphire. How to differentiate between natural and synthetic sapphires was described in Chapter 4.


ISSUE 16

SCHORL Is the black variety of tourmaline and seldom used in jewellery.

SERPENTINE Serpentine is a mineral group and occurs either as a massive cryptocrystalline rock varying in colour from green to greenish-yellow, white, brown, often mottled, or as coloured streaks in marble. It has a poor hardness and is usually carved into ornaments. When dyed, it may resemble jade or chalcedony, but is much softer,

SOAPSTONE Soapstone is a rock which consists nearly totally of the mineral talc. It could be white, grey, brown, light to dark green, often mottled and/or veined. It may look like jade or serpentine, but is much softer (H = 1-2) and has a soapy feel. Used for ornamental carvings or to make talcum powder. Lid of a carved soapstone box.

pure red variety called flame spinel can be priced up to US$2 000/ct. Larger gems are extremely rare. Synthetic spinel In an attempt to make synthetic blue sapphire, French scientists in the late 1890s produced synthetic spinel. Today, synthetic spinel is made to imitate nearly all gemstones, even lapis lazuli, and is widely used in inexpensive jewellery. It is relatively easy to identify as all colours exhibit a moderate to very strong fluorescence under short- and/or long-wave ultraviolet radiation.

SUGULITE This is the purple mineral that forms the gem known as Royal lavulite.

SUNSTONE

SODALITE Sodalite is a mineral that seldom occurs as crystals. It forms a massive rock, usually dark blue to violet-blue with white veins, and is used as beads and for carvings. It is mined in the Kaokoveld in northern Namibia and in Canada.

Colours of spinel.

Sunstone is a gem variety of the mineral feldspar that occurs only in two localities in Oregon, USA - a true American gem. It comes in a variety of colours that range from near colourless to pale green, orange and red and often shows a unique aventurescence called the schiller effect . This sparkling effect is caused by light being reflected from layers of included native copper crystals. Buddha carved from sodalite, 5 cm high.

SPINEL Although spinel (Mg,Al2O4) was recognised as a mineral species in 1587, it has received little attention in history. It usually crystallises as perfect octaheders (two four-sided pyramids base to base). The Burmese called these anyan nat thwe, meaning “cut and polished by the spirits”. Red spinels were long thought to be rubies. However, unlike rubies, spinels are normally free of inclusions and come in a variety of colours. Spinels are mined from alluvial gravels in Burma and Sri Lanka. Spinel is one of the few gems that is not routinely heated or treated to enhance its colour. It normally occurs as small, less than 3ct gems which can cost up to US$120/ct. However, the

Natural sunstone is quite rare and fine qualities (1-3ct) can cost US$150-300/ct. A glass imitation, also with copper platelets, is often encountered as beads and cabochons and is known as “goldstone”.

TALC Talc is a very soft mineral that forms soapstone, which is often carved as ornaments. It is also powdered, scented and sold as commercial talcum powder.

TANZANITE Tanzanite is a transparent violet-blue gem variety of the mineral species zoisite. A pear-shaped tanzanite, 5,5ct.


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JEWELLERY DESIGN | SAJN

CoNNect with customers and build your brand SA Jewellery News (SAJN) and JZA – Your Jewellery Magazine’s UK (London-based) media alliance partner, CoNNect Agency, is a brand development agency which embodies a new wave in brand recognition strategies. JEWELLERY AND FASHION ARE THE CONNECT Agency’s passions and it lives with those aesthetics in mind. CoNNect Agency represents a myriad of jewellery designers from around the world, each with their own unique niche approach to design. The company shares a deep passion with SAJN and JZA for their respective local and global jewellery brands and the extremely talented and innovative designers behind them.

“We work with emerging jewellery designers from all over the world and help them develop brand awareness and growth,” says Nina Dzhokhadze, the agency’s co-founder and Head of Brand Partnerships. “In today’s changing and fast-developing world, we’ve adapted and created our own unique way of promoting brands. We’re remarkably selective in the brands we represent. Our mission is to help independent designers engage with their customers’ lives. We can assist innovative and upcoming talented designers in raising their international profile.” CoNNect Agency’s focus and expertise is in wholesale distribution and its aim is to introduce emerging brands to new markets and support designers in maximising their presence in a worldwide retail section. “CoNNect Agency has experience in working with buyers within retail and wholesale setting,” says Dzhokhadze. “We trust designers who stand out and brands where exceptional quality and individuality are in synergy with global potential.”

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In today’s changing and fast-developing world, we’ve adapted and created our own unique way of promoting brands. We’re remarkably selective in the brands we represent. Our mission is to help independent designers engage with their customers’ lives. SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

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SAJN | JEWELLERY DESIGN

Keeva Trends recently opened its exclusive handmade jewellery store in Parkhurst, Johannesburg. By locally manufacturing all its jewellery pieces, it aims to grow SA’s local economy. SAJN caught up with its founder, Venesia van den Berg.

Not just another jewellery brand

KEEVA TRENDS, A SOUTH AFRICAN HANDmade jewellery brand, is moulding and crafting sustainable solutions for its small business, one piece at a time. The brand believes fervently in more sustainable economic development and ethical work practices and considers this in every avenue of the work it does. It equips women who are structurally vulnerable with the necessary skills so that they can live more empowered lives. All the brand’s products are locally manufactured under strict fair-trade practices that support social development. Furthermore, it works only with aligned suppliers and goes to extra lengths to derive more eco-friendly solutions for packaging and presentation.

and I worked a great deal in social justice NPOs, helping people from extremely vulnerable situations and backgrounds. Because of what we dealt with, we developed a real desire not only to help the vulnerable, but to create jobs and establish a platform for skills development. It was only then that I reconnected with my love for jewellery design. I managed to combine the two things I was most passionate about: creating job opportunities and designing beautiful jewellery. So Keeva Trends was born. What makes Keeva Trends so special? The fact that we’re 100% local – but it’s also all about what happens behind the scenes. There’s a story behind each of our pieces, but there’s also a face behind each piece. Many of our customers have told us how special it is for them to be able to enter our shop, walk right

up to the workbench and watch their jewellery being made there and then. People have loved knowing where their jewellery comes from and how it’s made. It’s become an experience our customers really value. When did you open the Keeva Trends store and why did you choose Parkhurst? We moved to our new location as soon as lockdown restrictions lifted enough for us to do so at the beginning of October 2020. We love the hustle and bustle of the open air, streetside dining and shopping in Parkhurst. The community, along with the many likeminded designers and creatives, make this neighbourhood one of a kind. Keeva Trends pieces are handmade locally by a tightly-knit team. What do you look

Tell us about yourself and how you came to launch Keeva Trends. I’ve always loved anything and everything creative and have been in the design industry for the past 15 years. As a child, I loved making jewellery with all the different flowers and leaves I could find in our garden. However, I never explored this passion until much later in life. Before launching Keeva Trends, my husband

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SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


JEWELLERY DESIGN | SAJN for when collaborating with other industry professionals? Because of our desire to support other local designers and business, we’ve loved featuring other brands in our shop. One such brand is Mary Jean Jewellery, of which we’re also the only manufacturer and stockist in SA. Brands that we collaborate with have all been selected on having the same ethical values and being purely local, as well as their professional craftsmanship. Most of our collaborating brands are just as passionate about developing a sustainable fashion industry. Sustainability is a huge aspect of your brand. Has that always been important to you? Yes – sustainability is a huge drive for us. It’s not the easiest road to take and it definitely presents its challenges, but I can’t imagine doing it any other way. As recently as 10 years ago, I wouldn’t have had much to say about sustainability. I was made hugely aware of it during the years we spent living in Japan. We learnt a lot from the Japanese about leading a sustainable life and business. When my husband and I returned to SA, I realised how much we needed to start thinking along those lines here. Our aim for job creation fits perfectly in the sustainability chain. We outsource, where necessary, to other local craftsmen and women and we’re proud to say that every product and packaging in our shop is truly local. We’ve done away with single-use plastic packaging and have sourced biodegradable boxes. Furthermore, our offcut metals are reused to create new designs. We’re doing our bit to protect and conserve our beautiful planet. What are the best-sellers in the store? That’s a rather hard question. We’ve tried to design “easy-wear” and trans-seasonal jewellery that fits and flatters women of all

Brands that we collaborate with have all been selected on having the same ethical values and being purely local, as well as their professional craftsmanship. Most of our collaborating brands are just as passionate about developing a sustainable fashion industry.

styles and ages. And we’ve had exactly those clients – women of all styles and ages. Yet the Zuri range seems to have particularly appealed to all of them, which has made it one of the most popular choices online and in store. It’s also my personal favourite. What advice can you offer other creatives who are ready to turn their passion into their livelihood? Just go ahead and start! For a long time, I thought I had to have it all figured out and every detail planned perfectly before taking the leap – but it’s really all about taking that first step, then the next, and sooner than you think, your ball is rolling. I believe that we should absolutely live our passions and sometimes, we need to give ourselves permission to “just do it”. Don’t focus on what you’re up against: rather focus on the possibilities that can propel you through each season.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

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SOLITAIRE THE FINE ART OF JEWELLERY AND LIVING

N°110

www.solitairemagazine.com

ASIA PACIFIC EDITION

Let’s Talk About Love SWITZERLAND TOURISM SPECIAL

Sol COVER_Issue 110.indd 2

03/02/2021 11:53

Solitaire Magazine

@solitairemagazine


BRAND MANAGEMENT | SAJN

The new generation of Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual Submariner The Oyster Perpetual Submariner and Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date exemplify the historic links between Rolex and the world of diving. Both timepieces now feature a redesigned, slightly larger 41 mm case – whose profile is highlighted by the light reflections from the case sides and lugs – and are fitted on a remodelled bracelet. The Oyster Perpetual Submariner and Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date, professional divers’ watches par excellence, are equipped respectively with calibre 3230 and calibre 3235, offering both time and date functions, and used in the Submariner range for the first time.

True to its aesthetic heritage, the new Submariner in Oystersteel has a black dial and rotatable bezel with matching Cerachrom insert. A yellow Rolesor version (combining Oystersteel and 18ct yellow gold) of the Submariner Date presents a royal blue dial with a rotatable bezel and a blue Cerachrom insert. Two versions of the Submariner Date, one in Oystersteel and the other in 18ct white gold, bring original colour combinations, with the dial and Cerachrom insert in different hues. The first watch blends a black dial with a green bezel, while the second proposes a black dial and a blue bezel.

Hublot launches new Big Bang Tourbillon Automatic Orange Sapphire Transparent, black, yellow, blue, red – Hublot has mastered the creation and machining of sapphires with exclusive shades for its watchcases. With the new Big Bang Tourbillon Automatic Orange Sapphire, the brand has once again achieved a world first by adding a completely new colour to its palette of through-tinted sapphires. This surprising and dynamic colour is a breath of fresh air for haute horlogerie. The fascination of the translucent bezel and case in finely polished orange sapphire is enhanced by the technical tone of the six H-shaped titanium screws that characterise the iconic Big Bang design. Hublot has also continued in its quest for transparency by using more sapphire in the movement itself. The manufacture calibre

on the Big Bang Tourbillon Automatic Orange Sapphire is equipped for the first time with three sapphire bridges – a barrel bridge, an automatic bridge and a tourbillon barrette. The lightweight effect of the skeleton work is accentuated by heavily open-worked and sandblasted platinum. The tourbillon cage at 6 o’clock, revolving on its axis every minute to compensate for the pull of the earth on the movement’s direction, is distinctive for its pure geometry, affording a glimpse into the mechanical heart of the model. The legibility of the open dial is enhanced by hands and indices with a luminescent coating.

The transparent orange rubber strap with a lined relief – with a patented express One Click interchangeability system and titanium deployant buckle – completes the cutting-edge look of this limited-edition release of 50 pieces. “In line with its winning spirit, Hublot has produced an exceptional innovation by unveiling the world’s very first case in orange sapphire,” says Hublot CEO Ricardo Guadalupe. “Our manufacture has also reaffirmed its watchmaking expertise by unveiling a new automatic tourbillon calibre, entirely designed and manufactured in-house, on which the spectacular visible dial side architecture underscores the innovative design of the watch. This is the ‘Art of Fusion’ in all its glory, according to Hublot.”

Disney Mickey Mouse X Keith Haring collection by Swatch The latest Swatch collaboration with Disney and the Keith Haring Studio celebrates the iconic 1980’s New York social activist and pop-artist, renowned for his revolutionary and

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

provocative graffiti-esque pictograms, lines and symbols. The result is a Swatch collection featuring Disney’s Mickey Mouse reimagined by the late Haring’s signature aesthetic, vibrant energy and colours. Big on making art accessible to all, Swatch mastered collaborations long ago as the first watchmaker in the industry to partner with artists, including Kiki Picasso, Alfred Hofkunst and David LaChapelle X Amanda Lepore. Haring believed in creating truly public art. His design language was used to great effect across the New York City streets and subway stations and famously helped fund children’s literacy projects and HIV/Aids awareness initiatives. Right now, brighter is infinitely better and Mouse Mariniere makes a colour-confident

statement with a solid and striped red strap, taking inspiration from Mickey’s iconic shorts. Haring’s illustration of Disney’s most famous character is etched on the glass watch case that sits atop a red and white striped dial for added depth and movement. Disney’s well-loved character, captured by Haring, takes centre stage on the dial of Micky Blancsur Noir, while the pop of yellow cut-out hands and strap loop perfectly offset the minimalist monochrome design. Haring’s trademark mesmerising black and white curved lines showcase Mickey Mouse in all his glory on Eclectic Mickey, punctuated by the renowned Swatch primary colours. Also available as a coveted Swatch Maxi watch measuring over 2 m, Maxi Eclectic Mickey is as functional as it is collectible.

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SAJN | INDUSTRY

Eighty-one years after Anglo American first set up its headquarters at 44 Main in Johannesburg’s then thriving inner city, the global mining giant is moving its headquarters from the central business district (CBD) to the suburb of Rosebank. WHILE COMMITTED TO UPHOLDING THE legacy of its historic CBD presence in downtown Johannesburg, diversified mining company Anglo American has decided to relocate its CBD colleagues to a new, consolidated corporate office at 144 Oxford Street in Rosebank later this year. A press statement from Anglo’s media specialist, Nomonde Ndwalaza, outlining the move explains that the company “has been exploring options to bring all of its SA corporate offices together in one location to support its future workplace strategy – which is based on creating a workplace that is safe, smart and collaborative”. The company has been engaging extensively with its staff over the past year, discussing not only where to work, but how everyone can work better together to cement Anglo’s highperformance culture and how it can offer all possible opportunities for its employees’ professional development. “Our immediate focus right now is on protecting the well-being and health of our employees during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will provide further updates on our move at the appropriate time. In the interim, most of our corporate office employees in SA continue to work from home, in line with the guidance provided by government under the COVID-19 regulations,” the statement read. “As a leading global mining company, with significant presence in SA, we are committed to attracting the best people and ensuring that they thrive, in the context of a changing workplace environment.” The move to an affluent northern suburb has sparked concerns about another potential exodus of multinational corporations – similar to that seen in the early 2000s. Back then, large corporations and financial institutions (including the JSE, Investec, RMB and Nedbank) fled the CBD and relocated to Sandton. Anglo American’s

Anglo American to move corporate office to Rosebank

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continued presence in the CBD has greatly contributed to the area’s stability. Sibusiso Tshabalala, Anglo American’s Group External Communications Manager, points out that while the impending move

may signal a change in the city, the company is certainly not “fleeing the CBD”. The statement reiterated this: “We are proud of our contribution to the Johannesburg CBD. While we have been here for many decades, it is

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


INDUSTRY | SAJN

mining campus at 55 Marshall and Anglo hopes that 45 Main will provide space for a business and entrepreneurial incubation hub. These and other new functions have been considered not only to ensure the sustainable use and protection of Anglo’s buildings, but also to enhance the urban energy in the southwest of the city. While the mining giant’s resettlement provides fresh opportunity for the city and the company, it is nevertheless sad to witness the departure of a grand Johannesburg mining institution which has been synonymous with 44 Main.

critical for us to consider the need for modern infrastructure and a safe working environment for our people. We will refurbish and renovate our JHB campus, so that the buildings can support the development of the inner city – and build on our positive legacy in SA.” Anglo does not plan to dispose of its downtown buildings and the move presents an opportunity to repurpose and re-imagine the historic campus. Ideas already include the possibility of opening 44 Main to the public, showcasing the building’s interiors, as well as curated collections of Anglo’s South African artworks. Discussions are also underway with tertiary institutions about locating a post-graduate

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

We are proud of our contribution to the Johannesburg CBD. While we have been here for many decades, it is critical for us to consider the need for modern infrastructure and a safe working environment for our people. We will refurbish and renovate our JHB campus so that the buildings can support the development of the inner city – and build on our positive legacy in SA. 37


Keep it GREEN. keep it BLUE. Sustain our planet. We encourage our clients and suppliers to be as environmentally responsible as possible when it comes to printing, merchandising and general business practice.

Address: 10th floor, Metal Box, 25 Owl Street, Milpark, Johannesburg Tel: 011 883 4627 | Email: isikhova@isikhova.co.za | www.isikhova.co.za


DIAMONDS | SAJN

Diamond market set for full recovery by 2024 The diamond supply chain will return to pre-pandemic levels between 2022 and 2024, led by economic recoveries in China and the USA, according to Bain & Co. ACCORDING TO GLOBAL MANAGEMENT CONsulting firm Bain & Co, the diamond supply chain will return to pre-pandemic levels by 2024. “For natural diamonds, we saw great interest and return-to-growth trajectory both in the USA and China once lockdowns were lifted and stores started to open their doors,” Bain partner Olya Linde told Rapaport News. “The growth was very robust and we honestly didn’t expect it to come back that fast.”

Demand for diamond jewellery in China is set to bounce back in early 2021, Bain said in February in its annual report on the industry conducted in partnership with the Antwerp World Diamond Centre. While the country’s diamond jewellery market suffered during the pandemic, it quickly recovered after lockdowns were lifted. The USA will reach pre-virus levels between 2021 and 2022, ahead of most other countries, thanks to the multiple stimulus packages offered by the government, Bain predicted. Rebounds in India and emerging countries will not occur until 2023/24. Meanwhile, rough diamond supply will remain stable at around 100 million carats annually over the next 10 years. The excess inventory accrued during 2020, when sales were minimal, as well as the output from the reopening of suspended mines, will compensate

for the closure of the Argyle deposit and the lack of new mines coming online, Bain explained. Over the next three to five years, production will likely grow by up to 2% annually, which will allow the supply chain to rebalance. Once excess diamond inventory is moved through the supply chain, long-term demand for diamond jewellery will exceed rough supply. Jewellery demand is set to grow at an average of 2-3% each year between 2023 and 2030, Bain noted. However, the current economic crisis is expected to be more severe than that of 2009 and the uncertainty surrounding it will continue to affect the market. If the 5-8% improvement in rough diamond prices and sales reported in January continues, a market recovery could come sooner than expected. Alternatively, if the virus re-emerges, a double-dip recession could occur, Bain warned. – Rapaport

Rough diamond supply will remain stable at around 100 million carats annually over the next 10 years. The excess inventory accrued during 2020, when sales were minimal, as well as the output from the re-opening of suspended mines, will compensate for the closure of the Argyle deposit and the lack of new mines coming online. SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

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SAJN | DID YOU KNOW?

Interesting facts 1

Rubies symbolise power and protection. When worn as a talisman, ruby was believed to help protect warriors in battle. One more modern allusion to this legend is in The Wizard of Oz. Dorothy’s ruby slippers were thought to protect her from evil.

4

Exposing jewellery to direct sunlight can cause discolouration and dullness. Heat can also distort colour in some gemstones. It is thus advised that you store your jewellery in a cool dry place.

7

Also known as brillianteering, polishing is the final stage of the diamond cutting process. The diamond’s final facets are polished and shaped to ideal proportions and symmetry in order for the diamond to reflect the maximum amount of white light.

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2

Tanzanite radiates three colorations ranging from deep blues to violets with hints of fuchsia. This is called trichroic.

5

There are two types of opals: precious and common. Precious opals either have vibrant colour (fire opal) or exhibit a play of colour. Play of colour is a term coined to describe the unique multi-dimensional colour display that the more precious opals have.

8

Enamel can be made in any colour but hardest of all is working with the red palette. Gold, which gives the quartz a red colour often behaves unpredictably when fired in the kiln.

3

Investment-quality gold bars should be at least 99.5% pure gold. The rest is an alloy, usually silver or copper, that makes smelting possible.

6

Coco Chanel was the first designer to introduce fake pearls and gemstones into her collections, sparking a trend which is still popular today. Chanel turned undesirable costume jewellery into a fashion trend that everyone desired.

9

Some researchers believe that black diamonds were formed in outer space in stellar ​supernova explosions and came to Earth via an asteroid crash between two and four million years ago. They are thought to have been the size of asteroids, a kilometre or more in diameter.

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


MARKETS | SAJN

Business barometer A monthly survey conducted by SAJN among industry players (small and large) on a national basis.

RETAILERS

50%

0%

BETTER

BETTER

50% SAME

50%

DIAMOND DEALERS

50%

0%

BETTER

BETTER

0%

0%

SAME

SAME

SAME

50%

100%

50%

WORSE

JANUARY 2021 VS JANUARY 2020

WORSE

0%

WORSE

WORSE

Best-selling diamond size Foot traffic

General sales compared with last year this time

0,5ct

Watch sales

General sales compared with last year this time

Breakdown of retail sales

bridal

fine jewellery

watches

15%

54%

31%

Participate in SAJN’s Business Barometer

MANUFACTURERS

0%

50%

0%

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

0%

50%

50%

SAME

SAME

50%

50%

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Consumption of gold compared with last year this time

Consumption of platinum compared with last year this time

Consumption of silver compared with last year this time

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

In an effort to accumulate statistics for the jewellery trade in South Africa, SAJN has been conducting a monthly survey among retailers, manufacturers, wholesalers and diamond traders for the past two years. The aim of the survey is to have some feeling as to what is happening at the retail front, as there is no other statistical information available. The survey does not require exact figures, but rather percentages and all information supplied is treated as strictly confidential. Participants receive no more than four questions to complete and e-mail back to us, which we combine and publish monthly. In order for the information to be as accurate as possible, we ask that participants commit to a 12-month period. Should you wish to participate, kindly send your name, company name and industry sector to: adri@isikhova.co.za.

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SAJN | LITTLE GEMS

A stone of many colours

CHALCEDONY REFERS TO A LARGE GROUP OF translucent or opaque mineral forms, generally with a single colour. One of these stones is jasper (meaning “spotted or speckled stone”), which is essentially a hard rock and occurs in many colours. It was a favourite in the ancient world, used to carve seals.

42

Despite being considered as chalcedony, jasper has been put in a group by itself within the quartz group by scientists because of its grainy structure. Its name has been derived from the Greek and it has also been accredited to Old French, Latin and even Italian. In ancient times, jasper referred to a completely different stone, which was green. In more modern times, it has been associated with pink and light red and it is an opaque rock, its colour emanating from the mineral sediments of volcanic ash. It can be multi-coloured, often striped and its different versions have been given various names according to colour,

Image courtesy Joan Hornig (Wikimedia Commons)

Little Gems is one of SAJN’s favourite pages in the magazine. Penned by our beloved editorial doyenne, the late Alice Weil, it will still continue to weave its magic with flair and with the unyielding love Alice had for jewellery and watches.

appearance, composition and the geographical localities where it is found – eg, the brown variety is known as “brown Egyptian jasper”. Finely grained dense jasper contains up to 20% of foreign materials which determine its colour, streak and appearance. Uniformly coloured jasper is rarely striped or flamed. Its patterns arise from the deposition in the

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021


LITTLE GEMS | SAJN original silica-rich sediments of volcanic ash. Sometimes it may be grown together with opal or agate and there is also a fossilised version. The stone is found in crevices or fissures, in modules. It is used for ornamental objects, in cabochons when used in jewellery and in stone mosaics. The pink to light red version found in Australia is cloudy and a whitish grey in Germany’s Rhineland, where – dyed with blue – it serves as “German lapis” or “Swiss lapis”, an imitation of lapis lazuli. The red variety is due to iron inclusions. The Egyptian stone is strongly yellow and red, while agate jasper is yellow, brown or green blended when grown together with agate. A finely-grained black version is used by jewellers and goldsmiths for streak tests of precious metals. Care must be taken in cutting and polishing banded jasper, which tends to separate along the layers. Chalcedony is one of the most important jewellery and ornamental stones of all time. It has been a favourite of hobbyists and professional jewellers because of its abundance and affordability. The name is technically applied to all varieties of quartz in cryptocrystalline, occurring in a wide variety of forms, colours, sizes and patterns. Individual names are traded under agate, cornelian and the aforementioned jasper. Chalcedony was recently discovered to be a combination of quartz and another silicate mineral – morganite. When it comes to hardness of jewellery, gemstone quartz measures 7 on the Mohs scale. Some varieties can exhibit a glow, which seems to come from within, with the stone taking on an excellent polish because it is durable. It is a most significant material, quite easy to distinguish from others. The most popular shapes are oval, round and cushion, and sometimes heart- or flower-shaped. As beads, they can be tumbled

Chalcedony is one of the most important jewellery and ornamental stones of all time. It has been a favourite of hobbyists and professional jewellers because of its abundance and affordability. and drilled, owing to their durability. Jasper is generally left untreated and unenhanced. It is quite porous, which allows it to be dyed easily to imitate other gemstones, or to replicate a particular variety of itself. Yet another variety of banded chalcedony which is found in various regions in the world is onyx, which differs only in the form of the bands. Agate and onyx are both layered varieties of this, with agate having curved bands and onyx having parallel ones. The colours of these bands vary from white to almost every other colour, except for certain shades of purple or blue. Common specimens of onyx are black and/or white, formed in bands of alternating colours. Artificial onyx types have been formed from common chalcedony and from plain agates and were used in Roman times. Treatments for forming black or other colours include soaking or boiling chalcedony in sugar solutions, then treating it with hydrochloric acid to carbonise sugars which have been absorbed into the top layers of the stone. These techniques are still

used, together with other dyeing treatments and most so-called “black onyx” sold today is artificially treated. Treatments with nitric acid have also been used to lighten or eliminate other undesirable colours. Onyx has a long history of use in hardstone carvings and jewellery, the latter generally cut into cabochons or beads, as well as for cameo-engraved gems where the bands make the image contrast with the background. Some onyx is natural, but much of the material made in commerce is produced by the staining of agate. Onyx was used in Egypt in the Second Dynasty to make bowls and other pottery items. The ancient Romans carried amulets of a variety of onyx into battle, engraved with Mars, the god of war. Brazilian green onyx was often used for plinths for Art Deco sculptures of the 1920s and 1930s, as well as for trays and pin dishes produced mainly in Austria. Renaissance Europeans believed that a certain variety bestowed eloquence. More recently, the Hôtel de la Parva in Paris is known for its yellow onyx décor.

Forever and always, our “Little Gem” ALICE WEIL 14 March 1919 – 17 July 2020

SA JEWELLERY NEWS - MARCH 2021

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SUPPORT ENGAGE ENCOURAGE

The Jewellery Council of South Africa is a voluntary, Non Profit Company that represents the interests of Jewellery Manufacturers, Retailers, Wholesalers and Service Members. For further information on membership benefits visit:

www.jewellery.org.za

Become a Member Today! Inquiries: Bavina Vassan on (011) 484 5528 or bavinav@jewellery.org.za

Address: The Hamlet, 27 Ridge Road, Parktown, Johannesburg • Tel: (011) 484 5528 • E-mail: admin@jewellery.org.za


JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

E-mail: aurum@worldonline.co.za; adela@aurumdesign.co.za Website: www.aurumdesign.co.za AUTHOR BY KATHLYN ALLAN Tel no: 084 247 0358 E-mail: mail@worldofauthor.com ADELE’S MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 595 3868/083 227 6550 E-mail: adele@amj.co.za ADJANI SCHOEMAN T/A ADJANI DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 083 460 7334 E-mail: info@adjani.co.za Website: www.adjani.co.za AFRICAN ARGENTUM RESOURCES Tel no: 011 608 0427 E-mail: info@silverchem.co.za Website: https://www.africanargentum.co.za/ AFRICAN TRADE BEADS JEWELLERY COLLECTION Tel no: 082 905 1736 / 011 726 7643 E-mail: tamiko@zazenconsulting.com Website: https://www.atbjc.com/about-us/ AKAPO JEWELS Tel no: 011 038 3130 E-mail: wumba@akapo.co.za; labi@akapo.co.za Website: www.akapojewels.co.za ALBO VAN DYK MANUFACTURING Tel no: 044 873 0567 E-mail: albo@telkomsa.net Website: http://www.albovandyk.com/ ALL BLING CREATIONS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 079 744 0971 E-mail: allblingcreations00@gmail.com; mmeshi.nkadimeng@gmail.com ALTIN JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 998 0141 E-mail: info@altin.co.za Website: www.altin.co.za ANACZYNSKI JEWELLERY Tel no: 082 934 5682 E-mail: anaczynski@gmail.com Website: www.anaczynski.co.za ANASTASIA JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 507 5561 E-mail: bazil.heeralall@gmail.com Website: www.anastasiajewellers.co.za ANDREAS SALVER MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 706 6828 E-mail: andreas@andreassalver.com Website: www.andreassalver.com ANDRONIKIS MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 966 6647 E-mail: mstergiou1966@gmail.com ANNELLE MURRAY GOUDSMID Tel no: 082 956 7747 E-mail: annellemurray@exclusivemail.co.za ANTONICORNELLIS JEWELLERY ENTERPRISE Tel no: 074 758 1014 E-mail: antonicornellius.nhlapo@gmail.com ASHLEY HEATHER JEWELLERY Tel no: 082 563 5086 E-mail: info@ashleyheather.co.za Website: www.ashleyheather.co.za ASIMI JEWELS INTERNATIONAL Tel no: 011 453 4775 E-mail: ellassa@iafrica.com ASSIQUE MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 706 3629 E-mail: hashiem@telkomsa.net AU TRADERS AND REFINERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 334 7607/8 E-mail: barend@autraders.co.za; jacqui@autraders.co.za Website: www.autraders.co.za AURUM DESIGN Tel no: 021 423 6590

AZTEC MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 013 757 0827 E-mail: ron@aztecjewellers.com; kyle@aztecjewellers.com Website: www.aztecjewellers.com BEADZ BY FLEX Tel no: 083 967 3264 E-mail: info@beadzbyflex.co.za Website: www.beadzbyflex.co.za BEAUDELL DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 082 885 8303 E-mail: esther@beaudell.co.za Website: www.beaudell.co.za BEN & CO DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 072 056 2156 E-mail: bheki@ben-codesigns.com; info@ben-codesigns.com Website: www.ben-codesigns.com BERNARD’S JEWELLERY DESIGN & MANUFACTURE Tel no: 032 586 0889 E-mail: bernard@bernardsjewellery.co.za Website: https://watchesforsale.co.za/ BIJOU EXQUISITE JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 450 4320 E-mail: marnic@bijoujewellery.international Website: https://www.bijoujewellery.international/ BRADLEY MANUFACTURING T/A VARGA MANUFACTURING Tel no: 011 327 7926 E-mail: bradjew@mweb.co.za BRETTLANDS FINE JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 562 8009 E-mail: bretland@iafrica.com Website: www.brettlands.co.za

E-mail: leatherw@mweb.co.za; charldebeer@hotmail.com CHARLENE NEL T/A BELLA COSA Tel no: 021 975 5097 E-mail: charlene@bellacosa.co.za CHATEAU D’OR CC Tel no: 011 728 3741/3723 E-mail: denlincoln@mweb.co.za Website: www.chateaudorjewellers.com COLLEGE OF CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 464 3821 E-mail: calbrechts@cct.edu.za; eoosthuizen@cct.edu.za Website: http://www.cct.edu.za/ CORNERSTONE MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD Tel no: 082 599 5919 E-mail: cornerstonelof@gmail.com CAPE PRECIOUS METALS – CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 551 2066 E-mail: sharon@cpmct.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CAPE PRECIOUS METALS – DURBAN Tel no: 031 303 5402 E-mail: malcolm@cpmdbn.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CAPE PRECIOUS METALS – JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 334 6263 E-mail: tom@cpmjhb.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CAPE PRECIOUS METALS – PORT ELIZABETH Tel no: 041 365 1890 E-mail: renee@capepreciousmetals.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CREATIVE DESIGN MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 031 563 3987 E-mail: goldlink@iafrica.com DABERON MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 334 8841 E-mail: daberon1@gmail.com

BRIAN BOSMAN GOLDSMITH STUDIO Tel no: 011 616 5328 E-mail: divagoldsmith@yahoo.com

DALEEN BRUWER JEWELLERY DESIGN & GOLDSMITH Tel no: 023 342 7808 E-mail: db@xsinet.co.za

BRONSKI JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 852 7891 E-mail: seanscrase@hotmail.com

DANIEL JACOBS JEWELLERY DESIGN CC Tel no: 021 880 1026 E-mail: djjd@mweb.co.za

BROWNS THE DIAMOND STORE – WORKSHOP Tel no: 011 438 7920 E-mail: albert@brownsjewellers.com Website: www.brownsjewellers.com

DAVID BOLDING GOLDSMITH Tel no: 021 418 1049/1612 E-mail: david@dbgold.co.za; marele@dbgold.co.za

CAPE DIAMONDS Tel no: 021 421 5364 E-mail: joelgraham@capediamonds.co.za Website: www.capediamonds.co.za CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 021 460 3632 E-mail: konstandakellisv@cput.ac.za; camerondowl@cput.ac.za Website: www.cput.ac.za CARESS JEWELLERS UITENHAGE CC Tel no: 041 992 4421 E-mail: eben-caress@mweb.co.za CAROMBA MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 036 631 4565 E-mail: frank@caromba.co.za Website: http://www.caromba.co.za CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY FREE STATE – WELKOM Tel no: 051 507 4044 E-mail: eholmes@cut.ac.za; nmphore@cut.ac.za Website: www.cut.ac.za CHANDLER’S MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 781 0303 E-mail: mcjewel@netactive.co.za CHARL DE BEER Tel no: 012 440 7693

DC JEWELLERS Tel no: 044 691 3692 E-mail: dcjewel@mweb.co.za DEGLON JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 021 851 3182 E-mail: waynedeglon@telkomsa.net Website: www.waynedeglondesign.withtank.com DESIGN @ 50 Tel no: 010 442 9201 E-mail: edna@design50.co.za Website: http://www.gidz.co.za/projects/design50.html DESIGNER GOLD BUSINESS TRUST Tel no: 043 726 2291 E-mail: info@designergold.co.za Website: https://www.designergold-el.co.za/ DIA-KIM DIAMONDS T/A CHRISTOPHER REID Tel no: 021 418 4484 E-mail: nick@christopherreid.co.za Website: http://www.christopherreid.co.za/ DIAMONDS4EVER Tel no: 082 786 7677 E-mail: info@diamonds4ever.co.za Website: www.diamonds4ever.co.za DIDIDESIGN Tel no: 011 784 0369 E-mail: didi@dididesign.co.za Website: www.dididesign.co.za


JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

DR ESME SPICER Tel no: 073 239 9983 E-mail: esme.spicer@gmail.com

GATTOO JEWELLERY DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 011 852 2046 E-mail: gattoosdesign@gmail.com

DUDLEY’S JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 319 3226 E-mail: dudleysjewellers@gmail.com

GAUTA REFINERIES (PTY) LTD Tel no: 012 753 3304 E-mail: rudi@gautarefinery.com Website: https://www.gautarefinery.com/

DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 031 373 6673/6 E-mail: chrisdb@dut.ac.za; samanthav@dut.ac.za Website: www.dut.ac.za

GC MANUFACTURING JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 326 7919 E-mail: admin@thediamondring.co.za

ECO CHIC JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 553 0332 E-mail: e.m.duplooy@gmail.com

GEM AFRIQUE Tel no: 062 050 6479 E-mail: soni2.goldsmith@gmail.com

EDEL DESIGNER JEWELLERY Tel no: 072 636 0213 E-mail: edeldesignerjewellery@gmail.com

GLOBAL JEWELLERY ACADEMY Tel no: 082 337 6428 E-mail: robertb@globaljewelleryacademy.co.za Website: www.globaljewelleryacademy.co.za

E-DESIGN Tel no: 082 445 8295 E-mail: cornenaude@e-design.co.za Website: www.e-design.co.za EKURHULENI JEWELLERY PROJECT Tel no: 011 825 5822 E-mail: colin@ejewellery.org.za Website: www.ejewellery.org.za ELEMENTAL STUDIO Tel no: 084 507 7777 E-mail: lezamcleod@icloud.com Website: www.elementalstudio.co.za EMBER MANUFACTURING & DESIGN (PTY) LTD Tel no: 083 557 5190 E-mail: info@ember.co.za Website: www.ember.co.za ENZA MANAGEMENT SERVICES Tel no: 031 824 9427 E-mail: khulile@imarajewellery.com EON HOON JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 083 578 7447 E-mail: eon@eonhoon.com Website: www.eonhoon.com ERICA DU PLESSIS (ERICA STRAUSS) Tel no: 021 851 8120 E-mail: artwear@telkomsa.net ETERNITY ENTERPRISE JEWELLERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 018 290 5722/3 E-mail: eternity@eternityenterprise.com Website: www.eternityenterprise.com EVERTRADE 142 (PTY) LTD T/A D’OURO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 615 3402 E-mail: dourojhb@vodamail.co.za; a.veloso@dourojewellers.co.za Website: www.dourojewellers.co.za

GOLD AND I (PTY) LTD Tel no: 084 360 6762 E-mail: info@goldandi.co.za Website: www.goldandi.co.za GOLDFASHION JEWELLERS CC Tel no: 021 931 1319 E-mail: mhendricks@wsnet.co.za; goldfashion@telkomsa.net GOUDSMID TEHILA VAN ENGELENHOVEN Tel no: 082 674 4410 E-mail: tehila@absamail.co.za HARRIS JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 555 1437 E-mail: harrisjewellers@telkomsa.net Website: www.harrisjewellers.net HAVILAH GOLD CREATIONS Tel no: 041 581 1942 E-mail: design@havilah.co.za; carol@havilah.co.za Website: www.havilah.co.za HEATHER JANE SMITH CERAMICS & PORCELAIN Tel no: 064 915 4282 E-mail: ladyheatherette@gmail.com ICKINGER JEWELLERS Tel no: 015 307 4448 E-mail: jacques@ickinger.co.za Website: www.ickinger.co.za IMFUNDISO SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Tel no: 012 734 0245 E-mail: imfundiso@mweb.co.za Website: www.imfundiso.com IMPILO COLLECTION Tel no: 010 0210441 E-mail: ayeung@impilocollection.co.za Website: www.facebook.com/impilocollection

JANINE BINNEMAN JEWELLERY DESIGNS Tel no: 021 715 6178 E-mail: info@janinebinneman.com Website: https://janinebinneman.com/ JEWEL CRAFT – BRANDHOF Tel no: 051 444 3449 E-mail: rean.p@mweb.co.za Website: www.jewelcraft.co.za JEWELLERY CONNECTION Tel no: 011 728 6800 E-mail: vmagnes@netactive.co.za; info@thejeweller.co.za Website: www.thejeweller.co.za JEWELLERY CONSULTANCY Tel no: 083 581 1513 E-mail: md.jewelleryconsultancy@gmail.com Website: www.jewelleryconsultancy.co.za JEWELLERY DESIGN CONCEPTS Tel no: 083 709 7722 E-mail: sandm@polka.co.za JOHANNA VAN ZYL Tel no: 082 778 5846 E-mail: jo@johannavanzyl.co.za Website: www.johannavanzyl.co.za JOHN STEDMAN T/A ELEMENTAL DESIGN Tel no: 031 572 2902 E-mail: john@elementaldesign.co.za Website: www.elementaldesign.co.za JOHREN MANUFACTURING CC T/A THE JEWELLERY SHOP Tel no: 046 624 3748 E-mail: johren@telkomsa.net JOY MASSYN JEWELLERY MANUFACTURE & DESIGN Tel no: 012 662 2861 E-mail: joy@joymassyn.co.za Website: http://www.joymassyn.com/ JPPE LAPIDARY Tel no: 021 424 7764 E-mail: kylegilson@mweb.co.za JYARAS JEWELLERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 067 397 6373 E-mail: admin@jyarasjewellers.co.za Website: https://jyarasjewellers.co.za/contact/ K2 DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 031 940 1274 E-mail: khanyisile@k2designstudio.co.za Website: www.k2designstudio.co.za KARLIEN DESIGNS CC Tel no: 083 659 2607 E-mail: karlien@karliendesigns.co.za Website: www.karliendesigns.co.za KARLSEN JEWELLERY CO Tel no: 033 386 7872 E-mail: karlsen@jewelleryco.co.za

FACET JEWELLERY Tel no: 073 397 8820 E-mail: catherine@facetjewellery.co.za

INFACET Tel no: 082 878 4949 E-mail: bridgette@infacet.co.za Website: www.infacet.co.za

FEMKE KLEISEN DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 083 787 6120 E-mail: femkekleisen@webafrica.org.za Website: www.femkekleisen.co.za

INGE SCHOLTZ JEWELLERY DESIGNER & MANUFACTURER Tel no: 073 271 3789 E-mail: admin@csvaluers.co.za

KIM CLOETE JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 021 531 9082 E-mail: kim@kimcloetedesign.co.za Website: http://www.kimcloetedesign.co.za/

FERROS JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 363 1881 E-mail: alex@ferrosjewellers.com Website: www.ferrosjewellers.com

ISABELLA JEWELLERS & REFINERS CC Tel no: 011 334 5919 E-mail: isabella@isabella-refiners.co.za Website: www.isabella-refiners.co.za

KINKEL JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 786 1549 E-mail: info@kinkeljewellery.co.za Website: www.kinkeljewellery.co.za

FINEGOLD LABORATORY SERVICES Tel no: 021 511 6237 E-mail: admin@finegold.co.za Website: www.finegold.co.za

J HIND JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 306 1330 E-mail: jhindrajesh@gmail.com Website: https://www.jhindjewellers.co.za/

KRISTEN MALAN CC Tel no: 011 880 1866 E-mail: kristen@merindol.com; john@merindol.com

FOREVER JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS Tel no: 031 564 9006 E-mail: fj@3i.co.za

JADE SOUTH AFRICA Tel no: 021 883 8974 E-mail: rhys@jade-sa.co.za Website: www.jade-sa.co.za

FRANKLI WILD Tel no: 011 483 2620 E-mail: kgf@frankliwild.com Website: www.frankliwild.com

JAGGATH JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 307 7790 E-mail: navinjagath372@gmail.com

KAYRO JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 585 4842 E-mail: slaide.kayro@mweb.co.za

LADY PECULIAR Tel no: 021 886 8868 E-mail: info@ladypeculiar.co.za Website: www.ladypeculiar.co.za LALI SILVER JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 646 8358 E-mail: jc_tilman@yahoo.com Website: www.lalisilver.co.za


JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

LAMBO DIAMONDS Tel no: 081 743 9255 E-mail: christian@lambodiamonds.com Website: www.lambodiamonds.com

MERAKI JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 082 574 6043 E-mail: megan@merakijewellerydesign.com Website: www.merakijewellerydesign.com

ORO AFRICA (PTY) LTD – JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 645 9260 E-mail: sharin@oroafrica.com Website: www.oroafrica.com

L’AUTRICHE FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 883 4021 E-mail: ernst@lebijoux.co.za Website: www.lautrichefj.co.za

METAL CONCENTRATORS SA (PTY) LTD – CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 510 0770 E-mail: cpt@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

OSMOND’S Tel no: 021 559 8277 E-mail: osmond@telkomsa.net

LEGA DORO CC Tel no: 011 450 3233 E-mail: legadoro@global.co.za; diamondafric@telkomsa.net Website: www.legadoro.co.za

METAL CONCENTRATORS SA (PTY) LTD – CENTURION Tel no: 012 000 4440 E-mail: info@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

LEOPOLDINE DESIGNS Tel no: 076 586 3820 E-mail: info@leopoldinedesigns.co.za

METAL CONCENTRATORS SA (PTY) LTD – DURBAN E-mail: info@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

LEUVEN METALS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 426 4140 E-mail: kvessen@oroafrica.com; andrev@oroafrica.com Website: www.leuvenmetals.co.za

METAL IMAGE Tel no: 021 447 6600 E-mail: mi_greg@iafrica.com; mi_accounts@iafrica.com Website: www.metalimage.co.za

LILLY FRIEDLAENDER CC Tel no: 021 887 1655 E-mail: lilly.f@wol.co.za

MG IVORY Tel no: 011 788 1018 E-mail: mgivory@netactive.co.za

LORIEN MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 967 1700 E-mail: heather@allanybrink.co.za

MICHAEL J SOLOMON MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS (MJS) Tel no: 011 792 5292 E-mail: ms@absamail.co.za

LOVI JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 011 882 3272 E-mail: lovijewellery@gmail.com MADE OF METTLE Tel no: 079 386 1079 E-mail: tracey@madeofmettle.co.za Website: www.madeofmettle.co.za MADELIEF DESIGNER JEWELLERY Tel no: 083 453 7018 E-mail: madeliefjewellery@gmail.com MADELINE’S TEMPTATIONS Tel no: 083 305 2798 E-mail: info@madelinestemptations.co.za Website: https://www.madelinestemptations.co.za/ MAGMA METAL RECOVERIES Tel no: 031 702 4422 E-mail: edwards@astronet.co.za MAMBU DESIGN Tel no: 011 614 1879 E-mail: mambudesign@mweb.co.za; mambuorders@mweb.co.za MAPULA DESIGNER JEWELLER (PTY) LTD Tel no: 083 641 2724 E-mail: mapuladesigner@gmail.com Website: www.mapuladesignerjeweller.com MARINE GOLD CC Tel no: 021 424 0077 E-mail: stephen@marinegold.co.za MARION’S JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 041 368 4582/3 E-mail: marionsstudio@mweb.co.za MARK WHITEHORN GOLDSMITH Tel no: 083 271 6065 E-mail: info@markwhitehorn.co.za Website: https://markwhitehorn.co.za/ MASELESELE JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 734 0245 E-mail: imfundiso@mweb.co.za; imfundisojewellers@mweb.co.za Website: www.imfundiso.com MD INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED HANDCRAFTED JEWELLERY T/A MICHAEL’S DESIGNS Tel no: 011 465 6446 E-mail: michael@michaelsdesigns.co.za Website: www.michaeldesigns.co.za MEDITERRANEAN JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 689 0630 E-mail: panayiotis@mmjewellers.co.za Website: http://www.mmjewellers.co.za/

MICHL CONTEMPORARY FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 913 3944 E-mail: michelleliaosa@gmail.com Website: www.michljewellery.com MIRKO JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 886 8296 E-mail: mirinda@mirkojewels.co.za Website: http://mirkojewels.co.za/

PAUL GALLIAS Tel no: 073 194 2415 E-mail: pgallias@hotmail.com PEARL AND DIAMONDS STUDIO Tel no: 011 678 0595/6 E-mail: pearldiamond@mweb.co.za Website: https://www.pearlanddiamond.co.za/ PHATSIMA JEWELLERY DESIGNS Tel no: 072 739 6800 E-mail: phatsimantando@gmail.com; orders@phatsimajd.com Website: www.phatsimajd.com PHILIP ZETLER JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 423 2771 E-mail: pzetler@mweb.co.za Website: www.philipzetlerjewellers.co.za PHOENIX MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 549 4966 E-mail: jack@phoenixjewellers.co.za Website: www.phoenixjewellers.co.za PICCOLO FINE DESIGNER JEWELLERY Tel no: 083 396 6178 E-mail: suvette@piccolo-jewellery.co.za Website: http://piccolo-jewellery.co.za/ PIERO G MANUFACTURING T/A PICO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 483 3442 E-mail: pico1@global.co.za Website: www.picojewellery.com

MIZANE JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 485 3784 E-mail: mizane@ananzi.co.za Website: www.mizanejewellery.co.za

PIYUVE JEWELLERS CC Tel no: 031 301 3963 E-mail: aroon@piyuvejewelers.co.za; shashi@piyuvejewelers.co.za Website: www.piyuvejewelers.co.za

MUGA MUGA HANDMADES Tel no: 072 299 7148 E-mail: info@mugamuga.co.za Website: www.mugamuga.co.za

PNEUMA JEWELLERS CC Tel no: 011 702 1462 E-mail: admin@pneumajewellers.com Website: www.pneumajewellers.co.za

NEWMAN JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 012 329 9600 E-mail: nina@newmandesign.co.za; dave@newmandesign.co.za

POLART JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 021 422 3848 E-mail: info@polart.co.za; polart@telkomsa.net Website: http://www.polart.co.za/home.html

NIGHT SHINE CANDY Tel no: 082 455 8973 E-mail: aleks@nightshinecandy.com Website: www.nightshinecandy.com

POPULAR DIAMOND JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING CC Tel no: 011 484 7044 E-mail: pop@tiscali.co.za

NILU ENGRAVING & JEWELLERY (PTY) LTD Tel no: 083 384 7792 E-mail: laser@nilu.co.za Website: www.nilu.co.za/ NOMAD JEWELLERY & ACCESSORIES Tel no: 082 770 9788 E-mail: idieh@mweb.co.za; info@nomadjewelleryandaccessories.com Website: https://nomadjewelleryandaccessories.com/ NOVUS DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 012 332 5850 E-mail: info@novusdesign.co.za Website: http://www.novusdesign.co.za/ NQ JEWELLERY DESIGN SERVICES Tel no: 073 700 6225 E-mail: nq2jewel@gmail.com Website: www.nqjewellery.co.za NV DESIGN COMPANY T/A BY NANETTE Tel no: 021 883 3856 E-mail: nanette@bynanette.com Website: www.bynanette.com ORO AFRICA (PTY) LTD – CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 480 9860 E-mail: sharin@oroafrica.com Website: www.oroafrica.com

PRECISION SETTERS Tel no: 011 484 7803/4 E-mail: julian@precisionsetters.co.za PRETTY FOUND THINGS Tel no: 083 651 9042 E-mail: prettyfoundthings@gmail.com Website: www.prettyfoundthings.co.za PRINS & PRINS DIAMONDS Tel no: 021 422 1090 E-mail: petre@prinsandprins.com; riana@prinsandprins.com Website: www.prinsandprins.com QUICKSET JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 468 9236 E-mail: qsjewel@telkomsa.net; osjewel@telkomsa.net Website: www.quicksetjewellers.co.za RALPH WALTON Tel no: 028 316 3851 E-mail: ralph@rwd.co.za Website: https://www.rwd.co.za/ RAND REFINERY LIMITED Tel no: 011 418 9000 E-mail: nicolab@gold.co.za Website: www.randrefinery.com RARE EARTH CREATIONS Tel no: 011 326 1727


JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

E-mail: noloyiso@rarearth.co.za Website: https://www.rareearth.co.za/

SILVER MYST – JULIANA RED Tel no: 021 762 9794 E-mail: moyonela@gmail.com

TIP TOP JEWELLERS Tel no: 044 873 3048 E-mail: tiptop@lantic.net

SIMON EFUNE MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 334 4529 E-mail: simon.efune@mweb.co.za

TRIMALCHIO Tel no: 012 346 6874 E-mail: casanra@mweb.co.za

REC SET & ENGRAVE (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 326 1727 E-mail: neil@rarearth.co.za; noloyiso@rarearth.co.za

SINCE NOW JEWELS Tel no: 072 336 9518 E-mail: sincenowcz@gmail.com

RICHLINE SA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 418 1600 E-mail: johan@richlinesa.co.za; marco@richlinesa.co.za Website: www.richlinegroup.co.za

SIRKEL JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 726 2365 E-mail: sirkeldesign@gmail.com Website: www.sirkeljewellery.co.za

TRISLO (PTY) LTD Tel no: 012 259 0100 E-mail: info@trislo.co.za Website: www.trislo.co.za

RITCO MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 374 2101 E-mail: sales@ritco.co.za Website: www.ritco.co.za

SL HERMAN MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 460 6771 E-mail: slhj@telkomsa.net Website: http://www.hermanmanufacturingjewellers.co.za/

ROHAN CHERRY DESIGNS Tel no: 082 974 4566 E-mail: info@rcdesigns.co.za Website: www.rcdesign.co.za

SMITH JEWELLERY Tel no: 071 313 8649 E-mail: info@smith-jewellery.com Website: www.smith-jewellery.com

ROK ORIGINALS Tel no: 072 203 3288 E-mail: info@rokoriginals.com Website: https://www.rokoriginals.com/

STARBRIGHT JEWELLERY Tel no: 083 775 9995 E-mail: megan@starbrightgirl.com Website: https://www.starbrightgirl.com/

ROMANELLI DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 794 1666 E-mail: bling@romanellidesigns.co.za Website: https://romanellidesigns.co.za/

STUDIO 1980 (PTY) LTD Tel no: 083 379 0171 E-mail: info@studio1980za.com Website: https://studio1980za.com/

RONALD’S JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 031 701 5154 E-mail: ronaldcbr262@gmail.com

STUDIO 39 JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 031 764 3000 E-mail: studio39@telkomsa.net Website: www.studio39.co.za

RASIFIWA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 422 1350 E-mail: rssa@rasifiwa.com; jacqui@rasifiwa.com Website: www.rasifiwa.com

ROUX DU PREEZ DESIGNS Tel no: 084 207 3876 E-mail: sales@preezdesigns.co.za Website: www.preezdesigs.co.za RUTH PROWSE SCHOOL OF ART Tel no: 021 447 2492 E-mail: admin@ruthprowse.co.za Website: www.ruthprowse.co.za SATHKAAR JEWELLERS C.C Tel no: 031 306 4921 E-mail: sathkaar@gmail.com SCARAB JEWELLERY STUDIO CC Tel no: 021 683 4646 E-mail: janine@scarabjewellery.co.za; tanya@scarabjewellery.co.za Website: www.scarabjewellery.co.za SEDA LIMPOPO JEWELLERY INCUBATOR Tel no: 015 293 0214 E-mail: tessa@slji.org.za Website: www.slji.org.za SERAGLIO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 783 8301 E-mail: rolling.albert@yahoo.com Website: www.seragliojewellers.com SHADOW JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 689 8297 E-mail: shadrackmogoane@yahoo.com

STUDIO C MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 642 7826 E-mail: chris@studioc.co.za; peggy@studioc.co.za Website: www.studioc.co.za STUDIO LOUBSER Tel no: 011 782 4051 E-mail: liz@lizloubser.com; info@studioloubser.com Website: www.studioloubser.com SUGARBUSH CREATIONS Tel no: 015 293 2358 E-mail: sugarbushcreations@gmail.com SUSAN ROOS JUWELE Tel no: 028 754 2949 E-mail: info@roosjuwele.co.za Website: www.roosjuwele.co.za TCHALIEU JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 453 0492 E-mail: siphokazi.tchalieu@gmail.com THATO RADEBE JEWELLERY E-mail: thato@thatoradebejewellery.co.za Website: https://thatoradebejewellery.co.za/ THE BERA DIAMOND ACADEMY Tel no: 011 854 4556 E-mail: mmbera@gmail.com; muhammad.bera@absa.co.za Website: http://www.benefittohumanity.com/

TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 012 382 6007 E-mail: newmand@tut.ac.za Website: www.tut.ac.za TURNER MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 424 2528 E-mail: sam@turnerjewellers.com Website: http://www.turnerjewellers.com/ UNCUT JEWELLERS Tel no: 083 225 8221 E-mail: mark@uncutjewellers.co.za Website: www.uncutjewellers.co.za UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 559 1129/1125 E-mail: fnazier@uj.ac.za Website: www.uj.ac.za UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH Tel no: 021 808 3047 E-mail: ct@sun.ac.za; Joani@sun.ac.za Website: www.sun.ac.za/english/faculty/arts/visual-arts/ VALLABHJEE’S JEWELLERY SHOP Tel no: 032 944 1657 E-mail: hemval1@yahoo.co.uk VAWDA GOLD GEM JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 208 9142/3 E-mail: info@vawdagoldgem.co.za Website: www.vawdagoldgem.co.za VICTORIA ORPEN JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 615 4758 E-mail: victoriaorpensa@gmail.com; roxanne.campbell07@gmail.com VIJAY SHAH CONCEPTS Tel no: 031 564 2948 E-mail: vijayshah@telkomsa.net; nihalshah23@gmail.com Website: www.vijayshahjewellers.co.za VK JEWELLERY Tel no: 082 789 4498 E-mail: vivek@vkjewellery.co.za Website: www.vkjewellery.co.za VUKANI UBUNTU COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS Tel no: 012 342 1385/8099 E-mail: demos@vukani.org; info@vukani.org Website: www.vukani.org WAINWRIGHT JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 554 1169 E-mail: info@wainwrightjewel.co.za Website: www.wainwrightjewel.co.za

SHANI D JEWELLERY DESIGN (PTY) LTD Tel no: 082 308 2111 E-mail: diamondshani@gmail.com Website: http://www.shanidjewellery.co.za/

THE JEWELLERY HUB Tel no: 083 326 5746 E-mail: ian@worldofdiamonds.co.za; yolandi@worldofdiamonds.co.za Website: www.worldofdiamonds.co.za

WHITE DIAMOND JEWELLERS Tel no: 035 789 5550 E-mail: whitediamondjewellers@telkomsa.net Website: www.telkomsa.net

SIBAHLE JEWELLERY (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 049 3933 E-mail: nthabiseng@sibahlejewellery.co.za Website: www.sibahlejewellery.co.za

THE MAKERY Tel no: 082 600 7142 E-mail: info@themakerycollection.com Website: www.themakerycollection.com

WOOSH DESIGNS JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 011 318 1340 E-mail: wooshen@wooshjewellery.co.za Website: www.wooshjewellery.co.za

SILK ROUTE GOLD (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 450 3192 E-mail: info@silkroutegold.com Website: www.silkroutegold.com

THE PLATINUM INCUBATOR Tel no: 014 597 0736 E-mail: sibongile@tpi.org.za Website: www.tpi.org.za

SILPLAT (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 461 5344 E-mail: info@silplat.co.za Website: www.silplat.co.za

TINSEL GALLERY Tel no: 011 782 4051 E-mail: geraldine@tinsel.co.za Website: https://tinselgallery.com/

YOL NOMADIC JEWELLERY Tel no: 074 136 3633 E-mail: yol_lu@yahoo.fr ZUREL BROTHERS SA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 015 293 2306/58 E-mail: zurelpolokwane@telkomsa.net; zurelqms@gmail.com Website: www.zurel.co.za


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